WorldWideScience

Sample records for evidence based recommendations

  1. Evidence-based recommendations to facilitate professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rachel Magdalena (Dalena) van Rooyen

    Purpose of the research: To develop evidence-based recommendations ... attitudes by not referring patients to traditional practitioners based on lack of knowledge ...... Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. ... A case study from Chile.

  2. Breast abscess: evidence based management recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine; Chan, Tiffany; Wiseman, Sam M

    2014-07-01

    Literature review was carried out and studies reporting on treatment of breast abscesses were critically appraised for quality and their level of evidence using the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy guidelines, and key recommendations were summarized. Needle aspiration either with or without ultrasound guidance should be employed as first line treatment of breast abscesses. This approach has the potential benefits of: superior cosmesis, shorter healing time, and avoidance of general anaesthesia. Multiple aspiration sessions may be required for cure. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheter placement may be considered as an alternative approach for treatment of larger abscesses (>3 cm). Surgical incision and drainage should be considered for first line therapy in large (>5 cm), multiloculated, or long standing abscesses, or if percutaneous drainage is unsuccessful. All patients should be treated concurrently with antibiotics. Patients with recurrent subareolar abscesses and fistulas should be referred for consideration of surgical treatment.

  3. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on ran...

  4. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on randomized controlled trials, prospective interventional trials without controls and retrospective reviews with greater than five subjects.

  5. How evidence-based are the recommendations in evidence-based guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finlay A McAlister

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment recommendations for the same condition from different guideline bodies often disagree, even when the same randomized controlled trial (RCT evidence is cited. Guideline appraisal tools focus on methodology and quality of reporting, but not on the nature of the supporting evidence. This study was done to evaluate the quality of the evidence (based on consideration of its internal validity, clinical relevance, and applicability underlying therapy recommendations in evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional analysis of cardiovascular risk management recommendations was performed for three different conditions (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension from three pan-national guideline panels (from the United States, Canada, and Europe. Of the 338 treatment recommendations in these nine guidelines, 231 (68% cited RCT evidence but only 105 (45% of these RCT-based recommendations were based on high-quality evidence. RCT-based evidence was downgraded most often because of reservations about the applicability of the RCT to the populations specified in the guideline recommendation (64/126 cases, 51% or because the RCT reported surrogate outcomes (59/126 cases, 47%. CONCLUSIONS: The results of internally valid RCTs may not be applicable to the populations, interventions, or outcomes specified in a guideline recommendation and therefore should not always be assumed to provide high-quality evidence for therapy recommendations.

  6. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered...... and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine. Opioid analgesics and tramadol are recommended as generally second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in select clinical circumstances. Other medications that would generally be used as third-line treatments but that could also be used as second......, and whether prompt onset of pain relief is necessary. To date, no medications have demonstrated efficacy in lumbosacral radiculopathy, which is probably the most common type of NP. Long-term studies, head-to-head comparisons between medications, studies involving combinations of medications, and RCTs...

  7. Evidence-based review, grade of recommendation, and suggested treatment recommendations for melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melasma is known to be less satisfactory, often incomplete, and relapse is frequent. Although many treatment options are available, they are either known to be unsafe on long-term use or their long-term safety profile is unknown. Patients often use various drugs, even topical steroid-based preparation without any medical supervision for long period of time, making the skin unsuitable for many of the drugs available. Thus, there has been gross disparity among the treating physician about what drugs and what regimen are best suitable for various categories of melasma patients and in different situations. With this background, numerous newer drugs, mostly combinations of some proprietary molecules or even unknown plant extracts, have flooded the market for the management of melasma. Information on efficacy or safety of these products are almost unknown. Studies on Asian people, especially Indian population, are far less commonly available. Therapeutic guideline for use on Indian patients with melasma is almost missing. Extrapolation of data from Caucasian people for use on Asian people may not be scientifically justifiable because Caucasian and Asian people are known to have inherent difference in their response as well as tolerance to the drugs used for melasma. With this background, we have extensively evaluated, following a strict, scientifically designed protocol, all the available studies on melasma management till May 2016 and prepared this document on level of evidence, grade of recommendation and suggested therapeutic guideline for melasma as per the method proposed by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine. Various ethical, social, logical, regional, and economic issues in the context of Indian and similar populations were given due importance while preparing the suggested therapeutic recommendation.

  8. EURRECA—Evidence-Based Methodology for Deriving Micronutrient Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Bouwman, J.; Brown, K.A.; Cavelaars, A.E.J.M.; Collings, R.; Grammatikaki, E.; Groot, L.C.P.G.M. de; Gurinovic, M.; Harvey, L.J.; Hermoso, M.; Hurst, R.; Kremer, S.H.A.; Ngo, J.; Novakovic, R.; Raats, M.M.; Rollin, F.; Serra-Majem, L.; Souverein, O.W.; Timotijevic, L.; Veer, P. van 't

    2013-01-01

    The EURopean micronutrient RECommendations Aligned (EURRECA) Network of Excellence explored the process of setting micronutrient recommendations to address the variance in recommendations across Europe. Work centered upon the transparent assessment of nutritional requirements via a series of

  9. Exercise for prevention of cardiovascular disease: Evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geevar Zachariah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. In India, a large percentage of the people are physically inactive with fewer than 10% engaging in recreational physical activity. Physical activity has many beneficial effects on the risk factors for CVD. Apart from improving fitness level, it decreases myocardial oxygen demand and improves myocardial perfusion. There is an inverse association between physical activity and all-cause mortality. In primary prevention, physical inactivity is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk for coronary events. In secondary prevention, data confirm the existence of an inverse dose–response relationship between cardiovascular fitness and the all-cause mortality in large populations of cardiovascular patients. Guidelines from the American authorities as well as the European Society of Cardiology provide specific recommendations for exercise depending on the clinical setting (primary or secondary prevention of CVD and the patient-specific factors (the patient's physical activity level and the perceived CVD risk. The present review summarizes the clinical evidence regarding the role of exercise in CVD prevention and the exercise recommendations from the leading Cardiac societies.

  10. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine. Opioid analgesics and tramadol are recommended as generally second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in select clinical circumstances. Other medications that would generally be used as third-line treatments but that could also be used as second...

  11. Daily internet time: towards an evidence-based recommendation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, André; Akre, Christina; Barrense-Dias, Yara; Zimmermann, Grégoire; Surís, Joan-Carles

    2018-04-17

    Since 2001, a recommendation of no more than 2 h per day of screen time for children 2 years of age or older was adopted in many countries. However, this recommendation was rarely examined empirically. The goal of the present study was to question this recommendation in today's connected world. We used data from the ado@internet.ch survey (spring 2012), a representative sample of 8th graders in the Canton of Vaud, Switzerland (n = 2942, 50.6% female). Internet use, health outcomes, substance use, well-being and socio-demographic characteristics were considered. Bi-variate statistical analyses were performed. All outcomes were significantly associated with the time spent on internet, more time being associated with a higher prevalence of adverse consequences. Youth spending on average one more hour on Internet per day than the reference category (1.5-2.5 h) did not differ in terms of adverse health outcomes. Differences began to appear on sleeping problems, tobacco use, alcohol misuse, cannabis use and sport inactivity with youth spending between 3.5 h and 4.5 h per day on internet. This study demonstrates the absence of justification for setting a limit to only 2 h of screen time per day. Significant effects on health seem to appear only beyond 4 h per day and there may be benefits for those who spend less than an hour and a half on internet.

  12. Sports specialization in young athletes: evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Neeru; Pinkham, Courtney; Dugas, Lara; Patrick, Brittany; Labella, Cynthia

    2013-05-01

    Sports specialization is intense training in 1 sport while excluding others. Sports specialization in early to middle childhood has become increasingly common. While most experts agree that some degree of sports specialization is necessary to achieve elite levels, there is some debate as to whether such intense practice time must begin during early childhood and to the exclusion of other sports to maximize potential for success. There is a concern that sports specialization before adolescence may be deleterious to a young athlete. PubMed and OVID were searched for English-language articles from 1990 to 2011 discussing sports specialization, expert athletes, or elite versus novice athletes, including original research articles, consensus opinions, and position statements. For most sports, there is no evidence that intense training and specialization before puberty are necessary to achieve elite status. Risks of early sports specialization include higher rates of injury, increased psychological stress, and quitting sports at a young age. Sports specialization occurs along a continuum. Survey tools are being developed to identify where athletes fall along the spectrum of specialization. Some degree of sports specialization is necessary to develop elite-level skill development. However, for most sports, such intense training in a single sport to the exclusion of others should be delayed until late adolescence to optimize success while minimizing injury, psychological stress, and burnout.

  13. An evidence-based recommendation on bed head elevation for mechanically ventilated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ni?l-Weise, Barbara S; Gastmeier, Petra; Kola, Axel; Vonberg, Ralf P; Wille, Jan C; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A semi-upright position in ventilated patients is recommended to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and is one of the components in the Ventilator Bundle of the Institute for Health Care Improvement. This recommendation, however, is not an evidence-based one. Methods A systematic review on the benefits and disadvantages of semi-upright position in ventilated patients was done according to PRISMA guidelines. Then a European expert panel developed a recommendation based ...

  14. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Townsend, Julie S.; Puckett, Mary C.; Rim, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions...

  15. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kenet, Gili; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Ravelli, Angelo; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Ozen, Seza; Brogan, Paul; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is rare in children, and evidence-based guidelines are sparse. Consequently, management is mostly based on observational studies and physician's experience, and treatment regimens differ widely. The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) initiative was launched to develop diagnostic and management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Here, we developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric APS. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. Following a detailed systematic review of the literature, a committee of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric haematology with expertise in paediatric APS developed recommendations. The literature review yielded 1473 articles, of which 15 were valid and relevant. In total, four recommendations for diagnosis and eight for treatment of paediatric APS (including paediatric Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome) were accepted. Additionally, two recommendations for children born to mothers with APS were accepted. It was agreed that new classification criteria for paediatric APS are necessary, and APS in association with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus should be identified by performing antiphospholipid antibody screening. Treatment recommendations included prevention of thrombotic events, and treatment recommendations for venous and/or arterial thrombotic events. Notably, due to the paucity of studies on paediatric APS, level of evidence and strength of the recommendations is relatively low. The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for paediatric APS, facilitating improvement and uniformity of care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use

  16. EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carville, S.F.; Arendt-Nielsen, S.; Bliddal, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome. Methods: A multidisciplinary task force was formed representing 11 European countries. The design of the study, including search strategy, participants, interventions, outcome measures, data collection...... quality studies were used to base recommendations on. When there was insufficient evidence from the literature, a Delphi process was used to provide basis for recommendation. Results: 146 studies were eligible for the review. 39 pharmacological intervention studies and 59 non-pharmacological were included......-pharmacological''. In many studies sample size was small and the quality of the study was insufficient for strong recommendations to be made. Conclusions: Nine recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome were developed using a systematic review and expert consensus Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  17. Development of an evidence-based review with recommendations using an online iterative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Smith, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    The practice of modern medicine is governed by evidence-based principles. Due to the plethora of medical literature, clinicians often rely on systematic reviews and clinical guidelines to summarize the evidence and provide best practices. Implementation of an evidence-based clinical approach can minimize variation in health care delivery and optimize the quality of patient care. This article reports a method for developing an "Evidence-based Review with Recommendations" using an online iterative process. The manuscript describes the following steps involved in this process: Clinical topic selection, Evidence-hased review assignment, Literature review and initial manuscript preparation, Iterative review process with author selection, and Manuscript finalization. The goal of this article is to improve efficiency and increase the production of evidence-based reviews while maintaining the high quality and transparency associated with the rigorous methodology utilized for clinical guideline development. With the rise of evidence-based medicine, most medical and surgical specialties have an abundance of clinical topics which would benefit from a formal evidence-based review. Although clinical guideline development is an important methodology, the associated challenges limit development to only the absolute highest priority clinical topics. As outlined in this article, the online iterative approach to the development of an Evidence-based Review with Recommendations may improve productivity without compromising the quality associated with formal guideline development methodology. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  18. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, David; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-03-01

    The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp developers rarely conduct or publish trial-based experimental validation of their apps. Indeed, a previous systematic review revealed a complete lack of trial-based evidence for many of the hundreds of MHapps available. To guide future MHapp development, a set of clear, practical, evidence-based recommendations is presented for MHapp developers to create better, more rigorous apps. A literature review was conducted, scrutinizing research across diverse fields, including mental health interventions, preventative health, mobile health, and mobile app design. Sixteen recommendations were formulated. Evidence for each recommendation is discussed, and guidance on how these recommendations might be integrated into the overall design of an MHapp is offered. Each recommendation is rated on the basis of the strength of associated evidence. It is important to design an MHapp using a behavioral plan and interactive framework that encourages the user to engage with the app; thus, it may not be possible to incorporate all 16 recommendations into a single MHapp. Randomized controlled trials are required to validate future MHapps and the principles upon which they are designed, and to further investigate the recommendations presented in this review. Effective MHapps are required to help prevent mental health problems and to ease the burden on health systems.

  19. High-Value Consults: A Curriculum to Promote Point-of-Care, Evidence-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiwada, Deepa Rani; Kohli, Amar; McNamara, Megan; Smith, Kenneth J; Zimmer, Shanta; McNeil, Melissa; Spagnoletti, Carla; Rubio, Doris; Berlacher, Kathryn

    2017-10-01

    In an era when value-based care is paramount, teaching trainees to explicitly communicate the evidence behind recommendations fosters high-value care (HVC) in the consultation process. To implement an HVC consult curriculum highlighting the need for clear consult questions, evidence-based recommendations to improve consult teaching, clinical decision-making, and the educational value of consults. A pilot curriculum was implemented for residents on cardiology consult electives utilizing faculty and fellows as evidence-based medicine (EBM) coaches. The curriculum included an online module, an EBM teaching point template, EBM presentations on rounds, and "coach" feedback on notes. A total of 15 residents and 4 fellows on cardiology consults participated, and 87% (13 of 15) of residents on consults felt the curriculum was educationally valuable. A total of 80% (72 of 90) of residents on general medicine rotations responded to the survey, and 25 of 72 residents (35%) had a consult with the EBM template. General medicine teams felt the EBM teaching points affected clinical decision-making (48%, 12 of 25) and favored dissemination of the curriculum (90%, 72 of 80). Checklist-guided chart review showed a 22% improvement in evidence-based summaries behind recommendations (7 of 36 precurriculum to 70 of 146 charts postcurriculum, P  = .015). The HVC consult curriculum during a cardiology elective was perceived by residents to influence clinical decision-making and evidence-based recommendations, and was found to be educationally valuable on both parties in the consult process.

  20. Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Helms, Eric R; Aragon, Alan A; Fitschen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming ...

  1. Fetal Implications of Diagnostic Radiation Exposure During Pregnancy: Evidence-based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimawi, Bassam H; Green, Victoria; Lindsay, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the fetal and long-term implications of diagnostic radiation exposure during pregnancy. Evidence-based recommendations for radiologic imaging modalities utilizing exposure of diagnostic radiation during pregnancy, including conventional screen-film mammography, digital mammography, tomosynthesis, and contrast-enhanced mammography are described.

  2. Adherence of preventive oral care products in the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, D; Mahzia, R; Nakhleh, K; Joury, E

    2016-09-25

    No study has investigated the availability and adherence of preventive oral care products on the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations. Data were collected in 2012, and updated in 2016, in terms of availability, characteristics and adherence to evidence-based international recommendations. Few preventive products adhered to the recommendations. Despite the large decrease in the number of oral care products on the Syrian market, due to the Syrian crisis, nonadherence of some of the available products is still present. A multisectorial approach at a policy level is needed to address such important limitations. The Syrian Ministry of Health should reform regulations for fluoride products to become subject to drug monitoring systems; the Syrian Arab Committee for Measurements and Standards needs to update its standards; and the Syrian General Dental Association should distribute a preventive booklet to dental practitioners.

  3. Topical therapies in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Hoy, Monica; Schlosser, Rodney J; Harvey, Richard J; Welch, Kevin C; Lund, Valerie; Smith, Timothy L

    2013-04-01

    Topical therapies have become an integral component in the management plan for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Several topical therapy strategies have been evaluated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the utilization of topical therapies in the management of CRS. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria were: adult population >18 years old; chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) based on published diagnostic criteria; and clearly defined primary clinical end-point. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2b or higher), but reported on lower-level studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. We excluded drug-eluting spacer and stent therapy from this review. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 5 topical therapy strategies for CRS: saline irrigation, topical steroid, topical antibiotic, topical antifungal, and topical alternatives (surfactant, manuka honey, and xylitol irrigations). Based on the available evidence, sinonasal saline irrigation and standard topical nasal steroid therapy are recommended in the topical treatment of CRS. Nonstandard (off-label) topical sinonasal steroid therapies can be an option for managing CRS. The evidence recommends against the use of topical antifungal therapy and topical antibiotic therapy delivered using nebulized and spray techniques in routine cases of CRS. There is insufficient clinical research to provide recommendations for alternative therapies or topical antibiotic therapy delivered using other delivery methods (eg, irrigations). © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA).Methods. A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process......, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR...... to each recommendation. The recommendations related to the efficacy and safety of various analgesic medications, pain measurement scales and pain management in the pre-conception period, pregnancy and lactation. Finally, an algorithm for the pharmacological management of pain in IA was developed. Twenty...

  5. Bone Health in Patients with Breast Cancer: Recommendations from an Evidence-Based Canadian Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. G. Paterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss is common in patients with breast cancer. Bone modifying agents (BMAs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, have been shown to reverse or stabilize bone loss and may be useful in the primary and metastatic settings. The purpose of this review is to provide clear evidence-based strategies for the management of bone loss and its symptoms in breast cancer. A systematic review of clinical trials and meta-analyses published between 1996 and 2012 was conducted of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reference lists were hand-searched for additional publications. Recommendations were developed based on the best available evidence. Zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate, and denosumab are recommended for metastatic breast cancer patients; however, no one agent can be recommended over another. Zoledronate or any oral bisphosphonate and denosumab should be considered in primary breast cancer patients who are postmenopausal on aromatase inhibitor therapy and have a high risk of fracture and/or a low bone mineral density and in premenopausal primary breast cancer patients who become amenorrheic after therapy. No one agent can be recommended over another. BMAs are not currently recommended as adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer for the purpose of improving survival, although a major Early Breast Cancer Cooperative Trialists’ Group meta-analysis is underway which may impact future practice. Adverse events can be managed with appropriate supportive care.

  6. Altered Mental Status: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Sanello

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with an acute change in mental status and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the State of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with altered mental status (AMS and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the AMS protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were patient assessment, point-of-care tests, supplemental oxygen, use of standardized scoring, evaluating for causes of AMS, blood glucose evaluation, toxicological treatment, and pediatric evaluation and management. Results: Protocols across 33 EMS agencies in California varied widely. All protocols call for a blood glucose check, 21 (64% suggest treating adults at <60mg/dL, and half allow for the use of dextrose 10%. All the protocols recommend naloxone for signs of opioid overdose, but only 13 (39% give specific parameters. Half the agencies (52% recommend considering other toxicological causes of AMS, often by using the mnemonic AEIOU TIPS. Eight (24% recommend a 12-lead electrocardiogram; others simply suggest cardiac monitoring. Fourteen (42% advise supplemental oxygen as needed; only seven (21% give specific parameters. In terms of considering various etiologies of AMS, 25 (76% give instructions to consider trauma, 20 (61% to consider stroke, and 18 (55% to consider seizure. Twenty-three (70% of the agencies have separate pediatric AMS protocols; others include pediatric considerations within the adult protocol. Conclusion: Protocols

  7. Evidence-based recommendations on the use of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, Sophie; Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Hoffman, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    to insufficient data for non-LAs. All recommendations were based on very low quality of evidence. CONCLUSION: Clinical recommendations regarding the use of ILE in poisoning were only possible in a small number of scenarios and were based mainly on very low quality of evidence, balance of expected risks...... and benefits, adverse effects, laboratory interferences as well as related costs and resources. The workgroup emphasizes that dose-finding and controlled studies reflecting human poisoning scenarios are required to advance knowledge of limitations, indications, adverse effects, effectiveness, and best regimen...... clinical situations were selected for voting. Voting statements were proposed using a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was used to reach consensus on the voting statements. Disagreement was quantified using RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. RESULTS: For the management of cardiac...

  8. Evidence-based diabetes nutrition therapy recommendations are effective: the key is individualization

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Marion J; Boucher, Jackie L; Evert, Alison B

    2014-01-01

    Marion J Franz,1 Jackie L Boucher,2 Alison B Evert3 1Nutrition Concepts by Franz, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, 2Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, 3Diabetes Care Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Current nutrition therapy recommendations for the prevention and treatment of diabetes are based on a systematic review of evidence and answer important nutrition care questions. First, is diabetes nutrition therapy effective? Clinical trials...

  9. Speaking out on safe sleep: evidence-based infant sleep recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartick, Melissa; Smith, Linda J

    2014-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued recommendations in 2005 and 2011 to reduce sleep-related infant death, which advise against all bedsharing for sleep. These recommendations overemphasize the risks of bedsharing, and this overemphasis has serious unintended consequences. It may result in increased deaths on sofas as tired parents try to avoid feeding their infants in bed. Current evidence shows that other risks are far more potent, such as smoking, shared sleep on sofas, sleeping next to impaired caregivers, and formula feeding. The emphasis on separate sleep is diverting resources away from addressing these critical risk factors. Recommendations to avoid bedsharing may also interfere with breastfeeding. We examine both the evidence behind the AAP recommendations and the evidence omitted from those recommendations. We conclude that the only evidence-based universal advice to date is that sofas are hazardous places for adults to sleep with infants; that exposure to smoke, both prenatal and postnatal, increases the risk of death; and that sleeping next to an impaired caregiver increases the risk of death. No sleep environment is completely safe. Public health efforts must address the reality that tired parents must feed their infants at night somewhere and that sofas are highly risky places for parents to fall asleep with their infants, especially if parents are smokers or under the influence of alcohol or drugs. All messaging must be crafted and reevaluated to avoid unintended negative consequences, including impact on breastfeeding rates, or falling asleep in more dangerous situations than parental beds. We must realign our resources to focus on the greater risk factors, and that may include greater investment in smoking cessation and doing away with aggressive formula marketing. This includes eliminating conflicts of interest between formula marketing companies and organizations dedicated to the health of children.

  10. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Storr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health care-associated infections (HAI are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  11. Classification and Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Fitzcharles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS, characterized by subjective complaints without physical or biomarker abnormality, courts controversy. Recommendations in recent guidelines addressing classification and diagnosis were examined for consistencies or differences. Methods. Systematic searches from January 2008 to February 2013 of the US-American National Guideline Clearing House, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, Guidelines International Network, and Medline for evidence-based guidelines for the management of FMS were conducted. Results. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines, independently developed in Canada, Germany, and Israel, recommended that FMS can be clinically diagnosed by a typical cluster of symptoms following a defined evaluation including history, physical examination, and selected laboratory tests, to exclude another somatic disease. Specialist referral is only recommended when some other physical or mental illness is reasonably suspected. The diagnosis can be based on the (modified preliminary American College of Rheumatology (ACR 2010 diagnostic criteria. Discussion. Guidelines from three continents showed remarkable consistency regarding the clinical concept of FMS, acknowledging that FMS is neither a distinct rheumatic nor mental disorder, but rather a cluster of symptoms, not explained by another somatic disease. While FMS remains an integral part of rheumatology, it is not an exclusive rheumatic condition and spans a broad range of medical disciplines.

  12. An evidence-based recommendation on bed head elevation for mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niël-Weise, Barbara S; Gastmeier, Petra; Kola, Axel; Vonberg, Ralf P; Wille, Jan C; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2011-01-01

    A semi-upright position in ventilated patients is recommended to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and is one of the components in the Ventilator Bundle of the Institute for Health Care Improvement. This recommendation, however, is not an evidence-based one. A systematic review on the benefits and disadvantages of semi-upright position in ventilated patients was done according to PRISMA guidelines. Then a European expert panel developed a recommendation based on the results of the systematic review and considerations beyond the scientific evidence in a three-round electronic Delphi procedure. Three trials (337 patients) were included in the review. The results showed that it was uncertain whether a 45° bed head elevation was effective or harmful with regard to the occurrence of clinically suspected VAP, microbiologically confirmed VAP, decubitus and mortality, and that it was unknown whether 45° elevation for 24 hours a day increased the risk for thromboembolism or hemodynamic instability. A group of 22 experts recommended elevating the head of the bed of mechanically ventilated patients to a 20 to 45° position and preferably to a ≥ 30° position as long as it does not pose risks or conflicts with other nursing tasks, medical interventions or patients' wishes. Although the review failed to prove clinical benefits of bed head elevation, experts prefer this position in ventilated patients. They made clear that the position of a ventilated patient in bed depended on many determinants. Therefore, given the scientific uncertainty about the benefits and harms of a semi-upright position, this position could only be recommended as the preferred position with the necessary restrictions.

  13. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists.......The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  14. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Optimizing Light in Day-to-Day Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Leveton, Lauren; Barger, Laura; Clark, Toni; Bollweg, Laura; Ohnesorge, Kristine; Brainard, George

    2015-01-01

    NASA Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP) personnel have previously reported on efforts to transition evidence-based recommendations for a flexible lighting system on the International Space Station (ISS). Based on these recommendations, beginning in 2016 the ISS will replace the current fluorescent-based lights with an LED-based system to optimize visual performance, facilitate circadian alignment, promote sleep, and hasten schedule shifting. Additional efforts related to lighting countermeasures in spaceflight operations have also been underway. As an example, a recent BHP research study led by investigators at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, evaluated the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of blue-enriched light exposure during exercise breaks for flight controllers working the overnight shift in the Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA Johnson Space Center. This effort, along with published laboratory studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of appropriately timed light for promoting alertness, served as an impetus for new light options, and educational protocols for flight controllers. In addition, a separate set of guidelines related to the light emitted from electronic devices, were provided to the Astronaut Office this past year. These guidelines were based on an assessment led by NASA's Lighting Environment Test Facility that included measuring the spectral power distribution, irradiance, and radiance of light emitted from ISS-grade laptops and I-Pads, as well as Android devices. Evaluations were conducted with and without the use of off-the-shelf screen filters as well as a software application that touts minimizing the short-wave length of the visible light spectrum. This presentation will focus on the transition for operations process related to lighting countermeasures in the MCC, as well as the evidence to support recommendations for optimal use of laptops, I-Pads, and Android devices during all

  15. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Townsend, Julie S.; Puckett, Mary C.; Rim, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions about how often they refer patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer to gynecologic oncologists, and reasons for lack of referral. We also analyzed these physicians’ knowledge of tests to help determine whether a gynecologic oncologist is needed for a planned surgery. The survey response rate was 52.2%. A total of 84% of primary care physicians (87% of family/general practitioners, 81% of internists and obstetrician/gynecologists) said they always referred patients to gynecologic oncologists for treatment. Common reasons for not always referring were patient preference or lack of gynecologic oncologists in the practice area. A total of 23% of primary care physicians had heard of the OVA1 test, which helps to determine whether gynecologic oncologist referral is needed. Although referral rates reported here are high, it is not clear whether ovarian cancer patients are actually seeing gynecologic oncologists for care. The NCCCP is undertaking several efforts to assist with this, including education of the recommendation among women and providers and assistance with treatment summaries and patient navigation toward appropriate treatment. Expansion of these efforts to all populations may help improve adherence to recommendations and reduce ovarian cancer mortality. PMID:26978124

  16. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivera, Francisca; Andrés, Mariano; Carmona, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    with a systematic literature review. Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL and abstracts from 2010-2011 European League Against Rheumatism and American College of Rheumatology meetings were searched in each review. Relevant studies were independently reviewed by two individuals for data extraction and synthesis...... and risk of bias assessment. Using this evidence, rheumatologists from 14 countries (Europe, South America and Australasia) developed national recommendations. After rounds of discussion and voting, multinational recommendations were formulated. Each recommendation was graded according to the level...

  17. Nursing-led management of side effects of radiation: evidence-based recommendations for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poirier P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia PoirierUniversity of Maine School of Nursing, Orono, ME, USAAbstract: It has been estimated that 50%–60% of patients diagnosed with cancer will receive radiation therapy at some point in their treatment. Although radiation therapy can play a significant role in the cure or control of cancer, and the palliation of symptoms, it also has side effects. Side effects of radiation therapy can interfere with patient quality of life and daily functioning. Severe side effects can lead to delays in treatment, potentially affecting the outcome of treatment. All patients receiving radiation therapy are at risk of fatigue and skin reactions in the area of the body being treated. Other side effects of radiation therapy are specific to the part of the body being treated. Radiation therapy to the head and neck area may cause oral mucositis, dryness, and nutritional deficiencies. Radiation therapy to the chest or lung area may lead to difficulty in swallowing and eating. Radiation therapy to the pelvis frequently causes diarrhea. There are many nursing interventions available to manage the side effects of treatment based on best available evidence and expert opinion. Nurses in all settings are essential in helping patients manage the side effects of treatment and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this review is to provide nurses with evidence-based recommendations and suggestions for managing common acute side effects of radiation therapy.Keywords: evidence-based practice, radiation therapy, side effects, nursing management

  18. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence Based Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Silverman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS agencies in California. Methods: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results: Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33 of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33 for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33 have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33 of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33 have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33 allow benzodiazepines to be

  19. Cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and ACOG recommendations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    To conduct a methodological review of the existing scientific literature within the field of cosmetic gynecology in the view of evidence-based medicine and to establish their relevance to the ACOG Committee Opinion No. 378. The appropriate medical subject heading terms were selected and applied in the search of the Internet multiple databases since 1900 until January 2010. Articles focusing on cosmetic gynecology were reviewed. Also, anecdotal and advertising literatures were analyzed. A methodological review of the literatures was conducted. In peer review journals, 72 relevant articles related to cosmetic gynecology were identified. Anecdotal information was identified in 3 sources and over 1,100 published marketing literatures were identified on the Internet and no scientific journals. Among reviewed articles on cosmetic gynecology, only two articles met the level II-2 in evidence-based medicine. The absence of documentations on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic vaginal procedures in the scientific literatures was ACOG's main concern. Practicing cosmetic gynecology within ACOG recommendations is desirable and possible. Currently, the standard of practice of cosmetic gynecology cannot be determined due to the absence of the documentation on safety and effectiveness. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be called cosmetic procedures, since it is a deceptive form of practice and marketing. Creating medical terminology trademarks and establishing a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical.

  20. Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based, expert driven, practical statement and rehabilitation recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Juultje; Engelbert, Raoul HH; Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, Daniela; Gosselink, Rik; Spronk, Peter E; Nollet, Frans; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for effective and safe diagnostic assessment and intervention strategies for the physiotherapy treatment of patients in intensive care units. Methods: We used the EBRO method, as recommended by the ‘Dutch Evidence Based Guideline Development Platform’ to develop an ‘evidence statement for physiotherapy in the intensive care unit’. This method consists of the identification of clinically relevant questions, followed by a systematic literature search, and summary of the evidence with final recommendations being moderated by feedback from experts. Results: Three relevant clinical domains were identified by experts: criteria to initiate treatment; measures to assess patients; evidence for effectiveness of treatments. In a systematic literature search, 129 relevant studies were identified and assessed for methodological quality and classified according to the level of evidence. The final evidence statement consisted of recommendations on eight absolute and four relative contra-indications to mobilization; a core set of nine specific instruments to assess impairments and activity restrictions; and six passive and four active effective interventions, with advice on (a) physiological measures to observe during treatment (with stopping criteria) and (b) what to record after the treatment. Conclusions: These recommendations form a protocol for treating people in an intensive care unit, based on best available evidence in mid-2014. PMID:25681407

  1. Identification and management of comorbidity in psoriatic arthritis: evidence- and expert-based recommendations from a multidisciplinary panel from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Carmona, Loreto; Moreno, Mireia; Galíndez, Eva; Babío, Jesús; Zarco, Pedro; Linares, Luis; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Barrial, Manuel Fernández; Hermosa, Juan Carlos; Coto, Pablo; Suárez, Carmen; Almodóvar, Raquel; Luelmo, Jesús; Castañeda, Santos; Gratacós, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to establish recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, for the identification and management of comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The following techniques were applied: discussion group, systematic review, and Delphi survey for agreement. A panel of professionals from four specialties defined the users, the sections of the document, possible recommendations, and what systematic reviews should be performed. A second discussion was held with the results of the systematic reviews. Recommendations were formulated in the second meeting and voted online from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). Agreement was considered if at least 70% voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidance. The full document was critically appraised by the experts, and the project was supervised at all times by a methodologist. In a final step, the document was reviewed and commented by a patient and a health management specialist. Fourteen recommendations were produced, together with a checklist to facilitate the implementation. The items with the largest support from evidence were those related to cardiovascular disease and risk factors. The panel recommends paying special attention to obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption, as they are all modifiable factors with an impact on treatment response or complications of PsA. Psychological and organizational aspects were also deemed important. We herein suggest practical recommendations for the management of comorbidities in PsA based on evidence and expert opinion.

  2. Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Eric R; Aragon, Alan A; Fitschen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals.

  3. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    , 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR......)/ACR abstracts. Relevant studies were retrieved for data extraction and quality assessment. Rheumatologists from each country used this evidence to develop a set of national recommendations. Multinational recommendations were then formulated and assessed for agreement and the potential impact on clinical...

  4. 2016 updated EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richette, P; Doherty, M; Pascual, E; Barskova, V; Becce, F; Castañeda-Sanabria, J; Coyfish, M; Guillo, S; Jansen, T L; Janssens, H; Lioté, F; Mallen, C; Nuki, G; Perez-Ruiz, F; Pimentao, J; Punzi, L; Pywell, T; So, A; Tausche, A K; Uhlig, T; Zavada, J; Zhang, W; Tubach, F; Bardin, T

    2017-01-01

    New drugs and new evidence concerning the use of established treatments have become available since the publication of the first European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of gout, in 2006. This situation has prompted a systematic review and update of the 2006 recommendations. The EULAR task force consisted of 15 rheumatologists, 1 radiologist, 2 general practitioners, 1 research fellow, 2 patients and 3 experts in epidemiology/methodology from 12 European countries. A systematic review of the literature concerning all aspects of gout treatments was performed. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated by use of a Delphi consensus approach. Three overarching principles and 11 key recommendations were generated. For the treatment of flare, colchicine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral or intra-articular steroids or a combination are recommended. In patients with frequent flare and contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs and corticosteroids, an interleukin-1 blocker should be considered. In addition to education and a non-pharmacological management approach, urate-lowering therapy (ULT) should be considered from the first presentation of the disease, and serum uric acid (SUA) levels should be maintained atgout. Allopurinol is recommended as first-line ULT and its dosage should be adjusted according to renal function. If the SUA target cannot be achieved with allopurinol, then febuxostat, a uricosuric or combining a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with a uricosuric should be considered. For patients with refractory gout, pegloticase is recommended. These recommendations aim to inform physicians and patients about the non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for gout and to provide the best strategies to achieve the predefined urate target to cure the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Evidence and recommendations for imaging liver fat in children, based on systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Hannah I; Newton, Kimberly P; Sirlin, Claude B; Behling, Cynthia; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Fatty liver is a common problem in children and increases their risk for cirrhosis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Liver biopsy is the clinical standard for diagnosing and grading fatty liver. However, noninvasive imaging modalities are needed to assess liver fat in children. We performed a systematic review of studies that evaluated imaging liver fat in children. We searched PubMed for original research articles in peer-reviewed journals from January 1, 1982, through December 31, 2012, using the key words "imaging liver fat." Studies included those in English, and those performed in children from birth to 18 years of age. To be eligible for inclusion, studies were required to measure hepatic steatosis via an imaging modality and a quantitative comparator as the reference standard. We analyzed 9 studies comprising 610 children; 4 studies assessed ultrasonography and 5 studies assessed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasonography was used in the diagnosis of fatty liver with positive predictive values of 47% to 62%. There was not a consistent relationship between ultrasound steatosis score and the reference measurement of hepatic steatosis. Liver fat as measurements by MRI or by spectroscopy varied with the methodologies used. Liver fat measurements by MRI correlated with results from histologic analyses, but sample size did not allow for an assessment of diagnostic accuracy. Available evidence does not support the use of ultrasonography for the diagnosis or grading of fatty liver in children. Although MRI is a promising approach, the data are insufficient to make evidence-based recommendations regarding its use in children for the assessment of hepatic steatosis. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-based recommendations for the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Feyer, Petra Ch.; Molassiotis, Alexander; Rossi, Romina; Clark-Snow, Rebecca A.; Olver, Ian; Warr, David; Schiavone, Concetta; Roila, Fausto

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report recommendations given in the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) International Consensus Conference regarding the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy. Patients and methods: A steering committee under MASCC auspice chose panel participants for the guidelines development process on prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced emesis (RIE). Pertinent information from published literature as of March 2004 was reviewed for the guideline process. Both the MASCC level of scientific confidence and level of consensus, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) type of evidence and grade for recommendation were adopted. Results: Total body irradiation is classified at high risk, upper abdomen at moderate, lower thorax, pelvis, cranium (radiosurgery) and craniospinal at low, head and neck, extremities, cranium and breast at minimal risk. The recommendations for the use of antiemetics in radiotherapy are as follows: prophylaxis with a 5-HT3 antagonist in patients at high and moderate risk levels of RIE (±dexamethasone in the former group), prophylaxis or rescue with a 5-HT3 antagonist in the low risk group, and rescue with dopamine or a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in minimal risk level. Conclusions: These recommendations represent a valid tool for prophylaxis and treatment of RIE in clinical practice

  7. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M.; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T.; Wise, Sarah K.; Rotenberg, Brian W.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population>18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. Results This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Conclusion Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision ESS. PMID:27480830

  8. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  9. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: recommendations of recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines with special emphasis on complementary and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, Jacob; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Buskila, Dan; Shir, Yoram; Sommer, Claudia; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran) were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques).

  10. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Moskowitz, R W; Nuki, G; Abramson, S; Altman, R D; Arden, N; Bierma-Zeinstra, S; Brandt, K D; Croft, P; Doherty, M; Dougados, M; Hochberg, M; Hunter, D J; Kwoh, K; Lohmander, L S; Tugwell, P

    2008-02-01

    To develop concise, patient-focussed, up to date, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), which are adaptable and designed to assist physicians and allied health care professionals in general and specialist practise throughout the world. Sixteen experts from four medical disciplines (primary care, rheumatology, orthopaedics and evidence-based medicine), two continents and six countries (USA, UK, France, Netherlands, Sweden and Canada) formed the guidelines development team. A systematic review of existing guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA published between 1945 and January 2006 was undertaken using the validated appraisal of guidelines research and evaluation (AGREE) instrument. A core set of management modalities was generated based on the agreement between guidelines. Evidence before 2002 was based on a systematic review conducted by European League Against Rheumatism and evidence after 2002 was updated using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library and HTA reports. The quality of evidence was evaluated, and where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk or odds ratio and cost per quality-adjusted life years gained were estimated. Consensus recommendations were produced following a Delphi exercise and the strength of recommendation (SOR) for propositions relating to each modality was determined using a visual analogue scale. Twenty-three treatment guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA were identified from the literature search, including six opinion-based, five evidence-based and 12 based on both expert opinion and research evidence. Twenty out of 51 treatment modalities addressed by these guidelines were universally recommended. ES for pain relief varied from treatment to treatment. Overall there was no statistically significant difference between non-pharmacological therapies [0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16, 0.34] and

  11. Generalizability of Evidence-Based Assessment Recommendations for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is frequently clinically diagnosed in youths who do not actually satisfy Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria, yet cases that would satisfy full DSM-IV-TR criteria are often undetected clinically. Evidence-based assessment methods…

  12. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, David; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp de...

  13. [Isolated primary nocturnal enuresis: international evidence based management. Consensus recommendations by French expert group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, D; Berard, E; Blanc, J-P; Lenoir, G; Liard, F; Lottmann, H

    2010-05-01

    The causes and treatment of isolated primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) are the subject of ongoing controversy. We are proposing consensus practical recommendations, based on a formalised analysis of the literature and validated by a large panel of experts. A task force of six experts based its work on the guide for literature analysis and recommendations and recommendation grading of the French Haute Autorité de Santé (formalized consensus process methodological guidelines) to evaluate the level of scientific proof (grade of 1 to 4) and the strength of the recommendations (grade A, B, C) of the publications on PNE. As a result of this, 223 articles from 2003 on were identified, of which only 127 (57 %) have an evaluable level of proof. This evaluation was then reviewed by a 19-member rating group. Several recommendations, poorly defined by the literature, had to be proposed by a professional agreement resulting from a consultation between the members of the task force and those of the rating group. For its final validation, the document was submitted to a reading group of 21 members working in a wide range of specialist areas and practices but all involved in PNE. The definition of PNE is very specific: intermittent incontinence during sleep, from the age of 5, with no continuous period of continence longer than 6 months, with no other associated symptom, particularly during the day. Its diagnosis is clinical by the exclusion of all other urinary pathologies. Two factors must be identified during the consultation: nocturnal polyuria promoted by excessive fluid intake, inverse secretion of vasopressin, snoring and sleep apnoea. It is sensitive to desmopressin; small bladder capacity evaluated according to a voiding diary and the ICCS formula. It may be associated with diurnal hyperactivity of the detrusor (30 %). It is resistant to desmopressin. Problems associated with PNE are: abnormal arousal threshold, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (10 %), low

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  15. Participatory and evidence-based recommendations for urban redevelopment following natural disasters: older adults as policy advisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael; Keeling, Sally; Wilkinson, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To develop community-generated recommendations to inform urban environmental remediation following earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, and share these with local decision-makers during a participatory action research process. This study employed three focus group discussions to critique mixed-methods and multiphase results and develop evidence-based recommendations. Participants included 30 volunteers and 8 knowledgeable advisers aged 65 years and older. Participant recommendations addressed the remediation of earthquake-affected suburbs, access to transportation, age-friendly design, safer communities, resilient support agencies, and restoration of resources for social and cultural activities. Older collaborators identified salient barriers to active ageing and options for post-earthquake redevelopment that had not previously been considered in research or policy. Independently living older adults are well placed to work with researchers to develop recommendations to improve the urban environment following natural disasters as well as in times of relative stability. © 2013 ACOTA.

  16. Generalizability of Evidence-Based Assessment Recommendations for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is frequently clinically diagnosed in youths who do not actually satisfy DSM-IV criteria, yet cases that would satisfy full DSM-IV criteria are often undetected clinically. Evidence-based assessment methods that incorporate Bayesian reasoning have demonstrated improved diagnostic accuracy, and consistency; however, their clinical utility is largely unexplored. The present study examines the effectiveness of promising evidence-based decision-making compared to the clinical gold standard. Participants were 562 youth, ages 5-17 and predominantly African American, drawn from a community mental health clinic. Research diagnoses combined semi-structured interview with youths’ psychiatric, developmental, and family mental health histories. Independent Bayesian estimates relied on published risk estimates from other samples discriminated bipolar diagnoses, Area Under Curve=.75, pbipolar illness, were significant. Bayesian risk estimates were highly correlated with logistic regression estimates using optimal sample weights, r=.81, p<.0005. Clinical and Bayesian approaches agree in terms of overall concordance and deciding next clinical action, even when Bayesian predictions are based on published estimates from clinically and demographically different samples. Evidence-based assessment methods may be useful in settings that cannot routinely employ gold standard assessments, and they may help decrease rates of overdiagnosis while promoting earlier identification of true cases. PMID:22004538

  17. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: revised third edition Recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.M.; Haddad, P. M.; Ferrier, I.N.; Aronson, J.K.; Barnes, T.R.H.; Cipriani, A.; Coghill, D.R.; Fazel, S.; Geddes, J.R.; Grunze, H.; Holmes, E.A.; Howes, O.; Hudson, S.; Hunt, N.; Jones, I.; Macmillan, I.C.; McAllister-Williams, H.; Miklowitz, D.M.; Morriss, R.; Munafò, M.; Paton, C.; Saharkian, B.J.; Saunders, K.E.A.; Sinclair, J.M.A.; Taylor, D.; Vieta, E.; Young, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines: in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change. PMID:26979387

  18. Evidence-based recommendations for bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in children: a report from a national working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D; Levine, A; Weiss, B; Hirsh, A; Shamir, R; Shaoul, R; Berkowitz, D; Bujanover, Y; Cohen, S; Eshach-Adiv, O; Jamal, Gera; Kori, M; Lerner, A; On, A; Rachman, L; Rosenbach, Y; Shamaly, H; Shteyer, E; Silbermintz, A; Yerushalmi, B

    2010-12-01

    There are no current recommendations for bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in children. The Israeli Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (ISPGAN) established an iterative working group to formulate evidence-based guidelines for bowel cleansing in children prior to colonoscopy. Data were collected by systematic review of the literature and via a national-based survey of all endoscopy units in Israel. Based on the strength of evidence, the Committee reached consensus on six recommended protocols in children. Guidelines were finalized after an open audit of ISPGAN members. Data on 900 colonoscopies per year were accrued, which represents all annual pediatric colonoscopies performed in Israel. Based on the literature review, the national survey, and the open audit, several age-stratified pediatric cleansing protocols were proposed: two PEG-ELS protocols (polyethylene-glycol with electrolyte solution); Picolax-based protocol (sodium picosulphate with magnesium citrate); sodium phosphate protocol (only in children over the age of 12 years who are at low risk for renal damage); stimulant laxative-based protocol (e. g. bisacodyl); and a PEG 3350-based protocol. A population-based analysis estimated that the acute toxicity rate of oral sodium phosphate is at most 3/7320 colonoscopies (0.041 %). Recommendations on diet and enema use are provided in relation to each proposed protocol. There is no ideal bowel cleansing regimen and, thus, various protocols are in use. We propose several evidence-based protocols to optimize bowel cleansing in children prior to colonoscopy and minimize adverse events. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Adolescent pregnancy in Argentina: evidence-based recommendations for public policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogna, Mónica; Binstock, Georgina; Fernández, Silvia; Ibarlucía, Inés; Zamberlin, Nina

    2008-05-01

    In Argentina adolescent pregnancy is still regarded as a public health problem or a "social epidemic". However, it is necessary to ask from which perspective and for whom it is a problem, and what type of problem. This article presents the findings of a large quantitative and qualitative study conducted in five Northern provinces and two metropolitan areas of Argentina in 2003-2004. Based on the results of a survey of adolescent mothers (n=1,645) and ten focus group discussions with adolescent girls and boys, it addresses the connections between school dropout, pregnancy and poverty, and makes recommendations on how to tailor health care and sexuality education to address local realities. The findings indicate a need to develop educational activities to promote safer sex and address gender power relations in programmes working with deprived communities. Sexuality education with a gender and rights perspective, and increasing accessibility to contraceptive methods for adolescent girls and boys is also crucial. Antenatal and post-partum care, as well as post-abortion care, should be improved for young women and viewed as opportunities for contraceptive counselling and provision. Male participation in pregnancy prevention and care also needs to be promoted.

