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Sample records for event rates hospital

  1. Variation in adverse event incidence rates between hospitals and hospital departments. The Dutch adverse events study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijne, M.C. de; Zegers, M.; Hoonhout, L.H.F.; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Wagner, C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the variation in adverse event (AE) rates at the hospital and hospital department level, in order to gain insight in room for improvement of patient safety at each level. Methods: Randomly selected records of 7926 hospital admissions of 2004 from 4 university and 17 general

  2. Variation in the rates of adverse events between hospitals and hospital departments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the variation in the rates of adverse events (AEs), and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments in order to investigate the room for improvement in reducing AEs at both levels. In addition, we explored the extent to which

  3. Variation in rates of adverse events between hospitals and hospital departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.; van der Wal, G.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to analyze the variation in the rates of adverse events (AEs), and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments in order to investigate the room for improvement in reducing AEs at both levels. In addition, we explored the extent to which

  4. Computing hospitalization rates in presence of repeated events: impact and countermeasures to avoid misinterpretation.

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    Baldi, Ileana; Ciccone, Giovannino; Merletti, Franco; Gregori, Dario

    2008-04-01

    The admission rate, including both first and recurrent events, is a clear overall measure of hospital utilization, its variability accounting for individual propensity to disease recurrence. In this paper, we compared two variance estimators derived from the Poisson and negative binomial distribution of directly and indirectly age/gender-standardized hospitalization rates allowing for multiple events. The latter approach accommodates departures from the assumption of randomness of repeated events required by the Poisson distribution. We apply these methods to a retrospective cohort based on hospital discharge data in 2001 of Piedmont (north-western Italy) residents. Estimated standard errors under the negative binomial for both directly and indirectly standardized rates result in almost twice those under the Poisson distribution. Our analysis confirms that ignoring the typical non-random nature of repeated events underestimates the true variance of rates and can lead to biased optimistic interpretation of study results.

  5. Event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major complications of diabetes: a multicountry comparative analysis.

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    Philip M Clarke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes imposes a substantial burden globally in terms of premature mortality, morbidity, and health care costs. Estimates of economic outcomes associated with diabetes are essential inputs to policy analyses aimed at prevention and treatment of diabetes. Our objective was to estimate and compare event rates, hospital utilization, and costs associated with major diabetes-related complications in high-, middle-, and low-income countries.Incidence and history of diabetes-related complications, hospital admissions, and length of stay were recorded in 11,140 patients with type 2 diabetes participating in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE study (mean age at entry 66 y. The probability of hospital utilization and number of days in hospital for major events associated with coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, and nephropathy were estimated for three regions (Asia, Eastern Europe, and Established Market Economies using multiple regression analysis. The resulting estimates of days spent in hospital were multiplied by regional estimates of the costs per hospital bed-day from the World Health Organization to compute annual acute and long-term costs associated with the different types of complications. To assist, comparability, costs are reported in international dollars (Int$, which represent a hypothetical currency that allows for the same quantities of goods or services to be purchased regardless of country, standardized on purchasing power in the United States. A cost calculator accompanying this paper enables the estimation of costs for individual countries and translation of these costs into local currency units. The probability of attending a hospital following an event was highest for heart failure (93%-96% across regions and lowest for nephropathy (15%-26%. The average numbers of days in hospital given at least one admission were greatest for stroke (17-32 d across

  6. Heart Rate Variability Predicts Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events and Hospitalization in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

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    Jiun-Chi Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heart rate variability (HRV has been linked to mortality in maintenance hemodialysis (HD patients, but it is less clear whether HRV is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs and hospitalization. Methods: This study enrolled 179 maintenance HD patients. HRV was measured to assess its prognostic significance in relation to MACEs and hospitalization. Results: During the follow-up period of 33.3 ± 6.7 months, 36 (20.1% patients had a MACE, and 98 (54.7% experienced hospitalization. In multivariate adjusted Cox regression analysis, low very low frequency (VLF power (hazard ratio [HR], 0.727; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.624–0.848; p < 0.001, a history of coronary artery disease, high ultrafiltration rate, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers, and the use of beta-blockers were all significantly associated with MACEs. Low VLF power (HR, 0.873; 95% CI, 0.785–0.971; p = 0.012, low serum albumin, low serum creatinine, low Kt/V levels, and high serum calcium-phosphorus product levels significantly predicted hospitalization in maintenance HD patients. Conclusions: Reduced VLF power is linked to an increased risk of MACEs and hospitalization in maintenance HD patients. Assessing cardiac autonomic function through HRV is of pivotal prognostic significance for this patient population.

  7. The effect of sporting events on emergency department attendance rates in a district general hospital in Northern Ireland.

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    McGreevy, A; Millar, L; Murphy, B; Davison, G W; Brown, R; O'Donnell, M E

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have reported a conflicting relationship between the effect of live and televised sporting events on attendance rates to emergency departments (ED). The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship of major sporting events on emergency department attendance rates and to determine the potential effects of such events on service provision. A retrospective analysis of ED attendances to a district general hospital (DGH) and subsequent admissions over a 24-h period following live and televised sporting activities was performed over a 5-year period. Data were compiled from the hospital's emergency record books including the number of attendances, patient demographics, clinical complaint and outcome. Review patients were excluded. Analysis of sporting events was compiled for live local, regional and national events as well as world-wide televised sporting broadcasts. A total of 137,668 (80,445 men) patients attended from April 2002 to July 2007. Mean attendance rate per day was 80 patients (men = 47). Mean admission rate was 13.6 patients per day. Major sporting events during the study period included; Soccer: 4 FA Cup and 1 World Cup (WC) finals; Rugby: 47 Six Nations, 25 Six nations games involving Ireland, 1 WC final, 2 WC semi-finals, 2 WC quarter-finals and 4 WC games involving Ireland; and Gaelic Football [Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA)]: 5 All-Ireland finals, 11 semi-finals, 11 quarter-finals and 5 provincial finals. There was a significantly higher patient admission rate during the soccer FA Cup final, Rugby Six Nations and games involving Ireland and for GAA semi- and quarter-final games (p = 0.001-0.01). There was no difference identified in total attendance or non-admission rates for sporting events throughout the study period. Although there was no correlation identified between any of these sporting events and total emergency department attendances (r 0.07), multinomial logistic regression demonstrated that FA Cup final (p

  8. Exploring similarities and differences in hospital adverse event rates between Norway and Sweden using Global Trigger Tool.

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    Deilkås, Ellen Tveter; Risberg, Madeleine Borgstedt; Haugen, Marion; Lindstrøm, Jonas Christoffer; Nylén, Urban; Rutberg, Hans; Michael, Soop

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we explore similarities and differences in hospital adverse event (AE) rates between Norway and Sweden by reviewing medical records with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). All acute care hospitals in both countries performed medical record reviews, except one in Norway. Records were randomly selected from all eligible admissions in 2013. Eligible admissions were patients 18 years of age or older, undergoing care with an in-hospital stay of at least 24 hours, excluding psychiatric and care and rehabilitation. Reviews were done according to GTT methodology. Similar contexts for healthcare and similar socioeconomic and demographic characteristics have inspired the Nordic countries to exchange experiences from measuring and monitoring quality and patient safety in healthcare. The co-operation has promoted the use of GTT to monitor national and local rates of AEs in hospital care. 10 986 medical records were reviewed in Norway and 19 141 medical records in Sweden. No significant difference between overall AE rates was found between the two countries. The rate was 13.0% (95% CI 11.7% to 14.3%) in Norway and 14.4% (95% CI 12.6% to 16.3%) in Sweden. There were significantly higher AE rates of surgical complications in Norwegian hospitals compared with Swedish hospitals. Swedish hospitals had significantly higher rates of pressure ulcers, falls and 'other' AEs. Among more severe AEs, Norwegian hospitals had significantly higher rates of surgical complications than Swedish hospitals. Swedish hospitals had significantly higher rates of postpartum AEs. The level of patient safety in acute care hospitals, as assessed by GTT, was essentially the same in both countries. The differences between the countries in the rates of several types of AEs provide new incentives for Norwegian and Swedish governing bodies to address patient safety issues. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  9. Effects of Italian smoking regulation on rates of hospital admission for acute coronary events: a country-wide study.

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    Francesco Barone-Adesi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported a reduction in acute coronary events (ACEs in the general population after the enforcement of smoking regulations, although there is uncertainty concerning the magnitude of the effect of such interventions. We conducted a country-wide evaluation of the health effects of the introduction of a smoking ban in public places, using data on hospital admissions for ACEs from the Italian population after the implementation of a national smoking regulation in January 2005. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rates of admission for ACEs in the 20 Italian regions from January 2002 to November 2006 were analysed using mixed-effect regression models that allowed for long-term trends and seasonality. Standard methods for interrupted time-series were adopted to assess the immediate and gradual effects of the smoking ban. Effect modification by age was investigated, with the assumption that exposure to passive smoking in public places would be greater among young people. In total, 936,519 hospital admissions for ACEs occurred in the Italian population during the study period. A 4% reduction in hospital admissions for ACEs among persons aged less than 70 years was evident after the introduction of the ban (Rate Ratio [RR], 0.96; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.95-0.98. No effect was found among persons aged at least 70 years (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.02. Effect modification by age was further suggested by analyses using narrower age categories. CONCLUSIONS: Smoke-free policies can constitute a simple and inexpensive intervention for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and thus should be included in prevention programmes.

  10. Comparison of adverse events rates and hospital cost between customized individually made implants and standard off-the-shelf implants for total knee arthroplasty

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    Steven D. Culler, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study compares selected hospital outcomes between patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA using either a customized individually made (CIM implant or a standard off-the-shelf (OTS implant. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 248 consecutive TKA patients treated in a single institution, by the same surgeon. Patients received either CIM (126 or OTS (122 implants. Study data were collected from patients' medical record or the hospital's administrative billing record. Standard statistical methods tested for differences in selected outcome measures between the 2 study arms. Results: Compared with the OTS implant study arm, the CIM implant study arm showed significantly lower transfusion rates (2.4% vs 11.6%; P = .005; a lower adverse event rate at both discharge (CIM 3.3% vs OTS 14.1%; P = .003 and 90 days after discharge (CIM 8.1% vs OTS 18.2%; P = .023; and a smaller percentage of patients were discharged to a rehabilitation or other acute care facility (4.8% vs 16.4%; P = .003. Total average real hospital cost for the TKA hospitalization between the 2 groups were nearly identical (CIM $16,192 vs OTS $16,240; P = .913. Finally, the risk-adjusted per patient total cost of care showed a net savings of $913.87 (P = .240 per patient for the CIM-TKA group, for bundle of care including the preoperative computed tomography scan, TKA hospitalization, and discharge disposition. Conclusions: Patients treated with a CIM implant had significantly lower transfusion rates, fewer adverse event rates, and were less likely to be discharged to a rehabilitation facility or another acute care facility. These outcomes were achieved without increasing costs. Keywords: Adverse event rate, Hospital cost, Length of stay, Customized individually made implant, TKA

  11. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

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    Pavão Ana Luiza B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103 and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103. Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43 and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23 between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events.

  12. Adverse outcomes of anticoagulant use among hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease: a comparison of the rates of major bleeding events between unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin.

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    Fatemeh Saheb Sharif-Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulation therapy is usually required in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of adverse outcomes of anticoagulants in hospitalized patients with CKD, and to compare the rates of major bleeding events between the unfractionated heparin (UFH and enoxaparin users. METHODS: One year prospective observational study was conducted in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (estimated GFR, 10-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 who were admitted to the renal unit of Dubai Hospital. Propensity scores for the use of anticoagulants, estimated for each of the 488 patients, were used to identify a cohort of 117 pairs of patients. Cox regression method was used to estimate association between anticoagulant use and adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Major bleeding occurred in 1 in 3 patients who received anticoagulation during hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR], 4.61 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05-10.35]. Compared with enoxaparin users, patients who received anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin had a lower mean [SD] serum level of platelet counts (139.95 [113] × 10(3/µL vs 205.56 [123] × 10(3/µL; P<0.001, and had a higher risk of major bleeding (HR, 4.79 [95% CI, 1.85-12.36]. Furthermore, compared with those who did not receive anticoagulants, patients who did had a higher in-hospital mortality (HR, 2.54 [95% CI, 1.03-6.25]; longer length of hospitalization (HR, 1.04 [95% CI, 1.01-1.06]; and higher hospital readmission at 30 days (HR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.10-2.91]. CONCLUSIONS: Anticoagulation among hospitalized patients with CKD was significantly associated with an increased risk of bleeding and in-hospital mortality. Hence, intensive monitoring and preventive measures such as laboratory monitoring and/or dose adjustment are warranted.

  13. At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates

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    ... fullstory_165869.html At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates Researchers assess 30-day survival for older ... dies," said lead author Dr. Laura Burke. If death rates at non-teaching hospitals were similar to ...

  14. Nursing magnet hospitals have better CMS hospital compare ratings

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    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been conflicting data on whether Nursing Magnet Hospitals (NMH provide better care. Methods: NMH in the Southwest USA (Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, and New Mexico were compared to hospitals not designated as NMH using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS hospital compare star designation. Results: NMH had higher star ratings than non-NMH hospitals (3.34 + 0.78 vs. 2.86 + 0.83, p<0.001. The hospitals were mostly large, urban non-critical access hospitals. Academic medical centers made up a disproportionately large portion of the NMH. Conclusions: Although NMH had higher hospital ratings, the data may favor non-critical access academic medical centers which are known to have better outcomes.

  15. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

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    Nguyen-Khoa Bao-Anh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519 and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557 were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p  Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes.

  16. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema.

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    Nguyen-Khoa, Bao-Anh; Goehring, Earl L; Werther, Winifred; Fung, Anne E; Do, Diana V; Apte, Rajendra S; Jones, Judith K

    2012-05-30

    Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519) and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557) were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p cerebrovascular diseases. Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes.

  17. Hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease in Brazil, 2004 - 2006

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    Hillegonda Maria Dutilh Novaes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease based on the Brazilian Hospital Information System (SIH. METHODS: Descriptive study based on the Hospital Information System of Brazilian National Health System data from January 2004 to December 2006: number of hospitalizations and deaths for pneumococcal meningitis, pneumococcal sepsis, pneumococcal pneumonia and Streptococcus pneumoniae as the cause of diseases reported in Brazil. Data from the 2003 Brazilian National Household Survey were used to estimate events in the private sector. Pneumococcal meningitis cases and deaths reported to the Notifiable Diseases Information System during the study period were also analyzed. RESULTS: Pneumococcal disease accounted for 34,217 hospitalizations in the Brazilian National Health System (0.1% of all hospitalizations in the public sector. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounted for 64.8% of these hospitalizations. The age distribution of the estimated hospitalization rates for pneumococcal disease showed a "U"-shape curve with the highest rates seen in children under one (110 to 136.9 per 100,000 children annually. The highest hospital case-fatality rates were seen among the elderly, and for sepsis and meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: PD is a major public health problem in Brazil. The analysis based on the SIH can provide an important input to pneumococcal disease surveillance and the impact assessment of immunization programs.

  18. Hospital Rating Systems and Implications For Patient Travel to Better-rated Hospitals.

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    Subramanian, Arun; Adler, Joel T; Shah, Nilay D; Hyder, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Publicly reported hospital ratings aim to encourage transparency, spur quality improvement, and empower patient choice. Travel burdens may limit patient choice, particularly for older adults (aged 65 years and more) who receive most medical care. For 3 major hospital ratings systems, we estimated travel burden as the additional 1-way travel distance to receive care at a better-rated hospital.Distances were estimated from publicly available data from the US Census, US News Top Hospitals, Society of Thoracic Surgeons composite rating for coronary artery bypass grafting (STS-CABG), and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Services (HCAHPS).Hospitals were rated for HCAHPS (n = 4656), STS-CABG (n = 470), and US News Top Hospitals (n = 15). Older adults were commonly located within 25 miles of their closest HCAHPS hospital (89.6%), but less commonly for STS-CABG (62.9%). To receive care at a better-rated hospital, travel distances commonly exceeded 25 miles: HCAHPS (39.2%), STS-CABG (62.7%), and US News Top Hospital (85.2%). Additional 1-way travel distances exceeded 25 miles commonly: HCAHPS (23.7%), STS-CABG (36.7%), US News Top Hospitals (81.8%).Significant travel burden is common for older adults seeking "better" care and is an important limitation of current hospital ratings for empowering patient choice.

  19. Hospitalization rates among dialysis patients during Hurricane Katrina.

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    Howard, David; Zhang, Rebecca; Huang, Yijian; Kutner, Nancy

    2012-08-01

    Dialysis centers struggled to maintain continuity of care for dialysis patients during and immediately following Hurricane Katrina's landfall on the US Gulf Coast in August 2005. However, the impact on patient health and service use is unclear. The impact of Hurricane Katrina on hospitalization rates among dialysis patients was estimated. Data from the United States Renal Data System were used to identify patients receiving dialysis from January 1, 2001 through August 29, 2005 at clinics that experienced service disruptions during Hurricane Katrina. A repeated events duration model was used with a time-varying Hurricane Katrina indicator to estimate trends in hospitalization rates. Trends were estimated separately by cause: surgical hospitalizations, medical, non-renal-related hospitalizations, and renal-related hospitalizations. The rate ratio for all-cause hospitalization associated with the time-varying Hurricane Katrina indicator was 1.16 (95% CI, 1.05-1.29; P = .004). The ratios for cause-specific hospitalization were: surgery, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.68-1.04; P = .11); renal-related admissions, 2.53 (95% CI, 2.09-3.06); P Katrina was 140, representing approximately three percent of dialysis patients at the affected clinics. Hospitalization rates among dialysis patients increased in the month following the Hurricane Katrina landfall, suggesting that providers and patients were not adequately prepared for large-scale disasters.

  20. Possible adverse drug events leading to hospital admission in a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Drug safety problems can lead to hospital admission. In Brazil, the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events is unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events and to identify the drugs, the adverse drug events, and the risk factors associated with hospital admissions. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in the internal medicine ward of a teaching hospital in São Paulo State, Brazil, from August to December 2008. All patients aged ≥18 years with a length of stay ≥24 hours were interviewed about the drugs used prior to hospital admission and their symptoms/complaints/causes of hospitalization. RESULTS: In total, 248 patients were considered eligible. The prevalence of hospitalization due to potential adverse drug events in the ward was 46.4%. Overprescribed drugs and those indicated for prophylactic treatments were frequently associated with possible adverse drug events. Frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness (15.2%, fatigue (12.3%, and chest pain (9.0%. Polypharmacy was a risk factor for the occurrence of possible adverse drug events. CONCLUSION: Possible adverse drug events led to hospitalization in a high-complexity hospital, mainly in polymedicated patients. The clinical outcomes of adverse drug events are nonspecific, which delays treatment, hinders causality analysis, and contributes to the underreporting of cases.

  1. The Rising Rate of Rural Hospital Closures.

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    Kaufman, Brystana G; Thomas, Sharita R; Randolph, Randy K; Perry, Julie R; Thompson, Kristie W; Holmes, George M; Pink, George H

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010, the rate of rural hospital closures has increased significantly. This study is a preliminary look at recent closures and a formative step in research to understand the causes and the impact on rural communities. The 2009 financial performance and market characteristics of rural hospitals that closed from 2010 through 2014 were compared to rural hospitals that remained open during the same period, stratified by critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other rural hospitals (ORHs). Differences were tested using Pearson's chi-square (categorical variables) and Wilcoxon rank test of medians. The relationships between negative operating margin and (1) market factors and (2) utilization/staffing factors were explored using logistic regression. In 2009, CAHs that subsequently closed from 2010 through 2014 had, in general, lower levels of profitability, liquidity, equity, patient volume, and staffing. In addition, ORHs that closed had smaller market shares and operated in markets with smaller populations compared to ORHs that remained open. Odds of unprofitability were associated with both market and utilization factors. Although half of the closed hospitals ceased providing health services altogether, the remainder have since converted to an alternative health care delivery model. Financial and market characteristics appear to be associated with closure of rural hospitals from 2010 through 2014, suggesting that it is possible to identify hospitals at risk of closure. As closure rates show no sign of abating, it is important to study the drivers of distress in rural hospitals, as well as the potential for alternative health care delivery models. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  2. Characterizing hospital workers' willingness to respond to a radiological event.

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    Ran D Balicer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Terrorist use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD, or "dirty bomb", which combines a conventional explosive device with radiological materials, is among the National Planning Scenarios of the United States government. Understanding employee willingness to respond is critical for planning experts. Previous research has demonstrated that perception of threat and efficacy is key in the assessing willingness to respond to a RDD event. METHODS: An anonymous online survey was used to evaluate the willingness of hospital employees to respond to a RDD event. Agreement with a series of belief statements was assessed, following a methodology validated in previous work. The survey was available online to all 18,612 employees of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from January to March 2009. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 3426 employees (18.4%, whose demographic distribution was similar to overall hospital staff. 39% of hospital workers were not willing to respond to a RDD scenario if asked but not required to do so. Only 11% more were willing if required. Workers who were hesitant to agree to work additional hours when required were 20 times less likely to report during a RDD emergency. Respondents who perceived their peers as likely to report to work in a RDD emergency were 17 times more likely to respond during a RDD event if asked. Only 27.9% of the hospital employees with a perception of low efficacy declared willingness to respond to a severe RDD event. Perception of threat had little impact on willingness to respond among hospital workers. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological scenarios such as RDDs are among the most dreaded emergency events yet studied. Several attitudinal indicators can help to identify hospital employees unlikely to respond. These risk-perception modifiers must then be addressed through training to enable effective hospital response to a RDD event.

  3. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

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    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  4. Differences in the rates of patient safety events by payer: implications for providers and policymakers.

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    Spencer, Christine S; Roberts, Eric T; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of adverse patient safety events and the equitable treatment of patients in hospitals are clinical and policy priorities. Health services researchers have identified disparities in the quality of care provided to patients, both by demographic characteristics and insurance status. However, less is known about the extent to which disparities reflect differences in the places where patients obtain care, versus disparities in the quality of care provided to different groups of patients in the same hospital. In this study, we examine whether the rate of adverse patient safety events differs by the insurance status of patients within the same hospital. Using discharge data from hospitals in 11 states, we compared risk-adjusted rates for 13 AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators by Medicare, Medicaid, and Private payer insurance status, within the same hospitals. We used multivariate regression to assess the relationship between insurance status and rates of adverse patient safety events within hospitals. Medicare and Medicaid patients experienced significantly more adverse safety events than private pay patients for 12 and 7 Patient Safety Indicators, respectively (at P patients had significantly lower event rates than private payers on 2 Patient Safety Indicators. Risk-adjusted Patient Safety Indicator rates varied with patients' insurance within the same hospital. More research is needed to determine the cause of differences in care quality received by patients at the same hospital, especially if quality measures are to be used for payment.

  5. Association of Changing Hospital Readmission Rates With Mortality Rates After Hospital Discharge.

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    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Wang, Yongfei; Lin, Zhenqiu; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Ross, Joseph S; Horwitz, Leora I; Desai, Nihar R; Suter, Lisa G; Drye, Elizabeth E; Bernheim, Susannah M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-07-18

    The Affordable Care Act has led to US national reductions in hospital 30-day readmission rates for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. Whether readmission reductions have had the unintended consequence of increasing mortality after hospitalization is unknown. To examine the correlation of paired trends in hospital 30-day readmission rates and hospital 30-day mortality rates after discharge. Retrospective study of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 years or older hospitalized with HF, AMI, or pneumonia from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2014. Thirty-day risk-adjusted readmission rate (RARR). Thirty-day RARRs and 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs) after discharge were calculated for each condition in each month at each hospital in 2008 through 2014. Monthly trends in each hospital's 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge were examined for each condition. The weighted Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for hospitals' paired monthly trends in 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge for each condition. In 2008 through 2014, 2 962 554 hospitalizations for HF, 1 229 939 for AMI, and 2 544 530 for pneumonia were identified at 5016, 4772, and 5057 hospitals, respectively. In January 2008, mean hospital 30-day RARRs and 30-day RAMRs after discharge were 24.6% and 8.4% for HF, 19.3% and 7.6% for AMI, and 18.3% and 8.5% for pneumonia. Hospital 30-day RARRs declined in the aggregate across hospitals from 2008 through 2014; monthly changes in RARRs were -0.053% (95% CI, -0.055% to -0.051%) for HF, -0.044% (95% CI, -0.047% to -0.041%) for AMI, and -0.033% (95% CI, -0.035% to -0.031%) for pneumonia. In contrast, monthly aggregate changes across hospitals in hospital 30-day RAMRs after discharge varied by condition: HF, 0.008% (95% CI, 0.007% to 0.010%); AMI, -0.003% (95% CI, -0.005% to -0.001%); and pneumonia, 0.001% (95% CI, -0.001% to 0.003%). However, correlation coefficients in

  6. Indicators of healthcare results: analysis of adverse events during hospital stays

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Cristina Pires Nascimento; Maria Cecília Toffoletto; Leilane Andrade Gonçalves; Walkíria das Graças Freitas; Katia Grillo Padilha

    2008-01-01

    This quantitative, retrospective study aimed to characterize adverse events (AE) in Intensive Care Units (ICU), Semi-Intensive Care Units (SCU) and Inpatient Units (IU), regarding nature, type, day of the week and nursing professionals / patient ratio at the moment of occurrence; as well as to identify nursing interventions after the event and AE rates. The study was performed at a private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Two hundred twenty-nine AE were notified. The predominant eve...

  7. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, H.W.; Hesselink, G.; Geense, W.; Vincent, C.; Wollersheim, H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. DESIGN: Systematic review of systematic reviews. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October

  8. Patient safety events in hospital care of individuals with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal, Adys; Thibault, Dylan P; Willis, Allison W

    2016-08-01

    (1) To describe patient adverse events (PAEs) experienced by hospitalized individuals with epilepsy and examine the association of an epilepsy diagnosis on risk of specific PAEs; (2) to examine the impact of a PAE on (a) length of stay (LOS), (b) inpatient death, and (c) use of institutional post-acute care. We applied the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) software to the National Inpatient Sample database to identify potential medical and postoperative PAEs among >72 million hospitalizations of adults in the United States from 2000 to 2010. Logistic regression models compared the odds of experiencing each PAE between hospitalizations of persons with epilepsy (PWE) and the general inpatient population. We also examined the impact of experiencing a PAE on LOS, inpatient death, and discharge disposition. Hospitalized PWEs were at increased risk for specific postoperative PAEs: fall with hip fracture (Adjusted Odds Ratio, AOR 1.90, 1.21-2.99), respiratory failure (AOR 2.64, 2.43-2.87), sepsis (AOR 1.41, 1.21-1.63), and preventable postoperative death (AOR 1.25, 1.15-1.36). The odds of perioperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis (AOR 1.65, 1.57-1.73), skin pressure ulcer (AOR 1.25, 1.22-1.29), and central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (AOR 1.24, 1.17-1.32) were also greater among hospitalizations of PWEs. Experiencing a PAE was associated with a prolonged mean length of stay (15 days vs. 5 days, t-test p epilepsy are vulnerable to specific safety-related adverse events, and these potential patient safety failures substantially impact outcomes and resource use. Efforts to reduce long-term disability and improve the value of care delivered to PWEs may need to consider provider-level interventions to reduce adverse events. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. The practice of reporting adverse events in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Siman, Andréia Guerra; Cunha, Simone Graziele Silva; Brito, Maria José Menezes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE Understanding the practice of reporting adverse events by health professionals. METHOD A qualitative case study carried out in a teaching hospital with participants of the Patient Safety Center and the nursing team. The collection took place from May to December 2015, and was conducted through interviews, observation and documentary research to treat the data using Content Analysis. RESULTS 31 professionals participated in the study. Three categories were elaborated: The...

  10. Smoking restrictions and hospitalization for acute coronary events in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Malenka, David J.; Li, Zhongze; Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of smoking restrictions in Germany on coronary syndromes and their associated costs. Methods and results All German states implemented laws partially restricting smoking in the public and hospitality sectors between August 2007 and July 2008. We conducted a before-and-after study to examine trends for the hospitalization rate for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) for an insurance cohort of 3,700,384 individuals 30 years and older. Outcome measures were hospitalization rates for coronary syndromes, and hospitalization costs. Mean age of the cohort was 56 years, and two-thirds were female. Some 2.2 and 1.1% persons were hospitalized for angina pectoris and AMI, respectively, during the study period from January 2004 through December 2008. Law implementation was associated with a 13.3% (95% confidence interval 8.2, 18.4) decline in angina pectoris and an 8.6% (5.0, 12.2) decline in AMI after 1 year. Hospitalization costs also decreased significantly for the two conditions—9.6% (2.5, 16.6) for angina pectoris and 20.1% (16.0, 24.2) for AMI at 1 year following law implementation. Assuming the law caused the observed declines, it prevented 1,880 hospitalizations and saved 7.7 million Euros in costs for this cohort during the year following law implementation. Conclusions Partial smoking restrictions in Germany were followed by reductions in hospitalization for angina pectoris and AMI, declines that continued through 1 year following these laws and resulted in substantial cost savings. Strengthening the laws could further reduce morbidity and costs from acute coronary syndromes in Germany. PMID:22350716

  11. [IBEAS design: adverse events prevalence in Latin American hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranaz-Andrés, J M; Aibar-Remón, C; Limón-Ramírez, R; Amarilla, A; Restrepo, F R; Urroz, O; Sarabia, O; Inga, R; Santivañez, A; Gonseth-García, J; Larizgoitia-Jauregui, I; Agra-Varela, Y; Terol-García, E

    2011-01-01

    To describe the methodological characteristics of the IBEAS study: adverse events prevalence in Latin American hospitals, with the aim of analysing the magnitude, significance and impact of adverse events (AE); to identify the main problems associated with patient safety AE; to increase the capacity of professionals involved in patient safety; and the setting up of patient safety agendas in the participating countries. A patient safety study launched in 35 Latin American hospitals through the analysis of AE in 5 countries: Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico and Peru, using a cross-sectional study using a review of clinical records as the main method. The implications of using a cross-sectional design when studying AE are described, in terms of resources required, internal validity and usefulness related to risk management. The cross-sectional design seems an efficient methodology in terms of time and resources spent, as well as being easy to carry out. Although the cross-sectional design does not review the all hospital episodes, it is able to provide a reliable estimate of prevalence and to support a surveillance system. Because of a possible survival bias, it is likely that the AE which led to hospital admissions will be overestimated, as well as the health related infections or those adverse events which are difficult to identify if the patient is not examined (e.g. contusions). Communication with the ward staff (if the patient is still hospitalised) help in finding the causality and their prevention. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Hospital Incidence and Mortality Rates of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Carolin; Thomas-Rueddel, Daniel O; Hartmann, Michael; Hartog, Christiane S; Welte, Tobias; Heublein, Steffen; Dennler, Ulf; Reinhart, Konrad

    2016-03-11

    Sepsis, the most severe manifestation of acute infection, poses a major challenge to health care systems around the world. To date, adequate data on the incidence and mortality of sepsis in Germany have been lacking. Nationwide case-related hospital DRG statistics for the years 2007-2013 were used to determine the in-hospital incidence and mortality of sepsis. Cases were identified on the basis of the clinical and pathogen-based ICD-10 codes for sepsis. The statistical evaluation was standardized for age and sex and carried out separately for each age group. The number of cases of sepsis rose by an average of 5.7% per year, from 200 535 in 2007 to 279 530 in 2013, corresponding to an increase in the adjusted in-hospital incidence from 256 to 335 cases per 100 000 persons per year. The percentage of patients with severe sepsis rose from 27% to 41%. The in-hospital mortality of sepsis fell over the same period by 2.7%, to 24.3%. In 2013, 67 849 persons died of sepsis in German hospitals (or died of another disease, but also had sepsis). The incidence was highest in the youngest and oldest age groups, and the in-hospital mortality rose nearly linearly with age from age 40 onward. Sepsis and death from sepsis are markedly more common in Germany than previously assumed, and they are on the rise. Sepsis statistics should become a standard component of federal statistical reports on public health, as well as of hospital statistics. Preventive measures and evidencebased treatment should be implemented across the nation.

  13. Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk marker? 128. Vol 52 No 2. SA Fam Pract 2010. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(2): 128-129. Heart rate in epidemiological studies. Over the last 25 years numerous reports demonstrated a significant association between resting heart rate and all- cause mortality ...

  14. Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Patient Safety Events: Results of the CSI Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, Garth; Hansen, Matthew; Lambert, William; O'Brien, Kerth; Dickinson, Caitlin; Dickinson, Kathryn; Van Otterloo, Joshua; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2017-10-12

    Studies of adult hospital patients have identified medical errors as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Little is known about the frequency and nature of pediatric patient safety events in the out-of-hospital setting. We sought to quantify pediatric patient safety events in EMS and identify patient, call, and care characteristics associated with potentially severe events. As part of the Children's Safety Initiative -EMS, expert panels independently reviewed charts of pediatric critical ambulance transports in a metropolitan area over a three-year period. Regression models were used to identify factors associated with increased risk of potentially severe safety events. Patient safety events were categorized as: Unintended injury; Near miss; Suboptimal action; Error; or Management complication ("UNSEMs") and their severity and potential preventability were assessed. Overall, 265 of 378 (70.1%) unique charts contained at least one UNSEM, including 146 (32.8%) errors and 199 (44.7%) suboptimal actions. Sixty-one UNSEMs were categorized as potentially severe (23.3% of UNSEMs) and nearly half (45.3%) were rated entirely preventable. Two factors were associated with heightened risk for a severe UNSEM: (1) age 29 days to 11 months (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.25-8.68); (2) cases requiring resuscitation (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.16-8.28). Severe UNSEMs were disproportionately higher among cardiopulmonary arrests (8.5% of cases, 34.4% of severe UNSEMs). During high-risk out-of-hospital care of pediatric patients, safety events are common, potentially severe, and largely preventable. Infants and those requiring resuscitation are important areas of focus to reduce out-of-hospital pediatric patient safety events.

  15. Incidence of Maternal "Near-Miss" Events in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Central Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Niyati T; Parmar, Ajay G; Mazumdar, Vihang S

    2016-10-01

    Constant decline in maternal mortality ratio has given rise to the need of a new indicator. This search has motivated investigation of severe maternal morbidity-"maternal near-miss" (MNM) event. World Health Organization (WHO) defines MNM as "a woman who, being close to death, survives a complication that occurred during pregnancy, delivery or up to 42 days after the end of her pregnancy". A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out at Sir Sayajirao General Hospital (SSGH), a tertiary care referral hospital in Vadodara, Central Gujarat, from May to September 2012. MNM events were identified according to either WHO or Mantel et al. criteria or both. During study period, 1929 live births, 18 maternal deaths and 46 "near-miss" cases were recorded. Among these 46 near-miss cases, 57 near-miss events were identified. Calculated MNM ratio was 23.85/1000 live births, MNM rate was 20.6/1000 obstetric admissions, the ratio of maternal death to MNM event was 1:2.6, and overall Mortality index was 28.1 %. Among near-miss cases, percentage of preterm delivery was 42 % and stillbirth rate was 35 % (16/46). Out of 46 MNM, pregnancies were continued in 3 while 43 pregnancies were terminated. (25 live births, 16 stillbirths, 2 abortions). Identification of preventable factors and special preventive actions should be taken for management of complications in such near-miss cases.

  16. Measuring hospital quality using pediatric readmission and revisit rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Naomi S; Vittinghoff, Eric; Asteria-Peñaloza, Renée; Edwards, Jeffrey D; Yazdany, Jinoos; Lee, Henry C; Boscardin, W John; Cabana, Michael D; Dudley, R Adams

    2013-09-01

    To assess variation among hospitals on pediatric readmission and revisit rates and to determine the number of high- and low-performing hospitals. In a retrospective analysis using the State Inpatient and Emergency Department Databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project with revisit linkages available, we identified pediatric (ages 1-20 years) visits with 1 of 7 common inpatient pediatric conditions (asthma, dehydration, pneumonia, appendicitis, skin infections, mood disorders, and epilepsy). For each condition, we calculated rates of all-cause readmissions and rates of revisits (readmission or presentation to the emergency department) within 30 and 60 days of discharge. We used mixed logistic models to estimate hospital-level risk-standardized 30-day revisit rates and to identify hospitals that had performance statistically different from the group mean. Thirty-day readmission rates were low (1% of hospitals labeled as different from the mean on 30-day risk-standardized revisit rates was mood disorders (4.2% of hospitals [n = 15], range of hospital performance 6.3%-15.9%). We found that when comparing hospitals' performances to the average, few hospitals that care for children are identified as high- or low-performers for revisits, even for common pediatric diagnoses, likely due to low hospital volumes. This limits the usefulness of condition-specific readmission or revisit measures in pediatric quality measurement.

  17. The Irish National Adverse Events Study (INAES): the frequency and nature of adverse events in Irish hospitals-a retrospective record review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Natasha; Hickey, Anne; Conroy, Ronan M; Condell, Sarah; O'Connor, Paul; Vaughan, David; Walsh, Gillian; Williams, David J

    2017-02-01

    Irish healthcare has undergone extensive change recently with spending cuts and a focus on quality initiatives; however, little is known about adverse event occurrence. To assess the frequency and nature of adverse events in Irish hospitals. 1574 (53% women, mean age 54 years) randomly selected adult inpatient admissions from a sample of eight hospitals, stratified by region and size, across the Republic of Ireland in 2009 were reviewed using two-stage (nurse review of patient charts, followed by physician review of triggered charts) retrospective chart review with electronic data capture. Results were weighted to reflect the sampling strategy. The impact on adverse event rate of differing application of international adverse event criteria was also examined. 45% of charts were triggered. The prevalence of adverse events in admissions was 12.2% (95% CI 9.5% to 15.5%), with an incidence of 10.3 events per 100 admissions (95% CI 7.5 to 13.1). Over 70% of events were considered preventable. Two-thirds were rated as having a mild-to-moderate impact on the patient, 9.9% causing permanent impairment and 6.7% contributing to death. A mean of 6.1 added bed days was attributed to events, representing an expenditure of €5550 per event. The adverse event rate varied substantially (8.6%-17.0%) when applying different published adverse event eligibility criteria. This first study of adverse events in Ireland reports similar rates to other countries. In a time of austerity, adverse events in adult inpatients were estimated to cost over €194 million. These results provide important baseline data on the adverse event burden and, alongside web-based chart review, provide an incentive and methodology to monitor future patient-safety initiatives. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. An additive-multiplicative rates model for recurrent event data with informative terminal event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liuquan; Kang, Fangyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose an additive-multiplicative rates model for recurrent event data in the presence of a terminal event such as death. The association between recurrent and terminal events is nonparametric. For inference on the model parameters, estimating equation approaches are developed, and the asymptotic properties of the resulting estimators are established. The finite sample behavior of the proposed estimators is evaluated through simulation studies, and an application to a bladder cancer study is provided.

  19. Hospitalization Rates Among Survivors of Young Adult Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Devon P; Daly, Corinne; Sutradhar, Rinku; Paszat, Lawrence F; Wilton, Andrew S; Rabeneck, Linda; Baxter, Nancy N

    2015-08-20

    There are limited data on health care use among survivors of young adult cancers. We aimed to describe patterns of hospitalization among a cohort of long-term survivors compared with noncancer controls. Persons diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 44 years with malignancies in Ontario, Canada, from 1992 to 1999, who lived at least 5 years recurrence free, were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and matched to noncancer controls. Hospitalizations were determined using hospital discharges, and rates were compared between survivors and controls. The absolute excess rate of hospitalizations was determined for each type of malignancy in survivors per 100 person-years of follow-up. The cohort included 20,275 survivors and 101,344 noncancer controls. During the study period, 6,948 (34.3%) survivors were admitted to the hospital and the adjusted relative rate (ARR) of hospitalizations in survivors compared with controls was 1.51 (95% CI, 1.48 to 1.54). The rate of hospitalization was highest for survivors of upper GI, leukemia, and urologic malignancies. The hospitalization rate (per person) for survivors significantly decreased from 0.22 in the first time period examined (5 to 8 years after diagnosis) to 0.15 in the last time period examined (18 to 20 years after diagnosis, P < .0001). However, at all time periods, survivors were more likely to be hospitalized than controls (ARR at 5 to 8 years, 1.67 [95% CI, 1.57 to 1.81]; ARR at 18 to 20 years, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.37]). Survivors of young adult cancers have an increased rate of hospitalization compared with controls. The rate of hospitalization for 20-year survivors did not return to baseline, indicating a substantial and persistent burden of late effects among this generally young population. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. The Relationship between Self-Rated Health and Hospital Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) co-varies with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Aging with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995-2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current, and future...... hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that SRH is able to capture diseases at prodromal stages and that with a sufficiently long time series ofindividual records, objective health measures can predict mortality...... to the same extent as global self-rated measures....

  1. [Hospital admission due to adverse drug events (ADE): an analysis of German routine hospital data of 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, C; Hasford, J; Stausberg, J

    2012-10-01

    In developed countries 1-5% of all hospital admissions are due to adverse drug events (ADE). An ADE is defined as an injury resulting from medical intervention related to a drug. The established reporting systems and study designs only capture selective data. The objective of the current analysis was to evaluate the rate, distribution and correlations of ADE related admissions by using German routine data. ADEs were identified by an array of 502 specified codes of the ICD-10-GM. The evaluation included only verified codes and was carried out by remote queries of the German DRG-Statistics 2006. Hospital admission due to an ADE was identified via the primary diagnosis. Of all hospital admissions 0.92% were revealed to be certainly caused by an adverse drug event. The average age between affected and non-affected was nearly identical for women 53.48 vs. 53.67 years, for men it was reduced by 4 years (48.38 years). The average hospital stay was lower for cases with an ADE, being reduced by 1.3 days for women (6.26 days vs. 7.55 days) and 1.5 days for men (5.91 days vs. 7.42 days). While mortality with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.59 (95% CI 0.57-0.62) was lower in ADE cases, the rate of emergency admissions due to ADE was increased, the OR being 3.10 (95% CI 3.07-3.13). The wards with excess rates of ADE cases were internal medicine, paediatrics, dermatology, intensive care and neurology. Younger age, reduced hospital stay and lower mortality of ADE cases are contrary to findings in the relevant literature. The DRG-Statistics also comprise populations which often are excluded in established study designs, in particular, children and cases due to medication errors, overdose, poisoning and allergic reactions. As these cases respond easily to prevention and are of significant interest to pharmacovigilance, the use of routine data is valuable for more intense research of ADE. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Adverse Drug Events and Medication Errors in African Hospitals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; Alhawassi, Tariq M; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-Anne E

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are universal problems contributing to patient harm but the magnitude of these problems in Africa remains unclear. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the literature on the extent of medication errors and adverse drug events, and the factors contributing to medication errors in African hospitals. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Global Health databases from inception to 31 August, 2017 and hand searched the reference lists of included studies. Original research studies of any design published in English that investigated adverse drug events and/or medication errors in any patient population in the hospital setting in Africa were included. Descriptive statistics including median and interquartile range were presented. Fifty-one studies were included; of these, 33 focused on medication errors, 15 on adverse drug events, and three studies focused on medication errors and adverse drug events. These studies were conducted in nine (of the 54) African countries. In any patient population, the median (interquartile range) percentage of patients reported to have experienced any suspected adverse drug event at hospital admission was 8.4% (4.5-20.1%), while adverse drug events causing admission were reported in 2.8% (0.7-6.4%) of patients but it was reported that a median of 43.5% (20.0-47.0%) of the adverse drug events were deemed preventable. Similarly, the median mortality rate attributed to adverse drug events was reported to be 0.1% (interquartile range 0.0-0.3%). The most commonly reported types of medication errors were prescribing errors, occurring in a median of 57.4% (interquartile range 22.8-72.8%) of all prescriptions and a median of 15.5% (interquartile range 7.5-50.6%) of the prescriptions evaluated had dosing problems. Major contributing factors for medication errors reported in these studies were individual practitioner factors (e.g. fatigue and inadequate knowledge

  3. [Adverse events associated with tramadol and dipirona administration in a level III hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Giovanny Alberto; Vaca, Claudia; Parra, María Fernanda

    2009-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of pharmaceutical drugs such as dipirone and tramadol must be a primary objective in the post-marketing period and as they are used in specific population groups. The frequency of adverse effects (including therapeutic failure) with the medications tramadol and dipirona were described and estimated. At the Hospital Universitario de la Samaritana, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia, adverse events associated with dipirone and tramadol were rigorously tracked in patients hospitalized in the internal medicine, as well as the orthopedics and surgery departments. For a period of six months, data were collected by means of the Instituto Nacional de Vigilancia Médica y Alimentos (INVIMA) standard report form. Direct costs of adverse event treatment to the patient were calculated. Adverse reactions were detected 213 times in 171 (8.4%) of the 2,547 patients admitted to the services (incidence rate. Of these instances, 53.4% were rated as possible for dipirone and 46.82% for tramadol. Of the total, 0.6% (16 cases) were classes as serious adverse events. The gastrointestinal system was the most affected, with the incidences of adverse events for dipirone of 27%) and tramadol of 42.9%. The total cost generated by the medical response to the 213 adverse events was estimated to be US$14,346.53. An unacceptable level of preventable adverse events was described that impacted the well-being of patients, as well as the costs associated with remedial treatment. These data recommend that institutional pharmacovigilance programs be required.

  4. The Relationship between Self-rated Health and Hospital Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    2016-01-01

    of future hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that with a sufficiently long time series of individual records, objective health measures can predict mortality to the same extent as global self......This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) covaries with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Ageing with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995 to 2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current...

  5. Adverse event reporting and patient safety at a University Hospital: Mapping, correlating and associating events for a data-based patient risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, Alessandra; Saieva, Anna Maria; Vinelli, Angela; Cacco, Rosaria Manola; Ottolitri, Ketty; De Battisti, Elisa; Dario, Claudio; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2016-09-17

    Reporting adverse events (AE) with a bearing on patient safety is fundamentally important to the identification and mitigation of potential clinical risks. The aim of this study was to analyze the AE reporting systems adopted at a university hospital for the purpose of enhancing the learning potential afforded by these systems. Retrospective cohort study Data were collected from different information flows (reports of incidents and falls, patients' claims and complaints, and cases of hospital-acquired infection [HAI]) at an university hospital. A composite risk indicator was developed to combine the data from the different flows. Spearman's nonparametric test was applied to investigate the correlation between the AE rates and a Poisson regression analysis to verify the association among characteristics of the wards and AE rates. Sixty-four wards at a University Hospital. There was a marked variability among wards AE rates. Correlations emerged between patients' claims with complaints and the number of incidents reported. Falls were positively associated with average length of hospital stay, number of beds, patients' mean age, and type of ward, and they were negatively associated with the average Cost Weight of the Diagnosis-related group (DRG) of patients on a given ward. Claims and complaints were associated directly with the average DRG weight of a ward's patient admissions. This study attempted to learn something useful from an analysis of the mandatory (but often little used) data flows generated on adverse events occurring at an university hospital with a view to managing the associated clinical risk to patients.

  6. Stressful life events in childhood and risk of infectious disease hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Simonsen, Jacob; Hviid, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Individuals exposed to high levels of stress might have an increased risk of infectious diseases. However, most of the previous studies have been conducted among adults. To examine the effect of childhood stress, we conducted a nationwide cohort study including all Danish children born from 1977 to 2004. Stressful life events (SFLE) included parental death, death of sibling or parental divorce. Outcome was defined as hospitalizations due to less severe (LSID) or severe infectious diseases (SID). Children were followed until the age of 15 years. The association between SFLE and risk of infections was evaluated through rate ratios (RR) comparing infectious disease incidence ratios in children with and without a history of SFLE. Overall, children exposed to SFLE were at 13% increased risk of LSID (RR = 1.13 (1.10-1.15)), but at no increased risk of SID hospitalization (RR = 1.05 (0.97-1.14)). Looking at the specific type of SFLE, parental divorce increased the risk of LSID (RR = 1.11 (1.09-1.14)) and SID hospitalization (1.11 (1.02-1.21)) by 11%, whereas no increased risk of LSID and SID hospitalization was observed following parental death. Finally, a 34% increased risk of LSID hospitalization (RR = 1.34 (1.23-1.45)) was observed following death of sibling, in contrast to no increased risk of SID hospitalization. Childhood exposure to SFLE, especially parental divorce seems to increase the risk of infectious disease hospitalization. Although we cannot determine whether our observations are the result of a biological effect of stress, adoption of unhealthy behaviours or increased likelihood of hospitalization, our findings do have public health relevance as a considerable proportion of the children today will be exposed to SFLE, the majority to parental divorce.

  7. The Relationship between Self-rated Health and Hospital Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Heien

    This paper investigates whether self-rated health (SRH) co-varies with individual hospital records. By linking the Danish Longitudinal Survey on Aging with individual hospital records covering all hospital admissions from 1995-2006, I show that SRH is correlated to historical, current, and future...... hospital records. I use both measures separately to control for health in a regression of mortality on wealth. Using only historical and current hospitalization controls for health yields the common result, that SRH is a stronger predictor of mortality than objective health measures. The addition of future...... hospitalizations as controls shows that the estimated gradient on wealth is similar to one in which SRH is the control. The results suggest that SRH is able to capture diseases at prodromal stages and that with a sufficiently long time series of individual records, objective health measures can predict mortality...

  8. Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Li, David X; Dzintars, Kathryn; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2017-09-01

    Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable. To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center. At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy. Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians. In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non-clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics. Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

  9. Effect of Hospital Staff Surge Capacity on Preparedness for a Conventional Mass Casualty Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Tyson B.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Bey, Tareg; Visser, Errol

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess current medical staffing levels within the Hospital Referral System in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa, and analyze the surge capacity needs to prepare for the potential of a conventional mass casualty incident during a planned mass gathering. Methods: Query of all available medical databases of both state employees and private medical personnel within the greater Cape Town area to determine current staffing levels and distribution of personnel across public and private domains. Analysis of the adequacy of available staff to manage a mass casualty incident. Results: There are 594 advanced pre-hospital personnel in Cape Town (17/100,000 population) and 142 basic pre-hospital personnel (4.6/100,000). The total number of hospital and clinic-based medical practitioners is 3097 (88.6/100,000), consisting of 1914 general physicians; 54.7/100,000 and 1183 specialist physicians; 33.8/100,000. Vacancy rates for all medical practitioners range from 23.5% to 25.5%. This includes: nursing post vacancies (26%), basic emergency care practitioners (39.3%), advanced emergency care personnel (66.8%), pharmacy assistants (42.6%), and pharmacists (33.1%). Conclusion: There are sufficient numbers and types of personnel to provide the expected ordinary healthcare needs at mass gathering sites in Cape Town; however, qualified staff are likely insufficient to manage a concurrent mass casualty event. Considering that adequate correctly skilled and trained staff form the backbone of disaster surge capacity, it appears that Cape Town is currently under resourced to manage a mass casualty event. With the increasing size and frequency of mass gathering events worldwide, adequate disaster surge capacity is an issue of global relevance. PMID:20823971

  10. Effect of Hospital Staff Surge Capacity on Preparedness for a Conventional Mass Casualty Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welzel, Tyson B MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess current medical staffing levels within the Hospital Referral System in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa, and analyze the surge capacity needs to prepare for the potential of a conventional mass casualty incident during a planned mass gathering.METHODS: Query of all available medical databases of both state employees and private medical personnel within the greater Cape Town area to determine current staffing levels and distribution of personnel across public and private domains. Analysis of the adequacy of available staff to manage a mass casualty incident.RESULTS: There are 594 advanced pre-hospital personnel in Cape Town (17/100,000 population and 142 basic pre-hospital personnel (4.6/100,000. The total number of hospital and clinic-based medical practitioners is 3097 (88.6/100,000, consisting of 1914 general physicians; 54.7/100,000 and 1183 specialist physicians; 33.8/100,000. Vacancy rates for all medical practitioners range from 23.5% to 25.5%. This includes: nursing post vacancies (26%, basic emergency care practitioners (39.3%, advanced emergency care personnel (66.8%, pharmacy assistants (42.6%, and pharmacists (33.1%.CONCLUSION: There are sufficient numbers and types of personnel to provide the expected ordinary healthcare needs at mass gathering sites in Cape Town; however, qualified staff are likely insufficient to manage a concurrent mass casualty event. Considering that adequate correctly skilled and trained staff form the backbone of disaster surge capacity, it appears that Cape Town is currently under resourced to manage a mass casualty event. With the increasing size and frequency of mass gathering events worldwide, adequate disaster surge capacity is an issue of global relevance. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:189-196.

  11. The incidence and nature of in-hospital adverse events: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E. N.; Ramrattan, M. A.; Smorenburg, S. M.; Gouma, D. J.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Adverse events in hospitals constitute a serious problem with grave consequences. Many studies have been conducted to gain an insight into this problem, but a general overview of the data is lacking. We performed a systematic review of the literature on in-hospital adverse events.

  12. Unintended events in hospitals: causes and the role of patient safety culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.

    2009-01-01

    Thesis on the causes of unintended events in hospitals Several patients suffer from adverse events as a result of the care they received in the hospital. On November 23rd – in the Dutch week of patient safety – NIVEL-researcher Marleen Smits will defend her thesis on the causes of such unintended

  13. Fast radio burst event rate counts - I. Interpreting the observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart, J.-P.; Ekers, R. D.

    2018-02-01

    The fluence distribution of the fast radio burst (FRB) population (the `source count' distribution, N (>F) ∝Fα), is a crucial diagnostic of its distance distribution, and hence the progenitor evolutionary history. We critically reanalyse current estimates of the FRB source count distribution. We demonstrate that the Lorimer burst (FRB 010724) is subject to discovery bias, and should be excluded from all statistical studies of the population. We re-examine the evidence for flat, α > -1, source count estimates based on the ratio of single-beam to multiple-beam detections with the Parkes multibeam receiver, and show that current data imply only a very weak constraint of α ≲ -1.3. A maximum-likelihood analysis applied to the portion of the Parkes FRB population detected above the observational completeness fluence of 2 Jy ms yields α = -2.6_{-1.3}^{+0.7 }. Uncertainties in the location of each FRB within the Parkes beam render estimates of the Parkes event rate uncertain in both normalizing survey area and the estimated post-beam-corrected completeness fluence; this uncertainty needs to be accounted for when comparing the event rate against event rates measured at other telescopes.

  14. Unintended events in hospitals : Causes and the role of patient safety culture

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, M

    2009-01-01

    Thesis on the causes of unintended events in hospitals Several patients suffer from adverse events as a result of the care they received in the hospital. On November 23rd – in the Dutch week of patient safety – NIVEL-researcher Marleen Smits will defend her thesis on the causes of such unintended events at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. Patient safety Previous research of NIVEL and EMGO+ has shown that in 5,7% of all hospital admissions, patients experience an adverse event. F...

  15. The impact of an extreme sports event on a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, M R; Daynes, R; Sedgwick, D M

    2005-08-01

    Extreme sports events are increasing in popularity, particularly in mountainous areas throughout Great Britain. Emergency medical care for these events is usually provided by voluntary organisations, providing event side first aid and referring patients to nearby District General Hospitals. The Fort William Mountain Bike Race is part of the UCI World Cup Series: 173 competitors racing in cross country, downhill and 4X events. The Belford Hospital provides year round medical care for the Lochaber community, which frequently swells during the tourist season. The hospital has 8300 new attendances per annum, 35 patient reviews per 24 hrs. We have reviewed the impact of the event on the local hospital. In total 52 riders reported 61 injuries. The hospital treated 24q (14%) riders. Retrospective analysis of attendances has revealed 19 riders attended on race days, increasing attendees by up to 28%. 46% of injured riders were seen at the A &E department, 1 rider requiring admission for observation and 1 rider required inter-hospital transfer Injury patterns (knee 20%, hand/wrist 18% and shoulder 18%) were similar to other reported series. We believe that extreme sports events can have considerable impact on small district general hospitals. Additional triage and staffing resources should be utilised and event organisers should anticipate the additional problems they present to the local community. District General Hospitals continue to provide a substantial contribution to the provision of health care for extreme sports within the UK.

  16. Text mining electronic health records to identify hospital adverse events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Hardahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Manual reviews of health records to identify possible adverse events are time consuming. We are developing a method based on natural language processing to quickly search electronic health records for common triggers and adverse events. Our results agree fairly well with those obtained using manu...

  17. Severe hypernatremia correction rate and mortality in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshayeb, Hala M; Showkat, Arif; Babar, Fatima; Mangold, Therese; Wall, Barry M

    2011-05-01

    Hypernatremia is a common problem in hospitalized patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to evaluate whether physicians follow the recommended guidelines for the rate of correction of hypernatremia of ≤0.5 mEq/L/hr and to evaluate the effect of the rate of correction of severe hypernatremia on the mortality of hospitalized patients. A retrospective chart review of 131 consecutively hospitalized patients with severe hypernatremia (serum sodium ≥155 mEq/L) was performed. Primary outcomes were 30-day patient mortality and 72-hour hypernatremia correction. The first 24-hour serum sodium (Na(+)) correction rate was tested as a categorical variable; slow rate (hypernatremia was corrected only in 27% of patients after 72 hours of treatment. Thirty-day patient mortality rate was 37%. In multivariable analysis, do not resuscitate status [hazards ratio (HR), 3.85; P hypernatremia (HR, 2.63; P = 0.02) and high heart rate (>100 beats/min; HR, 1.99; P = 0.03) were the independent predictors of 30-day mortality. In patients with severe hypernatremia, the rate of correction of hypernatremia was slow and resulted in inadequate correction in majority of the patients. Both slow rate of hypernatremia correction during the first 24 hours and do not resuscitate status were found to be significant predictors of 30-day patient mortality.