  20. Evidence-based recommendations for analgesic efficacy to treat pain of endodontic origin: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Kulild, James C; Donaldson, Mark; Hersh, Elliot V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify evidence-based clinical trials to aid dental clinicians in establishing the efficacy for recommending or prescribing analgesics for pain of endodontic origin. The authors prepared and registered a protocol on PROSPERO and conducted electronic searches in MEDLINE, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, the authors manually searched the bibliographies of all relevant articles, the gray literature, and textbooks for randomized controlled trials. Two authors selected the relevant articles independently. There were no disagreements between the authors. The authors analyzed 27 randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The authors divided the studies into 2 groups: preoperative and postoperative analgesic treatments. There was moderate evidence to support the use of steroids for patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Also, there was moderate evidence to support nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) preoperatively or postoperatively to control pain of endodontic origin. When NSAIDs were not effective, a combination of NSAIDs with acetaminophen, tramadol, or an opioid appeared beneficial. NSAIDs should be considered as the drugs of choice to alleviate or minimize pain of endodontic origin if there are no contraindications for the patient to ingest an NSAID. In situations in which NSAIDs alone are not effective, the combination of an NSAID with acetaminophen or a centrally acting drug is recommended. Steroids appear effective in irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. OnabotulinumtoxinA in overactive bladder: Evidence-based consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cidre, M A; Arlandis-Guzmán, S

    2016-04-01

    To offer a set of useful recommendations for urologists who are starting to provide treatment of overactive bladders with onabotulinumtoxinA. A literature search to December 2013 was conducted, as well as a subsequent critical reading of the selected publications. The coordinators prepared a document that was submitted for review by the members of the Spanish Group for the use of Botulinum Toxin in Urology. The expert group considered that onabotulinumtoxinA may be used for overactive bladder syndrome with urinary urge incontinence secondary to neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity for patients for whom conservative treatment and first-line medical treatment has failed, is not tolerated or is contraindicated. Treatment in most cases was performed with local intravesical anesthesia, although it can also be performed under epidural or general anesthesia. Patients must be informed of the possibility of requiring self-catheterization or temporary catheterization. Clinicians should ensure that the patients are capable of performing this catheterization before the treatment is conducted. Patients must also be informed of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. At least 2 follow-up visits are recommended: the first at days 7-14 after the injection and the second at 2-3 months. Reinjection is indicated when the effect of the treatment decreases. These guidelines can help clinicians in their daily decisions and limit the potential risks associated with the incorrect use of the drug. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  3. Nutraceuticals in the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine: Evidence-based review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Serena L; Venkateswaran, Sunita

    2014-07-01

    The literature on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is expanding. One of the most common conditions for which CAM is studied in the pediatric population is migraine. Nutraceuticals are a form of CAM that is being used for pediatric migraine prophylaxis. A literature search was carried out in order to identify both observational studies and randomized controlled trials on the use of nutraceuticals for the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine. Adult studies on included nutraceuticals were also reviewed. Thirty studies were reviewed on six different nutraceuticals: butterbur, riboflavin, ginkgolide B, magnesium, coenzyme Q10 and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overall, the quality of the evidence for the use of nutraceuticals in pediatric migraine prophylaxis is poor. Further research needs to be done in order to study the efficacy of nutraceuticals for the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations for the follow-up of early stage seminomatous testicular germ cell cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hartmann, Michael [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Krege, Susanne [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf GmbH, Krefeld (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Lorch, Anja [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Mayer, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Santis, Maria de [KFJ-Spital, ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP and LBI-ACR VIEnna-CTO, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Oncology; Gillessen, Silke [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Beyer, Joerg [Vivantes Klinikum am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Cathomas, Richard [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland). Medical Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To provide guidance regarding follow-up procedures after initial treatment of early stage testicular seminoma (clinical stages (CS) I-II A/B) based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Material: An interdisciplinary, multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists analyzed the published evidence regarding follow-up procedures in various stages of seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular cancers. Focusing on radiooncological aspects, the recommendations contained herein are restricted to early stage seminoma (with radiotherapy being a standard treatment option). In particular, extent, frequency, and duration of imaging at follow-up were analyzed concerning relapse patterns, risk factors, and mode of relapse detection. Results: Active surveillance, adjuvant carboplatin or radiotherapy are equally accepted options for CS I seminoma but they result in different relapse rates and patterns. Usually relapses occur within the first 2(-6) years. Routinely performed follow-up using computerized tomography (CT) after adjuvant treatment yield only low detection rates of recurrences. Therefore, there is no evidence to maintain routine examinations every 3-4 months. After treatment of stage IIA/B, detection rates of relapses or progression identified solely by routinely performed CT during follow-up are low. Conclusion: Considering lifelong cure rates of up to 99% for patients treated for seminoma CS I-IIA/B, the negative impact of unnecessary ionizing radiation exposure has to be considered. The presented recommendations for various follow-up scenarios for early stage seminoma strongly promote the restrictive use of imaging procedures that utilize ionizing radiation (especially CT), due to its potential to induce secondary malignancies. (orig.)

  5. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in restaging of colorectal cancer. Evidence-based recommendations and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Weber, W.; Schwaiger, M.

    2003-01-01

    Aim, method: Recommendations for the use of FDG-PET in relapsed colorectal cancer and the decision of reimbursement should base on published studies and on their level of evidence. Therefore, the PET-studies published between 1997 and 2002 were graded by the bias-criteria, by two rating-systems and by two classification-systems for the level of evidence according to AHCPR (Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) and VHA (Veterans Health Administration). Results: The recommendation for the use of PET in relapsed colorectal cancer reached the level IIa according to the AHCPR, corresponding to level B according to the VHA. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET were 94% (95% CI: 91-96%) and 78% (95% CI: 69-86%), respectively. Staging was changed correctly in 27% of patients (95% CI: 24-30%). Staging by FDG-PET was incorrect in 4% of the patients (95% CI: 2-5%) compared with the conventionel methods. The additional use of PET changed the prospectively defined management plan for 34% of patients (95% CI: 31-38%). Either potentially curative operations were initiated in case of resectable tumour or futile operations were cancelled in case of multiple metastases. Conclusion: The 3-years-survival-rate following surgery would have exceeded 70% if the selection of patients had included an additional PET-examination. The correct selection of patients is requested in the daily routine as well as in the clinical implementation of neoadjuvant therapies to prevent a selection-bias from a suboptimal restaging without PET. (orig.) [de

  6. PROSPECT: a practical method for formulating evidence-based expert recommendations for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, E A M; Wilkinson, R C; Kehlet, H; Schug, S A

    2007-07-01

    Many patients still suffer severe acute pain in the postoperative period. Although guidelines for treating acute pain are widely published and promoted, most do not consider procedure-specific differences in pain experienced or in techniques that may be most effective and appropriate for different surgical settings. The procedure-specific postoperative pain management (PROSPECT) Working Group provides procedure-specific recommendations for postoperative pain management together with supporting evidence from systematic literature reviews and related procedures at http://www.postoppain.org The methodology for PROSPECT reviews was developed and refined by discussion of the Working Group, and it adapts existing methods for formulation of consensus recommendations to the specific requirements of PROSPECT. To formulate PROSPECT recommendations, we use a methodology that takes into account study quality and source and level of evidence, and we use recognized methods for achieving group consensus, thus reducing potential bias. The new methodology is first applied in full for the 2006 update of the PROSPECT review of postoperative pain management for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Transparency in PROSPECT processes allows the users to be fully aware of any limitations of the evidence and recommendations, thereby allowing for appropriate decisions in their own practice setting.

  7. Systematic review and evidence based recommendations on texture modified foods and thickened liquids for adults (above 17 years) with oropharyngeal dysphagia - An updated clinical guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Hansen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    /chin down (RR 1.18; 95% CI 1.01-1.37). No evidence was identified for review question 2. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the quality of the evidence, assessment of the risk benefit ratio, and perceived patient preferences a weak recommendation against the use of texture modified liquids and good clinical practice......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) has significant consequences for both the person with dysphagia and the society. An often-used treatment for OD is the recommendation of the texture of food and liquids. This recommendation seems to be based more on best practice than on evidence from...... a systematic review of existing scientific evidence. The aim of this paper was to report the result of an up-date of an original national guideline focussing on whether thickened liquids (review question 1) and modified foods (review question 2) are beneficial for adults above 17 years with OD in relation...

  8. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  9. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure

  10. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T; Wise, Sarah K; Rotenberg, Brian W; Smith, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population >18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria, and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification, and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene-modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. Evaluation of evidence-based literature and formulation of recommendations for the clinical preventive guidelines for immigrants and refugees in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugwell, Peter; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Ueffing, Erin; Chambers, Andrea; Feightner, John

    2011-09-06

    This article describes the evidence review and guideline development method developed for the Clinical Preventive Guidelines for Immigrants and Refugees in Canada by the Canadian Collaboration for Immigrant and Refugee Health Guideline Committee. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) best-practice framework was combined with the recently developed Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for immigrants and refugees in Canada. A systematic approach was designed to produce the evidence reviews and apply the GRADE approach, including building on evidence from previous systematic reviews, searching for and comparing evidence between general and specific immigrant populations, and applying the GRADE criteria for making recommendations. This method was used for priority health conditions that had been selected by practitioners caring for immigrants and refugees in Canada. This article outlines the 14-step method that was defined to standardize the guideline development process for each priority health condition.

  12. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Why are some evidence-based care recommendations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease better implemented than others? Perspectives of medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston KN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Kylie N Johnston1, Mary Young2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers1, Ral Antic3, Peter A Frith41International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2Transitional and Community Services, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Services, Repatriation General Hospital and Flinders University Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: Clinical guidelines for management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD include recommendations based on high levels of evidence, but gaps exist in their implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives of medical practitioners regarding implementation of six high-evidence recommendations for the management of people with COPD.Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical practitioners involved with care of COPD patients in hospital and general practice. Interviews sought medical practitioners' experience regarding implementation of smoking cessation, influenza vaccination, pulmonary rehabilitation, guideline-based medications, long-term oxygen therapy for hypoxemia and plan and advice for future exacerbations. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis.Results: Nine hospital-based medical practitioners and seven general practitioners participated. Four major categories were identified which impacted on implementation of the target recommendations in the care of patients with COPD: (1 role clarity of the medical practitioner; (2 persuasive communication with the patient; (3 complexity of behavioral change required; (4 awareness and support available at multiple levels. For some recommendations, strength in all four categories provided significant enablers supporting implementation. However, with regard to

  14. Evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage to treat endodontic infections and pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Kulild, James C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify evidence-based scientific methodologies to aid dental clinicians in establishing the indications for prescribing antibiotics for endodontic infection or pain. The authors prepared and registered a protocol on PROSPERO. They conducted electronic searches in MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, the authors hand searched the bibliographies of all relevant articles, the gray literature, and textbooks for randomized controlled clinical studies. The authors independently selected the relevant articles. The overall quality of the studies was fair with a low risk of bias, but 2 studies had a moderate risk of bias. The best available clinical evidence signals no indications for prescribing antibiotics preoperatively or postoperatively to prevent endodontic infection or pain unless the spread of infection is systemic, the patient is febrile, or both. Generally, an accurate diagnosis coupled with effective endodontic treatment will decrease microbial flora enough for healing to occur. To help decrease the number of drug-resistant microbes, oral health care providers should not prescribe antibiotics when they are not indicated. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vaccination in paediatric patients with auto-immune rheumatic diseases : A systemic literature review for the European League against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G.; Borte, M.; Bijl, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and auto-inflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. Methods: A

  16. Evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT studies using wide area-detector scanners: a phantom study with cadaveric correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Formery, Anne-Sophie; Blum, Alain [CHRU-Nancy Hopital Central, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Hossu, Gabriela [Universite de Lorraine, IADI U947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CIC-IT 1433, Nancy (France); Winninger, Daniel [IDCmem, Nancy (France); Batch, Toufik [Hopital de Mercy, Service de Radiologie, Metz (France); Gervaise, Alban [Legouest Military Instruction Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Metz (France)

    2017-02-15

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT on wide area-detector CT. In order to assess factors influencing image quality in kinematic CT studies, a phantom consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate rotating disk with round wells of different sizes was imaged with various acquisition protocols. Cadaveric acquisitions were performed on the ankle joint during motion in two different axes and at different speeds to allow validation of phantom data. Images were acquired with a 320 detector-row CT scanner and were evaluated by two readers. Motion artefacts were significantly correlated with various parameters (movement axis, distance to centre, rotation speed and volume acquisition speed) (p < 0.0001). The relation between motion artefacts and distance to motion fulcrum was exponential (R{sup 2} 0.99). Half reconstruction led to a 23 % increase in image noise and a 40 % decrease in motion artefacts. Cadaveric acquisitions confirmed phantom data. Based on these findings, high tube rotation speed and half reconstruction are recommended for kinematic CT. The axis of motion significantly influences image artefacts and should be considered in patient training and evaluation of acquisition protocol suitability. This study provides evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT. (orig.)

  17. Psychological treatments for adults and children with epilepsy: Evidence-based recommendations by the International League Against Epilepsy Psychology Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Rosa; Tang, Venus; Goldstein, Laura H; Reuber, Markus; LaFrance, William Curt; Lundgren, Tobias; Modi, Avani C; Wagner, Janelle L

    2018-06-19

    Given the significant impact that psychosocial factors and epilepsy treatments can have on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of individuals with epilepsy and their families, there is great clinical interest in the role of psychological evaluation and treatments to improve HRQOL and comorbidities. Therefore, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) charged the Psychology Task Force with the development of recommendations for clinical care based on evaluation of the evidence from their recent Cochrane review of psychological treatments in individuals with epilepsy. The literature search for a recent Cochrane review of randomized controlled trials investigating psychological treatments for individuals with epilepsy constitutes the key source of evidence for this article. To provide practical guidance to service providers, we provide ratings on study research designs based on (1) the American Academy of Neurology's Level of Evidence system and (2) the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system. This paper is the culmination of an international collaboration process involving pediatric and adult psychologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, and neuropsychiatrists. The process and conclusions were reviewed and approved by the ILAE Executive Committee. The strongest evidence for psychological interventions was identified for the most common mental health problems, including depression, neurocognitive disturbances, and medication adherence. Psychological interventions targeting the enhancement of HRQOL and adherence and a decrease in comorbidity symptoms (anxiety, depression) should be incorporated into comprehensive epilepsy care. There is a range of psychological strategies (ie, cognitive behavioral therapy and mindfulness-based therapies) that show promise for improving the lives of persons with epilepsy, and clinical recommendations are provided to assist epilepsy health care providers in treating the comorbidities and

  18. MRI and mammography surveillance of women at increased risk for breast cancer: recommendations using an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granader, Elon J; Dwamena, Ben; Carlos, Ruth C

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate breast cancer screening with mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in high-risk populations, including women with the BRCA mutation, using an evidence-based approach. The MEDLINE, PubMed, EBM Reviews, ACP Journal Club, Cochrane Database MEDSEARCH, and SCOPUS databases were accessed and searched for articles up to August 2007. Articles were collected using the following terms and medical subject headings (MeSH) that applied to the focused clinical question: "BRCA1" and "BRCA2" with "mammography," "MRI," "prevention," "screening," and "surveillance." References from retrieved articles were also used to identify relevant papers. Abstracts were screened and relevant papers retrieved. Retrieved papers were graded for quality. Summary performance measures were obtained by random effects modeling of study-specific performance estimates and standard errors derived from the multiple 2 x 2 tables. Additionally, studies meeting the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine level 2b quality were reviewed. In women with an increased risk without the BRCA gene, cancer detection rates by MRI were 0.011 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.003-0.019), by mammography 0.005 (95% CI 0.002-0.008), and by a combination of both, 0.012 (95% CI 0.004-0.020). False-positive rates by MRI, mammography, or a combination of both were 0.10 (95% CI 0.03-0.18), 0.05 (95% CI 0.03-0.06), and 0.14 (95% CI 0.04-0.24). In BRCA positive women, cancer detection rates by MRI were 0.027 (95% CI 0.015-0.040), by mammography 0.010 (95% CI 0.005-0.016), and by a combination of both 0.031 (95% CI 0.018-0.045). False-positive rates by MRI, mammography, or a combination of both were 0.10 (95% CI 0.01-0.19), 0.05 (95% CI 0.03-0.07), and 0.14 (95% CI 0.04-0.24), respectively. The data support an essential role for screening MRI in women with an increased risk for breast cancer.

  19. Comparing a Mobile Decision Support System Versus the Use of Printed Materials for the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Recommendation: Protocol for a Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Jhon; Medina Ch, Ana María; Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald; Boyce, Richard

    2018-04-13

    The distribution of printed materials is the most frequently used strategy to disseminate and implement clinical practice guidelines, although several studies have shown that the effectiveness of this approach is modest at best. Nevertheless, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of other strategies. Recent research has shown that the use of computerized decision support presents a promising approach to address some aspects of this problem. The aim of this study is to provide qualitative evidence on the potential effect of mobile decision support systems to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based recommendations included in clinical practice guidelines. We will conduct a qualitative study with two arms to compare the experience of primary care physicians while they try to implement an evidence-based recommendation in their clinical practice. In the first arm, we will provide participants with a printout of the guideline article containing the recommendation, while in the second arm, we will provide participants with a mobile app developed after formalizing the recommendation text into a clinical algorithm. Data will be collected using semistructured and open interviews to explore aspects of behavioral change and technology acceptance involved in the implementation process. The analysis will be comprised of two phases. During the first phase, we will conduct a template analysis to identify barriers and facilitators in each scenario. Then, during the second phase, we will contrast the findings from each arm to propose hypotheses about the potential impact of the system. We have formalized the narrative in the recommendation into a clinical algorithm and have developed a mobile app. Data collection is expected to occur during 2018, with the first phase of analysis running in parallel. The second phase is scheduled to conclude in July 2019. Our study will further the understanding of the role of mobile decision support systems in the implementation

  20. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, K; Katchamart, W; Loza, E

    2009-01-01

    the work-up before initiating methotrexate, optimal dosage and route, use of folic acid, monitoring, management of hepatotoxicity, long-term safety, mono versus combination therapy and management in the perioperative period and before/during pregnancy. One recommendation concerned methotrexate as a steroid...

  1. A Hybrid Recommender System Based on User-Recommender Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Heng-Ru; Min, Fan; He, Xu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are used to make recommendations about products, information, or services for users. Most existing recommender systems implicitly assume one particular type of user behavior. However, they seldom consider user-recommender interactive scenarios in real-world environments. In this paper, we propose a hybrid recommender system based on user-recommender interaction and evaluate its performance with recall and diversity metrics. First, we define the user-recommender interaction...

  2. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on treatment strategies for localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werier, Joel; Yao, Xiaomei; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; di Primio, Gina; Ghert, Michelle; Gupta, Abha A; Kandel, Rita; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-06-01

    (1) To provide recommendations regarding the choice of surgery, radiation therapy (RT), or the combination of surgery plus RT in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (2) To determine the appropriate surgical planning imaging (pre-chemotherapy magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or post-chemotherapy MRI) to identify optimal resection margins in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who undergo surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1999 to February 2015), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2012 to January 2015) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. 1. Recommendation (1) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: (a) Surgery alone or RT alone are two reasonable treatment options; the combination of surgery plus RT is not recommended as an initial treatment option. (b) The local treatment for an individual patient should be decided by a multidisciplinary tumour board together with the patient after consideration of the following: (1) patient characteristics (e.g., age, tumour location, tumour size, response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and existing comorbidities), (2) the potential benefit weighed against the potential complications from surgery and/or toxicities associated with RT, and (3) patient preferences. 2. Recommendation (2) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who will undergo surgery: (a) Both pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy MRI scans should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. In certain anatomic locations with good chemotherapy response, the post-chemotherapy MRI may be the appropriate imaging modality to plan surgical resection margins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methodology for AACT evidence-based recommendations on the use of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, Sophie; Morris, Martin; Miller-Nesbitt, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) therapy is a novel treatment that was discovered in the last decade. Despite unclear understanding of its mechanisms of action, numerous and diverse publications attested to its clinical use. However, current evidence supporting its use is unclear and recommendati...

  4. Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Progress in evidence-based medicine and updates of consensus panel recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian HOU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder primarily characterized by infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells into the bone marrow, along with demonstration of monoclonal immunoglobulinemia M(IgM. Recent studies have demonstrated the MYD88 L265P somatic mutation contributes to the pathogenesis of WM. Mutated MYD88 activates NF-κB through a series of signals, which results in abnormal propagation of B cells. Clinical manifestation mainly consisted of tissue injuries attributable to tissue infiltration and monoclonal IgM. WM should be differentiated from lymphomas producing monoclonal IgM, and detection of MYD88 L265P mutation provides a new way to differentiate WM from other similar diseases. At present recommended treatments for WM include alkylating agents, nucleoside analogues, bortezomib, rituximab etc.

  5. Management of HIV Infection during Pregnancy in the United States: Updated Evidence-Based Recommendations and Future Potential Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam H. Rimawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All HIV-infected women contemplating pregnancy should initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, with a goal to achieve a maternal serum HIV RNA viral load beneath the laboratory level of detection prior to conceiving, as well as throughout their pregnancy. Successfully identifying HIV infection during pregnancy through screening tests is essential in order to prevent in utero and intrapartum transmission of HIV. Perinatal HIV transmission can be less than 1% when effective cART, associated with virologic suppression of HIV, is given during the ante-, intra-, and postpartum periods. Perinatal HIV guidelines, developed by organizations such as the World Health Organization, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the US Department of Health and Human Services, are constantly evolving, and hence the aim of our review is to provide a useful concise review for medical providers caring for HIV-infected pregnant women, summarizing the latest and current recommendations in the United States.

  6. Pharmacogenetics-based personalized therapy: Levels of evidence and recommendations from the French Network of Pharmacogenetics (RNPGx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Nicolas; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Barin-Le Guellec, Chantal; Thomas, Fabienne; Loriot, Marie-Anne

    2017-04-01

    More than 50 laboratories offer pharmacogenetic testing in France. These tests are restricted to a limited number of indications: prevention of serious adverse drug reactions; choice of most appropriate therapeutic option; dose adjustment for a specific drug. A very small proportion of these tests are mentioned in drug information labeling and the data provided (if any) are generally insufficient to ascertain whether a test is required and if it is useful. This article discusses the rationale for evaluating the performance and clinical usefulness of pharmacogenetics and provides, on behalf of the French national network of pharmacogenetics (RNPGx), three levels of recommendation for testing: essential, advisable, and possibly helpful. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence-Based Exercise Recommendations to Reduce Hepatic Fat Content in Youth- a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, María; Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Labayen, Idoia

    2018-02-13

    The main purposes of this study were to elucidate the effects of supervised-exercise training (ET) interventions on hepatic fat content and on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence in children and adolescents and to provide information about the optimal ET prescription (type, intensity, volume, and frequency) needed to reduce hepatic fat content in youths. Supervised-ET interventions performed in children and adolescents (6-19 years) that provided results of exercise effects on hepatic fat content or NAFLD prevalence were included. Supervised-exercise significantly reduced hepatic fat content compared to the control groups. Lifestyle interventions that included supervised-ET significantly reduced the prevalence of NAFLD. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that supervised-ET could be an effective strategy in the management and prevention of NAFLD in children and adolescents. Both aerobic and resistance ET, at vigorous or moderate-to-vigorous intensities, with a volume ≥60 min/session and a frequency ≥3 sessions/week, aiming to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength, had benefits on hepatic fat content reduction in youth. These data concur with the international recommendations of physical activity for health promotion in youth and may be useful when designing ET programs to improve and prevent hepatic steatosis in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A narrative review of evidence-based recommendations for the physical examination of the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joint complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C K; Johnson, E K

    2012-09-01

    Non-specific low back pain is a frequent complaint in primary care, but the differential diagnosis for low back pain can be complex. Despite advances in diagnostic imaging, a specific pathoanatomical source of low back pain can remain elusive in up to 85% of individuals. Best practice guidelines recommend that clinicians conduct a focused physical examination to help to identify patients with non-specific low back pain and an evidence-based course of clinical management. The use of sensitive and specific clinical methods to assess the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joints is critical for effective physical examination. Psychosocial factors also play an important role in the evaluation of individuals with low back pain, but are not included in this narrative review of physical examination methods. Physical examination of the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joints is presented, organized around patient position for efficient and effective clinical assessment. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Answering medical questions at the point of care: a cross-sectional study comparing rapid decisions based on PubMed and Epistemonikos searches with evidence-based recommendations developed with the GRADE approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcovich, Ariel; Criniti, Juan Martín; Popoff, Federico; Ragusa, Martín Alberto; Gigler, Cristel; Gonzalez Malla, Carlos; Clavijo, Manuela; Manzotti, Matias; Diaz, Martín; Catalano, Hugo Norberto; Neumann, Ignacio; Guyatt, Gordon

    2017-08-07

    Using the best current evidence to inform clinical decisions remains a challenge for clinicians. Given the scarcity of trustworthy clinical practice guidelines providing recommendations to answer clinicians' daily questions, clinical decision support systems (ie, assistance in question identification and answering) emerge as an attractive alternative. The trustworthiness of the recommendations achieved by such systems is unknown. To evaluate the trustworthiness of a question identification and answering system that delivers timely recommendations. Cross-sectional study. We compared the responses to 100 clinical questions related to inpatient management provided by two rapid response methods with 'Gold Standard' recommendations. One of the rapid methods was based on PubMed and the other on Epistemonikos database. We defined our 'Gold Standard' as trustworthy published evidence-based recommendations or, when unavailable, recommendations developed locally by a panel of six clinicians following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Recommendations provided by the rapid strategies were classified as potentially misleading or reasonable. We also determined if the potentially misleading recommendations could have been avoided with the appropriate implementation of searching and evidence summary tools. We were able to answer all of the 100 questions with both rapid methods. Of the 200 recommendations obtained, 6.5% (95% CI 3% to 9.9%) were classified as potentially misleading and 93.5% (95% CI 90% to 96.9%) as reasonable. 6 of the 13 potentially misleading recommendations could have been avoided by the appropriate usage of the Epistemonikos matrix tool or by constructing summary of findings tables. No significant differences were observed between the evaluated rapid response methods. A question answering service based on the GRADE approach proved feasible to implement and provided appropriate guidance for most identified

  10. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: systematic literature search of the 3E Initiative in Rheumatology involving a broad panel of experts and practising rheumatologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidiropoulos, P.I.; Hatemi, G.; Song, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recommendations and/or guidelines represent a popular way of integrating evidence-based medicine into clinical practice. The 3E Initiatives is a multi-national effort to develop recommendations for the management of rheumatic diseases, which involves a large number of experts combined ...... of rheumatologists may improve their dissemination and implementation in daily clinical practice....

  11. Improving preventive service delivery at adult complete health check-ups: the Preventive health Evidence-based Recommendation Form (PERFORM cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moineddin Rahim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the effectiveness of a single checklist reminder form to improve the delivery of preventive health services at adult health check-ups in a family practice setting. Methods A prospective cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted at four urban family practice clinics among 38 primary care physicians affiliated with the University of Toronto. Preventive Care Checklist Forms© were created to be used by family physicians at adult health check-ups over a five-month period. The sex-specific forms incorporate evidence-based recommendations on preventive health services and documentation space for routine procedures such as physical examination. The forms were used in two intervention clinics and two control clinics. Rates and relative risks (RR of the performance of 13 preventive health maneuvers at baseline and post-intervention and the percentage of up-to-date preventive health services delivered per patient were compared between the two groups. Results Randomly-selected charts were reviewed at baseline (n = 509 and post-intervention (n = 608. Baseline rates for provision of preventive health services ranged from 3% (fecal occult blood testing to 93% (blood pressure measurement, similar to other settings. The percentage of up-to-date preventive health services delivered per patient at the end of the intervention was 48.9% in the control group and 71.7% in the intervention group. This is an overall 22.8% absolute increase (p = 0.0001, and 46.6% relative increase in the delivery of preventive health services per patient in the intervention group compared to controls. Eight of thirteen preventive health services showed a statistically significant change (p Conclusion This simple, low cost, clinically relevant intervention improves the delivery of preventive health services by prompting physicians of evidence-based recommendations in a checklist format that incorporates existing practice patterns. Periodic updates

  12. The Swedish Web-system for enhancement and development of evidence-based care in heart disease evaluated according to recommended therapies (SWEDEHEART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; Attebring, Mona F; Hambraeus, Kristina; Ivert, Torbjorn; James, Stefan; Jeppsson, Anders; Lagerqvist, Bo; Lindahl, Bertil; Stenestrand, Ulf; Wallentin, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The aims of the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) are to support the improvement of care and evidence-based development of therapy of coronary artery disease (CAD). To provide users with online interactive reports monitoring the processes of care and outcomes and allowing direct comparisons over time and with other hospitals. National, regional and county-based reports are publicly presented on a yearly basis. Every hospital (n=74) in Sweden providing the relevant services participates. Launched in 2009 after merging four national registries on CAD. Consecutive acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, and patients undergoing coronary angiography/angioplasty or heart surgery. Includes approximately 80, 000 new cases each year. On admission in ACS patients, at coronary angiography in patients with stable CAD. 106 variables for patients with ACS, another 75 variables regarding secondary prevention after 12-14 months, 150 variables for patients undergoing coronary angiography/angioplasty, 100 variables for patients undergoing heart surgery. Web-based registry with all data registered online directly by the caregiver. A monitor visits approximately 20 hospitals each year. In 2007, there was a 96% agreement. Merged with the National Cause of Death Register, including information about vital status of all Swedish citizens, the National Patient Registry, containing diagnoses at discharge for all hospital stays in Sweden and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions recording all drug prescriptions in Sweden. Available for research by application to the SWEDEHEART steering group.

  13. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis: integrating systematic literature research and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittle, Samuel L.; Colebatch, Alexandra N.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J.; Adams, Karen; Englbrecht, Matthias; Hazlewood, Glen; Marks, Jonathan L.; Radner, Helga; Ramiro, Sofia; Richards, Bethan L.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Landewé, Robert B.; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Branco, Jaime C.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; Catrina, Anca I.; Hannonen, Pekka; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard; Lie, Elisabeth; Martinez-Osuna, Píndaro; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Westhovens, Rene; Zochling, Jane; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2012-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, 89 rheumatologists

  14. Guidelines for Improving Entry Into and Retention in Care and Antiretroviral Adherence for Persons With HIV: Evidence-Based Recommendations From an International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Amico, K. Rivet; Cargill, Victoria A.; Chang, Larry W.; Gross, Robert; Orrell, Catherine; Altice, Frederick L.; Bangsberg, David R.; Bartlett, John G.; Beckwith, Curt G.; Dowshen, Nadia; Gordon, Christopher M.; Horn, Tim; Kumar, Princy; Scott, James D.; Stirratt, Michael J.; Remien, Robert H.; Simoni, Jane M.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2014-01-01

    Description After HIV diagnosis, timely entry into HIV medical care and retention in that care are essential to the provision of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART adherence is among the key determinants of successful HIV treatment outcome and is essential to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care convened a panel to develop evidence-based recommendations to optimize entry into and retention in care and ART adherence for people with HIV. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to produce an evidence base restricted to randomized, controlled trials and observational studies with comparators that had at least 1 measured biological or behavioral end point. A total of 325 studies met the criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted and coded data from each study using a standardized data extraction form. Panel members drafted recommendations based on the body of evidence for each method or intervention and then graded the overall quality of the body of evidence and the strength for each recommendation. Recommendations Recommendations are provided for monitoring of entry into and retention in care, interventions to improve entry and retention, and monitoring of and interventions to improve ART adherence. Recommendations cover ART strategies, adherence tools, education and counseling, and health system and service delivery interventions. In addition, they cover specific issues pertaining to pregnant women, incarcerated individuals, homeless and marginally housed individuals, and children and adolescents, as well as substance use and mental health disorders. Recommendations for future research in all areas are also provided. PMID:22393036

  15. Hybrid employment recommendation algorithm based on Spark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuoquan; Lin, Yubei; Zhang, Xingming

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the real-time application of collaborative filtering employment recommendation algorithm (CF), a clustering collaborative filtering recommendation algorithm (CCF) is developed, which applies hierarchical clustering to CF and narrows the query range of neighbour items. In addition, to solve the cold-start problem of content-based recommendation algorithm (CB), a content-based algorithm with users’ information (CBUI) is introduced for job recommendation. Furthermore, a hybrid recommendation algorithm (HRA) which combines CCF and CBUI algorithms is proposed, and implemented on Spark platform. The experimental results show that HRA can overcome the problems of cold start and data sparsity, and achieve good recommendation accuracy and scalability for employment recommendation.

  16. A heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeonchan, Ahn [Seoul National University; Sungchan, Park [Seoul National University; Lee, Matt Sangkeun [ORNL; Sang-goo, Lee [Seoul National University

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous graph-based recommendation frameworks have flexibility in that they can incorporate various recommendation algorithms and various kinds of information to produce better results. In this demonstration, we present a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator which enables participants to experience the flexibility of a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation method. With our system, participants can simulate various recommendation semantics by expressing the semantics via meaningful paths like User Movie User Movie. The simulator then returns the recommendation results on the fly based on the user-customized semantics using a fast Monte Carlo algorithm.

  17. Systematic review of the literature and evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in trauma: results from an Italian consensus of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Daniele; Chieregato, Arturo; Langer, Martin; Viaggi, Bruno; Cingolani, Emiliano; Malacarne, Paolo; Mengoli, Francesca; Nardi, Giuseppe; Nascimben, Ennio; Riccioni, Luigi; Turriziani, Ilaria; Volpi, Annalisa; Coniglio, Carlo; Gordini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is frequently administered in severe trauma. However, the risk of selecting resistant bacteria, a major issue especially in critical care environments, has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of the present study was to provide guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis for four different trauma-related clinical conditions, taking into account the risks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection, thus innovating previous guidelines in the field. The MEDLINE database was searched for studies comparing antibiotic prophylaxis to controls (placebo or no antibiotic administration) in four clinical traumatic conditions that were selected on the basis of the traumatic event frequency and/or infection severity. The selected studies focused on the prevention of early ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in comatose patients with traumatic brain injury, of meningitis in severe basilar skull fractures, of wound infections in long-bone open fractures. Since no placebo-controlled study was available for deep surgical site-infections prevention in abdominal trauma with enteric contamination, we compared 24-hour and 5-day antibiotic prophylaxis policies. A separate specific research focused on the question of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection caused by antibiotic prophylaxis, an issue not adequately investigated by the selected studies. Randomised trials, reviews, meta-analyses, observational studies were included. Data extraction was carried out by one author according to a predefined protocol, using an electronic form. The strength of evidence was stratified and recommendations were given according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Uncertain evidence deserving further studies was found for two-dose antibiotic prophylaxis for early VAP prevention in comatose patients. In the other cases the risk of resistant-bacteria selection caused by antibiotic administration for 48 hours or more

  18. Preference-Based Recommendations for OLAP Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerbi, Houssem; Ravat, Franck; Teste, Olivier; Zurfluh, Gilles

    This paper presents a framework for integrating OLAP and recommendations. We focus on the anticipatory recommendation process that assists the user during his OLAP analysis by proposing to him the forthcoming analysis step. We present a context-aware preference model that matches decision-makers intuition, and we discuss a preference-based approach for generating personalized recommendations.

  19. Evidence-informed recommendations for rehabilitation with older adults living with HIV: a knowledge synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Solomon, Patricia; Trentham, Barry; MacLachlan, Duncan; MacDermid, Joy; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Baxter, Larry; Casey, Alan; Chegwidden, William; Robinson, Greg; Tran, Todd; Wu, Janet; Zack, Elisse

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to develop evidence-informed recommendations for rehabilitation with older adults living with HIV. Design We conducted a knowledge synthesis, combining research evidence specific to HIV, rehabilitation and ageing, with evidence on rehabilitation interventions for common comorbidities experienced by older adults with HIV. Methods We included highly relevant HIV-specific research addressing rehabilitation and ageing (stream A) and high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions for common comorbidities experienced by older adults ageing with HIV (stream B). We extracted and synthesised relevant data from the evidence to draft evidence-informed recommendations for rehabilitation. Draft recommendations were refined based on people living with HIV (PLHIV) and clinician experience, values and preferences, reviewed by an interprofessional team for Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) (quality) rating and revision and then circulated to PLHIV and clinicians for external endorsement and final refinement. We then devised overarching recommendations to broadly guide rehabilitation with older adults living with HIV. Results This synthesis yielded 8 overarching and 52 specific recommendations. Thirty-six specific recommendations were derived from 108 moderate-level or high-level research articles (meta-analyses and systematic reviews) that described the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions for comorbidities that may be experienced by older adults with HIV. Recommendations addressed rehabilitation interventions across eight health conditions: bone and joint disorders, cancer, stroke, cardiovascular disease, mental health challenges, cognitive impairments, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes. Sixteen specific recommendations were derived from 42 research articles specific to rehabilitation with older adults with HIV. The quality of evidence from which these

  20. Evidence-based surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Rems

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is setting a new ground by the reign of evidence that was brought up by the Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. While experiences and opinion of an expert count the least by the principles of EBM, randomized controlled trials (RCT and other comparative studies have gained their importance. Recommendations that were included in guidelines represent a demanding shift in surgeon’s professional thinking. Their thinking and classical education have not yet been completely based on the results of such studies and are still very very much master-pupil centred. Assessment of someone’s own experiences is threatened by objectivity as negative experiences get recorded in deeper memory. Randomized studies and meta-analyses do appear also in surgery. However, they demand an extra knowledge about critical assessment.Conclusions: Setting a patient to the foreground brings a surgeon’s decision to the field of EBM. The process has already begun and cannot be avoided. Decision hierarchy moves from the experience field to the evidence territory but to a lesser extent when compared to the rest of medicine. There exist objective restrictions with approving a new paradigm. However, these should not stop the process of EBM implementation. Finally, there is an ethic issue to be considered. Too slow activities in research, education and critical assessment can bring the surgeon to the position when a well-informed patient loses his/her trust.

  1. Treating an Established Episode of Delirium in Palliative Care: Expert Opinion and Review of the Current Evidence Base With Recommendations for Future Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José L.; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Currow, David C.; Meagher, David; Rabheru, Kiran; Wright, David; Bruera, Eduardo; Hartwick, Michael; Gagnon, Pierre R.; Gagnon, Bruno; Breitbart, William; Regnier, Laura; Lawlor, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium is a highly prevalent complication in patients in palliative care settings, especially in the end-of-life context. Objectives To review the current evidence base for treating episodes of delirium in palliative care settings and propose a framework for future development. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other purposely selected stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. This was supplemented by a literature search of multiple databases and relevant reference lists to identify studies regarding therapeutic interventions for delirium. Results The context of delirium management in palliative care is highly variable. The standard management of a delirium episode includes the investigation of precipitating and aggravating factors followed by symptomatic treatment with drug therapy. However, the intensity of this management depends on illness trajectory and goals of care in addition to the local availability of both investigative modalities and therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologically, haloperidol remains the practice standard by consensus for symptomatic control. Dosing schedules are derived from expert opinion and various clinical practice guidelines as evidence-based data from palliative care settings are limited. The commonly used pharmacologic interventions for delirium in this population warrant evaluation in clinical trials to examine dosing and titration regimens, different routes of administration, and safety and efficacy compared with placebo. Conclusion Delirium treatment is multidimensional and includes the identification of precipitating and aggravating factors. For symptomatic management, haloperidol remains the practice standard. Further high-quality collaborative research investigating the appropriate treatment of this complex syndrome is needed. PMID:24480529

  2. [GRADE system: classification of quality of evidence and strength of recommendation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis; Flores-Pastor, Benito; Soria-Aledo, Víctor

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition and classification of scientific evidence, and subsequent formulation of recommendations constitute the basis for the development of clinical practice guidelines. There are several systems for the classification of evidence and strength of recommendations; the most commonly used nowadays is the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system (GRADE). The GRADE system initially classifies the evidence into high or low, coming from experimental or observational studies; subsequently and following a series of considerations, the evidence is classified into high, moderate, low or very low. The strength of recommendations is based not only on the quality of the evidence, but also on a series of factors such as the risk/benefit balance, values and preferences of the patients and professionals, and the use of resources or costs. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Practitioner review: Engaging fathers--recommendations for a game change in parenting interventions based on a systematic review of the global evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter-Brick, Catherine; Burgess, Adrienne; Eggerman, Mark; McAllister, Fiona; Pruett, Kyle; Leckman, James F

    2014-11-01

    Despite robust evidence of fathers' impact on children and mothers, engaging with fathers is one of the least well-explored and articulated aspects of parenting interventions. It is therefore critical to evaluate implicit and explicit biases manifested in current approaches to research, intervention, and policy. We conducted a systematic database and a thematic hand search of the global literature on parenting interventions. Studies were selected from Medline, Psychinfo, SSCI, and Cochrane databases, and from gray literature on parenting programs, using multiple search terms for parent, father, intervention, and evaluation. We tabulated single programs and undertook systematic quality coding to review the evidence base in terms of the scope and nature of data reporting. After screening 786 nonduplicate records, we identified 199 publications that presented evidence on father participation and impact in parenting interventions. With some notable exceptions, few interventions disaggregate 'father' or 'couple' effects in their evaluation, being mostly driven by a focus on the mother-child dyad. We identified seven key barriers to engaging fathers in parenting programs, pertaining to cultural, institutional, professional, operational, content, resource, and policy considerations in their design and delivery. Barriers to engaging men as parents work against father inclusion as well as father retention, and undervalue coparenting as contrasted with mothering. Robust evaluations of father participation and father impact on child or family outcomes are stymied by the ways in which parenting interventions are currently designed, delivered, and evaluated. Three key priorities are to engage fathers and coparenting couples successfully, to disaggregate process and impact data by fathers, mothers, and coparents, and to pay greater attention to issues of reach, sustainability, cost, equity, and scale-up. Clarity of purpose with respect to gender-differentiated and coparenting

  4. Network-based recommendation algorithms: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Zeng, An; Gillard, Sébastien; Medo, Matúš

    2016-06-01

    Recommender systems are a vital tool that helps us to overcome the information overload problem. They are being used by most e-commerce web sites and attract the interest of a broad scientific community. A recommender system uses data on users' past preferences to choose new items that might be appreciated by a given individual user. While many approaches to recommendation exist, the approach based on a network representation of the input data has gained considerable attention in the past. We review here a broad range of network-based recommendation algorithms and for the first time compare their performance on three distinct real datasets. We present recommendation topics that go beyond the mere question of which algorithm to use-such as the possible influence of recommendation on the evolution of systems that use it-and finally discuss open research directions and challenges.

  5. Recommendation advertising method based on behavior retargeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; YIN, Xin-Chun; CHEN, Zhi-Min

    2011-10-01

    Online advertising has become an important business in e-commerce. Ad recommended algorithms are the most critical part in recommendation systems. We propose a recommendation advertising method based on behavior retargeting which can avoid leakage click of advertising due to objective reasons and can observe the changes of the user's interest in time. Experiments show that our new method can have a significant effect and can be further to apply to online system.

  6. PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose for staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Evidence-based recommendations and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.A.; Schwaiger, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Hellwig, D.; Kirsch, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate studies on the use of positron emission tomography with the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for the preoperative staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) according to the criteria of evidence based medicine and to discuss the cost-effectiveness of the technique. Methods: Clinical studies published between 1995 and 2002 on the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer were used for this analysis. Studies that did not meet the criteria published by the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) were excluded. The validity of the studies was evaluated by a standardized rating system developed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR). Results: For the detection of mediastinal lymph node metastases the mean sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET on a patient basis is 85% and 87% (16 studies, 1355 patients). In studies that compared FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) the mean sensitivity of CT was 66% at a specificity of 71%. In the detection of distant metastases FDG-PET correctly changed the tumor stage in 18% of the patients when compared to CT based staging (10 studies, 1073 patients). Five cost effectiveness analyses from the USA, Japan, and Germany concluded that FDG-PET improves the outcome of treatment at reduced or only slightly increased overall costs. Improvement of patient outcome was also demonstrated in a randomized trial, which found that the risk of a futile thoracotomy was reduced by 51% (p=0.003) when FDG-PET was added to the preoperative staging. Conclusion: According to the criteria of the AHCPR the use of FDG-PET for detection of mediastinal lymph node and distant metastases is documented at a level of evidence Ia and Ib, respectively. Since systematic analyses also indicate a favourable cost-effectiveness ratio FDG-PET has to be considered as 'strictly indicated' for the preoperative staging of a non-small cell lung cancer. (orig.) [de

  7. Personalized recommendation based on unbiased consistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Recently, in physical dynamics, mass-diffusion-based recommendation algorithms on bipartite network provide an efficient solution by automatically pushing possible relevant items to users according to their past preferences. However, traditional mass-diffusion-based algorithms just focus on unidirectional mass diffusion from objects having been collected to those which should be recommended, resulting in a biased causal similarity estimation and not-so-good performance. In this letter, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus bidirectional mass diffusion abilities, no matter originated from objects having been collected or from those which should be recommended, should be consistently powerful, showing unbiased consistence. We further propose a consistence-based mass diffusion algorithm via bidirectional diffusion against biased causality, outperforming the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including Netflix, MovieLens, Amazon and Rate Your Music.