  18. Adverse Events During Apheresis Procedures: Audit at a Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Kanchan; Fulzele, Parag; Rout, Diptiranjan; Chaurasia, Rahul; Coshic, Poonam; Chatterjee, Kabita

    2017-03-01

    Apheretic platelets are better quality blood components which reduce donor exposure and chances of TTIs to transfusion recipients when compared to the whole blood derived components. Though safe, these apheretic donations are associated with donor adverse events. We evaluated the incidence of such adverse events associated with the modern apheresis procedures that would provide an insight as well as help formulating preventive steps to avoid frequent occurrences of such events. This prospective audit-based observational study was conducted over 1 year. Donors for plateletpheresis were selected as per the standard operating procedure of the Apheresis Lab. The apheresis procedures were done on the MCS+ (Haemonetics Corp.), Trima Accel (Terumo BCT) and COM.TEC (Fresenius Kabi AG). 1740 apheresis procedures were performed, out of which 1708 were plateletpheresis and 32 therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) procedures for 7 patients. A total of 102 adverse events were noted; of which, 80 (78.43 %) events were associated with donors, 15 (14.71 %) were owed to equipment related problems and 7 (6.86 %) were technical aberrations. All the events associated with donors were mild. No adverse events were reported with any of the 32 TPEs. Apheresis procedures are associated with adverse events which can be reduced by meticulous donor-vigilance, superior training modules for the technical personnel and continued supervision of experienced transfusion medicine specialists. Continued efforts towards making the donor's experience with apheresis more pleasant give a forward thrust to the noble vision of preparing a voluntary apheresis donor pool in India.

  19. [Costs of serious adverse events in a community teaching hospital, in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Luis Meave; Torres-Montes, Abraham; Soria-Orozco, Manuel; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely; Ramírez-Hernández, María Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Serious adverse events during hospital care are a worldwide reality and threaten the safety of the hospitalised patient. To identify serious adverse events related to healthcare and direct hospital costs in a Teaching Hospital in México. A study was conducted in a 250-bed Teaching Hospital in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Data were obtained from the Quality and Patient Safety Department based on 2012 incidents report. Every event was reviewed and analysed by an expert team using the "fish bone" tool. The costs were calculated since the event took place until discharge or death of the patient. A total of 34 serious adverse events were identified. The average cost was $117,440.89 Mexican pesos (approx. €7,000). The great majority (82.35%) were largely preventable and related to the process of care. Undergraduate medical staff were involved in 58.82%, and 14.7% of patients had suffered adverse events in other hospitals. Serious adverse events in a Teaching Hospital setting need to be analysed to learn and deploy interventions to prevent and improve patient safety. The direct costs of these events are similar to those reported in developed countries. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparison of various rate functions of a recurrent event process in the presence of a terminal event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianghua; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Huang, Chiung-Yu

    2010-04-01

    Several different rate functions of the recurrent event process have been proposed for analysing recurrent event data when the observation of a study subject can be terminated by a failure event, such as death. When the terminal event is correlated with the underlying recurrent event process, these rate functions have different interpretations; however, recognition of the differences has been lacking theoretically and practically. In this article, we study the relationship between these rate functions and demonstrate that models based on an inappropriate rate function may lead to misleading scientific conclusions in various scenarios. An analysis of data from an AIDS clinical trial is presented to emphasise the importance of cautious model selection.

  1. EVALUATING MORTALITY RATE CAUSED BY ELECTROLYTE ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS HOSPITALIZED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khorasani

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Adjustment of composition of body fluids and electrolytes is one of the most important aspects of patients care. Sodium and Potassium are the most important body cations, the improper adjustment of them will cause sever disorders in neuromuscular, gastrointestinal, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Acute renal failure indicated by increase in creatinine and nitrogen urea, brings an accumulation of fluids, salts and metabolites of nitrogen in body. This study intends to assess the status of electrolyte abnormalities and mortality rates of the patients hospitalized in ICU wards in our country. This is a descriptive and retrospective study on the records of 378 patients hospitalized in ICU. A questionnaire was prepared and the data were entered in SPSS system. They were statistically analyzed by using chi-square and fisher's Exact test methods. Out of 378 patients hospitalized in ICU, over 2/3 of them were male and over half of them were>45 years old. Frequency distribution of electrolyte abnormalities was as follows: Hyponatremia 59% hypernatremia 23% hypokalemia 37% hyperkalemia 28%, 35% and 21% of patients had respectively BUN and creatinine more than the normal range. 26% of patients hospitalized in ICU had nonsurgical problems and 74% of the patients had surgical problems. Average time of hospitalization in ICU was 85 days and mortality rate was 35%. The most common electrolyte abnormality was related to variation in serum sodium levels in the form of hyponatremia. And the highest prevalence electrolyte abnormality in dead patients was hyponatremia. This study proves that the prevalence of electrolyte abnormalities is directly related to mortality and increase in hospitalization period and those having undergone surgical operations during hospitalization in ICU, manifested more abnormalities.

  2. [Hospital haemovigilance and adverse events or reactions: who notifies and what?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouëzec, H; Bazin, A; Lassale, B; Huchet, C; Artéro, N

    2012-11-01

    The French haemovigilance system designates a physician in charge of haemovigilance in each hospital. She/he collects the adverse reactions and events reported by medical staff or nurses. In 2010, 7360 (2.42/1000 units) adverse reactions and 518 adverse events (excepted donors) were reported. These results mean that the system is particularly effective in hospitals. This study collected the opinion of physicians in charge of haemovigilance about this organization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Medication huddles slash adverse drug events (ADE), promote safety culture across all hospital units, including the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    To make a big dent in adverse drug events (ADE), Nationwide Children's Hospital devised medication huddles: a process that takes place after every reported ADE. A core huddle team meets with clinicians from the specific unit involved to discuss why the ADE occurred, and what can be done to prevent future events. In three years, the approach has reduced ADEs by 74%, and the rate of ADEs per 1,000 dispensed doses has decreased by 85%. * Administrators say a safety culture that encourages error reporting is key to making the process work. * To facilitate the huddle discussions, developers created a data collection tool that prompts huddle participants to describe the ADE, what factors were involved, and potential solutions. * While the medication huddles were first implemented in the hospital's critical care units, the process has since been expanded to include all areas of the hospital, including the ED.

  4. Efficiency and hospital effectiveness in improving Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C; Rosko, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency has emerged as a central goal to the operations of health care organizations. There are two competing perspectives on the relationship between efficiency and organizational performance. Some argue that organizational slack is a waste and that efficiency contributes to organizational performance, whereas others maintain that slack acts as a buffer, allowing organizations to adapt to environmental demands and contributing to organizational performance. As value-based purchasing becomes more prevalent, health care organizations are incented to become more efficient and, at the same time, improve their patients' experiences and outcomes. Unused slack resources might facilitate the timely implementation of these improvements. Building on previous research on organizational slack and inertia, we test whether efficiency and other organizational factors predict organizational effectiveness in improving Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings. We rely on data from the American Hospital Association and HCAHPS. We estimate hospital cost-efficiency by Stochastic Frontier Analysis and use regression analysis to determine whether efficiency, competition, hospital size, and other organizational factors are significant predictors of hospital effectiveness. Our findings indicate that efficiency and hospital size have a significant negative association with organizational ability to improve HCAHPS ratings. Although achieving organizational efficiency is necessary for health care organizations, given the changes that are currently occurring in the U.S. health care system, it is important for health care managers to maintain a certain level of slack to respond to environmental demands and have the resources needed to improve their performance.

  5. Respiratory rate estimation during triage of children in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Ahmar; Fleming, Susannah; Thompson, Matthew; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of a child's health is critical for appropriate allocation of medical resources and timely delivery of healthcare in Emergency Departments. The accurate measurement of vital signs is a key step in the determination of the severity of illness and respiratory rate is currently the most difficult vital sign to measure accurately. Several previous studies have attempted to extract respiratory rate from photoplethysmogram (PPG) recordings. However, the majority have been conducted in controlled settings using PPG recordings from healthy subjects. In many studies, manual selection of clean sections of PPG recordings was undertaken before assessing the accuracy of the signal processing algorithms developed. Such selection procedures are not appropriate in clinical settings. A major limitation of AR modelling, previously applied to respiratory rate estimation, is an appropriate selection of model order. This study developed a novel algorithm that automatically estimates respiratory rate from a median spectrum constructed applying multiple AR models to processed PPG segments acquired with pulse oximetry using a finger probe. Good-quality sections were identified using a dynamic template-matching technique to assess PPG signal quality. The algorithm was validated on 205 children presenting to the Emergency Department at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK, with reference respiratory rates up to 50 breaths per minute estimated by paediatric nurses. At the time of writing, the authors are not aware of any other study that has validated respiratory rate estimation using data collected from over 200 children in hospitals during routine triage.

  6. Milk Flow Rates from bottle nipples used after hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pados, Britt Frisk; Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W Brant

    To test the milk flow rates and variability in flow rates of bottle nipples used after hospital discharge. Twenty-six nipple types that represented 15 common brands as well as variety in price per nipple and store location sold (e.g., Babies R' Us, Walmart, Dollar Store) were chosen for testing. Ten of each nipple type (n = 260 total) were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in 1 minute using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated. Flow rates of nipples within brand were compared statistically. Milk flow rates varied from 1.68 mL/min for the Avent Natural Newborn Flow to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown's Standard Y-cut. Variability between nipple types also varied widely, from .03 for the Dr. Brown's Standard Level 3 to .37 for MAM Nipple 1 Slow Flow. The extreme range of milk flow rates found may be significant for medically fragile infants being discharged home who are continuing to develop oral feeding skills. The name of the nipple does not provide clear information about the flow rate to guide parents in decision making. Variability in flow rates within nipples of the same type may complicate oral feeding for the medically fragile infant who may not be able to adapt easily to change in flow rates. Both flow rate and variability should be considered when guiding parents to a nipple choice.

  7. Measuring target detection performance in paradigms with high event rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Alexandra; Andersen, Søren K

    2013-05-01

    Combining behavioral and neurophysiological measurements inevitably implies mutual constraints, such as when the neurophysiological measurement requires fast-paced stimulus presentation and hence the attribution of a behavioral response to a particular preceding stimulus becomes ambiguous. We develop and test a method for validly assessing behavioral detection performance in spite of this ambiguity. We examine four approaches taken in the literature to treat such situations. We analytically derive a new variant of computing the classical parameters of signal detection theory, hit and false alarm rates, adapted to fast-paced paradigms. Each of the previous approaches shows specific shortcomings (susceptibility towards response window choice, biased estimates of behavioral detection performance). Superior performance of our new approach is demonstrated for both simulated and empirical behavioral data. Further evidence is provided by reliable correspondence between behavioral performance and the N2b component as an electrophysiological indicator of target detection. The appropriateness of our approach is substantiated by both theoretical and empirical arguments. We demonstrate an easy-to-implement solution for measuring target detection performance independent of the rate of event presentation. Thus overcoming the measurement bias of previous approaches, our method will help to clarify the behavioral relevance of different measures of cortical activation. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The relationship between Asian dust events and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takahiro; Hashizume, Masahiro; Ueda, Kayo; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Atsushi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nishiwaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Asian dust events are caused by dust storms that originate in the deserts of China and Mongolia and drift across East Asia. We hypothesized that the dust events would increase incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests by triggering acute events or exacerbating chronic diseases. We analyzed the Utstein-Style data collected in 2005 to 2008 from seven prefectures covering almost the entire length of Japan to investigate the effect of Asian dust events on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Asian dust events were defined by the measurement of light detection and ranging. A time-stratified case-crossover analysis was performed. The strength of the association between Asian dust events and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests was shown by odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals in two conditional logistic models. A pooled estimate was obtained from area-specific results by random-effect meta-analysis. The total number of cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was 59 273, of which 35 460 were in men and 23 813 were in women. The total number of event days during the study period was smallest in Miyagi and Niigata and largest in Shimane and Nagasaki. There was no significant relationship between Asian dust events and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests by area in either of the models. In the pooled analysis, the highest odds ratios were observed at lag day 1 in both model 1 (OR 1.07; 95% CI, 0.97-1.19) and model 2 (OR 1.08; 95% CI, 0.97-1.20). However, these results were not statistically significant. We found no evidence of an association between Asian dust events and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

  9. Aortic event rate in the Marfan population: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jondeau, Guillaume; Detaint, Delphine; Tubach, Florence; Arnoult, Florence; Milleron, Olivier; Raoux, Francois; Delorme, Gabriel; Mimoun, Lea; Krapf, Laura; Hamroun, Dalil; Beroud, Christophe; Roy, Carine; Vahanian, Alec; Boileau, Catherine

    2012-01-17

    Optimal management, including timing of surgery, remains debated in Marfan syndrome because of a lack of data on aortic risk associated with this disease. We used our database to evaluate aortic risk associated with standardized care. Patients who fulfilled the international criteria, had not had previous aortic surgery or dissection, and came to our center at least twice were included. Aortic measurements were made with echocardiography (every 2 years); patients were given systematic β-blockade and advice about sports activities. Prophylactic aortic surgery was proposed when the maximal aortic diameter reached 50 mm. Seven hundred thirty-two patients with Marfan syndrome were followed up for a mean of 6.6 years. Five deaths and 2 dissections of the ascending aorta occurred during follow-up. Event rate (death/aortic dissection) was 0.17%/y. Risk rose with increasing aortic diameter measured within 2 years of the event: from 0.09%/y per year (95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.20) when the aortic diameter was <40 mm to 0.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.71) with diameters of 45 to 49 mm and 1.33% (95% confidence interval, 0.00-3.93) with diameters of 50 to 54 mm. The risk increased 4 times at diameters ≥50 mm. The annual risk dropped below 0.05% when the aortic diameter was <50 mm after exclusion of a neonatal patient, a woman who became pregnant against our recommendation, and a 72-year-old woman with previous myocardial infarction. Risk of sudden death or aortic dissection remains low in patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic diameter between 45 and 49 mm. Aortic diameter of 50 mm appears to be a reasonable threshold for prophylactic surgery. © 2011 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Are language barriers associated with serious medical events in hospitalized pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam L; Rivara, Frederick; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather; Davis, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Language barriers may lead to medical errors by impeding patient-provider communication. The objective of this study was to determine whether hospitalized pediatric patients whose families have language barriers are more likely to incur serious medical errors than patients whose families do not have language barriers. A case-control study was conducted in a large, academic, regional children's hospital in the Pacific Northwest. Case patients (n = 97) included all hospitalizations of patients who were younger than 21 years and had a reported serious medical event from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2003. Control patients (n = 475) were chosen from hospitalizations without a reported serious medical event and were matched with case patients on age, admitting service, admission to intensive care, and date of admission. The main exposure was a language barrier defined by self- or provider-reported need for an interpreter. Serious medical events were defined as events that led to unintended or potentially adverse outcomes identified by the hospital's quality improvement staff. Fourteen (14.4%) of the case patients and 53 (11.2%) of the control patients were assigned an interpreter during their hospitalization. Overall, we found no increased risk for serious medical events in patients and families who requested an interpreter compared with patients and families who did not request an interpreter (odds ratio: 1.36; 95% confidence interval: 0.73-2.55). Spanish-speaking patients who requested an interpreter comprised 11 (11.3%) of the case patients and 26 (5.5%) of the control patients. This subgroup had a twofold increased risk for serious medical events compared with patients who did not request an interpreter (odds ratio: 2.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-4.81). Spanish-speaking patients whose families have a language barrier seem to have a significantly increased risk for serious medical events during pediatric hospitalization compared with patients whose families

  11. Readmission Rates and Long-Term Hospital Costs Among Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Li, Yan; Hammill, Bradley G.; Spertus, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although in-hospital cardiac arrest is common, little is known about readmission patterns and inpatient resource use among survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods and Results Within a large national registry, we examined long-term inpatient utilization among 6972 adults ≥65 years who survived an in-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined 30-day and 1-year readmission rates and inpatient costs, overall and by patient demographics, hospital disposition (discharge destination), and neurological status at discharge. The mean age was 75.8 ± 7.0 years, 56% were men, and 12% were black. There were a total of 2005 readmissions during the first 30 days (cumulative incidence rate: 35 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 33–37]) and 8751 readmissions at 1 year (cumulative incidence rate: 185 readmissions/100 patients [95% CI: 177–190]). Overall, mean inpatient costs were $7,741 ± $2323 at 30 days and $18,629 ± $9411 at 1 year. Thirty-day inpatient costs were higher in patients of younger age (≥85 years: $6052 [reference]; 75–84 years: $7444 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.23 [1.06–1.42]; 65–74 years: $8291 [adjusted cost ratio, 1.37 [1.19–1.59]; both Pcardiac arrest have frequent readmissions and high follow-up inpatient costs. Readmissions and inpatient costs were higher in certain subgroups, including patients of younger age and black race. PMID:25351479

  12. Unattended Hospital and Home Sleep Apnea Testing Following Cerebrovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Mark I; Elias, Sara; Wan, Anthony; Im, James; Frankul, Fadi; Atalla, Mina; Black, Sandra E; Basile, Vincenzo S; Sundaram, Arun; Hopyan, Julia J; Boyle, Karl; Gladstone, David J; Swartz, Richard H; Murray, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    Home sleep apnea testing (HSAT) is an alternative to polysomnography for the detection of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We assessed the feasibility of HSAT as an unattended screening tool for patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The primary outcome was the feasibility of unattended HSAT, as defined by analyzability of the data. Secondary outcomes included determining (1) predictors of obtaining nonanalyzable sleep data and (2) time to OSA detection and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) initiation. In this single-center prospective observational study, inpatients or outpatients who had sustained a stroke or TIA were screened for OSA using the ApneaLink Plus ambulatory sleep monitor in their home or hospital room. There were 102 patients who completed unattended sleep monitoring. Mean age was 68.7 ± 13.7 years, 55.9% were male, 57.8% were outpatients, and 77.5% had a stroke (22.5% with TIA). Eighty-two (80.4%) patients obtained four or more hours of analyzable sleep data. Functional dependence (defined as a modified Rankin Scale of >2) and elevated body mass index were independently associated with obtaining nonanalyzable data. OSA was detected in 63.4% (52 of 82) of patients and, of those, 34 of 52 (65.4%) initiated CPAP therapy. The mean time from study recruitment to HSAT was 1.7 days (median: 1, interquartile range [IQR]: 2) and CPAP was initiated on average within 62.7 days of recruitment (median: 53, IQR: 30). Unattended HSAT can be feasibly implemented after stroke or TIA. This method facilitates rapid diagnosis and management of OSA in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measuring hand hygiene compliance rates at hospital entrances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidotas, Marina; Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Marra, Alexandre R; Camargo, Thiago Zinsly Sampaio; Victor, Elivane da Silva; Gysi, Deisy Morselli; Leal, Flavio; Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão dos; Edmond, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    Despite the importance of hand hygiene in the health care setting, there are no studies evaluating hand hygiene compliance at hospital entrances. The study was prospectively performed over a 33-week period from March 30, 2014-November 15, 2014, to evaluate hand hygiene compliance in 2 hospital reception areas. We compared electronic handwash counters with the application of radiofrequency identification (GOJO SMARTLINK) (electronic observer) that counts each activation of alcohol gel dispensers to direct observation (human observer) via remote review of video surveillance. We found low hand hygiene compliance rates of 2.2% (99/4,412) and 1.7% (140/8,277), respectively, at reception areas A and D, detected by direct observation. Using the electronic observer, we measured rates of 17% (15,624/91,724) and 7.1% (51,605/730,357) at reception areas A and D, respectively. For the overall time period of simultaneous electronic and human observation, the human observer captured 1% of the hand hygiene episodes detected by the electronic observer. Our study showed very low hand hygiene compliance in hospital reception areas, and we found an electronic hand hygiene system to be a useful method to monitor hand hygiene compliance. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. General surgical adverse events in a UK district general hospital-lessons to learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, S V; Roshanzamir, S; Patel, Sandeep; Harinath, G

    2011-01-01

    An adverse event (AE) is defined as an unintended injury or complication caused by healthcare management rather than the disease process that may prolong admission and lead to disability or death. This study retrospectively assessed all reported general surgery-related AEs in a district general hospital in the south-east of England. All general surgical AEs arising from adult inpatient admissions between 2002 and 2007, that had been reported to the risk management team, following completion of the standard 'Adverse Incident Report Form', were retrospectively reviewed. There were 24,185 general surgical admissions over the period of the study; 461 AEs were reported (1.9% mean annual incident rate; 95% CI, 1.3%-2.5%). The majority (85%) were near miss or no injury events (category I and II) while serious/serious near-miss incidents accounted for just 2% of events. Communicative or administrative problems were implicated in 54% of cases while 12% arose from theatre/surgery-related failure. Of 58 medico-legal claims (0.24% of admissions) that were made, 16 (27.5%) progressed to the law courts for formal settlement. The reported annual AE incident rate of approximately 2% is well below the national average: this may be due to pre-selection of general surgery-related AEs or represent under-reporting of incidents. The vast majority of AEs were related to administrative and communicative error. These areas must be addressed if patient safety and outcome is to be significantly improved. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 42 CFR 412.331 - Determining hospital-specific rates in cases of hospital merger, consolidation, or dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., after a new hospital accepts its first patient but before the end of its base year, it merges with one... hospital-specific rate and payment determination for the merged entity are determined as follows— (1) Post... campus in accordance with § 412.328, and then determines a revised hospital-specific rate for the merged...

  16. Reducing hospital readmission rates: current strategies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Sunil; Theobald, Cecelia N; Anctil, Beth; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2014-01-01

    New financial penalties for institutions with high readmission rates have intensified efforts to reduce rehospitalization. Several interventions that involve multiple components (e.g., patient needs assessment, medication reconciliation, patient education, arranging timely outpatient appointments, and providing telephone follow-up) have successfully reduced readmission rates for patients discharged to home. The effect of interventions on readmission rates is related to the number of components implemented; single-component interventions are unlikely to reduce readmissions significantly. For patients discharged to postacute care facilities, multicomponent interventions have reduced readmissions through enhanced communication, medication safety, advanced care planning, and enhanced training to manage medical conditions that commonly precipitate readmission. To help hospitals direct resources and services to patients with greater likelihood of readmission, risk-stratification methods are available. Future work should better define the roles of home-based services, information technology, mental health care, caregiver support, community partnerships, and new transitional care personnel.

  17. National hospital ratings systems share few common scores and may generate confusion instead of clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J Matthew; Jha, Ashish K; Romano, Patrick S; Singer, Sara J; Vogus, Timothy J; Wachter, Robert M; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Attempts to assess the quality and safety of hospitals have proliferated, including a growing number of consumer-directed hospital rating systems. However, relatively little is known about what these rating systems reveal. To better understand differences in hospital ratings, we compared four national rating systems. We designated "high" and "low" performers for each rating system and examined the overlap among rating systems and how hospital characteristics corresponded with performance on each. No hospital was rated as a high performer by all four national rating systems. Only 10 percent of the 844 hospitals rated as a high performer by one rating system were rated as a high performer by any of the other rating systems. The lack of agreement among the national hospital rating systems is likely explained by the fact that each system uses its own rating methods, has a different focus to its ratings, and stresses different measures of performance. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. [Assessing the economic impact of adverse events in Spanish hospitals by using administrative data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allué, Natalia; Chiarello, Pietro; Bernal Delgado, Enrique; Castells, Xavier; Giraldo, Priscila; Martínez, Natalia; Sarsanedas, Eugenia; Cots, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and costs of adverse events registered in an administrative dataset in Spanish hospitals from 2008 to 2010. A retrospective study was carried out that estimated the incremental cost per episode, depending on the presence of adverse events. Costs were obtained from the database of the Spanish Network of Hospital Costs. This database contains data from 12 hospitals that have costs per patient records based on activities and clinical records. Adverse events were identified through the Patient Safety Indicators (validated in the Spanish Health System) created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality together with indicators of the EuroDRG European project. This study included 245,320 episodes with a total cost of 1,308,791,871€. Approximately 17,000 patients (6.8%) experienced an adverse event, representing 16.2% of the total cost. Adverse events, adjusted by diagnosis-related groups, added a mean incremental cost of between €5,260 and €11,905. Six of the 10 adverse events with the highest incremental cost were related to surgical interventions. The total incremental cost of adverse events was € 88,268,906, amounting to an additional 6.7% of total health expenditure. Assessment of the impact of adverse events revealed that these episodes represent significant costs that could be reduced by improving the quality and safety of the Spanish Health System. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Planning of traumatological hospital resources for a major winter sporting event as illustrated by the 2005 Winter Universiad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberladstaetter, J; Kamelger, F S; Rosenberger, R; Dallapozza, Ch; Struve, P; Luger, T; Fink, Ch; Attal, R

    2009-03-01

    The 22nd Student World Winter Games took place in January 2005 in Innsbruck and Seefeld, Austria. Exactly 1,500 athletes of 50 nationalities competed in 69 events in ten winter sports. A total number of 750 functionaries, 800 volunteers and 85,000 spectators participated in the second largest winter sports event behind the Olympic winter games. The aim of this study was to evaluate the needed resources to ensure traumatological care for an event of that size. At the medical "call-center" all consultations, as well as patient data, diagnosis, and medical treatment were recorded using a preset protocol. Further, all patients treated in the University Hospital Innsbruck were registered with an emphasis on trauma patients. Forty-eight of 65 patients transported to the hospital as a result of the Universiade were trauma patients, 37 of whom were athletes. The gender distribution was 34:14 (m:f). Ice hockey players had the highest rate of injury (25% of all injured athletes), followed by alpine skiers (20.8% of injured athletes). The highest ISS was nine. Forty-three patients got ambulatory treatment, five were admitted to the hospital and surgical treatment was conducted in three cases. Mean patient number was 4.8 per day. No additional personnel, structural, or technical hospital resources were needed to accommodate a large winter sports event like the Universiad. Thus, a level-B trauma center with an emergency room and independent traumatological department with around the clock surgical capability seems to be sufficient to provide traumatological care for an event of this size if the possibility of patient transport to a larger facility exists in the case of catastrophic events.

  20. Recurrent events analysis for examination of hospitalizations in heart failure: insights from the Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment (EFFECT) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Juarez R; Tu, Jack V; Austin, Peter C; Sutradhar, Rinku; Ross, Heather J; Lee, Douglas S

    2018-01-01

    Hospitalizations often occur multiple times during the disease course of a heart failure (HF) patient. However, repeated hospitalizations have not been explored in a fulsome way in this setting. We investigated the association between patient factors and the risk of hospitalization among patients with HF using an extension of the Cox model for the analysis of recurrent events. We examined hospitalizations and predictors of readmission among newly discharged patients with HF in the Enhanced Feedback For Effective Cardiac Treatment phase 1 (April 1999-March 2001) study with the Prentice-Williams-Peterson model with total time. Of 8948 individuals discharged alive from hospital, 7562 (84.5%) were hospitalized at least once during 15-year follow-up. More than 31 000 hospitalizations were observed. There was a progressive shortening of the interval length between hospitalization episodes. An increasing number of comorbidities (average 2.3 per patient) was associated to an increasing hazard of being readmitted to hospital. Most patient factors associated with the risk of hospitalization have been previously described in the literature. However, the estimates were smaller in comparison to a traditional analysis based on the Cox model. The importance of patient factors for the risk of being admitted to hospital was variable over the course of the disease. Conditions such as diabetes and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease had a sustained association with the rate of hospitalization across all episodes examined. The analysis of recurrent events can explore the longitudinal aspect of HF and the critical issue of hospitalizations in this population.

  1. Milk flow rates from bottle nipples used after hospital discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pados, Britt Frisk; Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M.; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W. Brant

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the milk flow rates and variability in flow rates of bottle nipples used after hospital discharge. Study Design and Methods Twenty-six nipple types that represented 15 common brands as well as variety in price per nipple and store location sold (e.g., Babies R’ Us, Walmart, Dollar Store) were chosen for testing. Ten of each nipple type (n=260 total) were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in one minute using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation (CV) were calculated. Flow rates of nipples within brand were compared statistically. Results Milk flow rates varied from 1.68 mL/min for the Avent Natural Newborn Flow to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown’s Standard Y-cut. Variability between nipple types also varied widely, from .03 for the Dr. Brown’s Standard Level 3 to .37 for MAM Nipple 1 Slow Flow. Clinical Implications The extreme range of milk flow rates found may be significant for medically fragile infants being discharged home who are continuing to develop oral feeding skills. The name of the nipple does not provide clear information about the flow rate to guide parents in decision-making. Variability in flow rates within nipples of the same type may complicate oral feeding for the medically fragile infant who may not be able to adapt easily to change in flow rates. Both flow rate and variability should be considered when guiding parents to a nipple choice. PMID:27008466

  2. Hospital administrative database underestimates delirium rate after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katznelson, Rita; Djaiani, George; Tait, Gordon; Wasowicz, Marcin; Sutherland, Ainsley M; Styra, Rima; Lee, Corina; Beattie, W Scott

    2010-10-01

    Administrative electronic databases are highly specific for postoperative complications, but they lack sensitivity. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of delirium after cardiac surgery using a targeted prospectively collected dataset and to compare the findings with the incidence of delirium in the same cohort of patients identified in a hospital administrative database. Following Research Ethics Board approval, we compared delirium rates in a prospectively collected data research database with delirium rates in the same cohort of patients in an administrative hospital database where delirium was identified from codes entered by coding and abstracting staff. Every 12 hr postoperatively, delirium was assessed with a Confusion Assessment Method in the Intensive Care Unit. The administrative database contained the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) codes for patient diagnoses. The ICD-10 codes were extracted from the administrative database for each patient in the research database and were checked for the presence of the ICD-10 code for delirium. Data from a cohort of 1,528 patients were analyzed. Postoperative delirium was identified in 182 (11.9%) patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.3-13.5%) in the research dataset and 46 (3%) patients (95% CI, 2.2-3.8%) in the administrative dataset (P administrative database were not identified in the research dataset. The median onset of postoperative delirium in these patients was significantly delayed (4 [3-9] days) compared with patients identified by both datasets (2 [1-9] days) and compared with patients from the research database only (1 [1-14] days) (P = 0.007). Postoperative delirium rates after cardiac surgery are underestimated by the hospital administrative database.

  3. Apparent life-threatening event admissions and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the value of hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Ami; Bernard-Stover, Laurie; Kuelbs, Cynthia; Castillo, Edward; Stucky, Erin

    2012-01-01

    No standard management plan for infants with an apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) currently exists. These infants are routinely hospitalized. Benefits of hospitalization of ALTE patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) need definition. The study's objectives were to determine the accuracy of a working diagnosis of GERD in infants admitted with ALTE and to describe the history and hospital course of infants with both working and discharge diagnoses of GERD. Authors retrospectively reviewed records from a large children's hospital of infants aged 1 year old and younger hospitalized from January 1, 2004, to March 1, 2007, with an admission diagnosis of ALTE. Demographics, clinical presentation, testing, hospital course, and 6-month postdischarge visits were abstracted. Intensive care admissions were excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified factors associated with a discharge diagnosis of GERD. Three hundred thirteen infants met inclusion. Mean age was 2.1 months; mean length of stay was 2.5 days. A discharge diagnosis of GERD was most common (n = 154, 49%); 138 (89%) were initially well appearing, 10 (6%) had in-hospital events, and only 20 (13%) had upper gastrointestinal series performed. Concordance of initial working to discharge diagnosis of GERD was 96%. Nonconcordant diagnoses evolved within 24 hours. Rescue breaths and calling 911 were independently associated with a discharge diagnosis of GERD. Within 6 months, 14 patients (9%) with a discharge diagnosis of GERD had recurrent ALTE, and 5 (3%) had significant new diagnoses. Concordance of initial working diagnosis with discharge diagnosis of GERD in ALTE patients is high. However, in hospital events, evolution to new diagnoses and recurrent ALTE suggest that hospitalization of these patients is beneficial. Diagnostic studies should not be routine but should target concerns from the history, examination, and hospital course.

  4. Mortality rate associated with hospital acquired infections among burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aslam Bharwana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infections (HAIs are the major contributors of mortality associated with burn injuries. The aim of this research was to document the antecedents affiliated with major burn injuries, hospitalization and mortality in burn patients. We performed a single center prospective study of patients admitted during 3 months period (April-June 2014 in burn wards of government hospital. There were 100 patients in this investigation which were observed weekly. The inclusion criterion was based on the shifting of patients from emergency to the wards after initial treatment of more than 24 h. Variables included were age and gender of the patient, the percent total body surface area (%TBSA burn, the cause of the burn. Mean age of patients was 30.29 years. More females (55.67% were admitted than males (44.32%. The total body surface area (%TBSA burnt were from 15%- 95% respectively moreover children were more sensitive to hospital acquired infections (HAIs and mortality rate was 34% in children with mean age of 5 years and disability of body parts were 42% among 75% were females. Whereas the most common (HAIs were primary blood stream (PBS with mean value of 30.50, wound infections (WIS were at second prevalence with mean value of 27.50, followed by sepsis (S and pneumonia (P 10.33, eye infections (EIs 4.833 and urinary tract infections (UTIs 2.667. Factors significantly (p-value= 0.000 associated with increased duration of hospitalization caught HAIs mortality include the age and gender of the patient, the cause of burn, inhalation injury, the region affected and %TBSA burnt. It concluded that the mortality was very much dependent on age and gender of the patient, burn causes, affected area as well as %TBSA burnt are considerable factors in determining the relationship of HAIs and whether the patients will survive or knuckle to injuries. Better compliance techniques, stricter control over disinfection and sterilization practices and usage of

  5. [Detection of adverse events in hospitalized adult patients by using the Global Trigger Tool method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ruiz, O; Ruiz-López, P; Gómez-Cámara, A; Ramírez-Martín, M

    2015-01-01

    To identify and characterize adverse events (AE) in an Internal Medicine Department of a district hospital using an extension of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT), analyzing the diagnostic validity of the tool. An observational, analytical, descriptive and retrospective study was conducted on 2013 clinical charts from an Internal Medicine Department in order to detect EA through the identification of 'triggers' (an event often related to an AE). The 'triggers' and AE were located by systematic review of clinical documentation. The AE were characterized after they were identified. A total of 149 AE were detected in 291 clinical charts during 2013, of which 75.3% were detected directly by the tool, while the rest were not associated with a trigger. The percentage of charts that had at least one AE was 35.4%. The most frequent AE found was pressure ulcer (12%), followed by delirium, constipation, nosocomial respiratory infection and altered level of consciousness by drugs. Almost half (47.6%) of the AE were related to drug use, and 32.2% of all AE were considered preventable. The tool demonstrated a sensitivity of 91.3% (95%CI: 88.9-93.2) and a specificity of 32.5% (95%CI: 29.9-35.1). It had a positive predictive value of 42.5% (95%CI: 40.1-45.1) and a negative predictive value of 87.1% (95%CI: 83.8-89.9). The tool used in this study is valid, useful and reproducible for the detection of AE. It also serves to determine rates of injury and to observe their progression over time. A high frequency of both AE and preventable events were observed in this study. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of periodontal treatment on hospitalization for adverse respiratory events in asthmatic adults: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-06-07

    Periodontal disease is prevalent in asthmatics, but it is unclear whether periodontal treatment plays a role in adverse respiratory events in these patients. We evaluated risk of hospitalization for adverse respiratory events (acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure) and mortality in asthmatic adults with and without periodontal treatment. We used National Health Insurance (NHI) claims data of Taiwan to identify 4771 asthmatic adults with periodontal disease who underwent periodontal treatment during 2000-2006. The control group consisted of asthmatic adults without periodontal disease at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score. Both groups were followed up for 5years to estimate the risk of hospitalization for adverse respiratory events and mortality. Compared with controls, the periodontal treatment group had lower overall incidence of hospitalization for adverse respiratory events [5.41 vs. 6.07 per 100 person-years, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.78-0.92] and intensive care unit admissions (1.14 vs. 1.25 per 100 person-years, 95% CI=0.79-0.99). In addition, the all-cause mortality rate was significantly lower in the periodontal treatment group than in the control group during the follow-up period (1.86 vs. 2.79 per 100 person-years, 95% CI=0.59-0.71). Asthmatic adults who underwent periodontal treatment were at lower risk of hospitalization for adverse respiratory events and mortality than those without periodontal disease. Asthmatic adults should adopt more precautionary oral hygiene and ensure that they undergo regular periodontal health checkups. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Asian dust storm events are associated with an acute increase in pneumonia hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Keller, Joseph J; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to examine the association of Asian dust storm (ADS) events with the daily number of pneumonia admissions using 10-year population-based data in the Taipei metropolitan region. We identified 1,933,247 admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of pneumonia between 2000 and 2009. The auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method was used to examine the associations between ADS episodes and the logarithm of the daily number of pneumonia hospitalizations. There was a significant difference in the mean number of daily pneumonia admissions between ADS event days, post-ADS event days, and non-ADS event days (P < .001); the mean number of daily admissions for ADS event days, post-ADS event days, and non-ADS event days were 292.5, 305.7, and 279.0, respectively. After adjusting for the time-trend effect, ambient temperature, and SO(2), CO, and O(3), the ARIMA showed that compared with non-ADS event days, ADS event days and post-ADS event days 1 through 4 had a significantly higher mean number of pneumonia admissions for the total group. Our results suggest that ADS event days and post-ADS days 1 through 4 had significantly higher mean numbers of pneumonia admissions than non-ADS days. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Collaborative Event-Driven Coverage and Rate Allocation for Event Miss-Ratio Assurances in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Sanli H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are often required to provide event miss-ratio assurance for a given event type. To meet such assurances along with minimum energy consumption, this paper shows how a node's activation and rate assignment is dependent on its distance to event sources, and proposes a practical coverage and rate allocation (CORA protocol to exploit this dependency in realistic environments. Both uniform event distribution and nonuniform event distribution are considered and the notion of ideal correlation distance around a clusterhead is introduced for on-duty node selection. In correlation distance guided CORA, rate assignment assists coverage scheduling by determining which nodes should be activated for minimizing data redundancy in transmission. Coverage scheduling assists rate assignment by controlling the amount of overlap among sensing regions of neighboring nodes, thereby providing sufficient data correlation for rate assignment. Extensive simulation results show that CORA meets the required event miss-ratios in realistic environments. CORA's joint coverage scheduling and rate allocation reduce the total energy expenditure by 85%, average battery energy consumption by 25%, and the overhead of source coding up to 90% as compared to existing rate allocation techniques.

  9. Exploring the causes of adverse events in hospitals and potential prevention strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Zegers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Zwaan, L.; Wal, G. van der; Wagner, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the causes of adverse events (AEs) and potential prevention strategies to minimise the occurrence of AEs in hospitalised patients. Methods For the 744 AEs identified in the patient record review study in 21 Dutch hospitals, trained reviewers were asked to select all causal

  10. Excess length of stay and economic consequences of adverse events in Dutch hospital patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Langelaan, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the average and extrapolated excess length of stay and direct costs of adverse events (AEs) and preventable AEs in Dutch hospitals, and to evaluate patient characteristics associated with excess length of stay and costs. Methods: Data of a large retrospective patient

  11. Exploring the causes of adverse events in hospitals and potential prevention strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Zegers, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Zwaan, L.; Wal, G. van der; Wagner, C.; Timmermans, D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the causes of adverse events (AEs) and potential prevention strategies to minimise the occurrence of AEs in hospitalised patients. Methods For the 744 AEs identified in the patient record review study in 21 Dutch hospitals, trained reviewers were asked to select all causal

  12. Adverse events and near misses relating to information management in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylhä, Virpi; Bates, David W; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-08-01

    This study described information management incidents and adverse event reporting choices of health professionals. Hospital adverse events reported in an anonymous electronic reporting system were analysed using directed content analysis and descriptive and inferential statistics. The data consisted of near miss and adverse event incident reports (n = 3075) that occurred between January 2008 and the end of December 2009. A total of 824 incidents were identified. The most common information management incident was failure in written information transfer and communication, when patient data were copied or documented incorrectly. Often patient data were transferred using paper even though an electronic patient record was in use. Reporting choices differed significantly among professional groups; in particular, registered nurses reported more events than other health professionals. A broad spectrum of information management incidents was identified, which indicates that preventing adverse events requires the development of safe practices, especially in documentation and information transfer. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Adverse Events Associated with Hospitalization or Detected through the RAI-HC Assessment among Canadian Home Care Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Hirdes, John P.; Blais, Régis; Baker, G. Ross; Poss, Jeff W.; Li, Xiaoqiang; Dill, Donna; Gruneir, Andrea; Heckman, George; Lacroix, Hélène; Mitchell, Lori; O'Beirne, Maeve; Foebel, Andrea; White, Nancy; Qian, Gan; Nahm, Sang-Myong; Yim, Odilia; Droppo, Lisa; McIsaac, Corrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of adverse events (AEs) in care settings is a patient safety concern that has significant consequences across healthcare systems. Patient safety problems have been well documented in acute care settings; however, similar data for clients in home care (HC) settings in Canada are limited. The purpose of this Canadian study was to investigate AEs in HC, specifically those associated with hospitalization or detected through the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC). Method: A retrospective cohort design was used. The cohort consisted of HC clients from the provinces of Nova Scotia, Ontario, British Columbia and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. Results: The overall incidence rate of AEs associated with hospitalization ranged from 6% to 9%. The incidence rate of AEs determined from the RAI-HC was 4%. Injurious falls, injuries from other than fall and medication-related events were the most frequent AEs associated with hospitalization, whereas new caregiver distress was the most frequent AE identified through the RAI-HC. Conclusion: The incidence of AEs from all sources of data ranged from 4% to 9%. More resources are needed to target strategies for addressing safety risks in HC in a broader context. Tools such as the RAI-HC and its Clinical Assessment Protocols, already available in Canada, could be very useful in the assessment and management of HC clients who are at safety risk. PMID:23968676

  14. Life Change Units (LCU) rating as stressors in Iranian hospitals' nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein; Shaham, Golsa

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare workers suffer from work-related or occupational stress. This can lead to severe distress, burnout or physical illness, and finally to decrease quality of work life and services provision. Nurses must be aware of retential stressors, because they add to the cumulative effect of other stressful events. Holmes and Rahe both found a relationship between life change unit as stressors and health changes. This research reported here aims to measure the life change units as stressors among Iranian Hospitals Nurses by LCU rating. A cross - sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted among 389 nurses working in 15 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The respondents were asked to select each of 54 events that cause stress ranked in order of their life change units developed by Holmes and Rahe as stress scale. Before beginning the main study, the reliability and coincidental validity was performed. All data were analyzed using SPSS for windows version 18, t-test, Anova statistical methods. Approximately, half of the nurses associated major mortgage, foreclosure of mortgage or loan. More than 50% of the Iranian nurses had 150-300 and more than 300 LCU rating which had the chance to expose to extremely serious risk to health.Iranian hospitals nurses suffer from stress that caused by Life Change Units organizational factors such as change in the financial state, change in the work environment and major mortgage. We recommend to Iranian nursing policy-makers to choose strategies to help nurses' cope effectively with workplace stressors. Nursing managers and / or nursing management should develop strategies to address and improve the quality of working conditions for nurses in the hospitals. Providing educational and career prospects can contribute to decrease nurses' occupational stress level, the maintaining their work ability.

  15. The impact of adverse events in the intensive care unit on hospital mortality and length of stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Jon

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse events (AEs are patient injuries caused by medical care. Previous studies have reported increased mortality rates and prolonged hospital length of stay in patients having an AE. However, these studies have not adequately accounted for potential biases which might influence these associations. We performed this study to measure the independent influence of intensive care unit (ICU based AEs on in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay. Methods Prospective cohort study in an academic tertiary-care ICU. Patients were monitored daily for adverse clinical occurrences. Data about adverse clinical occurrences were reviewed by a multidisciplinary team who rated whether they were AEs and whether they were preventable. We determined the association of AEs in the ICU with time to death and time to hospital discharge using multivariable survival analysis models. Results We evaluated 207 critically ill patients (81% required mechanical ventilation, median Glasgow Coma Scale = 8, median predicted mortality = 31%. Observed mortality rate and hospital length of stay were 25% (95% CI 19%–31% and 15 days (IQR 8–34 days, respectively. ICU-based AEs and preventable AEs occurred in 40 patients (19%, 95% CI 15%–25% and 21 patients (10%, 95% CI 7%–15%, respectively. ICU-based AEs and preventable AEs were not significantly associated with time to in-hospital death (HR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.44–1.98 and HR = 0.72 95% CI 0.25–2.04, respectively. ICU-based AEs and preventable AEs were independently associated with time to hospital discharge ((HR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.31–0.81 and HR = 0.46 95% CI 0.23–0.91, respectively. ICU-based AEs were associated with an average increase in hospital length of stay of 31 days. Conclusion The impact of AEs on hospital length of stay was clinically relevant. Larger studies are needed to conclusively measure the association between preventable AEs and patient outcomes.

  16. Development and validation of a taxonomy of adverse handover events in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Boje; Siemsen, Inger Margrete D.; Petersen, Lene Funck

    2015-01-01

    To develop and validate a taxonomy to classify and support the analysis of adverse events related to patient handovers in hospital settings. A taxonomy was established using descriptions of handover events extracted from incident reports, interviews and root cause analysis reports. The inter......-rater reliability and distribution of types of handover failures and causal factors. The taxonomy contains five types of failures and seven types of main causal factors. The taxonomy was validated against 432 adverse handover event descriptions contained in incident reports (stratified random sample from the Danish...... a tool for analyzing adverse handover events to identify frequent causes among reported handover failures. In turn, this provides a basis for selecting safety measures including handover protocols and training programmes....

  17. Association of azithromycin with mortality and cardiovascular events among older patients hospitalized with pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Eric M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Pugh, Mary Jo; Copeland, Laurel A.; Metersky, Mark; Fine, Michael J.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Alvarez, Carlos A.; Frei, Christopher R.; Good, Chester; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Downs, John R.; Anzueto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Importance Although clinical practice guidelines recommend combination therapy with macrolides, including azithromycin, as first line therapy for patients hospitalized with pneumonia, recent research suggests that azithromycin may be associated with increased cardiovascular events. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the association of azithromycin use with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Design Retrospective, cohort study comparing older patients hospitalized with pneumonia between fiscal years 2002–2012 prescribed azithromycin therapy and patients receiving other guideline-concordant antibiotic therapy Setting This study was conducted using national Department of Veterans Affairs administrative data of patients hospitalized at any Veterans Administration acute care hospital. Participants Patients were included if they were ≥65 years of age hospitalized with pneumonia and received antibiotic therapy concordant with national clinical practice guidelines. Main Outcome Measures Outcomes included 30 and 90-day all-cause mortality, and 90-day cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and any cardiac event. Propensity score matching was used to control for the possible effects of known confounders with conditional logistic regression. Results Out of the 73,690 patients from 118 hospitals identified, propensity-matched groups were composed of 31,863 azithromycin-exposed and 31,863 matched unexposed. There were no significant differences in potential confounders between groups after matching. 90-day mortality was significantly lower in those who received azithromycin (exposed- 17.4% vs. unexposed- 22.3%, odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.76). However, we found significant increased odds of myocardial infarctions (5.1% vs. 4.4%, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.08–1.25) but not any cardiac event (43.0% vs. 42.7%, OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.98–1.05), cardiac arrhythmias (25

  18. Adverse drug events leading to emergency department visits at an eye hospital: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Safa; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate adverse drug events (ADEs) resulting in emergency department visits in an eye hospital. Emergency department visits at Farabi Eye Hospital were assessed for a 7-day period. The patients' eye disorders and drug history were evaluated to detect ADEs. Of 1631 emergency visits, 5 (0.3%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.71%) were drug related. Tetracaine eye drops accounted for 4 (80%, 95% CI: 38-96%) cases with corneal involvement. The other case was an intense conjunctival injection due to naphazoline eye drops. ADEs should be considered in differential diagnosis of ocular emergency problems and preventive measure should be considered.

  19. Predictive combinations of monitor alarms preceding in-hospital code blue events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Sapo, Monica; Nenov, Val; Barry, Tod; Kim, Sunghan; Do, Duc H; Boyle, Noel; Martin, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Bedside monitors are ubiquitous in acute care units of modern healthcare enterprises. However, they have been criticized for generating an excessive number of false positive alarms causing alarm fatigue among care givers and potentially compromising patient safety. We hypothesize that combinations of regular monitor alarms denoted as SuperAlarm set may be more indicative of ongoing patient deteriorations and hence predictive of in-hospital code blue events. The present work develops and assesses an alarm mining approach based on finding frequent combinations of single alarms that are also specific to code blue events to compose a SuperAlarm set. We use 4-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to investigate the influence of four algorithm parameters on the performance of the data mining approach. The results are obtained from millions of monitor alarms from a cohort of 223 adult code blue and 1768 control patients using a multiple 10-fold cross-validation experiment setup. Using the optimal setting of parameters determined in the cross-validation experiment, final SuperAlarm sets are mined from the training data and used on an independent test data set to simulate running a SuperAlarm set against live regular monitor alarms. The ANOVA shows that the content of a SuperAlarm set is influenced by a subset of key algorithm parameters. Simulation of the extracted SuperAlarm set shows that it can predict code blue events one hour ahead with sensitivity between 66.7% and 90.9% while producing false SuperAlarms for control patients that account for between 2.2% and 11.2% of regular monitor alarms depending on user-supplied acceptable false positive rate. We conclude that even though the present work is still preliminary due to the usage of a moderately-sized database to test our hypothesis it represents an effort to develop algorithms to alleviate the alarm fatigue issue in a unique way. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gait event detection during stair walking using a rate gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formento, Paola Catalfamo; Acevedo, Ruben; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2014-03-19

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. These applications often require detection of the initial contact (IC) of the foot with the floor and/or final contact or foot off (FO) from the floor during outdoor walking. Previous investigations have reported the use of a single gyroscope placed on the shank for detection of IC and FO on level ground and incline walking. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects ascending and descending a set of stairs. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The absolute mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than 45 ms for IC and better than 135 ms for FO for both activities. Detection success was over 93%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of a gyroscope for gait event detection when walking up and down stairs.

  1. Impact of hospital type II violent events: use of psychotropic drugs and mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, John M; Lipscomb, Hester J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Pompeii, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    While violence can adversely affect mental health of victims, repercussions of violence against workers is not as well characterized. We explored relationships between workplace violent events perpetrated by patients or visitors (Type II) against hospital employees and the employee use of psychotropic medications or mental health services using a data system that linked violent events with health claims. Significant associations were observed between reported Type II workplace violent events and employee prescription claims for anti-depressants and anxiolytics combined (RR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.01-2.33) and anti-depressants alone (RR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.10-2.48). No significant association between reported violent events and health claims for treatment of depression or anxiety was observed. Type II violence experienced by hospital workers may lead to increased use of psychotropic drugs, particularly anti-depressants but also anxiolytics. Our results suggest an important role of employee assistance programs in mitigating the psychological consequences of workplace violent events. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Direct costs and hospital morbimortality impact from preventable adverse drug events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, José Fernando; Maldonado, Carlos; Díaz, Jorge A; Segura, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Implementing pharmacovigilance activities consists of monitoring and assessment of activities related to medical attention. However, additional data are necessary to identify conditions where care quality can be improved. Therefore, a focus on adverse drug events analysis from a prevention and economic perspective is needed, with emphasis on its local impact. Preventable adverse drug events were summarized to establishing their impact on morbidity and mortality, as well as to estimate the ensuing economic burden. The data were gathered from a level 3 hospital (high complexity), located in Bogotá, Colombia, where specific pharmacovigilance activities were recorded in 2007. Patient charts were reviewed to characterize adverse drug events according to their causality, severity and preventability. Direct costs were estimated by grouping diagnostic tests, length of hospitalization, procedures and additional drugs required. The charts of 283 patients and 448 reports were analyzed. These data indicated that 24.8% of adverse drug events were preventable and that an associated mortality of 1.1% had occurred. The associated direct costs were between USD $16,687 and $18,739. Factors more commonly associated with preventability were drug-drug interactions, as well as inappropriate doses and unsuitable frequencies at which the drugs were administrated. The data recommended that actions be taken to decrease preventable adverse drug events, because of negative impact on patient´s health, and unnecessary consumption of healthcare resources.

  3. Nature, occurrence and consequences of medication-related adverse events during hospitalization: a retrospective chart review in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, L.H.F.; de Bruijne, M.C.; Wagner, C.; Asscheman, H.; van der Wal, G.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Medication-related adverse events (MRAEs) form a large proportion of all adverse events in hospitalized patients and are associated with considerable preventable harm. Detailed information on harm related to drugs administered during hospitalization is scarce. Knowledge of the nature and

  4. Nature, occurrence and consequences of medication-related adverse events during hospitalization: a retrospective chart review in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, L.H.F.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.; Asscheman, H.; Wal, G. van der; Tulder, M.W. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication-related adverse events (MRAEs) form a large proportion of all adverse events in hospitalized patients and are associated with considerable preventable harm. Detailed information on harm related to drugs administered during hospitalization is scarce. Knowledge of the nature and

  5. Disaster metrics: quantitative benchmarking of hospital surge capacity in trauma-related multiple casualty events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Jamil D; Zuabi, Shawki; Subbarao, Italo

    2011-06-01

    Hospital surge capacity in multiple casualty events (MCE) is the core of hospital medical response, and an integral part of the total medical capacity of the community affected. To date, however, there has been no consensus regarding the definition or quantification of hospital surge capacity. The first objective of this study was to quantitatively benchmark the various components of hospital surge capacity pertaining to the care of critically and moderately injured patients in trauma-related MCE. The second objective was to illustrate the applications of those quantitative parameters in local, regional, national, and international disaster planning; in the distribution of patients to various hospitals by prehospital medical services; and in the decision-making process for ambulance diversion. A 2-step approach was adopted in the methodology of this study. First, an extensive literature search was performed, followed by mathematical modeling. Quantitative studies on hospital surge capacity for trauma injuries were used as the framework for our model. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization triage categories (T1-T4) were used in the modeling process for simplicity purposes. Hospital Acute Care Surge Capacity (HACSC) was defined as the maximum number of critical (T1) and moderate (T2) casualties a hospital can adequately care for per hour, after recruiting all possible additional medical assets. HACSC was modeled to be equal to the number of emergency department beds (#EDB), divided by the emergency department time (EDT); HACSC = #EDB/EDT. In trauma-related MCE, the EDT was quantitatively benchmarked to be 2.5 (hours). Because most of the critical and moderate casualties arrive at hospitals within a 6-hour period requiring admission (by definition), the hospital bed surge capacity must match the HACSC at 6 hours to ensure coordinated care, and it was mathematically benchmarked to be 18% of the staffed hospital bed capacity. Defining and quantitatively benchmarking the

  6. Detection of adverse events of transfusion in a teaching hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, A K; Owusu-Ofori, S P; Bates, I

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring the whole chain of events from the blood donors to recipients, documenting any undesirable or untoward effects and introducing measures to prevent their recurrence if possible are components of haemovigilance systems. Only few sub-Saharan African countries have haemovigilance systems, and there are very little data on adverse events of transfusion. Adverse events monitoring is an integral part of a haemovigilance system. Our study aimed to establish the incidence and types of adverse events of transfusions in Ghana and to identify interventions to improve effectiveness. This prospective observational 1-year study enrolled 372 recipients of 432 transfusions in a Ghanaian teaching hospital. Vital signs were monitored at 15, 30 and 60 min intervals during the transfusion, then 8 h until 24 h post-transfusion. Three investigators independently classified any new signs and symptoms according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion definitions. The adverse events incidence was 21·3% (92/432), predominantly mild acute transfusion reactions (84%). A total of 20 transfusions (4·6%) were stopped before completion, 60% of them for mild febrile reactions, which could have been managed with transfusion in situ. This prospective study indicates a high incidence of adverse events of transfusion in Kumasi, Ghana. The significant numbers of discontinued transfusions suggest that guidelines on how to manage transfusion reactions would help preserve scarce blood stocks. Gradual implementation of a haemovigilance system, starting with monitoring adverse transfusion events, is a pragmatic approach in resource-limited settings. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. Serious adverse events in a hospital using early warning score - what went wrong?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, John Asger; Mackel, Rebecca; Antonsen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of a new early warning score (EWS) system by reviewing all serious adverse events in our hospital over a 6-month time period. METHOD: All incidents of unexpected death (UD), cardiac arrest (CA) and unanticipated intensive care unit admission(UICU) of adult patients...... physicians provided adequate care in 49% of cases of UICU and 29% of cases of the CO. Senior staff was involved according to protocol in 53% and 36% of cases of UICU and CO, respectively. CONCLUSION: Poor compliance with the escalation protocol was commonly found when serious adverse events occurred...... but level of care provided by physicians was also a problem in a hospital with implemented early warning system. This information may prove useful in improving performance of EWS systems....

  8. A generic discrete-event simulation model for outpatient clinics in a large public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawat, Waressara; Pichitlamken, Juta; Subsombat, Peerapong

    2013-01-01

    The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD) ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES) simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  9. A Generic Discrete-Event Simulation Model for Outpatient Clinics in a Large Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waressara Weerawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  10. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans); F.G. Schellevis (François); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on

  11. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, J.H.J.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bindels, P.J.E.; Willemsen, S.P.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on children aged 0-17 years

  12. Preventable Hospitalization Rates and Neighborhood Poverty among New York City Residents, 2008–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Bocour, Angelica; Tria, Maryellen

    2016-01-01

    Knowing which demographic groups have higher rates of preventable hospitalizations can help identify geographic areas where improvements in primary care access and quality can be made. This study assessed whether preventable hospitalization rates by neighborhood poverty decreased from 2008 to 2013 and whether the gap between very high and low poverty neighborhoods changed. We examined trends in age-adjusted preventable hospitalization rates and rate ratios by neighborhood poverty overall and ...

  13. Risk factors for adverse events after vaccinations performed during the initial hospitalization of infants born prematurely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilińska, Maria; Warakomska, Małgorzata; Głuszczak-Idziakowska, Ewa; Jackowska, Teresa

    There are significant delays in implementing vaccination among preterm infants. Description of the frequency and kinds of adverse events following immunization in preterms. Establishment of the group of preterms who will distinctively be susceptible to adverse events. Demographical, clinical data and the occurrence of adverse events after DTaP, HIB and pneumococcal vaccination among preterms during their initial hospitalization were prospectively collected with the use of an electronic data form between 1st June 2011 and 31st May 2015. The analysis was conducted on 138 patients. The groups were divided according to maturity (I: ≤ GA 28w n=73 and GA 29-36 w n=65). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the occurrence of adverse events. Out of the total group, following vaccination apnoea developed in 6 newborns (4%) and activity dysfunctions were observed in 13 newborns (10%). The occurrence of apnoea after vaccination positively correlated with the time of non-invasive ventilation and the occurrence of late infection. There were no statistically significant demographical or clinical risk factors for the development of activity dysfunctions following vaccination. Term vaccination in clinically stable preterm infants is a safe medical procedure. However, long-term non-invasive respiratory support and late infections are risk factors for apnea following vaccinations. In these patients vaccinations should be considered during hospitalization.

  14. The effect of major adverse renal cardiovascular event (MARCE) incidence, procedure volume, and unit cost on the hospital savings resulting from contrast media use in inpatient angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuffel, Eric; McCullough, Peter A; Todoran, Thomas M; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Palli, Swetha R; Ryan, Michael P; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2017-12-15

    To determine the net economic impact of switching from low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) to iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; iodixanol) in patients undergoing inpatient coronary or peripheral angioplasty in the United States (US). A budget impact model (BIM) was developed from a hospital perspective. Nationally representative procedural and contrast media prevalence rates, along with MARCE (major adverse renal cardiovascular event) incidence and episode-related cost data were derived from Premier Hospital Data (October 2014 to September 2015). A previously estimated relative risk reduction in MARCE associated with IOCM usage (9.3%) was applied. The higher cost of IOCM was included when calculating the net impact estimates at the aggregate, hospital type, and per hospital levels. One-way (±25%) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses identified the model's most important inputs. Based on weighted analysis, 513,882 US inpatient angioplasties and 35,610 MARCE cases were estimated annually. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" strategy increases contrast media cost, but prevents 2,900 MARCE events. The annual budget impact was an estimated saving of $30.71 million, aggregated across all US hospitals, $6,316 per hospital, or $60 per procedure. Net savings were maintained across all univariate sensitivity analyses. While MARCE/event-free cost differential was the most important factor driving total net savings for hospitals in the Northeast and West, procedural volume was important in the Midwest and rural locations. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" approach yields substantial net global savings to hospitals, both at the national level and within hospital sub-groups. Hospital administrators should maintain awareness of the factors that are likely to be more influential for their hospital and recognize that purchasing on the basis of lower contrast media cost may result in higher overall costs for patients undergoing inpatient

  15. A discrete event simulation tool to support and predict hospital and clinic staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRienzo, Christopher M; Shaw, Ryan J; Meanor, Phillip; Lada, Emily; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Tanaka, David

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate how to develop a simulation tool to help healthcare managers and administrators predict and plan for staffing needs in a hospital neonatal intensive care unit using administrative data. We developed a discrete event simulation model of nursing staff needed in a neonatal intensive care unit and then validated the model against historical data. The process flow was translated into a discrete event simulation model. Results demonstrated that the model can be used to give a respectable estimate of annual admissions, transfers, and deaths based upon two different staffing levels. The discrete event simulation tool model can provide healthcare managers and administrators with (1) a valid method of modeling patient mix, patient acuity, staffing needs, and costs in the present state and (2) a forecast of how changes in a unit's staffing, referral patterns, or patient mix would affect a unit in a future state.

  16. The incidence of cardiovascular events after hospitalization due to CAP and their association with different inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajas, Olga; Ortega-Gómez, Mara; Galván Román, José María; Curbelo, José; Fernández Jiménez, Guillermo; Vega Piris, Lorena; Rodríguez Salvanes, Francisco; Arnalich, Belén; Luquero Bueno, Sergio; Díaz López, Ana; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Suárez, Carmen; Ancochea, Julio; Aspa, Javier

    2014-12-12

    Late prognosis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) patients is related to cardiovascular events. Persistence of inflammation-related markers, defined by high circulatory levels of interleukin 6 and 10 (IL-6/IL-10), is associated with a higher post-event mortality rate for CAP patients. However, association between these markers and other components of the immune response, and the risk of cardiovascular events, has not been adequately explored. The main objectives of this study are: 1) to quantify the incidence of cardiovascular disease, in the year post-dating their hospital admittance due to CAP and, 2) to describe the distribution patterns of a wide spectrum of inflammatory markers upon admittance to and release from hospital, and to determine their relationship with the incidence of cardiovascular disease. A cohort prospective study. All patients diagnosed and hospitalized with CAP will be candidates for inclusion. The study will take place in the Universitary Hospital La Princesa, Spain, during two years. Two samples of blood will be taken from each patient: the first upon admittance and the second one prior to release, in order to analyse various immune agents. The main determinants are: pro-adrenomedullin, copeptin, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-17, IFN-γ, IL-10 and TGF-β, E-Selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and subpopulations of peripheral T lymphocytes (T regulator, Th1 and Th17), together with other clinical and analytical variables. Follow up will start at admittance and finish a year after discharge, registering incidence of death and cardiovascular events. The main objective is to establish the predictive power of different inflammatory markers in the prognosis of CAP, in the short and long term, and their relationship with cardiovascular disease. The level of some inflammatory markers (IL-6/IL-10) has been proposed as a means to differentiate the degree of severity of CAP, but their association with cardiovascular risk is not well established. In this study we aim

  17. Impact of adverse events on hospital disposition in community-dwelling seniors admitted to acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy; Guernsey, Judith Read; MacKinnon, Neil J; Kovacs, George

    2009-01-01

    Older adults (> or =65 years) have been identified as a high-risk group for the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) in hospital. The purpose of this paper is to describe the association between AEs and disposition for a population of hospitalized seniors. All community-dwelling seniors admitted to an acute care in-patient unit were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective cohort study conducted at an adult tertiary care facility in Atlantic Canada between July 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006. AEs were identified from administrative data using validated screening criteria derived from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnosis and external cause of injury codes. Of the 982 eligible patients, 140 (14%) had evidence of at least one AE. There were 136 in-hospital deaths (14%). There was no significant difference in the proportion of deaths between those who experienced an AE and those who did not. However, of the 29 patients who were discharged to a long-term care facility, a significantly higher proportion had an in-hospital AE (6% versus 2%, p < .009). The potential contribution of an AE to the subsequent placement in a long-term care facility offers a compelling reason to develop prevention strategies for hospitalized seniors.

  18. [What are hospitals and primary care doing to mitigate the social impact of serious adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Carrillo, Irene; Lorenzo, Susana

    To explore what hospitals and primary care (PC) are doing to reduce the negative social impact of a serious adverse event (AE). We surveyed 195 hospital (n=113) and PC (n=82) managers from eight autonomous communities to explore the level of implementation of five interventions recommended after an AE to protect the reputation of healthcare institutions. Most institutions (70, 45.2% PC, and 85, 54.8% hospitals) did not have a crisis plan to protect their reputation after an AE. Internal (p=0.0001) and external (p=0.012) communications were addressed better in PC than in hospitals. Very few institutions had defined the managers' role in case of an AE (10.7% hospitals versus 6.25% PC). A majority of healthcare institutions have not planned crisis intervention after an AE with severe consequences nor have they defined plans to recover citizens' trust after an AE. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Association Between Medicare Summary Star Ratings for Patient Experience and Clinical Outcomes in US Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Trzeciak MD, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS released new summary star ratings for US hospitals based on patient experience. We aimed to test the association between CMS patient experience star ratings and clinical outcomes. Methods: We analyzed risk-adjusted data for more than 3000 US hospitals from CMS Hospital Compare using linear regression. Results: We found that better patient experience was associated with favorable clinical outcomes. Specifically, a higher number of stars for patient experience had a statistically significant association with lower rates of many in-hospital complications. A higher patient experience star rating also had a statistically significant association with lower rates of unplanned readmissions to the hospital within 30 days. Conclusion: Better patient experience according to the CMS star ratings is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. These results support the inclusion of patient experience data in the framework of how hospitals are paid for services.

  20. Nonphysician Out-of-Hospital Rapid Sequence Intubation Success and Adverse Events: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Pieter F; Stein, Christopher; Simpson, Paul; Carlson, Jestin N; Doi, Suhail A

    2017-10-01

    rates of adverse events for rapid sequence intubation in the out-of-hospital setting. Nevertheless, for all success and adverse events no firm conclusion for a difference could be drawn because of lack of precision of meta-analytic estimates or selective reporting. First-pass success could be an area in which to focus quality improvement strategies for nonphysicians. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. X-ray film reject rate analysis at eight selected government hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The collected data were then entered into a database for analysis using descriptive statistics. Results: Reject rate was calculated in eight governmental hospitals across all plain film examinations. The overall reject rate was 374 (3.1 %) in 12,165 x-ray exposures. Total reject rate by hospital showed 10.5% for Zewditu and ...

  2. Preventing drug-related adverse events following hospital discharge: the role of the pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Nicholls,1 Craig MacKenzie,1 Rhiannon Braund2 1Dunedin Hospital Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Transition of care (ToC points, and in particular hospital admission and discharge, can be associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs and other drug-related problems (DRPs. The growing recognition of the pharmacist as an expert in medication management, patient education and communication makes them well placed to intervene. There is evidence to indicate that the inclusion of pharmacists in the health care team at ToC points reduces ADEs and DRPs and improves patient outcomes. The objectives of this paper are to outline the following using current literature: 1 the increased risk of medication-related problems at ToC points; 2 to highlight some strategies that have been successful in reducing these problems; and 3 to illustrate how the role of the pharmacist across all facets of care can contribute to the reduction of ADEs, particularly for patients at ToC points. Keywords: pharmacist, adverse drug events, drug-related problems, transitions of care, hospital discharge

  3. Initiating Event Rates at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. 1988 - 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John A.; Bower, Gordon R.

    2014-02-01

    Analyzing initiating event rates is important because it indicates performance among plants and also provides inputs to several U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) risk-informed regulatory activities. This report presents an analysis of initiating event frequencies at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants since each plant’s low-power license date. The evaluation is based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1988 through 2013 as reported in licensee event reports. Engineers with nuclear power plant experience staff reviewed each event report since the last update to this report for the presence of valid scrams or reactor trips at power. To be included in the study, an event had to meet all of the following criteria: includes an unplanned reactor trip (not a scheduled reactor trip on the daily operations schedule), sequence of events starts when reactor is critical and at or above the point of adding heat, occurs at a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant (excluding Fort St. Vrain and LaCrosse), and is reported by a licensee event report. This report displays occurrence rates (baseline frequencies) for the categories of initiating events that contribute to the NRC’s Industry Trends Program. Sixteen initiating event groupings are trended and displayed. Initiators are plotted separately for initiating events with different occurrence rates for boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. p-values are given for the possible presence of a trend over the most recent 10 years.

  4. Hospital differences in rates of cesarean deliveries in the Sardinian region: An observational study

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    Massimo Cannas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rates of cesarean deliveries have been increasing steadily in several European countries in recent decades, with Italy having the second-highest rate (38% in 2010, causing concern and debate about the appropriateness of many interventions. Moreover, some recent studies suggest that rates of common obstetric interventions are not homogeneous across hospitals, maybe not only because of patient case mix but also possibly because of different hospital practices and cultures. Thus, it is important to investigate whether the variation in rates of cesarean sections can be traced back to patient characteristics or whether it depends upon context variables at the hospital level. Objective and method: Using official hospital abstracts on deliveries that occurred in Sardinia over a two-year period, we implement multilevel logistic regression models in order to assess whether the observed differences in cesarean rates across hospitals can be justified by case-mix differences across hospitals. Results: The between-hospital variation in rates of cesarean delivery is estimated to be 0.388 in the model with only the intercept and 0.382 in the model controlling for the mother’s clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions: The results show that taking into account the individual characteristics of delivered mothers is not enough to justify the observed variation across hospital rates, suggesting the important role of unobserved variables at the hospital level in determining cesarean section rates.

  5. The decision process used for hospital bond rating--and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, W O; Nutt, P C

    1984-12-01

    Investigation of the process of hospital bond rating related the ratings assigned by Moody's and Standard and Poors to indicators of hospital financial condition (such as debt per bed and peak debt coverage), institutional factors (including size, occupancy, and local market competition), indenture provisions (such as reserves), and contextual factors. The criteria used by Moody's and Standard and Poors to rate hospital bonds were revealed to be similar, but not identical. Criteria used in the bond rating process have several important implications: the rating approach provides strong financial incentives for increases in hospital size and complexity, for example, and hospitals that rely on extensive amounts of public financing appear to be penalized in the rating process.

  6. Notifications of hospital events to outpatient clinicians using health information exchange: a post-implementation survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Altman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The trend towards hospitalist medicine can lead to disjointed patient care. Outpatient clinicians may be unaware of patients’ encounters with a disparate healthcare system. Electronic notifications to outpatient clinicians of patients’ emergency department (ED visits and inpatient admissions and discharges using health information exchange can inform outpatient clinicians of patients’ hospital-based events.Objective Assess outpatient clinicians’ impressions of a new, secure messaging-based, patient event notification system.Methods Twenty outpatient clinicians receiving notifications of hospital-based events were recruited and 14 agreed to participate. Using a semi-structured interview, clinicians were asked about their use of notifications and the impact on their practices.Results Nine of 14 interviewed clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 10% of ED visits before the patient’s next visit. Nine clinicians (64% thought that without notifications, they would have heard about fewer than 25% of inpatient admissions and discharges before the patient’s next visit. Six clinicians (43% reported that they call the inpatient team more often because of notifications. Eight users (57% thought that notifications improved patient safety by increasing their awareness of the patients’ clinical events and their medication changes. Key themes identified were the importance of workflow integration and a desire for more clinical information in notifications.Conclusions The notification system is perceived by clinicians to be of value. These findings should instigate further message-oriented use of health information exchange and point to refinements that can lead to even greater benefits.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in parenteral nutrition therapy in hospitals: a discrete event simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradelli, Lorenzo; Eandi, Mario; Povero, Massimiliano; Mayer, Konstantin; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Heller, Axel R; Fries-Schaffner, Eva

    2014-10-01

    A recent meta-analysis showed that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in parenteral nutrition (PN) regimens is associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in infection rate, and length of hospital stay (LOS) in medical and surgical patients admitted to the ICU and in surgical patients not admitted to the ICU. The objective of this present study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the addition of omega-3 fatty acids to standard PN regimens in four European countries (Italy, France, Germany and the UK) from the healthcare provider perspective. Using a discrete event simulation scheme, a patient-level simulation model was developed, based on outcomes from the Italian ICU patient population and published literature. Comparative efficacy data for PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids versus standard PN regimens was taken from the meta-analysis of published randomised clinical trials (n = 23 studies with a total of 1502 patients), and hospital LOS reduction was further processed in order to split the reduction in ICU stay from that in-ward stays for patients admitted to the ICU. Country-specific cost data was obtained for Italian, French, German and UK healthcare systems. Clinical outcomes included in the model were death rates, nosocomial infection rates, and ICU/hospital LOS. Probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to test the reliability of results. PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were more effective on average than standard PN both in ICU and in non-ICU patients in the four countries considered, reducing infection rates and overall LOS, and resulting in a lower total cost per patient. Overall costs for patients receiving PN regimens containing omega-3 fatty acids were between €14 144 to €19 825 per ICU patient and €5484 to €14 232 per non-ICU patient, translating into savings of between €3972 and €4897 per ICU patient and savings of between €561 and €1762 per non

  8. "Against the silence": Development and first results of a patient survey to assess experiences of safety-related events in hospital

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    Schwappach David LB

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of patients in the detection and prevention of safety related events and medical errors have been widely recommended. However, it has also been questioned whether patients at large are willing and able to identify safety-related events in their care. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot test a brief patient safety survey applicable to inpatient care in Swiss hospitals. Methods A survey instrument was developed in an iterative procedure. The instrument asks patients to report whether they have experienced specific undesirable events during their hospital stay. The preliminary version was developed together with experts and tested in focus groups with patients. The adapted survey instrument was pilot-tested in random samples of patients of two Swiss hospitals (n = 400. Responders to the survey that had reported experience of any incident were sampled for qualitative interviews (n = 18. Based on the interview, the researcher classified the reported incidents as confirmed or discarded. Results The survey was generally well accepted in the focus groups and interviews. In the quantitative pilot test, 125 patients returned the survey (response rate: 31%. The mean age of responders was 55 years (range 17–91, SD 18 years and 62.5% were female. The 125 participating patients reported 94 "definitive" and 34 "uncertain" events. 14% of the patients rated any of the experienced events as "serious". The definitive and uncertain events reported with highest frequency were phlebitis, missing hand hygiene, allergic drug reaction, unavailability of documents, and infection. 23% of patients reported some or serious concerns about their safety. The qualitative interviews indicate that both, the extent of patients' uncertainty in the classification of events and the likelihood of confirmation by the interviewer vary very much by type of incident. Unexpectedly, many patients reported problems and incidents related to food

  9. The relationship between commercial website ratings and traditional hospital performance measures in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Naomi S; Asteria-Peñaloza, Renée; Boscardin, W John; Dudley, R Adams

    2013-03-01

    Our goal was to compare hospital scores from the most widely used commercial website in the USA to hospital scores from more systematic measures of patient experience and outcomes, and to assess what drives variation in the commercial website scores. For a national sample of US hospitals, we compared scores on Yelp.com, which aggregates website visitor ratings (1-5 stars), with traditional measures of hospital quality. We calculated correlations between hospital Yelp scores and the following: hospital percent high ratings (9 or 10, scale 0-10) on the 'Overall' item on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey; hospital individual HCAHPS domain scores (eg, nurse communication, pain control); hospital 30-day mortality; and hospital 30-day readmission rates. Of hospitals reporting HCAHPS (n=3796), 962 (25%) had scores on Yelp. Among hospitals with >5 Yelp ratings, the correlation of percent high ratings between Yelp and HCAHPS was 0.49 (p<0.001). The percent high ratings within each HCAHPS domain increased monotonically with increasing Yelp scores (p≤0.001 for all domains). Percent high ratings in Yelp and HCAHPS were statistically significantly correlated with lower mortality for myocardial infarction (MI; -0.19 for Yelp and -0.13 for HCAHPS) and pneumonia (-0.14 and -0.18), and fewer readmissions for MI (-0.17 and -0.39), heart failure (-0.31 and -0.39), and pneumonia (-0.18 and -0.27). These data suggest that rater experiences for Yelp and HCAHPS may be similar, and that consumers posting ratings on Yelp may observe aspects of care related to important patient outcomes.

  10. Using Rapid Improvement Events for Disaster After-Action Reviews: Experience in a Hospital Information Technology Outage and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Charles M; McStay, Christopher; Oeth, Justin; Koehler, April; Bookman, Kelly

    2018-02-01

    The use of after-action reviews (AARs) following major emergency events, such as a disaster, is common and mandated for hospitals and similar organizations. There is a recurrent challenge of identified problems not being resolved and repeated in subsequent events. A process improvement technique called a rapid improvement event (RIE) was used to conduct an AAR following a complete information technology (IT) outage at a large urban hospital. Using RIE methodology to conduct the AAR allowed for the rapid development and implementation of major process improvements to prepare for future IT downtime events. Thus, process improvement methodology, particularly the RIE, is suited for conducting AARs following disasters and holds promise for improving outcomes in emergency management. Little CM , McStay C , Oeth J , Koehler A , Bookman K . Using rapid improvement events for disaster after-action reviews: experience in a hospital information technology outage and response. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):98-100.

  11. Hospitality and Inclusion Logistics of a Spotlight Event: An Insiders Look at the 2016 DNC in Philadelphia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leora Halpern Lanz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2016 Democratic National Convention held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania prioritized hospitality efforts and incorporated inclusion and diversity as its theme. These strategies helped to create a successful spotlight event, benefiting the city of Philadelphia and its hospitality industry.

  12. Impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and rates of re-hospitalization in a general hospital setting in Brazil

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    Leite Silmara AO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is known to be related to a higher incidence of clinical and surgical complications and poorer outcomes. Adequate glycemic control and earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during hospitalization are cost-effective measures. Methods This prospective cohort study was designed to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality in a general hospital setting during a 3-month period by reviewing patients' records. The primary purposes of this trial were to verify that hyperglycemia was diagnosed properly and sufficiently early and that it was managed during the hospital stay; we also aimed to evaluate the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia control and outcomes such as complications during the hospital stay, extent of hospitalization, frequency of re-hospitalization, death rates and number of days in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit after admission. Statistical analyses utilized the Kruskall-Wallis complemented by the "a posteriori" d.m.s. test, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, with a level of significance of 5% (p Results We reviewed 779 patient records that fulfilled inclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 5 groups: group (1 diabetic with normal glycemic levels according to American Diabetes Association criteria for in-hospital patients (n = 123; group (2 diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 76; group (3 non-diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 225; group (4diabetics and non-diabetics with persistent hyperglycemia during 3 consecutive days (n = 57 and group (5 those with normal glucose control (n = 298. Compared to patients in groups 1 and 5, patients in groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher mortality rates (17.7% vs. 2.8% and Intensive Care Unit admissions with complications (23.3% vs. 4.5%. Patients in group 4 had the longest hospitalizations (mean 15.5 days, and group 5 had the lowest re-hospitalization rate (mean of 1.28 hospitalizations. Only

  13. Weighted hurdle regression method for joint modeling of cardiovascular events likelihood and rate in the US dialysis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, Damla; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Mu, Yi; Nguyen, Danh V

    2014-11-10

    We propose a new weighted hurdle regression method for modeling count data, with particular interest in modeling cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis. Cardiovascular disease remains one of the leading causes of hospitalization and death in this population. Our aim is to jointly model the relationship/association between covariates and (i) the probability of cardiovascular events, a binary process, and (ii) the rate of events once the realization is positive-when the 'hurdle' is crossed-using a zero-truncated Poisson distribution. When the observation period or follow-up time, from the start of dialysis, varies among individuals, the estimated probability of positive cardiovascular events during the study period will be biased. Furthermore, when the model contains covariates, then the estimated relationship between the covariates and the probability of cardiovascular events will also be biased. These challenges are addressed with the proposed weighted hurdle regression method. Estimation for the weighted hurdle regression model is a weighted likelihood approach, where standard maximum likelihood estimation can be utilized. The method is illustrated with data from the United States Renal Data System. Simulation studies show the ability of proposed method to successfully adjust for differential follow-up times and incorporate the effects of covariates in the weighting. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Automatic prediction of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events using heart rate variability analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Melillo

    Full Text Available There is consensus that Heart Rate Variability is associated with the risk of vascular events. However, Heart Rate Variability predictive value for vascular events is not completely clear. The aim of this study is to develop novel predictive models based on data-mining algorithms to provide an automatic risk stratification tool for hypertensive patients.A database of 139 Holter recordings with clinical data of hypertensive patients followed up for at least 12 months were collected ad hoc. Subjects who experienced a vascular event (i.e., myocardial infarction, stroke, syncopal event were considered as high-risk subjects. Several data-mining algorithms (such as support vector machine, tree-based classifier, artificial neural network were used to develop automatic classifiers and their accuracy was tested by assessing the receiver-operator characteristics curve. Moreover, we tested the echographic parameters, which have been showed as powerful predictors of future vascular events.The best predictive model was based on random forest and enabled to identify high-risk hypertensive patients with sensitivity and specificity rates of 71.4% and 87.8%, respectively. The Heart Rate Variability based classifier showed higher predictive values than the conventional echographic parameters, which are considered as significant cardiovascular risk factors.Combination of Heart Rate Variability measures, analyzed with data-mining algorithm, could be a reliable tool for identifying hypertensive patients at high risk to develop future vascular events.

  15. Analysis of hospitalization rates by electoral ward: relationship to accessibility and deprivation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, R; Ferguson, B; Ryder, S

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the relevance of access to hospital services in explaining utilization rates at a District Health Authority level in the UK. In order to test the hypothesis that access is important, it is necessary to develop a means of scoring access factors and then combining these scores with other more recognized influences on hospitalization rates e.g. deprivation measures. Acknowledging that hospitalization rates are not merely products of a population's socio-economic characteristics, the effect of accessibility to hospital services for the resident population is investigated through the derivation of an access score using both private and public transport from electoral ward of residence. Deprivation and accessibility to services were both found to be significant factors in determining hospitalization rates at electoral ward level. The chosen supply variable--number of GPs--was not found to be significant in any of the models developed using linear regression techniques. To conclude, it appears that access plays an important role in determining hospitalization rates within a given population. If high hospitalization rates are accepted as an indicator of effectively met demand then policy makers may have to consider increasing the accessibility of hospital services.

  16. Focused group discussion with health care staff improves breastfeeding rates in hospitalized infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Yunie Purwita Sari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Improving breastfeeding in sick infants is essential. During the neonatal care, health care staff play an important role in promoting breastfeeding. Therefore, it is important to study in depth how healthcare staff can improve breastfeeding practice in sick neonates. Objective To compare breastfeeding rates in sick infants before and after a focused group discussion (FGD of health care staff on how to improve breastfeeding. Methods This study was an operational study using FGD and in-depth interviews as an intervention. A fish bone diagram was used to assess problems that may prevent mothers from breastfeeding their sick infants. Breastfeeding achievement was compared before and after the FGD. Results Of 257 sick infants, 177 subjects were in the before FGD group and 80 subjects were in the after FGD group. Significantly more after FGD subjects were breastfed during hospitalization than before FGD subjects [97.5% vs. 82.9%, respectively; (x2 =9.43; P=0.002]. Breastfeeding initiation within 0-4 hours of birth was also significantly higher in the after FGD group [10 (12.5% vs. 6 (3.5%, respectively; (x2 = 52.5; P<0.001]. The solutions for breastfeeding problems were: 1 support of hospital management, 2 support of healthcare workers for breastfeeding mothers, 3 support of husbands and families for breastfeeding mothers, 4 financial support, 5 other factors such as level of care and consistent FGD events, and 6 a prospective cohort study. Conclusion The FGD with health care staff significantly increases breastfeeding achievement during infant hospitalization, and accelerated breastfeeding initiation. A fish bone diagram is used to effectively assess the problems with breastfeeding programs for sick babies.

  17. Spatial analysis of drug-related hospital admissions: an auto-Gaussian model to estimate the hospitalization rates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Colasante

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate, even if partially, how much the drug use phenomenon impacts on the Italian National Heatlh System throughout the estimation at local level (Local Health Unit of the hospitalization rate caused by substance use and abuse such as opiates, barbiturates-sedativeshypnotics, cocaine and cannabis, and keeping in mind the phenomenon distribution in the space and so the fact that what happens in a specific area depends on what is happening in the neighbourhoods close to it (spatial autocorrelation.

    Methods: Data from hospital discharge database were provided by the Ministry of Health and an auto- Gaussian model was fitted. The spatial trend can be a function of other explanatory variables or can simply be modeled as a function of spatial location. Both models were fitted and compared using the number of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services and the number of beds held by hospitals as covariates.

    Results: Concerning opiates use related hospitalizations, results show areas where the phenomenon was less prominent in 2001 (Lombardy, part of Liguria, Umbria, part of Latium, Campania, Apulia and Sicily. In the following years, the hospitalization rates increased in some areas, such as the north of Apulia, part of Campania and Latium. A dependence of the opiates related hospitalization rates on the rate of subjects kept in charge by the Drug Addiction Services is highlighted. Concerning barbiturates-sedatives-hypnotics consumption, the best model is the one without covariates and estimated hospitalization rates are lower then 3 per thousand. The model with only the covariate “rate of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services” has been used both for cocaine and cannabis. In these two cases, more than a half of the Local Health Units report hospitalization rates lower than 0.5 per thousand

  18. Dust events as a risk factor for daily hospitalization for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in Minqin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ziqiang; Lu, Bin

    Dust events are common air pollution events in parts of the world with arid, semi-arid, or desert areas. There is little research on the association between respiratory and cardiovascular health and dust events in places which are close to the deserts. The aim of this study is to evaluate the health effects of dust events in a location where traffic and industry are underdeveloped and dust events are most frequent in China. The setting allows the opportunity to reduce confounding by anthropogenically derived particulate matter and to confirm the health effects of dust events. The present study was done using daily counts of hospitalizations in Minqin (1994-2003) for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth revision) for males and females. Using a semi-parametric generalized additive model and controlling for long-term temporal trends, day of the week, meteorological factors, and seasonal influence, counts of hospitalization were analyzed for dust events in a Poisson regression. Relative risks (RRs) were used to estimate the risk of dust events for respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations. In the year-round model, dust events with a lag of 3 days were significantly associated with total respiratory hospitalization for males and females, with RRs of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.29) and 1.18 (95% CI 1.00-1.41); dust events with a lag of 4 days were significantly associated with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in males (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.59), and dust events with a lag of 6 days were significantly associated with pneumonia in males, with an RR of 1.17 (95% CI 1.00-1.38). A significant association between dust events with a lag of 3 days and hypertension in males was also found (RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03,1.64). In the seasonal analysis model, the associations between the dust events and respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations were stronger in spring and in winter, respectively. The

  19. Effect of physician collaboration network on hospitalization cost and readmission rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat; Kelaher, Margaret

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have documented the effect of collaboration among physicians on the effectiveness in delivering health services and in producing better patient outcomes. However, there is no systematic empirical study suggesting the underlying relationship between the collaboration network of physicians and its effect on hospitalization cost and readmission rate. In this study, we explore the effect of different attributes (i.e. degree centrality, betweenness centrality, network density and network distance) of physician collaboration network (PCN) on hospitalization cost and readmission rate. We analyse health insurance claim data set of total hip replacement (THR) patients to construct PCN and to test the effect of its network attributes on hospitalization cost and readmission rate. We consider patient age as moderating factor, which could affect the relation of the PCN attributes with hospitalization cost and readmission rate. We find that degree centrality (i.e. level of involvement) and network density (i.e. level of connectedness) of PCN are negatively correlated with hospitalization cost and readmission rate. In contrast, betweenness centrality (i.e. capacity to control the flow of information) is found positively correlated with hospitalization cost and readmission rate. Distance (i.e. embeddedness of actors in a network) is found positively correlated with hospitalization cost but negatively correlated with readmission rate. We do not notice any significant impact of patient age on the relation of PCN attributes with hospitalization cost and readmission rate. The results show that the structure of PCNs is related to indicators of hospital costs and quality (readmission). In their respective hospitals, health-care managers or administrators may follow our research findings to reduce cost and improve quality.

  20. Variations in hospitalization rates among nursing home residents: the role of facility and market attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mary W; Porell, Frank W

    2003-04-01

    This study examined the contribution of facility-level and area market-level attributes to variations in hospitalization rates among nursing home residents. Three years (1991-1994) of state quarterly Medicaid case-mix reimbursement data from 527 nursing homes (NH) in Massachusetts were linked with Medicare Provider Analysis and Review hospital claims and nursing facility attribute data to produce a longitudinal, analytical file containing 72,319 person-quarter observations. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the influence of facility-level and market-level factors on hospital use, after controlling for individual-level resident attributes, including: NH diagnoses, resident-level quality of care indicators, and diagnostic cost grouping classification from previous hospital stays. Multivariate findings suggest that resident heterogeneity alone does not account for the wide variations in hospitalization rates across nursing homes. Instead, facility characteristics such as profit status, nurse staffing patterns, NH size, chain affiliation, and percentage of Medicaid and Medicare reimbursed days significantly influence NH residents' risk of hospitalization. Broader area market factors also appear to contribute to variations in hospitalization rates. Variations in hospitalization rates may reflect underutilization, as well as overutilization. Continued efforts toward identifying medically necessary hospitalizations are needed.

  1. Events Leading to Hospital-Related Disenrollment of Home Hospice Patients: A Study of Primary Caregivers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Paustian, Shawn; Reid, Manney Carrington; Finley, Amanda; Martin, Angela; Delfs, John; Baughn, Rosemary; Adelman, Ronald D

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 25% of hospice disenrollments in the United States occur as the result of hospitalization, which can lead to burdensome transitions and undesired care. Informal caregivers (e.g., spouses, children) play a critical role in caring for patients on home hospice. Research examining hospital-related disenrollment among these patients is limited. To understand the events surrounding the hospitalization of patients discharged from home hospice through the perspective of their informal caregivers. Thirty-eight semistructured phone interviews with caregivers were conducted, and data regarding the events leading to hospitalization and hospice disenrollment were collected. Study data were analyzed by using qualitative methods. Subjects included caregivers of 38 patients who received services from one not-for-profit home hospice organization in New York City. Participants were English speaking only. Caregiver recordings were transcribed and analyzed by using content analysis. Content analysis revealed four major themes contributing to hospitalization: (1) distressing/difficult-to-witness signs and symptoms, (2) needing palliative interventions not deliverable in the home setting, (3) preference to be cared for by nonhospice physicians or at a local hospital, and (4) caregivers not comfortable with the death of their care recipient at home. Over half of all caregivers called 911 before calling hospice. Our study provides insight into the events leading to hospitalization of home hospice patients from the caregivers' perspective. Further research is needed to quantify the drivers of hospitalization and to develop interventions that reduce utilization, while improving care for home hospice patients and their caregivers.

  2. Estimation of potential cost savings associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular hospitalization among atrial fibrillation/flutter patients treated with dronedarone in the ATHENA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Lin, Jay; Jhaveri, Mehul; Mozaffari, Essy; Plich, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate, from a US payer perspective, potential cost savings resulting from the reduction in cardiovascular (CV) hospitalizations obtained with dronedarone in the ATHENA (A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel Arm Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Dronedarone 400 mg bid for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Hospitalization or Death from any Cause in PatiENts with Atrial Fibrillation/Atrial Flutter) trial. ATHENA randomized atrial fibrillation/flutter patients to dronedarone (n=2301) or placebo (n=2327) plus standard care. Dronedarone significantly reduced first CV hospitalization/all-cause mortality over 12-30 months of follow-up. CV hospitalization costs (2008 values) from a US cohort of ATHENA-like atrial fibrillation/flutter patients with Medicare supplemental insurance (n=10,200) and diagnosis-related group costs of adverse event-related hospitalizations were applied to hospitalizations occurring in ATHENA. The impact of cost variation was assessed using Monte Carlo simulation. In ATHENA, dronedarone reduced the overall CV hospitalization rate (vs. placebo) by 29% over the first 12 months (33.36 vs. 47.19 events per 100 patients) and by 25% over the full study (51.15 vs. 68.55 events per 100 patients). Adverse event-related hospitalization rates (dronedarone vs. placebo) were low (0.48 vs. 0.21 and 0.56 vs. 0.26 events per 100 patients over 12 months and the full study, respectively). Overall hospitalization cost savings were estimated at $1329 and $1763 per patient over 12 months and the full study, respectively. Cost savings were relatively stable [mean (95% confidence interval): $1330 ($994-$1676) for the first 12 months and $1763 ($1369-$2184) for the full study] over 10,000 cycles of random variation.

  3. Trends in Hospitalization Rates and Outcomes of Endocarditis among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Wang, Yun; Kim, Nancy; Desai, Mayur M.; Quagliarello, Vincent; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the hospitalization rates and outcomes of endocarditis among older adults. Background Endocarditis is the most serious cardiovascular infection and is especially common among older adults. Little is known about recent trends for endocarditis hospitalizations and outcomes. Methods Using Medicare inpatient Standard Analytic Files, we identified all Fee-For-Service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years with a principal or secondary diagnosis of endocarditis from 1999-2010. We used Medicare Denominator Files to report hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years. Rates of 30-day and 1-year mortality were calculated using Vital Status Files. We used mixed-effects models to calculate adjusted rates of hospitalization and mortality and to compare the results before and after 2007, when the American Heart Association revised recommendations for endocarditis prophylaxis. Results Overall, 262,658 beneficiaries were hospitalized with endocarditis. The adjusted hospitalization rate increased from 1999-2005, reaching 83.5 per 100,000 person-years in 2005, and declined during 2006-2007. After 2007, the decline continued, reaching 70.6 per 100,000 person-years in 2010. Adjusted 30-day and 1-year mortality rates ranged from 14.2% to 16.5% and from 32.6% to 36.2%, respectively. There were no consistent changes in adjusted rates of 30-day and 1-year mortality after 2007. Trends in rates of hospitalization and outcomes were consistent across demographic subgroups. Adjusted rates of hospitalization and mortality declined consistently in the subgroup with principal diagnosis of endocarditis. Conclusions Our study highlights the high burden of endocarditis among older adults. We did not observe an increase in adjusted rates of hospitalization or mortality associated with endocarditis after publication of the 2007 guidelines. PMID:23994421

  4. Hospital Variation in Postpartum Tubal Sterilization Rates in California and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joseph E.; Stevenson, Amanda J.; White, Kari; Hopkins, Kristine; Grossman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate variation across hospitals in the rate of postpartum sterilization. METHODS All hospitals with deliveries in California and Texas in 2009 were included. Proportion of live singleton deliveries with postpartum sterilization was calculated by hospital, insurance status (Medicaid compared with private insurance), type of delivery, and state. RESULTS Within each insurance status in California and Texas, we found wide variations across hospitals in postpartum tubal sterilization rates. This variability was not explained by disparities in hospital cesarean delivery rates. Some, but not all, of this variation was attributable to the absence of sterilizations in Catholic hospitals. Overall, postpartum tubal sterilization rates were higher in Texas than in California (10.2% compared with 6.7%), and this difference was found among both public insurance and private insurance patients. Interval sterilizations were more frequent in California, but the difference was not large enough to offset the difference in postpartum sterilization. CONCLUSIONS The variation in postpartum tubal sterilization rates across hospitals is substantial and exists even among hospitals without religious affiliations. Large-scale studies are needed to assess the demand for, and the barriers to, obtaining postpartum sterilization. PMID:23262940

  5. Cecal Intubation Rate During Colonoscopy at a Tertiary Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-14

    Jun 14, 2016 ... Chak A, Cooper GS, Blades EW, Canto M, Sivak MV. Prospective assessment of colonoscopic intubation skills in trainees. Gastrointest Endosc 1996;44:54-7. 15. Rathgaber SW, Wick TM. Colonoscopy completion and complication rates in a community gastroenterology practice. Gastrointest Endosc 2006 ...

  6. Hospital Variation in Rates of New Institutionalizations Within 6 Months of Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Zhou, Jie; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Goodwin, James S

    2017-06-01

    Hospitalization in community-dwelling elderly is often accompanied by functional loss, increasing the risk for continued functional decline and future institutionalization. The primary objective of our study was to examine the hospital-level variation in rates of new institutionalizations among Medicare beneficiaries. Retrospective cohort study. Hospitals and nursing homes. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged from 4,469 hospitals in 2013 (N = 4,824,040). New institutionalization, defined as new long term care nursing home residence (not skilled nursing facility) of at least 90 days duration within 6 months of hospital discharge. The overall observed rate of new institutionalizations was 3.6% (N = 173,998). Older age, white race, Medicaid eligibility, longer hospitalization, and having a skilled nursing facility stay over the 6 months before hospitalization were associated with higher adjusted odds. Observed rates ranged from 0.9% to 5.9% across states. The variation in rates attributable to the hospital after adjusting for case-mix and state was 5.1%. Odds were higher for patients treated in smaller (OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.27-1.45, ≤50 vs >500 beds), government owned (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.09-1.21 compared to for-profit), limited medical school affiliation (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.07-1.19 compared to major) hospitals and lower for patients treated in urban hospitals (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.76-0.82 compared to rural). Higher Summary Star ratings (OR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.67-0.93, five vs one stars) and Overall Hospital Rating (OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.57-0.67, ratings of 9-10 vs 0) were associated with lower odds of institutionalization. Hospitalization may be a critical period for preventing future institutionalization among elderly patients. The variation in rates across hospitals and its association with hospital quality ratings suggest some of these institutionalizations are avoidable and may represent targets for care improvement. © 2017, Copyright the Authors

  7. Finding the signal in the noise: Could social media be utilized for early hospital notification of multiple casualty events?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael A Callcut

    Full Text Available Delayed notification and lack of early information hinder timely hospital based activations in large scale multiple casualty events. We hypothesized that Twitter real-time data would produce a unique and reproducible signal within minutes of multiple casualty events and we investigated the timing of the signal compared with other hospital disaster notification mechanisms.Using disaster specific search terms, all relevant tweets from the event to 7 days post-event were analyzed for 5 recent US based multiple casualty events (Boston Bombing [BB], SF Plane Crash [SF], Napa Earthquake [NE], Sandy Hook [SH], and Marysville Shooting [MV]. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of tweet utilization were compared across events.Over 3.8 million tweets were analyzed (SH 1.8 m, BB 1.1m, SF 430k, MV 250k, NE 205k. Peak tweets per min ranged from 209-3326. The mean followers per tweeter ranged from 3382-9992 across events. Retweets were tweeted a mean of 82-564 times per event. Tweets occurred very rapidly for all events (<2 mins and represented 1% of the total event specific tweets in a median of 13 minutes of the first 911 calls. A 200 tweets/min threshold was reached fastest with NE (2 min, BB (7 min, and SF (18 mins. If this threshold was utilized as a signaling mechanism to place local hospitals on standby for possible large scale events, in all case studies, this signal would have preceded patient arrival. Importantly, this threshold for signaling would also have preceded traditional disaster notification mechanisms in SF, NE, and simultaneous with BB and MV.Social media data has demonstrated that this mechanism is a powerful, predictable, and potentially important resource for optimizing disaster response. Further investigated is warranted to assess the utility of prospective signally thresholds for hospital based activation.

  8. Reduced in-hospital survival rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims with obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; Warnier, M J; Bardai, A

    2013-01-01

    with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have a lower survival rate after OHCA than non-OPD patients. METHODS: We performed a community-based cohort study of 1172 patients with non-traumatic OHCA with ECG-documented VT/VF between 2005 and 2008. We compared survival to emergency room (ER), to hospital admission...

  9. Study of model of anesthesia related adverse event by incident report at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasethkamol, Arunchai; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Kyokong, Oranuch; Premsamran, Porntep; Kundej, Sarawut

    2011-01-01

    As a site of the Thai Anesthesia Incidents Monitoring Study (Thai AIMS), the authors continued data collection of incident reports to find out the frequency, clinical course, contributing factors, factors minimizing adverse events, and investigation of model appropriate for possible corrective strategies in a Thai university hospital. A standardized anesthesia incident report form that included close-end and open-end questions was provided to the attending anesthesia personnel of King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital between January I and December 31, 2007. They filled it on a voluntary and anonymous basis. Each incident report was reviewed by three reviewers. Any disagreement was discussed to achieve a consensus. One hundred sixty three incident reports were filled reporting 191 incidents. There were fewer male (44%) than female (56%) patients and they had an ASA physical status classification 1 (41%), 2 (43%), 3 (10%), 4 (4%) and 5 (2%). Surgical specialties that posed high risk of incidents were general, orthopedic, gynecological, otorhino-laryngological and urological surgery. Locations of incident were operating room (85%), ward (8%) and recovery room (2%). The common adverse incidents were oxygen desaturation (23%), arrhythmia needing treatment (14%), equipment malfunction (13%), drug error (9%), difficult intubation (6%), esophageal intubation (5%), cardiac arrest (5%), reintubation (4%), and endobronchial intubation (4%). Adverse events were detected by monitoring only (27%), by monitoring before clinical diagnosis (26%), by clinical diagnosis before monitoring (21%), and by clinical diagnosis only (26%). Incidents were considered to be from anesthesia related factor (73%), system factor (16%) and preventable (47%). Common factors related to incident were inexperience, lack of vigilance, haste, inappropriate decision, not comply with guidelines, and lack of equipment maintenance. Suggested corrective strategies were quality assurance activity, additional

  10. Incidence of patient safety events and process-related human failures during intra-hospital transportation of patients: retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Hui; Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Chen, Li-Chin; Li, Yu-Tsu; Huang, Hsiao-Fang; Wu, Chao-Ling; Chan, Jing-Yuan; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liang, Huey-Wen; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2017-11-03

    Intra-hospital transportation (IHT) might compromise patient safety because of different care settings and higher demand on the human operation. Reports regarding the incidence of IHT-related patient safety events and human failures remain limited. To perform a retrospective analysis of IHT-related events, human failures and unsafe acts. A hospital-wide process for the IHT and database from the incident reporting system in a medical centre in Taiwan. All eligible IHT-related patient safety events between January 2010 to December 2015 were included. Incidence rate of IHT-related patient safety events, human failure modes, and types of unsafe acts. There were 206 patient safety events in 2 009 013 IHT sessions (102.5 per 1 000 000 sessions). Most events (n=148, 71.8%) did not involve patient harm, and process events (n=146, 70.9%) were most common. Events at the location of arrival (n=101, 49.0%) were most frequent; this location accounted for 61.0% and 44.2% of events with patient harm and those without harm, respectively (pprocess step was the preparation of the transportation team (n=91, 48.9%). Contributing unsafe acts included perceptual errors (n=14, 7.5%), decision errors (n=56, 30.1%), skill-based errors (n=48, 25.8%), and non-compliance (n=68, 36.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that human failure found in the arrival and hand-off sub-process (OR 4.84, pprocess at the location of arrival and prevent errors other than omissions. Long-term monitoring of IHT-related events is also warranted. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Frequency of adverse events and mortality in patients with pleural empyema in a public referral hospital in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Kiengelher, L; Báez-Saldaña, R; Salas-Hernández, J; Avalos-Bracho, A; Pérez-Padilla, R; Torre-Bouscoulet, L

    2010-09-01

    Adverse events (AEs) that occur during medical treatment are a public health problem. 1) To measure the prevalence of AEs, 2) to characterize those that occur in patients diagnosed with empyema and 3) to analyze the mortality rate associated with the presence of empyema. Retrospective case series based on a review of files of patient diagnosed with empyema. A total of 347 files were assessed, reporting 96.6% of the total number of patients diagnosed with empyema in that period. There were 176 AEs reported for 150 of the patients. The frequency of at least one AE was 43%, with prolonged hospitalization being the most frequent condition. In these cases, 97% of the AEs were considered preventable. Intrahospital mortality was 4.8%, with age (HR for every 5 years 1.21, 95%CI 1.08-1.35, P diabetes mellitus (HR 2.26, 95%CI 1.0-5.0, P = 0.04) being significant associated factors. There was a high frequency of AEs in patients with empyema, but most were considered preventable, especially the length of hospitalization, which could be reduced through timely surgery.

  12. Impact of a COPD comprehensive case management program on hospital length of stay and readmission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshabanat, Abdulmajeed; Otterstatter, Michael C; Sin, Don D; Road, Jeremy; Rempel, Carmen; Burns, Jane; van Eeden, Stephan F; FitzGerald, J M

    2017-01-01

    COPD accounts for the highest rate of hospital admissions among major chronic diseases. COPD hospitalizations are associated with impaired quality of life, high health care utilization, and poor prognosis and result in an economic and a social burden that is both substantial and increasing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of a comprehensive case management program (CCMP) in reducing length of stay (LOS) and risk of hospital admissions and readmissions in patients with COPD. We retrospectively compared outcomes across five large hospitals in Vancouver, BC, Canada, following the implementation of a systems approach to the management of COPD patients who were identified in the hospital and followed up in the community for 90 days. We compared numbers, rates, and intervals of readmission and LOS during 2 years of active program delivery compared to 1 year prior to program implementation. A total of 1,564 patients with a clinical diagnosis of COPD were identified from 2,719 hospital admissions during the 3 years of study. The disease management program reduced COPD-related hospitalizations by 30% and hospitalizations for all causes by 13.6%. Similarly, the rate of readmission for all causes showed a significant decline, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.55 (year 1) and 0.51 (year 2) of intervention (Pmanagement program for COPD patients, including education, case management, and follow-up, was associated with significant reduction in hospital admissions and LOS.

  13. Impaired fasting glucose is associated with increased perioperative cardiovascular event rates in patients undergoing major non-cardiothoracic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekkeşin Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM is a well-established risk factor for perioperative cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. However, the impact of preoperative glucose levels on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients undergoing nonemergent, major noncardiothoracic surgery is unclear. Methods and Results A total of 680 patients undergoing noncardiothoracic surgery were prospectively evaluated. Patients older than 18 years who underwent an elective, nonday case, open surgical procedure were enrolled. Electrocardiography and cardiac biomarkers were obtained 1 day before surgery, and on days 1, 3 and 7 after surgery. Preoperative risk factors and laboratory test results were measured and evaluated for their association with the occurrence of in-hospital perioperative cardiovascular events. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG defined as fasting plasma glucose values of 100 to 125 mg/dl; DM was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dl and/or plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl or the current use of blood glucose-lowering medication, and glucose values below 100 mg/dl were considered normal. Plasma glucose levels were significantly higher in patients with perioperative cardiovascular events (n = 80, 11.8% in comparison to those without cardiovascular events (131 ± 42.5 vs 106.5 ± 37.5, p Conclusions Not only DM but also IFG is associated with increased perioperative cardiovascular event rates in patients undergoing noncardiothoracic surgery.

  14. Impact of primary care on hospital admission rates for diabetes patients: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, R.J.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Wensing, M.

    2017-01-01

    High-quality primary care for diabetes patients may be related to lowered hospital admissions. A systematic search was performed to assess the impact of structure, process, and outcome of primary diabetes care on hospital admission rates, considering patient characteristics. Studies on diabetes

  15. 42 CFR 413.40 - Ceiling on the rate of increase in hospital inpatient costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... intensive care services (as defined in § 413.53(b)) incurred by a hospital in furnishing covered inpatient...-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING...) Long-term care hospitals, as defined in section 1886(d)(1)(B)(iv) of the Act, that are paid based on...

  16. 38 CFR 4.29 - Ratings for service-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation. 4.29 Section 4.29 Pensions, Bonuses, and... § 4.29 Ratings for service-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation. A total... observation at Department of Veterans Affairs expense for a service-connected disability for a period in...

  17. Finding the signal in the noise: Could social media be utilized for early hospital notification of multiple casualty events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callcut, Rachael A; Moore, Sara; Wakam, Glenn; Hubbard, Alan E; Cohen, Mitchell J

    2017-01-01

    Delayed notification and lack of early information hinder timely hospital based activations in large scale multiple casualty events. We hypothesized that Twitter real-time data would produce a unique and reproducible signal within minutes of multiple casualty events and we investigated the timing of the signal compared with other hospital disaster notification mechanisms. Using disaster specific search terms, all relevant tweets from the event to 7 days post-event were analyzed for 5 recent US based multiple casualty events (Boston Bombing [BB], SF Plane Crash [SF], Napa Earthquake [NE], Sandy Hook [SH], and Marysville Shooting [MV]). Quantitative and qualitative analysis of tweet utilization were compared across events. Over 3.8 million tweets were analyzed (SH 1.8 m, BB 1.1m, SF 430k, MV 250k, NE 205k). Peak tweets per min ranged from 209-3326. The mean followers per tweeter ranged from 3382-9992 across events. Retweets were tweeted a mean of 82-564 times per event. Tweets occurred very rapidly for all events (tweets in a median of 13 minutes of the first 911 calls. A 200 tweets/min threshold was reached fastest with NE (2 min), BB (7 min), and SF (18 mins). If this threshold was utilized as a signaling mechanism to place local hospitals on standby for possible large scale events, in all case studies, this signal would have preceded patient arrival. Importantly, this threshold for signaling would also have preceded traditional disaster notification mechanisms in SF, NE, and simultaneous with BB and MV. Social media data has demonstrated that this mechanism is a powerful, predictable, and potentially important resource for optimizing disaster response. Further investigated is warranted to assess the utility of prospective signally thresholds for hospital based activation.

  18. Complication rates of ostomy surgery are high and vary significantly between hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, Kyle H; Waits, Seth A; Krell, Robert W; Morris, Arden M; Englesbe, Michael J; Mullard, Andrew; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Ostomy surgery is common and has traditionally been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, suggesting an important target for quality improvement. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the variation in outcomes after ostomy creation surgery within Michigan to identify targets for quality improvement. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study took place within the 34-hospital Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. Patients included were those undergoing ostomy creation surgery between 2006 and 2011. We evaluated hospital morbidity and mortality rates after risk adjustment (age, comorbidities, emergency vs elective, and procedure type). A total of 4250 patients underwent ostomy creation surgery; 3866 procedures (91.0%) were open and 384 (9.0%) were laparoscopic. Unadjusted morbidity and mortality rates were 43.9% and 10.7%. Unadjusted morbidity rates for specific procedures ranged from 32.7% for ostomy-creation-only procedures to 47.8% for Hartmann procedures. Risk-adjusted morbidity rates varied significantly between hospitals, ranging from 31.2% (95% CI, 18.4-43.9) to 60.8% (95% CI, 48.9-72.6). There were 5 statistically significant high-outlier hospitals and 3 statistically significant low-outlier hospitals for risk-adjusted morbidity. The pattern of complication types was similar between high- and low-outlier hospitals. Case volume, operative duration, and use of laparoscopic surgery did not explain the variation in morbidity rates across hospitals. This work was limited by its retrospective study design, by unmeasured variation in case severity, and by our inability to differentiate between colostomies and ileostomies because of the use of Current Procedural Terminology codes. Morbidity and mortality rates for modern ostomy surgery are high. Although this type of surgery has received little attention in healthcare policy, these data reveal that it is both common and uncommonly morbid. Variation in hospital performance provides an

  19. Comparison of Hospitalization Rates among For-Profit and Nonprofit Dialysis Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kirsten L.; Romano, Patrick S.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Mu, Yi; Ishida, Julie H.; Grimes, Barbara; Kaysen, George A.; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The vast majority of US dialysis facilities are for-profit and profit status has been associated with processes of care and outcomes in patients on dialysis. This study examined whether dialysis facility profit status was associated with the rate of hospitalization in patients starting dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & methods This was a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries starting dialysis between 2005 and 2008 using data from the US Renal Data System. All-cause hospitalization was examined and compared between for-profit and nonprofit dialysis facilities through 2009 using Poisson regression. Companion analyses of cause-specific hospitalization that are likely to be influenced by dialysis facility practices including hospitalizations for heart failure and volume overload, access complications, or hyperkalemia were conducted. Results The cohort included 150,642 patients. Of these, 12,985 (9%) were receiving care in nonprofit dialysis facilities. In adjusted models, patients receiving hemodialysis in for-profit facilities had a 15% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 13% to 18%) higher relative rate of hospitalization compared with those in nonprofit facilities. Among patients receiving peritoneal dialysis, the rate of hospitalization in for-profit versus nonprofit facilities was not significantly different (relative rate, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.17). Patients on hemodialysis receiving care in for-profit dialysis facilities had a 37% (95% CI, 31% to 44%) higher rate of hospitalization for heart failure or volume overload and a 15% (95% CI, 11% to 20%) higher rate of hospitalization for vascular access complications. Conclusions Hospitalization rates were significantly higher for patients receiving hemodialysis in for-profit compared with nonprofit dialysis facilities. PMID:24370770

  20. Complication Rates of Ostomy Surgery Are High and Vary Significantly Between Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheetz, Kyle H.; Waits, Seth A.; Krell, Robert W.; Morris, Arden M.; Englesbe, Michael J.; Mullard, Andrew; Campbell, Darrell A.; Hendren, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Ostomy surgery is common and has traditionally been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, suggesting an important target for quality improvement. Objective To evaluate the variation in outcomes after ostomy creation surgery within Michigan in order to identify targets for quality improvement. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The 34-hospital Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (MSQC). Patients Patients undergoing ostomy creation surgery between 2006-2011. Main outcome measures We evaluated hospitals' morbidity and mortality rates after risk-adjustment (age, comorbidities, emergency v. elective, procedure type). Results 4,250 patients underwent ostomy creation surgery; 3,866 (91.0%) procedures were open and 384 (9.0%) were laparoscopic. Unadjusted morbidity and mortality rates were 43.9% and 10.7%, respectively. Unadjusted morbidity rates for specific procedures ranged from 32.7% for ostomy-creation-only procedures to 47.8% for Hartmann's procedures. Risk-adjusted morbidity rates varied significantly between hospitals, ranging from 31.2% (95%CI 18.4-43.9) to 60.8% (95%CI 48.9-72.6). There were five statistically-significant high-outlier hospitals and three statistically-significant low-outlier hospitals for risk-adjusted morbidity. The pattern of complication types was similar between high- and low-outlier hospitals. Case volume, operative duration, and use of laparoscopic surgery did not explain the variation in morbidity rates across hospitals. Conclusions Morbidity and mortality rates for modern ostomy surgery are high. While this type of surgery has received little attention in healthcare policy, these data reveal that it is both common and uncommonly morbid. Variation in hospital performance provides an opportunity to identify quality improvement practices that could be disseminated among hospitals. PMID:24819104

  1. Average Rate of Heat-Related Hospitalizations in 23 States, 2001-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map shows the 2001–2010 average rate of hospitalizations classified as “heat-related” by medical professionals in 23 states that participate in CDC’s...