  8. Combination of evidence in recommendation systems characterized by distance functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, L. M. (Luis Mateus)

    2002-01-01

    Recommendation systems for different Document Networks (DN) such as the World Wide Web (WWW), Digitnl Libarries, or Scientific Databases, often make use of distance functions extracted from relationships among documents and between documents and semantic tags. For instance, documents In the WWW are related via a hyperlink network, while documents in bibliographic databases are related by citation and collaboration networks.Furthermore, documents can be related to semantic tags such as keywords used to describe their content, The distance functions computed from these relations establish associative networks among items of the DN, and allow recommendation systems to identify relevant associations for iudividoal users. The process of recommendation can be improved by integrating associative data from different sources. Thus we are presented with a problem of combining evidence (about assochaons between items) from different sonrces characterized by distance functions. In this paper we summarize our work on (1) inferring associations from semi-metric distance functions and (2) combining evidence from different (distance) associative DN.

  9. Detecting New Evidences for Evidence-Based Medical Guidelines with Journal Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Qing; Huang, Zisheng; ten Teije, Annette; van Harmelen, Frank; Riaño, David; Lenz, Richard; Reichert, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based medical guidelines are systematically developed recommendations with the aim to assist practitioner and patients decisions regarding appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances, and are based on evidence described in medical research papers. Evidence-based medical

  10. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Avoidance and Management of Complications from Hyaluronic Acid Fillers—Evidence- and Opinion-Based Review and Consensus Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Steven; Sundaram, Hema; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Goodman, Greg J.; Monheit, Gary; Wu, Yan; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Swift, Arthur; Vieira Braz, André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the safety profile of hyaluronic acid fillers is favorable, adverse reactions can occur. Clinicians and patients can benefit from ongoing guidance on adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. Methods: A multinational, multidisciplinary group of experts in cosmetic medicine convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to review the properties and clinical uses of Hylacross and Vycross hyaluronic acid products and develop updated consensus recommendations for early and late complications associated with hyaluronic acid fillers. Results: The consensus panel provided specific recommendations focusing on early and late complications of hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. The impact of patient-, product-, and technique-related factors on such reactions was described. Most of these were noted to be mild and transient. Serious adverse events are rare. Early adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers include vascular infarction and compromise; inflammatory reactions; injection-related events; and inappropriate placement of filler material. Among late reactions are nodules, granulomas, and skin discoloration. Most adverse events can be avoided with proper planning and technique. Detailed understanding of facial anatomy, proper patient and product selection, and appropriate technique can further reduce the risks. Should adverse reactions occur, the clinician must be prepared and have tools available for effective treatment. Conclusions: Adverse reactions with hyaluronic acid fillers are uncommon. Clinicians should take steps to further reduce the risk and be prepared to treat any complications that arise. PMID:27219265

  11. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  12. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment. Part VI: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M; Rundell, Sean D; Dougherty, Paul; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Morone, Natalia E; Naga Raja, Srinivasa; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Shega, Joseph; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-03-01

    . To present the sixth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), the most common condition for which older adults undergo spinal surgery. . The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a five-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of a contributor's colleague (SR). . We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with LSS, a condition that occurs not uncommonly in those with CLBP. The case illustrates the importance of function-focused management and a rational approach to conservative care. . Lumbar spinal stenosis exists not uncommonly in older adults with CLBP and management often can be accomplished without surgery. Treatment should address all conditions in addition to LSS contributing to pain and disability. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Short- and Long-Term Management of Uninvestigated Dyspepsia in Primary Care: An Update of the Canadian Dyspepsia Working Group (CanDys Clinical Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander JO Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is an update to and extension of the previous systematic review on the primary care management of patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD. The original publication of the clinical management tool focused on the initial four- to eight-week assessment of UD. This update is based on new data from systematic reviews and clinical trials relevant to UD. There is now direct clinical evidence supporting a test-and-treat approach in patients with nondominant heartburn dyspepsia symptoms, and head-to-head comparisons show that use of a proton pump inhibitor is superior to the use of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs in the initial treatment of Helicobacter pylori-negative dyspepsia patients. Cisapride is no longer available as a treatment option and evidence for other prokinetic agents is lacking. In patients with long-standing heartburn-dominant (ie, gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, a once-in-a-lifetime endoscopy is recommended. Endoscopy should also be considered in patients with new-onset dyspepsia that develops after the age of 50 years. Conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylic acid and cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors can all cause dyspepsia. If their use cannot be discontinued, cotherapy with either a proton pump inhibitor, misoprostol or high-dose H2RAs is recommended, although the evidence is based on ulcer data and not dyspepsia data. In patients with nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, noninvasive testing for H pylori should be performed and treatment given if positive. When starting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a prolonged course, testing and treatment with H2RAs are advised if patients have a history of previous ulcers or ulcer bleeding.

  14. Group recommendation strategies based on collaborative filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo de Melo Queiroz, Sérgio

    2003-01-01

    Ricardo de Melo Queiroz, Sérgio; de Assis Tenório Carvalho, Francisco. Group recommendation strategies based on collaborative filtering. 2003. Dissertação (Mestrado). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência da Computação, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, 2003.

  15. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Gorgels, P.; Rutledge, L.W.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how Semantic Web

  16. Children's sleep needs: is there sufficient evidence to recommend optimal sleep for children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricciani, Lisa; Blunden, Sarah; Rigney, Gabrielle; Williams, Marie T; Olds, Tim S

    2013-04-01

    It is widely recognized that sleep is important for children's health and well-being and that short sleep duration is associated with a wide range of negative health outcomes. Recently, there has been much interest in whether or not there are sufficient data to support the specific recommendations made for how much sleep children need. In this article we explore concepts related to children's sleep need, discuss the theory, rationale, and empirical evidence for contemporary sleep recommendations, and outline future research directions for sleep recommendations. If sleep is to be treated as a therapeutic intervention, then consensus guidelines, statements, and evidence-based best-practice documents are needed to underpin sleep recommendations for children.

  17. Evaluation of community-based oral health promotion and oral disease prevention--WHO recommendations for improved evidence in public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2004-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an integral part of the organisation and delivery of community oral health care programmes, ensuring the effectiveness of these community-based interventions. As for general health promotion programmes the common problems from effectiveness reviews of oral health...... a challenge to oral health professionals to integrate community oral health programmes into a wider health agenda. Public health research focusing on the development of evaluation methodologies has identified a variety of issues including the importance of using pluralistic evaluation approaches (quantitative...... of the evaluation of oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programmes. The aims of the workshop were to: (1) identify common problems and challenges in evaluating community-based oral health interventions; (2) explore developments in the evaluation approaches in public health; (3) share experiences...

  18. IPTV program recommendation based on combination strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new interactive service technology, IPTV has been extensively studying in the field of TV pro-gram recommendation, but the sparse of the user-program rating matrix and the cold-start problem is a bottleneck that the program recommended accurately. In this paper, a flexible combination of two recommendation strategies proposed, which explored the sparse and cold-start problem as well as the issue of user interest change over time. This paper achieved content-based filtering section and collaborative filtering section according to the two combination strategies, which effectively solved the cold-start program and over the sparse problem and the problem of users interest change over time. The experimental results showed that this combinational recommendation system in optimal parameters compared by using any one of two combination strategies or not using any combination strategy at all, and the reducing range of MAE is [2.7%,3%].The increasing range of precision and recall is [13.8%95.5%] and [0,97.8%], respectively. The experiment showed better results when using combinational recommendation system in optimal parameters than using each combination strategies individually or not using any combination strategy.

  19. Comprehensive review of the evidence regarding the effectiveness of community-based primary health care in improving maternal, neonatal and child health: 8. summary and recommendations of the Expert Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Robert E; Taylor, Carl E; Arole, Shobha; Bang, Abhay; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Kirkwood, Betty R; Kureshy, Nazo; Lanata, Claudio F; Phillips, James F; Taylor, Mary; Victora, Cesar G; Zhu, Zonghan; Perry, Henry B

    2017-06-01

    The contributions that community-based primary health care (CBPHC) and engaging with communities as valued partners can make to the improvement of maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) is not widely appreciated. This unfortunate reality is one of the reasons why so few priority countries failed to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. This article provides a summary of a series of articles about the effectiveness of CBPHC in improving MNCH and offers recommendations from an Expert Panel for strengthening CBPHC that were formulated in 2008 and have been updated on the basis of more recent evidence. An Expert Panel convened to guide the review of the effectiveness of community-based primary health care (CBPHC). The Expert Panel met in 2008 in New York City with senior UNICEF staff. In 2016, following the completion of the review, the Panel considered the review's findings and made recommendations. The review consisted of an analysis of 661 unique reports, including 583 peer-reviewed journal articles, 12 books/monographs, 4 book chapters, and 72 reports from the gray literature. The analysis consisted of 700 assessments since 39 were analyzed twice (once for an assessment of improvements in neonatal and/or child health and once for an assessment in maternal health). The Expert Panel recommends that CBPHC should be a priority for strengthening health systems, accelerating progress in achieving universal health coverage, and ending preventable child and maternal deaths. The Panel also recommends that expenditures for CBPHC be monitored against expenditures for primary health care facilities and hospitals and reflect the importance of CBPHC for averting mortality. Governments, government health programs, and NGOs should develop health systems that respect and value communities as full partners and work collaboratively with them in building and strengthening CBPHC programs - through engagement with planning, implementation (including the

  20. Personalized recommendation based on heat bidirectional transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenping; Feng, Xiang; Wang, Shanfeng; Gong, Maoguo

    2016-02-01

    Personalized recommendation has become an increasing popular research topic, which aims to find future likes and interests based on users' past preferences. Traditional recommendation algorithms pay more attention to forecast accuracy by calculating first-order relevance, while ignore the importance of diversity and novelty that provide comfortable experiences for customers. There are some levels of contradictions between these three metrics, so an algorithm based on bidirectional transfer is proposed in this paper to solve this dilemma. In this paper, we agree that an object that is associated with history records or has been purchased by similar users should be introduced to the specified user and recommendation approach based on heat bidirectional transfer is proposed. Compared with the state-of-the-art approaches based on bipartite network, experiments on two benchmark data sets, Movielens and Netflix, demonstrate that our algorithm has better performance on accuracy, diversity and novelty. Moreover, this method does better in exploiting long-tail commodities and cold-start problem.

  1. Evidence and recommendation. Intermitent neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is usefulness for reduction of recurrent nerve palsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis PARDAL-REFOYO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Clinical Question. In a patient with thyroid disease [patient], submitted to thyroidectomy [intervention], the use of neuromonitoring against the single visual identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN [comparison], offers advantages? [result]. Material and Methods: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library data descriptors and search strategy: (((((((laryngeal OR larynx AND nerve AND monitoring AND thyroidectomy AND meta-analysis. 10 items in English or Spanish of which 7 were selected for the qualitative study were obtained. Results: Level of evidence. Evidence for the lower incidence of transient unilateral paralysis in patients with neuromonitoring is moderate-high. Evidence on the lower incidence of permanent unilateral paralysis of RLN with NM is low. Evidence on the lower incidence of bilateral paralysis of RLN with neuromonitoring is low. Conclusions: Recommendation. Concerning the reduction of transient paralysis of the RLN the recommendation of the use of neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is strongly in favor. Regarding permanent paralysis recommendation is weak in favor (no recommendation against. Regarding prevention of bilateral laryngeal paralysis recommendation for weak. The decision to use NM cannot be based on the incidence of RLN paralysis.

  2. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  3. Evidence-based recommendations to facilitate professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As both health practitioners are working within the same communities, their respective practices could complement or undermine the health of consumers using both health services. Professional collaboration between traditional and allopathic health practitioners is therefore desirable and requires collaboration between ...

  4. Contemporary use of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome: insights from Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlén, Anders; Varenhorst, Christoph; Lagerqvist, Bo; Renlund, Henrik; Wallentin, Lars; James, Stefan K; Jernberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The platelet inhibitor ticagrelor is strongly recommended during 12 months post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in European guidelines. We analysed clinical characteristics of patients given ticagrelor for ACS in the real world. We studied the use of ticagrelor in patients admitted for ACS in Sweden between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 who were enrolled in the Swedish Web system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART). Clinical characteristics were investigated for patients prescribed ticagrelor at discharge as well as for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention who were prescribed ticagrelor. Independent factors associated with selecting ticagrelor were analysed in logistic regression. We found that 44.0% (n = 12 601) out of a total of 28 639 patients had been prescribed ticagrelor at discharge. After adjusting for age and sex, prior cardiovascular disease was less common in patients discharged on ticagrelor (myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, and peripheral vascular disease; P for all <0.001). The risk of death as predicted by GRACE score and the risk of major bleeding as predicted by CRUSADE score were both lower in ticagrelor-treated patients vs. others (median 99 vs. 126 and median 23 vs. 25, respectively; P for both < 0.001). The intended treatment duration at discharge was 12 months in 82.5% of patients and <12 months in 9.3%. Ticagrelor is preferentially being used in patients at lower risk. A minority of patients are recommended ticagrelor during <12 months. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alex J; Meader, Nick; Davies, Evan; Clover, Kerrie; Carter, Gregory L; Loscalzo, Matthew J; Linden, Wolfgang; Grassi, Luigi; Johansen, Christoffer; Carlson, Linda E; Zabora, James

    2012-10-01

    To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer settings. We used a standardized rating system. We excluded 11 tools without at least two independent studies, leaving 8 tools for comparison. Across all cancer stages there were 56 diagnostic validity studies (n=10,009). For case-finding, one stem question, two stem questions and the BDI-II all had level 2 evidence (2a, 2b and 2c respectively) and given their better acceptability we gave the stem questions a grade B recommendation. For screening, two stem questions had level 1b evidence (with high acceptability) and the BDI-II had level 2c evidence. For every 100 people screened in advanced cancer, the two questions would accurately detect 18 cases, while missing only 1 and correctly reassure 74 with 7 falsely identified. For every 100 people screened in non-palliative settings the BDI-II would accurately detect 17 cases, missing 2 and correctly re-assure 70, with 11 falsely identified as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... meeting customer needs. We are suggesting that the effects of the use of a system should play a prominent role in the contractual definition of IT projects and that contract fulfilment should be determined on the basis of evidence of these effects. Based on two ongoing studies of home-care management...

  7. Comprehensive review of the evidence regarding the effectiveness of community–based primary health care in improving maternal, neonatal and child health: 8. summary and recommendations of the Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Robert E; Taylor, Carl E; Arole, Shobha; Bang, Abhay; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Kirkwood, Betty R; Kureshy, Nazo; Lanata, Claudio F; Phillips, James F; Taylor, Mary; Victora, Cesar G; Zhu, Zonghan; Perry, Henry B

    2017-01-01

    Background The contributions that community–based primary health care (CBPHC) and engaging with communities as valued partners can make to the improvement of maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) is not widely appreciated. This unfortunate reality is one of the reasons why so few priority countries failed to achieve the health–related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. This article provides a summary of a series of articles about the effectiveness of CBPHC in improving MNCH and offers recommendations from an Expert Panel for strengthening CBPHC that were formulated in 2008 and have been updated on the basis of more recent evidence. Methods An Expert Panel convened to guide the review of the effectiveness of community–based primary health care (CBPHC). The Expert Panel met in 2008 in New York City with senior UNICEF staff. In 2016, following the completion of the review, the Panel considered the review’s findings and made recommendations. The review consisted of an analysis of 661 unique reports, including 583 peer–reviewed journal articles, 12 books/monographs, 4 book chapters, and 72 reports from the gray literature. The analysis consisted of 700 assessments since 39 were analyzed twice (once for an assessment of improvements in neonatal and/or child health and once for an assessment in maternal health). Results The Expert Panel recommends that CBPHC should be a priority for strengthening health systems, accelerating progress in achieving universal health coverage, and ending preventable child and maternal deaths. The Panel also recommends that expenditures for CBPHC be monitored against expenditures for primary health care facilities and hospitals and reflect the importance of CBPHC for averting mortality. Governments, government health programs, and NGOs should develop health systems that respect and value communities as full partners and work collaboratively with them in building and strengthening CBPHC programs – through engagement with

  8. Recommendation based on trust diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recommender system is emerging as a powerful and popular tool for online information relevant to a given user. The traditional recommendation system suffers from the cold start problem and the data sparsity problem. Many methods have been proposed to solve these problems, but few can achieve satisfactory efficiency. In this paper, we present a method which combines the trust diffusion (DiffTrust) algorithm and the probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF). DiffTrust is first used to study the possible diffusions of trust between various users. It is able to make use of the implicit relationship of the trust network, thus alleviating the data sparsity problem. The probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) is then employed to combine the users' tastes with their trusted friends' interests. We evaluate the algorithm on Flixster, Moviedata, and Epinions datasets, respectively. The experimental results show that the recommendation based on our proposed DiffTrust + PMF model achieves high performance in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE), Recall, and F Measure.

  9. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    -makers and the research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for...

  10. Context-aware recommender system based on ontology for recommending tourist destinations at Bandung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaldy Hafid Arigi, L.; Abdurahman Baizal, Z. K.; Herdiani, Anisa

    2018-03-01

    Recommender System is software that is able to provide personalized recommendation suits users’ needs. Recommender System has been widely implemented in various domains, including tourism. One approach that can be done for more personalized recommendations is the use of contextual information. This paper proposes a context aware recommender based ontology system in the tourism domain. The system is capable of recommending tourist destinations by using user preferences of the categories of tourism and contextual information such as user locations, weather around tourist destinations and close time of destination. Based on the evaluation, the system has accuracy of of 0.94 (item recommendation precision evaluated by expert) and 0.58 (implicitly from system-end user interaction). Based on the evaluation of user satisfaction, the system provides a satisfaction level of more than 0.7 (scale 0 to 1) for speed factors for providing liked recommendations (PE), informative description of recommendations (INF) and user trust (TR).

  11. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  12. Recommendations on evidence needed to support measurement equivalence between electronic and paper-based patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures: ISPOR ePRO Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Stephen Joel; Gwaltney, Chad J; Hays, Ron D; Lundy, J Jason; Sloan, Jeff A; Revicki, Dennis A; Lenderking, William R; Cella, David; Basch, Ethan

    2009-06-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are the consequences of disease and/or its treatment as reported by the patient. The importance of PRO measures in clinical trials for new drugs, biological agents, and devices was underscored by the release of the US Food and Drug Administration's draft guidance for industry titled "Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: Use in Medical Product Development to Support Labeling Claims." The intent of the guidance was to describe how the FDA will evaluate the appropriateness and adequacy of PRO measures used as effectiveness end points in clinical trials. In response to the expressed need of ISPOR members for further clarification of several aspects of the draft guidance, ISPOR's Health Science Policy Council created three task forces, one of which was charged with addressing the implications of the draft guidance for the collection of PRO data using electronic data capture modes of administration (ePRO). The objective of this report is to present recommendations from ISPOR's ePRO Good Research Practices Task Force regarding the evidence necessary to support the comparability, or measurement equivalence, of ePROs to the paper-based PRO measures from which they were adapted. The task force was composed of the leadership team of ISPOR's ePRO Working Group and members of another group (i.e., ePRO Consensus Development Working Group) that had already begun to develop recommendations regarding ePRO good research practices. The resulting task force membership reflected a broad array of backgrounds, perspectives, and expertise that enriched the development of this report. The prior work became the starting point for the Task Force report. A subset of the task force members became the writing team that prepared subsequent iterations of the report that were distributed to the full task force for review and feedback. In addition, review beyond the task force was sought and obtained. Along with a presentation and discussion period at an ISPOR meeting

  13. Recommendation System Based on Fuzzy Cognitive Map

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Liu; Linzhi Gao

    2014-01-01

    With the increase of data volume and visitor volume, the website faces great challenge in the environment of network. How to know the users’ requirements rapidly and effectively and recommend the required information to the user becomes the research direction of all websites. The researchers of recommendation system propose a series of recommendation system models and algorithms for the user. The common challenge faced by these algorithms is how to judge the user intention and recommend...

  14. Evidence and consensus recommendations for the pharmacological management of pain in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dureja GP

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gur Prasad Dureja,1 Rajagopalan N Iyer,2 Gautam Das,3 Jaishid Ahdal,4 Prashant Narang4 On behalf of the Pain Working Group 1Delhi Pain Management Centre, New Delhi, Delhi, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Raja Rajeswari Medical College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, 3Daradia Pain Clinic, Kolkata, West Bengal, 4Department of Medical Affairs, Janssen India, Johnson & Johnson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Despite enormous progress in the field of pain management over the recent years, pain continues to be a highly prevalent medical condition worldwide. In the developing countries, pain is often an undertreated and neglected aspect of treatment. Awareness issues and several misconceptions associated with the use of analgesics, fear of adverse events – particularly with opioids and surgical methods of analgesia – are major factors contributing to suboptimal treatment of pain. Untreated pain, as a consequence, is associated with disability, loss of income, unemployment and considerable mortality; besides contributing majorly to the economic burden on the society and the health care system in general. Available guidelines suggest that a strategic treatment approach may be helpful for physicians in managing pain in real-world settings. The aim of this manuscript is to propose treatment recommendations for the management of different types of pain, based on the available evidence. Evidence search was performed by using MEDLINE (by PubMed and Cochrane databases. The types of articles included in this review were based on randomized control studies, case–control or cohort studies, prospective and retrospective studies, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical practice guidelines and evidence-based consensus recommendations. Articles were reviewed by a multidisciplinary expert panel and recommendations were developed. A stepwise treatment algorithm-based approach based on a careful diagnosis and evaluation of the underlying disease

  15. Business Processes Modeling Recommender Systems: User Expectations and Empirical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fellmann

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems are in widespread use in many areas, especially electronic commerce solutions. In this contribution, we apply recommender functionalities to business process modeling and investigate their potential for supporting process modeling. To do so, we have implemented two prototypes, demonstrated them at a major fair and collected user feedback. After analysis of the feedback, we have confronted the findings with the results of the experiment. Our results indicate that fairgoers expect increased modeling speed as the key advantage and completeness of models as the most unlikely advantage. This stands in contrast to an initial experiment revealing that modelers, in fact, increase the completeness of their models when adequate knowledge is presented while time consumption is not necessarily reduced. We explain possible causes of this mismatch and finally hypothesize on two “sweet spots” of process modeling recommender systems.

  16. Recommender system based on scarce information mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Chung, Fu-Lai; Lai, Kunfeng; Zhang, Liang

    2017-09-01

    Guessing what user may like is now a typical interface for video recommendation. Nowadays, the highly popular user generated content sites provide various sources of information such as tags for recommendation tasks. Motivated by a real world online video recommendation problem, this work targets at the long tail phenomena of user behavior and the sparsity of item features. A personalized compound recommendation framework for online video recommendation called Dirichlet mixture probit model for information scarcity (DPIS) is hence proposed. Assuming that each clicking sample is generated from a representation of user preferences, DPIS models the sample level topic proportions as a multinomial item vector, and utilizes topical clustering on the user part for recommendation through a probit classifier. As demonstrated by the real-world application, the proposed DPIS achieves better performance in accuracy, perplexity as well as diversity in coverage than traditional methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Jeffrey; Sutton, Robert I

    2006-01-01

    For the most part, managers looking to cure their organizational ills rely on obsolete knowledge they picked up in school, long-standing but never proven traditions, patterns gleaned from experience, methods they happen to be skilled in applying, and information from vendors. They could learn a thing or two from practitioners of evidence-based medicine, a movement that has taken the medical establishment by storm over the past decade. A growing number of physicians are eschewing the usual, flawed resources and are instead identifying, disseminating, and applying research that is soundly conducted and clinically relevant. It's time for managers to do the same. The challenge is, quite simply, to ground decisions in the latest and best knowledge of what actually works. In some ways, that's more difficult to do in business than in medicine. The evidence is weaker in business; almost anyone can (and many people do) claim to be a management expert; and a motley crew of sources--Shakespeare, Billy Graham,Jack Welch, Attila the Hunare used to generate management advice. Still, it makes sense that when managers act on better logic and strong evidence, their companies will beat the competition. Like medicine, management is learned through practice and experience. Yet managers (like doctors) can practice their craft more effectively if they relentlessly seek new knowledge and insight, from both inside and outside their companies, so they can keep updating their assumptions, skills, and knowledge.

  18. Evidence, explanations, and recommendations for teachers' field trip strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Bryan

    their practices. A subset of eight teachers were interviewed using guided conversations in order to shed further light on their use of the aquarium field trip and their pedagogical preparation. Data from all sources were organized by repeating ideas relevant to the questions of interest. The resulting evidence was interpreted to support distinct categories of teacher strategies and experience and related claims about these strategies and experiences. Thus, findings reveal that teachers attempt to link the curriculum to the activities, resources, and content encountered on the trip using a variety of connections. However, these curriculum connections are characterized as products of opportunistic situations and reveal limited depth. Evidence further indicates that teachers treat the aquarium visit as a background experience for their students rather than as an opportunity to introduce new concepts or do an activity that is integrated into the curriculum. Nevertheless, teachers included in this study were leading field trips that created countless learning opportunities for their students. Because training specific to field trips is rarely included in preservice programs, teachers were asked about influences on their field trip practice with specific focus on observed strategies. Findings suggest four categories of training experiences that teachers apply to their practice: (1) informal mentoring; (2) past experience trip leading; (3) outdoor education training; (4) traditional education training. Overall findings along with a review of previous research are suggestive of many ways in which efforts to enhance students' learning opportunities may be developed by means of support for teachers. Foremost among recommendations is the idea that field trip pedagogy be integrated into science methods courses required for preservice teachers (the premise for the final manuscript). Furthermore, the findings of this study may serve as a starting point for museums interested in the

  19. Therapy Decision Support Based on Recommender System Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräßer, Felix; Beckert, Stefanie; Küster, Denise; Schmitt, Jochen; Abraham, Susanne; Malberg, Hagen; Zaunseder, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We present a system for data-driven therapy decision support based on techniques from the field of recommender systems. Two methods for therapy recommendation, namely, Collaborative Recommender and Demographic-based Recommender , are proposed. Both algorithms aim to predict the individual response to different therapy options using diverse patient data and recommend the therapy which is assumed to provide the best outcome for a specific patient and time, that is, consultation. The proposed methods are evaluated using a clinical database incorporating patients suffering from the autoimmune skin disease psoriasis. The Collaborative Recommender proves to generate both better outcome predictions and recommendation quality. However, due to sparsity in the data, this approach cannot provide recommendations for the entire database. In contrast, the Demographic-based Recommender performs worse on average but covers more consultations. Consequently, both methods profit from a combination into an overall recommender system.

  20. Therapy Decision Support Based on Recommender System Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Gräßer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a system for data-driven therapy decision support based on techniques from the field of recommender systems. Two methods for therapy recommendation, namely, Collaborative Recommender and Demographic-based Recommender, are proposed. Both algorithms aim to predict the individual response to different therapy options using diverse patient data and recommend the therapy which is assumed to provide the best outcome for a specific patient and time, that is, consultation. The proposed methods are evaluated using a clinical database incorporating patients suffering from the autoimmune skin disease psoriasis. The Collaborative Recommender proves to generate both better outcome predictions and recommendation quality. However, due to sparsity in the data, this approach cannot provide recommendations for the entire database. In contrast, the Demographic-based Recommender performs worse on average but covers more consultations. Consequently, both methods profit from a combination into an overall recommender system.

  1. A Classification-based Review Recommender

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Michael P.; Smyth, Barry

    Many online stores encourage their users to submit product/service reviews in order to guide future purchasing decisions. These reviews are often listed alongside product recommendations but, to date, limited attention has been paid as to how best to present these reviews to the end-user. In this paper, we describe a supervised classification approach that is designed to identify and recommend the most helpful product reviews. Using the TripAdvisor service as a case study, we compare the performance of several classification techniques using a range of features derived from hotel reviews. We then describe how these classifiers can be used as the basis for a practical recommender that automatically suggests the mosthelpful contrasting reviews to end-users. We present an empirical evaluation which shows that our approach achieves a statistically significant improvement over alternative review ranking schemes.

  2. Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deshpande, Mukund; Karypis, George

    2003-01-01

    ... items that will be of interest to a certain user. User-based collaborative filtering is the most successful technology for building recommender systems to date, and is extensively used in many commercial recommender systems...

  3. Evaluation of Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karypis, George

    2000-01-01

    ... items that will be of interest to a certain user. User-based Collaborative filtering is the most successful technology for building recommender systems to date, and is extensively used in many commercial recommender systems...

  4. Movie Recommendation System Based on Collaborative Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Kejun, Wang

    2013-01-01

    With the explosively growing of the technologies and services of the Internet, the information data world increases rapidly. Recommendation systems have acted an important role in many ways, including movies, books, friends, shopping on net and music. Especially like today, people are surrounded by mass of information. People try to find their preferred movies. It has become difficult when facing so many kinds of movies. People may dizzied by plenty of items on the net, they don't know how to...

  5. Mobile-Based Recommendation System in Conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández de la Iglesia, Daniel; Moreno García, María N.; Omatu, Sigeru

    2017-01-01

    Today information is a very important asset for organizations. Obtaining and interpreting information in real time can be a major benefit in decision making. For this reason, we have developed a mobile application that uses WiFi access points to locate users who are attending conferences and exhibits. The application can generate a dataset according to the user’s preferences and on-site location, and provide personalized recommendations accordingly.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids and schizophrenia: evidences and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, G; Traversi, G; Nannarelli, C; Mazza, S; Mazza, M

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a brain disease that represents a not rare condition, in fact the lifetime risk of developing schizophrenia is widely accepted to be around 1 in 100. Schizophrenia clinically manifests with acute episodes which are associated with hallucinations, delirium, behavioral disorders and a variable range of chronic persistent symptoms, which can be debilitating. The causes of schizophrenia are not clearly understood. It seems that genetic factors may produce a vulnerability to schizophrenia, along with environmental factors that contribute in a different way from individual to individual. In this context schizophrenia constitutes the outcome of a complex interaction between multiple genes and environmental risk factors, none of which on its own causes the disorder itself. Antipsychotic medications represent the first line of psychiatric treatment for schizophrenia. But there is a growing body of evidence that omega-3 fatty acids can prevent the disease or at least mitigate the course and symptoms. Probably, an appropriate dietary supplementation can play a partially therapeutic effect, even in more severe patients, improving some behavioral aspects and, mainly, reducing the cognitive deterioration. In this context the role of omega-3 fatty acids as a treatment for schizophrenia will strengthen the thrust of researchers and clinicians to the integrated approach to the prevention and cure of a disease that for more than a century challenging researchers.

  7. Improving Tensor Based Recommenders with Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leginus, Martin; Dolog, Peter; Zemaitis, Valdas

    2012-01-01

    Social tagging systems (STS) model three types of entities (i.e. tag-user-item) and relationships between them are encoded into a 3-order tensor. Latent relationships and patterns can be discovered by applying tensor factorization techniques like Higher Order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD),...... of the recommendations and execution time are improved and memory requirements are decreased. The clustering is motivated by the fact that many tags in a tag space are semantically similar thus the tags can be grouped. Finally, promising experimental results are presented...

  8. Physical activity promotion in business and industry: evidence, context, and recommendations for a national plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2009-11-01

    The contemporary workplace setting is in need of interventions that effectively promote higher levels of occupational and habitual physical activity. It is the purpose of this paper to outline an evidence-based approach to promote physical activity in the business and industry sector in support of a National Physical Activity Plan. Comprehensive literature searches identified systematic reviews, comprehensive reviews, and consensus documents on the impact of physical activity interventions in the business and industry sector. A framework for action and priority recommendations for practice and research were generated. Comprehensive, multicomponent work-site programs that include physical activity components generate significant improvements in health, reduce absenteeism and sick leave, and can generate a positive financial return. Specific evidence-based physical activity interventions are presented. Recommendations for practice include implementing comprehensive, multicomponent programs that make physical activity interventions possible, simple, rewarding and relevant in the context of a social-ecological model. The business and industry sector has significant opportunities to improve physical activity among employees, their dependents, and the community at-large and to reap important benefits related to worker health and business performance.

  9. Using research evidence to reframe the policy debate around mental illness and guns: process and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Frattaroli, Shannon; Appelbaum, Paul S; Bonnie, Richard J; Grilley, Anna; Horwitz, Joshua; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Webster, Daniel W

    2014-11-01

    Recent mass shootings have prompted a national dialogue around mental illness and gun policy. To advance an evidence-informed policy agenda on this controversial issue, we formed a consortium of national gun violence prevention and mental health experts. The consortium agreed on a guiding principle for future policy recommendations: restricting firearm access on the basis of certain dangerous behaviors is supported by the evidence; restricting access on the basis of mental illness diagnoses is not. We describe the group's process and recommendations.

  10. Research on personalized recommendation algorithm based on spark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng; Liu, Yu

    2018-04-01

    With the increasing amount of data in the past years, the traditional recommendation algorithm has been unable to meet people's needs. Therefore, how to better recommend their products to users of interest, become the opportunities and challenges of the era of big data development. At present, each platform enterprise has its own recommendation algorithm, but how to make efficient and accurate push information is still an urgent problem for personalized recommendation system. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm based on user collaborative filtering and content-based recommendation algorithm is proposed on Spark to improve the efficiency and accuracy of recommendation by weighted processing. The experiment shows that the recommendation under this scheme is more efficient and accurate.

  11. Creating adaptive web recommendation system based on user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walek, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes adaptive web recommendation system based on user behavior. The proposed system uses expert system to evaluating and recommending suitable items of content. Relevant items are subsequently evaluated and filtered based on history of visited items and user´s preferred categories of items. Main parts of the proposed system are presented and described. The proposed recommendation system is verified on specific example.

  12. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services

  13. A Location-Based Business Information Recommendation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many researches on information (e.g., POI, ADs recommendation based on location have been done in both research and industry. In this paper, we firstly construct a region-based location graph (RLG, in which region node respectively connects with user node and business information node, and then we propose a location-based recommendation algorithm based on RLG, which can combine with user short-ranged mobility formed by daily activity and long-distance mobility formed by social network ties and sequentially can recommend local business information and long-distance business information to users. Moreover, it can combine user-based collaborative filtering with item-based collaborative filtering, and it can alleviate cold start problem which traditional recommender systems often suffer from. Empirical studies from large-scale real-world data from Yelp demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods on the aspect of recommendation accuracy.

  14. Algorithm Research of Individualized Travelling Route Recommendation Based on Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although commercial recommendation system has made certain achievement in travelling route development, the recommendation system is facing a series of challenges because of people’s increasing interest in travelling. It is obvious that the core content of the recommendation system is recommendation algorithm. The advantages of recommendation algorithm can bring great effect to the recommendation system. Based on this, this paper applies traditional collaborative filtering algorithm for analysis. Besides, illustrating the deficiencies of the algorithm, such as the rating unicity and rating matrix sparsity, this paper proposes an improved algorithm combing the multi-similarity algorithm based on user and the element similarity algorithm based on user, so as to compensate for the deficiencies that traditional algorithm has within a controllable range. Experimental results have shown that the improved algorithm has obvious advantages in comparison with the traditional one. The improved algorithm has obvious effect on remedying the rating matrix sparsity and rating unicity.

  15. Music playlist recommendation based on user heartbeat and music preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Hu, J.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new user heartbeat and preference aware music recommendation system. The system can not only recommend a music playlist based on the user’s music preference but also the music playlist is generated based on the user’s heartbeat. If the user’s heartbeat is higher than the

  16. Generic knowledge-based analysis of social media for recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, V.; van de Venis, Anne; van Keulen, Maurice; de By, R.A.; Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems have been around for decades to help people find the best matching item in a pre-defined item set. Knowledge-based recommender systems are used to match users based on information that links the two, but they often focus on a single, specific application, such as movies to watch

  17. Recommendations for a Habitability Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Library Research Center.

    A prototype Habitability Data Base was developed for the United States Army Corps of Engineers. From a review of selected Army documents, standards in the form of goals or architectural criteria were identified as significant to man-environment relations (MER). A search of appropriate information systems was conducted to retrieve a minimum of 500…

  18. Rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment: an overview of recommendations arising from systematic reviews of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, David C; Bowen, Audrey; Chung, Charlie S; Cockburn, Janet; Knapp, Peter; Pollock, Alex

    2015-02-01

    Although cognitive impairments are common following stroke, there is considerable uncertainty about the types of interventions that can reduce activity restrictions and improve quality of life. Indeed, a recent project to identify priorities for research into life after stroke determined that the top priority for patients, carers and health professionals was how to improve cognitive impairments. To provide an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for patients with stroke and to determine the main gaps in the current evidence base. Evidence was synthesised for the six Cochrane reviews relating to rehabilitation for post-stroke cognitive impairment and any subsequently published randomized controlled trials to February 2012. Data arising from 44 trials involving over 1500 patients was identified. Though there was support for the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation for some cognitive impairments, significant gaps were found in the current evidence base. All of the Cochrane reviews identified major limitations within the evidence they identified. There is currently insufficient research evidence, or evidence of insufficient quality, to support clear recommendations for clinical practice. Recommendations are made as to the research required to strengthen the evidence base, and so facilitate the delivery of effective interventions to individuals with cognitive impairment after stroke. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. A LITERATURE SURVEY ON RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM BASED ON SENTIMENTAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Achin Jain; Vanita Jain; Nidhi Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Recommender systems have grown to be a critical research subject after the emergence of the first paper on collaborative filtering in the Nineties. Despite the fact that educational studies on recommender systems, has extended extensively over the last 10 years, there are deficiencies in the complete literature evaluation and classification of that research. Because of this, we reviewed articles on recommender structures, and then classified those based on sentiment analysis. The articles are...

  20. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  1. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Àlex; Wattjes, Mike P; Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    diagnosis in patients with MS. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the implementation of MRI of the brain and spinal cord in the diagnosis of patients who are suspected of having MS. These guidelines are based on an extensive review of the recent literature, as well as on the personal...

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    , and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  3. TDCCREC: AN EFFICIENT AND SCALABLE WEB-BASED RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Latha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Web browsers are provided with complex information space where the volume of information available to them is huge. There comes the Recommender system which effectively recommends web pages that are related to the current webpage, to provide the user with further customized reading material. To enhance the performance of the recommender systems, we include an elegant proposed web based recommendation system; Truth Discovery based Content and Collaborative RECommender (TDCCREC which is capable of addressing scalability. Existing approaches such as Learning automata deals with usage and navigational patterns of users. On the other hand, Weighted Association Rule is applied for recommending web pages by assigning weights to each page in all the transactions. Both of them have their own disadvantages. The websites recommended by the search engines have no guarantee for information correctness and often delivers conflicting information. To solve them, content based filtering and collaborative filtering techniques are introduced for recommending web pages to the active user along with the trustworthiness of the website and confidence of facts which outperforms the existing methods. Our results show how the proposed recommender system performs better in predicting the next request of web users.

  4. Newborn screening for proximal urea cycle disorders: Current evidence supporting recommendations for newborn screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J Lawrence; Brody, Linnea L; Pino, Gisele; Rinaldo, Piero

    2018-04-20

    Current newborn screening (NBS) for urea cycle disorders (UCD) is incomplete as only distal UCDs are included in most NBS programs by measuring elevated amino acid concentrations. NBS for the proximal UCDs involves the detection in NBS spots of low citrulline values, a finding which is often overlooked because it is considered to be inadequate. We retrospectively analyzed NBS blood spots from known UCD patients comparing the utility of the Region 4 Stork (R4S) interpretive tools to conventional cutoff based interpretation. This study shows the utility of R4S tools in detecting all UCDs, and provides evidence to support the nomination to add proximal UCDs to the recommended uniform screening panel. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Semantic content-based recommendations using semantic graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weisen; Kraines, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems (RSs) can be useful for suggesting items that might be of interest to specific users. Most existing content-based recommendation (CBR) systems are designed to recommend items based on text content, and the items in these systems are usually described with keywords. However, similarity evaluations based on keywords suffer from the ambiguity of natural languages. We present a semantic CBR method that uses Semantic Web technologies to recommend items that are more similar semantically with the items that the user prefers. We use semantic graphs to represent the items and we calculate the similarity scores for each pair of semantic graphs using an inverse graph frequency algorithm. The items having higher similarity scores to the items that are known to be preferred by the user are recommended.

  6. Diffusion-based recommendation with trust relations on tripartite graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximeng; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Guangquan; Xiong, Fei; Lu, Jie

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion-based recommendation approach is a vital branch in recommender systems, which successfully applies physical dynamics to make recommendations for users on bipartite or tripartite graphs. Trust links indicate users’ social relations and can provide the benefit of reducing data sparsity. However, traditional diffusion-based algorithms only consider rating links when making recommendations. In this paper, the complementarity of users’ implicit and explicit trust is exploited, and a novel resource-allocation strategy is proposed, which integrates these two kinds of trust relations on tripartite graphs. Through empirical studies on three benchmark datasets, our proposed method obtains better performance than most of the benchmark algorithms in terms of accuracy, diversity and novelty. According to the experimental results, our method is an effective and reasonable way to integrate additional features into the diffusion-based recommendation approach.

  7. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommendations through Homomorphic Encryption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Erkin, Zekeriya; Beye, M.; Veugen, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in ecommerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  8. Privacy-Preserving Content-Based Recommender System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    By offering personalized content to users, recommender systems have become a vital tool in e-commerce and online media applications. Content-based algorithms recommend items or products to users, that are most similar to those previously purchased or consumed. Unfortunately, collecting and storing

  9. Personalized Recommendations Based on Users' Information-Centered Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    The overwhelming amount of information available today makes it difficult for users to find useful information and as the solution to this information glut problem, recommendation technologies emerged. Among the several streams of related research, one important evolution in technology is to generate recommendations based on users' own social…

  10. Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: A Comprehensive Update of Evidence and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Russell, Cayley; Sabioni, Pamela; van den Brink, Wim; Le Foll, Bernard; Hall, Wayne; Rehm, Jürgen; Room, Robin

    2017-08-01

    Cannabis use is common in North America, especially among young people, and is associated with a risk of various acute and chronic adverse health outcomes. Cannabis control regimes are evolving, for example toward a national legalization policy in Canada, with the aim to improve public health, and thus require evidence-based interventions. As cannabis-related health outcomes may be influenced by behaviors that are modifiable by the user, evidence-based Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines (LRCUG)-akin to similar guidelines in other health fields-offer a valuable, targeted prevention tool to improve public health outcomes. To systematically review, update, and quality-grade evidence on behavioral factors determining adverse health outcomes from cannabis that may be modifiable by the user, and translate this evidence into revised LRCUG as a public health intervention tool based on an expert consensus process. We used pertinent medical search terms and structured search strategies, to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library databases, and reference lists primarily for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and additional evidence on modifiable risk factors for adverse health outcomes from cannabis use. We included studies if they focused on potentially modifiable behavior-based factors for risks or harms for health from cannabis use, and excluded studies if cannabis use was assessed for therapeutic purposes. We screened the titles and abstracts of all studies identified by the search strategy and assessed the full texts of all potentially eligible studies for inclusion; 2 of the authors independently extracted the data of all studies included in this review. We created Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses flow-charts for each of the topical searches. Subsequently, we summarized the evidence by behavioral factor topic, quality-graded it by following standard (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation; GRADE

  11. Challenges to decision-making processes in the national HTA agency in Brazil: operational procedures, evidence use and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuba, Tania Yuka; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; de Soárez, Patrícia Coelho

    2018-05-11

    The quality of the evidence used in health technology assessment (HTA) agency reports has been considered essential for decision-making processes and their legitimacy. In Brazil, CONITEC is the agency responsible for defining data mandatory for the submission of proposals for the incorporation of new technologies. The objective of this study was to analyse CONITEC recommendation reports, the type of scientific evidence used in them and their compliance with operational procedures. This is a descriptive study based on CONITEC official reports from July 2012 through December 2016. Data were collected with a specific extraction form and analysed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 199 CONITEC recommendation reports. The annual number of reports increased during the study period. The absolute annual number of new technologies incorporated in 2013 (n = 24) was similar to that observed for 2014 (n = 24) and 2015 (n = 22), decreasing in 2016 (n = 13). The type of technology most frequently evaluated was 'drugs' (68.3%), followed by 'procedures' (20.1%). Overall, 117 (58.8%) reports were internal demands, 75 (37.7%) were external demands and 7 (3.5%) were mixed demands. There were differences between internal and external demands in terms of the evidence used in the reports and the decision regarding the recommendation to incorporate the technologies. Among the internal demands, the recommendation to incorporate the new technology was made for 70.9% of the reports, only 9.6% of which included full HTAs. Among the external demands, the incorporation of the new technology was recommended for 17.3% of the reports, 76.9% of which included full HTAs. Of the 101 reports in which incorporation of the new technology was recommended, 88 (87.1%) did not include a full health economic evaluation and ICER calculation. There are compliance difficulties with the recommendations in the CONITEC internal regulations regarding the type and quality of evidence

  12. Evidence-based cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Khorasani, Ramin [Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients.

  13. Swarm-based Sequencing Recommendations in E-learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, Bert; Tattersall, Colin; Janssen, José; Brouns, Francis; Kurvers, Hub; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Van den Berg, B., Tattersall, C., Janssen, J., Brouns, F., Kurvers, H., & Koper, R. (2006). Swarm-based Sequencing Recommendations in E-learning. International Journal of Computer Science & Applications, III(III), 1-11.

  14. Extending a Hybrid Tag-Based Recommender System with Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    extension for a hybrid tag-based recommender system, which suggests similar Web pages based on the similarity of their tags. The semantic extension aims at discovering tag relations which are not considered in basic syntax similarity. With the goal of generating more semantically grounded recommendations......, the proposal extends a hybrid tag-based recommender system with a semantic factor, which looks for tag relations in different semantic sources. In order to evaluate the benefits acquired with the semantic extension, we have compared the new findings with results from a previous experiment involving 38 people......Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. This paper proposes a semantic...

  15. Improved Recommendations Based on Trust Relationships in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the pressure of information overload and enhance consumer satisfaction, personalization recommendation has become increasingly popular in recent years. As a result, various approaches for recommendation have been proposed in the past few years. However, traditional recommendation methods are still troubled with typical issues such as cold start, sparsity, and low accuracy. To address these problems, this paper proposed an improved recommendation method based on trust relationships in social networks to improve the performance of recommendations. In particular, we define trust relationship afresh and consider several representative factors in the formalization of trust relationships. To verify the proposed approach comprehensively, this paper conducted experiments in three ways. The experimental results show that our proposed approach leads to a substantial increase in prediction accuracy and is very helpful in dealing with cold start and sparsity.

  16. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  17. Inside guidelines: comparative analysis of recommendations and evidence in diabetes guidelines from 13 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Jako S.; Bailey, Julia V.; Klazinga, Niek S.; van der Bij, Akke K.; Grol, Richard; Feder, Gene

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare guidelines on diabetes from different countries in order to examine whether differences in recommendations could be explained by use of different research evidence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed 15 clinical guidelines on type 2 diabetes from 13 countries using

  18. Human resource recommendation algorithm based on ensemble learning and Spark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Zihan; Zhang, Xingming; Wang, Haoxiang; Xu, Hongjie

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the problem of “information overload” in the human resources industry, this paper proposes a human resource recommendation algorithm based on Ensemble Learning. The algorithm considers the characteristics and behaviours of both job seeker and job features in the real business circumstance. Firstly, the algorithm uses two ensemble learning methods-Bagging and Boosting. The outputs from both learning methods are then merged to form user interest model. Based on user interest model, job recommendation can be extracted for users. The algorithm is implemented as a parallelized recommendation system on Spark. A set of experiments have been done and analysed. The proposed algorithm achieves significant improvement in accuracy, recall rate and coverage, compared with recommendation algorithms such as UserCF and ItemCF.

  19. Evidence-based policymaking: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nortje

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of facilitating the uptake of evidence, for example, scientific research findings, into the policymaking process is multifaceted and thus complex. It is therefore important for scientists to understand this process in order to influence it more effectively. Similarly, policymakers need to understand the complexities of the scientific process to improve their interaction with the scientific sphere. This literature review addresses those factors that influence the uptake of scientific evidence into policymaking, the barriers to using science in policymaking, as well as recommendations for improved science–policymaking interaction. A visual diagram of the gears of a car is used to convey the message of the complexities around the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised.

  20. Vote Stuffing Control in IPTV-based Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Rajen

    Vote stuffing is a general problem in the functioning of the content rating-based recommender systems. Currently IPTV viewers browse various contents based on the program ratings. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy clustering-based approach to remove the effects of vote stuffing and consider only the genuine ratings for the programs over multiple genres. The approach requires only one authentic rating, which is generally available from recommendation system administrators or program broadcasters. The entire process is automated using fuzzy c-means clustering. Computational experiments performed over one real-world program rating database shows that the proposed approach is very efficient for controlling vote stuffing.

  1. Healthy food procurement and nutrition standards in public facilities: evidence synthesis and consensus policy recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D. Raine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unhealthy foods are widely available in public settings across Canada, contributing to diet-related chronic diseases, such as obesity. This is a concern given that public facilities often provide a significant amount of food for consumption by vulnerable groups, including children and seniors. Healthy food procurement policies, which support procuring, distributing, selling, and/or serving healthier foods, have recently emerged as a promising strategy to counter this public health issue by increasing access to healthier foods. Although numerous Canadian health and scientific organizations have recommended such policies, they have not yet been broadly implemented in Canada. Methods: To inform further policy action on healthy food procurement in a Canadian context, we: (1 conducted an evidence synthesis to assess the impact of healthy food procurement policies on health outcomes and sales, intake, and availability of healthier food, and (2 hosted a consensus conference in September 2014. The consensus conference invited experts with public health/nutrition policy research expertise, as well as health services and food services practitioner experience, to review evidence, share experiences, and develop a consensus statement/recommendations on healthy food procurement in Canada. Results: Findings from the evidence synthesis and consensus recommendations for healthy food procurement in Canada are described. Specifically, we outline recommendations for governments, publicly funded institutions, decision-makers and professionals, citizens, and researchers. Conclusion: Implementation of healthy food procurement policies can increase Canadians’ access to healthier foods as part of a broader vision for food policy in Canada.

  2. Healthy food procurement and nutrition standards in public facilities: evidence synthesis and consensus policy recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim D., Raine; Kayla, Atkey; Dana Lee, Dana Lee; Alexa R., Ferdinands; Dominique, Beaulieu; Susan, Buhler; Norm, Campbell; Brian, Cook; Mary, L’Abbé; Ashley, Lederer; David, Mowat; Joshna, Maharaj; Candace, Nykiforuk; Jacob, Shelley; Jacqueline, Street

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Unhealthy foods are widely available in public settings across Canada, contributing to diet-related chronic diseases, such as obesity. This is a concern given that public facilities often provide a significant amount of food for consumption by vulnerable groups, including children and seniors. Healthy food procurement policies, which support procuring, distributing, selling, and/or serving healthier foods, have recently emerged as a promising strategy to counter this public health issue by increasing access to healthier foods. Although numerous Canadian health and scientific organizations have recommended such policies, they have not yet been broadly implemented in Canada. Methods: To inform further policy action on healthy food procurement in a Canadian context, we: (1) conducted an evidence synthesis to assess the impact of healthy food procurement policies on health outcomes and sales, intake, and availability of healthier food, and (2) hosted a consensus conference in September 2014. The consensus conference invited experts with public health/nutrition policy research expertise, as well as health services and food services practitioner experience, to review evidence, share experiences, and develop a consensus statement/recommendations on healthy food procurement in Canada. Results: Findings from the evidence synthesis and consensus recommendations for healthy food procurement in Canada are described. Specifically, we outline recommendations for governments, publicly funded institutions, decision-makers and professionals, citizens, and researchers. Conclusion: Implementation of healthy food procurement policies can increase Canadians’ access to healthier foods as part of a broader vision for food policy in Canada. PMID:29323862

  3. Grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations in clinical practice guidelines part 3 of 3. The GRADE approach to developing recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brożek, J. L.; Akl, E. A.; Compalati, E.; Kreis, J.; Terracciano, L.; Fiocchi, A.; Ueffing, E.; Andrews, J.; Alonso-Coello, P.; Meerpohl, J. J.; Lang, D. M.; Jaeschke, R.; Williams, J. W.; Phillips, B.; Lethaby, A.; Bossuyt, P.; Glasziou, P.; Helfand, M.; Watine, J.; Afilalo, M.; Welch, V.; Montedori, A.; Abraha, I.; Horvath, A. R.; Bousquet, J.; Guyatt, G. H.; Schünemann, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    This is the third and last article in the series about the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to grading the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations in clinical practice guidelines and its application in the field of allergy. We

  4. An incentive-based architecture for social recommendations

    KAUST Repository

    Bhattacharjee, Rajat; Goel, Ashish; Kollias, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    We present an incentive-based architecture for providing recommendations in a social network. We maintain a distinct reputation system for each individual and we rely on users to identify appropriate correlations and rate the items using a system-provided recommendation language. The key idea is to design an incentive structure and a ranking system such that any inaccuracy in the recommendations implies the existence of a profitable arbitrage opportunity, hence making the system resistant to malicious spam and presentation bias. We also show that, under mild assumptions, our architecture provides users with incentive to minimize the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the ratings and the actual item qualities, quickly driving the system to an equilibrium state with accurate recommendations. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  5. Group Recommendation Systems Based on External Social-Trust Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Fang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of social networks and online mobile communities, group recommendation systems support users’ interaction with similar interests or purposes with others. We often provide some advices to the close friends, such as listening to favorite music and sharing favorite dishes. However, users’ personalities have been ignored by the traditional group recommendation systems while the majority is satisfied. In this paper, a method of group recommendation based on external social-trust networks is proposed, which builds a group profile by analyzing not only users’ preferences, but also the social relationships between members inside and outside of the group. We employ the users’ degree of disagreement to adjust group preference rating by external information of social-trust network. Moreover, having a discussion about different social network utilization ratio, we proposed a method to work for smaller group size. The experimental results show that the proposed method has consistently higher precision and leads to satisfactory recommendations for groups.

  6. Preventive dentistry: practitioners' recommendations for low-risk patients compared with scientific evidence and practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, P S; Sawai, R; Bowen, W H; Meyerowitz, C

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare published evidence supporting procedures to prevent dental caries and periodontal disease, in low-risk patients, with the actual preventive recommendations of practicing dentists. Methods included (1) a survey questionnaire of general dentists practicing in western New York State concerning the preventive procedures they would recommend and at what intervals for low-risk children, young adults, and older adults; and (2) review of the published, English-language literature for evidence supporting preventive dental interventions. The majority of dentists surveyed recommended semiannual visits for visual examination and probing to detect caries (73% to 79%), and scaling and polishing to prevent periodontal disease (83% to 86%) for low-risk patients of all ages. Bite-wing radiographs were recommended for all age groups at annual or semiannual intervals. In-office fluoride applications were recommended for low-risk children at intervals of 6 to 12 months by 73% of dentists but were recommended for low-risk older persons by only 22% of dentists. Application of sealants to prevent pit and fissure caries was recommended for low-risk children by 22% of dentists. Literature review found no studies comparing different frequencies of dental examinations and bite-wing radiographs to determine the optimal screening interval in low-risk patients. Two studies of the effect of scaling and polishing on the prevention of periodontal disease found no benefit from more frequent than annual treatments. Although fluoride is clearly a major reason for the decline in the prevalence of dental caries, there are no studies of the incremental benefit of in-office fluoride treatments for low-risk patients exposed to fluoridated water and using fluoridated toothpaste. Comparative studies using outcome end points are needed to determine the optimal frequency of dental examinations and bite-wing radiographs for the early detection of caries, and of scaling

  7. Evidence-based playground design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refshauge, Anne Dahl; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Lamm, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    , best practice, and the theories of Affordances and Behaviour Settings. A post-occupancy evaluation was carried out through a questionnaire survey and observation studies, which revealed that a majority of the potential evidence-based affordances were actualised, and that the application of the theories...

  8. Evidence-Based IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based IT development aims at developing a new commercial contract model for IT projects where the cus-tomers payment is dependent on measurable effects of using the vendors system. The idea is to establish a strategic part-nership in which customer and IT vendor share the responsi-bility...

  9. Anatomy of an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, David B.; Taymans, Juliana M.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) research evidence base on the effectiveness of replicable education interventions. Most interventions were found to have little or no support from technically adequate research studies, and intervention effect sizes were of questionable magnitude to meet education policy goals. These…

  10. Evidence-Based Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), and as is true in most health care professions, the primary focus of EBPP has been on treatment. Comparatively little attention has been devoted to applying the principles of EBPP to psychological assessment, despite the fact that assessment plays a central role in myriad domains of empirical and applied psychology (e.g., research, forensics, behavioral health, risk management, diagnosis and classification in mental health settings, documentation of neuropsychological impairment and recovery, personnel selection and placement in organizational contexts). This article outlines the central elements of evidence-based psychological assessment (EBPA), using the American Psychological Association's tripartite definition of EBPP as integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences. After discussing strategies for conceptualizing and operationalizing evidence-based testing and evidence-based assessment, 6 core skills and 3 meta-skills that underlie proficiency in psychological assessment are described. The integration of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences is discussed in terms of the complex interaction of patient and assessor identities and values throughout the assessment process. A preliminary framework for implementing EBPA is offered, and avenues for continued refinement and growth are described.

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    was considered through literature searches combined with personal files. Treatments should generally not be chosen based only on evidence from observational studies or single randomised clinical trials. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis of all identifiable randomised clinical trials with Grading...

  12. Recommendations for improving the quality of reporting clinical electrochemotherapy studies based on qualitative systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campana, LG; Clover, AJ; Valpione, S

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is becoming a well-established treatment for malignancies of skin and non-skin origin and its use is widening across Europe. The technique was developed and optimized from solid experimental and clinical evidence. A consensus document is now warranted to formalize reporting re...... studies and to provide the recommendations for reporting clinical trials on electrochemotherapy....... results, which should strengthen evidence-based practice recommendations. This consensus should be derived from high quality clinical data collection, clinical expertise and summarizing patient feedback. The first step, which is addressed in this paper, aims to critically analyze the quality of published...

  13. Recruitment recommendation system based on fuzzy measure and indeterminate integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Song, Jinjie

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we propose a comprehensive evaluation approach based on indeterminate integral. By introducing the related concepts of indeterminate integral and their formulas into the recruitment recommendation system, we can calculate the suitability of each job for different applicants with the defined importance for each criterion listed in the job advertisements, the association between different criteria and subjective assessment as the prerequisite. Thus we can make recommendations to the applicants based on the score of the suitability of each job from high to low. In the end, we will exemplify the usefulness and practicality of this system with samples.

  14. Improved personalized recommendation based on a similarity network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ximeng; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Fei

    2016-08-01

    A recommender system helps individual users find the preferred items rapidly and has attracted extensive attention in recent years. Many successful recommendation algorithms are designed on bipartite networks, such as network-based inference or heat conduction. However, most of these algorithms define the resource-allocation methods for an average allocation. That is not reasonable because average allocation cannot indicate the user choice preference and the influence between users which leads to a series of non-personalized recommendation results. We propose a personalized recommendation approach that combines the similarity function and bipartite network to generate a similarity network that improves the resource-allocation process. Our model introduces user influence into the recommender system and states that the user influence can make the resource-allocation process more reasonable. We use four different metrics to evaluate our algorithms for three benchmark data sets. Experimental results show that the improved recommendation on a similarity network can obtain better accuracy and diversity than some competing approaches.

  15. Are chartists artists? The determinants and profitability of recommendations based on technical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Dirk F.

    2016-01-01

    The value of technical analysis (TA) has been debated for decades; however, limited evidence exists on the profitability of investment recommendations issued by technical analysts. These ‘chartists’ sometimes claim that TA is an art rather than a science. We evaluated > 5000 TA-based buy and sell

  16. A Personalized Tag-Based Recommendation in Social Web Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    -based recommender system which suggests similar Web pages based on the similarity of their tags from a Web 2.0 tagging application. The proposed approach extends the basic similarity calculus with external factors such as tag popularity, tag representativeness and the affinity between user and tag. In order...... to study and evaluate the recommender system, we have conducted an experiment involving 38 people from 12 countries using data from Del.icio.us , a social bookmarking web system on which users can share their personal bookmarks......Tagging activity has been recently identified as a potential source of knowledge about personal interests, preferences, goals, and other attributes known from user models. Tags themselves can be therefore used for finding personalized recommendations of items. In this paper, we present a tag...

  17. A Knowledge Based Recommender System with Multigranular Linguistic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martinez

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems are applications that have emerged in the e-commerce area in order to assist users in their searches in electronic shops. These shops usually offer a wide range of items that cover the necessities of a great variety of users. Nevertheless, searching in such a wide range of items could be a very difficult and time-consuming task. Recommender systems assist users to find out suitable items by means of recommendations based on information provided by different sources such as: other users, experts, item features, etc. Most of the recommender systems force users to provide their preferences or necessities using an unique numerical scale of information fixed in advance. In spite of this information is usually related to opinions, tastes and perceptions, therefore, it seems that is usually better expressed in a qualitative way, with linguistic terms, than in a quantitative way, with precise numbers. We propose a Knowledge Based Recommender System that uses the fuzzy linguistic approach to define a flexible framework to capture the uncertainty of the user's preferences. Thus, this framework will allow users to express their necessities in scales closer to their own knowledge, and different from the scale utilized to describe the items.

  18. Recommender systems for location-based social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis; Manolopoulos, Yannis

    2014-01-01

    Online social networks collect information from users' social contacts and their daily interactions (co-tagging of photos, co-rating of products etc.) to provide them with recommendations of new products or friends. Lately, technological progressions in mobile devices (i.e. smart phones) enabled the incorporation of geo-location data in the traditional web-based online social networks, bringing the new era of Social and Mobile Web. The goal of this book is to bring together important research in a new family of recommender systems aimed at serving Location-based Social Networks (LBSNs). The chapters introduce a wide variety of recent approaches, from the most basic to the state-of-the-art, for providing recommendations in LBSNs. The book is organized into three parts. Part 1 provides introductory material on recommender systems, online social networks and LBSNs. Part 2 presents a wide variety of recommendation algorithms, ranging from basic to cutting edge, as well as a comparison of the characteristics of t...

  19. Children's Sleep Needs: Is There Sufficient Evidence to Recommend Optimal Sleep for Children?

    OpenAIRE

    Matricciani, Lisa; Blunden, Sarah; Rigney, Gabrielle; Williams, Marie T.; Olds, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely recognized that sleep is important for children's health and well-being and that short sleep duration is associated with a wide range of negative health outcomes. Recently, there has been much interest in whether or not there are sufficient data to support the specific recommendations made for how much sleep children need. In this article we explore concepts related to children's sleep need, discuss the theory, rationale, and empirical evidence for contemporary sleep recommendati...

  20. A Knowledge-based Recommendation Framework using SVN Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roddy Cabezas Padilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge based recommender systems, despite proven useful and having a high impact, persist with some shortcomings. Among its limitations are the lack of more flexible models and the inclusion of indeterminacy of the factors involved for computing a global similarity.

  1. Efficient privacy-enhanced familiarity-based recommender system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeckmans, Arjan; Peter, Andreas; Hartel, Pieter H.

    Recommender systems can help users to find interesting content, often based on similarity with other users. However, studies have shown that in some cases familiarity gives comparable results to similarity. Using familiarity has the added bonus of increasing privacy between users and utilizing a

  2. Similarity-based recommendation of new concepts to a terminology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandar, Praveen; Yaman, Anil; Hoxha, Julia; He, Zhe; Weng, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Terminologies can suffer from poor concept coverage due to delays in addition of new concepts. This study tests a similarity-based approach to recommending concepts from a text corpus to a terminology. Our approach involves extraction of candidate concepts from a given text corpus, which are

  3. IMPLEMENTING HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT-BASED RECOMMENDATIONS IN FINLAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sihvo, Sinikka; Ikonen, Tuija; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The Managed Uptake of Medical Methods Program (MUMM) started 10 years ago as a joint venture of the Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment (Finohta) and the twenty hospital districts in Finland. The aim is to offer information on the effectiveness, safety, organizational...... in decision making. Conclusions: HTA-based MUMM recommendations were well received by physicians but in practice they are less used than clinical practice guidelines. Short-form electronic surveys were a useful way of gathering information about awareness and implementation. The surveys also functioned...... as another method of informing key physicians about the recommendations....

  4. Quality Dimensions, Value, Service Cost and Recommendation Behaviour: Evidence from the Nigerian Cellular Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolaji Joachim Abiodun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study proposed and test a model that connects both affective and cognitive factors in cellular service to customers’ recommendation behavior. Results of the analysis of data collected through questionnaire from 293 respondents with cellular phones and active account in the Nigerian cellular industry indicate that core cellular service dimensions, service cost (price and hedonic values are significant determinants of customers’ recommendation behavior. In addition, the study found that customer service and utilitarian value exert negative effect on recommendation behavior. It seems that strengthening the performance of service providers on core service attributes, service cost (price and the entertainment and emotion evoking aspects of cellular service is of more value in partnering with customer to enlarge customer base through recommendation

  5. Process evaluations in neurological rehabilitation: a mixed-evidence systematic review and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson-Algar, Patricia; Burton, Christopher R; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-11-08

    To systematically review how process evaluations are currently designed, what methodologies are used and how are they developed alongside or within neurological rehabilitation trials. This mixed-methods systematic review had two evidence streams: stream I, studies reporting process evaluations alongside neurorehabilitation trials research and stream II, methodological guidance on process evaluation design and methodology. A search strategy was designed for each evidence stream. Data regarding process evaluation core concepts and design issues were extracted using a bespoke template. Evidence from both streams was analysed separately and then synthesised in a final overarching synthesis proposing a number of recommendations for future research. A total of 124 process evaluation studies, reporting on 106 interventions, were included in stream I evidence. 30 studies were included as stream II evidence. Synthesis 1 produced 9 themes, and synthesis 2 identified a total of 8 recommendations for process evaluation research. The overall synthesis resulted in 57 'synthesis recommendations' about process evaluation methodology grouped into 9 research areas, including the use of theory, the investigation of context, intervention staff characteristics and the delivery of the trial intervention. There remains no consensus regarding process evaluation terminology within the neurological rehabilitation field. There is a need for process evaluations to address the nature and influence of context over time. Process evaluations should clearly describe what intervention staff bring to a trial, including skills and experience prior to joining the research. Process evaluations should monitor intervention staff's learning effects and the possible impact that these may have on trial outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. A Study on Recommendation Systems in Location Based Social Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart devices in the hands of people are revolutionizing the social lifestyle of one's self. Everyone across the world are using smart devices linked to their social networking activities one such activity is to share location data by uploading the tagged media content like photos, videos. The data is of surroundings, events attended/attending and travel experiences. Users share their experiences at a given location through localization techniques. Using such data from social networks an attempt is made to analyse tagged media content to acquire information on user context, individual’s interests, tastes, behaviours and derive meaningful relationships amongst them are referred to as Location Based Social Networks (LBSNs. The resulting information can be used to market a product and to improve business, as well recommend a travel and plan an itinerary. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of recommended systems for LBSNs covering the concepts of LBSNs, terminologies of LBSN and various recommendation systems.

  7. Intelligent Online Store: User Behavior Analysis based Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Karimi Alavije

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems provide personalised recommendations to users, helping them find their ideal items, also play a key role in encouraging users to make their purchases through websites thus leading to the success of online stores. The collaborative filtering method is one of the most successful techniques utilized in these systems facilitating the provision of recommendations close to that of the customer's taste and need. However the proliferation of both customers and products on offer, the technique faces some issues such as "cold start" and scalability. As such in this paper a new method has been introduced in which user-based collaborative filtering is used at a base method along with a weighted clustering of users based upon demographics in order to improve the results obtained from the system. The implementation of the results of the algorithms demonstrate that the presented approach has a lower RMSE, which means that the system offers improved performance and accuracy and that the resulting recommendations are closer to the taste and preferences of the users.

  8. Hybrid attacks on model-based social recommender systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junliang; Gao, Min; Rong, Wenge; Li, Wentao; Xiong, Qingyu; Wen, Junhao

    2017-10-01

    With the growing popularity of the online social platform, the social network based approaches to recommendation emerged. However, because of the open nature of rating systems and social networks, the social recommender systems are susceptible to malicious attacks. In this paper, we present a certain novel attack, which inherits characteristics of the rating attack and the relation attack, and term it hybrid attack. Furtherly, we explore the impact of the hybrid attack on model-based social recommender systems in multiple aspects. The experimental results show that, the hybrid attack is more destructive than the rating attack in most cases. In addition, users and items with fewer ratings will be influenced more when attacked. Last but not the least, the findings suggest that spammers do not depend on the feedback links from normal users to become more powerful, the unilateral links can make the hybrid attack effective enough. Since unilateral links are much cheaper, the hybrid attack will be a great threat to model-based social recommender systems.

  9. FERTILIZER RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM FOR MELON BASED ON NUTRITIONAL BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aridiano Lima de Deus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Melon is one of the most demanding cucurbits regarding fertilization, requiring knowledge of soils, crop nutritional requirements, time of application, and nutrient use efficiency for proper fertilization. Developing support systems for decision-making for fertilization that considers these variables in nutrient requirement and supply is necessary. The objective of this study was parameterization of a fertilizer recommendation system for melon (Ferticalc-melon based on nutritional balance. To estimate fertilizer recommendation, the system considers the requirement subsystem (REQ, which includes the demand for nutrients by the plant, and the supply subsystem (SUP, which corresponds to the supply of nutrients through the soil and irrigation water. After determining the REQtotal and SUPtotal, the system calculates the nutrient balances for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S, recommending fertilizer application if the balance is negative (SUP < REQ, but not if the balance is positive or zero (SUP ≥ REQ. Simulations were made for different melon types (Yellow, Cantaloupe, Galia and Piel-de-sapo, with expected yield of 45 t ha-1. The system estimated that Galia type was the least demanding in P, while Piel-de-sapo was the most demanding. Cantaloupe was the least demanding for N and Ca, while the Yellow type required less K, Mg, and S. As compared to other fertilizer recommendation methods adopted in Brazil, the Ferticalc system was more dynamic and flexible. Although the system has shown satisfactory results, it needs to be evaluated under field conditions to improve its recommendations.

  10. Protection of Location Privacy Based on Distributed Collaborative Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Pei

    2016-01-01

    In the existing centralized location services system structure, the server is easily attracted and be the communication bottleneck. It caused the disclosure of users' location. For this, we presented a new distributed collaborative recommendation strategy that is based on the distributed system. In this strategy, each node establishes profiles of their own location information. When requests for location services appear, the user can obtain the corresponding location services according to the recommendation of the neighboring users' location information profiles. If no suitable recommended location service results are obtained, then the user can send a service request to the server according to the construction of a k-anonymous data set with a centroid position of the neighbors. In this strategy, we designed a new model of distributed collaborative recommendation location service based on the users' location information profiles and used generalization and encryption to ensure the safety of the user's location information privacy. Finally, we used the real location data set to make theoretical and experimental analysis. And the results show that the strategy proposed in this paper is capable of reducing the frequency of access to the location server, providing better location services and protecting better the user's location privacy.

  11. Partition-based Collaborative Tensor Factorization for POI Recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjing Luan; Guanjun Liu; Changjun Jiang; Liang Qi

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of location-based social networks (LBSNs) provides people with an opportunity of better understanding their mobility behavior which enables them to decide their next location.For example,it can help travelers to choose where to go next,or recommend salesmen the most potential places to deliver advertisements or sell products.In this paper,a method for recommending points of interest (POIs) is proposed based on a collaborative tensor factorization (CTF) technique.Firstly,a generalized objective function is constructed for collaboratively factorizing a tensor with several feature matrices.Secondly,a 3-mode tensor is used to model all users' check-in behaviors,and three feature matrices are extracted to characterize the time distribution,category distribution and POI correlation,respectively.Thirdly,each user's preference to a POI at a specific time can be estimated by using CTF.In order to further improve the recommendation accuracy,PCTF (Partitionbased CTF) is proposed to fill the missing entries of a tensor after clustering its every mode.Experiments on a real checkin database show that the proposed method can provide more accurate location recommendation.

  12. Evidence-based librarianship: searching for the needed EBL evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges of finding evidence needed to implement Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL). Focusing first on database coverage for three health sciences librarianship journals, the article examines the information contents of different databases. Strategies are needed to search for relevant evidence in the library literature via these databases, and the problems associated with searching the grey literature of librarianship. Database coverage, plausible search strategies, and the grey literature of library science all pose challenges to finding the needed research evidence for practicing EBL. Health sciences librarians need to ensure that systems are designed that can track and provide access to needed research evidence to support Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL).

  13. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix 1. The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhys Williams, William Herman, Ann-Louise Kinmonth...

  14. Strong Public Health Recommendations from Weak Evidence? Lessons Learned in Developing Guidance on the Public Health Management of Meningococcal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germaine Hanquet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence underpinning public health policy is often of low quality, leading to inconsistencies in recommended interventions. One example is the divergence in national policies across Europe for managing contacts of invasive meningococcal disease. Aiming to develop consistent guidance at the European level, a group of experts reviewed the literature and formulated recommendations. The group defined eight priority research questions, searched the literature, and formulated recommendations using GRADE methodology. Five of the research questions are discussed in this paper. After taking into account quality of evidence, benefit, harm, value, preference, burden on patient of the intervention, and resource implications, we made four strong recommendations and five weak recommendations for intervention. Strong recommendations related not only to one question with very low quality of evidence as well as to two questions with moderate to high quality of evidence. The weak recommendations related to two questions with low and very low quality of evidence but also to one question with moderate quality of evidence. GRADE methodology ensures a transparent process and explicit recognition of additional factors that should be considered when making recommendations for policy. This approach can be usefully applied to many areas of public health policy where evidence quality is often low.

  15. Managerial Methods Based on Analysis, Recommended to a Boarding House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomia Andreş

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a few theoretical and practical contributions regarding the implementing of analysis based methods, respectively a SWOT and an economic analysis, from the perspective and the demands of a firm management which functions with profits due to the activity of a boarding house. The two types of managerial methods recommended to the firm offer real and complex information necessary for the knowledge of the firm status and the elaboration of prediction for the maintaining of business viability.

  16. Tag and Neighbor based Recommender systems for Medical events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayyapu, Karunakar Reddy; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of a multifactor recommendation approach based on user tagging with term neighbours. Neighbours of words in tag vectors and documents provide for hitting larger set of documents and not only those matching with direct tag vectors or content of the documents. Tag...... in the situations where the quality of tags is lower. We discuss the approach on the examples from the existing Medworm system to indicate the usefulness of the approach....

  17. Recommendation System of Program Based on REST Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jin Bao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the popularity of digital TV, TV programs have been on the increase no matter in both the number and species, which brought many choice to the users. Although the digital TV has increased largely in the selectivity, it has become a fussy process that users search for programs which they are interested in. So there is need to have an efficient program recommendation system to solve the problem that is “information overload” for users. It can not only help users to get the program which they require, but also bring convenience to people’s life. The program recommendation system named MyView is planned and designed, aimed to providing an efficient information platform. The system also involves intelligent recommendation. The information guide will trigger the recommendation engine after users registering information, the engine will accord to the data in the guide information to make the personalized program recommendation. The system was deployed in the Tomcat and Apache integration servers on my localhost, so it also belongs to the Web application based on J2EE platform. AJAX is used that can achieve a good user experience to develop web presentation layer on MyView PC browser with flexible interface performance. The background of business services uses the hierarchical form. MyView System uses the CXF framework and Hibernate to equip controller and data persistence layer in the Spring container. The overall framework of the system uses the REST style, in order to extend the performance and function later. Background service layer with uniform interface, marked by the URI resource. At the same time, HTTP requestion is submitted by the AJAX to obtain services provided by resources. Finally, we can analyze and summary the features of MyView System.

  18. Evidence-based guideline update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Peer Carsten Tfelt-Hansen, Glostrup, Denmark: According to the recent American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline update, a drug can be recommended as possibly effective for migraine prevention if it had demonstrated efficacy in one Class II study.(1) Eight drugs are recommended as possibly...

  19. Compositional descriptor-based recommender system for the materials discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Atsuto; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Isao

    2018-06-01

    Structures and properties of many inorganic compounds have been collected historically. However, it only covers a very small portion of possible inorganic crystals, which implies the presence of numerous currently unknown compounds. A powerful machine-learning strategy is mandatory to discover new inorganic compounds from all chemical combinations. Herein we propose a descriptor-based recommender-system approach to estimate the relevance of chemical compositions where crystals can be formed [i.e., chemically relevant compositions (CRCs)]. In addition to data-driven compositional similarity used in the literature, the use of compositional descriptors as a prior knowledge is helpful for the discovery of new compounds. We validate our recommender systems in two ways. First, one database is used to construct a model, while another is used for the validation. Second, we estimate the phase stability for compounds at expected CRCs using density functional theory calculations.

  20. Content-based Music Search and Recommendation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegawa, Kazuki; Hijikata, Yoshinori; Nishida, Shogo

    Recently, the turn volume of music data on the Internet has increased rapidly. This has increased the user's cost to find music data suiting their preference from such a large data set. We propose a content-based music search and recommendation system. This system has an interface for searching and finding music data and an interface for editing a user profile which is necessary for music recommendation. By exploiting the visualization of the feature space of music and the visualization of the user profile, the user can search music data and edit the user profile. Furthermore, by exploiting the infomation which can be acquired from each visualized object in a mutually complementary manner, we make it easier for the user to search music data and edit the user profile. Concretely, the system gives to the user an information obtained from the user profile when searching music data and an information obtained from the feature space of music when editing the user profile.

  1. Sugars and Dental Caries: Evidence for Setting a Recommended Threshold for Intake123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries affects ≤80% of the world’s population with almost a quarter of US adults having untreated caries. Dental caries is costly to health care and negatively affects well-being. Dietary free sugars are the most important risk factor for dental caries. The WHO has issued guidelines that recommend intake of free sugars should provide ≤10% of energy intake and suggest further reductions to caries risk, which showed evidence of moderate quality from cohort studies that limiting free sugars to ≤10% of energy reduced, but did not eliminate, dental caries. Even low levels of dental caries in children are of concern because caries is a lifelong progressive and cumulative disease. The systematic review therefore explored if there were further benefits to dental health if the intake of free sugars was limited to caries when free sugar intake was 5% but ≤10% of energy. The WHO recommendations are intended for use by policy makers as a benchmark when assessing intake of sugars by populations and as a driving force for policy change. Multiple strategies encompassing both upstream and downstream preventive approaches are now required to translate the recommendations into policy and practice. PMID:26773022

  2. Sugars and Dental Caries: Evidence for Setting a Recommended Threshold for Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries affects ≤80% of the world's population with almost a quarter of US adults having untreated caries. Dental caries is costly to health care and negatively affects well-being. Dietary free sugars are the most important risk factor for dental caries. The WHO has issued guidelines that recommend intake of free sugars should provide ≤10% of energy intake and suggest further reductions to caries risk, which showed evidence of moderate quality from cohort studies that limiting free sugars to ≤10% of energy reduced, but did not eliminate, dental caries. Even low levels of dental caries in children are of concern because caries is a lifelong progressive and cumulative disease. The systematic review therefore explored if there were further benefits to dental health if the intake of free sugars was limited to caries when free sugar intake was 5% but ≤10% of energy. The WHO recommendations are intended for use by policy makers as a benchmark when assessing intake of sugars by populations and as a driving force for policy change. Multiple strategies encompassing both upstream and downstream preventive approaches are now required to translate the recommendations into policy and practice. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798.

  4. Evidence-based prevention of childhood malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdad, Aamer; Sadiq, Kamran; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2011-05-01

    Childhood malnutrition is prevalent in developing countries and contributes to one-third of all deaths in these countries. There have been advances in prevention of childhood malnutrition and the purpose of this article was to review the current evidence in the field. Multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplements during pregnancy reduce the incidence of maternal anemia and small for gestational-age babies. Recent evidence suggest that combined supplementation of MMNs with protein energy supplement is more effective than MMN supplementation alone. It is now recommended that HIV-infected mothers can exclusively breast-feed their infants for 6 months when the mother or infant is on effective antiretroviral therapy. Home fortification of complementary foods reduces the prevalence of anemia in infancy and combined supplementation of MMNs with lipid-based supplements improves growth in young children. Ready-to-use therapeutic foods have been successfully used to manage severe acute malnutrition in the community. Zinc supplementation is associated with a reduction in diarrhea and respiratory disease morbidity and improves linear growth. Vitamin A supplementation decreases the incidence of diarrhea and measles. Water supply, sanitation, and hygiene are important for the prevention of malnutrition because of their direct impact on infectious disease. There is clear evidence on the causes and consequences of malnutrition as well as effective interventions to prevent undernutrition. The next step is to implement these packages of interventions at large scale. A global effort is required that should entail unified and compelling advocacy among governments, lead organizations, and institutions.

  5. Evidence-based medicine: Mandible fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brad T; Samson, Thomas D; Schubert, Warren; Mackay, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and subunits of the mandible. 2. Review the cause and epidemiology of mandible fractures. 3. Discuss the preoperative evaluation and diagnostic imaging. 4. Understand the principles and techniques of mandible fracture reduction and fixation. The management of mandibular fractures has undergone significant improvement because of advancements in plating technology, imaging, and instrumentation. As the techniques in management continue to evolve, it is imperative for the practicing physician to remain up-to-date with the growing body of scientific literature. The objective of this Maintenance of Certification article is to present a review of the literature so that the physician may make treatment recommendation based on the best evidence available. Pediatric fractures have been excluded from this article.

  6. Implementing Evidence-Based Practices for People With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robert E.; Bond, Gary R.; Essock, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, a consensus has emerged regarding a set of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia that address symptom management and psychosocial functioning. Yet, surveys suggest that the great majority of the population of individuals with schizophrenia do not receive evidence-based care. In this article, we review the empirical literature on implementation of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia patients. We first examine lessons learned from implementation studies in general medicine. We then summarize the implementation literature specific to schizophrenia, including medication practices, psychosocial interventions, information technology, and state- and federal-level interventions. We conclude with recommendations for future directions. PMID:19491315

  7. Consensus-based recommendations for case report in Chinese medicine (CARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shu-Fei; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Zhang, Li; Zhong, Linda Li-Dan; Kun, Wai; Lin, Jia; Zhang, Bo-Li; Wang, Yong-Yan; Shang, Hong-Cai; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Case reports are valuable clinical evidence in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). However, the general reporting quality is suboptimal. A working group comprising 20 members was set up to develop systematic recommendations on case report in Chinese medicine (CARC). The working group (CARC group) developed a primary checklist based on reviewing the general reporting quality of case reports in TCM and thorough internal discussion. Two-round consensus process had been carried out among clinical experts, evidence-based medicine methodologists, medical journal editors and clinical practitioners with designated questionnaire embedded with the primary checklist. In total, 118 participants from 17 provinces of China and Korea completed the questionnaires. Their feedback was analyzed and discussed by the CARC group. The checklist was amended accordingly, and the final version, comprising 16-item, is presented here. Under the framework of CARC recommendations, the reporting quality of case reports in TCM can be improved.

  8. Collaborative filtering recommendation model based on fuzzy clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Yunhua

    2018-05-01

    As one of the most widely used algorithms in recommender systems, collaborative filtering algorithm faces two serious problems, which are the sparsity of data and poor recommendation effect in big data environment. In traditional clustering analysis, the object is strictly divided into several classes and the boundary of this division is very clear. However, for most objects in real life, there is no strict definition of their forms and attributes of their class. Concerning the problems above, this paper proposes to improve the traditional collaborative filtering model through the hybrid optimization of implicit semantic algorithm and fuzzy clustering algorithm, meanwhile, cooperating with collaborative filtering algorithm. In this paper, the fuzzy clustering algorithm is introduced to fuzzy clustering the information of project attribute, which makes the project belong to different project categories with different membership degrees, and increases the density of data, effectively reduces the sparsity of data, and solves the problem of low accuracy which is resulted from the inaccuracy of similarity calculation. Finally, this paper carries out empirical analysis on the MovieLens dataset, and compares it with the traditional user-based collaborative filtering algorithm. The proposed algorithm has greatly improved the recommendation accuracy.

  9. Improving treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders: recommendations based on preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberg, Judith R; Kyzar, Evan J; Stewart, Adam Michael; Nguyen, Michael; Poudel, Manoj K; Echevarria, David J; Collier, Adam D; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Klimenko, Viktor M; Norton, William; Pittman, Julian; Nakamura, Shun; Koshiba, Mamiko; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Apryatin, Sergey A; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Diamond, David M; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Parker, Matthew O; Brown, Richard E; Song, Cai; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are common and severely debilitating. Their chronic nature and reliance on both genetic and environmental factors makes studying NDDs and their treatment a challenging task. Herein, the authors discuss the neurobiological mechanisms of NDDs, and present recommendations on their translational research and therapy, outlined by the International Stress and Behavior Society. Various drugs currently prescribed to treat NDDs also represent a highly diverse group. Acting on various neurotransmitter and physiological systems, these drugs often lack specificity of action, and are commonly used to treat multiple other psychiatric conditions. There has also been relatively little progress in the development of novel medications to treat NDDs. Based on clinical, preclinical and translational models of NDDs, our recommendations cover a wide range of methodological approaches and conceptual strategies. To improve pharmacotherapy and drug discovery for NDDs, we need a stronger emphasis on targeting multiple endophenotypes, a better dissection of genetic/epigenetic factors or "hidden heritability," and a careful consideration of potential developmental/trophic roles of brain neurotransmitters. The validity of animal NDD models can be improved through discovery of novel (behavioral, physiological and neuroimaging) biomarkers, applying proper environmental enrichment, widening the spectrum of model organisms, targeting developmental trajectories of NDD-related behaviors and comorbid conditions beyond traditional NDDs. While these recommendations cannot be addressed all in once, our increased understanding of NDD pathobiology may trigger innovative cross-disciplinary research expanding beyond traditional methods and concepts.

  10. An evidence-based review: distracted driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, Luis E; Aronow, Kathy V; Macleod, Jana; Bard, Michael; Salzman, Steven; Greene, Wendy; Haider, Adil; Schupper, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Cell phone use and texting are prevalent within society and have thus pervaded the driving population. This technology is a growing concern within the confines of distracted driving, as all diversions from attention to the road have been shown to increase the risk of crashes. Adolescent, inexperienced drivers, who have the greatest prevalence of texting while driving, are at a particularly higher risk of crashes because of distraction. Members of the Injury Control Violence Prevention Committee of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma performed a PubMed search of articles related to distracted driving and cell phone use as a distractor of driving between 2000 and 2013. A total of 19 articles were found to merit inclusion as evidence in the evidence-based review. These articles provided evidence regarding the relationship between distracted driving and crashes, cell phone use contributing to automobile accidents, and/or the relationship between driver experience and automobile accidents. (Adjust methods/results sections to the number of articles that correctly corresponds to the number of references, as well as the methodology for reference inclusion.) Based on the evidence reviewed, we can recommend the following. All drivers should minimize all in-vehicle distractions while on the road. All drivers should not text or use any touch messaging system (including the use of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter) while driving. Younger, inexperienced drivers should especially not use cell phones, texting, or any touch messaging system while driving because they pose an increased risk for death and injury caused by distractions while driving.

  11. FDG PET/CT in cancer: comparison of actual use with literature-based recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Henrik; Johansen, Allan; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark); Holdgaard, Paw Christian [Vejle Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Madsen, Poul Henning [Vejle Hospital, Department of Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard [Odense University Hospital, Department of Haematological, Odense (Denmark); Gad, Dorte; Gravergaard, Anders Eggert [Odense University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Rohde, Max; Godballe, Christian [Odense University Hospital, Department of ORL Head and Neck Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth [Naestved Sygehus, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Naestved (Denmark); Bech, Karsten [Aabenraa Sygehus, Organ Centre, Aabenraa (Denmark); Teilmann-Joergensen, Dorte [Aabenraa Sygehus, Department of Gynaecoligcal and Obstetrics, Aabenraa (Denmark); Mogensen, Ole [Odense University Hospital, Department of Gynaecoligcal and Obstetrics, Odense (Denmark); Karstoft, Jens [Odense University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Odense (Denmark); Johansen, Joergen [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Christensen, Janne Buck [Odense University Hospital, Department of Quality and Research/HTA, Odense (Denmark); Collaboration: on behalf of the PET/CT Task Force of the Region of Southern Denmark

    2016-04-15

    The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012. Rapid Evidence Assessment was applied, using the methodology of systematic reviews with predefined limitations to search PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English/Danish/Swedish/Norwegian since 2002. PICO questions were defined, data recorded and quality appraised and rated with regard to strength and evidence level. Consequent recommendations for applications of PET/CT were established. The actual use of PET/CT was compared with these, where grades A and B indicated ''established'' and ''useful'' and grades C and D ''potentially useful'' and ''non-recommendable'' indications, respectively. Of 11,729 citations, 1,729 were considered for review, and 204 were included. The evidence suggested usefulness of PET/CT in lung, lymphoma, melanoma, head and neck, and colorectal cancers, whereas evidence was sparse in gynaecological cancers. The agreement between actual use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence was sparse in the sixth, gynaecological cancers. Actual use of PET/CT agreed well with recommendations. (orig.)

  12. An Ontology-Based Tourism Recommender System Based on Spreading Activation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali

    2015-12-01

    A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs) optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS) evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user's preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user's preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User's feedback adapts the user's preferences using Spreading Activation (SA) strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  13. AN ONTOLOGY-BASED TOURISM RECOMMENDER SYSTEM BASED ON SPREADING ACTIVATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bahramian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A tourist has time and budget limitations; hence, he needs to select points of interest (POIs optimally. Since the available information about POIs is overloading, it is difficult for a tourist to select the most appreciate ones considering preferences. In this paper, a new travel recommender system is proposed to overcome information overload problem. A recommender system (RS evaluates the overwhelming number of POIs and provides personalized recommendations to users based on their preferences. A content-based recommendation system is proposed, which uses the information about the user’s preferences and POIs and calculates a degree of similarity between them. It selects POIs, which have highest similarity with the user’s preferences. The proposed content-based recommender system is enhanced using the ontological information about tourism domain to represent both the user profile and the recommendable POIs. The proposed ontology-based recommendation process is performed in three steps including: ontology-based content analyzer, ontology-based profile learner, and ontology-based filtering component. User’s feedback adapts the user’s preferences using Spreading Activation (SA strategy. It shows the proposed recommender system is effective and improves the overall performance of the traditional content-based recommender systems.

  14. Nutrition (Micronutrients) in Child Growth and Development: A Systematic Review on Current Evidence, Recommendations and Opportunities for Further Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lo, Clifford W

    2017-10-01

    An important aspect of malnutrition is deficiency of different micronutrients during pregnancy or early childhood. We systematically reviewed the role of nutrition in child growth (weight or height gain) and development. A comprehensive literature search was done on PubMed/Cochrane Library browsing through 38,795 abstracts until December 31, 2016 to select systematic reviews/meta-analyses and individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of micronutrient supplementation. Micronutrients studied included iron, iodine, folate, zinc, calcium, magnesium, selenium, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin B complex, and multiple micronutrients. We summarize evidence with details and results of RCTs, highlight strengths/weaknesses, and critically interpret findings. Effects of breastfeeding-promotion, food-supplementation (complementary and school feeding), conditional-cash-transfers, and integrated nutrition/psychosocial interventions are discussed. Based on this evidence we make policy and programmatic recommendations for supplementation to mothers and children at high-risk of deficiency.

  15. ERGONOMIC DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS BASED ON AN ACTUAL CHAINSAW DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kaljun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: To develop high quality products, a designer has to consider various influential factors, one of which is ergonomics. And to fashion a specific product for the user, a designer needs expert knowledge of the user’s requirements. However, expert knowledge can also be accessed through an intelligent advisory system for ergonomic design support. The effectiveness of such an expert system depends mainly on the quality of the knowledge base and on the appropriateness of the system's inference engine. Data for the system’s knowledge base can be collected in different ways. One approach is to study relevant projects to collect appropriate ergonomic solutions; another is to recognise bottlenecks in ergonomic design. This paper presents a case study of the design of an actual chainsaw – with emphasis on ergonomic design solutions – that can be transformed into ergonomic design recommendations. At the end of the paper, an application of one of the derived recommendations within the knowledge base of the intelligent advisory system is presented.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: By die ontwerp van gehaltegoedere moet aandag gegee word aan verskeie faktore soos die Ergonomie. Die produkontwerper moet deeglike kennis dra van die verbruikersbehoeftes. Daarbenewens moet hy liefs ook gebruik maak van ’n intelligente sisteem vir ontwerphulp. Die navorsing is toegespits op datasteun vir ’n kettingsaagontwerp en toon hoe die intelligente sisteem betekenisvolle ondersteuning verleen.