  2. Risk adjustment for inter-hospital comparison of caesarean delivery rates in low-risk deliveries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stivanello, Elisa; Rucci, Paola; Carretta, Elisa; Pieri, Giulia; Seghieri, Chiara; Nuti, Sabina; Declercq, Eugene; Taglioni, Martina; Fantini, Maria Pia

    2011-01-01

    .... The objective of this study is to determine the extent to which risk adjustment for clinical and socio-demographic variables is needed for inter-hospital comparisons of CD rates in women without...

  3. High Rates of Bleeding Complications among Hospitalized Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Wood, Christopher P; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Cloft, Harry J; Misra, Sanjay; Kallmes, David F; Kamath, Patrick; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Krowka, Michael J; Swanson, Karen L; Iyer, Vivek N

    2016-09-01

    There is sparse published literature on the causes and outcomes of hospitalization of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). To evaluate rates of various complications, comorbidities, and in-hospital outcomes of patients with HHT using a large, multihospital inpatient database. We identified patients with HHT in the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2000 and 2012. Rates of hemorrhagic, neurological, hepatic, and cardiopulmonary complications among hospitalized patients with HHT were evaluated. We also studied procedure use rates for blood transfusion, endoscopy, and epistaxis treatment. Hospitalization outcomes, including in-hospital mortality, discharge status, charges, and length of stay, were evaluated. We identified 10,293 patients with HHT. The mean age of the HHT population was 60.7 years. Sixty percent of patients were female. More than 75% of HHT hospitalizations occurred in those older than 50 years of age. Patients with HHT had high rates of bleeding-related complications, including anemia (53.3%), epistaxis (16.2%), and gastrointestinal bleeding (10.8%). Overall, bleeding complications accounted for 62.7% of HHT-related complications. Thirty-eight percent of hospitalized patients with HHT received one or more transfusions of a blood product. Cardiopulmonary complications were present in 41.0% of the cases. Congestive heart failure was the second most common individual complication among patients with HHT, affecting 19.9% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 1.9%. In this large, nationwide study, we found that nearly two-thirds of patients hospitalized with HHT experienced a bleeding-related complication. Nearly 40% of hospitalized patients with HHT required transfusion of blood products. Cardiopulmonary complications, including congestive heart failure, were the second most common complication. The high burden of bleeding-related complications points to a significant unmet clinical need for these patients.

  4. Non-linearities in estimators of trilinear gauge couplings that use total event rate

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, F

    2000-01-01

    The total event rate of WW and single W production represents an important source of information on trilinear gauge couplings (TGC) at LEP 2. Present LEP analyses combine this information with the study of the four-fermion final-state angular distributions by means of an extended maximum likelihood (EML) estimator. In general, it can be shown that the inclusion of total event rate induces nonlinearities in the TGC estimators. In this letter, these biases are computed semi-analytically and calculations are carried out for typical LEP analyses at 161, 172 and 183 GeV. (9 refs).

  5. Effect of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline Treatment in Emergency Departments on the Hospitalization Rate for Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoulvant, François; Bellêttre, Xavier; Milcent, Karen; Teglas, Jean-Paul; Claudet, Isabelle; Le Guen, Christèle Gras; de Pontual, Loïc; Minodier, Philippe; Dubos, François; Brouard, Jacques; Soussan-Banini, Valérie; Degas-Bussiere, Vanessa; Gatin, Amélie; Schweitzer, Cyril; Epaud, Ralph; Ryckewaert, Amélie; Cros, Pierrick; Marot, Yves; Flahaut, Philippe; Saunier, Pascal; Babe, Philippe; Patteau, Géraldine; Delebarre, Mathilde; Titomanlio, Luigi; Vrignaud, Bénédicte; Trieu, Thanh-Van; Tahir, Abdelilah; Regnard, Delphine; Micheau, Pascale; Charara, Oussama; Henry, Simon; Ploin, Dominique; Panjo, Henri; Vabret, Astrid; Bouyer, Jean; Gajdos, Vincent

    2017-08-07

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization among infants. Previous studies, underpowered to examine hospital admission, have found a limited benefit of nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) treatment in the pediatric emergency department (ED). To examine whether HS nebulization treatment would decrease the hospital admission rate among infants with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis. The Efficacy of 3% Hypertonic Saline in Acute Viral Bronchiolitis (GUERANDE) study was a multicenter, double-blind randomized clinical trial on 2 parallel groups conducted during 2 bronchiolitis seasons (October through March) from October 15, 2012, through April 15, 2014, at 24 French pediatric EDs. Among the 2445 infants (6 weeks to 12 months of age) assessed for inclusion, 777 with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis with respiratory distress and no chronic medical condition were included. Two 20-minute nebulization treatments of 4 mL of HS, 3%, or 4 mL of normal saline (NS), 0.9%, given 20 minutes apart. Hospital admission rate in the 24 hours after enrollment. Of the 777 infants included in the study (median age, 3 months; interquartile range, 2-5 months; 468 [60.2%] male), 385 (49.5%) were randomized to the HS group and 387 (49.8%) to the NS group (5 patients did not receive treatment). By 24 hours, 185 of 385 infants (48.1%) in the HS group were admitted compared with 202 of 387 infants (52.2%) in the NS group. The risk difference for hospitalizations was not significant according to the mixed-effects regression model (adjusted risk difference, -3.2%; 95% CI, -8.7% to 2.2%; P = .25). The mean (SD) Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument score improvement was greater in the HS group (-3.1 [3.2]) than in the NS group (-2.4 [3.3]) (adjusted difference, -0.7; 95% CI, -1.2 to -0.2; P = .006) and similarly for the Respiratory Assessment Change Score. Mild adverse events, such as worsening of cough, occurred more frequently among children in the HS group

  6. Can use of an administrative database improve accuracy of hospital-reported readmission rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, James R; Herbert, Morley A; Hamman, Baron L; Ring, W Steves

    2017-12-05

    Readmission rates after cardiac surgery are being used as a quality indicator; they are also being collected by Medicare and are tied to reimbursement. Accurate knowledge of readmission rates may be difficult to achieve because patients may be readmitted to different hospitals. In our area, 81 hospitals share administrative claims data; 28 of these hospitals (from 5 different hospital systems) do cardiac surgery and share Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) clinical data. We used these 2 sources to compare the readmissions data for accuracy. A total of 45,539 STS records from January 2008 to December 2016 were matched with the hospital billing data records. Using the index visit as the start date, the billing records were queried for any subsequent in-patient visits for that patient. The billing records included date of readmission and hospital of readmission data and were compared with the data captured in the STS record. We found 1153 (2.5%) patients who had STS records that were marked "No" or "missing," but there were billing records that showed a readmission. The reported STS readmission rate of 4796 (10.5%) underreported the readmission rate by 2.5 actual percentage points. The true rate should have been 13.0%. Actual readmission rate was 23.8% higher than reported by the clinical database. Approximately 36% of readmissions were to a hospital that was a part of a different hospital system. It is important to know accurate readmission rates for quality improvement processes and institutional financial planning. Matching patient records to an administrative database showed that the clinical database may fail to capture many readmissions. Combining data with an administrative database can enhance accuracy of reporting. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: the REACH Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aichner, F T; Topakian, R; Alberts, M J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Data on current cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) are sparse. We compared the 1-year outcomes of patients with ACAS > or =70% versus patients without ACAS in an international, prospective cohort of outpatients.......26%, P = 0.04), cardiovascular death (2.29% vs. 1.52%, P = 0.002), the composite end-point cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke (6.03% vs. 4.29%, P events (1.41% vs. 0.81%, P = 0.002). In patients with ACAS, Cox regression analyses identified history of cerebrovascular...... ischaemic events as most important predictor of future stroke (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.82-5.65, P events. Stroke was powerfully predicted by prior cerebrovascular...

  8. [Epidemiology of the hospital adverse events in Catalonia, Spain: a first step for the patient safety improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañeres, Joaquim; Orrego, Carola; Navarro, Laura; Casas, Lidia; Banqué, Marta; Suñol, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    It has been published that hospital adverse events are an important source of morbidity and mortality in different countries and settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, magnitude, distribution and degree of preventability of adverse events in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia (Spain). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 4,790 hospital discharges that were selected by simple random sampling after stratified multistage sampling in 15 hospitals in Catalonia. 38.25% of patients had positive risk criteria (screening phase). We identified 356 cases of adverse events, which represent a 7.4% (95%CI: 6.7% to 8.1%). Of these, 43.5% (155 cases) were considered preventable. This study confirms that adverse events in hospitals in Catalonia are frequent, and generate a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. As in other studies, corroborated that a high proportion of these adverse events are considered preventable. It was possible to identify priority areas to focus improvement efforts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  9. Cardiovascular disease event rates in patients with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs, including biological agents, are widely used in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular...... disease events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular disease events in patients with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative databases was used to assess the event rates associated...... with use of biological agents, methotrexate or other therapies, including retinoids, cyclosporine and phototherapy, in Denmark from 2007 to 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Death, myocardial infarction and stroke. RESULTS: A total of 2400 patients with severe psoriasis, including 693 patients treated...

  10. [Incidence and preventability of adverse events in patients hospitalised in three Colombian hospitals during 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Duarte, Hernando; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Rodríguez-Malagon, Nelcy; Forero-Supelano, Víctor; Santofimio-Sierra, Dagoberto; Altahona, Hernando

    2008-01-01

    Determining adverse event (AE) incidence, preventability, classification and impact for establishing their importance as a public health problem within the Colombian Social Security System. This was a study of a prospective inpatient cohort from three Colombian general-practice institutions. at least 12 hours' length of hospital stay during 2006. suffering psychiatric disorders and AE which had occurred before hospitalisation indexing. The sample consisted of 6 557 patients. clinical charts. Being a three-phase design, the first phase consisted of translating and standardising screening and causation formats, phase II of actively monitoring screening criteria and phase III of evaluating causation regarding the care being provided, based on specialist committee concept on a 0-6 scale. The variables measured were age, gender, social security affiliation, cumulative AE incidence, temporality, preventability of AE and disability resulting from them. 6,688 patients were evaluated; 505 of them fulfilled positive screening criteria (95 % CI=7,9;7,3-8,6), 310 presented at least one AE during their hospitalisation (95 %CI for accumulated incidence=4,6; 4,1-5,1). AE were considered to have been preventable in 189 cases (95 % CI=61;55-66) and permanent disability occurred in 1,3 % of them. AE-associated mortality was 6,4 % (20/310). Hospitalisation became increased to 1 072 days as a direct consequence of AE. This study revealed an important incidence of AE in three Colombian hospitals, these being mainly preventable. Their ongoing monitoring as a part of risk management systems could reduce costs and AE-associated morbidity and mortality.

  11. Nonfatal Occupational Injury Rates and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Housekeeping Employees of a Hospital in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtigandha Salwe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in hospital cleaners. Methods. Injury data on all hospital employees were extracted from occupational health records and compared. Additionally an interview-based modified Nordic Questionnaire (response rate 98.14% was conducted. Results. The mean total injury rate for cleaners was 35.9 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE, while that for other employees was 13.64 per 100 FTE. Slips/trips/falls and MMH contributed 4.39 and 2.37 per 100 FTE among cleaners and rest of the hospital employees, respectively. The most common type of injury was strain while the most common cause of injury was a striking object. Conclusion. The cleaners have higher injury rates and morbidity as compared to other employees of the hospital. The lower back was most commonly affected.

  12. Fewer adverse events as a result of the SAFE or SORRY? programme in hospitals and nursing homes. part i: primary outcome of a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gaal, Betsie G I; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Mintjes, Joke A J; Borm, George F; Hulscher, Marlies E J L; Defloor, Tom; Habets, Herbert; Voss, Andreas; Vloet, Lilian C M; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; van Achterberg, Theo

    2011-09-01

    Patient care guidelines are usually implemented one at a time, yet patients are at risk for multiple, often preventable, adverse events simultaneously. This study aimed to test the effect of the SAFE or SORRY? programme on the incidence of three adverse events (pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections and falls). This paper describes Part I of the study: the effect on the incidence of adverse events. A cluster randomised trial was conducted between September 2006 and November 2008. After a three-month baseline period the intervention was implemented followed by a nine-month follow-up period. Ten wards from four hospitals and ten wards from six nursing homes were stratified for institute and ward type and then randomised to intervention or usual care group. During baseline and follow-up, patients (≥18 years) with an expected length of stay of at least five days, were asked to participate. The SAFE or SORRY? programme consisted of the essential recommendations of guidelines for the three adverse events. A multifaceted implementation strategy was used for the implementation: education, patient involvement and feedback on process and outcome indicators. The usual care group continued care as usual. Data were collected on the incidence of adverse events and a Poisson regression model was used to estimate the rate ratio of the adverse events between the intervention and the usual care group at follow-up. At follow-up, 2201 hospital patients with 3358 patient weeks and 392 nursing home patients with 5799 patient weeks were observed. Poisson regression analyses showed a rate ratio for the development of an adverse event in favour of the intervention group of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.34-0.95) and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.48-0.99) for hospital patients and nursing home patients respectively. This study showed that implementing multiple guidelines simultaneously is possible, which is promising. Patients in the intervention groups developed 43% and 33% fewer adverse events compared to the

  13. Review FRB Event Rate Predictions for the Ooty Wide Field Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing models, (b) the minimum total energy required to detect events, (c) the redshift distribution and (d) the detection rates of FRBs for the ... the scattering model I and remain flat and extend up to high redshifts (z ≲ 5) for the scattering model II. Keywords. ... FRBs often show ∼5−20 times excess DMs compared to what is ...

  14. Effects of urinary cortisol levels and resting heart rate on the risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ockenburg, Sonja L; Rosmalen, Judith G M; Bakker, Stephan J L; de Jonge, Peter; Gans, Reinold O B

    2016-05-01

    Higher cortisol levels are associated with cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. It is unclear whether this association also exists in a general population of younger adults and for non-fatal cardiovascular events. Likewise, resting heart rate is associated with cardiovascular mortality, but fewer studies have also considered non-fatal events. The goal of this study was to investigate whether twenty-four-hour urinary cortisol (24-h UFC) levels and resting heart rate (RHR) predict major adverse fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events (MACE) in the general population. We used data from a subcohort of the PREVEND study, a prospective general population based cohort study with a follow-up of 6.4 years for 24-h UFC and 10.6 years for RHR. Participants were 3432 adults (mean age 49 years, range 28-75). 24-h UFC was collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RHR was measured at baseline in a supine position for 10 min with the Dinamap XL Model 9300. Information about cardiovascular events and mortality was obtained from the Dutch national registry of hospital discharge diagnoses and the municipal register respectively. 24-h UFC did not significantly increase the hazard of MACE (hazard ratio = 0.999, 95% confidence interval = 0.993-1.006, p = 0.814). RHR increased the risk for MACE with 17% per 10 extra heart beats per minute (hazard ratio = 1.016, 95% confidence interval = 1.001-1.031, p = 0.036) after adjustment for conventional risk factors. In contrast to 24-h UFC, RHR is a risk marker for MACE in the general population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Hospitalization Rates and Reasons Among HIV Elite Controllers and Persons With Medically Controlled HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Trevor A; Gebo, Kelly A; Blankson, Joel N; Korthuis, P Todd; Yehia, Baligh R; Rutstein, Richard M; Moore, Richard D; Sharp, Victoria; Nijhawan, Ank E; Mathews, W Christopher; Hanau, Lawrence H; Corales, Roberto B; Beil, Robert; Somboonwit, Charurut; Edelstein, Howard; Allen, Sara L; Berry, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Elite controllers spontaneously suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia but also demonstrate chronic inflammation that may increase risk of comorbid conditions. We compared hospitalization rates and causes among elite controllers to those of immunologically intact persons with medically controlled HIV. For adults in care at 11 sites from 2005 to 2011, person-years with CD4 T-cell counts ≥350 cells/mm(2) were categorized as medical control, elite control, low viremia, or high viremia. All-cause and diagnostic category-specific hospitalization rates were compared between groups using negative binomial regression. We identified 149 elite controllers (0.4%) among 34 354 persons in care. Unadjusted hospitalization rates among the medical control, elite control, low-viremia, and high-viremia groups were 10.5, 23.3, 12.6, and 16.9 per 100 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, elite control was associated with higher rates of all-cause (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.77 [95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.60]), cardiovascular (3.19 [1.50-6.79]) and psychiatric (3.98 [1.54-10.28]) hospitalization than was medical control. Non-AIDS-defining infections were the most common reason for admission overall (24.1% of hospitalizations) but were rare among elite controllers (2.7%), in whom cardiovascular hospitalizations were most common (31.1%). Elite controllers are hospitalized more frequently than persons with medically controlled HIV and cardiovascular hospitalizations are an important contributor. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Hospital readmission rates after surgical treatment of primary and metastatic tumors of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Sing, David C; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd H; Burch, Shane; Tay, Bobby; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective cohort study. This study aimed to identify the rates and causes of unplanned hospital readmission at 30 days and 1 year after surgical treatment of primary and metastatic spinal tumors. Primary spine tumors and non-spine tumors metastatic to the spine can represent complex problems for surgical treatment, but surgical intervention can provide significant patients with significant improvements in quality of life. However, recent emphasis on decreasing the cost of health care has led to a focus on quality measures such as hospital readmission rates. At a large referral spine center between 2005 and 2011, 197 patients with primary (n = 33) or metastatic (n = 164) tumors of the spine were enrolled. Hospital readmissions within 1 year were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to estimate unplanned hospital readmission rates, and risk factors were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Unplanned hospital readmission rates were 6.1% and 16.8% at 30 days for primary and metastatic tumors (P = 0.126), respectively, and 27.5% and 37.8% at 1 year (P = 0.262). Metastatic tumors with aggressive biology (i.e., lung, osteosarcoma, stomach, bladder, esophagus, pancreas) caused higher rates of readmission than other types of metastatic tumors. One-third of readmissions were due to recurrent disease, whereas 23.3% were due to surgical complications and 43.3% due to medical complications. Numerous medical comorbidities increased the risk of unplanned hospital readmission. Unplanned hospital readmissions after surgical intervention for spine tumors are common, and patients with aggressive metastatic tumors are at increased risk. In addition, comorbid medical problems are important risk factors that increase the chance that a patient will require hospital readmission within 1 year. 3.

  17. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  18. Variation in rates of breast cancer surgery: A national analysis based on French Hospital Episode Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rococo, E; Mazouni, C; Or, Z; Mobillion, V; Koon Sun Pat, M; Bonastre, J

    2016-01-01

    Minimum volume thresholds were introduced in France in 2008 to improve the quality of cancer care. We investigated whether/how the quality of treatment decisions in breast cancer surgery had evolved before and after this policy was implemented. We used Hospital Episode Statistics for all women having undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy in France in 2005 and 2012. Three surgical procedures considered as better treatment options were analyzed: BCS, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We studied the mean rates and variation according to the hospital profile and volume. Between 2005 and 2012, the volume of breast cancer surgery increased by 11% whereas one third of the hospitals no longer performed this type of surgery. In 2012, the mean rate of BCS was 74% and similar in all hospitals whatever the volume. Conversely, IBR and SLNB rates were much higher in cancer centers (CC) and regional teaching hospitals (RTH) [IBR: 19% and 14% versus 8% on average; SLNB: 61% and 47% versus 39% on average]; the greater the hospital volume, the higher the IBR and SLNB rates (p women with breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of Rate and Causes of Wastage of Blood and Blood Products in Iranian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Mohebbi Far

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and causes of wastage of blood and blood products (packed red cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate in Qazvin hospitals. METHODS: The study was conducted in all hospitals in Qazvin, including 5 teaching hospitals, 2 social welfare hospitals, 3 private hospitals, 1 charity hospital, and 1 military hospital. This descriptive study was based on available data from hospital blood banks in the province of Qazvin. The research instrument was a 2-part questionnaire. The first part was related to demographic characteristics of hospitals and the second part elicited information about blood and blood component wastage. The collected data were then analyzed using descriptive statistic methods and SPSS 11.5. RESULTS: Blood wastage may occur for a number of reasons, including time expiry, wasted imports, blood medically or surgically ordered but not used, stock time expired, hemolysis, or miscellaneous reasons. Data indicated that approximately 77.9% of wasted pack cell units were wasted for the reason of time expiry. Pack cell wastage in hospitals is reported to range from 1.93% to 30.7%. Wastage at all hospitals averaged 9.8% among 30.913 issued blood products. Overall blood and blood product (packed red cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate wastage was 3048 units and average total wastage per participant hospital for all blood groups was 254 units per year. CONCLUSION: Blood transfusion is an essential part of patient care. The blood transfusion system has made significant advancements in areas such as donor management, storage of blood, cross-matching, rational use of blood, and distribution. In order to improve the standards of blood banks and the blood transfusion services in Iran, comprehensive standards have been formulated to ensure better quality control in collection, storage, testing, and distribution of blood and its components for the identified major factors

  20. Determination of rate and causes of wastage of blood and blood products in Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Far, Rafat Mohebbi; Rad, Fatemeh Samiee; Abdolazimi, Zahra; Kohan, Mohamad Mehdi Daneshi

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and causes of wastage of blood and blood products (packed red cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate) in Qazvin hospitals. The study was conducted in all hospitals in Qazvin, including 5 teaching hospitals, 2 social welfare hospitals, 3 private hospitals, 1 charity hospital, and 1 military hospital. This descriptive study was based on available data from hospital blood banks in the province of Qazvin. The research instrument was a 2-part questionnaire. The first part was related to demographic characteristics of hospitals and the second part elicited information about blood and blood component wastage. The collected data were then analyzed using descriptive statistic methods and SPSS 11.5. Blood wastage may occur for a number of reasons, including time expiry, wasted imports, blood medically or surgically ordered but not used, stock time expired, hemolysis, or miscellaneous reasons. Data indicated that approximately 77.9% of wasted pack cell units were wasted for the reason of time expiry. Pack cell wastage in hospitals is reported to range from 1.93% to 30.7%. Wastage at all hospitals averaged 9.8% among 30.913 issued blood products. Overall blood and blood product (packed red cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate) wastage was 3048 units and average total wastage per participant hospital for all blood groups was 254 units per year. Blood transfusion is an essential part of patient care. The blood transfusion system has made significant advancements in areas such as donor management, storage of blood, cross-matching, rational use of blood, and distribution. In order to improve the standards of blood banks and the blood transfusion services in Iran, comprehensive standards have been formulated to ensure better quality control in collection, storage, testing, and distribution of blood and its components for the identified major factors affecting blood product wastage.

  1. Variations in 30-day hospital readmission rates across primary care clinics within a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Maselli, Judith H; Gonzales, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Reducing hospital readmissions is a national healthcare priority. Little is known about how readmission rates vary across unique primary care practices. To calculate all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rates at the level of individual primary care practices and identify factors associated with variations in these rates. Retrospective analysis Seven primary care clinics affiliated with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Adults ≥18 years old with a primary care provider (PCP) at UCSF MEASUREMENTS: All-cause 30-day readmission rates were calculated for primary care clinics for discharges between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2012. We built a model to identify demographic, clinical, and hospital factors associated with variation in rates. There were 12,564 discharges for patients belonging to the 7 clinics, with 8685 index discharges and 1032 readmissions. Readmission rates varied across practices, from 14.9% in Human Immunodeficiency Virus primary care and 7.7% in women's health. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with variation in readmission rates included: male gender (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.40), Medicare insurance (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.64; Ref = private), Medicare-Medicaid dual eligible (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01-1.56), multiple comorbidities, and admitting services. Patients with a departed PCP awaiting transfer assignment to a new PCP had an OR of 1.59 (95% CI: 1.16-2.17) compared with having a current faculty PCP. Primary care practices are important partners in improving care transitions and reducing hospital readmissions, and this study introduces a new way to view readmission rates. PCP turnover may be an important risk factor for hospital readmissions. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Hospital cost-containment strategies that earn the respect of rating agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopoulos, Jason

    2016-01-01

    To confirm that hospitals have the necessary structures and strategies in place to reduce costs and secure future market share, credit rating agencies analyze a variety of quantitative and qualitative criteria, including: Salaries and benefits, bad debt, age of plant and depreciation, and other line items that may point to inefficiencies in a hospital's expense structure. Cost-benefit analyses, strategic plans, and leadership qualities that show the long-term value of expense cuts, capital investments, and mergers and acquisitions. Cost-effective and clinically appropriate shifts in a hospital's outpatient-to-inpatient ratio. Liquidity and market share.

  3. Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Mary Jessica Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI on voice ratings, identification accuracy, and confidence, as well as the link between verbal recall and accuracy. Participants listened to a dialogue between male and female targets, then read misleading information about voice pitch. Participants engaged in verbal recall, rated voices on a feature checklist, and made a lineup decision. Accuracy rates were low, especially on target-absent lineups. Confidence and accuracy were unrelated, but the number of facts recalled about the voice predicted later lineup accuracy. There was a main effect of misinformation on ratings of target voice pitch, but there was no effect on identification accuracy or confidence ratings. As voice lineup evidence from earwitnesses is used in courts, the findings have potential applied relevance.

  4. [Incidence rate of adverse reaction/event by Qingkailing injection: a Meta-analysis of single rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Chun-ling; Xie, Yan-ming; Li, Ming-quan; Wang, Lian-xin; Liao, Xing

    2015-12-01

    To systematically review the incidence rate of adverse drug reaction/event by Qingkailing injection. Such databases as the PubMed, EMbase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP WanFang data and CBM were searched by computer from foundation to July 30, 2015. Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and cross check data. Then, Meta-analysis was performed by using the R 3.2.0 software, subgroup sensitivity analysis was performed based on age, mode of medicine, observation time and research quality. Sixty-three studies involving 9,793 patients with Qingkailing injection were included, 367 cases of adverse reactions/events were reported in total. The incidence rate of adverse reaction in skin and mucosa group was 2% [95% CI (0.02; 0.03)]; the digestive system adverse reaction was 6% [95% CI(0.05; 0.07); the injection site adverse reaction was 4% [95% CI (0.02; 0.07)]. In the digestive system as the main types of adverse reactions/events, incidence of children and adults were 4.6% [0.021 1; 0.097 7] and 6.9% [0.053 5; 0.089 8], respectively. Adverse reactions to skin and mucous membrane damage as the main performance/event type, the observation time > 7 days and ≤ 7 days incidence of 3% [0.012 9; 0.068 3] and 1.9% [0.007 8; 0.046 1], respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that different types of adverse reactions, combination in the incidence of adverse reactions/events were higher than that of single drug, the difference was statistically significant (P reactions occur, and clinical rational drug use, such as combination, age and other fators, and the influence factors vary in different populations. Therefore, clinical doctors for children and the elderly use special care was required for a clear and open spirit injection, the implementation of individualized medication.

  5. Hospitalization Rates and Predictors of Rehospitalization Among Individuals With Advanced Cancer in the Year After Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Robin L; Bell, Janice F; Tancredi, Daniel J; Romano, Patrick S; Bold, Richard J; Joseph, Jill G

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Among individuals with advanced cancer, frequent hospitalization increasingly is viewed as a hallmark of poor-quality care. We examined hospitalization rates and individual- and hospital-level predictors of rehospitalization among individuals with advanced cancer in the year after diagnosis. Methods Individuals diagnosed with advanced breast, colorectal, non-small-cell lung, or pancreatic cancer from 2009 to 2012 (N = 25,032) were identified with data from the California Cancer Registry (CCR). After linkage with inpatient discharge data, multistate and log-linear Poisson regression models were used to calculate hospitalization rates and to model rehospitalization in the year after diagnosis, accounting for survival. Results In the year after diagnosis, 71% of individuals with advanced cancer were hospitalized, 16% had three or more hospitalizations, and 64% of hospitalizations originated in the emergency department. Rehospitalization rates were significantly associated with black non-Hispanic (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.42) and Hispanic (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.20) race/ethnicity; public insurance (IRR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.47) and no insurance (IRR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.35); lower socioeconomic status quintiles (IRRs, 1.09 to 1.29); comorbidities (IRRs, 1.13 to 1.59); and pancreatic (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.95 to 2.20) and non-small-cell lung (IRR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.54 to 1.86) cancers versus colorectal cancer. Rehospitalization rates were significantly lower after discharge from a hospital that had an outpatient palliative care program (IRR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and were higher after discharge from a for-profit hospital (IRR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.56). Conclusion Individuals with advanced cancer experience a heavy burden of hospitalization in the year after diagnosis. Efforts to reduce hospitalization and provide care congruent with patient preferences might target individuals at higher risk. Future work might

  6. Mortality Rates of Traumatic Traffic Accident Patients at the University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Senih MAYDA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to estimate hospitalization and mortality rates in patients admitted to the University Hospital due to traffic accidents, and to determine the mean cost of the applicants in the hospital due to traffic accident. In this retrospective study data were obtained from the records of a university research and practice hospital. There were 802 patients admitted to emergency and other outpatient clinics of the University Hospital because of traffic accidents throughout the year 2012. Out of these patients, 166 (20.7% were hospitalized, and the annual mortality rate was 0.87%. The total cost was 322,545.2 euro and 402.2 euro per patient. Road traffic accident detection reports covered only the numbers of fatal injuries and injuries that happened at the scene of accidents. Determination of the number of the dead and wounded with overall mortality rate would be supposed to reveal the magnitude of public health problem caused by traffic accidents.

  7. Rate of Adverse Events and Healthcare Costs Associated with the Topical Treatment of Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Todd; Kamalakar, Rajesh; Ogbonnaya, Augustina; Zagadailov, Erin A; Eaddy, Michael; Kreilick, Charlie

    2017-05-01

    Rosacea is a condition more common in women than in men, and in people aged ≥30 years than in younger patients. Adverse events associated with the use of topical medications for rosacea may lead to a lack of treatment adherence. Previous studies have reported low treatment adherence rates among patients with rosacea. To describe the rate of treatment discontinuation resulting from adverse events and the associated healthcare costs among patients with rosacea who are receiving a topical medication. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with rosacea based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 695.3 who were newly initiating topical treatment with metronidazole, azelaic acid, sodium sulfacetamide/sulfur, or benzoyl peroxide between January 1, 2009, and September 30, 2013. Patients were identified from the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database and the Medicare Supplemental database and had to be aged ≥30 years, have continuous coverage with medical and pharmacy benefits ≥12 months before treatment and ≥3 months after treatment inititation, and have no evidence of oral antibiotic use or ocular rosacea during the study period. The 3-month period immediately after the index date (ie, first topical rosacea treatment) was defined as the postindex period and was used to evaluate the outcome measures, which included the rate of adverse events, treatment patterns, and healthcare costs. The final cohort included 49,351 patients, with a mean age of 54 years, and 74.5% of the patients were female. Metronidazole was the most common (72.7%) treatment, followed by azelaic acid (21.7%), sodium sulfacetamide/sulfur (3.4%), and benzoyl peroxide (2.2%). A total of 6270 (12.7%) patients had a coded adverse event, of whom 199 (3.2%) continued treatment despite the adverse event, 466 (7.4%) switched to another treatment within 8.8 days, and 5605 (89.4%) discontinued therapy within 31.1 days

  8. The impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates: global data review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Maki; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Ferronato, Angela Esposito; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta

    2016-09-01

    to describe the impact of varicella vaccination on varicella-related hospitalization rates in countries that implemented universal vaccination against the disease. we identified countries that implemented universal vaccination against varicella at the http://apps.who.int/immunization_monitoring/globalsummary/schedules site of the World Health Organization and selected articles in Pubmed describing the changes (pre/post-vaccination) in the varicella-related hospitalization rates in these countries, using the Keywords "varicella", "vaccination/vaccine" and "children" (or) "hospitalization". Publications in English published between January 1995 and May 2015 were included. 24 countries with universal vaccination against varicella and 28 articles describing the impact of the vaccine on varicella-associated hospitalizations rates in seven countries were identified. The US had 81.4% -99.2% reduction in hospitalization rates in children younger than four years after 6-14 years after the onset of universal vaccination (1995), with vaccination coverage of 90%; Uruguay: 94% decrease (children aged 1-4 years) in six years, vaccination coverage of 90%; Canada: 93% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 10 years, coverage of 93%; Germany: 62.4% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 8 years, coverage of 78.2%; Australia: 76.8% decrease (age 1-4 years) in 5 years, coverage of 90%; Spain: 83.5% decrease (age <5 years) in four years, coverage of 77.2% and Italy 69.7% -73.8% decrease (general population), coverage of 60%-95%. The publications showed variations in the percentage of decrease in varicella-related hospitalization rates after universal vaccination in the assessed countries; the results probably depend on the time since the implementation of universal vaccination, differences in the studied age group, hospital admission criteria, vaccination coverage and strategy, which does not allow direct comparison between data. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por

  9. Intervention analysis of introduction of rotavirus vaccine on hospital admissions rates due to acute diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Teixeira Masukawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine on hospitalization rates for acute diarrhea in children younger than 5 years old after the introduction of the vaccine in 2006. A descriptive analytical observational study was carried out of the hospitalization rates occurred between 2000 and 2011 in 22 Regional Health Centers of Paraná State, Brazil. The effect of the vaccine was assessed by applying the SARIMA/Box-Jenkins time series methodology of intervention analysis, which allows verifying the slopes of the series are different after the introduction of the vaccine and estimating the magnitude of these effects for children younger than five years of age, by age group, for each region center. It was verified a statistically significant reduction by center/month on hospitalization rates for children 1 year old and younger, with averages of 47% and 58%, respectively, in December 2011.

  10. Decrease in rate of multiple sclerosis-related hospitalizations in Portugal [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pereira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate the rate of multiple sclerosis (MS-related hospitalizations in Portugal and assess whether there have been temporal changes as described in other countries. Using data from the Portuguese National Discharge Registry, we observed that between 2008 and 2013 the rate of MS-related hospitalizations decreased by 44%, from 15.9/100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI: 14.9-16.9 in 2008 to 8.9/100 person-years (95% CI: 8.2-9.6 in 2013. The change in hospitalization rates is in accordance with what has been observed in other countries, and coincides with the release of new therapies for MS in Portugal.

  11. Deformed shell model study of event rates for WIMP-73Ge scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, R.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2017-12-01

    The event detection rates for the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) (a dark matter candidate) are calculated with 73Ge as the detector. The calculations are performed within the deformed shell model (DSM) based on Hartree-Fock states. First, the energy levels and magnetic moment for the ground state and two low-lying positive parity states for this nucleus are calculated and compared with experiment. The agreement is quite satisfactory. Then the nuclear wave functions are used to investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of WIMP from 73Ge; inelastic scattering, especially for the 9/2+ → 5/2+ transition, is studied for the first time. The nuclear structure factors which are independent of supersymmetric model are also calculated as a function of WIMP mass. The event rates are calculated for a given set of nucleonic current parameters. The calculation shows that 73Ge is a good detector for detecting dark matter.

  12. Do Avoidable Hospitalization Rates among Older Adults Differ by Geographic Access to Primary Care Physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Michael R; Mellor, Jennifer M; Millones, Marco

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the association between older adults' potentially avoidable hospitalization rates and both a geographic measure of primary care physician (PCP) access and a standard bounded-area measure of PCP access. State physician licensure data from the Virginia Board of Medicine. Patient-level hospital discharge data from Virginia Health Information. Area-level data from the American Community Survey and the Area Health Resources Files. Virginia Information Technologies Agency road network data. US Census Bureau TIGER/Line boundary files. We use enhanced two-step floating catchment area methods to calculate geographic PCP accessibility for each ZIP Code Tabulation Area in Virginia. We use spatial regression techniques to model potentially avoidable hospitalization rates. Geographic accessibility was calculated using ArcGIS. Physician locations were geocoded using TAMU GeoServices and ArcGIS. Increased geographic access to PCPs is associated with lower rates of potentially avoidable hospitalization among older adults. This association is robust, allowing for spatial spillovers in spatial lag models. Compared to bounded-area density measures, unbounded geographic accessibility measures provide more robust evidence that avoidable hospitalization rates are lower in areas with more PCPs per person. Results from our spatial lag models reveal the presence of positive spatial spillovers. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Comparison of traditional trigger tool to data warehouse based screening for identifying hospital adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Devisetty, Vikram K; Patel, Amitkumar R; Malkenson, David; Sama, Pradeep; Thompson, William K; Landler, Matthew P; Barnard, Cynthia; Williams, Mark V

    2013-02-01

    Research supports medical record review using screening triggers as the optimal method to detect hospital adverse events (AE), yet the method is labour-intensive. This study compared a traditional trigger tool with an enterprise data warehouse (EDW) based screening method to detect AEs. We created 51 automated queries based on 33 traditional triggers from prior research, and then applied them to 250 randomly selected medical patients hospitalised between 1 September 2009 and 31 August 2010. Two physicians each abstracted records from half the patients using a traditional trigger tool and then performed targeted abstractions for patients with positive EDW queries in the complementary half of the sample. A third physician confirmed presence of AEs and assessed preventability and severity. Traditional trigger tool and EDW based screening identified 54 (22%) and 53 (21%) patients with one or more AE. Overall, 140 (56%) patients had one or more positive EDW screens (total 366 positive screens). Of the 137 AEs detected by at least one method, 86 (63%) were detected by a traditional trigger tool, 97 (71%) by EDW based screening and 46 (34%) by both methods. Of the 11 total preventable AEs, 6 (55%) were detected by traditional trigger tool, 7 (64%) by EDW based screening and 2 (18%) by both methods. Of the 43 total serious AEs, 28 (65%) were detected by traditional trigger tool, 29 (67%) by EDW based screening and 14 (33%) by both. We found relatively poor agreement between traditional trigger tool and EDW based screening with only approximately a third of all AEs detected by both methods. A combination of complementary methods is the optimal approach to detecting AEs among hospitalised patients.

  14. Nonstationarities in the occurrence rates of flood events in Portuguese watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory analysis on the variability of flood occurrence rates in 10 Portuguese watersheds is made, to ascertain if that variability is concurrent with the principle of stationarity. A peaks-over-threshold (POT sampling technique is applied to 10 long series of mean daily streamflows and to 4 long series of daily rainfall in order to sample the times of occurrence (POT time data of the peak values of those series. The kernel occurrence rate estimator, coupled with a bootstrap approach, was applied to the POT time data to obtain the time dependent estimated occurrence rate curves, λˆ(t, of floods and extreme rainfall events. The results of the analysis show that the occurrence of those events constitutes an inhomogeneous Poisson process, hence the occurrence rates are nonstationary. An attempt was made to assess whether the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO casted any influence on the occurrence rate of floods in the study area. Although further research is warranted, it was found that years with a less-than-average occurrence of floods tend to occur when the winter NAO is in the positive phase, and years with a higher occurrence of floods (more than twice the average tend to occur when the winter NAO is in the negative phase. Although the number of analyzed watersheds and their uneven spatial distribution hinders the generalization of the findings to the country scale, the authors conclude that the mathematical formulation of the flood frequency models relying on stationarity commonly employed in Portugal should be revised in order to account for possible nonstationarities in the occurrence rates of such events.

  15. The impact of rural health system reform on hospitalization rates in the Islamic Republic of Iran: an interrupted time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Joudaki, Hossein; Khodayari-Moez, Elham; Omranikhoo, Habib; Geraili, Bijan; Arab, Mohamad

    2013-12-01

    To assess the effects on hospital utilization rates of a major health system reform - a family physician programme and a social protection scheme - undertaken in rural areas of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 2005. A "tracer" province that was not a patient referral hub was selected for the collection of monthly hospitalization data over a period of about 10 years, beginning two years before the rural health system reform (the "intervention") began. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted and segmented regression analysis was used to assess the immediate and gradual effects of the intervention on hospitalization rates in an intervention group composed of rural residents and a comparison group composed of urban residents primarily. Before the intervention, the hospitalization rate in the rural population was significantly lower than in the comparison group. Although there was no significant increase or decline in hospitalization rates in the intervention or comparison group before the intervention, after the intervention a significant increase in the hospitalization rate - of 4.6 hospitalizations per 100 000 insured persons per month on average - was noted in the intervention group (P < 0.001). The monthly increase in the hospitalization rate continued for over a year and stabilized thereafter. No increase in the hospitalization rate was observed in the comparison group. The primary health-care programme instituted as part of the health system reform process has increased access to hospital care in a population that formerly underutilized hospital services. It has not reduced hospitalizations or hospitalization-related expenditure.

  16. Fluctuations in Wikipedia access-rate and edit-event data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Mirko; Tismer, Sebastian; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Muchnik, Lev

    2012-12-01

    Internet-based social networks often reflect extreme events in nature and society by drastic increases in user activity. We study and compare the dynamics of the two major complex processes necessary for information spread via the online encyclopedia ‘Wikipedia’, i.e., article editing (information upload) and article access (information viewing) based on article edit-event time series and (hourly) user access-rate time series for all articles. Daily and weekly activity patterns occur in addition to fluctuations and bursting activity. The bursts (i.e., significant increases in activity for an extended period of time) are characterized by a power-law distribution of durations of increases and decreases. For describing the recurrence and clustering of bursts we investigate the statistics of the return intervals between them. We find stretched exponential distributions of return intervals in access-rate time series, while edit-event time series yield simple exponential distributions. To characterize the fluctuation behavior we apply detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), finding that most article access-rate time series are characterized by strong long-term correlations with fluctuation exponents α≈0.9. The results indicate significant differences in the dynamics of information upload and access and help in understanding the complex process of collecting, processing, validating, and distributing information in self-organized social networks.

  17. Evaluation of Survival Rate and Effective Factors in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients in Emam Hospital (Year 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Maghsoodloo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the time being we have considered that the myocardial infarction is an increasing event in Islamic Republic of Iran and there are many procedures and methods which can help us to diminish the number of death from this ongoing event. The main aim of this research is to determine the survival rate in those patients who have had acute myocardial infarction and the association of it with different variables. Methods and Materials: The present research is a descriptive case-series study which evaluates the 100 cases of acute myocardial infarction who had been admitted in Tehran Emam Khomeini Hospital during the year 1999. Results: The mean age of patients was 57 years. The peak of attack rates was in spring and autumn. Investigating of the past history of these patients reviled that 41 percent had been smokers, 63.5 percent have had the history of previous ischemic heart disease, 41 percent have had hyper cholestrolemia, 34 percent had hypertension, 18 percent had diabetes mellitus, 9 percent had mitral rigurgitation and 9 percent had heart block. The Survival rate in our study has been calculated 68 percent in first 28 days of disease. Conclusion: In our study we concluded that there is significant correlation between survival rate and past history of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, tobacco smoking and clip classification.

  18. Developing models for the prediction of hospital healthcare waste generation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfahun, Esubalew; Kumie, Abera; Beyene, Abebe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the number of health institutions, along with frequent use of disposable medical products, has contributed to the increase of healthcare waste generation rate. For proper handling of healthcare waste, it is crucial to predict the amount of waste generation beforehand. Predictive models can help to optimise healthcare waste management systems, set guidelines and evaluate the prevailing strategies for healthcare waste handling and disposal. However, there is no mathematical model developed for Ethiopian hospitals to predict healthcare waste generation rate. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop models for the prediction of a healthcare waste generation rate. A longitudinal study design was used to generate long-term data on solid healthcare waste composition, generation rate and develop predictive models. The results revealed that the healthcare waste generation rate has a strong linear correlation with the number of inpatients (R(2) = 0.965), and a weak one with the number of outpatients (R(2) = 0.424). Statistical analysis was carried out to develop models for the prediction of the quantity of waste generated at each hospital (public, teaching and private). In these models, the number of inpatients and outpatients were revealed to be significant factors on the quantity of waste generated. The influence of the number of inpatients and outpatients treated varies at different hospitals. Therefore, different models were developed based on the types of hospitals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Interventions for Reducing Hospital Readmission Rates: The Role of Hospice and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlin, Emily J; Brewster, Amanda L; Curry, Leslie A; Canavan, Maureen E; Hurzeler, Rosemary; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2017-09-01

    Despite evidence that enrollment with hospice services has the potential to reduce hospital readmission rates, previous research has not examined exactly how hospitals may promote the appropriate use of hospice and palliative care for their discharged patients. Therefore, we sought to explore the strategies used by hospitals to increase the use of hospice and palliative care for patients at risk of readmission. We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data from a study of hospitals that were participating in the State Action on Avoidable Readmissions (STAAR) initiative, a quality improvement collaborative. We used data attained from 46 in-depth interviews conducted during 10 hospital site visits using a standard discussion guide and protocol. We used a grounded theory approach using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent and unifying themes. We found that a positive effect for hospitals participating in the STAAR initiative was enhanced engagement in efforts to promote greater use of hospice and palliative care as a possible method of reducing unplanned readmissions, the central goal of the STAAR initiative. Hospital staff described strategies to increase the use of hospice and palliative care that included (1) designing and implementing tracking systems to identify patients most at risk of being readmitted, (2) providing education about hospice and palliative care to family, internal and external clinical groups, and (3) establishing closer links to posthospital settings. National efforts to reduce rehospitalizations may result in improved integration of hospice and palliative care for patients who are at risk of readmission.

  20. Hospital Characteristics Affect Consent and Conversion Rates for Potential Organ Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jawad T; Ebadat, Aileen; Martins, Danilo; Ali, Sadia; Horton, Shannon; Coopwood, Thomas B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2017-04-01

    Consent and conversion rates of potential organ donors in the United States need to be maximized to match the number of individuals awaiting organ donation. Studies to date have not focused on characteristics of centers with better outcomes. We performed an 8-year (2006-2014) retrospective study of our local organ procurement organization database. We categorized hospitals in our region as academic centers versus nonacademic centers, trauma centers versus nontrauma centers, and large (≥400 beds) centers versus small (organ donors. There were 22,732 referrals to our organ procurement organization that resulted in 1,057 eligible deaths. When comparing academic to nonacademic hospitals, academic hospitals had higher consent (71% vs 59%, P organ donors. Small (types of hospitals.

  1. Influenza immunisation of doctors at an Australian tertiary hospital: immunisation rate and factors contributing to uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jonathan; Davis, Joshua; Krause, Vicki

    2008-12-01

    Immunisation of health care workers against influenza reduces influenza-related morbidity and mortality of hospital inpatients and staff absenteeism. Uptake of influenza vaccination amongst hospital doctors is generally inadequate, and factors contributing to influenza vaccine uptake among doctors have not been well defined. We performed an audit of doctors at an Australian hospital to establish the rate of and the factors contributing to influenza immunisation uptake. The audit was conducted by delivering a survey to doctors for self-completion at major departmental meetings. Of 243 doctors employed at the hospital, 150 completed the survey (response rate 62%), of whom only 28% received influenza immunisation in 2007 and 44% in any prior year. Doctors immunised in 2007 were of an older age (39.1 vs. 34.7 years, P = 0.01) and level of seniority (odds ratio for consultant vs. more junior staff = 2.9, P = 0.02) than those not immunised. Doctors who had ever been immunised had a better knowledge about influenza than those never immunised (odds ratio for high knowledge score 4.2, P vaccine. Immunisation rates among doctors in this study are inadequate. A perceived lack of convenience of the immunisation service and poor knowledge about influenza vaccination are the major contributing factors. Efforts to improve influenza immunisation uptake amongst hospital doctors should focus on education, and on innovative strategies to make immunisation more convenient and accessible specifically for doctors.

  2. Haemovigilance in a general university hospital: need for a more comprehensive classification and a codification of transfusion-related events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, M A; Schneider, P; Vu, D-H; Tissot, J-D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the transfusion-related events recorded in a general university hospital. The method we used was retrospective analysis of the data collected between 1999 and 2003. The incidence of transfusion reactions (n = 394) was 4.19 per 1000 blood products distributed: 59% (n = 231) were febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions; 22% (n = 88) were caused by allergy; 5% (n = 21) were caused by bacterial infection; and 14% (n = 54) were classified as other reactions. Platelet concentrates gave rise to a significantly greater number of reactions than erythrocyte concentrates and fresh-frozen plasma. Transfusion errors and near-miss events were also observed and were analysed separately. A series of transfusion-related events, such as haemosiderosis, metabolic disturbances or volume overload, were not reported. Our experience prompts us to propose a more comprehensive classification and codification of transfusion-related events.

  3. Association between the rate of the morning surge in blood pressure and cardiovascular events and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Wang, Yan-li; Wu, Ying-biao; Xu, Yao; Head, Geoffrey A; Barry, Macgrathy; Liang, Yu-lu

    2013-02-01

    The exaggerated surge in morning blood pressure (BP) that many patients experience upon awakening may be closely related to target organ damage and may be a predictor of cardiovascular complications. However, no previous studies have evaluated the rate of this surge independently of the evening period. It remains unclear whether the rate of increase experienced during the surge is a significant or independent determinant of cardiovascular events. We randomly selected 340 ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) patients. All subjects without type 2 diabetes mellitus were divided into two groups: hypertensive group (n = 170) and normotensive group (n = 170). We analyzed ambulatory blood pressure recordings using a double logistic curve-fitting procedure to determine whether the magnitude of the surge in BP and heart rate (HR) in the morning is related to the level of BP in hypertensive individuals. We evaluated the association between the rate of the morning surge in systolic BP (SBP) and the incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Comparisons between hypertensive and normotensive subjects showed that the rates of the morning surges in SBP, mean BP (MBP), and diastolic BP (DBP) were greater in the hypertensive group (P surge in BP was found to be correlated with the daytime SBP (r = 0.236, P surge in SBP was closely correlated with daytime SBP (r = 0.463, P surge in SBP was an independent determinant of myocardial infarction (OR = 1.266, 95% CI = 1.153 - 1.389, P surge in BP is greater in hypertensive subjects than in normotensive subjects. Daytime SBP may be the best predictor of the rate of morning surge in SBP. The rate of the morning surge in BP is associated with cardiovascular and stroke events.

  4. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  5. Hospitalization Rates for Patients on Assisted Peritoneal Dialysis Compared with In-Center Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaishi, Ahmed A.; Dixon, Stephanie N.; Perl, Jeffrey; Jain, Arsh K.; Lavoie, Susan D.; Nash, Danielle M.; Paterson, J. Michael; Lok, Charmaine E.; Quinn, Robert R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Assisted peritoneal dialysis is a treatment option for individuals with barriers to self-care who wish to receive home dialysis, but previous research suggests that this treatment modality is associated with a higher rate of hospitalization. The objective of our study was to determine whether assisted peritoneal dialysis has a different rate of hospital days compared to in-center hemodialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted a multicenter, retrospective cohort study by linking a quality assurance dataset to administrative health data in Ontario, Canada. Subjects were accrued between January 1, 2004 and July 9, 2013. Individuals were grouped into assisted peritoneal dialysis (family or home care assisted) or in-center hemodialysis on the basis of their first outpatient dialysis modality. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using a propensity score was used to create a sample in which the baseline covariates were well balanced. Results The study included 872 patients in the in–center hemodialysis group and 203 patients in the assisted peritoneal dialysis group. Using an intention to treat approach, patients on assisted peritoneal dialysis had a similar hospitalization rate of 11.1 d/yr (95% confidence interval, 9.4 to 13.0) compared with 12.9 d/yr (95% confidence interval, 10.3 to 16.1) in the hemodialysis group (P=0.19). Patients on assisted peritoneal dialysis were more likely to be hospitalized for dialysis-related reasons (admitted for 2.4 d/yr [95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 3.2] compared with 1.6 d/yr [95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 2.3] in the hemodialysis group; P=0.04). This difference was partly explained by more hospital days because of peritonitis. Modality switching was associated with high rates of hospital days per year. Conclusions Assisted peritoneal dialysis was associated with similar rates of all-cause hospitalization compared with in-center hemodialysis. Patients on assisted

  6. Impact of a COPD comprehensive case management program on hospital length of stay and readmission rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alshabanat A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdulmajeed Alshabanat,1 Michael C Otterstatter,2,3 Don D Sin,4,5 Jeremy Road,5,6 Carmen Rempel,6 Jane Burns,6 Stephan F van Eeden,4,5 JM FitzGerald5–7 On behalf of the COPD Transition Team Program 1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of British Columbia, 2British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 3School of Population and Public Health, 4Department of Medicine, Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St Paul’s Hospital, 5Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, University of British Columbia, 7Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada Background: COPD accounts for the highest rate of hospital admissions among major chronic diseases. COPD hospitalizations are associated with impaired quality of life, high health care utilization, and poor prognosis and result in an economic and a social burden that is both substantial and increasing.Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of a comprehensive case management program (CCMP in reducing length of stay (LOS and risk of hospital admissions and readmissions in patients with COPD.Materials and methodology: We retrospectively compared outcomes across five large hospitals in Vancouver, BC, Canada, following the implementation of a systems approach to the management of COPD patients who were identified in the hospital and followed up in the community for 90 days. We compared numbers, rates, and intervals of readmission and LOS during 2 years of active program delivery compared to 1 year prior to program implementation.Results: A total of 1,564 patients with a clinical diagnosis of COPD were identified from 2,719 hospital admissions during the 3 years of study. The disease management program reduced COPD-related hospitalizations by 30% and hospitalizations for all causes by 13.6%. Similarly, the rate of readmission for all

  7. Increasing the labour epidural rate in a state hospital in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A 2012 audit on labour epidural analgesia rates in Tygerberg Hospital (TBH) revealed that only 2.2% of labouring parturients received epidural analgesia. This unacceptably low number necessitated a dedicated epidural service that was subsequently initiated in June 2014 by the Department of ...

  8. Pattern and Mortality Rate of traumatic Injuries in a Tertiary Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to compare the pattern of injuries and mortality rates in our hospital. Methods: Demographic and clinical data of patients that sustained injuries due to trauma to all regions of the body were included in the ...

  9. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; van der Wal, G.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background. Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to

  10. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background: Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to

  11. Adverse drug events among children presenting to a hospital emergency department in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Khokan C; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Macdonald, Don; Barrett, Brendan; Collins, Kayla D; Gadag, Veeresh

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine epidemiologic characteristics of Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) among children and adolescents presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada. This study was conducted in three phases and included an ED chart review of visits to the Janeway Hospital in St. John's, NL, between 27th April 2006 and 26th April 2007. The first phase narrowed the sampling frame by excluding visits highly unlikely to be drug-related. In the second phase, a random sample of ED charts was selected for review by two research nurses using a Trigger Assessment Tool that classified ED visits according to their likelihood of being drug related ('high', 'moderate', 'low', 'very low', or 'no' probability). The third phase included a full chart review of all 'high', 'moderate', 'low', and 'very low' probability ADE charts, carried out independently by two ED pediatricians and two clinical pharmacists. Each ADE was also scored for severity and preventability, and consensus was reached among all four reviewers during meetings held at the end of this phase. In this study, 69 patients presented to the ED either due to an ADE or a possible ADE (PADE). After a sample-weight adjustment, the prevalence of ADEs/PADEs was found to be 2.1%. The number of co-morbidities was inversely associated with medication-related visits. There was no significant difference found between patients with and without medication related visits with respect to mean age of the patient and the mean number of current medications being taken. Of the 69 confirmed ADE/PADEs, none were fatal, six (8.7%) were serious/life-threatening, and 63 (91.3%) were considered significant. Antimicrobial agents (45.0%) were the most common drug classes associated with ADEs/PADEs. Approximately 20% of the 69 ADEs/PADEs identified were considered preventable. In St. John's NL, emergency department visits as a result of ADEs are common among the pediatric population and in many

  12. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Design Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Setting Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Participants Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Main outcome measures Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Results Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80nurses is associated with an 11% increase in the odds of death. In our hospital sample, there were an average of six caregivers for every 25 patients, four of whom were professional nurses. Substituting one nurse assistant for a professional nurse for every 25 patients is associated with a 21% increase in the odds of dying. Conclusions A bedside care workforce with a greater proportion of professional nurses is associated with better outcomes for patients and nurses. Reducing nursing skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. PMID:28626086

  13. Single event upset rate estimates for a 16-K CMOS SRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J. S.; Koga, R.; Kolasinski, W. A.

    1985-12-01

    A radiation-hardened 16-K CMOS SRAM has been developed for satellite and deep space applications. The RAM memory cell was modeled to predict the critical charge, necessary for single-particle upset, as a function of temperature, total dose, and hardening feedback resistance. Laboratory measurements of the single event cross section and effective funnel length were made using the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron to generate high energy krypton ions. The combination of modeled and measured parameters permitted estimation of the upset rate for the ramcell, and the mean-time-to-failure for a 512-K word, 22-bit memory system employing error detection and correction circuits while functioning in the Adam's '90 percent worst case' cosmic ray environment. This paper is presented in the form of a tutorial review, summarizing the results of substantial research efforts within the single event community.

  14. Inverse correlation between level of professional education and rate of handwashing compliance in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Joan M; Hensley, Sandra; Khuder, Sadik; Papadimos, Thomas J; Jacobs, Lloyd

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate educational level as a contributing factor in handwashing compliance. Observation of hand washing opportunities was performed for approximately 12 weeks before an announced Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) visit and for approximately 10 weeks after the visit. Trained observers recorded the date, time, and location of the observation; the type of healthcare worker or hospital employee observed; and the type of hand hygiene opportunity observed. University of Toledo Medical Center, a 319-bed teaching hospital. A total of 2,373 observations were performed. The rate of hand washing compliance among nurses was 91.3% overall. Medical attending physicians had the lowest observed rate of compliance (72.4%; Psurgical intensive care unit was more than 90%, greater than that in other hospital units (P = .001). Statistically, the compliance rate was better during the first part of the week (Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday) than during the latter part of the week (Thursday and Friday) (P = .002), and the compliance rate was better during the 3 PM-11 PM shift, compared with the 7 AM-3 PM shift (P<.001). When evaluated by logistic regression analysis, non-physician healthcare worker status and observation after the JCAHO accreditation visit were associated with an increased rate of hand hygiene compliance. An inverse correlation existed between the level of professional educational and the rate of compliance. Future research initiatives may need to address the different motivating factors for hand hygiene among nurses and physicians to increase compliance.