  16. A Probability-Based Hybrid User Model for Recommendation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of information communication technology, the available information or knowledge is exponentially increased, and this causes the well-known information overload phenomenon. This problem is more serious in product design corporations because over half of the valuable design time is consumed in knowledge acquisition, which highly extends the design cycle and weakens the competitiveness. Therefore, the recommender systems become very important in the domain of product domain. This research presents a probability-based hybrid user model, which is a combination of collaborative filtering and content-based filtering. This hybrid model utilizes user ratings and item topics or classes, which are available in the domain of product design, to predict the knowledge requirement. The comprehensive analysis of the experimental results shows that the proposed method gains better performance in most of the parameter settings. This work contributes a probability-based method to the community for implement recommender system when only user ratings and item topics are available.

  17. Evidence utilisation project: Management of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. The challenges of implementing best practice recommendations in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Judy; Hines, Sonia Jane; Chang, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    The prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (IPH) remains an important issue in perioperative healthcare. The aims of this project were to: (i) assess current clinical practice in the management of IPH and (ii) promote best practice in the management of IPH in adult operating theatres. This project from August 2010 to March 2012 utilised a system of audit and feedback to implement best practice recommendations. Data were collected via chart audits against criteria developed from best practice recommendations for managing IPH. Evidence-based best practices, such as consistent temperature monitoring and patient warming, were implemented using multifaceted interventions. Perioperative records for 73 patients (baseline) and 72 patients (post-implementation) were audited. Post-implementation audit showed an increase in patients with temperatures >36°C admitted to the post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU) (8%) and discharged from PACU (28%). The percentage of patients receiving preoperative temperature monitoring increased (38%); however, low levels of intraoperative monitoring remained (31% of patients with surgery of 30 min or longer duration). Small increases were found in patient warming of 5% intraoperatively and 8% postoperatively. Preoperative warming was not successfully implemented during this phase of the project. Temperature monitoring, warming and rates of normothermia improved; however, barriers to best practice of IPH management were experienced, which negatively impacted on the project. Further stages of implementation and audit were added to further address IPH management in this department. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  18. Security Considerations and Recommendations in Computer-Based Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M. Al-Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT. However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee.

  19. Security considerations and recommendations in computer-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleem, Saleh M; Ullah, Hanif

    2014-01-01

    Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT). However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password) in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee.

  20. Patient selection for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving surgery: Recommendations of the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) breast cancer working group based on clinical evidence (2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, Csaba; Limbergen, Erik Van; Poetter, Richard; Kovacs, Gyoergy; Polo, Alfredo; Lyczek, Jaroslaw; Hildebrandt, Guido; Niehoff, Peter; Guinot, Jose Luis; Guedea, Ferran; Johansson, Bengt; Ott, Oliver J.; Major, Tibor; Strnad, Vratislav

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To give recommendations on patient selection criteria for the use of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) based on available clinical evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and materials: Overall, 340 articles were identified by a systematic search of the PubMed database using the keywords 'partial-breast irradiation' and 'APBI'. This search was complemented by searches of reference lists of articles and handsearching of relevant conference abstracts and book chapters. Of these, 3 randomized and 19 prospective non-randomized studies with a minimum median follow-up time of 4 years were identified. The authors reviewed the published clinical evidence on APBI, complemented by relevant clinical and pathological studies of standard breast-conserving therapy and, through a series of personal communications, formulated the recommendations presented in this article. Results: The GEC-ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group recommends three categories guiding patient selection for APBI: (1) a low-risk group for whom APBI outside the context of a clinical trial is an acceptable treatment option; including patients ageing at least 50 years with unicentric, unifocal, pT1-2 (≤30 mm) pN0, non-lobular invasive breast cancer without the presence of an extensive intraductal component (EIC) and lympho-vascular invasion (LVI) and with negative surgical margins of at least 2 mm, (2) a high-risk group, for whom APBI is considered contraindicated; including patients ageing ≤40 years; having positive margins, and/or multicentric or large (>30 mm) tumours, and/or EIC positive or LVI positive tumours, and/or 4 or more positive lymph nodes or unknown axillary status (pNx), and (3) an intermediate-risk group, for whom APBI is considered acceptable only in the context of prospective clinical trials. Conclusions: These recommendations will provide a clinical guidance regarding the use of APBI outside the context of a clinical trial before large-scale randomized

  1. Historical perspectives on evidence-based nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, Suzanne C; Slattery, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The authors of this article offer a review and historical perspective on research utilization and evidence-based practice in nursing. They present the evolution of research utilization to the more contemporary framework of evidence-based nursing practice. The authors address the role of qualitative research in the context of evidence-based practice. Finally, some approaches and resources for learning more about the fundamentals of evidence-based healthcare are provided.

  2. Image Recommendation Algorithm Using Feature-Based Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Hwan

    As the multimedia contents market continues its rapid expansion, the amount of image contents used in mobile phone services, digital libraries, and catalog service is increasing remarkably. In spite of this rapid growth, users experience high levels of frustration when searching for the desired image. Even though new images are profitable to the service providers, traditional collaborative filtering methods cannot recommend them. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose feature-based collaborative filtering (FBCF) method to reflect the user's most recent preference by representing his purchase sequence in the visual feature space. The proposed approach represents the images that have been purchased in the past as the feature clusters in the multi-dimensional feature space and then selects neighbors by using an inter-cluster distance function between their feature clusters. Various experiments using real image data demonstrate that the proposed approach provides a higher quality recommendation and better performance than do typical collaborative filtering and content-based filtering techniques.

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression in Parkinson's disease: systematic review of evidence and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Bryson, William Culbertson; Buchholz, Jonathan; Samii, Ali; Borson, Soo

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of evidence regarding treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) utilizing electroconvulsive therapy. The search led to the inclusion of 43 articles, mainly case reports or case series, with the largest number of patients totaling 19. The analysis included 116 patients with depression and PD; depression improved in 93.1%. Where motor symptoms' severity was reported, 83% of patients improved. Cognition did not worsen in the majority (94%). Many patients experienced delirium or transient confusion, sometimes necessitating discontinuation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Little is known about maintenance ECT in this population. ECT can benefit patients suffering from PD and depression. We recommend an algorithm for treatment of depression in PD, utilizing ECT sooner rather than later.

  4. Imaging evidence and recommendations for traumatic brain injury: advanced neuro- and neurovascular imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, M; Sanelli, P C; Anzai, Y; Tsiouris, A J; Whitlow, C T

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of patients with traumatic brain injury, with NCCT as the first-line of imaging for patients with traumatic brain injury and MR imaging being recommended in specific settings. Advanced neuroimaging techniques, including MR imaging DTI, blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, PET/SPECT, and magnetoencephalography, are of particular interest in identifying further injury in patients with traumatic brain injury when conventional NCCT and MR imaging findings are normal, as well as for prognostication in patients with persistent symptoms. These advanced neuroimaging techniques are currently under investigation in an attempt to optimize them and substantiate their clinical relevance in individual patients. However, the data currently available confine their use to the research arena for group comparisons, and there remains insufficient evidence at the time of this writing to conclude that these advanced techniques can be used for routine clinical use at the individual patient level. TBI imaging is a rapidly evolving field, and a number of the recommendations presented will be updated in the future to reflect the advances in medical knowledge. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eui Geum

    2016-06-01

    As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR), a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Geum Oh, PhD, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR, a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings.

  7. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nonsurgical Medical Penile Girth Augmentation: Experience-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Jayson; Sharp, Gemma

    2017-10-01

    Penile augmentation is increasingly sought by men who are dissatisfied with the size and/or appearance of their penis. However, augmentation procedures are still considered to be highly controversial with no standardized recommendations reported in the medical literature and limited outcome data. Nevertheless, these procedures continue to be performed in increasing numbers in private settings. Therefore, there is a need for safe, effective, and minimally invasive procedures to be developed, evaluated, and reported in the research literature. In this article, we focus particularly on girth enhancement procedures rather than lengthening procedures as penile girth appears to be particularly important for sexual satisfaction. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the common techniques to date, with a focus on the minimally invasive injectable girth augmentation techniques. Based on considerable operative experience, we offer our own suggestions for patient screening, technique selection, and perioperative care. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES DURING AIR TRAVEL: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW OF CURRENT RECOMMENDATIONS AND THEIR SUPPORTING EVIDENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, James; Suresh, Rahul; Blue, Rebecca S; Mathers, Charles H; Belalcazar, L Maria

    2018-02-01

    Individuals with diabetes are increasingly seeking pretravel advice, but updated professional recommendations remain scant. We performed a systematic review on diabetes management during air travel to summarize current recommendations, assess supporting evidence, and identify areas of future research. A systematic review of the English literature on diabetes management during air travel was undertaken utilizing PubMed and MEDLINE. Publications regarding general travel advice; adjustment of insulin and noninsulin therapies; and the use of insulin pumps, glucometers and subcutaneous glucose sensors at altitude were included. Gathered information was used to create an updated summary of glucose-lowering medication adjustment during air travel. Sixty-one publications were identified, most providing expert opinion and few offering primary data (47 expert opinion, 2 observational studies, 2 case reports, 10 device studies). General travel advice was uniform, with increasing attention to preflight security. Indications for oral antihyperglycemic therapy adjustments varied. There were few recommendations on contemporary agents and on nonhypoglycemic adverse events. There was little consensus on insulin adjustment protocols, many antedating current insulin formulations. Most publications advocated adjusting insulin pump time settings after arrival; however, there was disagreement on timing and rate adjustments. Glucometers and subcutaneous glucose sensors were reported to be less accurate at altitude, but not to an extent that would preclude their clinical use. Recommendations for diabetes management during air travel vary significantly and are mostly based on expert opinion. Data from systematic investigation on glucose-lowering medication adjustment protocols may support the development of a future consensus statement. CSII = continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (device) DPP-4 = dipeptidyl peptidase 4 EGA = error grid analysis GDH = glucose dehydrogenase GOX = glucose

  10. Evidence-based practice of periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Charles M; MacNeill, Simon R; Satheesh, Keerthana

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice involves complex and conscientious decision making based not only on the available evidence but also on patient characteristics, situations, and preferences. It recognizes that care is individualized and ever-changing and involves uncertainties and probabilities. The specialty of periodontics has abundant high-level evidence upon which treatment decisions can be determined. This paper offers a brief commentary and overview of the available evidence commonly used in the private practice of periodontics.

  11. A well-started beginning elementary teacher's beliefs and practices in relation to reform recommendations about inquiry-based science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Given reform recommendations emphasizing scientific inquiry and empirical evidence pointing to the difficulties beginning teachers face in enacting inquiry-based science, this study explores a well-started beginning elementary teacher's (Sofia) beliefs about inquiry-based science and related

  12. Psiquiatria baseada em evidências Evidence-based psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício S de Lima

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Em psiquiatria, observa-se grande variabilidade de práticas clínicas, muitas vezes desnecessária. Essas variações podem estar relacionadas à ausência de evidência científica confiável ou ao desconhecimento das evidências de boa qualidade disponíveis. A medicina baseada em evidências (MBE é uma combinação de estratégias que busca assegurar que o cuidado individual do paciente seja baseado na melhor informação disponível, a qual deve ser incorporada à prática clínica. Neste artigo, conceitos de MBE são discutidos com relação a aspectos e desafios no tratamento de pacientes com distimia, bulimia nervosa e esquizofrenia. A partir de resultados de três revisões sistemáticas recentemente publicadas, conclui-se que a prática de psiquiatria baseada em evidências acrescenta qualidade à prática psiquiátrica tradicional.The unnecessary variability often seen in the clinical practice can be related to both the absence of reliable evidence and unawareness of the existence of good quality evidence. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is a set of linked strategies designed to assist clinicians in keeping themselves up-to-date with the best available evidence. Such evidence must be incorporated into the clinical practice. EBM concepts are discussed here through common aspects and challenges doctors face when treating patients with dysthymia, bulimia nervosa, and schizophrenia. In the light of some results from three systematic reviews it is concluded that Evidence-Based Psychiatry strategies, rather than replacing the traditional ones, may be a valuable tool to improving quality in a good clinical practice.

  13. A trajectory-based recommender system for tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Baraglia, Ranieri; Frattari, Claudio; Muntean, Cristina Ioana; Nardini, Franco Maria; Silvestri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Recommendation systems provide focused information to users on a set of objects belonging to a specific domain. The proposed recommender system provides personalized suggestions about touristic points of interest. The system generates recommendations, consisting of touristic places, according to the current position of a tourist and previously collected data describing tourist movements in a touristic location/city. The touristic sites correspond to a set of points of interest identified a pr...

  14. Identification of Evidence for Key Parameters in Decision-Analytic Models of Cost Effectiveness: A Description of Sources and a Recommended Minimum Search Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, Suzy

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes recommendations for a minimum level of searching for data for key parameters in decision-analytic models of cost effectiveness and describes sources of evidence relevant to each parameter type. Key parameters are defined as treatment effects, adverse effects, costs, resource use, health state utility values (HSUVs) and baseline risk of events. The recommended minimum requirement for treatment effects is comprehensive searching according to available methodological guidance. For other parameter types, the minimum is the searching of one bibliographic database plus, where appropriate, specialist sources and non-research-based and non-standard format sources. The recommendations draw on the search methods literature and on existing analyses of how evidence is used to support decision-analytic models. They take account of the range of research and non-research-based sources of evidence used in cost-effectiveness models and of the need for efficient searching. Consideration is given to what constitutes best evidence for the different parameter types in terms of design and scientific quality and to making transparent the judgments that underpin the selection of evidence from the options available. Methodological issues are discussed, including the differences between decision-analytic models of cost effectiveness and systematic reviews when searching and selecting evidence and comprehensive versus sufficient searching. Areas are highlighted where further methodological research is required.

  15. Persuasive Evidence: Improving Customer Service through Evidence Based Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Abbott

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To demonstrate how evidence based practice has contributed to informaing decisions and resolving issues if concern in service delivery at Bond University Librray. Methods - This paper critically analyses three evidence based research projects conducted at Bond University Library. Each project combined a range of research methods including surveys, literature reviews and the analysis of internal performance data to find solutions to problems in library service delivery. The first research project investigated library opening hours and the feasability of twenty-four hour opening. Another project reseached questions about the management of a collection of feature films on DVD and video. The thrd project investigated issues surrounding the teaching of EndNote to undergarduate students. Results - Despite some deficiencies in the methodologies used, each evidence based research project had positive outcomes. One of the highlights asn an essential feature of the process at Bond University Library was the involvement of stakeholders. The ability to build consensus and agree action plans with stakeholders was an important outcome of that process. Conclusion - Drawing on the experience of these research projects, the paper illustrates the benefits of evidence based information practice to stimulate innovation and improve library services. Librarians, like most professionals, need to continue to develop the skills and a culture to effectively carry out evidence based practice.

  16. Evidence-Based Psychotherapy: Advantages and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah C; Schwartz, Ann C; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2017-07-01

    Evidence-based psychotherapies have been shown to be efficacious and cost-effective for a wide range of psychiatric conditions. Psychiatric disorders are prevalent worldwide and associated with high rates of disease burden, as well as elevated rates of co-occurrence with medical disorders, which has led to an increased focus on the need for evidence-based psychotherapies. This chapter focuses on the current state of evidence-based psychotherapy. The strengths and challenges of evidence-based psychotherapy are discussed, as well as misperceptions regarding the approach that may discourage and limit its use. In addition, we review various factors associated with the optimal implementation and application of evidence-based psychotherapies. Lastly, suggestions are provided on ways to advance the evidence-based psychotherapy movement to become truly integrated into practice.

  17. Utility-Based Link Recommendation in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhepeng

    2013-01-01

    Link recommendation, which suggests links to connect currently unlinked users, is a key functionality offered by major online social networking platforms. Salient examples of link recommendation include "people you may know"' on Facebook and "who to follow" on Twitter. A social networking platform has two types of stakeholder:…

  18. Web items recommendation using hybridized content-based and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recommender Systems are software agent developed to tackle the problem of information overload by providing recommendations that assist individual users identify contents of interest by using the opinions of a community of users, similarities between items contents or the user's preferences. The exponential growth of ...

  19. Goal-based structuring in a recommender systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magoulas, G.D.; van Setten, Mark; Veenstra, Mettina; Chen, S.Y; Nijholt, Antinus; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.

    Recommender systems help people to find information that is interesting to them. However, current recommendation techniques only address the user's short-term and long-term interests, not their immediate interests. This paper describes a method to structure information (with or without using

  20. No evidence-based restoration without a sound evidence base: a reply to Guldemond et al.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based practice is not possible without an evidence base. Guldemond et al. confuse our attempt at assessing the status of the evidence base of restoration programs in South Africa with attempting to assess whether restoration is evidence...

  1. How Quality Improvement Practice Evidence Can Advance the Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼRourke, Hannah M; Fraser, Kimberly D

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the evaluation of quality improvement interventions have been made in order to improve the evidence base of whether, to what extent, and why quality improvement interventions affect chosen outcomes. The purpose of this article is to articulate why these recommendations are appropriate to improve the rigor of quality improvement intervention evaluation as a research endeavor, but inappropriate for the purposes of everyday quality improvement practice. To support our claim, we describe the differences between quality improvement interventions that occur for the purpose of practice as compared to research. We then carefully consider how feasibility, ethics, and the aims of evaluation each impact how quality improvement interventions that occur in practice, as opposed to research, can or should be evaluated. Recommendations that fit the evaluative goals of practice-based quality improvement interventions are needed to support fair appraisal of the distinct evidence they produce. We describe a current debate on the nature of evidence to assist in reenvisioning how quality improvement evidence generated from practice might complement that generated from research, and contribute in a value-added way to the knowledge base.

  2. Weight of evidence approaches for the identification of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals: Review and recommendations for EU regulatory application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Melanie; Green, Richard M; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R

    2017-12-01

    A Weight-of-evidence (WoE) evaluation should be applied in assessing all the available data for the identification of endocrine disrupting (ED) properties of chemicals. The European Commission draft acts specifying criteria under the biocidal products and plant protection products regulations require that WoE is implemented for the assessment of such products. However, only some general considerations and principles of how a WoE should be conducted are provided. This paper reviews WoE approaches to distil key recommendations specifically for the evaluation of potential ED properties of chemicals. In a manner, which is consistent with existing, published WoE frameworks, the WoE evaluation of ED properties can be divided into four phases: 1) Definition of causal questions and data gathering and selection, 2) Review of individual studies, 3) Data integration and evaluation, and 4) Drawing conclusions based on inferences. Recommendations are made on how to conduct each phase robustly and transparently to help guide the WoE evaluation of potential endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals within a European regulatory context. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  4. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper...

  5. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico; Sanders, Robert D.; Audisio, Riccardo; Borozdina, Anastasia; Cherubini, Antonio; Jones, Christina; Kehlet, Henrik; Maclullich, Alasdair; Radtke, Finn; Riese, Florian; Slooter, Arjen J C; Veyckemans, Francis; Kramer, Sylvia; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss, Bjoern; Spies, Claudia D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care,

  6. Personalized recommendation based on preferential bidirectional mass diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guilin; Gao, Tianrun; Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Yang, Zhao

    2017-03-01

    Recommendation system provides a promising way to alleviate the dilemma of information overload. In physical dynamics, mass diffusion has been used to design effective recommendation algorithms on bipartite network. However, most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on unidirectional mass diffusion from collected objects to uncollected objects, while overlooking the opposite direction, leading to the risk of similarity estimation deviation and performance degradation. In addition, they are biased towards recommending popular objects which will not necessarily promote the accuracy but make the recommendation lack diversity and novelty that indeed contribute to the vitality of the system. To overcome the aforementioned disadvantages, we propose a preferential bidirectional mass diffusion (PBMD) algorithm by penalizing the weight of popular objects in bidirectional diffusion. Experiments are evaluated on three benchmark datasets (Movielens, Netflix and Amazon) by 10-fold cross validation, and results indicate that PBMD remarkably outperforms the mainstream methods in accuracy, diversity and novelty.

  7. Evaluation of Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karypis, George

    2000-01-01

    The explosive growth of the world-wide-web and the emergence of e-commerce has led to the development of recommender systems a personalized information filtering technology used to identify a set of N...

  8. Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deshpande, Mukund; Karypis, George

    2003-01-01

    The explosive growth of the world-wide-web and the emergence of e-commerce has led to the development of recommender systems a personalized information filtering technology used to identify a set of N...

  9. Kernel based collaborative recommender system for e-purchasing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    proposed in order to overcome the traditional problems of CRS. ... known method for matrix factorization that provides the lowest rank ..... Adomavicius G, Tuzhilin A 2005 Toward the next generation of recommender systems: A survey of.

  10. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  11. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  12. Evidence-based management - healthcare manager viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Hasanpoor, Edris; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2018-06-11

    Purpose Hospital manager decisions can have a significant impact on service effectiveness and hospital success, so using an evidence-based approach can improve hospital management. The purpose of this paper is to identify evidence-based management (EBMgt) components and challenges. Consequently, the authors provide an improving evidence-based decision-making framework. Design/methodology/approach A total of 45 semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2016. The authors also established three focus group discussions with health service managers. Data analysis followed deductive qualitative analysis guidelines. Findings Four basic themes emerged from the interviews, including EBMgt evidence sources (including sub-themes: scientific and research evidence, facts and information, political-social development plans, managers' professional expertise and ethical-moral evidence); predictors (sub-themes: stakeholder values and expectations, functional behavior, knowledge, key competencies and skill, evidence sources, evidence levels, uses and benefits and government programs); EBMgt barriers (sub-themes: managers' personal characteristics, decision-making environment, training and research system and organizational issues); and evidence-based hospital management processes (sub-themes: asking, acquiring, appraising, aggregating, applying and assessing). Originality/value Findings suggest that most participants have positive EBMgt attitudes. A full evidence-based hospital manager is a person who uses all evidence sources in a six-step decision-making process. EBMgt frameworks are a good tool to manage healthcare organizations. The authors found factors affecting hospital EBMgt and identified six evidence sources that healthcare managers can use in evidence-based decision-making processes.

  13. Towards Evidence Based Usability in Health Informatics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcilly, Romaric; Peute, Linda W.; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Jaspers, Monique W.

    2015-01-01

    In a Health Information Technology (HIT) regulatory context in which the usability of this technology is more and more a critical issue, there is an increasing need for evidence based usability practice. However, a clear definition of evidence based usability practice and how to achieve it is still

  14. Quality of evidence-based pediatric guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; Lincke, Carsten R.; Offringa, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines and to assess their quality. Methods. We searched Medline, Embase, and relevant Web sites of guideline development programs and national pediatric societies to identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines. A list with titles of identified

  15. Contrast media induced nephropathy: a literature review of the available evidence and recommendations for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deek, Hiba; Newton, Phillip; Sheerin, Noella; Noureddine, Samar; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-11-01

    Contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN) is a sudden compromise of renal function 24-48 h after administering contrast medium during a CT scan or angiography. CIN accounts for 10% of hospital acquired renal failure and is ranked the third cause of acquiring this condition. Identifying patients at risk through proper screening can reduce the occurrence of this condition. This review paper aims to critique current evidence, provide a better understanding of CIN, inform nursing practice and make recommendations for bedside nurses and future research. An integrative review of the literature was made using the key terms: "contrast media", "nephritis", "nephropathy", "contrast media induced nephropathy scores", "acute kidney failure", "acute renal failure" and "acute kidney injury". MeSH key terms used in some databases were: "prevention and control", "acute kidney failure" and "treatment". Databases searched included Medline, CINAHL and Academic Search Complete, and references of relevant articles were also assessed. The search included all articles between the years 2000 and 2013. Sixty-seven articles were obtained as a result of the search, including RCTs, systematic reviews, and retrospective studies. Contrast media induced nephropathy is an iatrogenic complication occurring secondary to diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. At times it is unavoidable but a systematic method of risk assessment should be adopted to identify high risk patients for tailored and targeted approaches to management interventions. As the use of contrast media is increasing for diagnostic purposes, it is important that nurses be aware of the risk factors for CIN, identify and monitor high risk patients to prevent deterioration in renal function when possible. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gadolinium retention after administration of contrast agents based on linear chelators and the recommendations of the European Medicines Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekkers, Ilona A.; Roos, Rick; Molen, Aart J. van der

    2018-01-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) earlier this year recommended to suspend some marketing authorisations for Gadolinium Containing Contrast Agents (GCCAs) based on linear chelators due to the potential risk of gadolinium retention in the human body. These recommendations have recently been re-evaluated by EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), and confirmed the final opinion of the European Medicines Agency. This editorial provides an overview of the available GCCAs and summarises the recent evidence of gadolinium retention. Moreover, a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of the scientific evidence currently available on gadolinium retention is given. (orig.)

  17. RECOMMENDATION OF FERTILIZERS BASED ON THE LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geicimara Guimarães

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to demonstrate the viability of making recommendation of fertilizers for corn and bean cultures based on models of saturation kinetics, following the Law of diminishing return, aiming to improve the efficiency of nutrient use, reducing the costs of production and avoiding the excessive use of non renewable natural resources. In the corn culture (grain hybrid they were utilized levels of 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 g/hole of fertilizer NPK 4-14-8 in seeding and same amounts of ammonium sulfate 34 days later. The space between plants was of 20 x 70 cm (71.429 plants/hectare, with eight replicates per each level, totalizing 72 plants in the experimental area. In bean culture (red variety they were utilized levels of 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 g/hole of NPK 4-14-8 in planting. The space between plants was of 20 x 50 cm, with two grains per hole (71.429 plants/hectare, with eight holes per each level, totalizing 144 plants in the experimental area. The models of saturation kinetics of Lineweaver-Burk presented good adjustments for responses of corn and beans to fertilization, following the Law of diminishing return, in which 4 to 8 g of fertilizer per hole caused good part of the productive response for corn and 2 grams for bean. The employee of moderate level of fertilization leads to a more sustainable and economically viable agriculture to the household producer.

  18. From evidence-based to evidence-reflected practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    “Knowledge” is of the utmost significance for professional practice and learning. Today, though, the established knowledge base is changing in all areas of the labour market (Alvesson, 2004). Work and society are dominated by commitment to demands for high levels of demonstrable accountability......, cost-efficiency and measurable quality. Thus, today, evidence-based practice has become an expectation and fashion, often used to emphasize the grounding of practice in research based knowledge that provides measurable evidence for best practice. But at the same time, there is a growing distrust...... of the supremacy of this kind of knowledge, and traditional monopolies of knowledge are challenged (Gabbay & May, 2010). In the literature, there is an on-going debate about professional knowledge enacted in diverse settings. This debate presents a wide range of epistemological terminologies and typologies, which...

  19. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACLreconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1 Bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB reconstruction or hamstring reconstruction (HR; 2 Double bundle or single bundle; 3 Allograft or authograft; 4 Early or late reconstruction; 5 Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6 Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analysesfocused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.

  20. Psychological Interventions in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Evidence and Recommendations from Systematic Reviews and Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Christina; Mittag, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to summarize evidence and recommendations for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. We carried out a systematic literature search in several databases and on the websites of professional associations to identify relevant reviews and guidelines. In addition to the…

  1. Investment Banking and Analyst Objectivity: Evidence from Forecasts and Recommendations of Analysts Affiliated with M&A Advisors

    OpenAIRE

    Kolasinski, Adam; Kothari, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research finds some evidence that analysts affiliated with equity underwriters issue more optimistic earnings growth forecasts and optimistic recommendations of client stock than unaffiliated analysts. Unfortunately, these studies are unable to discriminate between three competing hypotheses for the apparent optimism. Under the bribery hypothesis, underwriting clients, with the promise of underwriting fees, coax analysts to compromise their objectivity. The execution-related conflict...

  2. Building reliable evidence from real-world data: methods, cautiousness and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corrao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Routinely stored information on healthcare utilisation in everyday clinical practice has proliferated over the past several decades. There is, however, some reluctance on the part of many health professionals to use observational data to support healthcare decisions, especially when data are derived from large databases. Challenges in conducting observational studies based on electronic databases include concern about the adequacy of study design and methods to minimise the effect of both misclassifications (in the absence of direct assessments of exposure and outcome validity and confounding (in the absence of randomisation. This paper points out issues that may compromise the validity of such studies, and approaches to managing analytic challenges. First, strategies of sampling within a large cohort, as an alternative to analysing the full cohort, will be presented. Second, methods for controlling outcome and exposure misclassifications will be described. Third, several techniques that take into account both measured and unmeasured confounders will also be presented. Fourth, some considerations regarding random uncertainty in the framework of observational studies using healthcare utilisation data will be discussed. Finally, some recommendations for good research practice are listed in this paper. The aim is to provide researchers with a methodological framework, while commenting on the value of new techniques for more advanced users.

  3. Behavioral intervention technologies: evidence review and recommendations for future research in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Schueller, Stephen M; Clarke, Gregory; Klinkman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A technical expert panel convened by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institute of Mental Health was charged with reviewing the state of research on behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) in mental health and identifying the top research priorities. BITs refers to behavioral and psychological interventions that use information and communication technology features to address behavioral and mental health outcomes. This study on the findings of the technical expert panel. Videoconferencing and standard telephone technologies to deliver psychotherapy have been well validated. Web-based interventions have shown efficacy across a broad range of mental health outcomes. Social media such as online support groups have produced disappointing outcomes when used alone. Mobile technologies have received limited attention for mental health outcomes. Virtual reality has shown good efficacy for anxiety and pediatric disorders. Serious gaming has received little work in mental health. Research focused on understanding reach, adherence, barriers and cost is recommended. Improvements in the collection, storage, analysis and visualization of big data will be required. New theoretical models and evaluation strategies will be required. Finally, for BITs to have a public health impact, research on implementation and application to prevention is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Probiotic Products in Canada with Clinical Evidence: What Can Gastroenterologists Recommend?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Reid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, defined as ‘live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host’, are finally becoming an option for gastroenterologists in Canada, after being available for many years in Japan, Europe and the United States of America. Unfortunately, Health Canada and the US Food and Drug Administration have not controlled the use of the term ‘probiotic’ or put into place United Nations and World Health Organization guidelines. The net result is that a host of products called ‘probiotics’ are available but are not truly probiotic. The aim of the present review was to discuss the rationale for probiotics in gastroenterology, and specifically examine which products are options for physicians in Canada, and which ones patients might be using. It is hoped that by clarifying what probiotics are, and the strengths and limitations of their use, specialists will be better placed to make recommendations on the role of these products in patient care. In due course, more clinically documented probiotics will emerge, some with therapeutic effects based on a better understanding of disease processes.

  5. Evidence-based management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sam K

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a review of evidence-based management (EBM), exploring whether management activities within healthcare have been, or can be, subject to the same scientific framework as clinical practice. The evidence-based approach was initially examined, noting the hierarchy of evidence ranging from randomized control trials to clinical anecdote. The literature varied in its degree of criticism of this approach; the most common concern referring to the assumed superiority of positivism. However, evidence-based practice was generally accepted as the best way forward. Stewart (1998) offered the only detailed exposition of EBM, outlining a necessary 'attitude of mind' both for EBM and for the creation of a research culture. However, the term 'clinical effectiveness' emerged as a possible replacement buzz-word for EBM (McClarey 1998). The term appears to encompass the sentiments of the evidence-based approach, but with a concomitant concern for economic factors. In this paper the author has examined the divide between those who viewed EBM as an activity for managers to make their own practice accountable and those who believed it to be a facilitative practice to help clinicians with evidence-based practice. Most papers acknowledged the limited research base for management activities within the health service and offered some explanation such as government policy constraints and lack of time. Nevertheless, the overall emphasis is that ideally there should be a management culture firmly based in evidence.

  6. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions – the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1–13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols. PMID:25077519

  7. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Johnson, Lorraine B; Maloney, Elizabeth L

    2014-09-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease were developed by the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS). The guidelines address three clinical questions - the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis for known tick bites, the effectiveness of erythema migrans treatment and the role of antibiotic retreatment in patients with persistent manifestations of Lyme disease. Healthcare providers who evaluate and manage patients with Lyme disease are the intended users of the new ILADS guidelines, which replace those issued in 2004 (Exp Rev Anti-infect Ther 2004;2:S1-13). These clinical practice guidelines are intended to assist clinicians by presenting evidence-based treatment recommendations, which follow the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. ILADS guidelines are not intended to be the sole source of guidance in managing Lyme disease and they should not be viewed as a substitute for clinical judgment nor used to establish treatment protocols.

  8. ICT Competence-Based Learning Object Recommendations for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergis, Stylianos; Zervas, Panagiotis; Sampson, Demetrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Recommender Systems (RS) have been applied in the Technology enhanced Learning (TeL) field for facilitating, among others, Learning Object (LO) selection and retrieval. Most of the existing approaches, however, aim at accommodating the needs of learners and teacher-oriented RS are still an under-investigated field. Moreover, the systems that focus…

  9. Towards Analogy-based Recommendation : Benchmarking of Perceived Analogy Semantics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lofi, C.; Tintarev, N.; Bogers, T.; Koolen, M.; Mobasher, B.; Said, A.; Tuzhilin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Requests for recommendation can be seen as a form of query for candidate items, ranked by relevance. Users are however o‰en
    unable to crisply de€ne what they are looking for. One of the core concepts of natural communication for describing and explaining
    complex information needs in an

  10. Content-based music recommendation using underlying music preference structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleymani, Mohammad; Aljanaki, A.; Wiering, F.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    The cold start problem for new users or items is a great challenge for recommender systems. New items can be positioned within the existing items using a similarity metric to estimate their ratings. However, the calculation of similarity varies by domain and available resources. In this paper, we

  11. an architecture-based technique to mobile contact recommendation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Aside being able to store the name of contacts and their phone numbers, there are ... the artificial neural network technique [21], along with ... Recommendation is part of everyday life. This concept ... However, to use RSs some level of intelligence must be ...... [3] Min J.-K. & Cho S.-B.Mobile Human Network Management.

  12. Second Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2015-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2015 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  13. CBRecSys 2016. New Trends on Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2016 workshop provides a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  14. CBRecSys 2015. New Trends on Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2015 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  15. Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2014)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Cantádor, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2014 workshop aims to address this by providing a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  16. Third Workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2016)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Musto, Cataldo

    2016-01-01

    While content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, it has not seen the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. However, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either...... these data sources should be combined to provided the best recommendation performance. The CBRecSys 2016 workshop provides a dedicated venue for papers dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommendation....

  17. History of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger L Sur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay reviews the historical circumstances surrounding the introduction and evolution of evidence-based medicine. Criticisms of the approach are also considered. Weaknesses of existing standards of clinical practice and efforts to bring more certainty to clinical decision making were the foundation for evidence-based medicine, which integrates epidemiology and medical research. Because of its utility in designing randomized clinical trials, assessing the quality of the literature, and applying medical research at the bedside, evidence-based medicine will continue to have a strong influence on everyday clinical practice.

  18. Trialling nutrient recommendations for slow lorises (Nycticebus spp.) based on wild feeding ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, F; Dierenfeld, E; Wirdateti, W; Donati, G; Nekaris, K A I

    2018-02-01

    Slow loris (Nycticebus spp.) captive diets have been based on routine and anecdotes rather than scientific fact. The growing body of evidence contradicts the high fruit diet supported by such anecdotes. Non-human primate nutrient requirements are grouped into new (based on the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus) or old world (based on rhesus macaques Macaca mulatta) primates. Slow lorises are known to suffer from many health ailments in captivity such as dental disease, obesity, wasting and kidney issues all of which have been linked to diet. This study aimed to estimate nutrient intake from free-ranging slow lorises and to determine whether this intake can be used as nutrient recommendations. We collected data of nutrient intake, food passage rate and digestibility of captive slow lorises on three diet treatments 1: current captive type diet which is mostly fruits, 2: wild-type diet made only of food items from their natural diet, 3: new diet made to reflect wild slow loris nutrient intake. In order to validate our nutrient recommendations, diets 2 and 3 would have to be significantly different to Diet 1 in terms of nutrients, but not different from each other. Captive diets were significantly higher in soluble carbohydrates and lower in minerals and fibre fractions than both diets 2 and 3. Diets 2 and 3 led to a significantly increased food passage time and to more effective fibre and calcium digestion compared to Diet 1. We also observed obese individuals lost weight and underweight individuals gained weight. Our nutrient recommendations have been validated by our trials, and new or old world monkey nutrient recommendations are not consistent with our results. Diets should be high in protein and fibre and low in soluble carbohydrates and fats. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  20. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. Evidence-Based Definition and Classification: A Commentary . . . . . . Steve O'Rahilly 37 PART II: PREVENTION OF DIABETES 4. Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes...

  1. Development of a Recommender System based on Personal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katsuaki; Hori, Koichi; Yamamoto, Masato

    The flood of information on the Internet makes a person who surf it without some strong intention strayed into it. One of the ways to control the balance between a person and the flood is a recommender system by computer, and many web sites use it. These systems work on a web site for the same kind of items. However the field of personal activity is not limited to handle the same kind of thing and a web site, but also offline area in the real world. To handle personal offline activities, LifeLog is proposed as method to record it, but the main purpose of LifeLog is recording a personal history. How to use a history has still been studied stage. The authors have developed a recommender system that captures personal context from history of personal online and offline activities, treats information on web sites as a large set of context, and finds out and extends overlap of them, then recommends information located there. The aim of the system is that a person can enjoy waves of information again. The system worked as a part of My-life Assist Service. It was a service for mobile phones provided by NTT DoCoMo, Inc. as a field experiment from Dec. 2007 to Feb. 2008.

  2. Collaborating Filtering Community Image Recommendation System Based on Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Tao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of smart city, the development of intelligent mobile terminal and wireless network, the traditional text information service no longer meet the needs of the community residents, community image service appeared as a new media service. “There are pictures of the truth” has become a community residents to understand and master the new dynamic community, image information service has become a new information service. However, there are two major problems in image information service. Firstly, the underlying eigenvalues extracted by current image feature extraction techniques are difficult for users to understand, and there is a semantic gap between the image content itself and the user’s understanding; secondly, in community life of the image data increasing quickly, it is difficult to find their own interested image data. Aiming at the two problems, this paper proposes a unified image semantic scene model to express the image content. On this basis, a collaborative filtering recommendation model of fusion scene semantics is proposed. In the recommendation model, a comprehensiveness and accuracy user interest model is proposed to improve the recommendation quality. The results of the present study have achieved good results in the pilot cities of Wenzhou and Yan'an, and it is applied normally.

  3. Learning material recommendation based on case-based reasoning similarity scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Mona; Mokmin, Nur Azlina Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    A personalized learning material recommendation is important in any Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS). Case-based Reasoning (CBR) is an Artificial Intelligent Algorithm that has been widely used in the development of ITS applications. This study has developed an ITS application that applied the CBR algorithm in the development process. The application has the ability to recommend the most suitable learning material to the specific student based on information in the student profile. In order to test the ability of the application in recommending learning material, two versions of the application were created. The first version displayed the most suitable learning material and the second version displayed the least preferable learning material. The results show the application has successfully assigned the students to the most suitable learning material.

  4. Evidence-based librarianship: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-10-01

    To demonstrate how the core characteristics of both evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based health care (EBHC) can be adapted to health sciences librarianship. Narrative review essay involving development of a conceptual framework. The author describes the central features of EBM and EBHC. Following each description of a central feature, the author then suggests ways that this feature applies to health sciences librarianship. First, the decision-making processes of EBM and EBHC are compatible with health sciences librarianship. Second, the EBM and EBHC values of favoring rigorously produced scientific evidence in decision making are congruent with the core values of librarianship. Third, the hierarchical levels of evidence can be applied to librarianship with some modifications. Library researchers currently favor descriptive-survey and case-study methods over systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other higher levels of evidence. The library literature nevertheless contains diverse examples of randomized controlled trials, controlled-comparison studies, and cohort studies conducted by health sciences librarians. Health sciences librarians are confronted with making many practical decisions. Evidence-based librarianship offers a decision-making framework, which integrates the best available research evidence. By employing this framework and the higher levels of research evidence it promotes, health sciences librarians can lay the foundation for more collaborative and scientific endeavors.

  5. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-01-01

    This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC) that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between sc...

  6. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work.

  7. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  8. Improved Personalized Recommendation Based on Causal Association Rule and Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wu; Qing, Fang; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    There are usually limited user evaluation of resources on a recommender system, which caused an extremely sparse user rating matrix, and this greatly reduce the accuracy of personalized recommendation, especially for new users or new items. This paper presents a recommendation method based on rating prediction using causal association rules.…

  9. Career Goal-Based E-Learning Recommendation Using Enhanced Collaborative Filtering and PrefixSpan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueying; Ye, Lu

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how e-learning recommender systems nowadays have applied different kinds of techniques to recommend personalized learning content for users based on their preference, goals, interests and background information. However, the cold-start problem which exists in traditional recommendation algorithms are still left over in…

  10. The Effect of Incorporating Good Learners' Ratings in e-Learning Content-Based Recommender System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghauth, Khairil Imran; Abdullah, Nor Aniza

    2011-01-01

    One of the anticipated challenges of today's e-learning is to solve the problem of recommending from a large number of learning materials. In this study, we introduce a novel architecture for an e-learning recommender system. More specifically, this paper comprises the following phases i) to propose an e-learning recommender system based on…

  11. Measuring Costs to Community-Based Agencies for Implementation of an Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason M; Connell, Christian M

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare reform has led to an increase in dissemination of evidence-based practices. Cost is frequently cited as a significant yet rarely studied barrier to dissemination of evidence-based practices and the associated improvements in quality of care. This study describes an approach to measuring the incremental, unreimbursed costs in staff time and direct costs to community-based clinics implementing an evidence-based practice through participating in a learning collaborative. Initial implementation costs exceeding those for providing "treatment as usual" were collected for ten clinics implementing trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy through participation in 10-month learning collaboratives. Incremental implementation costs of these ten community-based clinic teams averaged the equivalent of US$89,575 (US$ 2012). The most costly activities were training, supervision, preparation time, and implementation team meetings. Recommendations are made for further research on implementation costs, dissemination of evidence-based practices, and implications for researchers and policy makers.

  12. Music recommendation according to human motion based on kernel CCA-based relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkushi, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Haseyama, Miki

    2011-12-01

    In this article, a method for recommendation of music pieces according to human motions based on their kernel canonical correlation analysis (CCA)-based relationship is proposed. In order to perform the recommendation between different types of multimedia data, i.e., recommendation of music pieces from human motions, the proposed method tries to estimate their relationship. Specifically, the correlation based on kernel CCA is calculated as the relationship in our method. Since human motions and music pieces have various time lengths, it is necessary to calculate the correlation between time series having different lengths. Therefore, new kernel functions for human motions and music pieces, which can provide similarities between data that have different time lengths, are introduced into the calculation of the kernel CCA-based correlation. This approach effectively provides a solution to the conventional problem of not being able to calculate the correlation from multimedia data that have various time lengths. Therefore, the proposed method can perform accurate recommendation of best matched music pieces according to a target human motion from the obtained correlation. Experimental results are shown to verify the performance of the proposed method.

  13. Metamodels for Computer-Based Engineering Design: Survey and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Peplinski, Jesse; Koch, Patrick N.; Allen, Janet K.

    1997-01-01

    The use of statistical techniques to build approximations of expensive computer analysis codes pervades much of todays engineering design. These statistical approximations, or metamodels, are used to replace the actual expensive computer analyses, facilitating multidisciplinary, multiobjective optimization and concept exploration. In this paper we review several of these techniques including design of experiments, response surface methodology, Taguchi methods, neural networks, inductive learning, and kriging. We survey their existing application in engineering design and then address the dangers of applying traditional statistical techniques to approximate deterministic computer analysis codes. We conclude with recommendations for the appropriate use of statistical approximation techniques in given situations and how common pitfalls can be avoided.

  14. Layout Study and Application of Mobile App Recommendation Approach Based On Spark Streaming Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. T.; Chen, T. T.; Yan, C.; Pan, H.

    2018-05-01

    For App recommended areas of mobile phone software, made while using conduct App application recommended combined weighted Slope One algorithm collaborative filtering algorithm items based on further improvement of the traditional collaborative filtering algorithm in cold start, data matrix sparseness and other issues, will recommend Spark stasis parallel algorithm platform, the introduction of real-time streaming streaming real-time computing framework to improve real-time software applications recommended.

  15. A Study of Scenic Spot Living Facility Recommendation Based on Collaborative Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the collection of massive complex information, the collaborative filtering system can work as a highly efficient information screening tool. It can recommend reasonable information reserve with multi angles according to the living service facility information of the scenic spots. The collaborative filtering system can collect information and forecast rating results based on users’ preference. According to different recommendation goals, the collaborative filtering system can recommend results for user feedback and give feedback of the recommendation results in various forms.

  16. Development of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Recommendations: Relevance and Influence of the Evidence on the Decision-Making Process in France and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Laura; Paget, W John; Mosnier, Anne; Buthion, Valérie; Cohen, Jean Marie; Perrier, Lionel; Späth, Hans Martin

    2016-01-01

    Target groups for seasonal influenza vaccination are defined at the country level and are based on several factors. However, little is known about the national decision-making procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare the evidence used for the development of recommendations and its impact on the choice of target groups in France and the Netherlands. A preliminary documentary analysis identified institutions to include in the assessment: governmental authorities, research institutions, associations, and manufacturers. At least one expert from each group was invited to our study. Thirty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2013 (16 France, 17 the Netherlands). We used NVivo10® to perform a thematic content analysis. Clinical/epidemiological studies were the evidence most used in both countries. Economic models were increasingly being used; these had greater influence on the decision making in the Netherlands than in France, probably because of the presence of a modeler. Generally, the quality of the evidence used was poor, although no systematic use of standard protocol for its assessment was observed. A general protocol was sometimes used in France; however, the personal judgment of the experts was crucial for the assessment in both countries. There were differences in the target groups, for example, pregnant women, recommended only in France. France and the Netherlands use similar evidence for developing vaccination recommendations, although different decisions are sometimes made regarding target groups. This could be associated with the lack of systematic standard appraisals, increasing the influence of the experts' judgment on decision making. The development of standards for the appraisal of evidence is recommended. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends......The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  18. The development of evidence-based guidelines in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, C M

    2013-02-01

    Use of guidelines is an important means of reducing the gap between research and clinical practice. Sound and unbiased information should be available to enable dental professionals to provide better clinical treatment for their patients. The development of clinical guidelines in dentistry should follow standard and transparent methodology. The purpose of this article is to propose important steps for developing evidence-based clinical recommendations in dentistry. Initially, dental guidelines should be extensively sought and assessed to answer focused clinical questions. If there is a paucity of guidelines or if existing guidelines are not of good methodological quality, systematic reviews should be searched or conducted to serve as a basis for the development of evidence-based guidelines. When systematic reviews are produced, they should be rigorous in order to provide the best evidence possible. In the last phase of the process, the overall quality of evidence should be scrutinized and assessed, together with other factors (balance between treatment effects and side effects, patients' values, and cost-effectiveness of therapy) to determine the strength of recommendations. It is expected this approach will result in the development of sound clinical guidelines and consequent improvement of dental treatment.

  19. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logesh Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented.

  20. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Logesh; Vairavasundaram, Subramaniyaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW) and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented. PMID:27069468

  1. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Logesh; Vairavasundaram, Subramaniyaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW) and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented.

  2. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Consensus-based recommendations for the management of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Tamas; Foeldvari, Ivan; Anton, Jordi; de Boer, Joke; Czitrom-Guillaume, Severine; Edelsten, Clive; Gepstein, Raz; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Simonini, Gabriele; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastian J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke; Walscheid, Karoline; Pálinkás, Annamária; Pattani, Reshma; Györgyi, Zoltán; Kozma, Richárd; Boom, Victor; Ponyi, Andrea; Ravelli, Angelo; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2018-03-28

    In 2012, a European initiative called S ingle Hub and Access point for pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched to optimise and disseminate diagnostic and management regimens in Europe for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children and uveitis is possibly its most devastating extra-articular manifestation. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is mostly based on physicians' experience. Consequently, treatment practices differ widely, within and between nations. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Recommendations were developed by an evidence-informed consensus process using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedures. A committee was constituted, consisting of nine experienced paediatric rheumatologists and three experts in ophthalmology from Europe. Recommendations derived from a validated systematic literature review were evaluated by an Expert Committee and subsequently discussed at two consensus meetings using nominal group techniques. Recommendations were accepted if >80% agreement was reached (including all three ophthalmologists). In total, 22 recommendations were accepted (with >80% agreement among experts): 3 on diagnosis, 5 on disease activity measurements, 12 on treatment and 2 on future recommendations. The SHARE initiative aims to identify best practices for treatment of patients suffering from JIA-associated uveitis. Within this remit, recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of JIA-associated uveitis have been formulated by an evidence-informed consensus process to suggest a standard of care for JIA-associated uveitis patients throughout Europe. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Enhancing content-based recommendation with the task model of classication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, S.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Schreiber, A.Th.; Cimiano, P.; Pinto, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we define reusable inference steps for content-based recommender systems based on semantically-enriched collections. We show an instantiation in the case of recommending artworks and concepts based on a museum domain ontology and a user profile consisting of rated artworks and rated

  5. Validity evidence based on test content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen; Faulkner-Bond, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Validity evidence based on test content is one of the five forms of validity evidence stipulated in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing developed by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and National Council on Measurement in Education. In this paper, we describe the logic and theory underlying such evidence and describe traditional and modern methods for gathering and analyzing content validity data. A comprehensive review of the literature and of the aforementioned Standards is presented. For educational tests and other assessments targeting knowledge and skill possessed by examinees, validity evidence based on test content is necessary for building a validity argument to support the use of a test for a particular purpose. By following the methods described in this article, practitioners have a wide arsenal of tools available for determining how well the content of an assessment is congruent with and appropriate for the specific testing purposes.

  6. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Rapp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%–2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress.

  7. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomassen-Hilgersom Ilona L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines.

  8. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  9. Queer challenges to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay; Grant, Alec

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to queer evidence-based practice by troubling the concepts of evidence, knowledge and mental illness. The evidence-based narrative that emerged within biomedicine has dominated health care. The biomedical notion of 'evidence' has been critiqued extensively and is seen as exclusive and limiting, and even though the social constructionist paradigm attempts to challenge the authority of biomedicine to legitimate what constitutes acceptable evidence or knowledge for those experiencing mental illness, biomedical notions of evidence appear to remain relatively intact. Queer theory offers theoretical tools to disrupt biomedical norms and challenges biomedical normativity to indicate how marginalisation occurs when normative truths about mental health classify those who differ from the norm as 'ill' or 'disordered'. Queer theory's emphasis on normativity serves the political aim to subvert marginalisation and bring about radical social and material change. Reference will be made to mental health subjects within each discourse by indicating how the body acts as a vehicle for knowing. Deleuzian notions of the rhizome are used as metaphor to suggest a relational approach to knowledge that does away with either/or positions in either biomedical, or queer knowledge to arrive at a both/and position where the biomedical, constructionist and queer are interrelated and entangled in needing the other for their own evolution. However, queer does not ask for assimilation but celebrates difference by remaining outside to disrupt that which is easily overlooked, assumed to be natural or represented as the norm. The task of queer knowledge is to do justice to the lives lived in the name of evidence-based practice and demands that we consider the relations of power where knowledge is produced. This pursuit creates different knowledge spaces where we identify new intersections that allow for socially just understandings of knowing or evidence to emerge. © 2013 John Wiley

  10. Report on RecSys 2016 Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn; Musto, Cataldo

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the CBRecSys 2016 workshop, the third edition of the workshop on New Trends in Content-based Recommender Systems, co-located with RecSys 2016 in Boston, MA. Content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, but it has not seen the same...... for work dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommender systems....... level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. Nevertheless, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either in addition to or instead of ratings and implicit usage data. The CBRecSys workshop series provides a dedicated venue...

  11. Evidence-based dentistry: Future aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Mohindra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, clinical decisions in dentistry have been based on the experience of the dentist. If the given treatment works, it was utilized again, but if the results were disappointing, the procedure was deserted. Evaluating clinical treatment in this fashion is difficult because it is hard to know which factors are important for success and which contribute to failure. This came with the concept of evidence-based approach which facilitates conclusions for clinical practice based on sound research studies.

  12. Social and Behavioral Aspects of a Tag-Based Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has emerged as a useful means to organize and share resources on the Web. Recommender systems have been utilized tags for identifying similar resources and generate personalized recommendations. In this paper, we analyze social and behavioral aspects of a tag-based recommender...... system which suggests similar Web pages based on the similarity of their tags. Tagging behavior and language anomalies in tagging activities are some aspects examined from an experiment involving 38 people from 12 countries....

  13. Evidence-Based Advances in Ferret Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh; Chassang, Lucile; Zoller, Graham

    2017-09-01

    This literature review covers approximately 35 years of veterinary medicine. This article develops the current state of knowledge in pet ferret medicine regarding the most common diseases according to evidence-based data and gives insight into further axis of research. Literature review was conducted through identification of keywords (title + ferret) with Web-based database searching. To appreciate the methodological quality and the level of evidence of each article included in the review, full-text versions were reviewed and questions addressed in the articles were formulated. Analysis of the articles' content was performed by the authors, and relevant clinical information was extracted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epistemologic inquiries in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ashcroft, Richard E

    2009-04-01

    Since the term "evidence-based medicine" (EBM) first appeared in the scientific literature in 1991, the concept has had considerable influence in many parts of the world. Most professional societies, the public,and funding agencies have accepted EBM with remarkable enthusiasm. The concept of evidence-based practice is now applied in management, education, criminology, and social work. Yet, EBM has attracted controversy: its critics allege that EBM uses a narrow concept of evidence and a naive conception of the relationships between evidence, theory, and practice. They also contend that EBM presents itself as a radical restructuring of medical knowledge that discredits more traditional ways of knowing in medicine, largely in the interests of people with a particular investment in the enterprise of large-scale clinical trials. Because EBM proposes aspecific relationship between theory, evidence, and knowledge, its theoretical basis can be understood as an epistemological system. Undertaking epistemological inquiry is important because the adoption of a particular epistemological view defines how science is conducted. In this paper, we challenge this critical view of EBM by examining how EBM fits into broad epistemological debates within the philosophy of science. We consider how EBM relates to some classical debates regarding the nature of science and knowledge. We investigate EBM from the perspective of major epistemological theories (logical-positivism/inductivism, deductivism/falsificationism/theory-ladeness of observations, explanationism/holism, instrumentalism, underdetermination theory by evidence). We first explore the relationship between evidence and knowledge and discuss philosophical support for the main way that evidence is used in medicine: (1) in the philosophical tradition that "rational thinkers respect their evidence," we show that EBM refers to making medical decisions that are consistent with evidence, (2) as a reliable sign, symptom, or mark to

  15. Evidence-based intervention in physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, Gregory W; Parra, Diana C; Sarmiento, Olga L

    2012-01-01

    Promotion of physical activity is a priority for health agencies. We searched for reviews of physical activity interventions, published between 2000 and 2011, and identified effective, promising, or emerging interventions from around the world. The informational approaches of community......-wide and mass media campaigns, and short physical activity messages targeting key community sites are recommended. Behavioural and social approaches are effective, introducing social support for physical activity within communities and worksites, and school-based strategies that encompass physical education......, classroom activities, after-school sports, and active transport. Recommended environmental and policy approaches include creation and improvement of access to places for physical activity with informational outreach activities, community-scale and street-scale urban design and land use, active transport...

  16. [What else is Evidence-based Medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswaldt, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The practice of evidence-based medicine means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence. Strange enough, scientific discussion focuses on external evidence from systematic research, but neglects its counterpart, i.e., individual clinical expertise. Apart from a lack of appropriate intellectual tools for approaching the latter, this might be due to the mutual concealment of thought and action, of sensor and motor activity (Viktor von Weizsaecker's principle of the revolving door). Behind this, and incommensurably different from each other, lie the world of physics and the world of biology with an ego animal, that is, the dilemma of the self-conscious subject in a world of objects. When practicing medicine, this dilemma of self-reference is being resolved but only through a holistic approach combining rational and external evidence with biographical, spiritual, emotional and pre-rational elements represented in the physician's individual clinical expertise. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. A Novel Mobile Personalized Recommended Method Based on Money Flow Model for Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalized recommended method is widely used to recommend commodities for target customers in e-commerce sector. The core idea of merchandise personalized recommendation can be applied to financial field, which can also achieve stock personalized recommendation. This paper proposes a new recommended method using collaborative filtering based on user fuzzy clustering and predicts the trend of those stocks based on money flow. We use M/G/1 queue system with multiple vacations and server close-down time to measure practical money flow. Based on the indicated results of money flow, we can select the more valued stock to recommend to investors. The experimental results show that the proposed method provides investors with reliable practical investment guidance and receiving more returns.

  18. A Personalized Recommendation-Based Mobile Learning Approach to Improving the Reading Performance of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a personalized recommendation-based mobile language learning approach is proposed. A mobile learning system has been developed based on the approach by providing a reading material recommendation mechanism for guiding EFL (English as Foreign Language) students to read articles that match their preferences and knowledge levels, and a…

  19. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine is of vital importance for improving quality of care, promoting public health and health system development. Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine allows using the most powerful information source, which have ever existed in medicine. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching Evidence-Based Medicine, including long-term outcomes of training. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Astana, where the Scientific and Educational Center of Evidence-Based Medicine was established in 2010 with the help of the corresponding project of the World Bank. The participants of the study were the faculty trained in Evidence-Based Medicine at the workshop "Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine" for the period of 2010-2015 years. There were a total of 16 workshops during the period, and 323 employees were trained. All participants were asked to complete our questionnaire two times: before the training - pre-training (to determine the initial level of a listener) and after the training - post-training (to determine the acquired level and get the feedback). Questionnaires were prepared in such a way, that the majority of questions before and after training were identical. Thus, it provided a clear picture of the effectiveness of training. Questions in the survey were open-ended so that the respondents had the opportunity to freely and fully express their views. The main part of the questionnaires included the following questions: "Do you understand what evidence-based medicine is", "how do you understand what the study design means", "what is randomization", "how research is classified", "do you know the steps of decision-making according to Evidence-Based Medicine, list them", "what literature do you prefer to use when searching for information (print, electronic, etc.)", "what resources on the Internet do you prefer to use". Only 30-35% of respondents gave correct answers to the questions on

  20. Evidence and practice in spine registries A systematic review, and recommendations for future design of registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooff, M.L.; Jacobs, W.C.H.; Willems, P.C.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; de Kleuver, M.; Peul, W.C.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Fritzell, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose-We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the "quality

  1. Some issues related to evidence-based implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar E Carlsson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews relevant dental literature to answer some frequent questions related to evidence-based implantology. There are hundreds of implant systems on the market, but the majority lack clinical documentation. Recommended number of implants for full-arch fixed prostheses is four or five in the mandible but at least six in the maxilla. Less expensive implant-retained overdentures make implant treatment available to a greater portion of edentulous subjects. Mandibular overdentures on two implants, and even one implant, have shown excellent long-term outcomes. In the maxilla, less than four implants are not recommended for good results. Single implant restorations have good prognosis, but placement of the implant should be postponed until adulthood. Osseointegrated implants have revolutionized clinical dentistry. However, in a global perspective, implants make up only a small part of all prosthodontic treatment. Knowledge and skill in conventional prosthodontics must be maintained as it will remain the most common part of the specialty.

  2. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration......, on the use of toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to correct preoperative corneal astigmatism, the use of intracameral and topical antibiotics to prevent endophthalmitis, choice of anti-inflammatory medication to control postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular oedema, the use of immediate...

  3. Evidence-based approach for continuous improvement of occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Lamberto; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Magnavita, Nicola; Durando, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    It was recognized early on that an Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) approach could be applied to Public Health (PH), including the area of Occupational Health (OH). The aim of Evidence-Based Occupational Health (EBOH) is to ensure safety, health, and well-being in the workplace. Currently, high-quality research is necessary in order to provide arguments and scientific evidence upon which effective, efficient, and sustainable preventive measures and policies are to be developed in the workplace in Western countries. Occupational physicians need to integrate available scientific evidence and existing recommendations with a framework of national employment laws and regulations. This paper addresses the state of the art of scientific evidence available in the field (i.e., efficacy of interventions, usefulness of education and training of workers, and need of a multidisciplinary strategy integrated within the national PH programs) and the main critical issues for their implementation. Promoting good health is a fundamental part of the smart, inclusive growth objectives of Europe 2020 - Europe's growth strategy: keeping people healthy and active for longer has a positive impact on productivity and competitiveness. It appears clear that health quality and safety in the workplace play a key role for smart, sustainable, and inclusive growth in Western countries.

  4. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities for im...

  5. Barriers to compliance with evidence-based care in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Kudyakov, Rustam; Ballard, David; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-03-01

    We have preciously demonstrated that trauma patients receive less than two-thirds of the care recommended by evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this study was to identify patients least likely to receive optimal care. Records of a random sample of 774 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center (2006-2008) with moderate to severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) were reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific processes of care (T-POC) endorsed by Advanced Trauma Life Support, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Brain Trauma Foundation, Surgical Care Improvement Project, and the Glue Grant Consortium based on evidence or consensus. These encompassed all aspects of trauma care, including initial evaluation, resuscitation, operative care, critical care, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify patients likely to receive recommended care. Study patients were eligible for a total of 2,603 T-POC, of which only 1,515 (58%) were provided to the patient. Compliance was highest for T-POC involving resuscitation (83%) and was lowest for neurosurgical interventions (17%). Increasing severity of head injuries was associated with lower compliance, while intensive care unit stay was associated with higher compliance. There was no relationship between compliance and patient demographics, socioeconomic status, overall injury severity, or daily volume of trauma admissions. Little over half of recommended care was delivered to trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries. Patients with increasing severity of traumatic brain injuries were least likely to receive optimal care. However, differences among patient subgroups are small in relation to the overall gap between observed and recommended care. II.

  6. Conducting Clinically Based Intimate Partner Violence Research: Safety Protocol Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jocelyn C; Glass, Nancy E; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    Maintaining safety is of utmost importance during research involving participants who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Limited guidance on safety protocols to protect participants is available, particularly information related to technology-based approaches to informed consent, data collection, and contacting participants during the course of a study. The purpose of the article is to provide details on the safety protocol developed and utilized with women receiving care at an urban HIV clinic and who were taking part in an observational study of IPV, mental health symptoms, and substance abuse and their relationship to HIV treatment adherence. The protocol presents the technological strategies to promote safety and allow autonomy in participant decision-making throughout the research process, including Voice over Internet Protocol telephone numbers, and tablet-based eligibility screening and data collection. Protocols for management of participants at risk for suicide and/or intimate partner homicide that included automated high-risk messaging to participants and research staff and facilitated disclosure of risk to clinical staff based on participant preferences are discussed. Use of technology and partnership with clinic staff helped to provide an environment where research regarding IPV could be conducted without undue burden or risk to participants. Utilizing tablet-based survey administration provided multiple practical and safety benefits for participants. Most women who screened into high-risk categories for suicide or intimate partner homicide did not choose to have their results shared with their healthcare providers, indicating the importance of allowing participants control over information sharing whenever possible.

  7. Action to Support Practices Implement Research Evidence (ASPIRE): protocol for a cluster-randomised evaluation of adaptable implementation packages targeting 'high impact' clinical practice recommendations in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Thomas A; Hartley, Suzanne; Glidewell, Liz; Farrin, Amanda J; Lawton, Rebecca; McEachan, Rosemary R C; Ingleson, Emma; Heudtlass, Peter; Collinson, Michelle; Clamp, Susan; Hunter, Cheryl; Ward, Vicky; Hulme, Claire; Meads, David; Bregantini, Daniele; Carder, Paul; Foy, Robbie

    2016-02-29

    There are recognised gaps between evidence and practice in general practice, a setting which provides particular challenges for implementation. We earlier screened clinical guideline recommendations to derive a set of 'high impact' indicators based upon criteria including potential for significant patient benefit, scope for improved practice and amenability to measurement using routinely collected data. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted, adaptable intervention package to implement four targeted, high impact recommendations in general practice. The research programme Action to Support Practice Implement Research Evidence (ASPIRE) includes a pair of pragmatic cluster-randomised trials which use a balanced incomplete block design. Clusters are general practices in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom (UK), recruited using an 'opt-out' recruitment process. The intervention package adapted to each recommendation includes combinations of audit and feedback, educational outreach visits and computerised prompts with embedded behaviour change techniques selected on the basis of identified needs and barriers to change. In trial 1, practices are randomised to adapted interventions targeting either diabetes control or risky prescribing and those in trial 2 to adapted interventions targeting either blood pressure control in patients at risk of cardiovascular events or anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. The respective primary endpoints comprise achievement of all recommended target levels of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure and cholesterol in patients with type 2 diabetes, a composite indicator of risky prescribing, achievement of recommended blood pressure targets for specific patient groups and anticoagulation prescribing in patients with atrial fibrillation. We are also randomising practices to a fifth, non-intervention control group to further assess Hawthorne effects. Outcomes will be assessed using routinely collected data

  8. Recommendations for the Use of Automated Gray Matter Segmentation Tools: Evidence from Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eileanoir B.; Gregory, Sarah; Johnson, Hans J.; Durr, Alexandra; Leavitt, Blair R.; Roos, Raymund A.; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Scahill, Rachael I.

    2017-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate segmentation tool is a challenge facing any researcher aiming to measure gray matter (GM) volume. Many tools have been compared, yet there is currently no method that can be recommended above all others; in particular, there is a lack of validation in disease cohorts. This work utilizes a clinical dataset to conduct an extensive comparison of segmentation tools. Our results confirm that all tools have advantages and disadvantages, and we present a series of considerations that may be of use when selecting a GM segmentation method, rather than a ranking of these tools. Seven segmentation tools were compared using 3 T MRI data from 20 controls, 40 premanifest Huntington’s disease (HD), and 40 early HD participants. Segmented volumes underwent detailed visual quality control. Reliability and repeatability of total, cortical, and lobular GM were investigated in repeated baseline scans. The relationship between each tool was also examined. Longitudinal within-group change over 3 years was assessed via generalized least squares regression to determine sensitivity of each tool to disease effects. Visual quality control and raw volumes highlighted large variability between tools, especially in occipital and temporal regions. Most tools showed reliable performance and the volumes were generally correlated. Results for longitudinal within-group change varied between tools, especially within lobular regions. These differences highlight the need for careful selection of segmentation methods in clinical neuroimaging studies. This guide acts as a primer aimed at the novice or non-technical imaging scientist providing recommendations for the selection of cohort-appropriate GM segmentation software. PMID:29066997

  9. Recommendations for the Use of Automated Gray Matter Segmentation Tools: Evidence from Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileanoir B. Johnson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of an appropriate segmentation tool is a challenge facing any researcher aiming to measure gray matter (GM volume. Many tools have been compared, yet there is currently no method that can be recommended above all others; in particular, there is a lack of validation in disease cohorts. This work utilizes a clinical dataset to conduct an extensive comparison of segmentation tools. Our results confirm that all tools have advantages and disadvantages, and we present a series of considerations that may be of use when selecting a GM segmentation method, rather than a ranking of these tools. Seven segmentation tools were compared using 3 T MRI data from 20 controls, 40 premanifest Huntington’s disease (HD, and 40 early HD participants. Segmented volumes underwent detailed visual quality control. Reliability and repeatability of total, cortical, and lobular GM were investigated in repeated baseline scans. The relationship between each tool was also examined. Longitudinal within-group change over 3 years was assessed via generalized least squares regression to determine sensitivity of each tool to disease effects. Visual quality control and raw volumes highlighted large variability between tools, especially in occipital and temporal regions. Most tools showed reliable performance and the volumes were generally correlated. Results for longitudinal within-group change varied between tools, especially within lobular regions. These differences highlight the need for careful selection of segmentation methods in clinical neuroimaging studies. This guide acts as a primer aimed at the novice or non-technical imaging scientist providing recommendations for the selection of cohort-appropriate GM segmentation software.

  10. Recommendations for the Use of Automated Gray Matter Segmentation Tools: Evidence from Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eileanoir B; Gregory, Sarah; Johnson, Hans J; Durr, Alexandra; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund A; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Scahill, Rachael I

    2017-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate segmentation tool is a challenge facing any researcher aiming to measure gray matter (GM) volume. Many tools have been compared, yet there is currently no method that can be recommended above all others; in particular, there is a lack of validation in disease cohorts. This work utilizes a clinical dataset to conduct an extensive comparison of segmentation tools. Our results confirm that all tools have advantages and disadvantages, and we present a series of considerations that may be of use when selecting a GM segmentation method, rather than a ranking of these tools. Seven segmentation tools were compared using 3 T MRI data from 20 controls, 40 premanifest Huntington's disease (HD), and 40 early HD participants. Segmented volumes underwent detailed visual quality control. Reliability and repeatability of total, cortical, and lobular GM were investigated in repeated baseline scans. The relationship between each tool was also examined. Longitudinal within-group change over 3 years was assessed via generalized least squares regression to determine sensitivity of each tool to disease effects. Visual quality control and raw volumes highlighted large variability between tools, especially in occipital and temporal regions. Most tools showed reliable performance and the volumes were generally correlated. Results for longitudinal within-group change varied between tools, especially within lobular regions. These differences highlight the need for careful selection of segmentation methods in clinical neuroimaging studies. This guide acts as a primer aimed at the novice or non-technical imaging scientist providing recommendations for the selection of cohort-appropriate GM segmentation software.

  11. Policy recommendations for addressing privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbogu, Ubaka; Burningham, Sarah; Ollenberger, Adam; Calder, Kathryn; Du, Li; El Emam, Khaled; Hyde-Lay, Robyn; Isasi, Rosario; Joly, Yann; Kerr, Ian; Malin, Bradley; McDonald, Michael; Penney, Steven; Piat, Gayle; Roy, Denis-Claude; Sugarman, Jeremy; Vercauteren, Suzanne; Verhenneman, Griet; West, Lori; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-02-03

    The increased use of human biological material for cell-based research and clinical interventions poses risks to the privacy of patients and donors, including the possibility of re-identification of individuals from anonymized cell lines and associated genetic data. These risks will increase as technologies and databases used for re-identification become affordable and more sophisticated. Policies that require ongoing linkage of cell lines to donors' clinical information for research and regulatory purposes, and existing practices that limit research participants' ability to control what is done with their genetic data, amplify the privacy concerns. To date, the privacy issues associated with cell-based research and interventions have not received much attention in the academic and policymaking contexts. This paper, arising out of a multi-disciplinary workshop, aims to rectify this by outlining the issues, proposing novel governance strategies and policy recommendations, and identifying areas where further evidence is required to make sound policy decisions. The authors of this paper take the position that existing rules and norms can be reasonably extended to address privacy risks in this context without compromising emerging developments in the research environment, and that exceptions from such rules should be justified using a case-by-case approach. In developing new policies, the broader framework of regulations governing cell-based research and related areas must be taken into account, as well as the views of impacted groups, including scientists, research participants and the general public. This paper outlines deliberations at a policy development workshop focusing on privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions. The paper provides an overview of these challenges, followed by a discussion of key themes and recommendations that emerged from discussions at the workshop. The paper concludes that privacy risks associated with cell-based

  12. Increasing Glencore's sustainable management performance: recommendation and risks, statements based on literature and best practices

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschall, Arnaud; Maeder, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to provide Glencore with applicable recommendations so that it can improve its sustainable reputation. The second purpose of the work is to present all risks incurred by Glencore’s non-application of sustainable recommendations. Recommendations and risks have been developed based on literature, interviews and companies’ good practices. Sustainability reports of mining companies publicly quoted have been intensively used to grasp the different sustainability ...

  13. Observation, Sherlock Holmes, and Evidence Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John

    2002-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh between 1876 and 1881 under Doctor Joseph Bell who emphasised in his teaching the importance of observation, deduction and evidence. Sherlock Holmes was modelled on Joseph Bell. The modern notions of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) are not new. A very brief indication of some of the history of EBM is presented including a discussion of the important and usually overlooked contribution of statisticians to the Popperian philosophy of EBM.

  14. Evaluation of Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-15

    Furthermore, one of the advantages of the item-based algorithm is that it has much smaller computational require- 11 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 ecommerce ...items, utilized by many e-commerce sites, cannot take advantage of pre-computed user-to-user similarities. Consequently, even though the throughput of...Non-Zeros ecommerce 6667 17491 91222 catalog 50918 39080 435524 ccard 42629 68793 398619 skills 4374 2125 82612 movielens 943 1682 100000 Table 1: The

  15. Evidence Based Education: un quadro storico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vivanet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, nel pensiero pedagogico anglosassone, si è affermata una cultura dell’evidenza cui ci si riferisce con l’espressione “evidence based education” (EBE. Secondo tale prospettiva, le decisioni in ambito educativo dovrebbero essere assunte sulla base delle conoscenze che la ricerca empirica offre in merito alla minore o maggiore efficacia delle differenti opzioni didattiche. Si tratta di un approccio (denominato “evidence based practice” che ha origine in ambito medico e che in seguito ha trovato applicazione in differenti domini delle scienze sociali. L’autore presenta un quadro introduttivo all’EBE, dando conto delle sue origini e dei differenti significati di cui è portatrice.

  16. Frequency of Testing for Dyslipidemia: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemias include high levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is a major contributor to mortality in Canada. Approximately 23% of the 2009/11 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) participants had a high level of LDL cholesterol, with prevalence increasing with age, and approximately 15% had a total cholesterol to HDL ratio above the threshold. Objectives To evaluate the frequency of lipid testing in adults not diagnosed with dyslipidemia and in adults on treatment for dyslipidemia. Research Methods A systematic review of the literature set out to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, health technology assessments (HTAs), and observational studies published between January 1, 2000, and November 29, 2012, that evaluated the frequency of testing for dyslipidemia in the 2 populations. Results Two observational studies assessed the frequency of lipid testing, 1 in individuals not on lipid-lowering medications and 1 in treated individuals. Both studies were based on previously collected data intended for a different objective and, therefore, no conclusions could be reached about the frequency of testing at intervals other than the ones used in the original studies. Given this limitation and generalizability issues, the quality of evidence was considered very low. No evidence for the frequency of lipid testing was identified in the 2 HTAs included. Canadian and international guidelines recommend testing for dyslipidemia in individuals at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The frequency of testing recommended is based on expert consensus. Conclusions Conclusions on the frequency of lipid testing could not be made based on the 2 observational studies. Current guidelines recommend lipid testing in adults with increased cardiovascular risk, with

  17. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  18. Teaching evidence based medicine in family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of evidence based medicine (EBM as the integrationof clinical expertise, patient values and the best evidence was introduced by David Sackett in the 1980’s. Scientific literature in medicine is often marked by expansion, acummulation and quick expiration. Reading all important articles to keep in touch with relevant information is impossible. Finding the best evidence that answers a clinical question in general practice (GP in a short time is not easy. Five useful steps are described –represented by the acronym “5A+E”: assess, ask, acquire, appraise, apply and evaluate.The habit of conducting an evidence search “on the spot’’ is proposed. Although students of medicine at University of Split School of Medicine are taught EBM from the first day of their study and in all courses, their experience of evidence-searching and critical appraisal of the evidence, in real time with real patient is inadequate. Teaching the final-year students the practical use of EBM in a GP’s office is different and can have an important role in their professional development. It can positively impact on quality of their future work in family practice (or some other medical specialty by acquiring this habit of constant evidence-checking to ensure that best practice becomes a mechanism for life-long learning. Conclusion. EBM is a foundation stone of every branch of medicine and important part of Family Medicine as scientific and professional discipline. To have an EB answer resulting from GP’s everyday work is becoming a part of everyday practice.

  19. Use of economic evaluation in decision making: evidence and recommendations for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2010-10-22

    Information about the value for money of a medicine as derived from an economic evaluation can be used for decision-making purposes by policy makers, healthcare payers, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies. This article illustrates the use of economic evaluation by decision makers and formulates a number of recommendations to enhance the use of such evaluations for decision-making purposes. Over the last decades, there has been a substantial increase in the number of economic evaluations assessing the value for money of medicines. Economic evaluation is used by policy makers and healthcare payers to inform medicine pricing/reimbursement decisions in more and more countries. It is a suitable tool to evaluate medicines and to present information about their value for money to decision makers in a familiar format. In order to fully exploit the use of economic evaluation for decision-making purposes, researchers need to take care to conduct such economic evaluations according to methodologically sound principles. Additionally, researchers need to take into account the decision-making context. They need to identify the various objectives that decision makers pursue and discuss how decision makers can use study findings to attain these objectives. These issues require further attention from researchers, policy makers, healthcare payers, healthcare professionals and pharmaceutical companies with a view to optimizing the use of economic evaluation in decision making.

  20. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  1. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive "medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community." Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs.

  2. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toklu HZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hale Zerrin Toklu Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive “medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community.” Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs. Keywords: pharmacist, rational use of medicine, pharmacotherapy, pharmaceutical, outcome

  3. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: International Consensus-based Recommendations for Monitoring Patients in Clinical Practice and Research Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Koos, Bernd; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Cron, Randy Q; Abramowicz, Shelly; Verna, Carlalberta; Peltomäki, Timo; Alstergren, Per; Petty, Ross; Ringold, Sarah; Nørholt, Sven Erik; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Herlin, Troels

    2017-03-01

    To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains and items to be included in the recommendations. Phase 3: A systematic literature review was performed to assess the evidence supporting the consensus-based recommendations. Phase 4: An independent group of orofacial and JIA experts were invited to assess the content validity of the task force's recommendations. Five recommendations were developed to assess the following 5 domains: medical history, orofacial symptoms, muscle and temporomandibular joint function, orofacial function, and dentofacial growth. After application of data search criteria, 56 articles were included in the systematic review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized data collection for future studies. The task force has formulated a future research program based on the proposed recommendations.

  4. The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ross

    2008-01-01

    School Library Journal's 2007 Leadership Summit, "Where's the Evidence? Understanding the Impact of School Libraries," focused on the topic of evidence-based practice. Evidence-based school librarianship is a systematic approach that engages research-derived evidence, school librarian-observed evidence, and user-reported evidence in the processes…

  5. A Novel Preferential Diffusion Recommendation Algorithm Based on User’s Nearest Neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuguo Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recommender system is a very efficient way to deal with the problem of information overload for online users. In recent years, network based recommendation algorithms have demonstrated much better performance than the standard collaborative filtering methods. However, most of network based algorithms do not give a high enough weight to the influence of the target user’s nearest neighbors in the resource diffusion process, while a user or an object with high degree will obtain larger influence in the standard mass diffusion algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel preferential diffusion recommendation algorithm considering the significance of the target user’s nearest neighbors and evaluate it in the three real-world data sets: MovieLens 100k, MovieLens 1M, and Epinions. Experiments results demonstrate that the novel preferential diffusion recommendation algorithm based on user’s nearest neighbors can significantly improve the recommendation accuracy and diversity.

  6. The transparency of published health technology assessment-based recommendations on pharmaceutical reimbursement in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Tomasz; Kocot, Ewa; Rodzinka, Marcin; Godman, Brian; Maciejewska, Katarzyna; Kamal, Susan; Pilc, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The appropriate access to public information is very important for healthcare system stakeholders. The goal of this study was to examine how the execution of the formally existing right to public information on the HTA-based recommendations on reimbursement of new health technologies from public funds has been changing in Poland. All recommendations published within two predefined equal periods of time between 2013 and 2015 were analyzed. The gathered data was subjected to statistical analysis. The frequency and intensity of censoring the published HTA-based recommendations on the pharmaceutical reimbursement has diminished. The text readability and clarity of message has improved, although the degree of decisiveness of the recommendations has dropped. The positive changes in the public communication policy should be continued. The transparency of the HTA-based recommendations should be increased further in some areas in the future.

  7. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  8. Radiographers' preconditions for evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Liikanen, Eeva

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential in today's health care, but its establishment requires several preconditions from individuals and organizations (e.g. knowledge, understanding, attitudes, abilities, self-confidence, support, and resources). Previous studies suggest that radiographers do generate and use evidence in their work, but evidence-based radiography (EBR) is not yet used routinely as established practice, especially in terms of research utilization. This paper aims to describe radiographers' preconditions for EBR, and their participation in research activities. Main focus is on research utilization. Using an electronic questionnaire developed for this study, a survey was conducted: data collected from Finnish radiographers and radiotherapists (N = 438) were analysed both statistically and qualitatively. The final response rate was 39%. The results suggest radiographers' preconditions for EBR to consist of knowledge of research, significance of research activities, research-orientated way of working, and support. In addition, adequate resourcing is essential. Reading scientific journals, participation in research activities, a higher degree of education, and senior post seem to be significant promoters of EBR and research utilization. The results support the notion that EBR, and especially research utilization, are not yet well-established in Finland, and radiographers' viewpoints concerning the role and significance of research evidence and research activities still seem to vary.

  9. Research on E-Commerce Platform-Based Personalized Recommendation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at data sparsity and timeliness in traditional E-commerce collaborative filtering recommendation algorithms, when constructing user-item rating matrix, this paper utilizes the feature that commodities in E-commerce system belong to different levels to fill in nonrated items by calculating RF/IRF of the commodity’s corresponding level. In the recommendation prediction stage, considering timeliness of the recommendation system, time weighted based recommendation prediction formula is adopted to design a personalized recommendation model by integrating level filling method and rating time. The experimental results on real dataset verify the feasibility and validity of the algorithm and it owns higher predicting accuracy compared with present recommendation algorithms.

  10. Matrix- and tensor-based recommender systems for the discovery of currently unknown inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Atsuto; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Kashima, Hisashi; Tanaka, Isao

    2018-01-01

    Chemically relevant compositions (CRCs) and atomic arrangements of inorganic compounds have been collected as inorganic crystal structure databases. Machine learning is a unique approach to search for currently unknown CRCs from vast candidates. Herein we propose matrix- and tensor-based recommender system approaches to predict currently unknown CRCs from database entries of CRCs. Firstly, the performance of the recommender system approaches to discover currently unknown CRCs is examined. A Tucker decomposition recommender system shows the best discovery rate of CRCs as the majority of the top 100 recommended ternary and quaternary compositions correspond to CRCs. Secondly, systematic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to investigate the phase stability of the recommended compositions. The phase stability of the 27 compositions reveals that 23 currently unknown compounds are newly found to be stable. These results indicate that the recommender system has great potential to accelerate the discovery of new compounds.

  11. Evidence-Based Adequacy Model for School Funding: Success Rates in Illinois Schools that Meet Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study explores the 2010 recommendation of the Educational Funding Advisory Board to consider the Evidence-Based Adequacy model of school funding in Illinois. This school funding model identifies and costs research based practices necessary in a prototypical school and sets funding levels based upon those practices. This study…

  12. Evidence-Based Advances in Reptile Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A; Perry, Sean M

    2017-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine allows veterinarians to practice high-quality medicine, because the basis for all decision making is quantitative, objective, and reproducible. Case reports and case series are limited in their scope and application. Cross-sectional studies, likewise, cannot provide answers to specific variable testing with a temporal application. It is essential for the reptile specialty to expand into case-control studies, cohort studies, and experimental/intervention studies. Unfortunately, much of the reptile literature remains limited to descriptive studies. This article reviews current evidence-based topics in reptile medicine and shares how everyone practicing in the field can contribute to improving this specialty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Creative teaching an evidence-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an evidence-based pedagogic guide to enable any motivated teaching/training professional to be able to teach effectively and creatively. It firstly summarises the extensive research field on human psychological functioning relating to learning and how this can be fully utilised in the design and facilitation of quality learning experiences. It then demonstrates what creativity actually 'looks like' in terms of teaching practices, modelling the underpinning processes of creative learning design and how to apply these in lesson planning. The book, having established an evidence-based and pedagogically driven approach to creative learning design, extensively focuses on key challenges facing teaching professionals today. These include utilising information technologies in blended learning formats, differentiating instruction, and developing self-directed learners who can think well. The main purpose of the book is to demystify what it means to teach creatively, explicitly demonstrating the pr...

  14. Evidence-based hypnotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy (CH) is a comprehensive evidence-based hypnotherapy for clinical depression. This article describes the major components of CH, which integrate hypnosis with cognitive-behavior therapy as the latter provides an effective host theory for the assimilation of empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various theoretical models of psychotherapy and psychopathology. CH meets criteria for an assimilative model of psychotherapy, which is considered to be an efficacious model of psychotherapy integration. The major components of CH for depression are described in sufficient detail to allow replication, verification, and validation of the techniques delineated. CH for depression provides a template that clinicians and investigators can utilize to study the additive effects of hypnosis in the management of other psychological or medical disorders. Evidence-based hypnotherapy and research are encouraged; such a movement is necessary if clinical hypnosis is to integrate into mainstream psychotherapy.

  15. Automatic evidence quality prediction to support evidence-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abeed; Mollá, Diego; Paris, Cécile

    2015-06-01

    Evidence-based medicine practice requires practitioners to obtain the best available medical evidence, and appraise the quality of the evidence when making clinical decisions. Primarily due to the plethora of electronically available data from the medical literature, the manual appraisal of the quality of evidence is a time-consuming process. We present a fully automatic approach for predicting the quality of medical evidence in order to aid practitioners at point-of-care. Our approach extracts relevant information from medical article abstracts and utilises data from a specialised corpus to apply supervised machine learning for the prediction of the quality grades. Following an in-depth analysis of the usefulness of features (e.g., publication types of articles), they are extracted from the text via rule-based approaches and from the meta-data associated with the articles, and then applied in the supervised classification model. We propose the use of a highly scalable and portable approach using a sequence of high precision classifiers, and introduce a simple evaluation metric called average error distance (AED) that simplifies the comparison of systems. We also perform elaborate human evaluations to compare the performance of our system against human judgments. We test and evaluate our approaches on a publicly available, specialised, annotated corpus containing 1132 evidence-based recommendations. Our rule-based approach performs exceptionally well at the automatic extraction of publication types of articles, with F-scores of up to 0.99 for high-quality publication types. For evidence quality classification, our approach obtains an accuracy of 63.84% and an AED of 0.271. The human evaluations show that the performance of our system, in terms of AED and accuracy, is comparable to the performance of humans on the same data. The experiments suggest that our structured text classification framework achieves evaluation results comparable to those of human performance

  16. Personalized Location-Based Recommendation Services for Tour Planning in Mobile Tourism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Hsiao-Ping

    Travel and tour planning is a process of searching, selecting, grouping and sequencing destination related products and services including attractions, accommodations, restaurants, and activities. Personalized recommendation services aim at suggesting products and services to meet users’ preferences and needs, while location-based services focus on providing information based on users’ current positions. Due to the fast growing of user needs in the mobile tourism domain, how to provide personalized location-based tour recommendation services becomes a critical research and practical issue. The objective of this paper is to propose a system architecture and design methods for facilitating the delivery of location-based recommendation services to support personalized tour planning. Based on tourists’ current location and time, as well as personal preferences and needs, various recommendations regarding sightseeing spots, hotels, restaurants, and packaged tour plans can be generated efficiently. An application prototype is also implemented to illustrate and test the system feasibility and effectiveness.

  17. Interface design recommendations for computerised clinical audit and feedback: Hybrid usability evidence from a research-led system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Balatsoukas, Panos; Williams, Richard; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain

    2016-10-01

    Audit and Feedback (A&F) is a widely used quality improvement technique that measures clinicians' clinical performance and reports it back to them. Computerised A&F (e-A&F) system interfaces may consist of four key components: (1) Summaries of clinical performance; (2) Patient lists; (3) Patient-level data; (4) Recommended actions. There is a lack of evidence regarding how to best design e-A&F interfaces; establishing such evidence is key to maximising usability, and in turn improving patient safety. To evaluate the usability of a novel theoretically-informed and research-led e-A&F system for primary care (the Performance Improvement plaN GeneratoR: PINGR). (1) Describe PINGR's design, rationale and theoretical basis; (2) Identify usability issues with PINGR; (3) Understand how these issues may interfere with the cognitive goals of end-users; (4) Translate the issues into recommendations for the user-centred design of e-A&F systems. Eight experienced health system evaluators performed a usability inspection using an innovative hybrid approach consisting of five stages: (1) Development of representative user tasks, Goals, and Actions; (2) Combining Heuristic Evaluation and Cognitive Walkthrough methods into a single protocol to identify usability issues; (3) Consolidation of issues; (4) Severity rating of consolidated issues; (5) Analysis of issues according to usability heuristics, interface components, and Goal-Action structure. A final list of 47 issues were categorised into 8 heuristic themes. The most error-prone heuristics were 'Consistency and standards' (13 usability issues; 28% of the total) and 'Match between system and real world' (n=10, 21%). The recommended actions component of the PINGR interface had the most usability issues (n=21, 45%), followed by patient-level data (n=5, 11%), patient lists (n=4, 9%), and summaries of clinical performance (n=4, 9%). The most error-prone Actions across all user Goals were: (1) Patient selection from a list; (2) Data

  18. Should recommendations about starting inhaled corticosteroid treatment for mild asthma be based on symptom frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, Helen K.; Busse, William W.; Pedersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Low-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective for reducing asthma exacerbations and mortality. Conventionally, ICS treatment is recommended for patients with symptoms on more than 2 days per week, but this criterion has scant evidence. We aimed to assess the validity of t...

  19. Collaborative Filtering Recommendation Based on Trust Model with Fused Similar Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recommended system is beneficial to e-commerce sites, which provides customers with product information and recommendations; the recommendation system is currently widely used in many fields. In an era of information explosion, the key challenges of the recommender system is to obtain valid information from the tremendous amount of information and produce high quality recommendations. However, when facing the large mount of information, the traditional collaborative filtering algorithm usually obtains a high degree of sparseness, which ultimately lead to low accuracy recommendations. To tackle this issue, we propose a novel algorithm named Collaborative Filtering Recommendation Based on Trust Model with Fused Similar Factor, which is based on the trust model and is combined with the user similarity. The novel algorithm takes into account the degree of interest overlap between the two users and results in a superior performance to the recommendation based on Trust Model in criteria of Precision, Recall, Diversity and Coverage. Additionally, the proposed model can effectively improve the efficiency of collaborative filtering algorithm and achieve high performance.

  20. Use of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Among Adolescents: Status of the Evidence and Public Health Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Aarti D; Van Dyke, Alison L

    2017-02-01

    Although the prevalence of tobacco smoking has been declining in recent years, the use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) such as of electronic cigarettes, vaporizers, and hookahs has been steadily rising, especially among adolescents. ENDS are not only advertised to children, but their sale via the Internet has made them easily accessible to youth. In general, children perceive ENDS as safe, or at least safer than smoking traditional combustible tobacco products; however, exposure to nicotine may have deleterious effects on the developing brain. Concern also persists that ENDS may be a "starter" drug that may lead to further tobacco, drug, and/or alcohol use. In contrast to this precautionary stance that is associated with calls for legislative oversight of ENDS marketing and sales, harm reductionists claim that the risks posed by ENDS are minor in comparison with those of combustible tobacco products and that ENDS may be used as a means of nicotine replacement for smoking cessation, despite no concrete evidence to support this assertion. Many medical and health-related organizations have produced position statements concerning ENDS use, including among adolescents. This article summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of using ENDS espoused in these position statements, especially as they relate to use among adolescents. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e69-e77.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. A Stock Trading Recommender System Based on Temporal Association Rule Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binoy B. Nair

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems capable of discovering patterns in stock price movements and generating stock recommendations based on the patterns thus discovered can significantly supplement the decision-making process of a stock trader. Such recommender systems are of great significance to a layperson who wishes to profit by stock trading even while not possessing the skill or expertise of a seasoned trader. A genetic algorithm optimized Symbolic Aggregate approXimation (SAX–Apriori based stock trading recommender system, which can mine temporal association rules from the stock price data set to generate stock trading recommendations, is presented in this article. The proposed system is validated on 12 different data sets. The results indicate that the proposed system significantly outperforms the passive buy-and-hold strategy, offering scope for a layperson to successfully invest in capital markets.

  2. The "Acute coronary syndromes: consensus recommendations for translating knowledge into action" position statement is based on a false premise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forge, Brett H

    2010-06-21

    Recent National Heart Foundation of Australia (NHFA) guidelines for management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) recommend increasing the rates of early invasive management of ACS and providing equal access for all Australians to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) facilities. For patients with ACS managed in regional hospitals without PCI facilities, review of the evidence does not show unequivocal benefit of early routine PCI over selective PCI for patients with non-ST-segment-elevation ACS or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The current pattern of transfer based on the NHFA guidelines is expensive and disruptive of patient care, as well as undermining regional health care services. Further increase in transfer rates and increases in PCI facilities would divert resources away from supporting the regional infrastructure needed to provide evidence-based therapies, without any evidence that lives would be saved.