  15. Evaluation of Distributive Frequency of Oral Contraceptive Pills Consumption in Women with Cerebrovascular Events Admitted in Farshchian Hospital of Hamadan between 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdokht Mazdeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Although there is no prolonged time elapsed from propagation of oral contraceptive pills (OCP, case reports demonstrated occurrence of pulmonary embolism and cerebral infarction in women using these pills. Present study was done to specify distributive frequency of oral contraceptive pills consumption in women with cerebrovascular events admitted in Farshchian hospital of Hamadan between 1997 to 2007. Materials & Methods: Every woman with cerebrovascular events during years 1997-2007 who was admitted in Farshchian hospital of Hamadan and her dossier was present in archive of hospital, were carefully checked and those who hadn’t exclusion criteria, were include in this study, a total of 1587 of them with respect to their Characteristics such as type of cerebrovascular event, age, type of oral contraceptive pill and duration of pill use were extracted from patient dossier and registered in respective checklist. Results: 24.1% of patient used oral contraceptive pill and 76.9% of patients were non users. Mean age of OCP users and non users were 45 years. Mean duration of pill use among these patients was 33 months. In assessing type of vascular events, in the group OCP users 73.1% and non users 66.4% had ischemic stroke.Which was statistically significant. In the group OCP users 24.6% and non users 29.1% were hemorrhagic stroke.. Also in the group OCP users 2.3% and non users 4.5% were affected sagital sinuses thrombosis that showed no significant difference. Among OCP users 85% of the patients used OCP, LD and 15% of the patients OCP, HD. Conclusion: The present study showed, the ischemic stroke rate of the patients with OCP consumption were significantly more than those of non users.

  16. Work stress and patient safety: observer-rated work stressors as predictors of characteristics of safety-related events reported by young nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, A; Semmer, N K; Grebner, S

    This study investigates the link between workplace stress and the 'non-singularity' of patient safety-related incidents in the hospital setting. Over a period of 2 working weeks 23 young nurses from 19 hospitals in Switzerland documented 314 daily stressful events using a self-observation method (pocket diaries); 62 events were related to patient safety. Familiarity of safety-related events and probability of recurrence, as indicators of non-singularity, were the dependent variables in multilevel regression analyses. Predictor variables were both situational (self-reported situational control, safety compliance) and chronic variables (job stressors such as time pressure, or concentration demands and job control). Chronic work characteristics were rated by trained observers. The most frequent safety-related stressful events included incomplete or incorrect documentation (40.3%), medication errors (near misses 21%), delays in delivery of patient care (9.7%), and violent patients (9.7%). Familiarity of events and probability of recurrence were significantly predicted by chronic job stressors and low job control in multilevel regression analyses. Job stressors and low job control were shown to be risk factors for patient safety. The results suggest that job redesign to enhance job control and decrease job stressors may be an important intervention to increase patient safety.

  17. Fatality rates in published reports of RSV hospitalizations among high-risk and otherwise healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welliver, Robert C; Checchia, Paul A; Bauman, Jay H; Fernandes, Ancilla W; Mahadevia, Parthiv J; Hall, Caroline B

    2010-09-01

    To review the fatalities among children hospitalized with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, and identify factors leading to a fatal outcome. Review of literature identified from a structured search of PubMed (1966-2009) using the following Medical Subject Headings: respiratory syncytial virus infection; hospitalized; infants; and risk factors. Publications were restricted to: English language; full papers; inclusion of > or =10 subjects; children aged infection; and deaths reported. Case fatality rates were defined as number of deaths divided by number of children hospitalized for RSV and were calculated for each study. Thirty-six studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Case fatality rates among children hospitalized for RSV ranged from 0 to 33%. In general, studies showed that subgroups of high-risk children (chronic lung disease [CLD] 3.5-23%, congenital heart disease [CHD] 2-37%, and prematurity 0-6.1%) had higher fatality rates than older or otherwise healthy children (consistently 1 year) children. Higher fatality rates were reported for infants receiving intensive unit care (1.1-8.6%), extracorporeal life support (33%) or for those who acquired nosocomial RSV infection (0-12.2%). The majority of studies did not report cause of death and clinical details of the fatal cases were often not provided. Other limitations of this review include our search limits, the possibility of inherent bias in our methodology that could result in an under or over estimation of case-fatality rates, and potential publication bias. Children at high risk for RSV (CLD, CHD and prematurity), those with severe underlying comorbidities, or those with nosocomial RSV appear to be at increased risk for death after RSV hospitalization. More data are needed on cause of death and how much is directly attributable to RSV.

  18. Characterization of an ultraviolet imaging detector with high event rate ROIC (HEROIC) readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Nicholas; France, Kevin; Harwit, Alex; Bradley, Scott; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2016-07-01

    We present characterization results from a photon counting imaging detector consisting of one microchannel plate (MCP) and an array of two readout integrated circuits (ROIC) that record photon position. The ROICs used in the position readout are the high event rate ROIC (HEROIC) devices designed to handle event rates up to 1 MHz per pixel, recently developed by the Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in collaboration with the University of Colorado. An opaque cesium iodide (CsI) photocathode sensitive in the far-ultraviolet (FUV; 122-200 nm), is deposited on the upper surface of the MCP. The detector is characterized in a chamber developed by CU Boulder that is capable of illumination with vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) monochromatic light and measurement of absolute ux with a calibrated photodiode. Testing includes investigation of the effects of adjustment of internal settings of the HEROIC devices including charge threshold, gain, and amplifier bias. The detector response to high count rates is tested. We report initial results including background, uniformity, and quantum detection efficiency (QDE) as a function of wavelength.

  19. Study of Survival Rate After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Hospitals of Kermanshah in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Afshin; Jalali, Amir; Almasi, Afshin; Naderipour, Arsalan; Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Khodadadi, Amineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: After CPR, the follow-up of survival rate and caused complications are the most important practices of the medical group. This study was performed aimed at determining the follow-up results after CPR in patients of university hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: In this prospective study, 320 samples were examined. A purposive sampling method was used, and data was collected using a researcher-made information form with content and face validity and reliability of r= 0.79. Data was analyzed with STATA9 software and statistical tests, including calculation of the success rate, relative risk (RR), chi-square and Fisher at significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The initial success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was equal to 15.3%, while the ultimate success rate (discharged alive from the hospital) was as 10.6%. The six-month success rate after resuscitation was 8.78% than those who were discharged alive. There were no significant statistical differences between different age groups regarding the initial success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.14), and the initial resuscitation success rate was higher in patients in morning shift (P = 0.02). Conclusion: By the results of study, it is recommended to increase the medical - nursing knowledge and techniques for personnel in the evening and night shifts. Also, an appropriate dissemination of health care staff in working shifts should be done to increase the success rate of CPR procedure. PMID:25560341

  20. Incidence, hospital costs and in-hospital mortality rates of surgically treated patients with traumatic cranial epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atci Ibrahim Burak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, the patients who were operated in two clinics due to traumatic cranial epidural hematoma (EDH were assessed retrospectively and the factors that increase the costs were tried to be revealed through conducting cost analyses. Methods: The patients who were operated between 2010 and 2016 with the diagnosis of EDH were assessed in terms of age, sex, trauma etiology, Glasgow coma scale (GCS at admission, the period from trauma to hospital arrival, trauma-related injury in other organs, the localization of hematoma, the size of hematoma, length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU, length of antibiotherapy administration, number of consultations conducted, total cost of in-hospital treatments of the patients and prognosis. Results: Distribution of GCS were, between 13-15 in 18 (36% patients, 9-13 in 23 (46% patients and 3-8 in 9 (18% patients. The reasons for emergency department admissions were fall from high in 29 (58% patients, assault in 11 (22% patients and motor vehicle accident in 10 (20% patients. The average cost per ICU stay was 2838 $ (range=343-20571 $. The average cost per surgical treatment was 314 $. ICU care was approximately 9 times more expensive than surgical treatment costs. The mortality rate of the study cohort was 14% (7 patients. Conclusion: The prolonged period of stay in the ICU, antibiotherapy and repeat head CTs increase the costs for patients who are surgically treated for EDH.

  1. Evaluating Whether Changes in Utilization of Hospital Outpatient Services Contributed to Lower Medicare Readmission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Geoffrey; Yemane, Alshadye; Apostle, Keri; Oelschlaeger, Allison; Rollins, Eric; Brennan, Niall

    2014-01-01

    Objective Descriptive analysis comparing changes in hospital inpatient readmissions to emergency department visits and observation stays that occurred within 30 days of an inpatient stay. Population Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries that had at least one acute hospital inpatient stay. Data Source Using 100 percent of claims in the Chronic Condition Data Warehouse, we compare growth in annual readmission stays to post-hospitalization emergency department visits and observation stays that were not accompanied by an inpatient stay. Comparisons are performed at the national level and within the Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions (HRRs) Results In calendar year 2012, the national, all-cause, 30-day hospital readmission rate among Medicare FFS beneficiaries was 18.5 percent, a significant decline from 19 percent in 2011, which was also the average rate over the previous five years. The number of index admission stays per-1,000 Medicare beneficiaries declined by 4.3 percent, from 283.4 in 2011 to 271.3 in 2012. On a per-1,000 beneficiary basis, the number of readmission stays declined by 6.8 percent, from 53.8 in 2011 to 50.1 in 2012. On the same per-beneficiary basis, the rate of outpatient visits to an emergency department occurring within 30 days of an index hospitalization remained similar at 23.5 in 2011 and 23.4 in 2012. Per-1,000 beneficiaries, the number of observation stays within 30 days of an index hospitalization increased by 0.3 percent, from 3.4 in 2011 to 3.7 in 2012. Discussion The reasons behind the decline in the Medicare readmission rate in 2012 are not yet clear. When looking at utilization changes in absolute terms, our findings suggest that the reduction in the nation-wide readmission rate observed in 2012 was not primarily the result of increases in either post-index ED visits or post-index observation stays. PMID:25009762

  2. Specific activity types at the time of event and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a nationwide observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sang Hoon; Shin, Sang Do; Ro, Young Sun; Lee, Eui Jung; Song, Kyoung Jun; Park, Chang Bae; Kim, Joo Yeong

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to describe the characteristics of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) according to specific activity types at the time of event and to determine the association between activities and outcomes according to activity type at the time of event occurrence of OHCA. A nationwide OHCA cohort database, compiled from January 2008 to December 2010 and consisting of hospital chart reviews and ambulance run sheet data, was used. Activity group was categorized as one of the following types: paid work activity (PWA), sports/leisure/education (SLE), routine life (RL), moving activity (MA), medical care (MC), other specific activity (OSA), and unknown activity. The main outcome was survival to discharge. Multivariate logistic analysis for outcomes was used adjusted for potential risk factors (reference = RL group). Of the 72,256 OHCAs, 44,537 cases were finally analyzed. The activities were RL (63.7%), PWA (3.1%), SLE (2.7%), MA (2.0%), MC (4.3%), OSA (2.2%), and unknown (21.9%). Survival to discharge rate for total patients was 3.5%. For survival to discharge, the adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.42 (1.06-1.90) in the SLE group and 1.62 (1.22-2.15) in PWA group compared with RL group. In conclusion, the SLE and PWA groups show higher survival to discharge rates than the routine life activity group.

  3. Test and analysis of hadronic interaction models with KASCADE event rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risse, M. E-mail: risse@ik1.fzk.de; Antoni, T.; Apel, W.D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bernloehr, K.; Bluemer, H.; Bollmann, E.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Buettner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engler, J.; Fessler, F.; Gils, H.J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haeusler, R.; Hafemann, W.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hoerandel, J.R.; Holst, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kempa, J.; Klages, H.O.; Knapp, J.; Martello, D.; Mathes, H.J.; Matussek, P.; Mayer, H.J.; Milke, J.; Muehlenberg, D.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; Vardanyan, A.; Vulpescu, B.; Weber, J.H.; Wentz, J.; Wiegert, T.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.; Zagromski, S

    2001-04-01

    Based on the KASCADE multi-detector system with its large hadron calorimeter and using the CORSIKA simulation program with the implemented high-energy hadronic interaction models QGSJET, VENUS, DPMJET, SIBYLL, and HDPM, a method for the test of models by comparing event rates is described. Preliminary results show differences of the model predictions both among each other and when confronted with measurements. The rates are strongly influenced by the inelastic cross sections and the elasticity, especially by the contribution of diffractive dissociation. The discrepancy to measurements at primary energies below {approx_equal} 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} eV can be reduced by increasing the non-diffractive inelastic cross section.

  4. Association between Search Behaviors and Disease Prevalence Rates at 18 U.S. Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dennis; Wolbrink, Traci; Logvinenko, Tanya; Harper, Marvin; Burns, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Background Usage of online resources by clinicians in training and practice can provide insight into knowledge gaps and inform development of decision support tools. Although online information seeking is often driven by encountered patient problems, the relationship between disease prevalence and search rate has not been previously characterized. Objective This article aimed to (1) identify topics frequently searched by pediatric clinicians using UpToDate (http://www.uptodate.com) and (2) explore the association between disease prevalence rate and search rate using data from the Pediatric Health Information System. Methods We identified the most common search queries and resources most frequently accessed on UpToDate for a cohort of 18 children's hospitals during calendar year 2012. We selected 64 of the most frequently searched diseases and matched ICD-9 data from the PHIS database during the same time period. Using linear regression, we explored the relationship between clinician query rate and disease prevalence rate. Results The hospital cohort submitted 1,228,138 search queries across 592,454 sessions. The majority of search sessions focused on a single search topic. We identified no consistent overall association between disease prevalence and search rates. Diseases where search rate was substantially higher than prevalence rate were often infectious or immune/rheumatologic conditions, involved potentially complex diagnosis or management, and carried risk of significant morbidity or mortality. None of the examined diseases showed a decrease in search rate associated with increased disease prevalence rates. Conclusion This is one of the first medical learning needs assessments to use large-scale, multisite data to identify topics of interest to pediatric clinicians, and to examine the relationship between disease prevalence and search rate for a set of pediatric diseases. Overall, disease search rate did not appear to be associated with hospital

  5. Family medicine and hospital specialty match rates: does the economy have anything to do with it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueston, William J; Bradford, W David; Shepard, Todd M

    2004-04-01

    This study explored whether certain economic markers are associated with changes in the selection of primary care as a career. Using linear regression models, we examined whether economic factors in the United States could be used to predict the variability in US senior match rates in family medicine and three hospital-based specialties between 1978 and 2000. A linear regression model using several economic indicators showed that public and private expenditures were associated with the US senior match rates in family medicine, anesthesia, and radiology. As private expenditures increased, the match rate for family medicine fell while the match rates for anesthesia and radiology increased. Increases in public expenditures were associated with increased family medicine match rates and declining match rates for the other two specialties. Increases in private spending resulted in average increases of 0.92% and 2.38% in the anesthesia and radiology match, respectively, with a drop in family medicine match rates of 1.36%. We found that for every 1% increase in public expenditures for health, family medicine match rates rise on average 1.39%, while anesthesia rates fall by 0.84% and radiology rates drop 2.16%. The amount of public and private funding for health care is associated with US senior match rates in family medicine, anesthesia, and radiology. Changes in these funding sources may predict future student specialty choice and could be used to plan residency match rates in disciplines such as family medicine.

  6. Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas; Griffiths, Peter; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Bruyneel, Luk; McHugh, Matthew; Maier, Claudia B; Moreno-Casbas, Teresa; Ball, Jane E; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Sermeus, Walter

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of their care and indicators of quality of care. Cross-sectional patient discharge data, hospital characteristics and nurse and patient survey data were merged and analysed using generalised estimating equations (GEE) and logistic regression models. Adult acute care hospitals in Belgium, England, Finland, Ireland, Spain and Switzerland. Survey data were collected from 13 077 nurses in 243 hospitals, and 18 828 patients in 182 of the same hospitals in the six countries. Discharge data were obtained for 275 519 surgical patients in 188 of these hospitals. Patient mortality, patient ratings of care, care quality, patient safety, adverse events and nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Richer nurse skill mix (eg, every 10-point increase in the percentage of professional nurses among all nursing personnel) was associated with lower odds of mortality (OR=0.89), lower odds of low hospital ratings from patients (OR=0.90) and lower odds of reports of poor quality (OR=0.89), poor safety grades (OR=0.85) and other poor outcomes (0.80skill mix by adding nursing associates and other categories of assistive nursing personnel without professional nurse qualifications may contribute to preventable deaths, erode quality and safety of hospital care and contribute to hospital nurse shortages. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Geothermal induced seismicity: What links source mechanics and event magnitudes to faulting regime and injection rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garzon, Patricia; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Bohnhoff, Marco; Dresen, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Improving estimates of seismic hazard associated to reservoir stimulation requires advanced understanding of the physical processes governing induced seismicity, which can be better achieved by carefully processing large datasets. To this end, we investigate source-type processes (shear/tensile/compaction) and rupture geometries with respect to the local stress field using seismicity from The Geysers (TG) and Salton Sea geothermal reservoirs, California. Analysis of 869 well-constrained full moment tensors (MW 0.8-3.5) at TG reveals significant non-double-couple (NDC) components (>25%) for 65% of the events and remarkably diversity in the faulting mechanisms. Volumetric deformation is clearly governed by injection rates with larger NDC components observed near injection wells and during high injection periods. The overall volumetric deformation from the moment tensors increases with time, possibly reflecting a reservoir pore pressure increase after several years of fluid injection with no significant production nearby. The obtained source mechanisms and fault orientations are magnitude-dependent and vary significantly between faulting regimes. Normal faulting events (MW dilatancy, and they occur on varying fault orientations. In contrast, strike-slip events dominantly reveal a double-couple source, larger magnitudes (MW > 2) and mostly occur on optimally oriented faults with respect to the local stress field. NDC components indicating closure of cracks and pore spaces in the source region are found for reverse faulting events with MW > 2.5. Our findings from TG are generally consistent with preliminary source-type results from a reduced subset of well-recorded seismicity at the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir. Combined results imply that source processes and magnitudes of geothermal-induced seismicity are strongly affected by and systematically related to the hydraulic operations and the local stress state.

  8. Improved meal presentation increases food intake and decreases readmission rate in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Daniela Abigail; Boaz, Mona; Krause, Ilan; Elis, Avishay; Chernov, Karina; Giabra, Mursi; Levy, Miriam; Giboreau, Agnes; Kosak, Sigrid; Mouhieddine, Mohamed; Singer, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Reduced food intake is a frequent problem at a hospital setting, being a cause and/or consequence of malnutrition. Food presentation can affect food intake and induce nutritional benefit. To investigate the effect of improved meal presentation supported by gastronomy expertise on the food intake in adults hospitalized in internal medicine departments. Controlled before and after study. Two hundred and six newly hospitalized patients in internal medicine departments were included and divided in two groups, a) control: receiving the standard lunch from the hospital and b) experimental: receiving a lunch improved in terms of presentation by the advices received by the Institut Paul Bocuse, Ecully, Lyon, France together with the hospital kitchen of the Beilinson Hospital, without change in the composition of the meal. The amount of food left at the participants' plates was estimated using the Digital Imaging Method, which consisted in photographing the plates immediately to previous tray collection by the researcher. In addition, the nutritionDay questionnaire was used to measure other variables concerned to their food intake during hospitalization. Charlson Comorbidity Index was calculated. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding demography or Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients who received the meal with the improved presentation showed significantly higher food intake than those who received the standard meal, despite reported loss in appetite. Participants from the experimental group left on their plate less starch (0.19 ± 0.30 vs. 0.52 + 0.41) (p  0.05). Both of the groups were asked how hungry they were before the meal and no significance was shown. More participants from the experimental group reported their meal to be tasty in comparison to those in the control group (49.5% vs. 33.7% p < 0.005). Length of stay was not different but readmission rate decreased significantly in the study group (p < 0.02) from 31.2% to 13

  9. The 2007 Stromboli eruption: Event chronology and effusion rates using thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvari, S.; Lodato, L.; Steffke, A.; Cristaldi, A.; Harris, A. J. L.; Spampinato, L.; Boschi, E.

    2010-04-01

    Using thermal infrared images recorded by a permanent thermal camera network maintained on Stromboli volcano (Italy), together with satellite and helicopter-based thermal image surveys, we have compiled a chronology of the events and processes occurring before and during Stromboli's 2007 effusive eruption. These digital data also allow us to calculate the effusion rates and lava volumes erupted during the effusive episode. At the onset of the 2007 eruption, two parallel eruptive fissures developed within the northeast crater, eventually breaching the NE flank of the summit cone and extending along the eastern margin of the Sciara del Fuoco. These fed a main effusive vent at 400 m above sea level to feed lava flows that extended to the sea. The effusive eruption was punctuated, on 15 March, by a paroxysm with features similar to those of the 5 April paroxysm that occurred during the 2002-2003 effusive eruption. A total of between 3.2 × 106 and 11 × 106 m3 of lava was erupted during the 2007 eruption, over 34 days of effusive activity. More than half of this volume was emplaced during the first 5.5 days of the eruption. Although the 2007 effusive eruption had an erupted volume comparable to that of the previous (2002-2003) effusive eruption, it had a shorter duration and thus a mean output rate (=total volume divided by eruption duration) that was 1 order of magnitude higher than that of the 2002-2003 event (˜2.4 versus 0.32 ± 0.28 m3 s-1). In this paper, we discuss similarities and differences between these two effusive events and interpret the processes occurring in 2007 in terms of the recent dynamics witnessed at Stromboli.

  10. Childhood malaria admission rates to four hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emelda A Okiro

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions.Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection.In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend P<0.05. At these hospitals clinical malaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from <6% across all sites in 2000 to maximum of 33% at one hospital site by 2010. Additionally, malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000-2010 across all sites.Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may become evident within a

  11. Associations of Physician Empathy with Patient Anxiety and Ratings of Communication in Hospital Admission Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Rachel; Vittinghoff, Eric; Fang, Margaret C; Cimino, Jenica E W; Chasteen, Kristen Adams; Arnold, Robert M; Auerbach, Andrew D; Anderson, Wendy G

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between the frequency of empathic physician responses with patient anxiety, ratings of communication, and encounter length during hospital admission encounters. Analysis of coded audio-recorded hospital admission encounters and pre- and postencounter patient survey data. Two academic hospitals. Seventy-six patients admitted by 27 attending hospitalist physicians. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed by trained coders, who counted the number of empathic, neutral, and nonempathic verbal responses by hospitalists to their patients' expressions of negative emotion. We developed multivariable linear regression models to test the association between the number of these responses and the change in patients' State Anxiety Scale (STAI-S) score pre- and postencounter and encounter length. We used Poisson regression models to examine the association between empathic response frequency and patient ratings of the encounter. Each additional empathic response from a physician was associated with a 1.65-point decline in the STAI-S anxiety scale (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-2.82). Frequency of empathic responses was associated with improved patient ratings for covering points of interest, feeling listened to and cared about, and trusting the doctor. The number of empathic responses was not associated with encounter length (percent change in encounter length per response 1%; 95% CI, -8%-10%). Responding empathically when patients express negative emotion was associated with less patient anxiety and higher ratings of communication but not longer encounter length.

  12. Milk Flow Rates From Bottle Nipples Used for Feeding Infants Who Are Hospitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M.; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W. Brant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study tested the milk flow rates and variability in flow of currently available nipples used for bottle-feeding infants who are hospitalized. Method Clinicians in 3 countries were surveyed regarding nipples available to them for feeding infants who are hospitalized. Twenty-nine nipple types were identified, and 10 nipples of each type were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in 1 min using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation were used to compare nipples within brand and within category (i.e., Slow, Standard, Premature). Results Flow rates varied widely between nipples, ranging from 2.10 mL/min for the Enfamil Cross-Cut to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown's Y-Cut Standard Neck. Variability of flow rates among nipples of the same type ranged from a coefficient of variation of 0.05 for Dr. Brown's Level 1 Standard- and Wide-Neck to 0.42 for the Enfamil Cross-Cut. Mean coefficient of variation by brand ranged from 0.08 for Dr. Brown's to 0.36 for Bionix. Conclusions Milk flow is an easily manipulated variable that may contribute to the degree of physiologic instability experienced by infants who are medically fragile during oral feeding. This study provides clinicians with information to guide appropriate selection of bottle nipples for feeding infants who are hospitalized. PMID:26172340

  13. Milk Flow Rates From Bottle Nipples Used for Feeding Infants Who Are Hospitalized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pados, Britt F; Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W Brant

    2015-11-01

    This study tested the milk flow rates and variability in flow of currently available nipples used for bottle-feeding infants who are hospitalized. Clinicians in 3 countries were surveyed regarding nipples available to them for feeding infants who are hospitalized. Twenty-nine nipple types were identified, and 10 nipples of each type were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in 1 min using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation were used to compare nipples within brand and within category (i.e., Slow, Standard, Premature). Flow rates varied widely between nipples, ranging from 2.10 mL/min for the Enfamil Cross-Cut to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown's Y-Cut Standard Neck. Variability of flow rates among nipples of the same type ranged from a coefficient of variation of 0.05 for Dr. Brown's Level 1 Standard- and Wide-Neck to 0.42 for the Enfamil Cross-Cut. Mean coefficient of variation by brand ranged from 0.08 for Dr. Brown's to 0.36 for Bionix. Milk flow is an easily manipulated variable that may contribute to the degree of physiologic instability experienced by infants who are medically fragile during oral feeding. This study provides clinicians with information to guide appropriate selection of bottle nipples for feeding infants who are hospitalized.

  14. Sepsis outcomes in patients receiving statins prior to hospitalization for sepsis: comparison of in-hospital mortality rates between patients who received atorvastatin and those who received simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Daniel R; Moscoso, Erics Espinoza; Corrales, Julio Pinto; Peters, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the in-hospital mortality rates between septic patients receiving statins and those that did not prior to developing sepsis. We compared subgroups receiving atorvastatin and simvastatin because these two drugs differ in their pharmacologic properties. This study was a retrospective analysis of patients selected from an institutional data base of patients hospitalized with sepsis. The study patients were drawn from a data base of 1,961 hospitalized patients with sepsis and included patients who met selection criteria and who were studied for HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) use both prior to and during hospitalization. The in-hospital mortality rates of patients receiving statins and those that did not prior to developing sepsis were compared. In-hospital mortality rates of patient subgroups receiving atorvastatin and simvastatin were also compared. A multivariable analysis was conducted with in-hospital mortality as the outcome variable and with multiple risk factors to include atorvastatin and simvastatin use. The mortality rate for 359 patients receiving statins prior to hospitalization for sepsis was not significantly different than that for 1,302 patients who did not receive pre-hospital statins (26.5% versus 30.4%, p > 0.05). The mortality rate for 92 patients who had received atorvastatin prior to hospitalization was significantly less than that of 253 patients who received simvastatin (18.5% versus 30.0%, p = 0.032). The use of atorvastatin prior to sepsis was independently associated with lower in-hospital mortality in a multivariable analysis of sepsis risk factors (p = 0.021, OR = 0.455). Patients who received atorvastatin prior to hospitalization for sepsis and had statins continued in hospital had a very low mortality rate that was significantly less than that of those patients who never received statins (15.7% versus 30.8%, p = 0.007). Pre-hospital atorvastatin use was associated with

  15. Exploring the relationship between analgesic event rate and pain intensity in kidney stone surgery: A Repeated Time to Event Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Christrup, Lona Louring

    III-60 Rasmus Juul Exploring the relationship between analgesic event rate and pain intensity in kidney stone surgery: A Repeated Time to Event Pilot Study RV Juul(1), KV Pedersen(2, 4), LL Christrup(1), AE Olesen(1, 3), AM Drewes(3), PJS Osther(4), TM Lund(1) 1) Department of Drug Design...... a relationship with pain intensity has not yet been established. The aim of this pilot study was to discuss how best to investigate the relationship between RTTE hazard of analgesic events and pain intensity in postoperative pain. Methods: Data was available from 44 patients undergoing kidney stone surgery...

  16. Early Percutaneous Cholecystostomy in Severe Acute Cholecystitis Reduces the Complication Rate and Duration of Hospital Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Kai; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Chan, Che-Chang; Perng, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Ku; Fang, Wen-Liang; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The optimal timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy for severe acute cholecystitis is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy and its relationship to clinical outcomes in patients with inoperable acute severe cholecystitis. From 2008 to 2010, 209 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital due to acute cholecystitis and were treated by percutaneous cholecystostomy were retrospectively reviewed. The time periods from symptom onset to when percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and when patients were discharged were recorded. In the 209 patients, the median time period between symptom onset and percutaneous cholecystostomy was 23 hours (range, 3–95 hours). The early intervention group (≤24 hours, n = 109) had a significantly lower procedure-related bleeding rate (0.0% vs 5.0%, P = 0.018) and shorter hospital stay (15.8 ± 12.9 vs 21.0 ± 17.5 days) as compared with the late intervention group (>24 hours, n = 100). Delayed percutaneous cholecystostomy was a significant independent factor for a longer hospital stay (odds ratio 3.03, P = 0.001). In inoperable patients with acute severe cholecystitis, early percutaneous cholecystostomy reduced hospital stay and procedure-related bleeding without increasing the mortality rate. PMID:26166097

  17. Predicting the Incremental Hospital Cost of Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries in the Comprehensive Joint Replacement Program During Fiscal Year 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Steven D; Jevsevar, David S; McGuire, Kevin J; Shea, Kevin G; Little, Kenneth M; Schlosser, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The Medicare program's Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) payment model places hospitals at financial risk for the treatment cost of Medicare beneficiaries (MBs) undergoing lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR). This study uses Medicare Provider Analysis and Review File and identified 674,777 MBs with LEJR procedure during fiscal year 2014. Adverse events (death, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, sepsis or shock, surgical site bleeding, pulmonary embolism, mechanical complications, and periprosthetic joint infection) were studied. Multivariable regressions were modeled to estimate the incremental hospital cost of treating each adverse event. The risk-adjusted estimated hospital cost of treating adverse events varied from a high of $29,061 (MBs experiencing hip fracture and joint infection) to a low of $6308 (MBs without hip fracture that experienced pulmonary embolism). Avoidance of adverse events in the LEJR hospitalization will play an important role in managing episode hospital costs in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hospitalization and Mortality Rates in Long-Term Care Facilities: Does For-Profit Status Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanuseputro, Peter; Chalifoux, Mathieu; Bennett, Carol; Gruneir, Andrea; Bronskill, Susan E; Walker, Peter; Manuel, Douglas

    2015-10-01

    To establish if proprietary status (ie, for-profit or not-for-profit) is associated with mortality and hospitalizations among publicly funded long-term care (nursing) homes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of new admissions in 640 publicly funded long-term care facilities in Ontario, Canada (384 for-profit, 256 not-for-profit). A population-based cohort of 53,739 incident admissions into long-term care facilities between January 1, 2010, and March 1, 2012, was observed. We measured adjusted rates of hospital admissions and mortality, per 1000 person-years (PY) of follow-up, among for-profit and not-for-profit facilities at 3, 6, and 12 months postadmission. Rates were measured postadmission and until discharge or death, whichever came first. One year after admission and before discharge, 11.7% of residents died and 25.7% had at least one hospitalization. After 12 months of follow-up, residents in for-profit facilities had a hospitalization rate of 462 per 1000 PY versus 358 per 1000 PY in not-for-profit facilities. During this period, the crude mortality rate in for-profit facilities was 208 per 1000 PY versus 185 per 1000 PY in not-for-profit facilities. At 3, 6, and 1 year after admission, for-profit facilities had an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-1.43), 1.33 (95% CI 1.27-1.39), and 1.25 (95% CI 1.21-1.30) for hospitalizations and hazards of 1.20 (95% CI 1.11-1.29), 1.16 (95% CI 1.09-1.24), and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) for mortality, respectively. Publicly funded for-profit facilities have significantly higher rates of both mortality and hospital admissions. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus : An observational prospective community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoeijen, Daniel A.; Blom, Marieke T.; Bardai, Abdennasser; Souverein, Patrick C.; De Boer, Anthonius; Tan, Hanno L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major cause of death. We aimed to determine whether type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after OHCA. Methods and results An observational community-based cohort study was performed

  20. Are Facebook user ratings associated with hospital cost, quality and patient satisfaction? A cross-sectional analysis of hospitals in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauren; Li, Yue

    2018-02-01

    Hospital care costs are high while quality varies across hospitals. Patient satisfaction may be associated with better clinical quality, and social media ratings may offer another opportunity to measure patient satisfaction with care. To test if Facebook user ratings of hospitals are associated with existing measures of patient satisfaction, cost and quality. Data were obtained from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare, the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System impact files and the Area Health Resource File for 2015. Information from hospitals' Facebook pages was collected in July 2016. Multivariate linear regression was used to test if there is an association between Facebook user ratings (star rating and adjusted number of 'likes') and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient satisfaction measures, the 30-day all-cause readmission rate, and the Medicare spending per beneficiary (MSPB) ratio. One hundred and thirty-six acute care hospitals in New York State in 2015. An increase in the Facebook star rating is associated with significant increases in 21/23 HCAHPS measures (p≤0.003). An increase in the adjusted number of 'likes' is associated with very small increases in 3/23 HCAHPS measures (pFacebook user ratings are not associated with the 30-day all-cause readmission rate or the Medicare spending per beneficiary ratio. Results demonstrate an association between HCAHPS patient satisfaction measures and Facebook star ratings. Adjusted number of 'likes' may not be a useful measure of patient satisfaction. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Real-time operational feedback: daily discharge rate as a novel hospital efficiency metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hannah J; Wu, Robert C; Caesar, Michael; Abrams, Howard; Morra, Dante

    2010-12-01

    Part of delivering quality care means providing it in a timely, efficient manner. Improving the efficiency of care requires measurement. The selection of appropriate indicators that are valid and responsive is crucial to focus improvement initiatives. Indicators of operational efficiency should be conceptually simple, generated in real time, calculated using readily available hospital administrative data, sufficiently granular to reveal detail needed to focus improvement, and correlate with other valid indicators of operational efficiency. In this paper, the authors propose daily discharge rate as a novel real-time metric of hospital operational discharge efficiency and compare it with average length of stay. The authors also suggest the use of control charts as an effective way to present daily discharge rate data to clinicians and managers in real time to prompt actionable improvements in discharge efficiency. The authors conclude that daily discharge rate has the potential to drive timely improvements in the discharge process and warrants consideration and further study by others interested in improving hospital operational efficiency and the delivery of quality care.

  2. Success Rate of Trabeculectomy in Primary Glaucoma at Cicendo Eye Hospital on January–December 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erva Monica Saputro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trabeculectomy is a surgical therapy for glaucoma to preserve visual function by lowering intraocular pressure (IOP. In some studies, the success of trabeculectomy in lowering IOP is greater than medication. Success is defined by IOP <21 mmHg, with or without glaucoma medication. Primary glaucoma based on the mechanism of aquous humor outflow is divided into primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG. This study aimed to know the success rate of trabeculectomy in POAG and PACG. Methods: This study was a descriptive study conducted at Cicendo Eye Hospital using medical record of POAG and PACG patients who underwent trabeculectomy surgery on January–December 2013 with minimal one month follow-up. Data collection was conducted during September 2014. Data processed in this study were 100 eyes from 76 patients with diagnosis POAG and PACG. Results: The success rate for trabeculectomy in POAG was 79% and PACG was 86%, failure (IOP ≥ 21 mmHg 21% in POAG, and 14% in PACG for period 2013 at Cicendo Eye Hospital. Conclusions: The success rate of trabeculectomy at Cicendo Eye Hospital is good in one month, with or without glaucoma medication after surgery.

  3. Medical costs, Cesarean delivery rates, and length of stay in specialty hospitals vs. non-specialty hospitals in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ju Kim

    Full Text Available Since 2011, specialty hospitals in South Korea have been known for providing high- quality care in specific clinical areas. Much research related to specialty hospitals and their performance in many such areas has been performed, but investigations about their performance in obstetrics and gynecology are lacking. Thus, we aimed to compare specialty vs. non-specialty hospitals with respect to mode of obstetric delivery, especially the costs and length of stay related to Cesarean section (CS procedures, and to provide evidence to policy-makers for evaluating the success of hospitals that specialize in obstetric and gynecological (OBGYN care.We obtained National Health Insurance claim data from 2012 to 2014, which included information from 418,141 OBGYN cases at 214 hospitals. We used a generalized estimating equation model to identify a potential association between the likelihood of CS at specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals. We also evaluated medical costs and length of stay in specialty hospitals according to type of delivery.We found that 150,256 (35.9% total deliveries were performed by CS. The odds ratio of CS was significantly lower in specialty hospitals (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.96compared to other hospitals Medical costs (0.74% and length of stay (1% in CS cases increased in specialty hospitals, although length of stay following vaginal delivery was lower (0.57% in specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals.We determined that specialty hospitals are significantly associated with a lower likelihood of CS delivery and shorter length of stay after vaginal delivery. Although they are also associated with higher costs for delivery, the increased cost could be due to the high level of intensive care provided, which leads to improve quality of care. Policy-makers should consider incentive programs to maintain performance of specialty hospitals and promote efficiency that could reduce medical costs accrued by patients.

  4. The influence of disturbance events on survival and dispersal rates of Florida box turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C.K.; Ozgul, A.; Oli, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Disturbances have the potential to cause long-term effects to ecosystem structure and function, and they may affect individual species in different ways. Long-lived vertebrates such as turtles may be at risk from such events, inasmuch as their life histories preclude rapid recovery should extensive mortality occur. We applied capture–mark–recapture models to assess disturbance effects on a population of Florida box turtles (Terrapene carolina bauri) on Egmont Key, Florida, USA. Near the midpoint of the study, a series of physical disturbances affected the island, from salt water overwash associated with several tropical storms to extensive removal of nonindigenous vegetation. These disturbances allowed us to examine demographic responses of the turtle population and to determine if they affected dispersal throughout the island. Adult survival rates did not vary significantly either between sexes or among years of the study. Survival rates did not vary significantly between juvenile and adult turtles, or among years of the study. Furthermore, neither adult nor juvenile survival rates differed significantly between pre- and post-disturbance. However, dispersal rates varied significantly among the four major study sites, and dispersal rates were higher during the pre-disturbance sampling periods compared to post-disturbance. Our results suggest few long-term effects on the demography of the turtle population. Florida box turtles responded to tropical storms and vegetation control by moving to favorable habitats minimally affected by the disturbances and remaining there. As long as turtles and perhaps other long-lived vertebrates can disperse to non-disturbed habitat, and high levels of mortality do not occur in a population, a long life span may allow them to wait out the impact of disturbance with potentially little effect on long-term population processes.

  5. 2Kx2K resolution element photon counting MCP sensor with >200 kHz event rate capability

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, J V

    2000-01-01

    Siegmund Scientific undertook a NASA Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract to develop a versatile, high-performance photon (or particle) counting detector combining recent technical advances in all aspects of Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector development in a low cost, commercially viable package that can support a variety of applications. The detector concept consists of a set of MCPs whose output electron pulses are read out with a crossed delay line (XDL) anode and associated high-speed event encoding electronics. The delay line anode allows high-resolution photon event centroiding at very high event rates and can be scaled to large formats (>40 mm) while maintaining good linearity and high temporal stability. The optimal sensitivity wavelength range is determined by the choice of opaque photocathodes. Specific achievements included: spatial resolution of 200 000 events s sup - sup 1; local rates of >100 events s sup - sup 1 per resolution element; event timing of <1 ns; and low background ...

  6. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  7. Primary coronary angioplasty in 9,434 patients during acute myocardial infarction: predictors of major in- hospital adverse events from 1996 to 2000 in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattos Luiz Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the results after the performance of primary coronary angioplasty in Brazil in the last 4 years. METHODS: During the first 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction onset, 9,434 (12.2% patients underwent primary PTCA. We analyzed the success and occurrence of major in-hospital events, comparing them over the 4-year period. RESULTS: Primary PTCA use increased compared with that of all percutaneous interventions (1996=10.6% vs. 2000=13.1%; p<0.001. Coronary stent implantation increased (1996=20% vs. 2000=71.9%; p<0.001. Success was greater (1998=89.5% vs. 1999=92.5%; p<0.001. Reinfarction decreased (1998=3.9% vs. 99=2.4% vs. 2000=1.5%; p<0.001 as did emergency bypass surgery (1996=0.5% vs. 2000=0.2%; p=0.01. In-hospital deaths remained unchanged (1996=5.7% vs. 2000=5.1%, p=0.53. Balloon PTCA was one of the independent predictors of a higher rate of unsuccessful procedures (odds ratio 12.01 [CI=95%] 1.58-22.94, and stent implantation of lower mortality rates (odds ratio 4.62 [CI=95%] 3.19-6.08. CONCLUSION: The success rate has become progressively higher with a significant reduction in reinfarction and urgent bypass surgery, but in-hospital death remains nearly unchanged. Coronary stenting was a predictor of a lower death rate, and balloon PTCA was associated with greater procedural failure.

  8. Constraining the rate of oceanic deoxygenation leading up to a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2: ~94 Ma)

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrander, Chadlin M.; Owens, Jeremy D.; Nielsen, Sune G.

    2017-01-01

    The rates of marine deoxygenation leading to Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events are poorly recognized and constrained. If increases in primary productivity are the primary driver of these episodes, progressive oxygen loss from global waters should predate enhanced carbon burial in underlying sediments?the diagnostic Oceanic Anoxic Event relic. Thallium isotope analysis of organic-rich black shales from Demerara Rise across Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 reveals evidence of expanded sediment-water inter...

  9. Low hospital referral rates of school scoliosis screening positives in an urban district of mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yawen; Jiang, Qingwu; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Kami, Masahiro; Luo, Chunyan; Leppold, Claire; Nishimura, Koichi; He, Yongpin; Kato, Shigeaki; Ding, Xiaocang

    2017-04-01

    Significant prevalence rates of adolescent scoliosis in China were suggested in previous studies. However, school screenings for adolescent scoliosis have been suspended due to low rates of positive detection under the past screening system in China. The present study was undertaken to screen for adolescent scoliosis in middle school students under a modern assessment system in a district of Shanghai. We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study of a middle school scoliosis screening program in the Jingan district. In 2015, schoolchildren were initially screened by visual inspection of clinical signs and the forward-bending test. Suspected cases were referred for radiography in hospital for scoliosis diagnosis. A total of 5327 middle school students (grades 6-8) were screened with 520 (9.76%) positives (the positive rates of girls and boys at 15.28% and 4.59%, respectively) and no statistically significant difference among grades. Only 301 positives (57.9%) followed the referral for hospital radiography. There were 102 cases (33.9%) that were diagnosed with scoliosis by radiography criteria (Cobb angle ≥10°) including mild scoliosis (Cobb 10-25) for 94 cases and moderate scoliosis (Cobb 25-40) for 8 cases, and false-positives (Cobb 0) for 39 cases. The putative prevalence rate was estimated as 1.9% from the referred students. Under an accurate and modern assessment system, school screenings can detect scoliosis at a significant rate, but awareness of scoliosis risks is needed for residents in China to take up referrals for hospital diagnosis after school screenings.

  10. Large-scale deployment of the Global Trigger Tool across a large hospital system: refinements for the characterisation of adverse events to support patient safety learning opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, V S; Saldaña, M; Gilder, R; Nicewander, D; Kennerly, D A

    2011-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement encourages use of the Global Trigger Tool to objectively determine and monitor adverse events (AEs). Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) is an integrated healthcare delivery system in North Texas. The Global Trigger Tool was applied to BHCS's eight general acute care hospitals, two inpatient cardiovascular hospitals and two rehabilitation/long-term acute care hospitals. Data were collected from a monthly random sample of charts for each facility for patients discharged between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007 by external professional nurse auditors using an MS Access Tool developed for this initiative. In addition to the data elements recommended by Institute for Healthcare Improvement, BHCS developed fields to permit further characterisation of AEs to identify learning opportunities. A structured narrative description of each identified AE facilitated text mining to further characterise AEs. INITIAL FINDINGS: Based on this sample, AE rates were found to be 68.1 per 1000 patient days, or 50.8 per 100 encounters, and 39.8% of admissions were found to have ≥1 AE. Of all AEs identified, 61.2% were hospital-acquired, 10.1% of which were associated with a National Coordinating Council - Medical Error Reporting and Prevention harm score of "H or I" (near death or death). To enhance learning opportunities and guide quality improvement, BHCS collected data-such as preventability and AE source-to characterise the nature of AEs. Data are provided regularly to hospital teams to direct quality initiatives, moving from a general focus on reducing AEs to more specific programmes based on patterns of harm and preventability.

  11. Recurrence rate of clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Kim, Jason; Latta, Dan; Smathers, Sarah; McGowan, Karin L; Zaoutis, Theodore; Mamula, Petar; Baldassano, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and associated morbidity of Clostridium difficile (CD) infection has been increasing at an alarming rate in North America. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the USA. Patients with CDAD have longer average hospital admissions and additional hospital costs. Evidence has demonstrated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher incidence of CD in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of recurrence of CD in hospitalized pediatric patients with IBD compared to hospitalized controls. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether infection with CD resulted in a more severe disease course of IBD. This was a nested case control retrospective study of hospitalized pediatric patients. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed with stool Toxin A and B analysis. The following data were obtained from the medical records: demographic information, classification of IBD including location of disease, IBD therapy, and prior surgeries. In addition, prior hospital admissions within 1 year and antibiotic exposure were recorded. The same information was recorded following CD infection. Cases were patients with IBD and CD; two control populations were also studied: patients with CD but without IBD, and patients with IBD but without CD. For aim 1, a total of 111 eligible patients with IBD and CD infection and 77 eligible control patients with CD infection were included. The rate of recurrence of CD in the IBD population was 34% compared to 7.5% in the control population (P < 0.0001). In evaluating the effect of CD infection on IBD disease severity, we compared the 111 IBD patients with CD to a second control population of 127 IBD patients without CD. 57% of IBD-CD patients were readmitted with an exacerbation of disease within 6 months of infection with CD and 67% required escalation of therapy following CD infection, compared to 30% of IBD patients without CD (P

  12. A Protocolised Once a Day Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) Measurement Is an Appropriate Screening Tool for Major Adverse Events in a General Hospital Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Louise S; Dijkstra, Casper C; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; Kramer, Mark H H; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B

    2016-01-01

    The Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) was developed to timely recognise clinically deteriorating hospitalised patients. However, the ability of the MEWS in predicting serious adverse events (SAEs) in a general hospital population has not been examined prospectively. The aims were to (1) analyse protocol adherence to a MEWS protocol in a real-life setting and (2) to determine the predictive value of protocolised daily MEWS measurement on SAEs: death, cardiac arrests, ICU-admissions and readmissions. All adult patients admitted to 6 hospital wards in October and November 2015 were included. MEWS were checked each morning by the research team. For each critical score (MEWS ≥ 3), the clinical staff was inquired about the actions performed. 30-day follow-up for SAEs was performed to compare between patients with and without a critical score. 1053 patients with 3673 vital parameter measurements were included, 200 (19.0%) had a critical score. The protocol adherence was 89.0%. 18.2% of MEWS were calculated wrongly. Patients with critical scores had significant higher rates of unplanned ICU admissions [7.0% vs 1.3%, p scores were calculated wrongly. Patients with a MEWS ≥ 3 experienced significantly more adverse events. The negative predictive value of early morning MEWS score as a screening tool.

  13. Comparison of Hospital Mortality and Readmission Rates for Medicare Patients Treated by Male vs Female Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugawa, Yusuke; Jena, Anupam B.; Figueroa, Jose F.; Orav, E. John; Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Jha, Ashish K.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Studies have found differences in practice patterns between male and female physicians, with female physicians more likely to adhere to clinical guidelines and evidence-based practice. However, whether patient outcomes differ between male and female physicians is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE To determine whether mortality and readmission rates differ between patients treated by male or female physicians. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We analyzed a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years or older hospitalized with a medical condition and treated by general internists from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2014. We examined the association between physician sex and 30-day mortality and readmission rates, adjusted for patient and physician characteristics and hospital fixed effects (effectively comparing female and male physicians within the same hospital). As a sensitivity analysis, we examined only physicians focusing on hospital care (hospitalists), among whom patients are plausibly quasi-randomized to physicians based on the physician’s specific work schedules. We also investigated whether differences in patient outcomes varied by specific condition or by underlying severity of illness. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Patients’ 30-day mortality and readmission rates. RESULTS A total of 1 583 028 hospitalizations were used for analyses of 30-day mortality (mean [SD] patient age, 80.2 [8.5] years; 621 412 men and 961 616 women) and 1 540 797 were used for analyses of readmission (mean [SD] patient age, 80.1 [8.5] years; 602 115 men and 938 682 women). Patients treated by female physicians had lower 30-day mortality (adjusted mortality, 11.07% vs 11.49%; adjusted risk difference, −0.43%; 95% CI, −0.57% to −0.28%; P < .001; number needed to treat to prevent 1 death, 233) and lower 30-day readmissions (adjusted readmissions, 15.02% vs 15.57%; adjusted risk difference, −0.55%; 95% CI, −0.71% to −0.39%; P < .001; number

  14. [ORION®: a simple and effective method for systemic analysis of clinical events and precursors occurring in hospital practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debouck, F; Rieger, E; Petit, H; Noël, G; Ravinet, L

    2012-05-01

    Morbimortality review is now recommended by the French Health Authority (Haute Autorité de santé [HAS]) in all hospital settings. It could be completed by Comités de retour d'expérience (CREX), making systemic analysis of event precursors which may potentially result in medical damage. As commonly captured by their current practice, medical teams may not favour systemic analysis of events occurring in their setting. They require an easy-to-use method, more or less intuitive and easy-to-learn. It is the reason why ORION(®) has been set up. ORION(®) is based on experience acquired in aeronautics which is the main precursor in risk management since aircraft crashes are considered as unacceptable even though the mortality from aircraft crashes is extremely low compared to the mortality from medical errors in hospital settings. The systemic analysis is divided in six steps: (i) collecting data, (ii) rebuilding the chronology of facts, (iii) identifying the gaps, (iv) identifying contributing and influential factors, (v) proposing actions to put in place, (vi) writing the analysis report. When identifying contributing and influential factors, four kinds of factors favouring the event are considered: technical domain, working environment, organisation and procedures, human factors. Although they are essentials, human factors are not always considered correctly. The systemic analysis is done by a pilot, chosen among people trained to use the method, querying information from all categories of people acting in the setting. ORION(®) is now used in more than 400 French hospital settings for systemic analysis of either morbimortality cases or event precursors. It is used, in particular, in 145 radiotherapy centres for supporting CREX. As very simple to use and quasi-intuitive, ORION(®) is an asset to reach the objectives defined by HAS: to set up effective morbi-mortality reviews (RMM) and CREX for improving the quality of care in hospital settings. By helping the

  15. Clinical features in adult patients with in-hospital cardiovascular events with confirmed 2009 Influenza A (H1N1 virus infection: Comparison with those without in-hospital cardiovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Gun Song

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that the CV group had higher in-hospital and cardiac mortality rates than the NCV group. A meticulous therapeutic approach should be considered for elderly patients with 2009 H1N1 infections having coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hypertension, and high levels of leukocyte count, hs-CRP, glucose, and NT-proBNP at the time of admission.

  16. [Development and validation of risk score model for acute myocardial infarction in China: prognostic value thereof for in hospital major adverse cardiac events and evaluation of revascularization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-fan; Lü, Shu-zheng; Chen, Yun-dai; Pan, Wei-qi; Song, Xian-tao; Li, Jing; Liu, Xin; Wang, Xi-zhi; Zhang, Li-jie; Ren, Fang; Luo, Jing-guang

    2008-07-08

    To develop a simple risk score model of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including all-cause mortality, new or recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), and evaluate the efficacy about revascularization on patients with different risk. The basic characteristics, diagnosis, therapy, and in-hospital outcomes of 1512 ACS patients from Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) study of China were collected to develop a risk score model by multivariable stepwise logistic regression. The goodness-of-fit test and discriminative power of the final model were assessed respectively. The best cut-off value for the risk score was used to assess the impact of revascularization for ST-elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST elevation acute coronary artery syndrome (NSTEACS) on in-hospital outcomes. (1) The following 6 independent risk factors accounted for about 92.5% of the prognostic information: age > or =80 years (4 points), SBP or =90 mm Hg (2 points), Killip II (3 points), Killip III or IV (9 points), cardiac arrest during presentation (4 points), ST-segment elevation (3 points) or depression (5 points) or combination of elevation and depression (4 points) on electrocardiogram at presentation. (2) CHIEF risk model was excellent with Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test of 0.673 and c statistics of 0.776. (3)1301 ACS patients previously enrolled in GRACE study were divided into 2 groups with the best cut-off value of 5.5 points. The impact of revascularization on the in-hospital MACE of the higher risk subsets was stronger than that of the lower risk subsets both in STEMI [OR (95% CI) = 0.32 (0.11, 0.94), chi2 = 5.39, P = 0.02] and NSTEACS [OR (95% CI) = 0.32 (0.06, 0.94), chi2 =4.17, P = 0.04] population. However, both STEMI (61.7% vs. 78.3%, P = 0.000) and NSTEACS (42.0% vs 62.3%, P = 0.000) patients with the risk scores more than 5.5 points had lower revascularization rates. The risk score provides excellent ability to predict in-hospital death or (re) MI

  17. Impact of Hospital Population Case-Mix, Including Poverty, on Hospital All-Cause and Infection-Related 30-Day Readmission Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, Shruti K; Datta, Rupak; Cao, Chenghua; Phelan, Michael J; Nguyen, Vinh; Rowther, Armaan A; Huang, Susan S

    2015-10-15

    Reducing hospital readmissions, including preventable healthcare-associated infections, is a national priority. The proportion of readmissions due to infections is not well-understood. Better understanding of hospital risk factors for readmissions and infection-related readmissions may help optimize interventions to prevent readmissions. Retrospective cohort study of California acute care hospitals and their patient populations discharged between 2009 and 2011. Demographics, comorbidities, and socioeconomic status were entered into a hierarchical generalized linear mixed model predicting all-cause and infection-related readmissions. Crude verses adjusted hospital rankings were compared using Cohen's kappa. We assessed 30-day readmission rates from 323 hospitals, accounting for 213 879 194 post-discharge person-days of follow-up. Infection-related readmissions represented 28% of all readmissions and were associated with discharging a high proportion of patients to skilled nursing facilities. Hospitals serving populations with high proportions of males, comorbidities, prolonged length of stay, and populations living in a federal poverty area, had higher all-cause and infection-related readmission rates. Academic hospitals had higher all-cause and infection-related readmission rates (odds ratio 1.24 and 1.15, respectively). When comparing adjusted vs crude hospital rankings for infection-related readmission rates, adjustment revealed 31% of hospitals changed performance category for infection-related readmissions. Infection-related readmissions accounted for nearly 30% of all-cause readmissions. High hospital infection-related readmissions were associated with serving a high proportion of patients with comorbidities, long lengths of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, and those living in federal poverty areas. Preventability of these infections needs to be assessed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases

  18. Exposure to extreme heat and precipitation events associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneja, Sutyajeet; Jiang, Chengsheng; Fisher, Jared; Upperman, Crystal Romeo; Mitchell, Clifford; Sapkota, Amir

    2016-04-27

    Several studies have investigated the association between asthma exacerbations and exposures to ambient temperature and precipitation. However, limited data exists regarding how extreme events, projected to grow in frequency, intensity, and duration in the future in response to our changing climate, will impact the risk of hospitalization for asthma. The objective of our study was to quantify the association between frequency of extreme heat and precipitation events and increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland between 2000 and 2012. We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to examine the association between exposure to extreme heat and precipitation events and risk of hospitalization for asthma (ICD-9 code 493, n = 115,923). Occurrence of extreme heat events in Maryland increased the risk of same day hospitalization for asthma (lag 0) by 3 % (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.03, 95 % Confidence Interval (CI): 1.00, 1.07), with a considerably higher risk observed for extreme heat events that occur during summer months (OR: 1.23, 95 % CI: 1.15, 1.33). Likewise, summertime extreme precipitation events increased the risk of hospitalization for asthma by 11 % in Maryland (OR: 1.11, 95 % CI: 1.06, 1.17). Across age groups, increase in risk for asthma hospitalization from exposure to extreme heat event during the summer months was most pronounced among youth and adults, while those related to extreme precipitation event was highest among ≤4 year olds. Exposure to extreme heat and extreme precipitation events, particularly during summertime, is associated with increased risk of hospitalization for asthma in Maryland. Our results suggest that projected increases in frequency of extreme heat and precipitation event will have significant impact on public health.

  19. Hospitals ineligible for federal meaningful-use incentives have dismally low rates of adoption of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Larry; Harvell, Jennie; Jha, Ashish K

    2012-03-01

    The US government has dedicated substantial resources to help certain providers, such as short-term acute care hospitals and physicians, adopt and meaningfully use electronic health record (EHR) systems. We used national data to determine adoption rates of EHR systems among all types of inpatient providers that were ineligible for these same federal meaningful-use incentives: long-term acute care hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, and psychiatric hospitals. Adoption rates for these institutions were dismally low: less than half of the rate among short-term acute care hospitals. Specifically, 12 percent of short-term acute care hospitals have at least a basic EHR system, compared with 6 percent of long-term acute care hospitals, 4 percent of rehabilitation hospitals, and 2 percent of psychiatric hospitals. To advance the creation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure, federal and state policy makers should consider additional measures, such as adopting health information technology standards and EHR system certification criteria appropriate for these ineligible hospitals; including such hospitals in state health information exchange programs; and establishing low-interest loan programs for the acquisition and use of certified EHR systems by ineligible providers.