  3. An Evidence-Based Framework for Evidence-Based Management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-05-01

    May 1, 2018 ... BACKGROUND: Evidence-based management (EBMgt) is a growing literature ... organization and management, especially in the last decade (1-6). One of these models is ..... Organizational Behavior. 2017;4(1):235-61.

  4. An Evidence-Based Framework for Evidence-Based Management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-05-01

    May 1, 2018 ... BACKGROUND: Evidence-based management (EBMgt) is a growing literature concept in ... principles are developing across disciplines such as education, criminology ..... Australian Health Review. 2012;36(3):284-90. 17.

  5. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  6. A Hybrid Approach using Collaborative filtering and Content based Filtering for Recommender System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, G.; Safa, M.; Fancy, C.; Saranya, D.

    2018-04-01

    In today’s digital world, it has become an irksome task to find the content of one's liking in an endless variety of content that are being consumed like books, videos, articles, movies, etc. On the other hand there has been an emerging growth among the digital content providers who want to engage as many users on their service as possible for the maximum time. This gave birth to the recommender system comes wherein the content providers recommend users the content according to the users’ taste and liking. In this paper we have proposed a movie recommendation system. A movie recommendation is important in our social life due to its features such as suggesting a set of movies to users based on their interest, or the popularities of the movies. In this paper we are proposing a movie recommendation system that has the ability to recommend movies to a new user as well as the other existing users. It mines movie databases to collect all the important information, such as, popularity and attractiveness, which are required for recommendation. We use content-based and collaborative filtering and also hybrid filtering, which is a combination of the results of these two techniques, to construct a system that provides more precise recommendations concerning movies.

  7. Evidence-Based Interactive Management of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fleischmann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based interactive management of change means hands-on experience of modified work processes, given evidence of change. For this kind of pro-active organizational development support we use an organisational process memory and a communication-based representation technique for role-specific and task-oriented process execution. Both are effective means for organizations becoming agile through interactively modelling the business at the process level and re-constructing or re-arranging process representations according to various needs. The tool allows experiencing role-specific workflows, as the communication-based refinement of work models allows for executable process specifications. When presenting the interactive processes to individuals involved in the business processes, changes can be explored interactively in a context-sensitive way before re-implementing business processes and information systems. The tool is based on a service-oriented architecture and a flexible representation scheme comprising the exchange of message between actors, business objects and actors (roles. The interactive execution of workflows does not only enable the individual reorganization of work but also changes at the level of the entire organization due to the represented interactions.

  8. Variability in State-Based Recommendations for Management of Alpha Thalassemia Trait and Silent Carrier Detected on the Newborn Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Benjamin N; Nguyen, Hong Loan T; Smink, Gayle; Sekhar, Deepa L

    2018-04-01

    We conducted an inventory of state-based recommendations for follow-up of alpha thalassemia silent carrier and trait identified on newborn screen. We found wide variability in the nature and timing of these recommendations. We recommend a standardized recommendation to guide pediatricians in evidenced-based care for this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An improved recommended algorithm for network structure based on two partial graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Song

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis,we introduce an improved algorithm based on network structure.Based on the standard material diffusion algorithm,considering the influence of the user's score on the recommendation,the adjustment factor of the initial resource allocation vector and the resource transfer matrix in the recommendation algorithm is improved.Using the practical data set from GroupLens webite to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm,we performed a series of experiments.The experimental results reveal that it can yield better recommendation accuracy and has higher hitting rate than collaborative filtering,network-based inference.It can solve the problem of cold start and scalability in the standard material diffusion algorithm.And it also can make the recommendation results diversified.

  10. Annual limits on intake of radionuclides by workers based on the 1990 recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Commission's new radiation protection recommendations (ICRP, 1991) were developed to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposures and supersede earlier recommendations in Publication 26 (ICRP, 1977). Adoption of the recommendations necessitates a revision in the Commission's secondary limits contained in Publication 30, Parts 1-4 (ICRP, 1979a, 1980, 1981b, 1988). In order to permit immediate application of these new recommendations, new values of the Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) which incorporate the new dose limits, radiation weighting factors, and tissue weighting factors and the metabolic and biokinetic information from Publication 30 have been calculated. Presented here are secondary limits for the 1990 Recommendations based on the dosimetric data assembled during the preparation of Publication 30. (author)

  11. Good practice recommendations - medical-professional control of internal exposure to radionuclides in nuclear base installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, Philippe; Blanchin, Nicolas; Fottorino, Robert; Gonin, Michele; Quesne, Benoit; Agrinier, Anne-Laure; Bourgaut, Laurent; Blanchardon, Eric; Challeton de Vathaire, Cecile; Franck, Didier; Piechowski, Jean; Fritsch, Paul; Poncy, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The first part of this voluminous report presents the context and method of definition of recommendations for a clinical practice and comprises a literature review of national, European and international recommendations, standards and work-group reports. The second part develops recommendations under four main themes: assessment of the committed effective dose (objectives, implementation, communication, traceability and archiving), control programs, dosimetric estimation based on results, and health risk and taking into care by the occupational physician. The authors adopted the same structure for each sub-theme or issue: target extract of regulatory and standard requirements and international recommendations, analysis of literature and of data from professional practices, opinion of the work-group, and graded recommendations with respect to the proof level

  12. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... 49 out of 1295 references showed that CSII compared with conventional or multiple insulin injections therapy demonstrated a significant reduction in mean HbA1c (primary outcome) of 1.2% CI [0.73; 1.59] (P... daily insulin injections was based on only one publication demonstrating an improved quality of life but no significant reduction in HbA1c or hypoglycaemia. A comparison of rapid-acting insulin analogues and human soluble insulin demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in HbA1c of 0.1% CI: [0...

  13. Causes of ring-related leg injuries in birds - evidence and recommendations from four field studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Griesser

    Full Text Available One of the main techniques for recognizing individuals in avian field research is marking birds with plastic and metal leg rings. However, in some species individuals may react negatively to rings, causing leg injuries and, in extreme cases, the loss of a foot or limb. Here, we report problems that arise from ringing and illustrate solutions based on field data from Brown Thornbills (Acanthiza pusilla (2 populations, Siberian Jays (Perisoreus infaustus and Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens (Malurus coronatus. We encountered three problems caused by plastic rings: inflammations triggered by material accumulating under the ring (Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens, contact inflammations as a consequence of plastic rings touching the foot or tibio-tarsal joint (Brown Thornbills, and toes or the foot getting trapped in partly unwrapped flat-band colour rings (Siberian Jays. Metal rings caused two problems: the edges of aluminium rings bent inwards if mounted on top of each other (Brown Thornbills, and too small a ring size led to inflammation (Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens. We overcame these problems by changing the ringing technique (using different ring types or larger rings, or using different adhesive. Additionally, we developed and tested a novel, simple technique of gluing plastic rings onto metal rings in Brown Thornbills. A review of studies reporting ring injuries (N = 23 showed that small birds (35 g tend to get rings stuck over their feet. We give methodological advice on how these problems can be avoided, and suggest a ringing hazard index to compare the impact of ringing in terms of injury on different bird species. Finally, to facilitate improvements in ringing techniques, we encourage online deposition of information regarding ringing injuries of birds at a website hosted by the European Union for Bird Ringing (EURING.

  14. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Leading change: evidence-based transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brennan; Allen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a framework for evidence-based transition of patient populations within an acute care pediatric institution. Transition within a hospital is foreseeable, given the ever-changing needs of the patients within an evolving healthcare system. These changes include moving patient populations because of expansion, renovation, or cohorting similar patient diagnoses to provide care across a continuum. Over the past 1 to 2 years, Children's Health Children's Medical Center Dallas has experienced a wide variety of transition. To provide a smooth transition for patients and families into new care areas resulting in a healthy work environment for all team members. The planning phase for patient population moves, and transition should address key aspects to include physical location and care flow, supplies and equipment, staffing model and human resources (HR), education and orientation, change process and integrating teams, and family preparation. It is imperative to consider these aspects in order for transitions within a healthcare system to be successful. During a time of such transitions, the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is a highly valuable team member offering a unique perspective and methodological approach, which is central to the new initiative's overall success. The themes addressed in this article on evidence-based transition are organized according to the CNS spheres of influence: system/organization, patient/family, and nursing. An evidence-based transition plan was developed and implemented successfully with the support from the CNS for 3 patient populations. Organizational leadership gained an increased awareness of the CNS role at the conclusion of each successful transition. The CNS plays a pivotal role as clinical experts and proponents of evidence-based practice and effects change in the system/organization, nursing, and patient/family spheres of influence. While transitions can be a source of stress for leaders

  17. Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change.

  18. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine: Is It Working in Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into dai...

  19. Hot Idea or Hot Air: A Systematic Review of Evidence for Two Widely Marketed Youth Suicide Prevention Programs and Recommendations for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; Kutcher, Stan; LeBlanc, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Youth suicide is highly related to mental disorders. While communities and schools are marketed to with a plethora of suicide prevention programs, they often lack the capacity to choose evidence-based programs. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of two youth suicide prevention programs to help determine if the quality of evidence available justifies their wide spread dissemination. We searched Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Campbell Collaboration SPECTR database, SocIndex, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, ERIC, Social Work Abstracts, Research Library, and Web of Science, for relevant studies. We included studies/systematic reviews/meta-analysis that evaluated the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and/or safety of Signs of Suicide (SOS) and Yellow Ribbon (YR) suicide prevention programs that target adolescents. We applied the Office of Justice Program What Works Repository (OJP-R) to evaluate the quality of the included studies as effective, effective with reservation, promising, inconclusive evidence, insufficient evidence, and ineffective. Two SOS studies were ranked as “inconclusive evidence” based on the OJP-R. One SOS study was ranked as having “insufficient evidence” on OJP-R. The YR study was ranked as “ineffective” using OJP-R. We only included studies in peer-reviewed journals in English and therefore may have missed reports in grey literature or non-English publications. Results: We cannot recommend that schools and communities implement either the SOS or YR suicide prevention programs. Purchasers of these programs should be aware that there is no evidence that their use prevents suicide. Conclusions: Academics and organizations should not overstate the positive impacts of suicide prevention interventions when the evidence is lacking. PMID:26336375

  20. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  1. Translation, cross-cultural adaption and measurement properties of the evidence-based practice profile

    OpenAIRE

    Titlestad, Kristine Berg; Snibsoer, Anne Kristin; Stromme, Hilde; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    Background The evidence-based practice profile (EBP2) questionnaire assesses students? self-reported knowledge, behaviour and attitudes related to evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt EBP2 into Norwegian and to evaluate the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version. Methods EBP2 was translated and cross-culturally adapted using recommended methodology. Face validity and feasibility were evaluated in a pilot on bache...

  2. Empirical methods for systematic reviews and evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enst, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Systematic reviews have become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, which is reflected in the position systematic reviews have in the pyramid of evidence-based medicine. Systematic

  3. Information provision in medical libraries: An evidence based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined information provision in special libraries such as medical libraries. It provides an overview of evidence based practice as a concept for information provision by librarians. It specifically proffers meaning to the term evidence as used in evidence based practice and to evidence based medicine from where ...

  4. Ethical reflections on Evidence Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corrao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to Potter’s point of view, medical ethics is the science of survival, a bridge between humanistic and scientific culture. The working out of judgements on right or wrong referred to the human being are studied by this science. Methodological quality is fundamental in clinical research, and several technical issues are of paramount importance in trying to answer to the final question “what is the true, the right thing?”. We know they are essential aspects as in medical ethics as in evidence based practice. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of this paper is to talk about relationships and implications between ethical issues and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. DISCUSSION EBM represents a new paradigm that introduces new concepts to guide medical-decision making and health-care planning. Its principles are deeply rooted in clinical research methodology since information are derived from sound studies of strong quality. Health-care professionals have to deal with methodological concepts for critical appraisal of literature and implementation of evidences in clinical practice and healthcare planning. The central role of EBM in medical ethics is obvious, but a risk could be possible. The shift from Hippocratic point of view to community-centred one could lose sight of the centrality of the patient. CONCLUSION Both EBM principles and the needs to adequately response to economic restrictions urge a balance between individual and community ethics. All this has to represent an opportunity to place the patient at the centre of medical action considering at the same time community ethics as systemic aim, but without forgetting the risk that economic restrictions push towards veterinary ethics where herd is central and individual needs do not exist.

  5. Analysis of tag-based Recommendation Performance for a Semantic Wiki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durao, Frederico; Dolog, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations play a very important role for revealing related topics addressed in the wikis beyond the currently viewed page. In this paper, we extend KiWi, a semantic wiki with three different recommendation approaches. The first approach is implemented as a traditional tag-based retrieval......, the second takes into account external factors such as tag popularity, tag representativeness and the affinity between user and tag and the third approach recommends pages in grouped by tag. The experiment evaluates the wiki performance in different scenarios regarding the amount of pages, tags and users...

  6. A new collaborative recommendation approach based on users clustering using artificial bee colony algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Chunhua; Xu, Chonghuan

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many good collaborative recommendation methods, it is still a challenge to increase the accuracy and diversity of these methods to fulfill users' preferences. In this paper, we propose a novel collaborative filtering recommendation approach based on K-means clustering algorithm. In the process of clustering, we use artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to overcome the local optimal problem caused by K-means. After that we adopt the modified cosine similarity to compute the similarity between users in the same clusters. Finally, we generate recommendation results for the corresponding target users. Detailed numerical analysis on a benchmark dataset MovieLens and a real-world dataset indicates that our new collaborative filtering approach based on users clustering algorithm outperforms many other recommendation methods.

  7. A New Collaborative Recommendation Approach Based on Users Clustering Using Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Ju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many good collaborative recommendation methods, it is still a challenge to increase the accuracy and diversity of these methods to fulfill users’ preferences. In this paper, we propose a novel collaborative filtering recommendation approach based on K-means clustering algorithm. In the process of clustering, we use artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm to overcome the local optimal problem caused by K-means. After that we adopt the modified cosine similarity to compute the similarity between users in the same clusters. Finally, we generate recommendation results for the corresponding target users. Detailed numerical analysis on a benchmark dataset MovieLens and a real-world dataset indicates that our new collaborative filtering approach based on users clustering algorithm outperforms many other recommendation methods.

  8. The ethical approach to evidence-based medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research findings as the basis for clinical decisions”.2 The practice ... paper will explore the role of evidence-based medicine in ethical practice of health care professionals. ... based medicine is used for “evidence-based purchasing”, it will.

  9. Interest Aware Location-Based Recommender System Using Geo-Tagged Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma AlBanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in location acquisition and mobile technologies led to the addition of the location dimension to Social Networks (SNs and to the emergence of a newer class called Location-Based Social Networks (LBSNs. While LBSNs are richer in their model and functions than SNs, they fail so far to attract as many users as SNs. On the other hand, SNs have large amounts of geo-tagged media that are under-utilized. In this paper, we propose an Interest-Aware Location-Based Recommender system (IALBR, which combines the advantages of both LBSNs and SNs, in order to provide interest-aware location-based recommendations. This recommender system is proposed as an extension to LBSNs. It is novel in: (1 utilizing the geo-content in both LBSNs and SNs; (2 ranking the recommendations based on a novel scoring method that maps to the user interests. It also works for passive users who are not active content contributors to the LBSN. This feature is critical to increase the number of LBSN users. Moreover, it helps with reducing the cold start problem, which is a common problem facing the new users of recommender systems who get random unsatisfying recommendations. This is due to the lack of user interest awareness, which is reliant on user history in most of the recommenders. We evaluated our system with a large-scale real dataset collected from foursquare with respect to precision, recall and the f-measure. We also compared the results with a ground truth system using metrics like the normalized discounted cumulative gain and the mean absolute error. The results confirm that the proposed IALBR generates more efficient recommendations than baselines in terms of interest awareness.

  10. A mobile and web application-based recommendation system using color quantization and collaborative filtering

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, FİDAN; YILDIZ, GÜREL; KAVAK, ADNAN

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a recommendation system based on a mobile and web application is proposed for indoor decoration. The main contribution of this work is to apply two-stage filtering using linear matching and collaborative filtering to make recommendations. In the mobile application part, the image of the medium captured by a mobile phone is analyzed using color quantization methods, and these color analysis results along with other user-defined parameters such as height, width, and type of the p...

  11. Clinicians adopting evidence based guidelines: a case study with thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE is a cause of hospital mortality and managing its morbidity is associated with significant expenditure. Uptake of evidenced based guideline recommendations intended to prevent VTE in hospital settings is sub-optimal. This study was conducted to explore clinicians' attitudes and the clinical environment in which they work to understand their reluctance to adopt VTE prophylaxis guidelines. Methods Between February and November 2009, 40 hospital employed doctors from 2 Australian metropolitan hospitals were interviewed in depth. Qualitative data were analysed according to thematic methodology. Results Analysis of interviews revealed that barriers to evidence based practice include i the fragmented system of care delivery where multiple members of teams and multiple teams are responsible for each patient's care, and in the case of VTE, where everyone shares responsibility and no-one in particular is responsible; ii the culture of practice where team practice is tailored to that of the team head, and where medicine is considered an 'art' in which guidelines should be adapted to each patient rather than applied universally. Interviewees recommend clear allocation of responsibility and reminders to counteract VTE risk assessment being overlooked. Conclusions Senior clinicians are the key enablers for practice change. They will need to be convinced that guideline compliance adds value to their patient care. Then with the support of systems in the organisation designed to minimize the effects of care fragmentation, they will drive practice changes in their teams. We believe that evidence based practice is only possible with a coordinated program that addresses individual, cultural and organisational constraints.

  12. An effective trust-based recommendation method using a novel graph clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Parham; Ahmadian, Sajad; Akhlaghian, Fardin

    2015-10-01

    Recommender systems are programs that aim to provide personalized recommendations to users for specific items (e.g. music, books) in online sharing communities or on e-commerce sites. Collaborative filtering methods are important and widely accepted types of recommender systems that generate recommendations based on the ratings of like-minded users. On the other hand, these systems confront several inherent issues such as data sparsity and cold start problems, caused by fewer ratings against the unknowns that need to be predicted. Incorporating trust information into the collaborative filtering systems is an attractive approach to resolve these problems. In this paper, we present a model-based collaborative filtering method by applying a novel graph clustering algorithm and also considering trust statements. In the proposed method first of all, the problem space is represented as a graph and then a sparsest subgraph finding algorithm is applied on the graph to find the initial cluster centers. Then, the proposed graph clustering algorithm is performed to obtain the appropriate users/items clusters. Finally, the identified clusters are used as a set of neighbors to recommend unseen items to the current active user. Experimental results based on three real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms several state-of-the-art recommender system methods.

  13. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  14. The Heart of the Matter of Opinion and Evidence: The Value of Evidence-Based Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Masvidal, Daniel; Lavie, Carl J.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is an important aspect of continuing medical education. This article reviews previous and current examples of conflicting topics that evidence-based medicine has clarified to allow us to provide the best possible patient care.

  15. The evidence-based practice ideologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzoukas, Stefanos

    2007-10-01

    This paper puts forward the argument that there are various, competing, and antithetical evidence-based practice (EBP) definitions and acknowledges that the different EBP definitions are based on different epistemological perspectives. However, this is not enough to understand the way in which nurse professionals choose between the various EBP formations and consequently facilitate them in choosing the most appropriate for their needs. Therefore, the current article goes beyond and behind the various EBP epistemologies to identify how individuals choose an epistemology, which consequently will assist our understanding as to how an individual chooses a specific EBP formation. Individuals choose an epistemology on the mere belief that the specific epistemology offers the ideals or ideas of best explaining or interpreting daily reality. These ideals or ideas are termed by science, history, and politics as ideology. Similarly, individual practitioners choose or should choose between the different EBP formations based on their own personal ideology. Consequently, this article proceeds to analyse the various ideologies behind different EBP definitions as to conclude that there are two broad ideologies that inform the various EBP formations, namely the ideology of truth and the ideology of individual emancipation. These two ideologies are analysed and their connections to the various EBP formations are depicted. Eventually, the article concludes that the in-depth, critical, and intentional analysis by individual nurses of their own ideology will allow them to choose the EBP formation that is most appropriate and fitting for them, and their specific situation. Hence, the conscious analysis of individual ideology becomes the criterion for choosing between competing EBP formations and allows for best evidence to be implemented in practice. Therefore, the best way to teach EBP courses is by facilitating students to analyse their own ideology.

  16. An Inter-Personal Information Sharing Model Based on Personalized Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Koji; Funakoshi, Kaname; Akahani, Jun-Ichi; Satoh, Tetsuji

    In this paper, we propose an inter-personal information sharing model among individuals based on personalized recommendations. In the proposed model, we define an information resource as shared between people when both of them consider it important --- not merely when they both possess it. In other words, the model defines the importance of information resources based on personalized recommendations from identifiable acquaintances. The proposed method is based on a collaborative filtering system that focuses on evaluations from identifiable acquaintances. It utilizes both user evaluations for documents and their contents. In other words, each user profile is represented as a matrix of credibility to the other users' evaluations on each domain of interests. We extended the content-based collaborative filtering method to distinguish other users to whom the documents should be recommended. We also applied a concept-based vector space model to represent the domain of interests instead of the previous method which represented them by a term-based vector space model. We introduce a personalized concept-base compiled from each user's information repository to improve the information retrieval in the user's environment. Furthermore, the concept-spaces change from user to user since they reflect the personalities of the users. Because of different concept-spaces, the similarity between a document and a user's interest varies for each user. As a result, a user receives recommendations from other users who have different view points, achieving inter-personal information sharing based on personalized recommendations. This paper also describes an experimental simulation of our information sharing model. In our laboratory, five participants accumulated a personal repository of e-mails and web pages from which they built their own concept-base. Then we estimated the user profiles according to personalized concept-bases and sets of documents which others evaluated. We simulated

  17. Evidence-Based Practice in Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patrick S; Moyer, Kurtis E

    2018-01-24

    The goal of this study is to examine the existing peer reviewed literature comparing modern adjunctive techniques in liposuction including laser-assisted liposuction (LAL) and ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) to standard suction-assisted liposuction (SAL). We intend to interpret these findings into a literature-based clinical application to influence practice patterns. A literature review was conducted using a keyword search in PubMed. Keyword search items included liposuction, lipoplasty, suction assisted liposuction, ultrasound assisted liposuction, laser assisted liposuction, tumescent, liposuction comparison, liposuction review, and combinations therein. Exclusion criteria included articles with a primary focus on histologic effects of energy devices, primary animal models, primary opinion papers with no reference to available data, and industry-sponsored publications. Inclusion criteria included articles with direct comparison of liposuction modalities, randomized or blinded studies, and studies with objective outcomes. Twenty-five articles that met the inclusion criteria comparing SAL to UAL or LAL out of 9972 articles identified were obtained. The selected literature was assigned into 3 categories: evidence demonstrating an advantage of 1 modality (SAL, UAL, or LAL) over another, evidence that showed no benefit of 1 modality over another, and evidence that demonstrated risks of complications of 1 modality over another. The benefits of UAL and LAL over SAL include the following: (1) UAL over SAL in the treatment of gynecomastia, (2) LAL and UAL over SAL with decreased hemoglobin/hematocrit in high-volume lipoaspirates, and (3) LAL over SAL with skin tightening in select areas specifically the submental area. Otherwise, the literature demonstrates equivocal results among the described techniques with no clear benefit to set one apart from the other. There appears to be no demonstrable added benefit to the addition of either UAL or LAL that would urge a

  18. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  19. Acute gastroenteritis: evidence-based management of pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, KeriAnne; Pade, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Although most cases of acute gastroenteritis require minimal medical intervention, severe dehydration and hypoglycemia may develop in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. The mainstay of treatment for mild-to-moderately dehydrated patients with acute gastroenteritis should be oral rehydration solution. Antiemetics allow for improved tolerance of oral rehydration solution, and, when used appropriately, can decrease the need for intravenous fluids and hospitalization. This issue reviews the common etiologies of acute gastroenteritis, discusses more-severe conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and provides evidence-based recommendations for management of acute gastroenteritis in patients with mild-to-moderate dehydration, severe dehydration, and hypoglycemia. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  20. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers. PMID:27630517

  1. A New Recommendation Algorithm Based on User’s Dynamic Information in Complex Social Network

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    Jiujun Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of recommendation system comes with the research of data sparsity, cold start, scalability, and privacy protection problems. Even though many papers proposed different improved recommendation algorithms to solve those problems, there is still plenty of room for improvement. In the complex social network, we can take full advantage of dynamic information such as user’s hobby, social relationship, and historical log to improve the performance of recommendation system. In this paper, we proposed a new recommendation algorithm which is based on social user’s dynamic information to solve the cold start problem of traditional collaborative filtering algorithm and also considered the dynamic factors. The algorithm takes user’s response information, dynamic interest, and the classic similar measurement of collaborative filtering algorithm into account. Then, we compared the new proposed recommendation algorithm with the traditional user based collaborative filtering algorithm and also presented some of the findings from experiment. The results of experiment demonstrate that the new proposed algorithm has a better recommended performance than the collaborative filtering algorithm in cold start scenario.

  2. Recommender System for E-Learning Based on Semantic Relatedness of Concepts

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    Mao Ye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital publishing resources contain a lot of useful and authoritative knowledge. It may be necessary to reorganize the resources by concepts and recommend the related concepts for e-learning. A recommender system is presented in this paper based on the semantic relatedness of concepts computed by texts from digital publishing resources. Firstly, concepts are extracted from encyclopedias. Information in digital publishing resources is then reorganized by concepts. Secondly, concept vectors are generated by skip-gram model and semantic relatedness between concepts is measured according to the concept vectors. As a result, the related concepts and associated information can be recommended to users by the semantic relatedness for learning or reading. History data or users’ preferences data are not needed for recommendation in a specific domain. The technique may not be language-specific. The method shows potential usability for e-learning in a specific domain.

  3. Effect of recent popularity on heat-conduction based recommendation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Jun; Dong, Qiang; Shi, Yang-Bo; Fu, Yan; He, Jia-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Accuracy and diversity are two important measures in evaluating the performance of recommender systems. It has been demonstrated that the recommendation model inspired by the heat conduction process has high diversity yet low accuracy. Many variants have been introduced to improve the accuracy while keeping high diversity, most of which regard the current node-degree of an item as its popularity. However in this way, a few outdated items of large degree may be recommended to an enormous number of users. In this paper, we take the recent popularity (recently increased item degrees) into account in the heat-conduction based methods, and propose accordingly the improved recommendation models. Experimental results on two benchmark data sets show that the accuracy can be largely improved while keeping the high diversity compared with the original models.

  4. PRUB: A Privacy Protection Friend Recommendation System Based on User Behavior

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    Wei Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast developing social network is a double-edged sword. It remains a serious problem to provide users with excellent mobile social network services as well as protecting privacy data. Most popular social applications utilize behavior of users to build connection with people having similar behavior, thus improving user experience. However, many users do not want to share their certain behavioral information to the recommendation system. In this paper, we aim to design a secure friend recommendation system based on the user behavior, called PRUB. The system proposed aims at achieving fine-grained recommendation to friends who share some same characteristics without exposing the actual user behavior. We utilized the anonymous data from a Chinese ISP, which records the user browsing behavior, for 3 months to test our system. The experiment result shows that our system can achieve a remarkable recommendation goal and, at the same time, protect the privacy of the user behavior information.

  5. Colon Trauma: Evidence-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Logue, Alicia J; Muir, Mark T

    2018-01-01

    Colon injury is not uncommon and occurs in about a half of patients with penetrating hollow viscus injuries. Despite major advances in the operative management of penetrating colon wounds, there remains discussion regarding the appropriate treatment of destructive colon injuries, with a significant amount of scientific evidence supporting segmental resection with primary anastomosis in most patients without comorbidities or large transfusion requirement. Although literature is sparse concerning the management of blunt colon injuries, some studies have shown operative decision based on an algorithm originally defined for penetrating wounds should be considered in blunt colon injuries. The optimal management of colonic injuries in patients requiring damage control surgery (DCS) also remains controversial. Studies have recently reported that there is no increased risk compared with patients treated without DCS if fascial closure is completed on the first reoperation, or that a management algorithm for penetrating colon wounds is probably efficacious for colon injuries in the setting of DCS as well.

  6. EVIDENCE-BASED USE OF EPLERENONE

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    S. R. Gilyarevski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of the negative effect of high concentrations of aldosterone in the blood for cardiovascular disease, which served as the theoretical basis for wider use in clinical practice of the drugs belonging to the class of aldosterone receptor blockers is presented. Evidence-based data on efficacy and safety of aldosterone receptor blockers, which were obtained in the course of several randomized clinical trials is performed. Particular attention is paid to aspects of the clinical use of selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone, including current data, which makes reasonable extension of indications for its use in treating patients with chronic heart failure. Data on indications of eplerenone use in patients with hypertension, especially in the case of associated target organ damage is presented.

  7. EVIDENCE-BASED USE OF EPLERENONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilyarevski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Data of the negative effect of high concentrations of aldosterone in the blood for cardiovascular disease, which served as the theoretical basis for wider use in clinical practice of the drugs belonging to the class of aldosterone receptor blockers is presented. Evidence-based data on efficacy and safety of aldosterone receptor blockers, which were obtained in the course of several randomized clinical trials is performed. Particular attention is paid to aspects of the clinical use of selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone, including current data, which makes reasonable extension of indications for its use in treating patients with chronic heart failure. Data on indications of eplerenone use in patients with hypertension, especially in the case of associated target organ damage is presented.

  8. Evidence Based Cataloguing: Moving Beyond the Rules

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    Kathy Carter

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cataloguing is sometimes regarded as a rule-bound, production-based activity that offers little scope for professional judgement and decision-making. In reality, cataloguing involves challenging decisions that can have significant service and financial impacts. The current environment for cataloguing is a maelstrom of changing demands and competing visions for the future. With information-seekers turning en masse to Google and their behaviour receiving greater attention, library vendors are offering “discovery layer” products to replace traditional OPACs, and cataloguers are examining and debating a transformed version of their descriptive cataloguing rules (Resource Description and Access or RDA. In his “Perceptions of the future of cataloging: Is the sky really falling?” (2009, Ivey provides a good summary of this environment. At the same time, myriad new metadata formats and schema are being developed and applied for digital collections in libraries and other institutions. In today’s libraries, cataloguing is no longer limited to management of traditional AACR and MARC-based metadata for traditional library collections. And like their parent institutions, libraries cannot ignore growing pressures to demonstrate accountability and tangible value provided by their services. More than ever, research and an evidence based approach can help guide cataloguing decision-making.

  9. Multi-agent system for Knowledge-based recommendation of Learning Objects

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    Paula Andrea RODRÍGUEZ MARÍN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning Object (LO is a content unit being used within virtual learning environments, which -once found and retrieved- may assist students in the teaching - learning process. Such LO search and retrieval are recently supported and enhanced by data mining techniques. In this sense, clustering can be used to find groups holding similar LOs so that from obtained groups, knowledge-based recommender systems (KRS can recommend more adapted and relevant LOs. In particular, prior knowledge come from LOs previously selected, liked and ranked by the student to whom the recommendation will be performed. In this paper, we present a KRS for LOs, which uses a conventional clustering technique, namely K-means, aimed at finding similar LOs and delivering resources adapted to a specific student. Obtained promising results show that proposed KRS is able to both retrieve relevant LO and improve the recommendation precision.Learning Object (LO is a content unit being used within virtual learning environments, which -once found and retrieved- may assist students in the teaching - learning process. Such LO search and retrieval are recently supported and enhanced by data mining techniques. In this sense, clustering can be used to find groups holding similar LOs so that from obtained groups, knowledge-based recommender systems (KRS can recommend more adapted and relevant LOs. In particular, prior knowledge come from LOs previously selected, liked and ranked by the student to whom the recommendation will be performed. In this paper, we present a KRS for LOs, which uses a conventional clustering technique, namely K-means, aimed at finding similar LOs and delivering resources adapted to a specific student. Obtained promising results show that proposed KRS is able to both retrieve relevant LO and improve the recommendation precision.

  10. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

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    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  11. Evidence-Based Treatment of Delirium in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication seen in patients with cancer, and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Increased health care costs, prolonged hospital stays, and long-term cognitive decline are other well-recognized adverse outcomes of delirium. Improved recognition of delirium and early treatment are important in diminishing such morbidity. There has been an increasing number of studies published in the literature over the last 10 years regarding delirium treatment as well as prevention. Antipsychotics, cholinesterase inhibitors, and alpha-2 agonists are the three groups of medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials in different patient populations. In patients with cancer, the evidence is most clearly supportive of short-term, low-dose use of antipsychotics for controlling the symptoms of delirium, with close monitoring for possible adverse effects, especially in older patients with multiple medical comorbidities. Nonpharmacologic interventions also appear to have a beneficial role in the treatment of patients with cancer who have or are at risk for delirium. This article presents evidence-based recommendations based on the results of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies of the treatment and prevention of delirium. PMID:22412123

  12. Developing evidence-based maternity care in Iran: a quality improvement study

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    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Iranian perinatal statistics indicate that maternity care continues to need improvement. In response, we implemented a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of maternity care at an Iranian Social Security Hospital. Using a before-and-after design our aim was to improve the uptake of selected evidence based practices and more closely attend to identified women's needs and preferences. Methods The major steps of the study were to (1 identify women's needs, values and preferences via interviews, (2 select through a process of professional consensus the top evidence-based clinical recommendations requiring local implementation (3 redesign care based on the selected evidence-based recommendations and women's views, and (4 implement the new care model. We measured the impact of the new care model on maternal satisfaction and caesarean birth rates utilising maternal surveys and medical record audit before and after implementation of the new care model. Results Twenty women's needs and requirements as well as ten evidence-based clinical recommendations were selected as a basis for improving care. Following the introduction of the new model of care, women's satisfaction levels improved significantly on 16 of 20 items (p Conclusion The introduction of a quality improvement care model improved compliance with evidence-based guidelines and was associated with an improvement in women's satisfaction levels and a reduction in rates of caesarean birth.

  13. Evidence-based medicine - an appropriate tool for evidence-based health policy? A case study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Elvbakken, Kari Tove

    2016-03-05

    Evidence-based policy (EBP), a concept modelled on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM), is widely used in different areas of policymaking. Systematic reviews (SRs) with meta-analyses gradually became the methods of choice for synthesizing research evidence about interventions and judgements about quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Critics have argued that the relation between research evidence and service policies is weak, and that the notion of EBP rests on a misunderstanding of policy processes. Having explored EBM standards and knowledge requirements for health policy decision-making, we present an empirical point of departure for discussing the relationship between EBM and EBP. In a case study exploring the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC), an independent government unit, we first searched for information about the background and development of the NOKC to establish a research context. We then identified, selected and organized official NOKC publications as an empirical sample of typical top-of-the-line knowledge delivery adhering to EBM standards. Finally, we explored conclusions in this type of publication, specifically addressing their potential as policy decision tools. From a total sample of 151 SRs published by the NOKC in the period 2004-2013, a purposive subsample from 2012 (14 publications) advised major caution about their conclusions because of the quality or relevance of the underlying documentation. Although the case study did not include a systematic investigation of uptake and policy consequences, SRs were found to be inappropriate as universal tools for health policy decision-making. The case study demonstrates that EBM is not necessarily suited to knowledge provision for every kind of policy decision-making. Our analysis raises the question of whether the evidence-based movement, represented here by an independent government organization, undertakes too broad a range of commissions using

  14. Teaching evidence-based medicine more effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmi, Zinat Nadia; Tahvildari, Sousan; Dabiran, Soheila; Soheili, Suraya; Sabouri Kashani, Ahmad; Raznahan, Maedeh

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) is becoming an integral component of graduate medical education competency and a requirement for grad medical education practice-based learning core competency. This study tries to compare the efficacy of conferences utilizing small-group discussions with the traditional conference method in enhancing EBM competency. The participants in this randomized controlled trial (RCT) were 170 members of the medical faculty who were divided into two groups of 86 (intervention) and 84 (control). Following the intervention, EBM competency was assessed by a written examination. statistical analysis made use of chi-square test, independent sample t-test and relative risks for univariate analysis. Mantel-Hanszel was used for bivariate analysis. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate multivariate-adjusted associations between EBM educational intervention and EBM knowledge, attitude and skills. A new indicator of number needed to intervention (NNI) was defined and computed. The results proved conference along with small-group discussion to be a more effective teaching method with P=0.001 on knowledge, P<0.001 for attitude and skills P<0.001 in an EBM exam when compared with medical faculty members who did not participate in EBM educational intervention (n=84). Moreover, they had also increased confidence with critical appraisal skills, and searching EBM resources. Conferences followed by small-group discussions significantly enhance EBM knowledge, attitude, critical appraisal skills and literature review skills.

  15. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine More Effectively

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    Zinat Nadia Hatmi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nEvidence-based Medicine (EBM is becoming an integral component of graduate medical education competency and a requirement for grad medical education practice-based learning core competency. This study tries to compare the efficacy of conferences utilizing small-group discussions with the traditional conference method in enhancing EBM competency. The participants in this randomized controlled trial (RCT were 170 members of the medical faculty who were divided into two groups of 86 (intervention and 84 (control. Following the intervention, EBM competency was assessed by a written examination. statistical analysis made use of chi-square test, independent sample t-test and relative risks for univariate analysis. Mantel-Hanszel was used for bivariate analysis. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate multivariate-adjusted associations between EBM educational intervention and EBM knowledge, attitude and skills. A new indicator of number needed to intervention (NNI was defined and computed. Results: The results proved conference along with small-group discussion to be a more effective teaching method with P=0.001 on knowledge, P<0.001 for attitude and skills P<0.001 in an EBM exam when compared with medical faculty members who did not participate in EBM educational intervention (n=84. Moreover, they had also increased confidence with critical appraisal skills, and searching EBM resources. Conclusions: Conferences followed by small-group discussions significantly enhance EBM knowledge, attitude, critical appraisal skills and literature review skills.

  16. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine More Effectively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Nadia Hatmi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based Medicine (EBM is becoming an integral component of graduate medical education competency and a requirement for grad medical education practice-based learning core competency. This study tries to compare the efficacy of conferences utilizing small-group discussions with the traditional conference method in enhancing EBM competency. The participants in this randomized controlled trial (RCT were 170 members of the medical faculty who were divided into two groups of 86 (intervention and 84 (control. Following the intervention, EBM competency was assessed by a written examination. statistical analysis made use of chi-square test, independent sample t-test and relative risks for univariate analysis. Mantel-Hanszel was used for bivariate analysis. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate multivariate-adjusted associations between EBM educational intervention and EBM knowledge, attitude and skills. A new indicator of number needed to intervention (NNI was defined and computed. Results: The results proved conference along with small-group discussion to be a more effective teaching method with P=0.001 on knowledge, P

  17. A Geospatial Data Recommender System based on Metadata and User Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Yang, C. P.; Armstrong, E. M.; Huang, T.; Moroni, D. F.; Finch, C. J.; McGibbney, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    Earth observations are produced in a fast velocity through real time sensors, reaching tera- to peta- bytes of geospatial data daily. Discovering and accessing the right data from the massive geospatial data is like finding needle in the haystack. To help researchers find the right data for study and decision support, quite a lot of research focusing on improving search performance have been proposed including recommendation algorithm. However, few papers have discussed the way to implement a recommendation algorithm in geospatial data retrieval system. In order to address this problem, we propose a recommendation engine to improve discovering relevant geospatial data by mining and utilizing metadata and user behavior data: 1) metadata based recommendation considers the correlation of each attribute (i.e., spatiotemporal, categorical, and ordinal) to data to be found. In particular, phrase extraction method is used to improve the accuracy of the description similarity; 2) user behavior data are utilized to predict the interest of a user through collaborative filtering; 3) an integration method is designed to combine the results of the above two methods to achieve better recommendation Experiments show that in the hybrid recommendation list, the all the precisions are larger than 0.8 from position 1 to 10.

  18. Recommendations for Policy and Practice of Physical Education in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Australian Secondary Schools Based on a Two-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Dean A.; Pearson, Phil; Okely, Anthony D.; Cotton, Wayne G.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity affords a host of physical and cognitive benefits for children. Physical education classes are one such venue where children can reap recommended amounts of physical activity. However, little research has explored evidence-based physical education instruction, particularly in culturally and linguistically diverse schools. No…

  19. Current Guidelines Have Limited Applicability to Patients with Comorbid Conditions: A Systematic Analysis of Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Burgers, Jako S.; Clancy, Carolyn; Westert, Gert P.; Schneider, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines traditionally focus on the diagnosis and treatment of single diseases. As almost half of the patients with a chronic disease have more than one disease, the applicability of guidelines may be limited. The aim of this study was to assess the extent that guidelines address comorbidity and to assess the supporting evidence of recommendations related to comorbidity. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic analysis of evidence-based guidelines focusing on four highly prevalent chronic conditions with a high impact on quality of life: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depressive disorder, diabetes mellitus type 2, and osteoarthritis. Data were abstracted from each guideline on the extent that comorbidity was addressed (general comments, specific recommendations), the type of comorbidity discussed (concordant, discordant), and the supporting evidence of the comorbidity-related recommendations (level of evidence, translation of evidence). Of the 20 guidelines, 17 (85%) addressed the issue of comorbidity and 14 (70%) provided specific recommendations on comorbidity. In general, the guidelines included few recommendations on patients with comorbidity (mean 3 recommendations per guideline, range 0 to 26). Of the 59 comorbidity-related recommendations provided, 46 (78%) addressed concordant comorbidities, 8 (14%) discordant comorbidities, and for 5 (8%) the type of comorbidity was not specified. The strength of the supporting evidence was moderate for 25% (15/59) and low for 37% (22/59) of the recommendations. In addition, for 73% (43/59) of the recommendations the evidence was not adequately translated into the guidelines. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that the applicability of current evidence-based guidelines to patients with comorbid conditions is limited. Most guidelines do not provide explicit guidance on treatment of patients with comorbidity, particularly for discordant combinations. Guidelines should be more

  20. Evidence-based information needs of public health workers: a systematized review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Barr-Walker, MPH, MS

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Recommendations are given for how librarians can increase the use of evidence-based information in public health research, practice, and policy making. Further research using rigorous methodologies and transparent reporting practices in a wider variety of settings is needed to further evaluate public health workers’ information needs.

  1. Shilling attack detection for recommender systems based on credibility of group users and rating time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wen, Junhao; Qu, Qiang; Zeng, Jun; Cheng, Tian

    2018-01-01

    Recommender systems are vulnerable to shilling attacks. Forged user-generated content data, such as user ratings and reviews, are used by attackers to manipulate recommendation rankings. Shilling attack detection in recommender systems is of great significance to maintain the fairness and sustainability of recommender systems. The current studies have problems in terms of the poor universality of algorithms, difficulty in selection of user profile attributes, and lack of an optimization mechanism. In this paper, a shilling behaviour detection structure based on abnormal group user findings and rating time series analysis is proposed. This paper adds to the current understanding in the field by studying the credibility evaluation model in-depth based on the rating prediction model to derive proximity-based predictions. A method for detecting suspicious ratings based on suspicious time windows and target item analysis is proposed. Suspicious rating time segments are determined by constructing a time series, and data streams of the rating items are examined and suspicious rating segments are checked. To analyse features of shilling attacks by a group user's credibility, an abnormal group user discovery method based on time series and time window is proposed. Standard testing datasets are used to verify the effect of the proposed method.

  2. Evidence-based diagnostics: adult septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Everett, Worth W; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-08-01

    Acutely swollen or painful joints are common complaints in the emergency department (ED). Septic arthritis in adults is a challenging diagnosis, but prompt differentiation of a bacterial etiology is crucial to minimize morbidity and mortality. The objective was to perform a systematic review describing the diagnostic characteristics of history, physical examination, and bedside laboratory tests for nongonococcal septic arthritis. A secondary objective was to quantify test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity, as well as best-evidence diagnostic and treatment risks and anticipated benefits from appropriate therapy. Two electronic search engines (PUBMED and EMBASE) were used in conjunction with a selected bibliography and scientific abstract hand search. Inclusion criteria included adult trials of patients presenting with monoarticular complaints if they reported sufficient detail to reconstruct partial or complete 2 × 2 contingency tables for experimental diagnostic test characteristics using an acceptable criterion standard. Evidence was rated by two investigators using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). When more than one similarly designed trial existed for a diagnostic test, meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Interval likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed when possible. To illustrate one method to quantify theoretical points in the probability of disease whereby clinicians might cease testing altogether and either withhold treatment (test threshold) or initiate definitive therapy in lieu of further diagnostics (treatment threshold), an interactive spreadsheet was designed and sample calculations were provided based on research estimates of diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic risk, and therapeutic risk/benefits. The prevalence of nongonococcal septic arthritis in ED patients with a single acutely painful joint is approximately 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 17

  3. Screening mammography beliefs and recommendations: a web-based survey of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Shagufta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appropriateness and cost-effectiveness of screening mammography (SM for women younger than 50 and older than 74 years is debated in the clinical research community, among health care providers, and by the American public. This study explored primary care physicians' (PCPs perceptions of the influence of clinical practice guidelines for SM; the recommendations for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios; and the factors associated with perceived SM effectiveness and recommendations in the US from June to December 2009 before the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recently revised guidelines. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,922 PCPs was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire. The response rate was 5.7% (684; (41% 271 family physicians (FP, (36% 232 general internal medicine physicians (IM, (23% 150 obstetrician-gynaecologists (OBG, and (0.2% 31 others. Cross-sectional analysis examined PCPs perceived effectiveness of SM, and recommendation for SM in response to hypothetical case scenarios. PCPs responses were measured using 4-5 point adjectival scales. Differences in perceived effectiveness and recommendations for SM were examined after adjusting for PCPs specialty, race/ethnicity, and the US region. Results Compared to IM and FP, OBG considered SM more effective in reducing breast cancer mortality among women aged 40-49 years (p = 0.003. Physicians consistently recommended mammography to women aged 50-69 years with no differences by specialty (p = 0.11. However, 94% of OBG "always recommended" SM to younger and 86% of older women compared to 81% and 67% for IM and 84% and 59% for FP respectively (p = p = Conclusions A majority of physicians, especially OBG, favour aggressive breast cancer screening for women from 40 through 79 years of age, including women with short life expectancy. Policy interventions should focus on educating providers to provide tailored recommendations for

  4. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  5. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

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    Zhengyou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs. In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  6. A novel video recommendation system based on efficient retrieval of human actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Mohsen; Yaghmaee, Farzin

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, fast growth of online video sharing eventuated new issues such as helping users to find their requirements in an efficient way. Hence, Recommender Systems (RSs) are used to find the users' most favorite items. Finding these items relies on items or users similarities. Though, many factors like sparsity and cold start user impress the recommendation quality. In some systems, attached tags are used for searching items (e.g. videos) as personalized recommendation. Different views, incomplete and inaccurate tags etc. can weaken the performance of these systems. Considering the advancement of computer vision techniques can help improving RSs. To this end, content based search can be used for finding items (here, videos are considered). In such systems, a video is taken from the user to find and recommend a list of most similar videos to the query one. Due to relating most videos to humans, we present a novel low complex scalable method to recommend videos based on the model of included action. This method has recourse to human action retrieval approaches. For modeling human actions, some interest points are extracted from each action and their motion information are used to compute the action representation. Moreover, a fuzzy dissimilarity measure is presented to compare videos for ranking them. The experimental results on HMDB, UCFYT, UCF sport and KTH datasets illustrated that, in most cases, the proposed method can reach better results than most used methods.

  7. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  8. GaMuSo: Graph base music recommendation in a social bookmarking service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijf, de J.; Liekens, A.M.L.; Gama, J.; Bradley, E.; Hollmén, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe a recommendation system based upon user-generated description (tags) of content. In particular, we describe an experimental system (GaMuSo) that consists of more than 140.000 user-defined tags for over 400.000 artists. From this data we constructed a bipartite graph, linking

  9. Understanding the Organizational Nature of Student Persistence: Empirically-based Recommendations for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.

    2002-01-01

    Builds on the assumption that colleges and universities are organizations and subsequently that the organizational perspective provides important insights for improving retention on campuses. A review of existing organizational studies of undergraduate persistence serves as the basis for ten empirically-based recommendations for practice that are…

  10. A well-started beginning elementary teacher's beliefs and practices in relation to reform recommendations about inquiry-based science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2017-06-01

    Given reform recommendations emphasizing scientific inquiry and empirical evidence pointing to the difficulties beginning teachers face in enacting inquiry-based science, this study explores a well-started beginning elementary teacher's (Sofia) beliefs about inquiry-based science and related instructional practices. In order to explore Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices, several kinds of data were collected in a period of 9 months: a self-portrait and an accompanying narrative, a personal philosophy assignment, three interviews, three journal entries, ten lesson plans, and ten videotaped classroom observations. The analysis of these data showed that Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices were reform-minded. She articulated contemporary beliefs about scientific inquiry and how children learn science and was able to translate these beliefs into practice. Central to Sofia's beliefs about science teaching were scientific inquiry and engaging students in investigations with authentic data, with a prevalent emphasis on the role of evidence in the construction of scientific claims. These findings are important to research aiming at supporting teachers, especially beginning ones, to embrace reform recommendations.

  11. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice, [corrected] evidence-based medicine and the Cochrane collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, E

    1999-03-01

    Encouraging professionals in training and later to consider practice-related research findings when making important clinical decisions is an on-going concern. Evidenced-Based Medicine (EBM) and the Cochrane Collaboration (CC) provide a source of tools and ideas for doing so, as well as a roster of colleagues who share this interest. Evidenced-based medicine involves integrating clinical expertise with the best available external evidence from systematic research as well as considering the values and expectations of patients/clients. Advantage can be taken of educational formats developed in EBM, such as problem-based learning and critical-appraisal workshops in which participants learn how to ask key answerable questions related to important clinical practice questions (e.g., regarding effectiveness, accuracy of assessment measures, prediction, prevention, and quality of clinical practice guidelines) and to access and critically appraise related research. The Cochrane Collaboration is a world-wide network of centers that prepare, maintain, and disseminate high-quality systematic reviews on the efficacy of healthcare. These databases allow access to evidence related to clinical practice decisions. Forging reciprocal working relationships with those involved in EBM reciprocal and the CC should contribute to the pursuit of shared goals such as basing clinical decisions on the best-available evidence and involving clients as informed consumers.

  13. Research and Design of a Grid Based Electronic Commerce Recommendation System

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yueling; Nie, Guihua

    2010-01-01

    Current electronic commerce recommendation system is designed for single electronic commerce website and current recommendation technologies have obvious deficiencies Centralized recommendation systems can not resolve the contradiction between high recommendation quality and timely response, as well as that between limited recommendation range and ever rich information on the web. Distributed recommendation systems are expected to improve the recommendation quality while maintaining high perf...

  14. Psychological treatments and psychotherapies in the neurorehabilitation of pain: evidences and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for an effective care of the person in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose to identify the best practices that can be used in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary approach for fostering a reduction in pain intensity. However, there is the need to elucidate what forms of psychotherapy could be matched with the specific pathologies that are taken in charge by the neurorehabilitation teams.ObjectivesTo extensively assess the available evidence which supports the use of psychological therapies for pain reduction in neurological diseases. MethodsA systematic review of the studies evaluating the effect of psychotherapies on pain intensity in neurological disorders was performed through an electronic search using PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on the level of evidence of the included studies, recommendations were outlined separately for the different conditions.ResultsThe literature search yielded 2352 results and the final database included 400 articles. The overall strength of the recommendations was medium/low. The different forms of psychological interventions, including Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy, cognitive or behavioral techniques, Mindfulness, hypnosis, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Brief Interpersonal Therapy, virtual reality interventions, the different forms of biofeedback and mirror therapy were found to be effective for pain reduction in pathologies such as musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Central Post – Stroke pain, Phantom Limb Pain, pain secondary to Spinal Cord Injury, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating syndromes

  15. E-book recommender system design and implementation based on data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongjiang

    2011-12-01

    In the knowledge explosion, rapid development of information age, how quickly the user or users interested in useful information for feedback to the user problem to be solved in this article. This paper based on data mining, association rules to the model and classification model a combination of electronic books on the recommendation of the user's neighboring users interested in e-books to target users. Introduced the e-book recommendation and the key technologies, system implementation algorithms, and implementation process, was proved through experiments that this system can help users quickly find the required e-books.

  16. Review of Recommender Systems Algorithms Utilized in Social Networks based e-Learning Systems & Neutrosophic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Salama

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a review of different recommender system algorithms that are utilized in social networks based e-Learning systems. Future research will include our proposed our e-Learning system that utilizes Recommender System and Social Network. Since the world is full of indeterminacy, the neutrosophics found their place into contemporary research. The fundamental concepts of neutrosophic set, introduced by Smarandache in [21, 22, 23] and Salama et al. in [24-66].The purpose of this paper is to utilize a neutrosophic set to analyze social networks data conducted through learning activities.

  17. Developing an evidence base for interdisciplinary learning: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, H; Carlisle, C; Gibbs, T; Watkins, C

    2001-07-01

    The overall aim of the study was to explore the feasibility of introducing interdisciplinary education within undergraduate health professional programmes. This paper reports on the first stage of the study in which a systematic review was conducted to summarize the evidence for interdisciplinary education of undergraduate health professional students. Systematic reviews integrate valid information providing a basis for rational decision making about health care which should be based on empirical and not anecdotal evidence. The accepted principles for systematic reviews were adapted in order to allow integration of the literature to produce recommendations for educational practice and guidelines for future research. The literature on interdisciplinary education was found to be diverse, including relatively small amounts of research data and much larger amounts of evaluation literature. Methodological rating schemes were used to test for confounding influences in the research studies. The number of studies found was 141 but only 30 (21%) were included in the analysis because of lack of methodological rigour in the research and poorly developed outcome measures. Student health professionals were found to benefit from interdisciplinary education with outcome effects primarily relating to changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes and beliefs. Effects upon professional practice were not discernible and educational and psychological theories were rarely used to guide the development of the educational interventions.

  18. Evidence based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, P J; Cullinan, P; Taylor, A J Newman; Burge, P S; Boyle, C

    2005-05-01

    Occupational asthma is the most frequently reported work related respiratory disease in many countries. This work was commissioned by the British Occupational Health Research Foundation to assist the Health and Safety Executive in achieving its target of reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in Great Britain by 30% by 2010. The guidelines aim to improve the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma by providing evidence based recommendations on which future practice can be based. The literature was searched systematically using Medline and Embase for articles published in all languages up to the end of June 2004. Evidence based statements and recommendations were graded according to the Royal College of General Practitioner's star system and the revised Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system. A total of 474 original studies were selected for appraisal from over 2500 abstracts. The systematic review produced 52 graded evidence statements and 22 recommendations based on 223 studies. Evidence based guidelines have become benchmarks for practice in healthcare and the process used to prepare them is well established. This evidence review and its recommendations focus on interventions and outcomes to provide a robust approach to the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma, based on and using the best available medical evidence. The most important action to prevent cases of occupational asthma is to reduce exposure at source. Thereafter surveillance should be performed for the early identification of symptoms, including occupational rhinitis, with additional functional and immunological tests where appropriate. Effective management of workers suspected to have occupational asthma involves the identification and investigation of symptoms suggestive of asthma immediately they occur. Those workers who are confirmed to have occupational asthma should be advised to avoid further exposure completely

  19. Audio-based Age and Gender Identification to Enhance the Recommendation of TV Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepstone, Sven Ewan; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2013-01-01

    Recommending TV content to groups of viewers is best carried out when relevant information such as the demographics of the group is available. However, it can be difficult and time consuming to extract information for every user in the group. This paper shows how an audio analysis of the age...... and gender of a group of users watching the TV can be used for recommending a sequence of N short TV content items for the group. First, a state of the art audio-based classifier determines the age and gender of each user in an M-user group and creates a group profile. A genetic recommender algorithm...... profile, thus ensuring that items are proportionally allocated to users with respect to their demographic categorization. The proposed system is compared to an ideal system where the group demographics are provided explicitly. Results using real speaker utterances show that, in spite of the inaccuracies...

  20. Recommendation System Based On Association Rules For Distributed E-Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Gabroveanu

    2015-09-01

    Traditional Learning Management Systems are installed on a single server where learning materials and user data are kept. To increase its performance, the Learning Management System can be installed on multiple servers; learning materials and user data could be distributed across these servers obtaining a Distributed Learning Management System. In this paper is proposed the prototype of a recommendation system based on association rules for Distributed Learning Management System. Information from LMS databases is analyzed using distributed data mining algorithms in order to extract the association rules. Then the extracted rules are used as inference rules to provide personalized recommendations. The quality of provided recommendations is improved because the rules used to make the inferences are more accurate, since these rules aggregate knowledge from all e-Learning systems included in Distributed Learning Management System.

  1. Using Mathematical Modeling and Set-Based Design Principles to Recommend an Existing CVL Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND SET-BASED DESIGN PRINCIPLES TO RECOMMEND AN EXISTING CVL DESIGN by William H. Ehlies September 2017 Thesis Advisor...Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE...September 2017 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE USING MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND SET-BASED DESIGN PRINCIPLES

  2. N-screen aware multicriteria hybrid recommender system using weight based subspace clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Farman; Sarwar, Ghulam; Lee, Sungchang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a recommender system for N-screen services in which users have multiple devices with different capabilities. In N-screen services, a user can use various devices in different locations and time and can change a device while the service is running. N-screen aware recommendation seeks to improve the user experience with recommended content by considering the user N-screen device attributes such as screen resolution, media codec, remaining battery time, and access network and the user temporal usage pattern information that are not considered in existing recommender systems. For N-screen aware recommendation support, this work introduces a user device profile collaboration agent, manager, and N-screen control server to acquire and manage the user N-screen devices profile. Furthermore, a multicriteria hybrid framework is suggested that incorporates the N-screen devices information with user preferences and demographics. In addition, we propose an individual feature and subspace weight based clustering (IFSWC) to assign different weights to each subspace and each feature within a subspace in the hybrid framework. The proposed system improves the accuracy, precision, scalability, sparsity, and cold start issues. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and prove the aforementioned statements.

  3. a Context-Aware Tourism Recommender System Based on a Spreading Activation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramian, Z.; Abbaspour, R. Ali; Claramunt, C.

    2017-09-01

    Users planning a trip to a given destination often search for the most appropriate points of interest location, this being a non-straightforward task as the range of information available is very large and not very well structured. The research presented by this paper introduces a context-aware tourism recommender system that overcomes the information overload problem by providing personalized recommendations based on the user's preferences. It also incorporates contextual information to improve the recommendation process. As previous context-aware tourism recommender systems suffer from a lack of formal definition to represent contextual information and user's preferences, the proposed system is enhanced using an ontology approach. We also apply a spreading activation technique to contextualize user preferences and learn the user profile dynamically according to the user's feedback. The proposed method assigns more effect in the spreading process for nodes which their preference values are assigned directly by the user. The results show the overall performance of the proposed context-aware tourism recommender systems by an experimental application to the city of Tehran.

  4. A CONTEXT-AWARE TOURISM RECOMMENDER SYSTEM BASED ON A SPREADING ACTIVATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bahramian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Users planning a trip to a given destination often search for the most appropriate points of interest location, this being a non-straightforward task as the range of information available is very large and not very well structured. The research presented by this paper introduces a context-aware tourism recommender system that overcomes the information overload problem by providing personalized recommendations based on the user’s preferences. It also incorporates contextual information to improve the recommendation process. As previous context-aware tourism recommender systems suffer from a lack of formal definition to represent contextual information and user’s preferences, the proposed system is enhanced using an ontology approach. We also apply a spreading activation technique to contextualize user preferences and learn the user profile dynamically according to the user’s feedback. The proposed method assigns more effect in the spreading process for nodes which their preference values are assigned directly by the user. The results show the overall performance of the proposed context-aware tourism recommender systems by an experimental application to the city of Tehran.

  5. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  6. Lost in transformation? Reviving ethics of care in hospital cultures of evidence-based healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente

    2017-07-01

    Drawing on previous empirical research, we provide an exemplary narrative to illustrate how patients have experienced hospital care organized according to evidence-based fast-track programmes. The aim of this paper was to analyse and discuss if and how it is possible to include patients' individual perspectives in an evidence-based practice as seen from the point of view of nursing theory. The paper highlights two conflicting courses of development. One is a course of standardization founded on evidence-based recommendations, which specify a set of rules that the patient must follow rigorously. The other is a course of democratization based on patients' involvement in care. Referring to the analysis of the narrative, we argue that, in the current implementation of evidence-based practice, the proposed involvement of patients resembles empty rhetoric. We argue that the principles and values from evidence-based medicine are being lost in the transformation into the current evidence-based hospital culture which potentially leads to a McDonaldization of nursing practice reflected as 'one best way'. We argue for reviving ethics of care perspectives in today's evidence practice as the fundamental values of nursing may potentially bridge conflicts between evidence-based practice and the ideals of patient participation thus preventing a practice of 'McNursing'. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. From scientifically based research to evidence based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a reflection on the peculiarities of the scientifically based research and on the distinctive elements of the EBL (evidence based learning, methodology used in the study on the “Relationship between Metacognition, Self-efficacy and Self-regulation in Learning”. The EBL method, based on the standardization of data, explains how the students’ learning experience can be considered as a set of “data” and can be used to explain how and when the research results can be considered generalizable and transferable to other learning situations. The reflections present in this study have also allowed us to illustrate the impact that its results have had on the micro and macro level of reality. They helped to fill in the gaps concerning the learning/teaching processes, contributed to the enrichment of the scientific literature on this subject and allowed to establish standards through rigorous techniques such as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

  8. Screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults: evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reaffirmation recommendation statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kenneth; Fajardo, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, and screening for this condition in pregnant women is a well-established, evidence-based standard of current medical practice. Screening other groups of adults has not been shown to improve outcomes. To review new and substantial evidence on screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria, to support the work of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. English-language studies of adults (age >18 years) indexed in PubMed and the Cochrane Library and published from 1 January 2002 through 30 April 2007. For benefits of screening or treatment for screened populations, systematic reviews; meta-analyses; and randomized, controlled trials were included. For harms of screening, systematic reviews; meta-analyses; randomized, controlled trials; cohort studies; case-control studies; and case series of large multisite databases were included. Two reviewers independently reviewed titles, abstracts, and full articles for inclusion. Two reviewers extracted data from studies on benefits of screening and treatment (including decreases in the incidence of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, symptomatic urinary tract infections, hypertension, and renal function decline). An updated Cochrane systematic review of 14 randomized, controlled trials of treatment supports screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. A randomized, controlled trial and a prospective cohort study show that screening nonpregnant women with diabetes for asymptomatic bacteriuria is unlikely to produce benefits. No new evidence on screening men for asymptomatic bacteriuria or on harms of screening was found. The focused search strategy may have missed some smaller studies on the benefits and harms of screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria. The available evidence continues to support screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, but not in other groups of adults.

  9. Evidence-based surgery: Dissemination, communication, decision aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knops, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surgeons are expected to make treatment decisions that are based on the best available evidence. Moreover, they are called to recognise that important decisions should also be shared with patients. While dissemination of evidence-based surgery and communication of evidence to patients have been

  10. Evidence based policy-making: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, FW

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of facilitating the uptake of evidence, for example, scientific research findings, into the policymaking process is multifaceted and thus complex. It is therefore important for scientists to understand this process in order to influence...

  11. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise these guidelines using an evidence-based approach. Twelve multidisciplinary review groups performed systematic literature reviews to answer 38 predefined clinical questions. Recommendations were graded using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The review groups presented their recommendations during the 2012 joint IAP/APA meeting. At this one-day, interactive conference, relevant remarks were voiced and overall agreement on each recommendation was quantified using plenary voting. The 38 recommendations covered 12 topics related to the clinical management of acute pancreatitis: A) diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and etiology, B) prognostication/predicting severity, C) imaging, D) fluid therapy, E) intensive care management, F) preventing infectious complications, G) nutritional support, H) biliary tract management, I) indications for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, J) timing of intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, K) intervention strategies in necrotizing pancreatitis, and L) timing of cholecystectomy. Using the GRADE system, 21 of the 38 (55%) recommendations, were rated as 'strong' and plenary voting revealed 'strong agreement' for 34 (89%) recommendations. The 2012 IAP/APA guidelines provide recommendations concerning key aspects of medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the currently available evidence. These recommendations should serve as a reference standard for current management and guide future clinical research on acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Using evidence-based medicine to protect healthcare workers from pandemic influenza: Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralton, Jan; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2011-01-01

    To use evidence-based principles to develop infection control algorithms to ensure the protection of healthcare workers and the continuity of health service provision during a pandemic. : Evidence-based algorithms were developed from published research as well as "needs and values" assessments. Research evidence was obtained from 97 studies reporting the protectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, seasonal vaccination, and mask use. Needs and values assessments were undertaken by international experts in pandemic infection control and local healthcare workers. Opportunity and resources costs were not determined. The Australian government commissioned the development of an evidence-based algorithm for inclusion in the 2008 revision of the Australian Health and Management Plan for Pandemic Influenza. Two international infection control teams responsible for healthcare worker safety during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome outbreak reviewed the evidence-based algorithms. The algorithms were then reviewed for needs and values by eight local clinicians who were considered key frontline clinicians during the contain and sustain phases. The international teams reviewed for practicability of implementation, whereas local clinicians reviewed for clinician compliance. Despite strong evidence for vaccination and antiviral prophylaxis providing significant protection, clinicians believed they required the additional combinations of both masks and face shields. Despite the equivocal evidence for the efficacy of surgical and N95 masks and the provision of algorithms appropriate for the level of risk according to clinical care during a pandemic, clinicians still demanded N95 masks plus face shields in combination with prophylaxis and novel vaccination. Conventional evidence-based principles could not be applied to formulate recommendations due to the lack of pandemic-specific efficacy data of protection tools and the inherent unpredictability of pandemics. As an alternative

  13. Empirical Comparison of Graph-based Recommendation Engines for an Apps Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Chiroque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recommendation engines (RE are becoming highly popular, e.g., in the area of e-commerce. A RE offers new items (products or content to users based on their profile and historical data. The most popular algorithms used in RE are based on collaborative filtering. This technique makes recommendations based on the past behavior of other users and the similarity between users and items. In this paper we have evaluated the performance of several RE based on the properties of the networks formed by users and items. The RE use in a novel way graph theoretic concepts like edges weights or network flow. The evaluation has been conducted in a real environment (ecosystem for recommending apps to smartphone users. The analysis of the results allows concluding that the effectiveness of a RE can be improved if the age of the data, and if a global view of the data is considered. It also shows that graph-based RE are effective, but more experiments are required for a more accurate characterization of their properties.

  14. TRSDL: Tag-Aware Recommender System Based on Deep Learning–Intelligent Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Liang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recommender systems (RS, many models are designed to predict ratings of items for the target user. To improve the performance for rating prediction, some studies have introduced tags into recommender systems. Tags benefit RS considerably, however, they are also redundant and ambiguous. In this paper, we propose a hybrid deep learning model TRSDL (tag-aware recommender system based on deep learning to improve the performance of tag-aware recommender systems (TRS. First, TRSDL uses pre-trained word embeddings to represent user-defined tags, and constructs item and user profiles based on the items’ tags set and users’ tagging behaviors. Then, it utilizes deep neural networks (DNNs and recurrent neural networks (RNNs to extract the latent features of items and users, respectively. Finally, it predicts ratings from these latent features. The model not only addresses tag limitations and takes advantage of semantic tag information but also learns more advanced implicit features via deep structures. We evaluated our proposed approach and several baselines on MovieLens-20 m, and the experimental results demonstrate that TRSDL significantly outperforms all the baselines (including the state-of-the-art models BiasedMF and I-AutoRec. In addition, we also explore the impacts of network depth and type on model performance.

  15. PROPOSAL FOR BUILD A TEST STAND TO THE STUDY WATER RAM BASED ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz GRYGO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article was developed of a test stand to a study physics phenomena accruing at work in a ram water based on the construction recommendations. The experience gained by a number of attempts allowed to the developed construction recommendations that allowed to adjust the test stand to perform various studies of physics phenomena occurring at the work of water ram and easy adaptions to the new requirements. The article includes: the review of the test stands on which performed the study in the history and in the present times, description of the construction recommendations of the universal test stand and the proposal of the test stand developed based on the construction recommendations. Motivation to take up this issue follows from the interest of devices that work in an unconventional way, devices used a renewable energy that can be used in household e.g. to improve their energy balance, delivery water to houses, drinking water for animals, fields irrigation, etc. Analysis of the literature of the water ram, test stands and their performance shown that it is small and typically old development in popular science form. In times of intensive search new sources of renewable energy reactivation of this type equipment may be highly probable.

  16. Evidence for current recommendations concerning the management of foot health for people with chronic long-term conditions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Edwards

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research focusing on management of foot health has become more evident over the past decade, especially related to chronic conditions such as diabetes. The level of methodological rigour across this body of work however is varied and outputs do not appear to have been developed or translated into clinical practice. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the latest guidelines, standards of care and current recommendations relative to people with chronic conditions to ascertain the level of supporting evidence concerning the management of foot health. Methods A systematic search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Web of Science, SCOPUS and The Cochrane Library for literature on recommendations for foot health management for people with chronic conditions was performed between 2000 and 2016 using predefined criteria. Data from the included publications was synthesised via template analysis, employing a thematic organisation and structure. The methodological quality of all included publications was appraised using the Appraisal for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II instrument. A more in-depth analysis was carried out that specifically considered the levels of evidence that underpinned the strength of their recommendations concerning management of foot health. Results The data collected revealed 166 publications in which the majority (102 were guidelines, standards of care or recommendations related to the treatment and management of diabetes. We noted a trend towards a systematic year on year increase in guidelines standards of care or recommendations related to the treatment and management of long term conditions other than diabetes over the past decade. The most common recommendation is for preventive care or assessments (e.g. vascular tests, followed by clinical interventions such as foot orthoses, foot ulcer care and foot health education. Methodological quality was spread across the range of AGREE II

  17. Microbial quality of reclaimed water for urban reuses: Probabilistic risk-based investigation and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipi-Shrestha, Gyan; Hewage, Kasun; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-01-15

    Although Canada has abundant freshwater resources, many cities still experience seasonal water shortage. Supply-side and demand-side management is a core strategy to address this water shortage. Under this strategy, reclaimed water, which the Canadian public is willing to use for non-potable purposes, is an option. However, no universal guidelines exist for reclaimed water use. Despite the federal government's long-term goal to develop guidelines for many water reuse applications, guidelines have only been prescribed for reclaimed water use in toilet and urinal flushing in Canada. At the provincial level, British Columbia (BC) has promulgated guidelines for wide applications of reclaimed water but only at broad class levels. This research has investigated and proposed probabilistic risk-based recommended values for microbial quality of reclaimed water in various non-potable urban reuses. The health risk was estimated by using quantitative microbial risk assessment. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used in the analysis to include variability and uncertainty in input data. The proposed recommended values are based on the indicator organism E. coli. The required treatment levels for reuse were also estimated. In addition, the recommended values were successfully applied to three wastewater treatment effluents in the Okanagan Valley, BC, Canada. The health risks associated with other bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp.), virus (adenovirus, norovirus, and rotavirus), and protozoa (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia spp.), were also estimated. The estimated risks indicate the effectiveness of the E. coli-based water quality recommended values. Sensitivity analysis shows the pathogenic E. coli ratio and morbidity are the most sensitive input parameters for all water reuses. The proposed recommended values could be further improved by using national or regional data on water exposures, disease burden per case, and the susceptibility

  18. A multi-label learning based kernel automatic recommendation method for support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Song, Qinbao

    2015-01-01

    Choosing an appropriate kernel is very important and critical when classifying a new problem with Support Vector Machine. So far, more attention has been paid on constructing new kernels and choosing suitable parameter values for a specific kernel function, but less on kernel selection. Furthermore, most of current kernel selection methods focus on seeking a best kernel with the highest classification accuracy via cross-validation, they are time consuming and ignore the differences among the number of support vectors and the CPU time of SVM with different kernels. Considering the tradeoff between classification success ratio and CPU time, there may be multiple kernel functions performing equally well on the same classification problem. Aiming to automatically select those appropriate kernel functions for a given data set, we propose a multi-label learning based kernel recommendation method built on the data characteristics. For each data set, the meta-knowledge data base is first created by extracting the feature vector of data characteristics and identifying the corresponding applicable kernel set. Then the kernel recommendation model is constructed on the generated meta-knowledge data base with the multi-label classification method. Finally, the appropriate kernel functions are recommended to a new data set by the recommendation model according to the characteristics of the new data set. Extensive experiments over 132 UCI benchmark data sets, with five different types of data set characteristics, eleven typical kernels (Linear, Polynomial, Radial Basis Function, Sigmoidal function, Laplace, Multiquadric, Rational Quadratic, Spherical, Spline, Wave and Circular), and five multi-label classification methods demonstrate that, compared with the existing kernel selection methods and the most widely used RBF kernel function, SVM with the kernel function recommended by our proposed method achieved the highest classification performance.

  19. Evidence-based interventions in pediatric psychology: progress over the decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M

    2014-09-01

    This introduction to the special issue on Evidence-Based Interventions in Pediatric Psychology provides background on the process used to develop the special issue, a summary of the key findings from the series of reviews, and discussion of the implications for evidence-based practice. Authors followed a three-phase approach to develop their systematic reviews using rigorous systematic review methodology drawn heavily from the Cochrane Collaboration. The strength of the evidence for each pediatric psychology intervention was evaluated using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The introduction discusses the progress that has been made in the evidence base for pediatric psychology interventions since the first special series published in 1999. Recommendations to stimulate further research and expand and strengthen the quality of the evidence base are described. The introduction concludes with implications from the special issue for pediatric psychology training in evidence-based practice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evidence Based Management as a Tool for Special Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Fisher

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ To examine the evidence based management literature, as an example of evidence based practice, and determine how applicable evidence based management might be in the special library environment. Methods ‐ Recent general management literature and the subject‐focused literature of evidence based management were reviewed; likewise recent library/information science management literature and the subject‐focused literature of evidence based librarianshipwere reviewed to identify relevant examples of the introduction and use of evidence based practice in organizations. Searches were conducted in major business/management databases, major library/information science databases, and relevant Web sites, blogs and wikis. Citation searches on key articles and follow‐up searches on cited references were also conducted. Analysis of the retrieved literature was conducted to find similarities and/or differences between the management literature and the library/information scienceliterature, especially as it related to special libraries.Results ‐ The barriers to introducing evidence based management into most organizations were found to apply to many special libraries and are similar to issues involved with evidence based practice in librarianship in general. Despite these barriers, a set of resources to assist special librarians in accessing research‐based information to help them use principles of evidence based management is identified.Conclusion ‐ While most special librarians are faced with a number of barriers to using evidence based management, resources do exist to help overcome these obstacles.

  1. Pharmaceutical counseling: Between evidence-based medicine and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, S N; Akhmetova, T

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical counseling standards: Article 1.1 "Code of Ethics of the pharmaceutical worker of Russia" states: "The main task of the professional activity of the pharmaceutical worker - protection of human health", Article 1.3 states that a pharmaceutical worker must take professional decisions solely in the interests of a patient [1]. However, the pharmacy is a trade organization, thus as a retailer the pharmacy is directly interested in making profits and increasing sales of pharmaceutical products, including non-prescription medicines. Moreover, while the clinical medicine is monitored for unjustified prescribing and measures are being taken to prevent polypharmacy, for a pharmacist the growing sales of over-the-counter drugs, active promotion of dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, medical devices, and, consequently, an increase of financial indicators (particularly "average purchase size") - all are characteristics of success [2].Rational use of over-the-counter medicines requires introduction of pharmaceutical counseling standards (pharmaceutical care) according to symptoms - major reasons to visit a pharmacy as part of responsible self-medication (cold, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, etc.). Standards of pharmaceutical counseling should be objective, reliable and up-to-date and contain recommendations for the rational use of over-the-counter drugs as well as indications requiring treatment to the doctor. Standardization of pharmaceutical counseling in terms of Evidence-based Pharmacy would enhance the efficiency, safety and cost-effectiveness of over-the-counter medicines.Currently, the lack of clinical component in the higher pharmaceutical education and the lack of approved standards of pharmaceutical counseling lead to the introduction of cross-selling technologies (which are broadly applied in other areas of trade, for example, the offer of a boot-polish during the sale of shoes) to the pharmaceutical practice [2, 3]. However, drugs belong to a special group

  2. Designing Dietary Recommendations Using System Level Interactomics Analysis and Network-Based Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A range of computational methods that rely on the analysis of genome-wide expression datasets have been developed and successfully used for drug repositioning. The success of these methods is based on the hypothesis that introducing a factor (in this case, a drug molecule that could reverse the disease gene expression signature will lead to a therapeutic effect. However, it has also been shown that globally reversing the disease expression signature is not a prerequisite for drug activity. On the other hand, the basic idea of significant anti-correlation in expression profiles could have great value for establishing diet-disease associations and could provide new insights into the role of dietary interventions in disease.Methods: We performed an integrated analysis of publicly available gene expression profiles for foods, diseases and drugs, by calculating pairwise similarity scores for diet and disease gene expression signatures and characterizing their topological features in protein-protein interaction networks.Results: We identified 485 diet-disease pairs where diet could positively influence disease development and 472 pairs where specific diets should be avoided in a disease state. Multiple evidence suggests that orange, whey and coconut fat could be beneficial for psoriasis, lung adenocarcinoma and macular degeneration, respectively. On the other hand, fructose-rich diet should be restricted in patients with chronic intermittent hypoxia and ovarian cancer. Since humans normally do not consume foods in isolation, we also applied different algorithms to predict synergism; as a result, 58 food pairs were predicted. Interestingly, the diets identified as anti-correlated with diseases showed a topological proximity to the disease proteins similar to that of the corresponding drugs.Conclusions: In conclusion, we provide a computational framework for establishing diet-disease associations and additional information on the role of

  3. An Evidence-based Guideline for the air medical transportation of prehospital trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephen H; Brown, Kathleen M; Oliver, Zoë J; Spaite, Daniel W; Lawner, Benjamin J; Sahni, Ritu; Weik, Tasmeen S; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Wright, Joseph L; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    Decisions about the transportation of trauma patients by helicopter are often not well informed by research assessing the risks, benefits, and costs of such transport. The objective of this evidence-based guideline (EBG) is to recommend a strategy for the selection of prehospital trauma patients who would benefit most from aeromedical transportation. A multidisciplinary panel was recruited consisting of experts in trauma, EBG development, and emergency medical services (EMS) outcomes research. Representatives of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) (funding agency), and the Children's National Medical Center (investigative team) also contributed to the process. The panel used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to guide question formulation, evidence retrieval, appraisal/synthesis, and formulate recommendations. The process followed the National Evidence-Based Guideline Model Process, which has been approved by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS and the National EMS Advisory Council. Two strong and three weak recommendations emerged from the process, all supported only by low or very low quality evidence. The panel strongly recommended that the 2011 CDC Guideline for the Field Triage of Injured Patients be used as the initial step in the triage process, and that ground emergency medical services (GEMS) be used for patients not meeting CDC anatomic, physiologic, and situational high-acuity criteria. The panel issued a weak recommendation to use helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) for higher-acuity patients if there is a time-savings versus GEMS, or if an appropriate hospital is not accessible by GEMS due to systemic/logistical factors. The panel strongly recommended that online medical direction should not be required for activating HEMS. Special consideration was given to the potential need for local

  4. Recommendations to enhance constructivist-based learning in Interprofessional Education using video-based self-assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahmen, Uta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interprofessional collaboration is crucial to the optimization of patient care.Aim: This paper aims to provide recommendations for implementing an innovative constructivist educational concept with the core element of video-based self-assessment.Methodology: A course for students in medicine, physiotherapy, and nursing was developed through interprofessional, cross-institutional collaboration. The course consisted of We evaluated the preparation and implementation of the three courses conducted thus far. Concrete recommendations for implementation were made based on evaluation sheets (students, open discussions (tutors, instructors, institutions and recorded meeting minutes (project managers, project participants.Results: Basic recommendations for implementation include: selecting appropriate criteria for self-assessment and a simulated situation that offers members of each professional group an equal opportunity to act in the role play. In terms of administrative implementation we recommend early coordination among the professions and educational institutions regarding the target groups, scheduling and attendance policy to ensure participant recruitment across all professions. Procedural planning should include developing teaching materials, such as the case vignette and treatment scenario, and providing technical equipment that can be operated intuitively in order to ensure efficient recording.Conclusion: These recommendations serve as an aid for implementing an innovative constructivist educational concept with video-based self-assessment at its core.

  5. Recommendations to enhance constructivist-based learning in Interprofessional Education using video-based self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Uta; Schulze, Christine; Schindler, Claudia; Wick, Katharina; Schwartze, Dominique; Veit, Andrea; Smolenski, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is crucial to the optimization of patient care. This paper aims to provide recommendations for implementing an innovative constructivist educational concept with the core element of video-based self-assessment. A course for students in medicine, physiotherapy, and nursing was developed through interprofessional, cross-institutional collaboration. The course consisted of drawing on prior knowledge about the work done by each professional group in regard to a specific clinical scenario and an interprofessional treatment situation, filming a role play of this treatment situation, and a structured self-assessment of the role play. We evaluated the preparation and implementation of the three courses conducted thus far. Concrete recommendations for implementation were made based on evaluation sheets (students), open discussions (tutors, instructors, institutions) and recorded meeting minutes (project managers, project participants). Basic recommendations for implementation include: selecting appropriate criteria for self-assessment and a simulated situation that offers members of each professional group an equal opportunity to act in the role play. In terms of administrative implementation we recommend early coordination among the professions and educational institutions regarding the target groups, scheduling and attendance policy to ensure participant recruitment across all professions. Procedural planning should include developing teaching materials, such as the case vignette and treatment scenario, and providing technical equipment that can be operated intuitively in order to ensure efficient recording. These recommendations serve as an aid for implementing an innovative constructivist educational concept with video-based self-assessment at its core.

  6. A Personalized Electronic Movie Recommendation System Based on Support Vector Machine and Improved Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xibin; Luo, Fengji; Qian, Ying; Ranzi, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of ICT and Web technologies, a large an amount of information is becoming available and this is producing, in some instances, a condition of information overload. Under these conditions, it is difficult for a person to locate and access useful information for making decisions. To address this problem, there are information filtering systems, such as the personalized recommendation system (PRS) considered in this paper, that assist a person in identifying possible products or services of interest based on his/her preferences. Among available approaches, collaborative Filtering (CF) is one of the most widely used recommendation techniques. However, CF has some limitations, e.g., the relatively simple similarity calculation, cold start problem, etc. In this context, this paper presents a new regression model based on the support vector machine (SVM) classification and an improved PSO (IPSO) for the development of an electronic movie PRS. In its implementation, a SVM classification model is first established to obtain a preliminary movie recommendation list based on which a SVM regression model is applied to predict movies' ratings. The proposed PRS not only considers the movie's content information but also integrates the users' demographic and behavioral information to better capture the users' interests and preferences. The efficiency of the proposed method is verified by a series of experiments based on the MovieLens benchmark data set.

  7. Implementing Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Crowe, Remle P; Cash, Rebecca E; Nudell, Nikiah G; Martin-Gill, Christian; Richards, Christopher T

    2018-01-19

    As prehospital research advances, more evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) are implemented into emergency medical services (EMS) practice. However, incomplete or suboptimal prehospital EBG implementation may hinder improvement in patient outcomes. To inform future efforts, this study's objective was to review existing evidence pertaining to prehospital EBG implementation methods. This study was a systematic literature review and evaluation following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Advanced Search were searched without language or publication date filters for articles addressing prehospital EBG implementation. Conference proceedings, textbooks, and non-English articles were excluded. GRADE was applied to the remaining articles independently by three of five study investigators. Study characteristics and salient findings from the included articles are reported. The systematic literature review identified 1,367 articles, with 41 meeting inclusion criteria. Most articles described prehospital EBG implementation (n = 24, 59%), or implementation barriers (n = 13, 32%). Common study designs were statement documents (n = 12, 29%), retrospective cohort studies (n = 12, 29%), and cross-sectional studies (n = 9, 22%). Using GRADE, evidence quality was rated low (n = 18, 44%), or very low (n = 23, 56%). Salient findings from the articles included: (i) EBG adherence and patient outcomes depend upon successful implementation, (ii) published studies generally lack detailed implementation methods, (iii) EBG implementation takes longer than planned (mostly for EMS education), (iv) EMS systems' heterogeneity affects EBG implementation, and (v) multiple barriers limit successful implementation (e.g., financial constraints, equipment purchasing, coordination with hospitals, and regulatory agencies). This review found no direct evidence for best prehospital EBG implementation practices. There

  8. Bariatric surgery: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m(2).() Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m(2) or at least 35 kg/m(2) with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m(2). An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999-2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the "normal" range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m(2) and extend into the "overweight" range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight

  9. An evidence-based update on vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, K Kelly; Hume, Anne L

    2010-04-01

    American adults take many types of vitamin supplements, despite limited evidence of their efficacy, especially in preventing chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Supplements contain significant amounts of vitamins when consumed from multiple sources. Excess consumption of some vitamins may have detrimental health effects. Use of MMVM products appears to be safe; however, clinical outcomes have not been established. Although vitamin D and preconception folic acid may be appropriate for self care, a health care provider should monitor other vitamin supplements for disease prevention, such as niacin. Beyond supplementation as treatment for vitamin deficiencies, evidence is lacking.

  10. TaDb: A time-aware diffusion-based recommender algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Jun; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Dong, Qiang; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Traditional recommender algorithms usually employ the early and recent records indiscriminately, which overlooks the change of user interests over time. In this paper, we show that the interests of a user remain stable in a short-term interval and drift during a long-term period. Based on this observation, we propose a time-aware diffusion-based (TaDb) recommender algorithm, which assigns different temporal weights to the leading links existing before the target user's collection and the following links appearing after that in the diffusion process. Experiments on four real datasets, Netflix, MovieLens, FriendFeed and Delicious show that TaDb algorithm significantly improves the prediction accuracy compared with the algorithms not considering temporal effects.

  11. Science Concierge: A Fast Content-Based Recommendation System for Scientific Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achakulvisut, Titipat; Acuna, Daniel E; Ruangrong, Tulakan; Kording, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Finding relevant publications is important for scientists who have to cope with exponentially increasing numbers of scholarly material. Algorithms can help with this task as they help for music, movie, and product recommendations. However, we know little about the performance of these algorithms with scholarly material. Here, we develop an algorithm, and an accompanying Python library, that implements a recommendation system based on the content of articles. Design principles are to adapt to new content, provide near-real time suggestions, and be open source. We tested the library on 15K posters from the Society of Neuroscience Conference 2015. Human curated topics are used to cross validate parameters in the algorithm and produce a similarity metric that maximally correlates with human judgments. We show that our algorithm significantly outperformed suggestions based on keywords. The work presented here promises to make the exploration of scholarly material faster and more accurate.

  12. Science Concierge: A Fast Content-Based Recommendation System for Scientific Publications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titipat Achakulvisut

    Full Text Available Finding relevant publications is important for scientists who have to cope with exponentially increasing numbers of scholarly material. Algorithms can help with this task as they help for music, movie, and product recommendations. However, we know little about the performance of these algorithms with scholarly material. Here, we develop an algorithm, and an accompanying Python library, that implements a recommendation system based on the content of articles. Design principles are to adapt to new content, provide near-real time suggestions, and be open source. We tested the library on 15K posters from the Society of Neuroscience Conference 2015. Human curated topics are used to cross validate parameters in the algorithm and produce a similarity metric that maximally correlates with human judgments. We show that our algorithm significantly outperformed suggestions based on keywords. The work presented here promises to make the exploration of scholarly material faster and more accurate.

  13. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  14. FCT: a fully-distributed context-aware trust model for location based service recommendation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiquan LIU; Jianfeng MA; Zhongyuan JIANG; Yinbin MIAO

    2017-01-01

    With the popularity of location based service (LBS),a vast number of trust medels for LBS recommendation (LBSR) have been proposed.These trust models are centralized in essence,and the trusted third party may collude with malicious service providers or cause the single-point failure problem.This work improves the classic certified reputation (CR) model and proposes a novel fully-distributed context-aware trust (FCT) model for LBSR.Recommendation operations are conducted by service providers directly and the trusted third party is no longer required in our FCT model.Besides,our FCT model also supports the movements of service providers due to its self-certified characteristic.Moreover,for easing the collusion attack and value imbalance attack,we comprehensively consider four kinds of factor weights,namely number,time decay,preference and context weights.Finally,a fully-distributed service recommendation scenario is deployed,and comprehensive experiments and analysis are conducted.The results indicate that our FCT model significantly outperforms the CR model in terms of the robustness against the collusion attack and value imbalance attack,as well as the service recommendation performance in improving the successful trading rates of honest service providers and reducing the risks of trading with malicious service providers.

  15. Design of a Real-Time and Continua-Based Framework for Care Guideline Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Telehealth is an important issue in the medical and healthcare domains. Although a number of systems have been developed to meet the demands of emerging telehealth services, the following problems still remain to be addressed: (1 most systems do not monitor/predict the vital signs states so that they are able to send alarms to caregivers in real-time; (2 most systems do not focus on reducing the amount of work that caregivers need to do, and provide patients with remote care; and (3 most systems do not recommend guidelines for caregivers. This study thus proposes a framework for a real-time and Continua-based Care Guideline Recommendation System (Cagurs which utilizes mobile device platforms to provide caregivers of chronic patients with real-time care guideline recommendations, and that enables vital signs data to be transmitted between different devices automatically, using the Continua standard. Moreover, the proposed system adopts the episode mining approach to monitor/predict anomalous conditions of patients, and then offers related recommended care guidelines to caregivers so that they can offer preventive care in a timely manner.

  16. Smartparticipation a fuzzy-based recommender system for political community-building

    CERN Document Server

    Terán Tamayo, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    In this book a fuzzy-based recommender system architecture for stimulating political participation and collaboration is proposed. It showcases the ""Smart Participation"" project, which uses the database of ""smart vote"", a well-known voting advice application (VAA) for local, cantonal and national elections in Switzerland. Additionally, an evaluation framework for e Participation is presented, which allows to analyze different projects and their development towards the enhancement of citizen's participation and empowerment. The book demonstrates the potential for building political communiti

  17. is planning in Nigeria becoming evidence based?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related Millennium Development Goals high on the policy agendas of many developing nations, the costs and as well as benefits of these health interventions are extremely vital in resource poor settings such as Nigeria. Despite the body of evidence ...

  18. Justifying Physical Education Based on Neuroscience Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that exercise improves cognitive function and psychological traits that influence behavior (e.g., mood, level of motivation). The evidence in the literature also shows that physical education may enhance learning or that academic performance is at least maintained despite a reduction in classroom time in order to increase time…

  19. An evidence-based view on hyperbilirubinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Hulzebos, Christian V.

    Introduction: We conducted a review of the evidence which contributes to the current care of jaundiced newborn infants. Methods: Literature was searched for reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results: Six Cochrane reviews and eight other reviews and eighteen recent RCTs are discussed.

  20. Item Anomaly Detection Based on Dynamic Partition for Time Series in Recommender Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Tian, Renli; Wen, Junhao; Xiong, Qingyu; Ling, Bin; Yang, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, recommender systems have become an effective method to process information overload. However, recommendation technology still suffers from many problems. One of the problems is shilling attacks-attackers inject spam user profiles to disturb the list of recommendation items. There are two characteristics of all types of shilling attacks: 1) Item abnormality: The rating of target items is always maximum or minimum; and 2) Attack promptness: It takes only a very short period time to inject attack profiles. Some papers have proposed item anomaly detection methods based on these two characteristics, but their detection rate, false alarm rate, and universality need to be further improved. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an item anomaly detection method based on dynamic partitioning for time series. This method first dynamically partitions item-rating time series based on important points. Then, we use chi square distribution (χ2) to detect abnormal intervals. The experimental results on MovieLens 100K and 1M indicate that this approach has a high detection rate and a low false alarm rate and is stable toward different attack models and filler sizes.