  20. Comparison of brand versus generic antiepileptic drug adverse event reporting rates in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Plotkina, Annya V; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the cost saving role of generic anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), debate exists as to whether generic substitution of branded AEDs may lead to therapeutic failure and increased toxicity. This study compared adverse event (AE) reporting rates for brand vs. authorized generic (AG) vs. generic AEDs. Since AGs are pharmaceutically identical to brand but perceived as generics, the generic vs. AG comparison minimized potential bias against generics. Events reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System between January 2004 to March 2015 with lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine listed as primary or secondary suspect were classified as brand, generic, or AG based on the manufacturer. Disproportionality analyses using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) assessed the relative rate of reporting of labeled AEs compared to reporting these events with all other drugs. The Breslow-Day statistic compared RORs across brand, AG, and other generics using a Bonferroni-corrected Pevents with lamotrigine, 13,950 events with carbamazepine, and 5077 events with oxcarbazepine were reported, with generics accounting for 27%, 41%, and 32% of reports, respectively. Although RORs for the majority of known AEs were different between brand and generics for all three drugs of interest (Breslow-Day Preports of suicide or suicidal ideation compared with the respective AGs based on a multiple comparison-adjusted Preporting rates were observed for the AG and generic comparisons for most outcomes and drugs, suggesting that brands and generics have similar reporting rates after accounting for generic perception biases. Disproportional suicide reporting was observed for generics compared with AGs and brand, although this finding needs further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Decline in Clostridium difficile-associated disease rates in Singapore public hospitals, 2006 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Prabha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile is the major cause of pseudomembranous colitis associated with antibiotic use, and the spread of the hypervirulent epidemic ribotype 027/NAP-1 strain across hospitals worldwide has re-focused attention on this nosocomial pathogen. The overall incidence and trend of C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD in Singapore is unknown, and a surveillance program to determine these via formal laboratory-based reporting was established. Findings Laboratory and pharmacy data were collated from one tertiary and two secondary hospitals on a quarterly basis between 2006 and 2008. All hospitals tested for C. difficile using Immunocard Toxins A&B (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH during this period. Duplicate positive C. difficile results within a 14-day period were removed. The CDAD results were compared with trends in hospital-based prescription of major classes of antibiotics. Overall CDAD incidence-density decreased from 5.16 (95%CI: 4.73 - 5.62 cases per 10,000 inpatient-days in 2006 to 2.99 (95%CI: 2.67 to 3.33 cases per 10,000 inpatient-days in 2008 (p C. difficile testing increased significantly (p Conclusions Our results demonstrate a real decline of CDAD rates in three large local hospitals. The cause is unclear and is not associated with improved infection control measures or reduction in antibiotic prescription. Lack of C. difficile stool cultures as part of routine testing precluded determination of the decline of a major clone as a potential explanation. For more accurate epidemiological trending of CDAD and early detection of epidemic clones, data collection will have to be expanded and resources set in place for reference laboratory culture and typing.

  2. Comparing Coronary Atheroma Progression Rates and Coronary Events in the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rishi; Nicholls, Stephen J; St John, Julie; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Wolski, Kathy; Nissen, Steven E

    2016-12-01

    We explored for geographic variations in coronary atheroma progression rates in the United States compared to other world regions (Canada, Latin America, Western Europe, and Central-Eastern Europe) and sought to ascertain if this associated with regional differences in major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE; cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization). Across 7 randomized trials with a global recruitment pattern, 5,451 participants with angiographic coronary disease underwent serial coronary intravascular ultrasonography during 18 or 24 months, with adjudicated MACE. Change in coronary percent atheroma volume (ΔPAV) and MACE in the United States versus other world regions were assessed. Despite similar baseline angiographic and plaque characteristics across participants and regions, following propensity-weighted and multivariate analysis, US (n = 3,706) versus non-US (n = 1,745) participants demonstrated marginal but significantly greater annualized ΔPAV (least-square means ± SE: 0.27 ± 0.14% vs 0.062 ± 0.14%, p = 0.005). However, MACE rates were disproportionately higher in US compared to non-US participants (23.5% vs 10.9%, p <0.001), driven by a doubling in crude rates of coronary revascularization procedures (16.1% vs 7.8%, p <0.001). The US participants hospitalized with unstable angina demonstrated more significant disease progression than their non-US counterparts (ΔPAV: 0.57 ± 0.19% vs -0.30 ± 0.36%, p = 0.033) and greater MACE (9.1% vs 4.8%, p <0.001). A US geographic disposition independently associated with MACE (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.92, p <0.001). In conclusion, in participants with stable coronary disease, coronary atheroma progression rates are modestly higher in US-based compared to non-US-based participants. Elective coronary revascularization rates however are disproportionately greater in US-based participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Childhood Malaria Admission Rates to Four Hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiro, Emelda A.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.; Kabaria, Caroline W.; Ligomeka, Jeffrey; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Ali, Doreen; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection. Results In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend Pmalaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000–2010 across all sites. Discussion Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may become evident within a period when coverage reaches optimal levels. PMID:23638008

  4. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. Objective: We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Methods: Total testosterone (TT and free testosterone (FT were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66 and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44 groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Results: Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008. Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001. In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02 predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009 and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02 predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001. Conclusion: These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT.

  5. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Trombetta, Ivani Credidio [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE) (Brazil); Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Arap, Marco Antônio [Faculdade de medicina da Universidade de São Paulo - Urologia (Brazil); Negrão, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Escola de Educação Física e Esporte da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Middlekauff, Holly R. [Division of Cardiology - David Geffen School of Medicine - University of California (United States); Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes, E-mail: janieire.alves@incor.usp.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT.

  6. Prediction of hospital acute myocardial infarction and heart failure 30-day mortality rates using publicly reported performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, David S; Bardach, Naomi S; Lin, Grace A; Chattopadhyay, Arpita; Goldman, L Elizabeth; Dudley, R Adams

    2013-01-01

    To identify an approach to summarizing publicly reported hospital performance data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure (HF) that best predicts current year hospital mortality rates. A total of 1,868 U.S. hospitals reporting process and outcome measures for AMI and HF to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from July 2005 to June 2006 (Year 0) and July 2006 to June 2007 (Year 1). Observational cohort study measuring the percentage variation in Year 1 hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate explained by denominator-based weighted composite scores summarizing hospital Year 0 performance. Data were prospectively collected from hospitalcompare.gov. Percentage variation in Year 1 mortality was best explained by mortality rate alone in Year 0 over other composites including process performance. If only Year 0 mortality rates were reported, and consumers using hospitals in the highest decile of mortality instead chose hospitals in the lowest decile of mortality rate, the number of deaths at 30 days that potentially could have been avoided was 1.31 per 100 patients for AMI and 2.12 for HF (p < .001). Public reports focused on 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate may more directly address policymakers' goals of facilitating consumer identification of hospitals with better outcomes. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  7. Impact of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty on 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates and Unplanned Episodes of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Bryan D; Odum, Susan M; Vegari, David N; Mokris, Jeffrey G; Beaver, Walter B

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study comparing 30-day readmission rates between patients undergoing outpatient versus inpatient total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. A retrospective review of 137 patients undergoing outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and 106 patients undergoing inpatient (minimum 2-day hospital stay) TJA was conducted. Unplanned hospital readmissions and unplanned episodes of care were recorded. All patients completed a telephone survey. Seven inpatients and 16 outpatients required hospital readmission or an unplanned episode of care following hospital discharge. Readmission rates were higher for TKA than THA. The authors found no statistical differences in 30-day readmission or unplanned care episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rates and risk factors associated with unplanned hospital readmission after fusion for pediatric spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Erika; Diab, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Short-term readmission rates are becoming widely used as a quality and performance metric for hospitals. Data on unplanned short-term readmission after spine fusion for deformity in pediatric patients are limited. To characterize the rate and risk factors for short-term readmission after spine fusion for deformity in pediatric patients. This is a retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the State Inpatient Database from New York, Utah, Nebraska, Florida, North Carolina (years 2006-2010), and California (years 2006-2011). Outcome measures included 30- and 90-day readmission rates. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 0-21 years, a primary diagnosis of spine deformity, and a primary 3+-level lumbar or thoracic fusion. Exclusion criteria included revision surgery at index admission and cervical fusion. Readmission rates were calculated and logistic analyses were used to identify independent predictors of readmission. There were a total of 13,287 patients with a median age of 14 years. Sixty-seven percent were girls. The overall 30- and 90-day readmission rates were 4.7% and 6.1%. The most common reasons for readmission were infection (38% at 30 days and 33% at 90 days), wound dehiscence (19% and 17%), and pulmonary complications (12% and 13%). On multivariate analysis, predictors of 30-day readmission included male sex (p=.008), neuromuscular (p80 operations/year was associated with a 34% reduced risk of 30-day readmission (95% confidence interval 12%-50%, p=.005) compared with hospitals performing spine deformity surgery is driven by patient-related factors, as well as several risk factors that may be modified to reduce this rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee; Park, Jeongeon; Choi, Jeongim; Park, Chang Gi

    2011-12-01

    Reduced heart rate variability significantly increases cardiovascular mortality. Metabolic syndrome increases the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Recently, increasing cardiovascular mortality has been reported in patients with schizophrenia. This study was done to compare heart rate variability between adults with and without schizophrenia and to compare the relationship of heart rate variability to metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. This was a descriptive and correlational study in which 719 adults without schizophrenia and 308 adults with schizophrenia took part between May and June 2008. We measured the following: five-minute heart rate variability; high-frequency, low-frequency, the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency, and the Standard Deviation of all the normal RR intervals. Data was also collected on metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure and fasting glucose. The Standard Deviation of all the normal RR intervals values of heart rate variability indices were 1.53±0.18. The low-frequency and high-frequency values of heart rate variability indices were significantly higher in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia (3.89±1.36; 3.80±1.20) than those in the healthy participants (2.20±0.46; 2.10±0.46). There were no significant differences between the schizophrenic patients with and without metabolic syndrome. The results of this study indicate that schizophrenia patients have significantly lower cardiac autonomic control, but they have significantly higher low-frequency and high-frequency values than those of healthy adults. Use of antipsychotic drug may affect the autonomic nervous system in schizophrenic patients. Metabolic syndrome was not associated with cardiac autonomic control in schizophrenia patients.

  10. Exclusive breastfeeding rates in a multiethnic population at a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shelly; Gupta, Adeeti; Jacobs, Allan J

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate exclusive breastfeeding (EB) rates in a multiethnic community population and study various factors that could influence selection of feeding method. Electronic medical records of 100 patients who delivered from January to August 2009 in a community hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients who breastfed exclusively were compared with those whose children obtained some or all nutrition from bottle-feeding during the hospitalization immediately following delivery (NEB). Continuation rates at the infant's initial follow-up examination were assessed. The Asian populations had the highest EB (50%) and continuity rate. Single status and educational status were the only factors other than ethnicity found on univariate analysis to have an impact on the mode of feeding (p sex of newborn did not have a significant effect on the type of feeding. Using multiple regression, only educational status had a significant association with exclusive breastfeeding, with an odds ratio of 2.1 (p = 0.038). EB was not well accepted by non-Asian populations. Because educational level was associated with breastfeeding, ways of encouraging those with limited education to practice breastfeeding should be developed.

  11. Preventable and non-preventable adverse drug events in hospitalized patients: a prospective chart review in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequito, Aileen B; Mol, Peter G M; van Doormaal, Jasperien E; Zaal, Rianne J; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-11-01

    Medication safety research and clinical pharmacy practice today is primarily focused on managing preventable adverse drug events (pADEs). Determinants of both pADEs and non-preventable adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have been identified. However, relatively little is known on the overlap between these determinants and the balance of preventable and non-preventable harm inpatients experience in modern computerized hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of pADEs and non-preventable ADRs as well as the determinants, including multimorbidity, of these ADEs, i.e. both pADEs and ADRs. Adverse events experienced by patients admitted to two Dutch hospitals with functioning computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems were prospectively identified through chart review. Adverse events were divided into pADEs (i.e. as a result of a medication error) and non-preventable ADRs. In both cases, a causal relationship between adverse events and patients' drugs was established using the simplified Yale algorithm. Study data were collected anytime between April 2006 and May 2008 over a 5-month period at each hospital ward included in the study, beginning from 8 weeks after CPOE was implemented at the ward. pADEs and non-preventable ADRs were experienced by 349 (58%) patients, of whom 307 (88%) had non-preventable ADRs. Multimorbidity (adjusted odds ratio [OR(adj)] 1.90; 95% CI 1.44, 2.50; OR(adj) 1.28; 95% CI 1.14, 1.45, respectively), length of stay (OR(adj) 1.13; 95% CI 1.06, 1.21; OR(adj) 1.11; 95% CI 1.07, 1.16, respectively), admission to the geriatric ward (OR(adj) 7.78; 95% CI 2.15, 28.13; OR(adj) 3.82; 95% CI 1.73, 8.45, respectively) and number of medication orders (OR(adj) 1.25; 95% CI 1.16, 1.35; OR(adj) 1.13; 95% CI 1.06, 1.21, respectively) were statistically significantly associated with pADEs and ADRs. Admission to the gastroenterology/rheumatology ward (OR(adj) 0.22; 95% CI 0.06, 0.77; OR(adj) 0.40; 95% CI 0.24, 0.65, respectively) was

  12. The effect of annual surgical caseload on the rates of in-hospital pneumonia and other in-hospital outcomes after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitges, Jan; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Bianchi, Marco; Sun, Maxine; Abdollah, Firas; Ahyai, Sascha A; Jeldres, Claudio; Steuber, Thomas; Perrotte, Paul; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Menon, Mani; Montorsi, Francesco; Graefen, Markus; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effect of annual surgical caseload (ASC) on contemporary in-hospital pneumonia (IHP) rates and three other in-hospital outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP). Between 1999 and 2008, 34,490 open RPs were performed in the state of Florida. First, logistic regression models predicting the rate of IHP were fitted. Second, other logistic regression models examined the association between IHP and three other outcomes: in-hospital mortality, hospital charges within the highest quartile, and length of stay (LOS) within the highest quartile. Covariates included ASC, age, race, baseline Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), interval between admission and surgery, as well as blood transfusion. The overall IHP rate was 0.5%. It was higher in patients operated within the low (0.7%) and intermediate (0.5%) ASC tertile versus high ASC tertile (0.2%, P $37,333, and were 20-fold more likely to have a LOS >3 days (all P < 0.001). RP by high ASC surgeons exerts a protective effect on IHP rates. Additionally, IHP is associated with higher in-hospital mortality, prolonged LOS, and higher hospital charges.

  13. Effect of Organ Scandal on Corneal Donation Rate and Organ Donors at a German University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Daniel; Petersen, Peter; Yoeruek, Efdal; Thaler, Sebastian; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Tobias

    2017-07-11

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of an organ transplantation scandal on the rate of corneal donations and organ donors at the University Hospital Tübingen. MATERIAL AND METHODS Data from all hospital deaths from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. The corneal donor procurement was handled by an ophthalmic resident on a full-time basis with standard used unchanged set of procedures. Each patient who died due to cerebral complications was considered as a potential organ donor. During the two-year period, a German transplantation scandal occurred at the end of 2012 and received worldwide attention. The rates of corneal donation and organ donation in 2012 and 2013 were examined and evaluated. RESULTS Among the 1685 deceased patients, approval for corneal donation was received in 220 cases (13.1%): 124 cases (15.0%) in 2012 and 96 cases (11.2%) in 2013. This corresponds to a decline of 23%. The leading causes of nonfulfillment of corneal donations were refusal to donation: 401 cases (48.4%) in 2012 and 445 cases (52.0%) in 2013; and medical contraindications: 201 cases (24.2%) in 2012 and 212 cases (24.8%) in 2013. During the two-year period, consent for organ donation was obtained in 25 cases (1.5%): 15 cases (1.8%) in 2012 and 10 cases (1.2%) in 2013. The number of realized organ donors was 20 cases (1.2%): 12 cases (1.4%) in 2012 and 8 cases (0.9%) in 2013. This corresponds to a decline of 33%. CONCLUSIONS After a transplantation scandal, the number of realized corneal donors and realized organ donors decreased significantly. It seems that increasing professional performance is very important to gaining trust inside and outside the hospital and improving corneal and organ donation rate.

  14. A European benchmarking system to evaluate in-hospital mortality rates in acute coronary syndrome: the EURHOBOP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégano, Irene R; Subirana, Isaac; Torre, Marina; Grau, María; Vila, Joan; Fusco, Danilo; Kirchberger, Inge; Ferrières, Jean; Malmivaara, Antti; Azevedo, Ana; Meisinger, Christa; Bongard, Vanina; Farmakis, Dimitros; Davoli, Marina; Häkkinen, Unto; Araújo, Carla; Lekakis, John; Elosua, Roberto; Marrugat, Jaume

    2015-03-01

    Hospital performance models in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are useful to assess patient management. While models are available for individual countries, mainly US, cross-European performance models are lacking. Thus, we aimed to develop a system to benchmark European hospitals in AMI and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), based on predicted in-hospital mortality. We used the EURopean HOspital Benchmarking by Outcomes in ACS Processes (EURHOBOP) cohort to develop the models, which included 11,631 AMI patients and 8276 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients who underwent PCI. Models were validated with a cohort of 55,955 European ACS patients. Multilevel logistic regression was used to predict in-hospital mortality in European hospitals for AMI and PCI. Administrative and clinical models were constructed with patient- and hospital-level covariates, as well as hospital- and country-based random effects. Internal cross-validation and external validation showed good discrimination at the patient level and good calibration at the hospital level, based on the C-index (0.736-0.819) and the concordance correlation coefficient (55.4%-80.3%). Mortality ratios (MRs) showed excellent concordance between administrative and clinical models (97.5% for AMI and 91.6% for PCI). Exclusion of transfers and hospital stays ≤1day did not affect in-hospital mortality prediction in sensitivity analyses, as shown by MR concordance (80.9%-85.4%). Models were used to develop a benchmarking system to compare in-hospital mortality rates of European hospitals with similar characteristics. The developed system, based on the EURHOBOP models, is a simple and reliable tool to compare in-hospital mortality rates between European hospitals in AMI and PCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of the intra-hospital attending of ventricular fibrilation/ventricular taquicardia simulated events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Miguel Antônio; Bento, André Moreira; Quilici, Ana Paula; Martins, Márcia; Cardoso, Luís Francisco; Timerman, Sérgio

    2005-06-01

    To analyze the time intervals between the beginning of the Ventricular Fibrilation/Ventricular Taquicardia (VF/VT) and the main procedures made. Twenty VF/VT simulations were performed and filmed in a hospital environment, using a static mannequin, on random days at random times. All teams had the same level of skills. The times (in sec.) related to basic life support (BLS) - arrival of the team (AT), confirmation of the arrest (CAT), beginning of the CPR (IT) and the times related to the advanced life support (ALS) - 1st defibrillation (DT), 1st dose of adrenalin (AT) and orotracheal intubation (OTIT). The variables were analyzed and compared in two groups: intensive care unit (ICU) and wards with telemetry (TLW). The results in both groups was in that order (GW x ICU ) - AT (70.2+38.7 x 38.6+49.2); CCA (89.4+57.1 x 71+63.9); SC (166.8+81.1 x 142+66.2); FD (282.5+142.8 x 108.4+52.5); FE (401.4+161.7 x 263.3+122.8) e OI (470.3+150.6 x 278.8+98.8). Shows the comparison of the average times between the two groups. The differences noted in relation to DT, AT and OTIT favorable to ICU are associated to the facility of performance of the ALS maneuvers in such environment. The BLS-related times were similar in both groups, which reinforce the need for the use of semi-automatic defibrillators, even in a hospital environment.

  16. Heart rate regulation during cycle-ergometer exercise via event-driven biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argha, Ahmadreza; Su, Steven W; Celler, Branko G

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of regulating the heart rate response along a predetermined reference profile, for cycle-ergometer exercises designed for training or cardio-respiratory rehabilitation. The controller designed in this study is a non-conventional, non-model-based, proportional, integral and derivative (PID) controller. The PID controller commands can be transmitted as biofeedback auditory commands, which can be heard and interpreted by the exercising subject to increase or reduce exercise intensity. However, in such a case, for the purposes of effectively communicating to the exercising subject a change in the required exercise intensity, the timing of this feedback signal relative to the position of the pedals becomes critical. A feedback signal delivered when the pedals are not in a suitable position to efficiently exert force may be ineffective and this may, in turn, lead to the cognitive disengagement of the user from the feedback controller. This note examines a novel form of control system which has been expressly designed for this project. The system is called an "actuator-based event-driven control system". The proposed control system was experimentally verified using 24 healthy male subjects who were randomly divided into two separate groups, along with cross-validation scheme. A statistical analysis was employed to test the generalisation of the PID tunes, derived based on the average transfer functions of the two groups, and it revealed that there were no significant differences between the mean values of root mean square of the tracking error of two groups (3.9 vs. 3.7 bpm, [Formula: see text]). Furthermore, the results of a second statistical hypothesis test showed that the proposed PID controller with novel synchronised biofeedback mechanism has better performance compared to a conventional PID controller with a fixed-rate biofeedback mechanism (Group 1: 3.9 vs. 5.0 bpm, Group 2: 3.7 vs. 4.4 bpm, [Formula: see text]).

  17. Administration of eptifibatide during endovascular treatment of ruptured cerebral aneurysms reduces the rate of thromboembolic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Gaudard, Jean; Suissa, Laurent; Lachaud, Sylvain; Lonjon, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Thromboembolic complications are the most frequent complications of endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The optimal protocol to prevent thromboembolic complications during coil embolization does not yet exist. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of eptifibatide for the prevention of thromboembolic complications during elective coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A consecutive series of 100 patients (group 1) with ruptured intracranial aneurysm were treated using endovascular coil embolization. At the beginning of the procedure, all patients received an intra-arterial bolus (0.2 mg/kg) of eptifibatide. The following data were collected: degree of aneurysmal occlusion after treatment, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications and other intraoperative adverse events. The results were compared with those from a control group (group 2) which were analyzed retrospectively. Group 2 consisted of 100 previous patients with ruptured aneurysm managed with coil embolization who had received heparin and/or aspirin at the beginning of the procedure. (1) Patient populations in groups 1 and 2 were considered statistically comparable, except that group 1 (eptifibatide) included more wide-necked aneurysms (p = 0.011). (2) There were less thromboembolic complications in group 1 (p = 0.011): seven intraoperative complications in group 1 versus 20 in group 2. (3) Intraoperative hemorrhagic complications were statistically comparable in both groups (p = 1). Eptifibatide was effective in lowering the intraoperative thromboembolic complication rate in ruptured aneurysms treated with coil embolization and did not increase the hemorrhagic risk.

  18. Building capacity for active surveillance of vaccine adverse events in the Americas: A hospital-based multi-country network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Alcántara, Pamela; Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Molina-León, Helvert Felipe; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Black, Steven; Zuber, Patrick L F; Maure, Christine; Castro, Jose Luis

    2018-01-08

    New vaccines designed to prevent diseases endemic in low and middle-income countries are being introduced without prior utilization in countries with robust vaccine pharmacovigilance systems. Our aim was to build capacity for active surveillance of vaccine adverse events in the Americas. We describe the implementation of a proof-of-concept study for the feasibility of an international collaborative hospital-based active surveillance system for vaccine safety. The study was developed and implemented in 15 sentinel sites located in seven countries of the region of the Americas, under the umbrella of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Vaccine Safety Initiative. The study evaluated the associations between measles-mumps-rubella vaccines and two well-recognized adverse events: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and aseptic meningitis. The regional network contributed 63 confirmed ITP and 16 confirmed aseptic meningitis eligible cases to the global study, representing, respectively, 33% and 19% of the total cases. To ensure long-term sustainability and usefulness to investigate adverse events following new vaccine introductions in low and middle-income countries, the network needs to be strengthened with additional sites and integrated into national health systems. Copyright © 2017 Pan American Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nurses about pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction and adverse event reporting in a state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Fisun; Ciftci, Seval; Vural, Birol

    2014-01-01

    With the use of any drug comes the possibility of unintended consequences which when harmful are referred to as adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The development of national pharmacovigilance systems is the responsibility of all health workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge of nurses about pharmacovigilance and attitudes about ADR and adverse event reporting. This descriptive-cross sectional study was performed in 112 nurses working in a public hospital. The questionnaire was applied about pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions. The knowledge, attitudes and practices about adverse drug reactions were asked. The 74.1% of the nurses definition of "severe adverse effect" of drug therapy. The ratio of participants who knew that ADRs are reported to contact person responsible from pharmacovigilance was 34.9%. Although 70.5% of nurses knew the necessity of ADR reporting, the 8% of the nurses knew Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TÜFAM). Only 8% of nurses reported ADRs in their professionality. Although most of the participants knew the importance of ADR event reporting, event reporting was low. Thiese results showed that there is a lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance. Futher studies with different settings and healthcare staff are needed to improve awareness about pharmacovigilance.

  20. Discovery of temporal and disease association patterns in condition-specific hospital utilization rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian S Haimovich

    Full Text Available Identifying temporal variation in hospitalization rates may provide insights about disease patterns and thereby inform research, policy, and clinical care. However, the majority of medical conditions have not been studied for their potential seasonal variation. The objective of this study was to apply a data-driven approach to characterize temporal variation in condition-specific hospitalizations. Using a dataset of 34 million inpatient discharges gathered from hospitals in New York State from 2008-2011, we grouped all discharges into 263 clinical conditions based on the principal discharge diagnosis using Clinical Classification Software in order to mitigate the limitation that administrative claims data reflect clinical conditions to varying specificity. After applying Seasonal-Trend Decomposition by LOESS, we estimated the periodicity of the seasonal component using spectral analysis and applied harmonic regression to calculate the amplitude and phase of the condition's seasonal utilization pattern. We also introduced four new indices of temporal variation: mean oscillation width, seasonal coefficient, trend coefficient, and linearity of the trend. Finally, K-means clustering was used to group conditions across these four indices to identify common temporal variation patterns. Of all 263 clinical conditions considered, 164 demonstrated statistically significant seasonality. Notably, we identified conditions for which seasonal variation has not been previously described such as ovarian cancer, tuberculosis, and schizophrenia. Clustering analysis yielded three distinct groups of conditions based on multiple measures of seasonal variation. Our study was limited to New York State and results may not directly apply to other regions with distinct climates and health burden. A substantial proportion of medical conditions, larger than previously described, exhibit seasonal variation in hospital utilization. Moreover, the application of clustering

  1. Prevalence rates of infection in intensive care units of a tertiary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toufen Junior Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence rates of infections among intensive care unit patients, the predominant infecting organisms, and their resistance patterns. To identify the related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection and mortality rates. DESIGN: A 1-day point-prevalence study. SETTING:A total of 19 intensive care units at the Hospital das Clínicas - University of São Paulo, School of Medicine (HC-FMUSP, a teaching and tertiary hospital, were eligible to participate in the study. PATIENTS: All patients over 16 years old occupying an intensive care unit bed over a 24-hour period. The 19 intensive care unit s provided 126 patient case reports. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of infection, antimicrobial use, microbiological isolates resistance patterns, potential related factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection, and death rates. RESULTS: A total of 126 patients were studied. Eighty-seven patients (69% received antimicrobials on the day of study, 72 (57% for treatment, and 15 (12% for prophylaxis. Community-acquired infection occurred in 15 patients (20.8%, non- intensive care unit nosocomial infection in 24 (33.3%, and intensive care unit-acquired infection in 22 patients (30.6%. Eleven patients (15.3% had no defined type. The most frequently reported infections were respiratory (58.5%. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Enterobacteriaceae (33.8%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.4%, and Staphylococcus aureus (16.9%; [100% resistant to methicillin]. Multivariate regression analysis revealed 3 risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired infection: age > 60 years (p = 0.007, use of a nasogastric tube (p = 0.017, and postoperative status (p = 0.017. At the end of 4 weeks, overall mortality was 28.8%. Patients with infection had a mortality rate of 34.7%. There was no difference between mortality rates for infected and noninfected patients (p=0.088. CONCLUSION: The rate of nosocomial infection is high in intensive care

  2. Adverse events in pediatric cardiac catheterization: Initial experience of Sohag university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa Husein Ali

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Pediatric cardiac catheterization by well trained team of pediatric cardiologists in a new center is effective. The rate of occurrence of AEs approximated to those which are reported by various interventional pediatric cardiology centers around the world. The lower body weight and the second year of initial experience are risk factors for occurrence of AE.

  3. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate, Cardiovascular Events and Mortality Across Age Groups Among Individuals Older Than 60 Years in Southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-González, Betlem; Gil-Terrón, Neus; Cerain-Herrero, M Jesús; Subirana, Isaac; Güell-Miró, Roser; Rodríguez-Latre, Luisa M; Cunillera-Puértolas, Oriol; Elosua, Roberto; Grau, Maria; Vila, Joan; Pascual-Benito, Luisa; Mestre-Ferrer, Jordi; Ramos, Rafel; Baena-Díez, José Miguel; Soler-Vila, Maria; Alonso-Bes, Eva; Ruipérez-Guijarro, Laura; Álvarez-Funes, Virtudes; Freixes-Villaró, Esther; Rodríguez-Pascual, Mercedes; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto

    2017-10-28

    Individuals with a decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are at increased risk of all-cause (ACM) and cardiovascular mortality; there is ongoing debate about whether older individuals with eGFR 45 to 59mL/min/1.73 m 2 are also at increased risk. We evaluated the association between eGFR and ACM and cardiovascular events (CVE) in people aged 60 to 74 and ≥ 75 years in a population with a low coronary disease incidence. We conducted a retrospective cohort study by using primary care and hospital electronic records. We included 130 233 individuals aged ≥ 60 years with creatinine measurement between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011; eGFR was estimated by using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. The independent association between eGFR and the risk of ACM and hospital admission due to CVE were determined with Cox and Fine-Gray regressions, respectively. The median was age 70 years, and 56.1% were women; 13.5% had eGFR < 60 (69.7% eGFR 45-59). During a median follow-up of 38.2 months, 6474 participants died and 3746 had a CVE. For ACM and CVE, the HR in older individuals became significant at eGFR < 60. Fully adjusted HR for ACM in the eGFR 45 to 59 category were 1.61; 95%CI, 1.37-1.89 and 1.19; 95%CI, 1.10-1.28 in 60- to 74-year-olds and ≥ 75-year-olds, respectively; for CVE HR were 1.28; 95%CI, 1.08-1.51 and 1.12; 95%CI, 0.99-1.26. In a region with low coronary disease incidence, the risk of death and CVE increased with decreasing eGFR. In ≥ 75-year-olds, the eGFR 45 to 59 category, which had borderline risk for CVE, included many individuals without significant additional risk. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  5. Data filtering and expected muon and neutrino event rates in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanidze, Rezo [ECAP, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str.1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future Mediterranean deep sea neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of several cubic kilometres. The neutrino and muon events in KM3NeT will be reconstructed from the signals collected from the telescope's photo detectors. However, in the deep sea the dominant source of photon signals are the decays of K40 nuclei and bioluminescence. The selection of neutrino and muon events requires the implementation of fast and efficient data filtering algorithms for the reduction of accidental background event rates. Possible data filtering and triggering schemes for the KM3NeT neutrino telescope and expected muon and neutrino event rates are discussed.

  6. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  7. Social deprivation and hospital admission rates, length of stay and readmissions in emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, Seán; Byrne, Declan; Conway, Richard; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission. How deprivation relates to the admission or readmission incidence rates, episode length of stay (LOS) and ancillary resource utilization is less clear. All emergency medical admissions (66,861 episodes in 36,214 patients) between 2002 and 2013, categorized by quintile of Irish National Deprivation Index were assessed against admission or readmission incidence rates (/1000 local population by electoral division), LOS and utilization of five ancillary services. Univariate and multi-variable risk estimates (odds ratios (OR) or incidence rate ratios (IRR)) were calculated, using truncated Poisson regression. The deprivation index quintile was strongly correlated with the emergency medical admission rate with IRR (as compared with quintile 1) as follows: Q2 1.99 (95% CI: 1.96, 2.01), Q3 3.45 (95% CI: 3.41, 3.49), Q4 3.27 (95% CI: 3.23, 3.31) and Q5 4.29 (95% CI: 4.23, 4.35). LOS was not influenced by deprivation status; although increasing deprivation resulted in increased utilization of social services (OR 1.04: 95% CI: 1.03, 1.06), with a lower requirement for occupational therapy (OR 0.94: 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) and speech/language services (OR 0.83: 95% CI: 0.80, 0.86). There was a rather decreased use of ancillary services with increasing deprivation; however, the readmission rate was strongly predicted by deprivation status. Deprivation status strongly influenced the admission and readmission rates for medical patients admitted as emergencies; however, ancillary resource utilization was not increased. Deprivation index will increase demand on hospital resources due to the aggregate effect on both admission and readmission incidence rates. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of a hospital policy of not accepting free infant formula on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Marie; Lok, Kris Yw; Fong, Daniel Yt; Lee, Irene Ly; Sham, Alice; Lam, Christine; Wu, Kendra M; Bai, Dorothy L; Wong, Ka Lun; Wong, Emmy My; Chan, Noel Pt; Dodgson, Joan E

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of public hospitals in Hong Kong not accepting free infant formula from manufacturers on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration. Prospective cohort study. In-patient postnatal units of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. Two cohorts of breast-feeding mother-infant pairs (n 2560). Cohort 1 (n 1320) was recruited before implementation of the policy to stop accepting free infant formula and cohort 2 (n 1240) was recruited after policy implementation. Participants were followed prospectively for 12 months or until they stopped breast-feeding. The mean number of formula supplements given to infants in the first 24 h was 2·70 (sd 3·11) in cohort 1 and 1·17 (sd 1·94) in cohort 2 (Pbreast-fed during the hospital stay increased from 17·7 % in cohort 1 to 41·3 % in cohort 2 (Pbreast-feeding cessation was significantly lower in cohort 2 (hazard ratio=0·81; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·90). Participants who non-exclusively breast-fed during the hospital stay had a significantly higher risk of stopping any or exclusive breast-feeding. Higher levels of formula supplementation also increased the risk of breast-feeding cessation in a dose-response pattern. After implementation of a hospital policy to pay market price for infant formula, rates of in-hospital formula supplementation were reduced and the rates of in-hospital exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding duration increased.

  9. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  10. Classification of Tattoo Complications in a Hospital Material of 493 Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Jørgen; Sepehri, Mitra; Hutton Carlsen, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Tattooing is a global trend. Clinical knowledge of complications is based on case reports collected over a century. Larger cohorts reflecting complications associated with contemporary trends are lacking. The study was a retrospective review of a consecutive cohort of patients with tattoo complications diagnosed in the "Tattoo Clinic" of Bispebjerg University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 2008 to 2015, based on patient history and systematic clinical examination. A total of 493 tattoo complications in 405 patients were studied. Overall, 184 (37%) presented allergic reactions with plaque elevation in 32.2%, excessive hyperkeratosis in 3.7%, and ulceration in 1.4%, predominantly observed in red tattoos and nuances of red; 66 (13%) presented papulo-nodular reactions, mainly observed in black tattoos (considered non-allergic) and due to pigment agglomeration; 53 (11%) had bacterial infections; 46 (9%) were psycho-social complications; 144 (30%) belonged to several specific diagnostic entities, including photosensitivity, pain syndrome, and lymphopathy. We found no cases of cutaneous or other malignancies. Sarcoidosis was primarily seen in black tattoos and was a common associated disease, found in 23 reactions (5%), compared to the background population. The study introduces a new concept of classification of tattoo complications based on simple tools such as patient history and objective findings supplemented with histology. The study reflects complications originating from presently used tattoo inks, often with organic pigments. The introduced classification has been submitted to the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a proposal to the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Gender differences in the rates of exposure to stressful life events and sensitivity to their depressogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Thornton, L M; Prescott, C A

    2001-04-01

    Women are at greater risk for major depression than men. The authors sought to determine whether the gender difference in prevalence for major depression was due to more frequent exposure to stressful life events and/or greater sensitivity to their depressogenic effects. Male-male, female-female, and male-female twin pairs from a population-based registry were personally interviewed. Each interview assessed the occurrence, to the nearest month, of 18 personal and social network classes of stressful life events and episode onsets of major depression. Standard logistic regression analyses were conducted for the same-sex pairs, and each female twin in the opposite-sex pairs was compared with her male co-twin by using conditional logistic regression. Women consistently reported higher rates of housing problems, loss of confidant, crises and problems getting along with individuals in their proximal network, and illness of individuals within their distal network. In both the same-sex and opposite-sex samples, men reported higher rates of job loss, legal problems, robbery, and work problems. Consistent sex differences in the depressogenic effect of stressful life events were seen for three event categories: men were more sensitive to the depressogenic effects of divorce or separation and work problems; women were more sensitive to the depressogenic effects of problems getting along with individuals in their proximal network. None of the gender difference in prevalence of major depression could be explained by differing rates of or sensitivities to stressful life events. Women reported more interpersonal whereas men reported more legal and work-related stressful life events. Most life event categories influenced the risk for major depression similarly in the two sexes. The results suggest that the greater prevalence of major depression in women versus men is due neither to differences in the rates of reported stressful life events nor to differential sensitivity to their

  12. Prevalent Rate of Nonalbuminuric Renal Insufficiency and Its Association with Cardiovascular Disease Event in Korean Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNonalbuminuric renal insufficiency is a unique category of diabetic kidney diseases. The objectives of the study were to evaluate prevalent rate of nonalbuminuric renal insufficiency and to investigate its relationship with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD event in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.MethodsLaboratory and clinical data of 1,067 subjects with T2DM were obtained and reviewed. Study subjects were allocated into four subgroups according to the CKD classification. Major CVD events were included with coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular events.ResultsNonalbuminuric stage ≥3 CKD group, when compared with albuminuric stage ≥3 CKD group, had shorter diabetic duration, lower concentrations of glycated hemoglobin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lower prevalent rates of retinopathy and previous CVD, and higher rate of treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers. Nonalbuminuric stage ≥3 CKD group showed a greater association with prior CVD events than no CKD group; however, albuminuric stage ≥3 CKD group made addition to increase prevalence of prior CVD events significantly when CKD categories were applied as covariates. Association of prior CVD events, when compared with normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and nonalbuminuria categories, became significant for declined eGFR, which was higher for eGFR of <30 mL/min/1.73 m2, and albuminuria.ConclusionThe results show that subjects with nonalbuminuric stage ≥3 CKD is significantly interrelated with occurrence of prior CVD events than those with normal eGFR with or without albuminuria. Comparing with normal eGFR and nonalbuminuria categories, the combination of increased degree of albuminuria and declined eGFR is becoming significant for the association of prior CVD events.

  13. Mortality Rate and Predictive Factors for Invasive Fungal Rhinosinusitis: Experience in Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premyot Ngaotepprutaram, M.D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To elucidate the mortality rate and prognostic factors in patients with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in Siriraj Hospital. Methods: Thirty-nine patients with a definitive diagnosis of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis were recruited from October 2003 to September 2014. The mortality rate was retrieved, and the impacts of underlying diseases, clinical presentation, disease extension, fungal types, antifungal drugs, and time to treatment were statistically analyzed. Results: The overall mortality rate was 23.1%. All patients except one were immunocompromised. Cranial nerve involvement was the most common symptom. The ethmoid sinus was the most commonly affected intranasal site (46.2%, and the majority of extranasal lesions were located in the orbit (17.9%. Most patients were affected by Aspergillus spp. (64.1%. Alteration of consciousness and periorbital pain were significant negative prognostic factors [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval, 10.37 (1.31–82.07 and 8.67 (1.30–57.88, respectively]. Other factors such as time to treatment, age, and central nervous system involvement had no effect on mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in this study was 23.1%. Negative prognostic factors were alteration of consciousness and periorbital pain. Clinicians must have a high index of suspicion for invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, and aggressive treatment should be considered.

  14. Volume, rates, source and types of add-on pathology test requests across five hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew; Toouli, George; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2012-01-26

    Add-on test requests, where a clinician requests further test assays on an existing specimen, contribute disproportionately to pathology service workload. However, little research has quantified the volume, rates, source or types of add-on tests. This study provides a descriptive analysis of add-on testing within a pathology service serving five hospitals. We analyzed 6 months of test data extracted from a pathology service in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Add-on requests were analyzed in terms of total volume and as a proportion of all test requests and test assays; ten most frequently requested add-on test types for clinical chemistry and hematology; by patient registration category; and proportions of add-on requests received within 1-, 4-, 8-, and 24-h of specimen collection. Add-on test requests constituted 3.7% (n=19,541) of the total 529,361 test requests. Clinical chemistry and hematology add-on requests accounted for 76.9% of all add-on requests. The add-on request rate was higher in the clinical chemistry (5.4%) than in hematology (1.3%). Patients who entered hospital via the emergency department had the highest rates of add-on requests. A total of 79.5% of add-on requests across the pathology service were made within 24-h of specimen collection. The volume of add-on requests is substantial and varies considerably by test type and patient registration category thus impacting differentially upon pathology service departments. While some add-on requests are unavoidable in clinical practice, others are precipitated by inadequate information at the point of care. Improving appropriate utilization of add-on testing will reduce their burden on pathology services.

  15. The Roles of Ethnicity, Sex, and Parental Pain Modeling in Rating of Experienced and Imagined Pain Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Bunch, Jennifer R.; Robinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association of ethnicity, sex, and parental pain modeling on the evaluation of experienced and imagined painful events, 173 healthy volunteers (96 women) completed the Prior Pain Experience Questionnaire, a 79-question assessment of the intensity of painful events, and a questionnaire regarding exposure to parental pain models. Consistent with existing literature, greater ratings of experienced pain were noted among Black vs. White participants. Parental pain modeling was associated with higher imagined pain ratings, but only when the parent matched the participant’s sex. This effect was greater among White and Asian participants than Black or Hispanic participants, implying ethno-cultural effects may moderate the influence of pain modeling on the evaluation of imagined pain events. The clinical implications of these findings, as well as the predictive ability of imagined pain ratings for determining future experiences of pain, should be investigated in future studies. PMID:26085306

  16. Incremental Hospital Cost and Length-of-stay Associated With Treating Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Cervical Spinal Fusion During Fiscal Year 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Steven D; McGuire, Kevin J; Little, Kenneth M; Jevsevar, David; Shea, Kevin; Schlosser, Michael; Ambrose, Karen E; Simon, April W

    2017-10-15

    A retrospective study. To report the incremental hospital resources consumed with treating adverse events experienced by Medicare beneficiaries undergoing a two or three vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. Hospitals are increasingly at financial risk for patients experiencing adverse events due "pay for performance." Little is known about incremental resources consumed when treating patients who experienced an adverse event after cervical spinal fusions. Fiscal years 2013 and 2014 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file was used to identify 86,265 beneficiaries who underwent 2 or 3 vertebrae level cervical spinal fusion. International Classification of Diseases 9th Clinical Modification diagnostic and procedure codes were used to identify 10 adverse events. This study estimated both the observed and risk-adjusted incremental hospital resources consumed (cost [2014 US $] and length-of-stay) in treating beneficiaries experiencing each adverse event. Overall, 6.2% of beneficiaries undergoing cervical spinal fusion experienced at least one of the study's adverse events. Beneficiaries experiencing any complication consumed significantly more hospital resources (incremental cost of $28,638) and had longer length-of-stay (incremental stays of 9.1 days). After adjusting for patient demographics and comorbid conditions, incremental cost of treating adverse events ranged from $42,358 (infection) to $10,100 (dural tear). Adverse events frequently occur and add substantially to the hospital costs of patients undergoing cervical spinal fusion. Shared decision-making instruments should clearly provide these risk estimates to the patient before surgical consideration. Investment in activities that have been shown to reduce specific adverse events is warranted, and this study may allow health systems to prioritize performance improvement areas. 3.

  17. Potential modification of the UKPDS risk engine and evaluation of macrovascular event rates in controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang F

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fred Yang,1 June Ye,2 Kenneth Pomerantz,3 Murray Stewart1 1Alternative Development Program, GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA, 2Discovery Biometrics, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Clinical Development and Medical Affairs, Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Ridgefield, CT, USA Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate a modified UKPDS risk engine in order to establish a risk prediction benchmark for the general diabetes population. Methods: Data sources were summary demographic and risk factor data from the major type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes studies, including ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, RECORD, PROactive, ADOPT, and BARI 2D. Patients in these studies spanned a wide spectrum of disease, from drug-naïve to insulin-dependent. Cardiovascular events/major adverse coronary events (CVE/MACE were primary or safety end points. Overall observed rates for cardiovascular events/MACE were summarized, and the observed annualized event rates were calculated using linear approximation. Simulation studies were then conducted using original (cardiovascular history excluded and modified (cardiovascular history included United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS models; the predicted event rates were then compared with the observed event rates for all studies. The consistency of the predicted rates derived from each model was then evaluated using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Results: The original UKPDS model tended to overestimate event rates across studies. The ratio of predicted events versus observed MACE ranged from 0.9 to 2.0, with mean of 1.5 ± 0.4 and a coefficient of variation of 26% (R2 = 0.80. However, cardiovascular risk predictions were more precise using a modified UKPDS model; the ratio of predicted versus observed MACE events ranged from 1.8 to 2.4, with a mean of 2.1 ± 0.25 and a coefficient of variation of 13% (R2 = 0.94. Conclusion: A modified UKPDS model which includes adjustments for

  18. A Comparative Assessment of Adverse Event Classification in the Out of Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Lave, Judith R.; Weaver, Matthew D.; Guyette, Francis X.; Arnold, Robert M.; Martin-Gill, Christian; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Krackhardt, David; Mosesso, Vincent N.; Roth, Ronald N.; Wadas, Richard J.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to test reliability of two approaches to classify adverse events (AEs) associated with Helicopter EMS (HEMS) transport. Methods The first approach for AE classification involved flight nurses and paramedics (RN/Medics) and mid-career emergency physicians (MC-EMPs) independently reviewing 50 randomly selected HEMS medical records. The second approach involved RN/Medics and MC-EMPs meeting as a group to openly discuss 20 additional medical records and reach consensus-based AE decision. We compared all AE decisions to a reference criterion based on the decision of three senior emergency physicians (Sr-EMPs). We designed a study to detect an improvement in agreement (reliability) from fair (kappa=0.2) to moderate (kappa=0.5). We calculated sensitivity, specificity, percent agreement, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV / NPV). Results For the independent reviews, the Sr-EMP group identified 26 AEs while individual clinician reviewers identified between 19 and 50 AEs. Agreement on the presence/absence of an AE between Sr-EMPs and three MC-EMPs ranged from K=0.20 to K=0.25. Agreement between Sr-EMPs and three RN/Medics ranged from K=0.11 to K=0.19. For the consensus/open-discussion approach, the Sr-EMPs identified 13 AEs, the MC-EMP group identified 18 AEs, and RN/Medic group identified 36 AEs. Agreement between Sr-EMPs and MC-EMP group was (K=0.30 95%CI −0.12, 0.72), whereas agreement between Sr-EMPs and RN/Medic group was (K=0.40 95%CI 0.01, 0.79). Agreement between all three groups was fair (K=0.33, 95%CI 0.06, 0.66). Percent agreement (58-68%) and NPV (63-76%) was moderately dissimilar between clinicians, while sensitivity (25-80%), specificity (43-97%), and PPV (48-83%) varied. Conclusions We identified a higher level of agreement/reliability in AE decisions utilizing a consensus-based approach for review rather than independent reviews. PMID:24878451

  19. A comparative assessment of adverse event classification in the out-of-hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Lave, Judith R; Weaver, Matthew D; Guyette, Francis X; Arnold, Robert M; Martin-Gill, Christian; Rittenberger, Jon C; Krackhardt, David; Mosesso, Vincent N; Roth, Ronald N; Wadas, Richard J; Yealy, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    We sought to test reliability of two approaches to classify adverse events (AEs) associated with helicopter EMS (HEMS) transport. The first approach for AE classification involved flight nurses and paramedics (RN/Medics) and mid-career emergency physicians (MC-EMPs) independently reviewing 50 randomly selected HEMS medical records. The second approach involved RN/Medics and MC-EMPs meeting as a group to openly discuss 20 additional medical records and reach consensus-based AE decision. We compared all AE decisions to a reference criterion based on the decision of three senior emergency physicians (Sr-EMPs). We designed a study to detect an improvement in agreement (reliability) from fair (kappa = 0.2) to moderate (kappa = 0.5). We calculated sensitivity, specificity, percent agreement, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV/NPV). For the independent reviews, the Sr-EMP group identified 26 AEs while individual clinician reviewers identified between 19 and 50 AEs. Agreement on the presence/absence of an AE between Sr-EMPs and three MC-EMPs ranged from κ = 0.20 to κ = 0.25. Agreement between Sr-EMPs and three RN/Medics ranged from κ = 0.11 to κ = 0.19. For the consensus/open-discussion approach, the Sr-EMPs identified 13 AEs, the MC-EMP group identified 18 AEs, and RN/medic group identified 36 AEs. Agreement between Sr-EMPs and MC-EMP group was (κ = 0.30 95%CI -0.12, 0.72), whereas agreement between Sr-EMPs and RN/medic group was (κ = 0.40 95%CI 0.01, 0.79). Agreement between all three groups was fair (κ = 0.33, 95%CI 0.06, 0.66). Percent agreement (58-68%) and NPV (63-76%) was moderately dissimilar between clinicians, while sensitivity (25-80%), specificity (43-97%), and PPV (48-83%) varied. We identified a higher level of agreement/reliability in AE decisions utilizing a consensus-based approach for review rather than independent reviews.

  20. Cost comparison of orthopaedic fracture pathways using discrete event simulation in a Glasgow hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gillian H; Jenkins, Paul J; McDonald, David A; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec; Nugent, Margaret; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2017-09-07

    Healthcare faces the continual challenge of improving outcome while aiming to reduce cost. The aim of this study was to determine the micro cost differences of the Glasgow non-operative trauma virtual pathway in comparison to a traditional pathway. Discrete event simulation was used to model and analyse cost and resource utilisation with an activity-based costing approach. Data for a full comparison before the process change was unavailable so we used a modelling approach, comparing a virtual fracture clinic (VFC) with a simulated traditional fracture clinic (TFC). The orthopaedic unit VFC pathway pioneered at Glasgow Royal Infirmary has attracted significant attention and interest and is the focus of this cost study. Our study focused exclusively on patients with non-operative trauma attending emergency department or the minor injuries unit and the subsequent step in the patient pathway. Retrospective studies of patient outcomes as a result of the protocol introductions for specific injuries are presented in association with activity costs from the models. Patients are satisfied with the new pathway, the information provided and the outcome of their injuries (Evidence Level IV). There was a 65% reduction in the number of first outpatient face-to-face (f2f) attendances in orthopaedics. In the VFC pathway, the resources required per day were significantly lower for all staff groups (p≤0.001). The overall cost per patient of the VFC pathway was £22.84 (95% CI 21.74 to 23.92) per patient compared with £36.81 (95% CI 35.65 to 37.97) for the TFC pathway. Our results give a clearer picture of the cost comparison of the virtual pathway over a wholly traditional f2f clinic system. The use of simulation-based stochastic costings in healthcare economic analysis has been limited to date, but this study provides evidence for adoption of this method as a basis for its application in other healthcare settings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  1. Impact of Modality Choice on Rates of Hospitalization in Patients Eligible for Both Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert R.; Ravani, Pietro; Zhang, Xin; Garg, Amit X.; Blake, Peter G.; Austin, Peter C.; Zacharias, James M.; Johnson, John F.; Pandeya, Sanjay; Verrelli, Mauro; Oliver, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: Hospitalization rates are a relevant consideration when choosing or recommending a dialysis modality. Previous comparisons of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) have not been restricted to individuals who were eligible for both therapies. ♦ Methods: We conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study of people 18 years of age and older who were eligible for both PD and HD, and who started outpatient dialysis between 2007 and 2010 in four Canadian dialysis programs. Zero-inflated negative binomial models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to examine the association between modality choice and rates of hospitalization. ♦ Results: The study enrolled 314 patients. A trend in the HD group toward higher rates of hospitalization, observed in the primary analysis, became significant when modality was treated as a time-varying exposure or when the population was restricted to elective outpatient starts in patients with at least 4 months of pre-dialysis care. Cardiovascular disease, infectious complications, and elective surgery were the most common reasons for hospital admission; only 23% of hospital stays were directly related to complications of dialysis or kidney disease. ♦ Conclusions: Efforts to promote PD utilization are unlikely to result in increased rates of hospitalization, and efforts to reduce hospital admissions should focus on potentially avoidable causes of cardiovascular disease and infectious complications. PMID:24525596

  2. Evaluating the Rate of Compliance with Radiation Protection Standards in Shohada Teaching Hospital -Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Pourasghar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ​ Background and Objectives : If proper diagnosis is regarded as the basis of modern medicine, medical radiography is the foundation of medical diagnosis. Properly applied radiography helps physicians to diagnose problems. On one side, using it to improve quality of life is essential but on the other hand, its hazards are obvious. A reasonable usage and according to protection standards are the best way to benefit its advantages and reduce the hazards. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted by a researcher-made check list that its validity and reliability were confirmed by experts. It was performed as direct observation in Shohada teaching hospital. Collected data were entered into Excel software and analyzed applying descriptive statistics. Results : The results indicated that compliance with protection standards regarding staff protection ranged from 73.6 to 100 percent and it ranged from 0 to 99.2 percent regarding patient protection. Compliance with protection standards concerning the availability of the devices was lower than average but it was rated higher than average regarding environmental protection. Conclusion : In general, not all protection standards for radiological diagnostic tests are followed at the radiology ward in the shohada teaching hospital. Continuous training courses and increasing staff and patients' awareness might resolve this problem.

  3. Prediction of hospital mortality by changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Berzan, E

    2015-03-01

    Deterioration of physiological or laboratory variables may provide important prognostic information. We have studied whether a change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value calculated using the (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula) over the hospital admission, would have predictive value. An analysis was performed on all emergency medical hospital episodes (N = 61964) admitted between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2011. A stepwise logistic regression model examined the relationship between mortality and change in renal function from admission to discharge. The fully adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) for 5 classes of GFR deterioration showed a stepwise increased risk of 30-day death with OR\\'s of 1.42 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.68), 1.59 (1.27, 1.99), 2.71 (2.24, 3.27), 5.56 (4.54, 6.81) and 11.9 (9.0, 15.6) respectively. The change in eGFR during a clinical episode, following an emergency medical admission, powerfully predicts the outcome.

  4. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seena Fazel

    Full Text Available To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services.We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder on outcomes.Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949 after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%, and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613 with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied-substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes.Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses.

  5. Adverse drug events in hospitals: a systematic review Eventos adversos a medicamentos em hospitais: uma revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Giordani Cano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate studies on the occurrence of adverse drug events (ADEs in hospitals in order to learn about their frequency and characteristics, comparing the methods for identifying them and the various definitions. A search was conducted on MEDLINE and identified studies published from 2000 to 2009. Inclusion criteria were: studies in populations not selected for specific diseases or drugs and ADEs that occurred during hospitalization. Twenty-nine studies were selected, displaying multiple sources of heterogeneity, including differences in the study populations, surveillance techniques, definitions of ADEs, and indicators. The proportion of patients with ADEs ranged from 1.6% to 41.4% of inpatients and the rates ranged from 1.7 to 51.8 events/100 admissions. A considerable share of these events could have been avoided. The findings show that ADEs in inpatients are a public health problem. However, further studies are needed to monitor these adverse events in order to effectively promote safe drug use.O objetivo foi avaliar estudos sobre a ocorrência de eventos adversos a medicamentos (EAM em hospitais para conhecer as suas freqüências e características, comparando os métodos de identificação e as definições utilizadas para caracterizá-los. A busca foi realizada no MEDLINE e identificou estudos publicados entre 2000 e 2009. Os critérios de inclusão foram estudos em população não selecionada por patologias ou medicamentos específicos e os EAM ocorridos durante a internação. Foram selecionados 29 estudos e encontradas múltiplas fontes de heterogeneidade entre eles, incluindo diferenças nas populações estudadas, nas técnicas de vigilância, nas definições de EAM e nos indicadores. A freqüência de pacientes com EAM está entre 1,6% e 41,4% dos pacientes internados e as taxas entre 1,7 e 51,8 eventos/100 internações. Uma parte considerável desses eventos poderia ter sido evitada. Os

  6. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Cardiovascular Events, and Death: Outcomes at 4 Years From the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Matthew A; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Smith, Sidney C; Eagle, Kim; Ohman, E Magnus; Goto, Shinya; Kuder, Julia; Im, Kyungah; Wilson, Peter W F; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2015-09-08

    Despite the known association of diabetes mellitus with cardiovascular events, there are few contemporary data on the long-term outcomes from international cohorts of patients with diabetes mellitus. We sought to describe cardiovascular outcomes at 4 years and to identify predictors of these events in patients with diabetes mellitus. The Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) registry is an international registry of patients at high risk of atherothrombosis or established atherothrombosis. Four-year event rates in patients with diabetes mellitus were determined with the corrected group prognosis method. Of the 45 227 patients in the REACH registry who had follow-up at 4 years, 43.6% (n=19 699) had diabetes mellitus at baseline. The overall risk and hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke were greater in patients with diabetes compared with patients without diabetes (16.5% versus 13.1%; adjusted HR, 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.35). There was also an increase in both cardiovascular death (8.9% versus 6.0%; adjusted HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.26-1.52) and overall death (14.3% versus 9.9%; adjusted HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.30-1.51). Diabetes mellitus was associated with a 33% greater risk of hospitalization for heart failure (9.4% versus 5.9%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.18-1.50). In patients with diabetes mellitus, heart failure at baseline was independently associated with cardiovascular death (adjusted HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 2.17-2.77; P<0.001) and hospitalization for heart failure (adjusted odds ratio, 4.72; 95% CI, 4.22-5.29; P<0.001). Diabetes mellitus substantially increases the risk of death, ischemic events, and heart failure. Patients with both diabetes mellitus and heart failure are at particularly elevated risk of cardiovascular death, highlighting the need for additional therapies in this high-risk population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Hospital admission rates for alcoholic intoxication after policy changes in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Matthias; Gmel, Gerhard

    2011-11-01

    In February, 2005, the canton of Geneva in Switzerland prohibited the off-premise sale of alcoholic beverages between 9 pm and 7 am, and banned their sale in gas stations and video stores. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this policy change on hospital admission rates for alcoholic intoxication. An interrupted time series analysis of this natural experiment was performed with data on hospitalisations for acute alcoholic intoxication during the 2002-2007 period. The canton of Geneva was treated as the experimental group, while all other Swiss cantons were used as the control group. In the experimental site, the policy change was found to have a significant effect on admission rates among adolescents and young adults. Depending on the age group, hospitalisation rates for alcoholic intoxication fell by an estimated 25-40% as the result of restricted alcohol availability. Modest restrictions on opening hours and the density of off-premise outlets were found to be of relevance for public health in the canton of Geneva. In light of this finding, policy makers should consider such action as a promising approach to alcohol prevention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Access to palliative care services during a terminal hospital episode reduces intervention rates and hospital costs: a database study of 19 707 elderly patients dying in hospital, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Anthony W

    2017-05-01

    The burden of healthcare costs for persons approaching death is of increasing concern. This study examines cost savings associated with access to palliative care (PC) during a hospital episode ending in death for a large sample of elderly patients. A retrospective cohort study of administrative data for the Department of Veterans' Affairs clients identified patient demographics, hospital characteristics, utilisation data and component costs for the hospital terminal episode for patients aged ≥ 70 years who died in hospital between July 2011 and June 2015. Differences between patients with and without access to PC were analysed with descriptive statistics and negative binomial regression models. Access to PC service was reported for 33.2% of patients, 59.5% for those with a cancer diagnosis and 24.3% for other patients. Rates were significantly lower in private hospitals for all patient groups. For the complete sample, PC access was associated with significantly lower rates of admission into the intensive care unit (1.9% vs 10.6%, P terminal episodes was $10 801 for PC patients and $16 165 for those with no recorded PC access (P < 0.001). All differences remained significant after adjustment for patient age, comorbidity and hospital type. In a hospital episode ending in death, access to PC services was associated with significantly lower rates of medical interventions and total hospital costs. © 2017 Commonwealth of Australia Internal Medicine Journal © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. Patient safety events in out-of-hospital paediatric airway management: a medical record review by the CSI-EMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew; Meckler, Garth; Lambert, William; Dickinson, Caitlin; Dickinson, Kathryn; Van Otterloo, Joshua; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2016-11-11

    To describe the frequency and characterise the nature of patient safety events in paediatric out-of-hospital airway management. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional medical record review of all 'lights and sirens' emergency medicine services transports from 2008 to 2011 in patients <18 years of age in the Portland Oregon metropolitan area. A chart review tool (see online supplementary appendix) was adapted from landmark patient safety studies and revised after pilot testing. Expert panels of physicians and paramedics performed blinded reviews of each chart, identified safety events and described their nature. The primary outcomes were presence and severity of patient safety events related to airway management including oxygen administration, bag-valve-mask ventilation (BVM), airway adjuncts and endotracheal intubation (ETI).DC1SM110.1136/bmjopen-2016-012259.supp1supplementary appendix RESULTS: From the 11 328 paediatric transports during the study period, there were 497 'lights and sirens' (code 3) transports (4.4%). 7 transports were excluded due to missing data. Of the 490 transports included in the analysis, 329 had a total of 338 airway management procedures (some had more than 1 procedure): 61.6% were treated with oxygen, 15.3% with BVM, 8.6% with ETI and 2% with airway adjuncts. The frequency of errors was: 21% (71/338) related to oxygen use, 9.8% (33/338) related to BVM, 9.5% (32/338) related to intubation and 0.9% (3/338) related to airway adjunct use. 58% of intubations required 3 or more attempts or failed altogether. Cardiac arrest was associated with higher odds of a severe error. Errors in paediatric out-of-hospital airway management are common, especially in the context of intubations and during cardiac arrest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. International Geographic Variation in Event Rates in Trials of Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Køber, Lars; Jhund, Pardeep S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International geographic differences in outcomes may exist for clinical trials of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), but there are few data for those with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF). METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed outcomes by international geographic...... Trial in HF-REF (CORONA). Crude rates of heart failure hospitalization varied by geographic region, and more so for HF-PEF than for HF-REF. Rates in patients with HF-PEF were highest in the United States/Canada (HF hospitalization rate 7.6 per 100 patient-years in I-Preserve; 8.8 in CHARM.......01-1.74; P=0.04) in I-Preserve and 1.85 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.91; P=0.01) in CHARM-Preserved. In HF-REF, rates of HF hospitalization were slightly lower in Western Europe compared with other regions. For both HF-REF and HF-PEF, there were few regional differences in rates of all...

  11. Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Stern, Ariel Dora; Baum, Christopher F; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-03-01

    To examine compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) as well as evaluate the BFHI and its components on breastfeeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education level. Quasi-experimental study using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2004 to 2008. Birth facilities in Maine. 915 mothers who gave birth in four hospitals that were BFHI-accredited or became accredited and 1099 mothers from six matched non-BFHI facilities. Mothers reported on seven (of 10) BFHI practices (breastfeeding practice score 0-7) and receipt of a gift pack with formula (yes/no). Self-report of breastfeeding initiation, any breast feeding for ≥4 weeks, exclusive breast feeding for ≥4 weeks. 34.6% of mothers from BFHI-accredited facilities reported experiencing all seven BFHI breastfeeding practices, while 28.4% reported being given a gift pack with formula. Among mothers with lower education, the BFHI increased breastfeeding initiation by 8.6 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.086 [95% CI, 0.01 to 0.16]) and, independently, each additional breastfeeding practice was associated with an average increase in breastfeeding initiation of 16.2 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.162 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.18]). Among all mothers and mothers with higher education, there was no effect of the BFHI on breastfeeding rates. Compliance with BFHI practices among BFHI-accredited facilities is not optimal and needs to be monitored, as greater compliance may have an even larger impact on breastfeeding rates and potentially reduce socio-economic disparities in breast feeding.

  12. Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Stern, Ariel Dora; Baum, Christopher F; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) as well as evaluate the BFHI and its components on breastfeeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education level. Design Quasi-experimental study using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2004 to 2008. Setting Birth facilities in Maine. Participants 915 mothers who gave birth in four hospitals that were BFHI-accredited or became accredited and 1099 mothers from six matched non-BFHI facilities. Mothers reported on seven (of 10) BFHI practices (breastfeeding practice score 0–7) and receipt of a gift pack with formula (yes/no). Main outcome measures Self-report of breastfeeding initiation, any breast feeding for ≥4 weeks, exclusive breast feeding for ≥4 weeks. Results 34.6% of mothers from BFHI-accredited facilities reported experiencing all seven BFHI breastfeeding practices, while 28.4% reported being given a gift pack with formula. Among mothers with lower education, the BFHI increased breastfeeding initiation by 8.6 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.086 [95% CI, 0.01 to 0.16]) and, independently, each additional breastfeeding practice was associated with an average increase in breastfeeding initiation of 16.2 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.162 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.18]). Among all mothers and mothers with higher education, there was no effect of the BFHI on breastfeeding rates. Conclusions Compliance with BFHI practices among BFHI-accredited facilities is not optimal and needs to be monitored, as greater compliance may have an even larger impact on breastfeeding rates and potentially reduce socio-economic disparities in breast feeding. PMID:24277661

  13. The effectiveness of the solidary care ahead of events that follow the chronicle illness process of the hospitalized child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Maria Alves

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Article of research that objectified to identify how the nurses carrie through the solidary care front to the alterations in the evolution of the hospitalized child that lead to the chronicle illness process. The methodology is qualitative through the exploratory- description method. The subjects had been nine assisstencial nurses who act in pediatric units of a great hospital of Curitiba-PR wich is reference in the pediatric area in all Brazil. For the collection of the information we used the half-structuralized interview. To accomplish the analysis of the depositions we followed the content analysis proposal by Bardin (1991. The ethical rules had been followed in agreement to the Resolution 196/96. All the subjects had signed the term of content of written informed consent. After the transcription of the interviews that had been recorded, we initiate the categorization. Three Units of Context and six Units of Meaning had been apprehended.The Units of Context include the perception of the chronicle illness process of the hospitalized child by the nurse; the perception of the nursing actions of solidary care by the family and, pointing characteristics that interpose the solidary care. For the analysis of the depositions it was possible to perceive that the lack of familiar structure is visible, therefore the child remains long time in the hospital, modifying its daily routine, affecting the family and changing its routine, that is, coexisting with the chronicle illness process imposes alterations in the existing space and temporality of the child. The family and child need support supplied by the nurse in solidary care. The solidary care is perceived by the bond, interest, contact, dialogue, support, the presence, the listening, for the empathy, reliable transmission and hope. It can be established with multiprofessional work, preparation of the team, knowledge, availability, respect for the other. The solidary care is a process, an event that

  14. Impact of quadripolar LV leads on heart failure hospitalization rates among patients implanted with CRT-D: data from the Israeli ICD Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Eran; Suleiman, Mahmoud; Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Haim, Moti; Geist, Michael; Luria, David; Glikson, Michael; Goldenberg, Ilan; Michowitz, Yoav

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for heart failure (HF); however, a third of patients are non-responders. The development of quadripolar left ventricular (LV) lead was shown, mainly in single manufactures' registry, to improve LV remodeling and overall mortality. However, limited reports exist on the impact of quadripolar LV leads on HF hospitalization rates in real-life cohorts. We evaluated the clinical outcomes associated with quadripolar LV leads in a large nation-wide registry including all patients implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D). Between July 2010 and October 2016, 2913 consecutive patients were implanted with a CRT-D and all were prospectively enrolled in the Israeli ICD Registry. Quadripolar LV leads were implanted in 973 (33.4%) patients during this period, and their clinical outcomes were compared to CRT-D recipients implanted with a bipolar LV lead. Primary endpoint was HF hospitalization rate. Quadripolar leads were implanted more in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and for primary prevention indication and less in post-infarction patients and for secondary prevention of sudden death. Longer QRS duration was observed with quadripolar leads (147 ± 23 vs 143 ± 25; p < 0.001). Outcome event rate for 100 patient years revealed no difference in HF hospitalization rates between bipolar and quadripolar LV leads. Quadripolar lead implant led to lower cardiac mortality, with no influence on overall mortality. Multivariate analysis revealed no significant differences in study endpoints between bipolar and quadripolar LV leads. In a large real-life registry, implantation of quadripolar LV leads in patients with CRT-D did not influence HF hospitalization rates.

  15. Constraining the rate of oceanic deoxygenation leading up to a Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2: ~94 Ma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Chadlin M; Owens, Jeremy D; Nielsen, Sune G

    2017-08-01

    The rates of marine deoxygenation leading to Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events are poorly recognized and constrained. If increases in primary productivity are the primary driver of these episodes, progressive oxygen loss from global waters should predate enhanced carbon burial in underlying sediments-the diagnostic Oceanic Anoxic Event relic. Thallium isotope analysis of organic-rich black shales from Demerara Rise across Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 reveals evidence of expanded sediment-water interface deoxygenation ~43 ± 11 thousand years before the globally recognized carbon cycle perturbation. This evidence for rapid oxygen loss leading to an extreme ancient climatic event has timely implications for the modern ocean, which is already experiencing large-scale deoxygenation.

  16. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment modality. Design: It is a retrospective study of all confirmed. Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Ile. Ife (OAUTHC) between 1986 and 2002. Patients and methods: The medical records of all the patients with the histopathologically confirmed ...

  17. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs), percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider strategizing fall and

  18. The contribution of staff call light response time to fall and injurious fall rates: an exploratory study in four US hospitals using archived hospital data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and the effect of programs on decreasing total falls and fall-related injuries is still inconclusive. This exploratory multi-hospital study examined the unique contribution of call light response time to predicting total fall rates and injurious fall rates in inpatient acute care settings. The conceptual model was based on Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and health-care outcomes. The covariates included the hospital, unit type, total nursing hours per patient-day (HPPDs, percentage of the total nursing HPPDs supplied by registered nurses, percentage of patients aged 65 years or older, average case mix index, percentage of patients with altered mental status, percentage of patients with hearing problems, and call light use rate per patient-day. Methods We analyzed data from 28 units from 4 Michigan hospitals, using archived data and chart reviews from January 2004 to May 2009. The patient care unit-month, defined as data aggregated by month for each patient care unit, was the unit of analysis (N = 1063. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used. Results Faster call light response time was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. Units with a higher call light use rate had lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of productive nursing hours provided by registered nurses was associated with lower total fall and injurious fall rates. A higher percentage of patients with altered mental status was associated with a higher total fall rate but not a higher injurious fall rate. Units with a higher percentage of patients aged 65 years or older had lower injurious fall rates. Conclusions Faster call light response time appeared to contribute to lower total fall and injurious fall rates, after controlling for the covariates. For practical relevance, hospital and nursing executives should consider

  19. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Eric; Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981-2009) and hospital admission (1995-2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.59% to -2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI -7.79% to -3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments.

  20. Diffusion of innovation I: Formulary acceptance rates of new drugs in teaching and non-teaching British Columbia hospitals--a hospital pharmacy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, M M; Hill, D S; Stratton, T P

    1994-12-01

    Lag times in the diffusion of new drugs in the hospital setting have both patient care and pharmaceutical industry implications. This two-part series uses diffusion theory to examine differences in the adoption rates of new drugs in British Columbia teaching and non-teaching hospitals. Formulary addition of a new drug by a hospital's Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee was considered the adoption indicator. Time for adoption was defined as the difference between a drug's Canadian market approval date and the date of formulary addition. Surveys were mailed in September 1990 to 41 hospital pharmacies (response rate = 88%), asking respondents to provide formulary inclusion dates of 29 drugs marketed between July 1987 and March 1990. A significant difference (Mann-Whitney U Test, p < 0.0358) in median adoption time was observed between the six teaching and 25 non-teaching study hospitals, with the former adopting a new drug in 7.5 months versus the latter adopting a new drug in 12.1 months.

  1. What are key determinants of hospital admissions, readmission rate and day case rate within the South African medical schemes population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nondumiso Gugu Khumalo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  BACKGROUND: In South Africa, private hospitals absorb a high proportion of the total health expenditure on private health care. Between 2008-2010 private hospital expenditure which includes ward fees, theatre fees, consumables, medicines and per diem arrangements consumed between 40.5% and 40.9% of the total benefits paid by medical schemes from the risk pool, whilst in-hospital managed care fees ranged between 1.8% and 2.8% for the equivalent years.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to highlight key factors contributing to utilisation of hospital services within the medical schemes population and to recommend “appropriate” and cost effective strategies on hospital utilisation management.METHODS: A cross sectional survey informed by retrospective analysis of quantitative data was used. Researchers also triangulated quantitative data with systematic review of literature.RESULTS: The results show that demographic indicators such as age profile, dependency ratio, pensioner ratio and prevalence of chronic conditions are not the only key factors influencing hospital admissions, but rather the effectiveness of each medical scheme in containing hospital admissions is also influenced by available technical capacity on utilisation review and audit as well as the managed care methodology including the philosophy underpinning benefit option design.CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of “value based” managed care programs linked to benefit option design in health care utilisation management. The choice of one managed care program over the other often leads to tradeoffs whereby unintended consequences emanate. Medical schemes are therefore encouraged to continuously review their managed care programs to ensure value for money as well as better access and health outcomes.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v13i2.207

  2. Effects of urinary cortisol levels and resting heart rate on the risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ockenburg, Sonja L.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; de Jonge, Peter; Gans, Reinold O. B.

    Background and aims: Higher cortisol levels are associated with cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. It is unclear whether this association also exists in a general population of younger adults and for non-fatal cardiovascular events. Likewise, resting heart rate is associated with

  3. Convenient Access to Professional Interpreters in the Hospital Decreases Readmission Rates and Estimated Hospital Expenditures for Patients with Limited English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Gregorich, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Twenty-five million people in the U.S. have limited English proficiency (LEP); this growing and aging population experiences worse outcomes when hospitalized. Federal requirements that hospitals provide language access services are very challenging to implement in the fast-paced, 24-hour hospital environment. Objective Determine if increasing access to professional interpreters improves hospital outcomes for older patients with LEP Design Natural experiment on a medicine floor of an academic hospital Participants Patients age ≥50 discharged between Jan 15, 2007–Jan 15, 2010. Exposure Dual-handset interpreter telephone at every bedside July 15, 2008–Mar 14, 2009 Outcome Measures 30-day readmission, length of stay (LOS), estimated hospital expenditures Results Of 8,077 discharges, 1,963 were for LEP, and 6,114 for English-proficient (EP) patients. There was a significant decrease in observed 30-day readmission rates for the LEP group during the 8-month intervention period compared to 18 months pre-intervention (17.8% vs. 13.4%); at the same time EP readmission rates increased (16.7% vs. 19.7%); results remained significant in adjusted analyses. This improved readmission outcome for the LEP group was not maintained during the subsequent post-intervention period when the telephones became less accessible. There was no significant intervention impact on LOS in either unadjusted or adjusted analyses. After accounting for interpreter services costs, the estimated 119 readmissions averted during the intervention period were associated with estimated monthly hospital expenditure savings of $161,404. Conclusions Comprehensive language access represents an important, high value service that all medical centers should provide in order to achieve equitable, quality healthcare for vulnerable LEP populations. PMID:27579909

  4. Ecological factors associated with pandemic influenza A (H1N1 hospitalization rates in California, USA: a geospatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Maliszewski

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus subtype (H1N1 pandemic had a large impact in the United States of America (USA, causing an estimated 192,000 to 398,000 hospitalizations and 8,720 to 18,050 deaths between April 2009 and mid- March 2010. Recent research on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic has largely focused on individual, non-spatial demographic characterizations (e.g. age and race/ethnicity associated with H1N1 hospitalizations. Broader ecological factors such as transportation use, land use and other socioeconomic factors are important aspects of influenza studies that have not been empirically examined. This research explores and identifies ecological factors associated with 2009 H1N1 pandemic hospitalization rates. We conducted a spatial regression analysis of county level hospitalization rates from 3 April to 15 September, 2009 obtained via the California Department of Public Health. Hospitalization rates were found to be spatially dependent. Public transportation usage rates and agricultural land use proportions were significant environmental factors positively related to hospitalization rates. Consistent with public health official’s assumptions and existing evidence, county percentages of persons less than 18 years of age were positively associated with hospitalization. These findings help to clarify the limited consensus and dubious evidence on the role of broader ecological factors associated with pandemic influenza. A better understanding of the ecological risk factors associated with hospitalizations should also benefit public health officials with respect to their work aiming at improving emergency supply allocation and non-pharmaceutical intervention strategies in the context of an influenza pandemic.

  5. Prevalence of epilepsy and seizure disorders as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE) in children admitted to a tertiary hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Anjos, Alessandra Marques dos; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and describe clinical characteristics of seizure disorders and epilepsy as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE) in children admitted at the emergency and followed in a tertiary hospital. METHOD: Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection using specific guidelines to determine the etiology of ALTE. RESULTS: During the study, 30 (4.2%) children admitted to the hospital had a diagnosis of ALTE. There was a predominance of males (73%...

  6. Magnitude of and risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge stroke in patients with acute coronary syndromes: findings from a Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaj, Andrzej; Flasinska, Katarzyna; Gore, Joel M; Anderson, Frederick A; Dabbous, Omar H; Spencer, Frederick A; Goldberg, Robert J; Fox, Keith A A

    2005-06-21

    Stroke is a recognized complication after acute myocardial infarction, but few studies have investigated the incidence and outcome of stroke in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study examined the incidence and outcomes of hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic stroke and risk factors associated with stroke in patients with ACS. Data were obtained from 35,233 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) with an ACS. In-hospital strokes occurred in 310 patients (0.9%), of which 100 (32.6%) were fatal. The incidence of in-hospital stroke was significantly higher in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction than in non-ST-segment myocardial infarction or unstable angina (1.3%, 0.9%, 0.5%, respectively; P<0.001). Overall, 35.5% of in-hospital strokes occurred within 6 days of hospitalization. The strongest risk factor for in-hospital nonhemorrhagic stroke was in-hospital CABG, followed by in-hospital atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, initial enzyme elevation, and advanced age. Prior statin use was a protective factor. After controlling for potential confounders, in-hospital mortality was significantly higher among patients who experienced an in-hospital stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 8.3; 95% CI, 6.0 to 11.4). A total of 269 additional strokes (1.1%) occurred within 6 months after discharge from hospital, of which 56 (20.9%) were fatal. The most important risk factor for postdischarge stroke was the occurrence of an in-hospital stroke. Stroke is an uncommon event in patients with ACS but is associated with high mortality. Despite current therapy, the incidence of postdischarge stroke is not low. New approaches are warranted to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with ACS.

  7. Great comeback rates AHA award. Franciscan Children's develops less costly, alternative programs to save hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreria, J

    1998-01-01

    After struggling financially for several years, Boston-based Franciscan Children's Hospital wins the coveted "Great Comeback of the Year" award. With the award, the hospital produces a PR campaign that resulted a plethora of television, print and radio stories. Officials of the Franciscan Children's Hospital announced its financial soundness and commitment to its Boston market area.

  8. Hospital-acquired infection rate in a tertiary care teaching hospital in China: a cross-sectional survey involving 2434 inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Bin Tao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A single-day hospital-acquired infections (HAIs point prevalence study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in China. The overall prevalence rate of HAIs was 3.53% (95% confidence interval 2.80–4.26% among 2434 inpatients surveyed. Respiratory system infection was the most common type of HAI (49.43%, followed by surgical site infection (22.99%. The pathogen detection results for 50 patients showed Pseudomonas aeruginosa to account for 24.00% of isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.00% and Escherichia coli (14.00%.

  9. Higher rate of serious perinatal events in non-Western women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marianne Brehm; Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted; Weber, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To elucidate possible mechanisms behind the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality among migrants in Denmark, this study aimed to analyse characteristics of perinatal deaths at Hvidovre Hospital 2006-2010 according to maternal country of origin. Methods: We identified...... children born at Hvidovre Hospital who died perinatally and included the patient files in a series of case studies. Our data were linked to data from popu­lation-covering registries in Statistics Denmark. Timing, causes of death as well as social, medical and obstetric characteristics of the parents were...... described according to maternal country of origin. Results: This study included 125 perinatal deaths. The data indicated that intrapartum death, death caused by maternal disease, lethal malformation and preterm birth may be more frequent among non-Western than among Danish-born women. Obesity...

  10. Higher rate of serious perinatal events in non-Western women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Christensen, Marianne; Fredsted Villadsen, Sarah; Weber, Tom

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To elucidate possible mechanisms behind the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality among migrants in Denmark, this study aimed to analyse characteristics of perinatal deaths at Hvidovre Hospital 2006-2010 - -according to maternal country of origin. METHODS: We identified...... children born at Hvidovre Hospital who died perinatally and included the patient files in a series of case studies. Our data were linked to data from population-covering registries in Statistics Denmark. Timing, causes of death as well as social, medical and obstetric characteristics of the parents were...... described according to maternal country of origin. RESULTS: This study included 125 perinatal deaths. The data indicated that intrapartum death, death caused by maternal disease, lethal malformation and preterm birth may be more frequent among non-Western than among Danish-born women. Obesity...

  11. Higher Rates of Misdiagnosis in Pediatric Patients Versus Adults Hospitalized With Imported Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Yassen, Adam E; Mony, Vidya K; Arguin, Paul M; Daily, Johanna P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective antimalarial prophylaxis, imported adult and pediatric malaria occurs in the United States, and this can pose diagnostic issues. We examined the clinical characteristics and diagnostic challenges of imported malaria requiring adult or pediatric inpatient admission at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx which provides care for a large population of immigrants from malaria endemic areas. We conducted a retrospective single center review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of malaria at Montefiore Medical Center from 2005 through 2012. We extracted historical, clinical, and laboratory values from the electronic medical record and patient charts. We identified 95 patients who were diagnosed and hospitalized with malaria from 2005 to 2012, 33 (35%) of them were children and 17 (18%) were with severe malaria. Most patients contracted malaria while visiting friends and relatives in West Africa. Only 38% of travelers took prophylaxis, and fewer than half reported taking it as prescribed. Misdiagnosis by emergency room or primary care doctors was observed in almost one quarter of all of the patients. Misdiagnosis occurred significantly more frequently in children (43%) compared to adults (13%) (P = 0.002). Pediatric patients were more likely to present with abdominal pain (42% vs. 15%; P = 0.005). Pediatric patients admitted for imported malaria at Montefiore Medical Center had a higher rate of misdiagnosis and presented with more gastrointestinal symptoms than hospitalized adults. By describing the clinical characteristics of patients with imported malaria, we hope to improve diagnostic accuracy by health care workers and raise awareness that friends and relatives may require more intensive pretravel counseling.

  12. Next-to-next-leading order correction to 3-jet rate and event-shape ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The coupling constant, , was measured by two different methods: first by employing the three-jet observables. Combining all the data, the value of as at next-to-next leading order (NNLO) was determined to be 0.117 ± 0.004(hard) ± 0.006(theo). Secondly, from the event-shape distributions, the strong coupling constant, ...

  13. Variability in elective day-surgery rates between Belgian hospitals - Analyses of administrative data explained by surgical experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Roos; Camberlin, Cécile; Lefèvre, Mélanie; Van den Heede, Koen; Van de Voorde, Carine; Beguin, Claire

    2017-09-01

    In the last decades, day surgery has steadily and significantly grown in many countries, yet the increase has been uneven. There are large variations in day-surgery activity between countries, but also within countries between hospitals and surgeons. This paper explores the variability in day-care activity for elective surgical procedures between Belgian hospitals. The administrative hospital data of all patients formally admitted in a Belgian hospital for inpatient or day-care surgery between 2011 and 2013 were analysed and summarized in graphs. During 11 expert meetings with ad-hoc surgical expert groups the variability in day-surgery share between hospitals was discussed in depth. The variability in day-care share between Belgian hospitals is considerable. For 37 out of 486 elective surgical procedures, the variability ranged between 0 and 100%. High national day-care rates do not preclude room for improvement for certain hospitals as for the majority of these procedures there are "low performers". According to the consulted clinical experts, the high variability in day-care share may for the greater part be explained by medical team related factors, customs and traditions, the lack of clinical guidelines, financial factors, organisational factors and patient related factors. If a further expansion of day surgery is envisaged in Belgium the factors that contribute to the current variability in day-surgery rates between hospitals should be addressed. In addition, a feedback system in which hospitals and health care providers have the figures on their percentage of procedures carried out in day surgery compared to other hospitals and care providers (benchmarking) and the monitoring of a number of quality indicators (e.g. unplanned readmission, unplanned inpatient stay, emergency department visit) should be installed. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamdan Al-HazmiDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: Our aim is to prove that duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay (LOS are associated with the rate of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI, while taking into account type of urinary catheter used, the most common organisms found, patient diagnosis on admission, associated comorbidities, age, sex, precautions that should be taken to avoid UTI, and comparison with other studies.Methods: The study was done in a university teaching hospital with a 920-bed capacity; this hospital is a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study was done on 250 selected patients during the year 2010 as a retrospective descriptive study. Patients were selected as purposive sample, all of them having been exposed to urinary catheterization; hospital-acquired UTI were found in 100 patients. Data were abstracted from the archived patients' files in the medical record department using the annual infection control logbook prepared by the infection control department. The data collected were demographic information about the patients, clinical condition (diagnosis and the LOS, and possible risk factors for infection such as duration of catheterization, exposure to invasive devices or surgical procedures, and medical condition.Results: There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and duration of catheterization: seven patients had UTI out of 46 catheterized patients (15% at 3 days of catheterization, while 30 patients had UTI out of 44 catheterized patients (68% at 8 days of catheterization (median 8 days in infected patients versus 3 days in noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, which means that the longer the duration of catheterization, the higher the UTI rate. There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and LOS

  15. Carriage rate and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae amongst children in Thika Hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Githii

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rates of carriage are highest in infants and the elderly. The objectives of this study were to determine the rate of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae, and to describe the antibiotic resistant patterns and the serotypes of the carried isolates. A cross-sectional study design was used. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 315 children in the months of Octoberand November 2010 and processed to isolate S. pneumoniae. The isolates were serotyped by the Quellung reaction and their antibiotic susceptibilities assessed by the disc diffusion method. The overall nasopharyngeal carriage rate for S. pneumoniae was 17%. Seventeen serotypes were detected amongst 55 strains analysed: 6A, 23F, 19F, 13, 6B, 14A, 20, 7C, 1,15B, 35B, 19A, 11A, 34, 5, 3 and 23A. Susceptibility testing revealed that nearly all (98% were resistant to cotrimoxazole, 9% were resistant to penicillin and 7% to cefotaxime. Resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin was 2% and 4%, respectively. All isolates were fully sensitive to tetracycline. High levels of cotrimoxazole resistance and some resistance to other antimicrobial agents commonly used in Thika District Hospital shows that there is need to revise antimicrobial policy in this region in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal infections. The frequent serotypes found in this study have previously been associated with pneumococcal infectionsin children. Several of these serotypes are included in the ten-valent vaccine and therefore useof this vaccine will help reduce pneumococcal infections in Thika.

  16. New myocardial infarction definition affects incidence, mortality, hospitalization rates and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüero, Fernando; Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto; Sala, Joan; Masiá, Rafael; Ramos, Rafel; Grau, María

    2015-10-01

    To analyse differences in myocardial infarction incidence, mortality and hospitalization rates, 28-day case-fatality and two-year prognosis using two myocardial infarction case definitions: the classical World Health Organization definition (1994) and the European Society of Cardiology/American College of Cardiology definition (2000), which added cardiac troponin as a diagnostic biomarker. Population-based cohort of 4170 consecutive myocardial infarction patients aged 35-74 years from Girona (Spain) recruited between 2002 and 2009. Incidence, mortality rates standardized to the European population and 28-day case-fatality were calculated. To estimate the association between case definition and prognosis, Cox models were fitted. Use of the 2000 European Society of Cardiology/American College of Cardiology definition significantly increased myocardial infarction incidence per 100,000 population (238.3 vs. 274.5 in men and 54.1 vs. 69.7 in women). Applying this definition decreased the 28-day case-fatality rate from 26.9% to 23.4% in men, and from 31.0% to 24.1% in women. In the acute phase, patients diagnosed only by increased troponins were significantly less treated with thrombolysis (34.4% vs. 2.0%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (71.7% vs. 65.0%) and percutaneous coronary intervention (41.1% vs. 31.7%). Case-fatality at 28 days was significantly better in cases diagnosed only by troponin increase (0.2 % vs. 9.7%), but two-year cardiovascular mortality was higher (7.5% vs. 3.7%). Inclusion of cardiac troponins in myocardial infarction diagnosis increased annual incidence and decreased case-fatality. Diagnosis based only on increased troponins was associated with worse outcome. This group of patients at high risk of death should receive aggressive secondary prevention therapy. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  17. Effect of population screening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality rate and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Griffin, Simon J; Witte, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    -based screening for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors on mortality rates and cardiovascular events. METHODS: This register-based, non-randomised, controlled trial included men and women aged 40-69 years without known diabetes who were registered with a general practice in Denmark (n = 1......-screening group (HR 0.99 [0.96, 1.02], p = 0.49). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: A population-based stepwise screening programme for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors among all middle-aged adults in Denmark was not associated with a reduction in rate of mortality or cardiovascular events between 2001...... were invited to visit their GP for assessment of diabetes status and cardiovascular risk (screening group). The 1,759,285 individuals registered with all other general practices in Denmark constituted the retrospectively constructed no-screening (control) group. Outcomes were mortality rate...

  18. Risk adjusting cesarean delivery rates: a comparison of hospital profiles based on medical record and birth certificate data.

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiuseppe, D L; Aron, D C; Payne, S M; Snow, R J; Dierker, L; Rosenthal, G E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Compare the discrimination of risk-adjustment models for primary cesarean delivery derived from medical record data and birth certificate data and determine if the two types of models yield similar hospital profiles of risk-adjusted cesarean delivery rates. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The study involved 29,234 women without prior cesarean delivery admitted for labor and delivery in 1993-95 to 20 hospitals in northeast Ohio for whom data abstracted from patient medical records and ...

  19. Why are hospital admission and mortality rates for childhood asthma higher in New Zealand than in the United Kingdom?

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, E.A.; Anderson, H R; Freeling, P; White, P T

    1990-01-01

    New Zealand has higher mortality and hospital admission rates for asthma than England and Wales. To determine the reasons for this the available data on asthma mortality and hospital admissions from the Auckland region of New Zealand were compared with data from the South West Thames Region of England for 1979-86 and data from previous surveys on prevalence of wheeze (Auckland 1985, Croydon 1978). In addition, a survey of general practitioners was carried out to determine their approach to th...

  20. Adverse drug events-Analysis of a decade. A Portuguese case-study, from 2004 to 2013 using hospital database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina Scripcaru

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to characterise adverse drug events (ADE, including both adverse drug reaction (ADR and accidental poisoning by drugs (AP, considering age, gender, length of stay (LOS, number of deaths and year, during the period 2004-2013. Additionally distributions of the ten's most frequent ADR and AP were characterized, considering age-group and gender.A retrospective descriptive nationwide study was conducted, based on the hospital discharges database in Portugal from 2004 to 2013, using ICD-9. Events were identified based on the following codes: from E930 to E949.9 and from E850 to E858.9.A total of 9 320 076 patients were discharged within this period, with 133 688 patients (1.46% having at least one ADE, 4% of them related with AP. The mean age of these patients was 63.79 years (SD 21.31, 54.50% were female and the mean LOS was 14.05 days (SD 22.19. Patient with AP had a mean age of 41.06 years (SD 34.05, 54.70% were female and LOS was 7.15 days (SD 19.42. We have identified 10.691 deaths that represent 8.00% from the total of patients with an ADE. The patients above 65 years were more affected by ADR and children below 18 were more affected by AP.In the last decade an increasing trend of ADR were observed and an AP pattern relatively stable. Elderly people and children were the age groups most affected. Antibiotics (in ADR and benzodiazepine-based tranquilizers (in AP were the major problems. This is a huge, increasing and challenging problem. Further research, using individual and contextual risk factors should be developed to understand spatiotemporal variability, promoting tailored interventions, within and across countries.

  1. Design of a medical record review study on the incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring a higher level of care in Belgian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlayen Annemie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse events are unintended patient injuries that arise from healthcare management resulting in disability, prolonged hospital stay or death. Adverse events that require intensive care admission imply a considerable financial burden to the healthcare system. The epidemiology of adverse events in Belgian hospitals has never been assessed systematically. Findings A multistage retrospective review study of patients requiring a transfer to a higher level of care will be conducted in six hospitals in the province of Limburg. Patient records are reviewed starting from January 2012 by a clinical team consisting of a research nurse, a physician and a clinical pharmacist. Besides the incidence and the level of causation and preventability, also the type of adverse events and their consequences (patient harm, mortality and length of stay will be assessed. Moreover, the adequacy of the patient records and quality/usefulness of the method of medical record review will be evaluated. Discussion This paper describes the rationale for a retrospective review study of adverse events that necessitate a higher level of care. More specifically, we are particularly interested in increasing our understanding in the preventability and root causes of these events in order to implement improvement strategies. Attention is paid to the strengths and limitations of the study design.

  2. Hospitalization rates and post-operative mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysm in Italy over the period 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sensi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have reported declines in incidence, prevalence and mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs in various countries, but evidence from Mediterranean countries is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine the trend of hospitalization and post-operative mortality rates for AAAs in Italy during the period 2000-2011, taking into account the introduction of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR in 1990s. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was carried out in Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with 4.5 million inhabitants. A total of 19,673 patients hospitalized for AAAs between 2000 and 2011, were identified from the hospital discharge records (HDR database. Hospitalization rates, percentage of OSR and EVAR and 30-day mortality rates were calculated for unruptured (uAAAs and ruptured AAAs (rAAAs. RESULTS: Adjusted hospitalization rates decreased on average by 2.9% per year for uAAAs and 3.2% for rAAAs (p<0.001. The temporal trend of 30-day mortality rates remained stable for both groups. The percentage of EVAR for uAAAs increased significantly from 2006 to 2011 (42.7 versus 60.9% respectively, mean change of 3.9% per year, p<0.001. No significant difference in mortality was found between OSR and EVAR for uAAAs and rAAAs. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence and trend of hospitalization rates for rAAAs and uAAAs decreased significantly in the last decade, while 30-day mortality rates in operated patients remained stable. OSR continued to be the most common surgery in rAAAs, although the gap between OSR and EVAR recently declined. The EVAR technique became the preferred surgery for uAAAs since 2008.

  3. Sedimentation rate in Cheko Lake (Evenkia, Siberia): New evidence on the problem of the 1908 Tunguska Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozin, D. Y.; Darin, A. V.; Kalugin, I. A.; Melgunov, M. S.; Meydus, A. V.; Degermendzhi, A. G.

    2017-10-01

    We estimated the age and sedimentation rate of bottom sediments in Cheko Lake located in southern Evenkia, in the territory of Tunguska Nature Reserve, near the supposed epicenter of the so-called 1908 Tunguska Event. The vertical distributions of 137Cs and 210Pb activity and visually counted varves in the core of lake bottom sediments indicate that Cheko Lake is significantly older than the 1908 Tunguska Event; therefore, the lake basin cannot be a crater or a trace of the explosion as was supposed earlier by some researchers.

  4. Development and validation of a Thai stressful life events rating scale for patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenic methamphetamine abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ek-uma Imkome

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to psychometrically test a Thai Stressful Life Events Rating Scale (TSLERS. Factor analysis was done on data collected from 313 patients with schizophrenia and methamphetamine abuse in Thailand from April to May, 2015. Results identified the following problems impacting physical and mental health: social relationship and social concerns, money, family life, life security, and career. Evaluation of the psychometric scale properties demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability. TSLERS provided scientific and empirical data about stressful life events of patients with schizophrenia and methamphetamine abuse, and was suitable for stress detection and suggesting further innovations.

  5. Risk factors leading to increased rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute care child and adolescent psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Logan; Pullen, Lisa M; Savage, Jennifer; Cayce, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents in the United States, with suicidal behavior peaking in adolescence. Suicidal and self-harming behavior is often chronic, with an estimated 15-30% of adolescents who attempt suicide having a second suicide attempt within a year. The focus of acute psychiatric hospitalization is on stabilization of these psychiatric symptoms resulting at times in premature discharge. Finding from studies based on high rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital indicates that adolescents continue to experience crisis upon discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital, leading to the question of whether or not these adolescents are being discharged prematurely. A chart review was performed on 98 adolescent clients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital to identify risk factors that may increase rehospitalization among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Clients admitted to the hospital within a 12-month time frame were compared to clients who were not readmitted during that 12-month period. History of self-harming behavior and length of stay greater than 5 days were found to be risk factors for rehospitalization. Adolescent clients who are admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital with a history of self-harming behavior and extended length of stay need to be identified and individualized treatment plans implemented for preventing repeat hospitalizations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rates of self-harm presenting to general hospitals: a comparison of data from the Multicentre Study of Self-Harm in England and Hospital Episode Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Geulayov, Galit; Waters, Keith; Ness, Jennifer; Townsend, Ellen; Khundakar, Kazem; Kapur, Nav

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of hospital presentation for self-harm in England were compared using different national and local data sources. Design The study was descriptive and compared bespoke data collection methods for recording self-harm presentations to hospital with routinely collected hospital data. Setting Local area data on self-harm from the 3 centres of the Multicentre Study of Self-harm in England (Oxford, Manchester and Derby) were used along with national and local routinely collected data on self-harm admissions and emergency department attendances from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). Primary outcome Rate ratios were calculated to compare rates of self-harm generated using different data sources nationally and locally (between 2010 and 2012) and rates of hospital presentations for self-harm were plotted over time (between 2003 and 2012), based on different data sources. Results The total number of self-harm episodes between 2010 and 2012 was 13 547 based on Multicentre Study data, 9600 based on HES emergency department data and 8096 based on HES admission data. Nationally, routine HES data underestimated overall rates of self-harm by approximately 60% compared with rates based on Multicentre Study data (rate ratio for HES emergency department data, 0.41 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.49); rate ratio for HES admission data, 0.42 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.49)). Direct local area comparisons confirmed an overall underascertainment in the HES data, although the difference varied between centres. There was a general increase in self-harm over time according to HES data which contrasted with a fall and then a rise in the Multicentre Study data. Conclusions There was a consistent underestimation of presentations for self-harm recorded by HES emergency department data, and fluctuations in year-on-year figures. HES admission data appeared more reliable but missed non-admitted episodes. Routinely collected data may miss important trends in self-harm and cannot be used in isolation as

  7. [Influence of leukocytes on coronary flow reserve, left ventricular systolic function, and in-hospital events, in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction treated by primary angioplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, P; Elmkies, F; Boulanger, J; Zemir, H; Benali, T; Espanel, C; Clerc, J; Doutrelan, L; Beausoleil, M; Luycx-Bore, A

    2010-11-01

    To assess the relationship between leukocyte count, non invasive coronary flow reserve (CFR), left ventricular systolic function, and in-hospital adverse events in acute anterior myocardial infarction (AMI) treated by primary angioplasty. Leukocyte count at admission and within 24h after angioplasty, and differential count at admission were obtained in 72 consecutive patients with a first AMI (mean age 56±12 years) successfully treated by primary angioplasty. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was performed within 24h after angioplasty and 3 months later to assess the CFR (using intravenous adenosine), in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the wall motion score index using the nine segments assigned to the LAD territory (WMSi-lad). In hospital events were defined as death, heart failure (Killip≥2) and reinfarction. Leukocyte count was higher before and after angioplasty in patients with impaired acute CFR (leukocyte, neutrophil and monocyte count (PLeukocyte (before and after angioplasty), and neutrophil count, were lower in patients with recovery of global and regional LV function (Pleukocyte count before and after angioplasty, and, initial and follow-up LVEF, and WMSi-lad (all, P≤0.01). Leukocyte (before and after angioplasty) and monocyte count were higher in patients with in-hospital events (n=14), by comparison to patients without events (all, Pleukocyte count after angioplasty was an independent predictor of CFR, and in-hospital events, and neutrophil count of WMSi-lad at follow-up (all, Pleukocyte count is inversely correlated to CFR, and global and regional LV systolic function at follow-up. These links are higher after than before reperfusion. And, leukocyte count after angioplasty is an independent predictor of in-hospital adverse events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A video event trigger for high frame rate, high resolution video technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    1991-01-01

    When video replaces film the digitized video data accumulates very rapidly, leading to a difficult and costly data storage problem. One solution exists for cases when the video images represent continuously repetitive 'static scenes' containing negligible activity, occasionally interrupted by short events of interest. Minutes or hours of redundant video frames can be ignored, and not stored, until activity begins. A new, highly parallel digital state machine generates a digital trigger signal at the onset of a video event. High capacity random access memory storage coupled with newly available fuzzy logic devices permits the monitoring of a video image stream for long term or short term changes caused by spatial translation, dilation, appearance, disappearance, or color change in a video object. Pretrigger and post-trigger storage techniques are then adaptable for archiving the digital stream from only the significant video images.

  9. Next-to-next-leading order correction to 3-jet rate and event-shape ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The coupling constant, αs, was measured by two different methods: first by employing the three-jet observables. Combining all the data, the value of as at next-to-next leading order (NNLO) was determined to be 0.117 ± 0.004(hard) ± 0.006(theo). Secondly, from the event-shape distributions, the strong coupling constant, αs ...

  10. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  11. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    . Documentation exists in; well-being of patients and staff, sleep disorders, pain distraction, confidentiality and privacy, levels of errors in hospitals. Art and the use of color: Art can be context related so one should be aware whether it is in a private ward or the foyer and related to the experience...... in treating disease can be supported by architecture which is sensitive to the contextual conditions of healing in health facilities. It is not the intention to supplant technology, but a question of supplementing the incredible advances that have been made in medicine in recent decades. The central premise......- sick-leave and work-related injuries....

  12. Reduction in Rate of Nosocomial Respiratory Virus Infections in a Children's Hospital Associated With Enhanced Isolation Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Kohn, Nina; Nullet, Susan; Hill, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether the use of enhanced isolation precautions (droplet and contact precautions) for inpatients with respiratory tract viral infections is associated with a reduction in rate of nosocomial viral respiratory infections. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study with the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infection as the primary dependent variable and rate of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection as a nonequivalent dependent variable comparator. SETTING Cohen Children's Medical Center of NY, a tertiary-care children's hospital attached to a large general hospital. INTERVENTION During years 1 and 2 (July 2012 through June 2014), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee's recommended isolation precautions for inpatients with selected respiratory virus infections were in effect. Enhanced isolation precautions were in effect during years 3 and 4 (July, 2014 through June, 2016), except for influenza, for which enhanced precautions were in effect during year 4 only. RESULTS During the period of enhanced isolation precautions, the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections with any of 4 virus categories decreased 39% from 0.827 per 1,000 hospital days prior to enhanced precautions to 0.508 per 1,000 hospital days (Pinfections, the rates decreased 58% from 0.317 per 1,000 hospital days to 0.134 per 1,000 hospital days during enhanced precautions (Pnosocomial C. difficile infection. CONCLUSIONS Enhanced isolation precautions for inpatients with respiratory virus infections were associated with a reduction in the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:152-156.

  13. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital - design and development of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.; Gorter, K.J.; Stellato, R.K.; Rijken, M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to

  14. Tailored support for type 2 diabetes patients with an acute coronary event after discharge from hospital: design and development of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasteleyn, M.J.; Gorter, K.J.; Stellato, R.K.; Rijken, M.; Nijpels, G.; Rutten, G.E.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with an acute coronary event (ACE) experience decreased quality of life and increased distress. According to the American Diabetes Association, discharge from the hospital is a time of increased distress for all patients. Tailored support specific to

  15. Can preoperative erythrocyte sedimentation rate serve as an indicator for midterm adverse events after coronary bypass grafting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togan, Turhan; Günday, Murat; Çiftçi, Özgür; Bingol, Hakan

    2015-04-28

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) may serve as a reasonably good indicator for coronary heart disease as usually ESR is elevated in these patients. The measurement of ESR is a very simple and cheap laboratory test that can be performed in routine blood examinations. In this study, we investigated the association between preoperative erythrocyte sedimentation rate and postoperative midterm adverse events after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In the study, only male patients were included. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (preoperative sedimentation rate [<20 mm/h] normal [n = 232, 63.9%]) and group 2 (preoperative sedimentation rate [>20 mm/h] above normal [n = 131, 36.1%]). The hemogram and biochemistry panel values were measured one day before operation, on the postoperative first day, on the postoperative seventh day, and on the postoperative third month. Among the laboratory values, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to postoperative first-day ESR and postoperative third-month high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P < .05). In terms of postoperative morbidity, there was also a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between the two groups with regard to pleural effusion, infection of the soft tissue over the sternum, pulmonary infection, return to the intensive care unit, rehospitalization, and mortality. Elevated preoperative sedimentation rate is associated with postoperative adverse events in patients who undergo CABG. For this purpose, we suggest that patients with higher sedimentation rates undergo detailed examination to prevent mortality and morbidity.

  16. Slip rate, magnitudes and ages of surface-rupturing events along the Main Frontal Thrust in Bhutan (Himalaya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, J.; Berthet, T.; Ferry, M. A.; Pelgay, P.; Cattin, R.; Drukpa, D.; Braucher, R.; Chophel, J.; Thinley, K.; Hetényi, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalayas absorb about 20 mm.yr-1 of the convergence between India and Eurasia plate. Morphotectonics studies East of Bhutan yielded a Holocene shortening rate of 23 × 6.2 mm/yr consistent with the 21 × 1.5 mm/yr estimated in Nepal. Most of this crustal shortening is accommodated along the Main Frontal Thrust by major earthquakes (M≥8) that occurred in the past 1000 years. Between 89°E and 92°E, the MFT runs along the southern border of the Kingdom of Bhutan where no reliable historical record of major earthquakes exists (one strong historical earthquake would have occurred in 1713 after a Tibetan eyewitness reports). However, recent paleoseismic investigations in Nepal and on both side of Bhutan border suggest that a great earthquake may have ruptured a 700 to 800 km long section of the MFT during a single event around AD 1100. In December 2012, we carried out a first morphotectonic and paleosismologic study within two sites (Sarpang, Gelephu) along the MFT in central Bhutan. We identified several sequences of abandoned fluvial terraces that have been uplifted along the fault. From a kinematic GPS survey, we estimated that the oldest terrace sequence (T2) has a cumulative offset of 53.6 × 2.3 m. A younger sequence (T1) shows offsets of 4.5 × 0.5 m on the lower terrace (T1a) and 7.9 × 0.5 m on the upper one (T1b). The uplift on T1b may cumulate the vertical components of the two last seismic events that would have produced each a vertical offset of several meters. These preliminary observations suggest that the latest seismic event as well as the penultimate event correspond to two major seismic events with magnitudes greater than M8. After 14C dating (charcoals in sands on top of T1 terraces sequence), these two last seismic events occurred after 1000 AD. The youngest event may correspond to the historical event reported in 1713 AD, while the penultimate event could correspond the great medieval earthquake observed in trenches East and West of Bhutan

  17. [Do laymen understand information about hospital quality? An empirical verification using risk-adjusted mortality rates as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Uwe; Kolb, Benjamin; Taheri, Fatemeh; Patzelt, Christiane; Emmert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The effect of public reporting to improve quality in healthcare is reduced by the limited intelligibility of information about the quality of healthcare providers. This may result in worse health-related choices especially for older people and those with lower levels of education. There is, as yet, little information as to whether laymen understand the concepts behind quality comparisons and if this comprehension is correlated with hospital choices. An instrument with 20 items was developed to analyze the intelligibility of five technical terms which were used in German hospital report cards to explain risk-adjusted death rates. Two online presentations of risk-adjusted death rates for five hospitals in the style of hospital report cards were developed. An online survey of 353 volunteers tested the comprehension of the risk-adjusted mortality rates and included an experimental hospital choice. The intelligibility of five technical terms was tested: risk-adjusted, actual and expected death rate, reference range and national average. The percentages of correct answers for the five technical terms were in the range of 75.0-60.2%. Between 23.8% and 5.1% of the respondents were not able to answer the question about the technical term itself. The least comprehensible technical terms were "risk-adjusted death rate" and "reference range". The intelligibility of the 20 items that were used to test the comprehension of the risk-adjusted mortality was between 89.5% and 14.2%. The two items that proved to be least comprehensible were related to the technical terms "risk-adjusted death rate" and "reference range". For all five technical terms it was found that a better comprehension correlated significantly with better hospital choices. We found a better than average intelligibility for the technical terms "actual and expected death rate" and for "national average". The least understandable were "risk-adjusted death rate" and "reference range". Since the self

  18. Evaluation of an ultraviolet room disinfection protocol to decrease nursing home microbial burden, infection and hospitalization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Taneli, Yavuz; Neiman, Tammy; Dyer, Elaine M; Arzaga, Alvin Jason A; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2017-03-03

    The focus of nursing home infection control procedures has been on decreasing transmission between healthcare workers and residents. Less evidence is available regarding whether decontamination of high-touch environmental surfaces impacts infection rates or resident outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine if ultraviolet disinfection is associated with changes in: 1) microbial counts and adenosine triphosphate counts on high-touch surfaces; and 2) facility wide nursing home acquired infection rates, and infection-related hospitalization. The study was conducted in one 160-bed long-term care facility. Following discharge of each resident, their room was cleaned and then disinfected using a newly acquired ultraviolet light disinfection device. Shared living spaces received weekly ultraviolet light disinfection. Thirty-six months of pretest infection and hospitalization data were compared with 12 months of posttest data. Pre and posttest cultures were taken from high-touch surfaces, and luminometer readings of adenosine triphosphate were done. Nursing home acquired infection rates were analyzed relative to hospital acquired infection rates using analysis of variance procedures. Wilcoxon signed rank tests, The Cochran's Q, and Chi Square were also used. There were statistically significant decreases in adenosine triphosphate readings on all high-touch surfaces after cleaning and disinfection. Culture results were positive for gram-positive cocci or rods on 33% (n = 30) of the 90 surfaces swabbed at baseline. After disinfectant cleaning, 6 of 90 samples (7.1%) tested positive for a gram-positive bacilli, and after ultraviolet disinfection 4 of the 90 samples (4.4%) were positive. There were significant decreases in nursing home acquired relative to hospital-acquired infection rates for the total infections (p = .004), urinary tract infection rates (p = .014), respiratory system infection rates (p = .017) and for rates of infection of the skin

  19. Accelerated discharge of patients in the event of a major incident: observational study of a teaching hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Challen, Kirsty; Walter, Darren

    2006-01-01

    ... from PCTs in order to achieve this. Repeated survey over 12 days in 3 months of hospital bed occupancy by type of condition and discharge capacity in an 855-bed UK tertiary teaching hospital also providing secondary care services...

  20. A Generalized Approach to Model the Spectra and Radiation Dose Rate of Solar Particle Events on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; McDole, Thoren; Kühl, Patrick; Appel, Jan C.; Matthiä, Daniel; Krauss, Johannes; Köhler, Jan

    2018-01-01

    For future human missions to Mars, it is important to study the surface radiation environment during extreme and elevated conditions. In the long term, it is mainly galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) modulated by solar activity that contribute to the radiation on the surface of Mars, but intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events may induce acute health effects. Such events may enhance the radiation level significantly and should be detected as immediately as possible to prevent severe damage to humans and equipment. However, the energetic particle environment on the Martian surface is significantly different from that in deep space due to the influence of the Martian atmosphere. Depending on the intensity and shape of the original solar particle spectra, as well as particle types, the surface spectra may induce entirely different radiation effects. In order to give immediate and accurate alerts while avoiding unnecessary ones, it is important to model and well understand the atmospheric effect on the incoming SEPs, including both protons and helium ions. In this paper, we have developed a generalized approach to quickly model the surface response of any given incoming proton/helium ion spectra and have applied it to a set of historical large solar events, thus providing insights into the possible variety of surface radiation environments that may be induced during SEP events. Based on the statistical study of more than 30 significant solar events, we have obtained an empirical model for estimating the surface dose rate directly from the intensities of a power-law SEP spectra.

  1. Drug dosing in patients with renal insufficiency in a hospital setting using electronic prescribing and automated reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita L; Henriksen, Daniel P; Marinakis, Christianna

    2014-01-01

    In patients with impaired renal function, drug dose adjustment is often required. Non-adherence to clinical prescribing recommendations may result in severe adverse events. In previous studies, the prevalence rate of non-adherence to recommended dosing has been reported to be 19-67%. Using....... We conclude that despite implementation of electronic prescribing and automated reporting of eGFR, patients with renal insufficiency may still be exposed to inappropriate drug use, with potential increased risk of adverse effects. Initiatives to reduce medication errors such as the use of electronic...... the clinical support system Renbase(®) as reference, we investigated the use and dosing of drugs in patients with impaired renal function in a university hospital setting using electronic prescription and automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In all, 232 patients with an e...

  2. Clopidogrel Resistance Increases Rate of Recurrent Stroke and Other Vascular Events in Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xingyang; Lin, Jing; Zhou, Qiang; Wu, Lang; Cheng, Wen; Wang, Chun

    2016-05-01

    Research regarding clopidogrel resistance (CR) and ischemic stroke (IS) recurrence related to IS is scanty. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of CR and the association between CR and IS recurrence and other vascular events in patients with IS receiving clopidogrel. CR was assessed by platelet aggregation assay in 535 IS patients receiving clopidogrel. All patients continued taking clopidogrel after discharge and were followed up for 6 months. The primary outcome was a composite of recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS), myocardial infarction, and death. The secondary outcome was the degree of disability as measured by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Out of 535 IS patients, 208 (38.88%) were CR and 327 (61.12%) were clopidogrel sensitive (CS). Diabetes was independently associated with risk of CR (odds ratio: 2.42, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-4.97, P clopidogrel is relatively high in the Chinese population. CR is associated with ischemic vascular events, including RIS, and poor neurological recovery. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shell-model study on event rates of lightest supersymmetric particles scattering off 83Kr and 125Te

    OpenAIRE

    Pirinen, Pekka; Srivastava, P. C.; Suhonen, Jouni; Kortelainen, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) dark matter off two possible target nuclei, 83Kr and 125Te. For the nuclear-structure calculations, we employ the nuclear shell model using recently generated realistic interactions. We have condensed the nuclear-physics contribution to a set of nuclear-structure factors that are independent of the adopted supersymmetric (SUSY) model. Total event rates are then easily calculated by combin...

  4. Characteristics of small areas with high rates of hospital-treated self-harm: deprived, fragmented and urban or just close to hospital? A national registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, I B; Corcoran, P; Perry, I J

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown an inconsistent relationship between the spatial distribution of hospital treated self-harm and area-level factors such as deprivation and social fragmentation. However, many of these studies have been confined to urban centres, with few focusing on rural settings and even fewer studies carried out at a national level. Furthermore, no previous research has investigated if travel time to hospital services can explain the area-level variation in the incidence of hospital treated self-harm. From 2009 to 2011, the Irish National Registry of Deliberate Self Harm collected data on self-harm presentations to all hospital emergency departments in the country. The Registry uses standard methods of case ascertainment and also geocodes patient addresses to small area geographical level. Negative binomial regression was used to explore the ecological relationship between area-level self-harm rates and various area-level factors. Deprivation, social fragmentation and population density had a positive linear association with self-harm, with deprivation having the strongest independent effect. Furthermore, self-harm incidence was found to be elevated in areas that had shorter journey times to hospital. However, while this association became attenuated after controlling for other area-level factors it still remained statistically significant. A subgroup analysis examining the effect of travel time on specific methods of self-harm, found that this effect was most marked for self-harm acts involving minor self-cutting. Self-harm incidence was influenced by proximity to hospital services, population density and social fragmentation; however, the strongest area-level predictor of self-harm was deprivation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. X-ray film reject rate analysis at eight selected government hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of film faults as well as the pattern and magnitude of film rejection. Methods: Using a prospective cross-sectional hospital based approach; eight public hospitals were selected in Addis. Ababa through .... clinical radiology service. In this respect, reject ...

  6. Consumers' use of HCAHPS ratings and word-of-mouth in hospital choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, John W; Carlson, Jay P

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the impact of the HCAHPS report of patient experiences and word-of-mouth narratives on consumers' hospital choice. Online consumer research panel of U.S. adults ages 18 and older. In an experiment, 309 consumers were randomly assigned to see positive or negative information about a hospital in two modalities: HCAHPS graphs and a relative's narrative e-mail. Then they indicated their intentions to choose the hospital for elective surgery. A simple, one-paragraph e-mail and 10 HCAHPS graphs had similar impacts on consumers' hospital choice. When information was inconsistent between the HCAHPS data and e-mail narrative, one modality attenuated the other's effect on hospital choice. The findings illustrate the power of anecdotal narratives, suggesting that policy makers should consider how HCAHPS data can be affected by word-of-mouth communication. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Gait event detection on level ground and incline walking using a rate gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Paola; Ghoussayni, Salim; Ewins, David

    2010-01-01

    Gyroscopes have been proposed as sensors for ambulatory gait analysis and functional electrical stimulation systems. Accurate determination of the Initial Contact of the foot with the floor (IC) and the final contact or Foot Off (FO) on different terrains is important. This paper describes the evaluation of a gyroscope placed on the shank for determination of IC and FO in subjects walking outdoors on level ground, and up and down an incline. Performance was compared with a reference pressure measurement system. The mean difference between the gyroscope and the reference was less than -25 ms for IC and less than 75 ms for FO for all terrains. Detection success was over 98%. These results provide preliminary evidence supporting the use of the gyroscope for gait event detection on inclines as well as level walking.

  8. A hospital-to-nursing home transfer process associated with low hospital readmission rates while targeting quality of care, patient safety, and convenience: a 20-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, David; Bade, Priscilla; Dunham, Anita; Hendrickson, Sara

    2013-05-01

    Safe patient transfer from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) is one of the most logistically challenging safety problems in the US medical system. The authors describe a community that experienced inefficient transfers in the 1990s, spurring development of continuous quality improvement (CQI) methods to develop transfer forms and processes to improve efficiency. The community established a Geriatric Forum for educational and process improvement purposes. Attendees consist of anyone involved with care of older patients in the community. Over the years, minor environmental changes forced periodic adjustments to transfer processes. The need for adjustment is identified by asking the simple question, "Have any problems occurred with transfers lately?" When problems are identified, forum attendees make process changes. The current forms and processes are discussed in detail. Initial improvement in efficiency of transfers also produced improvements in patient safety and quality of medical care according to periodic internal surveys. During 2009, this community's 30-day rehospitalization rate of patients discharged to a SNF was 14.75%, lower than any national or state average reported rate. Developing hospital-to-SNF transfer methods focusing on the traditional CQI goals of efficiency, patient safety, and quality of care also yields lower hospital readmission rates. Because the methodology is that of CQI, a widely taught skill, similar programs could be established between any hospital and the SNFs to which it discharges patients. The particular examples of transfer forms and processes described might be helpful to other programs. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal bleeding events: Comparing short-term clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding and acute myocardial infarction in a US managed care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mel Wilcox

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available C Mel Wilcox1, Byron L Cryer2, Henry J Henk3, Victoria Zarotsky3, Gergana Zlateva41University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX; 3i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 4Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, USA Objectives: To compare the short-term mortality rates of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding to those of acute myocardial infarction (AMI by estimating the 30-, 60-, and 90-day mortality among hospitalized patients.Methods: United States national health plan claims data (1999–2003 were used to identify patients hospitalized with a GI bleeding event. Patients were propensity-matched to AMI patients with no evidence of GI bleed from the same US health plan.Results: 12,437 upper GI-bleed patients and 22,847 AMI patients were identified. Propensity score matching yielded 6,923 matched pairs. Matched cohorts were found to have a similar Charlson Comorbidity Index score and to be similar on nearly all utilization and cost measures (excepting emergency room costs. A comparison of outcomes among the matched cohorts found that AMI patients had higher rates of 30-day mortality (4.35% vs 2.54%; p < 0.0001 and rehospitalization (2.56% vs 1.79%; p = 0.002, while GI bleed patients were more likely to have a repeat procedure (72.38% vs 44.95%; p < 0.001 following their initial hospitalization. The majority of the difference in overall 30-day mortality between GI bleed and AMI patients was accounted for by mortality during the initial hospitalization (1.91% vs 3.58%.Conclusions: GI bleeding events result in significant mortality similar to that of an AMI after adjusting for the initial hospitalization.Keywords: gastrointestinal, bleeding, mortality, acute myocardial infarction, claims analysis

  10. Incidence rates of in-hospital carpal tunnel syndrome in the general population and possible associations with marital status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Carla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially relevant condition associated with biomechanical risk factors. We evaluated age-sex-specific incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS in central/northern Italy and explored relations with marital status. Methods Seven regions were considered (overall population, 14.9 million over 3–6-year periods between 1997 and 2002 (when out-of-hospital CTS surgery was extremely rare. Incidence rates of in-hospital cases of CTS were estimated based on 1 codified demographic, diagnostic and intervention data in obligatory discharge records from all Italian public/private hospitals, archived (according to residence on regional databases; 2 demographic general population data for each region. We compared (using the χscore test age-sex-specific rates between married, unmarried, divorced and widowed subsets of the general population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs for married/unmarried men and women. Results Age-standardized incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years of in-hospital cases of CTS were 166 in women and 44 in men (106 overall. Married subjects of both sexes showed higher age-specific rates with respect to unmarried men/women. SIRs were calculated comparing married vs unmarried rates of both sexes: 1.59 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.57–1.60 in women, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.40–1.45 in men. As compared with married women/men, widows/widowers both showed 2–3-fold higher incidence peaks during the fourth decade of life (beyond 50 years of age, widowed subjects showed similar trends to unmarried counterparts. Conclusion This large population-based study illustrates distinct age-related trends in men and women, and also raises the question whether marital status could be associated with CTS in the general population.

  11. On the Mass and Luminosity Functions of Tidal Disruption Flares: Rate Suppression due to Black Hole Event Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, S.

    2018-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole is expected to yield a luminous flare of thermal emission. About two dozen of these stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) may have been detected in optical transient surveys. However, explaining the observed properties of these events within the tidal disruption paradigm is not yet possible. This theoretical ambiguity has led some authors to suggest that optical TDFs are due to a different process, such as a nuclear supernova or accretion disk instabilities. Here we present a test of a fundamental prediction of the tidal disruption event scenario: a suppression of the flare rate due to the direct capture of stars by the black hole. Using a recently compiled sample of candidate TDFs with black hole mass measurements, plus a careful treatment of selection effects in this flux-limited sample, we confirm that the dearth of observed TDFs from high-mass black holes is statistically significant. All the TDF impostor models we consider fail to explain the observed mass function; the only scenario that fits the data is a suppression of the rate due to direct captures. We find that this suppression can explain the low volumetric rate of the luminous TDF candidate ASASSN-15lh, thus supporting the hypothesis that this flare belongs to the TDF family. Our work is the first to present the optical TDF luminosity function. A steep power law is required to explain the observed rest-frame g-band luminosity, {dN}/{{dL}}g\\propto {L}g-2.5. The mean event rate of the flares in our sample is ≈ 1× {10}-4 galaxy‑1 yr‑1, consistent with the theoretically expected tidal disruption rate.

  12. Variation in rates of ICU readmissions and post-ICU in-hospital mortality and their association with ICU discharge practices

    OpenAIRE

    Sluisveld, N. van; F. Bakhshi-Raiez; de Keizer, N; Holman, R.; Westert, G.P.; Wollersheim, H.C.; van der Hoeven, J. G.; Zegers, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Variation in intensive care unit (ICU) readmissions and in-hospital mortality after ICU discharge may indicate potential for improvement and could be explained by ICU discharge practices. Our objective was threefold: (1) describe variation in rates of ICU readmissions within 48?h and post-ICU in-hospital mortality, (2) describe ICU discharge practices in Dutch hospitals, and (3) study the association between rates of ICU readmissions within 48?h and post-ICU in-hospital mortality a...

  13. Getting their appetite back. In need of capital, not-for-profit hospitals take advantage of dropping interest rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Melanie

    2011-10-31

    After steering clear of the municipal bond market this year, not-for-profit hospitals are being lured back by dropping interest rates. "We're taking advantage of the current market," says Jim Budzinski, left, executive vice president and chief financial officer of WellStar Health System. The Georgia provider's recent bond deal helped erase $4.2 million in interest costs.

  14. Delirium subtype identification and the validation of the Delirium Rating Scale--Revised-98 (Dutch version) in hospitalized elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Casteelen, Gerty; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; van der Mast, Roos C.; Levi, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is the most common acute neuropsychiatric disorder in hospitalized elderly. The Dutch version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) appears to be a reliable method to classify delirium. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the

  15. The effect of a smoking ban on hospitalization rates for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Gaudreau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This is the first study to have examined the effect of smoking bans on hospitalizations in the Atlantic Canadian socio-economic, cultural and climatic context. On June 1, 2003 Prince Edward Island (PEI enacted a province-wide smoking ban in public places and workplaces. Changes in hospital admission rates for cardiovascular (acute myocardial infarction, angina, and stroke and respiratory (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma conditions were examined before and after the smoking ban. METHODS: Crude annual and monthly admission rates for the above conditions were calculated from April 1, 1995 to December 31, 2008 in all PEI acute care hospitals. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series models were used to test for changes in mean and trend of monthly admission rates for study conditions, control conditions and a control province after the comprehensive smoking ban. Age- and sex-based analyses were completed. RESULTS: The mean rate of acute myocardial infarctions was reduced by 5.92 cases per 100,000 person-months (P = 0.04 immediately after the smoking ban. The trend of monthly angina admissions in men was reduced by -0.44 cases per 100,000 person-months (P = 0.01 in the 67 months after the smoking ban. All other cardiovascular and respiratory admission changes were non-significant. CONCLUSIONS: A comprehensive smoking ban in PEI reduced the overall mean number of acute myocardial infarction admissions and the trend of angina hospital admissions.

  16. The effect of a smoking ban on hospitalization rates for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Katherine; Sanford, Carolyn J; Cheverie, Connie; McClure, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to have examined the effect of smoking bans on hospitalizations in the Atlantic Canadian socio-economic, cultural and climatic context. On June 1, 2003 Prince Edward Island (PEI) enacted a province-wide smoking ban in public places and workplaces. Changes in hospital admission rates for cardiovascular (acute myocardial infarction, angina, and stroke) and respiratory (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma) conditions were examined before and after the smoking ban. Crude annual and monthly admission rates for the above conditions were calculated from April 1, 1995 to December 31, 2008 in all PEI acute care hospitals. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series models were used to test for changes in mean and trend of monthly admission rates for study conditions, control conditions and a control province after the comprehensive smoking ban. Age- and sex-based analyses were completed. The mean rate of acute myocardial infarctions was reduced by 5.92 cases per 100,000 person-months (P = 0.04) immediately after the smoking ban. The trend of monthly angina admissions in men was reduced by -0.44 cases per 100,000 person-months (P = 0.01) in the 67 months after the smoking ban. All other cardiovascular and respiratory admission changes were non-significant. A comprehensive smoking ban in PEI reduced the overall mean number of acute myocardial infarction admissions and the trend of angina hospital admissions.

  17. [Prediction value of deceleration capacity of rate and GRACE risk score on major adverse cardiac events in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Chen, Y D; Shi, Y J; Xue, H; Wang, J L

    2016-07-24

    To investigate the prediction value of deceleration capacity of rate (DC) and GRACE risk score for cardiovascular events in AMI patients. Consecutive AMI patients with sinus rhythm hospitalized in our department during August 2012 to August 2013 were included in this prospective study. 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring was performed within 1 week, and the DC value was analyzed, GRACE risk score was acquired with the application of GRACE risk score calculator. Patients were followed up for more than 1 year and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were obtained. Analysised the Kaplan Meier survival according to DC and GRACE score risk stratification respectively. A total of 157 patients were enrolled in the study (average age: (58.9±12.7)years old). The average follow-up was (20.54±2.85) months. Mortality during follow-up was significantly higher in patients with DC>2.5 compared to patients with DC≤2.5 (Prisk stratification was 0.898 (95%CI 0.840-0.940, Prisk stratification was 0.786 (95%CI 0.714-0.847, Prisk stratification was 0.708 (95%CI 0.652-0.769, Prisk patients than those with intermediate and low risk patients according to DC risk stratification in intermediate and low risk patients by GRACE risk stratification (Prisk stratification is superior to GRACE risk score on outcome assessment in this AMI patient cohort.

  18. Elliptical Accretion and Low Luminosity from High Accretion Rate Stellar Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirski, Gilad; Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian

    2017-05-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disc at the pericentre scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, ˜ 1044 erg s- 1, implies that we observe only ˜1 per cent of the energy expected from radiatively efficient accretion. Even the energy that must be lost to circularize the returning tidal flow is larger than the observed energy. Recently, Piran et al. suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocentre between freshly infalling material and earlier arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature and the large radius implied by the observations as well as the t-5/3 light curve. However the question of the system's low bolometric efficiency remains unanswered. We suggest that the high orbital energy and low angular momentum of the flow make it possible for magnetic stresses to reduce the matter's already small angular momentum to the point at which it can fall ballistically into the supermassive black hole before circularization. As a result, the efficiency is only ˜1-10 per cent of a standard accretion disc's efficiency. Thus, the intrinsically high eccentricity of the tidal debris naturally explains why most TDE candidates are fainter than expected.

  19. Using preventive home monitoring to reduce hospital admission rates and reduce costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Hæsum, Lisa Korsbakke Emtekær; Sørensen, Natascha

    2012-01-01

    We studied whether preventive home monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could reduce the frequency of hospital admissions and lower the cost of hospitalization. Patients were recruited from a health centre, general practitioner (GP) or the pulmonary hospital ward....... They were randomized to usual care or tele-rehabilitation with a telehealth monitoring device installed in their home for four months. A total of 111 patients were suitable for inclusion and consented to be randomized: 60 patients were allocated to intervention and three were lost to follow...... of admissions was €3461 per patient in the intervention group and €4576 in the control group; this difference was not significant. The Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to hospital admission were longer for the intervention group than the controls, but the difference was not significant. Future work requires...

  20. Association of Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Incidence of a Composite of Postoperative In-hospital Mortality and Cardiovascular Events in Men Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argalious, Maged Y; You, Jing; Mao, Guangmei; Ramos, Daniel; Khanna, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Kamal; Trombetta, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    Whether patients on testosterone replacement therapy undergoing noncardiac surgery have an increased risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events remains unknown. We therefore sought to identify the impact of testosterone replacement on the incidence of a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events in men undergoing noncardiac surgery. Data from male American Society of Anesthesiologists I through IV patients 40 yr or older who underwent noncardiac surgery between May 2005 and December 2015 at the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio) main campus were included. The primary exposure was preoperative testosterone use. The primary outcome was a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events. We compared patients who received testosterone and those who did not using propensity score matching within surgical procedure matches. Among 49,273 patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria, 947 patients on testosterone were matched to 4,598 nontestosterone patients. The incidence of in-hospital mortality was 1.3% in the testosterone group and 1.1% in the nontestosterone group, giving an odds ratio of 1.17 (99% CI, 0.51 to 2.68; P = 0.63). The incidence of myocardial infarction was 0.2% in the testosterone group and 0.6% in the nontestosterone group (odds ratio = 0.34; 99% CI, 0.05 to 2.28; P = 0.15). Similarly, no significant difference was found in stroke (testosterone vs. nontestosterone: 2.0% vs. 2.1%), pulmonary embolism (0.5% vs. 0.7%), or deep venous thrombosis (2.0% vs. 1.7%). Preoperative testosterone is not associated with an increased incidence of a composite of postoperative in-hospital mortality and cardiovascular events.

  1. Readmission rates after a planned hospital stay of 2 versus 3 days in fast-track colonic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens; Hjort-Jakobsen, Dorthe; Christiansen, P. S.

    2007-01-01

    hospital stay was 2 and 3 days, median stay after readmission was 5 and 5.5 days, and median (mean) total stay was 3 (5.6) and 3 (5.7) days in periods 1 and 2 respectively. The readmission rate in period 2 was lower because there were fewer readmissions for short-term observation or social reasons...... from August 2004. All patients were examined 8 and 30 days after surgery. RESULTS: Readmission rates fell from 20.1 per cent in 408 patients with a planned 2-day hospital stay (period 1) to 11.3 per cent in 133 patients with a planned 3-day hospital stay (period 2) (P 0.020). Median length of primary...... with a planned hospital stay of 2 versus 3 days. METHODS: The study included 541 consecutive colonic resections from one surgical department with a structured care programme, including well defined discharge criteria, between April 1997 and December 2005. The planned hospital stay was increased from 2 to 3 days...

  2. Patients with a history of diabetes have a lower survival rate after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petursson, P; Gudbjörnsdottir, S; Aune, S; Svensson, L; Oddby, E; Sjöland, H; Herlitz, J

    2008-01-01

    To describe the association between a history of diabetes and outcome among patients suffering an in-hospital cardiac arrest. All patients suffering an in-hospital cardiac arrest in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Göteborg between 1994 and 2006 and at nine further hospitals in Sweden between 2005 and 2006. In all, 1810 patients were included in the survey, 395 (22%) of whom had a previous history of diabetes. Patients with a history of diabetes differed from those without such a history by having a higher prevalence of previous myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure and renal disease. They were more frequently treated with anti-arrhythmic drugs during resuscitation. Whereas immediate survival did not differ between groups (51.7% and 53.1%, respectively), patients with diabetes were discharged alive from hospital (29.3%) less frequently compared with those without diabetes (37.6%). When correcting for dissimilarities at baseline, the adjusted odds ratio for being discharged alive (diabetes/no diabetes) was 0.57 (95% CL 0.40-0.79). Among patients suffering an in-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden in whom CPR was attempted, 22% had a history of diabetes. These patients had a lower survival rate, which cannot simply be explained by different co-morbidity.

  3. Five Year Continence Rates, Satisfaction and Adverse Events of Burch Urethropexy and Fascial Sling Surgery for Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, L; Richter, H. E.; Norton, P. A.; Albo, M.; Zyczynski, H. M.; Chai, T. C.; Zimmern, P.; Kraus, S.; Sirls, L.; Kusek, J. W.; Stoddard, A.; Tennstedt, S.; Gormley, E. Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To characterize continence, satisfaction, and adverse events in women at least 5 years after a Burch urethropexy or fascial sling with longitudinal follow-up of randomized clinical trial participants at least 5 years post-operatively. Methods 482 (73.6520 (79.4%) of 655 women participated in a randomized surgical trial comparing efficacy of the Burch and sling treatments enrolled in this long-term observational study. Urinary continence status was assessed yearly for a minimum of five years postoperatively. Continence was defined as no urinary leakage on a three-day voiding diary and no self-reported stress incontinence symptoms AND no stress incontinence surgical retreatment. Results Incontinent participants were more likely to enroll in the follow-up study than continent patients (85.5% vs. 52.2%), regardless of surgical group (p <0.0001). Overall the continence rates were lower in the Burch urethropexy group than in the fascial sling group (p=0.002). The continence rates at five years were 24.1% (95% CI 18.5% to 29.7%) compared to 30.8% (24.7% to 36.9%), respectively. Satisfaction at 5 years was related to continence status and higher in women undergoing a sling (83% vs. 73%, p=0.04). Satisfaction declined over time (P=0.001) and remained higher in the sling group (p=0.03). The two groups had similar adverse event rates (10% Burch vs.9 % sling) and similar numbers of participants with adverse events (23 Burch vs. 22 sling). Conclusions Continence rates in both groups declined substantially over five years, yet most women reported satisfaction with their continence status. Satisfaction was higher in continent women and those who underwent fascial sling, despite the voiding dysfunction associated with this procedure. PMID:22341290

  4. Hand carriage of Candida occurs at lesser rates in hospital personnel who use antimicrobial hand disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Mustafa; Sahin, Idris; Oksuz, Sukru; Sencan, Irfan; Kucukbayrak, Abdulkadir; Cakir, Selma; Ozaydin, Cigdem

    2014-09-01

    The hands of hospital personnel are considered to be important for colonization and infection of patients with Candida spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different hand disinfectants in reducing the carriage of Candida species on the hands of hospital personnel. A controlled study was conducted at Duzce University School of Medicine Hospital. Eighty hospital personnel were included in the trial. Subjects were divided into 4 groups according to hand hygiene procedures: group 1, hand rubbing with alcohol-based solution; group 2, hand washing with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate; group 3, hand washing with 7.5% povidone-iodine; group 4, hand washing with plain soap and water. The hands of all participants were tested by culture with the broth wash technique. Hand carriage of Candida spp. was lower in the 4% chlorhexidine gluconate group (10.5%, p = 0.006), in the 7.5% povidone-iodine group (18.7%, p = 0.043), and in the alcohol-based hand rub group (21.1%, p = 0.048) compared to the group washing hands with plain soap and water (50%). The use of hand disinfectant containing antimicrobial agents is more effective than hand washing with water and soap in reducing carriage of Candida on the hands of hospital personnel. It is recommended that hospital personnel use an antimicrobial hand disinfectant in units where there is a high risk of Candida infection.

  5. Real-time registration of adverse events in Dutch hospitalized children in general pediatric units: First experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van der Starre (Cynthia); M. van Dijk (Monique); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe objectives of this study are to describe the number and nature of adverse events occurring in general pediatric practice, to describe factors contributing to the occurrence of these adverse events, and to report on the experience of pediatricians with reporting adverse events. It is

  6. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, A C M; Mureau, M A M; Schreuder, K; van Dalen, T; Vrancken Peeters, M T F D; Schrieks, M; Maduro, J H; Siesling, S

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. Patients undergoing mastectomy for primary invasive breast cancer or DCIS diagnosed between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013 were selected from the NABON Breast Cancer Audit. All the 92 hospitals in the Netherlands were included. The use of IBR in all hospitals was compared using unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Patient and tumor factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 16,953 patients underwent mastectomy: 15,072 for invasive breast cancer and 1881 for DCIS. Unadjusted analyses revealed considerable variation between hospitals in postmastectomy IBR rates for invasive breast cancer (mean 17%; range 0-64%) and DCIS (mean 42%; range 0-83%). For DCIS, younger age and multifocal disease were factors that significantly increased IBR rates. For patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, IBR was more often used in younger patients, multifocal tumors, smaller tumors, tumors with a lower grade, absence of lymph node involvement, ductal carcinomas, or hormone-receptor positive/HER2-positive tumors. After case-mix adjustments for these factors, the variation in the use of IBR between hospitals remained large (0-43% for invasive breast cancer and 0-74% for DCIS). A large variation between hospitals was found in postmastectomy IBR rates in the Netherlands for both invasive breast cancer and DCIS even after adjustment for patient and tumor factors. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High rates of hospital admission among older residents in assisted living facilities: opportunities for intervention and impact on acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B; Amuah, Joseph E; Strain, Laurel A; Wodchis, Walter P; Soo, Andrea; Eliasziw, Misha; Gruneir, Andrea; Hagen, Brad; Teare, Gary; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about health or service use outcomes for residents of Canadian assisted living facilities. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of admission to hospital over 1 year for residents of designated (i.e., publicly funded) assisted living (DAL) facilities in Alberta, to compare this rate with the rate among residents of long-term care facilities, and to identify individual and facility predictors of hospital admission for DAL residents. Participants were 1066 DAL residents (mean age ± standard deviation 84.9 ± 7.3 years) and 976 longterm care residents (85.4 ± 7.6 years) from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Research nurses completed a standardized comprehensive assessment for each resident and interviewed family caregivers at baseline (2006 to 2008) and 1 year later. We used standardized interviews with administrators to generate facility- level data. We determined hospital admissions through linkage with the Alberta Inpatient Discharge Abstract Database. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of hospital admission. The cumulative annual incidence of hospital admission was 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.9%- 41.9%) for DAL residents and 13.7% (95% CI 11.5%-15.8%) for long-term care residents. The risk of hospital admission was significantly greater for DAL residents with greater health instability, fatigue, medication use (11 or more medications), and 2 or more hospital admissions in the preceding year. The risk of hospital admission was also significantly higher for residents from DAL facilities with a smaller number of spaces, no licensed practical and/ or registered nurses on site (or on site less than 24 hours a day, 7 days a week), no chain affiliation, and from select health regions. The incidence of hospital admission was about 3 times higher among DAL residents than among long-term care residents, and the risk of hospital admission was associated with a number of

  8. Estrategia para la prevención de eventos adversos en el anciano hospitalizado Strategy for the prevention of adverse events in the hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M��. Antonia Muñoz Mella

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available La hospitalización deriva frecuentemente en una declinación irreversible del estado funcional, pudiendo dar como resultado complicaciones no relacionadas con el problema de admisión y producir una cascada de eventos adversos (EA que pueden culminar con la disminución de la calidad de vida. Las causas en los pacientes mayores son múltiples y acumulativas. Nuestro objetivo general fue diseñar un programa específico para la prevención de eventos adversos relacionados con la hospitalización del paciente anciano frágil, determinando para ello los factores de riesgo, tanto intrínsecos como extrínsecos, para establecer estrategias de seguridad que incluyan acciones que minimicen o eliminen los EA según la prioridad de riesgo establecida. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo de los pacientes ingresados en el hospital que cumplen el criterio de edad mayor o igual a 80 años. Las evaluaciones fueron realizadas durante 3 días consecutivos en 3 meses diferentes. La muestra total analizada fue de 133 pacientes, que representa el 20% de los pacientes ingresados en nuestro hospital durante el período de estudio. Como resultado hemos obtenido una valoración de los EA de la población anciana hospitalizada para realizar un plan de prevención de riesgos que desarrolle cuidados específicos para estos pacientes.There are multiple and cumulative causes of functional decline among hospitalized elderly patients Hospitalization itself may frequently cause a state of irreversible functional decline, leading to complications not related to the initial reasons for the hospital admission. Moreover, this lower functional status may carry risks of adverse events, potentially reducing quality of life. Our general goal was to design a specific program to prevent adverse events relating to hospitalized frail elderly patients. We determined intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors within our security strategies, including actions to minimize or even mitigate adverse

  9. Differences in Adverse Event Reporting Rates of Therapeutic Failure Between Two Once-daily Extended-release Methylphenidate Medications in Canada: Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Event Reporting Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Wyllie, Laura; van Stralen, Judy; Castillon, Genaro; Sherman, Stephen E; Almagor, Doron

    2017-10-01

    Our study evaluated adverse events of therapeutic failure (and specifically reduced duration of action) with the use of a branded product, Osmotic Release Oral System (OROS) methylphenidate, which is approved for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a generic product (methylphenidate, methylphenidate ER-C), which was approved for marketing in Canada based on bioequivalence to OROS methylphenidate. This study was initiated following reports that some US-marketed generic methylphenidate ER products had substantially higher reporting rates of therapeutic failure than did the referenced brands. Through methodology similar to that used by the US Food and Drug Administration to investigate the issue with the US-marketed generic, reporting rates were calculated from cases of therapeutic failure identified in the Canadian Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online database for a 1-year period beginning 8 months after each product launch. Corresponding population exposure was estimated from the number of tablets dispensed. An in-depth analysis of narratives of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) with the use of the generic product was conducted in duplicate by 2 physicians to assess causality and to characterize the potential safety risk and clinical pattern of therapeutic failure. Similar secondary analyses were conducted on the US-marketed products. Reporting rates of therapeutic failure with the use of methylphenidate ER-C (generic) and OROS methylphenidate (brand name) were 411.5 and 37.5 cases per 100,000 patient-years, respectively (reporting rate ratio, 10.99; 95% CI, 5.93-22.21). In-depth analysis of narratives of 230 ICSRs of therapeutic failure with the Canadian-marketed generic determined that all ICSRs were either probably (60 [26%]) or possibly (170 [74%]) causally related to methylphenidate ER-C. Clinical symptoms suggestive of overdose were present in 31 reports of loss of efficacy (13.5%) and occurred primarily in the morning, and

  10. Attention, predictive learning, and the inverse base-rate effect: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Andy J; Lavric, Aureliu; Hemmings, Yvonne; Surrey, Ed

    2014-02-15

    We report the first electrophysiological investigation of the inverse base-rate effect (IBRE), a robust non-rational bias in predictive learning. In the IBRE, participants learn that one pair of symptoms (AB) predicts a frequently occurring disease, whilst an overlapping pair of symptoms (AC) predicts a rarely occurring disease. Participants subsequently infer that BC predicts the rare disease, a non-rational decision made in opposition to the underlying base rates of the two diseases. Error-driven attention theories of learning state that the IBRE occurs because C attracts more attention than B. On the basis of this account we predicted and observed the occurrence of brain potentials associated with visual attention: a posterior Selection Negativity, and a concurrent anterior Selection Positivity, for C vs. B in a post-training test phase. Error-driven attention theories further predict no Selection Negativity, Selection Positivity or IBRE, for control symptoms matched on frequency to B and C, but for which there was no shared symptom (A) during training. These predictions were also confirmed, and this confirmation discounts alternative explanations of the IBRE based on the relative novelty of B and C. Further, we observed higher response accuracy for B alone than for C alone; this dissociation of response accuracy (B>C) from attentional allocation (C>B) discounts the possibility that the observed attentional difference was caused by the difference in response accuracy. © 2013.

  11. The validity of readmission rate as a marker of the quality of hospital care, and a recommendation for its definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumball-Smith, Juliet; Hider, Phil

    2009-02-13

    To perform a review of relevant literature regarding the use of readmission rate as a marker of the quality of hospital care, summarise its validity, and recommend a definition for its use. Literature search was performed on the Embase and Medline databases, with relevant articles extracted and reviewed. Readmission rate as a marker of the quality of hospital care has been used both internationally and nationally, although its validity has only been partially substantiated. While prone to confounding, it remains a valuable indicator due to its ease of collection and its ability to be able to be combined with other variables. Although the definition of readmission rate varies in the literature, it may be defined as 'the number of patients who experienced unintended, acute readmission or death within 30-days of discharge from the index admission, divided by the total number of patients discharged alive within the reference period'.

  12. Rates and predictors of depression status among caregivers of patients with COPD hospitalized for acute exacerbations: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabeu-Mora R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Bernabeu-Mora,1–3 Gloria García-Guillamón,2 Joaquina Montilla-Herrador,2,3 Pilar Escolar-Reina,2,3 José Antonio García-Vidal,2 Francesc Medina-Mirapeix2,3 1Division of Pneumology, Hospital Morales Meseguer, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Murcia, 3Physiotherapy and Disability Research Group, Instituto Murciano de Investigación Biosanitaria Virgen de la Arrixaca (IMIB, Murcia, Spain Background: Hospitalization is common for acute exacerbation of COPD, but little is known about its impact on the mental health of caregivers. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the rates and predictors of depressive symptoms in caregivers at the time of hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD and to identify the probability and predictors of subsequent changes in depressive status 3 months after discharge. Materials and methods: This was a prospective study. Depression symptoms were measured in 87 caregivers of patients hospitalized for exacerbation at hospitalization and 3 months after discharge. We measured factors from four domains: context of care, caregiving demands, caregiver resources, and patient characteristics. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the predictors of depression at hospitalization and subsequent changes at 3 months. Results: A total of 45 caregivers reported depression at the time of hospitalization. After multiple adjustments, spousal relationship, dyspnea, and severe airflow limitation were the strongest independent predictors of depression at hospitalization. Of these 45 caregivers, 40% had a remission of their depression 3 months after discharge. In contrast, 16.7% of caregivers who were not depressive at hospitalization became depressive at 3 months. Caregivers caring >20 hours per week for patients with dependencies had decreased odds of remission, and patients having dependencies after discharge increased the odds of caregivers becoming

  13. Application of stochastic discrete event system framework for detection of induced low rate TCP attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhuiya, F A; Agarwal, Mayank; Purwar, Sanketh; Biswas, Santosh; Nandi, Sukumar

    2015-09-01

    TCP is the most widely accepted transport layer protocol. The major emphasis during the development of TCP was its functionality and efficiency. However, not much consideration was given on studying the possibility of attackers exploiting the protocol, which has lead to several attacks on TCP. This paper deals with the induced low rate TCP attack. Since the attack is relatively new, only a few schemes have been proposed to mitigate it. However, the main issues with these schemes are scalability, change in TCP header, lack of formal frameworks, etc. In this paper, we have adapted the stochastic DES framework for detecting the attack, which addresses most of these issues. We have successfully deployed and tested the proposed DES based IDS on a test bed. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Left Ventricular Wall Stress-Mass-Heart Rate Product and Cardiovascular Events in Treated Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereux, Richard B; Bang, Casper N; Roman, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    randomized treatment, the triple product was reduced more by atenolol, with prevalences of elevated triple product of 39% versus 51% on losartan (both P≤0.001). In Cox regression analyses adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and prior stroke, MI, and heart failure, 1 SD lower triple product......In the Losartan Intervention for End Point Reduction in Hypertension (LIFE) study, 4.8 years' losartan- versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular end points, including cardiovascular death and stroke. However, there was no difference...... in myocardial infarction (MI), possibly related to greater reduction in myocardial oxygen demand by atenolol-based treatment. Myocardial oxygen demand was assessed indirectly by the left ventricular mass×wall stress×heart rate (triple product) in 905 LIFE participants. The triple product was included as time...

  15. Ion-ion coincidence imaging at high event rate using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingming; Furch, Federico J.; Durá, Judith; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John; Schulz, Claus Peter; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-07-01

    A new ion-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer based on a pixelated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector has been developed for the investigation of molecular ionization and fragmentation processes in strong laser fields. Used as a part of a velocity map imaging spectrometer, the detection system is comprised of a set of microchannel plates and a Timepix detector. A fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) is used to enhance the ion time-of-flight resolution by correlating timestamps registered separately by the Timepix detector and the TDC. In addition, sub-pixel spatial resolution (principle experiment on strong field dissociative double ionization of carbon dioxide molecules (CO2), using a 400 kHz repetition rate laser system. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectrometer can detect multiple ions in coincidence, making it a valuable tool for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules in strong laser fields.

  16. [C-section rate in low-risk women: a useful indicator to compare hospitals attending deliveries with different risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librero, Julián; Peiró, Salvador; Belda, Ana; Calabuig, Julia

    2014-01-01

    the C-section rate has been criticized as a performance indicator for not considering that different hospitals manage deliveries with diverse risks. In this work we explore the characteristics of a new indicator restricted to low C-section risk deliveries. retrospective cohort of all births (n=214,611) in all public hospitals during 2005-2010 in the Valencia Region, Spain (source: minimum basic dataset). A low-risk subpopulation consisting of women under-35, no history of c-section, between 37 and 41 gestational weeks, and with a single fetus, with cephalic presentation and normal weight (2500-3999 g) was constructed. We analyzed variability in the new indicator, its correlation with the crude indicator and, using multilevel logistic regression models, the presence of residual risks. a total of 117 589 births (58.4% of the whole deliveries) were identified as low C-section risk. The c-section rate in these women was 11.9% (24.4% for all deliveries) ranging between hospitals from 7.0% to 28.9%. The c-section rate in low-risk and total deliveries correlated strongly (r=0.88). The remaining risks in the population of low risk did not alter the hospital effect on the c-section rate. the percentage of C-section in low risk women include a high volume of deliveries, correlated with the crude indicator and residual risks are not differentially influenced by hospitals, being a useful indicator for monitoring the quality of obstetric care in the National Health System.

  17. Measuring the Transition Rates of Coalescence Events during Double Phase Separation in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Oprisan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase transition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, science and technology. In general, the phase separation from a homogeneous phase depends on the depth of the temperature quench into the two-phase region. Earth’s gravity masks the details of phase separation phenomena, which is why experiments were performed under weightlessness. Under such conditions, the pure fluid sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 near its critical point also benefits from the universality of phase separation behavior and critical slowing down of dynamics. Initially, the fluid was slightly below its critical temperature with the liquid matrix separated from the vapor phase. A 0.2 mK temperature quench further cooled down the fluid and produced a double phase separation with liquid droplets inside the vapor phase and vapor bubbles inside the liquid matrix, respectively. The liquid droplets and the vapor bubbles respective distributions were well fitted by a lognormal function. The evolution of discrete bins of different radii allowed the derivation of the transition rates for coalescence processes. Based on the largest transition rates, two main coalescence mechanisms were identified: (1 asymmetric coalescences between one small droplet of about 20 μ m and a wide range of larger droplets; and (2 symmetric coalescences between droplets of large and similar radii. Both mechanisms lead to a continuous decline of the fraction of small radii droplets and an increase in the fraction of the large radii droplets. Similar coalescence mechanisms were observed for vapor bubbles. However, the mean radii of liquid droplets exhibits a t 1 / 3 evolution, whereas the mean radii of the vapor bubbles exhibit a t 1 / 2 evolution.

  18. Measuring the Transition Rates of Coalescence Events during Double Phase Separation in Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Ana; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2017-07-06

    Phase transition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, science and technology. In general, the phase separation from a homogeneous phase depends on the depth of the temperature quench into the two-phase region. Earth's gravity masks the details of phase separation phenomena, which is why experiments were performed under weightlessness. Under such conditions, the pure fluid sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) near its critical point also benefits from the universality of phase separation behavior and critical slowing down of dynamics. Initially, the fluid was slightly below its critical temperature with the liquid matrix separated from the vapor phase. A 0.2 mK temperature quench further cooled down the fluid and produced a double phase separation with liquid droplets inside the vapor phase and vapor bubbles inside the liquid matrix, respectively. The liquid droplets and the vapor bubbles respective distributions were well fitted by a lognormal function. The evolution of discrete bins of different radii allowed the derivation of the transition rates for coalescence processes. Based on the largest transition rates, two main coalescence mechanisms were identified: (1) asymmetric coalescences between one small droplet of about 20 μ m and a wide range of larger droplets; and (2) symmetric coalescences between droplets of large and similar radii. Both mechanisms lead to a continuous decline of the fraction of small radii droplets and an increase in the fraction of the large radii droplets. Similar coalescence mechanisms were observed for vapor bubbles. However, the mean radii of liquid droplets exhibits a t 1 / 3 evolution, whereas the mean radii of the vapor bubbles exhibit a t 1 / 2 evolution.

  19. Infection rate in adult patients with open fractures treated at the emergency hospital and at the ULBRA university hospital in Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel; Gregio, Fernando Machado; Bernardi, Adriane; Castro, Cyntia Cordeiro de

    2017-01-01

    To identify the infection rate in adult patients with open fractures treated at two tertiary hospitals in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This quantitative descriptive study was conducted at Hospital de Pronto Socorro de Canoas. Eligible participants were adults aged 18-60 years with open fractures who were admitted to the orthopedic trauma service from January to May 2014 and followed-up for one year. A total of 133 patients with open fractures were included; most were men (92.48%), with a mean age of 36 years. There was a predominance of Gustilo-Anderson type III fractures. The infection rate was 18.80%, being more frequent in Gustilo-Anderson type III fractures (72.00%). The most commonly observed bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter aerogenes . The infection rate in open fractures of patients initially treated at the emergency department of HPSC was 18.8%. The infections occurred predominantly in Gustilo-Anderson type III fractures. The bacteria with the highest incidence in infections were Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter aerogenes .

  20. Lifestyle Modifications Versus Antihypertensive Medications in Reducing Cardiovascular Events in an Aging Society: A Success Rate-oriented Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Araki, Ryuichiro; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sato, Makiko; Takahashi, Sachiko; Suwa, Emi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is difficult to compare directly the practical effects of lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications on reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to compare the hypothetical potential of lifestyle modifications with that of antihypertensive medications in reducing CVD in an aging society using a success rate-oriented simulation. Methods We constructed a simulation model for virtual Japanese subpopulations according to sex and age at 10-year intervals from 40 years of age as an example of an aging society. The fractional incidence rate of CVD was calculated as the product of the incidence rate at each systolic blood pressure (SBP) level and the proportion of the SBP frequency distribution in the fractional subpopulations of each SBP. The total incidence rate was calculated by the definite integral of the fractional incidence rate at each SBP level in the sex- and age-specific subpopulations. Results If we consider the effects of lifestyle modifications on metabolic factors and transfer them onto SBP, the reductions in the total incidence rate of CVD were competitive between lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications in realistic scenarios. In middle-aged women, the preventive effects of both approaches were limited due to a low incidence rate. In middle-aged men and extremely elderly subjects whose adherence to antihypertensive medications is predicted to be low, lifestyle modifications could be an alternative choice. Conclusion The success rate-oriented simulation suggests that the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications or antihypertensive medications in preventing cardiovascular events largely depends on the baseline incidence rate and sex- and age-specific behavioral factors.

  1. Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning hospitalization and emergency department counts and rates by county, year, and fire-relatedness among California residents,2000-2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) inpatient hospitalizations and emergency...

  2. Nasal Colonization rate of Staphylococcus aureus strains among Health Care Service Employee’s of Teaching University Hospitals in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili Mohammad Bagher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to find the extent of staphylococcal carriages including Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in employee's of teaching university hospitals in Yazd. Nasal swabs of 742 employees in four different medical teaching hospitals in Yazd were collected, and tested for detection of staphylococci strains. Out of 742 employees, 94 (12.7% were carrier of staphylococcus aurus and 57 (11.38% for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA respectively. Prevalence of Staphylococci aureus and MRSA in individual hospitals and wards were different. In general the highest carriers were personnel of dialysis ward and the lowest pediatrics wards. Resistance rate of MRSA against Ciprofloxacin, Vancomycin, and Rifampin were found to be as 28.1%, 10.5% and 35.1% respectively.

  3. Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits after Bariatric Surgery at Saudi Arabian Hospital: The Rates, Reasons, and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saudi Arabian hospital readmissions and emergency department (ED visits following bariatric surgery and discharge have never been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the rates and reasons of hospital readmissions and ED visits related to surgical weight loss interventions at the King Abdulaziz Medical City - Riyadh. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 301 patients who underwent bariatric surgery between January 2011 and July 2016. We reviewed patient medical records progressively to assess hospital readmission, ED visits, and complications. Results: Of the 301 patients analyzed, 67.1% were female and 93% had class II obesity. The readmission rate, ED visit rate after discharge and the rate of either of the two was 8%, 14%,and 18.3%, respectively. The most common causes of readmission were abdominal pain (37.5%, nausea/vomiting (29.2%, and site leak (25%, while the most common causes of ED visits were abdominal pain (59.5% and nausea/vomiting (16.9%. Readmission rates tended to be higher in older patients (age of patients readmitted 42 ± 12.1 years vs. age of patients not readmitted 34.3 ± 11.8 years; p = 0.002. The rate of readmission tends to increase in patients with overweight or class I obesity (odds ratio (OR = 20.15, diabetes (OR = 14.82, and obstructive sleep apnea (OR = 14.29. Dyslipidemia was positively associated with ED visits (p = 0.027, OR = 2.87. The rate of readmission or ED visits increased with age, while there were decreases in readmission and ED visits for those who had received gastric sleeve surgery. Conclusions: The study reported high rates of readmission and ED visits, thus the effectiveness of different types of weight loss surgeries should be further evaluated, particularly in individuals with complicated medical issues such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea.

  4. The Conformity Rate of the Principles of Catheterization Nursing Care in Women with the Standards in Selected Hospital of Qom University of Medical Sciences, 2015, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahime Rostami Nouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Given the increasing prevalence of use of urinary catheter, nurses as one of the largest and the most important health care provider groups, should have extensive knowledge and skills in order to provide standard health care. This study was conducted to determine the conformity rate of the principles of catheterization nursing care in women with the standards in selected Hospital of Qom University of Medical Sciences, 2015. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 195 cases of catheterization nursing care in women, were investigated using event sampling in one of the hospitals affiliated to Qom University of Medical Sciences, in 2015. Data were gathered through Nurses' Demographic Information Questionnaire and checklist of catheterization nursing care in women. Results: In this study, the conformity rate of catheterization nursing care with the standards was 70.8% (moderate; 29.2% of the care was desirable; and 0% was poor. Conclusion: According to the results, nurses’ performance in the catheterization nursing care in women was in moderate level compared to the standards. In order to improve the quality of cares, implementation of nursing clinical guidelines for women catheterization, and clinical supervision by nurse managers, are suggested.  

  5. Hysterectomy in Denmark 1977-2011: Changes in rate, indications, and hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Rune; Blaakær, J.; Ottesen, B.

    2013-01-01

    . The indication of pelvic organ prolapse and abnormal uterine bleeding increased while the indication of fibroids decreased. The average age of women at time of hysterectomy increased from 46 years in 1977-1981 to 50 years in 2006-2011. The mean number of hospitalization days was reduced by 75%. Regional......OBJECTIVE: To describe conditions regarding hysterectomy for benign indications during the past 35 years in Denmark. STUDY DESIGN: Population-based register study of 167,802 women who underwent hysterectomy for benign conditions in the period 1977-2011. Patient data regarding operative techniques...... differences were detected regarding route of hysterectomy and hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a change in the pattern of indications for hysterectomy, increased age of the affected women, reduced length of stay in the hospital, and a rise in the percentage of minimal invasive surgical...

  6. The devil is in the details: trends in avoidable hospitalization rates by geography in British Columbia, 1990–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier-Fisher, Denise; Penning, Margaret J; Zheng, Chi; Druyts, Eric-Bené F

    2006-01-01

    Background Researchers and policy makers have focussed on the development of indicators to help monitor the success of regionalization, primary care reform and other health sector restructuring initiatives. Certain indicators are useful in examining issues of equity in service provision, especially among older populations, regardless of where they live. AHRs are used as an indicator of primary care system efficiency and thus reveal information about access to general practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to examine trends in avoidable hospitalization rates (AHRs) during a period of time characterized by several waves of health sector restructuring and regionalization in British Columbia. AHRs are examined in relation to non-avoidable and total hospitalization rates as well as by urban and rural geography across the province. Methods Analyses draw on linked administrative health data from the province of British Columbia for 1990 through 2000 for the population aged 50 and over. Joinpoint regression analyses and t-tests are used to detect and describe trends in the data. Results Generally speaking, non-avoidable hospitalizations constitute the vast majority of hospitalizations in a given year (i.e. around 95%) with AHRs constituting the remaining 5% of hospitalizations. Comparing rural areas and urban areas reveals that standardized rates of avoidable, non-avoidable and total hospitalizations are consistently higher in rural areas. Joinpoint regression results show significantly decreasing trends overall; lines are parallel in the case of avoidable hospitalizations, and lines are diverging for non-avoidable and total hospitalizations, with the gap between rural and urban areas being wider at the end of the time interval than at the beginning. Conclusion These data suggest that access to effective primary care in rural communities remains problematic in BC given that rural areas did not make any gains in AHRs relative to urban areas under recent health sector

  7. Treatment persistence and hospitalization rates among patients with schizophrenia: a quasi-experiment to evaluate a patient information program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Dominic; Amos, Tony B; Germain, Guillaume; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Lefebvre, Patrick; Benson, Carmela J

    2017-04-01

    The effective treatment of schizophrenia requires continuous antipsychotic maintenance therapy. However, poor persistence with treatment is common among patients with schizophrenia. The objective of this study was to compare persistence and hospitalization rates among patients with schizophrenia treated with long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics (i.e. paliperidone palmitate and risperidone) and enrolled in a patient information program (program cohort) with patients treated with oral antipsychotics (OAs) who were not enrolled in a patient information program (nonprogram cohort). Using a quasi-experimental design, data from chart reviews (for program patients) and Medicaid claims (for nonprogram patients) was analyzed. Patients were eligible if they had ≥12 months of pre-index data, ≥6 months of post-index data, and no hospitalization at index. Persistence and hospitalization rates were assessed at 6 months post-index. Propensity score matching was used to control for observed differences in demographics and baseline clinical characteristics. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using generalized estimating equation models and adjusted for matched pairs and propensity score. A total of 102 program patients were matched to 408 nonprogram patients with similar baseline characteristics. Adjusted ORs indicated that the persistence rate at 6 months was significantly higher for the program cohort (88.2%) versus the nonprogram cohort (43.9%; OR: 9.70; P program cohort (14.7%) was significantly lower versus the nonprogram cohort after adjustments (22.5%; OR: 0.55; P = 0.0321). The data for the program and nonprogram patients were from two different and independent data sources (healthcare claims and chart reviews, respectively). Results were based on a relatively small number of program LAI patients. Program patients treated with LAI antipsychotics had higher persistence rates and significantly lower adjusted hospitalization rates compared with nonprogram

  8. Case-mix adjustment approach to benchmarking prevalence rates of nosocomial infection in hospitals in Cyprus and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Dimitriadis, Ioannis; Roumbelaki, Maria; Vounou, Emelia; Kontou, Maria; Papakyriakou, Panikos; Koliou-Mazeri, Maria; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Vrouchos, George; Troulakis, George; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-08-01

    To examine the effect of heterogeneous case mix for a benchmarking analysis and interhospital comparison of the prevalence rates of nosocomial infection. Cross-sectional survey. Eleven hospitals located in Cyprus and in the region of Crete in Greece. The survey included all inpatients in the medical, surgical, pediatric, and gynecology-obstetrics wards, as well as those in intensive care units. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria were used to define nosocomial infection. The information collected for all patients included demographic characteristics, primary admission diagnosis, Karnofsky functional status index, Charlson comorbidity index, McCabe-Jackson severity of illness classification, use of antibiotics, and prior exposures to medical and surgical risk factors. Outcome data were also recorded for all patients. Case mix-adjusted rates were calculated by using a multivariate logistic regression model for nosocomial infection risk and an indirect standardization method.Results. The overall prevalence rate of nosocomial infection was 7.0% (95% confidence interval, 5.9%-8.3%) among 1,832 screened patients. Significant variation in nosocomial infection rates was observed across hospitals (range, 2.2%-9.6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the mean predicted risk of nosocomial infection across hospitals ranged from 3.7% to 10.3%, suggesting considerable variation in patient risk. Case mix-adjusted rates ranged from 2.6% to 12.4%, and the relative ranking of hospitals was affected by case-mix adjustment in 8 cases (72.8%). Nosocomial infection was significantly and independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6 [95% confidence interval, 2.1-6.1]). The first attempt to rank the risk of nosocomial infection in these regions demonstrated the importance of accounting for heterogeneous case mix before attempting interhospital comparisons.

  9. Comparison of claims data on hospitalization rates and repeat procedures in patients receiving a bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lisa E; Sacks, Naomi C; Cyr, Philip L; Sharma, Abhishek; Dahdal, David N

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes of colorectal screening using sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate compared with other prescription bowel-preparation agents. Primary endpoints were rates of procedure-associated hospitalizations, diagnosis at hospitalization, and rates of early repeat screenings. This retrospective cohort study identified patients using the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan databases, which contain fully adjudicated, de-identified, medical- and prescription-drug claims, as well as demographic and enrollment information for individuals with commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare supplemental insurance coverage. Patients who had a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy over a 3-year period were identified using International Classification of Diseases Clinical Modification procedure codes, recorded on claims from physicians and facilities. First, screening colonoscopy was identified for each patient, and the study was limited to those patients who could be observed for ≥6 months before and 3 months after the screening procedure. Total number of hospitalizations and rates of early repeat screenings were evaluated for all patients who received sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate and compared with those who received other bowel-preparation agents. Individual prescription medications that could affect the outcome of the cleansing agent were identified; further evaluations were made to establish whether patients had comorbid conditions, such as chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, or psychiatric illness. Statistical methods included descriptive statistics, two-tailed t-tests, and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 566,628 procedures were identified in the MarketScan databases and included in the study. Sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate performed well in terms of safety outcomes, with no hospitalizations due to diagnosis of hyponatremia, dehydration, or other fluid disorders in the 10 days after procedure. Early repeat rates among

  10. Comparison of rates of adverse events in adolescent and adult women undergoing medical abortion: population register based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinimäki, Maarit; Suhonen, Satu; Mentula, Maarit; Hemminki, Elina; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Gissler, Mika

    2011-04-19

    To determine the risks of short term adverse events in adolescent and older women undergoing medical abortion. Population based retrospective cohort study. Finnish abortion register 2000-6. All women (n = 27,030) undergoing medical abortion during 2000-6, with only the first induced abortion analysed for each woman. Incidence of adverse events (haemorrhage, infection, incomplete abortion, surgical evacuation, psychiatric morbidity, injury, thromboembolic disease, and death) among adolescent (abortion and linked with data from the abortion register for 2004-6. During 2000-6, 3024 adolescents and 24,006 adults underwent at least one medical abortion. The rate of chlamydia infections was higher in the adolescent cohort (5.7% v 3.7%, P abortion (0.69, 0.59 to 0.82), and surgical evacuation (0.78, 0.67 to 0.90) were lower in the adolescent cohort. In subgroup analysis of primigravid women, the risks of incomplete abortion (0.68, 0.56 to 0.81) and surgical evacuation (0.75, 0.64 to 0.88) were lower in the adolescent cohort. In logistic regression, duration of gestation was the most important risk factor for infection, incomplete abortion, and surgical evacuation. The incidence of adverse events after medical abortion was similar or lower among adolescents than among older women. Thus, medical abortion seems to be at least as safe in adolescents as it is in adults.

  11. Rates of organ donation in a UK tertiary cardiac arrest centre following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Olivia V; Thomas, Matthew J C; Hadfield, John; O'Higgins, Fran; Mitchell, Claire; Rooney, Kieron D

    2016-04-01

    To ascertain the rate of successful organ donation (OD) within patients who sustained an out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with initial return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to hospital admission, but whom subsequently do not survive to hospital discharge. A retrospective audit of ambulance service and hospital databases from January 2010 to January 2015 was undertaken in a United Kingdom tertiary-referral regional cardiac arrest centre. Crude denominator data for cardiac arrests was obtained from the regional ambulance service; the ICU database was interrogated for OHCA patient admissions and outcomes. Patients who died were cross-referenced against the local Organ Donation service database. Five hundred and fourteen {514} patients were admitted to ICU following OHCA over this five year period. Two hundred and forty-one {241} patients (47%) survived to hospital discharge and 273 (53%) died of whom 106 (39%) were referred to a Specialist Nurse for Organ Donation (SNOD). The conversion rate after the family was approached was 64%. Twenty-eight {28} patients proceeded to donation and 25 patients (24%) successfully donated at least one organ. On average, a patient proceeding to donation provided 1.9 organs. A proactive, systematic approach to OD in OHCA patients can provide a good conversion rate and substantial number of donors. Most donations occur after death from circulatory criteria. There is a positive socio-economic benefit with nearly £4m in savings to the health service within the next 5 years potentially being realised during this period by liberating patients from dialysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Why are hospital admission and mortality rates for childhood asthma higher in New Zealand than in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A; Anderson, H R; Freeling, P; White, P T

    1990-03-01

    New Zealand has higher mortality and hospital admission rates for asthma than England and Wales. To determine the reasons for this the available data on asthma mortality and hospital admissions from the Auckland region of New Zealand were compared with data from the South West Thames Region of England for 1979-86 and data from previous surveys on prevalence of wheeze (Auckland 1985, Croydon 1978). In addition, a survey of general practitioners was carried out to determine their approach to the management of asthma, patient simulations being used. Asthma mortality in children of European descent aged 5-14 years was 2.5 times higher in Auckland than in South West Thames. The reported lifetime, 12 month, and one month prevalences of wheeze were also higher in Auckland (by 18.5%, 32.1%, and 87.5%). Unexpectedly, the hospital admission rate for asthma in children of European descent aged 5-14 years was 5% less in Auckland than in South West Thames. Comparative studies of hospital case notes and of the replies from general practitioners showed that in Auckland the duration of illness before admission was greater and that general practitioners were less likely to admit patients with acute asthma. The overall standard of general practitioner care in Auckland was, if anything, higher than in South West Thames but in both areas there was considerable variation. On balance it was concluded that the higher mortality rate in New Zealand is explained by higher levels of morbidity rather than relative deficiencies in care. Nevertheless, the implications of the lesser use of hospital care for acute asthma observed in Auckland need further consideration.

  13. Coronary Venous Dissection from Left Ventricular Lead Placement During Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy With Defibrillator Implantation and Associated in-Hospital Adverse Events (from the NCDR ICD Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jonathan C; Varosy, Paul D; Bao, Haikun; Dewland, Thomas A; Curtis, Jeptha P; Marcus, Gregory M

    2018-01-01

    Coronary venous dissection is a known complication of left ventricular lead placement during implantation of a cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator (CRT-D) system. A large-scale evaluation of the prevalence of coronary venous dissection and associated in-hospital clinical outcomes has not been performed. We sought to identify predictors of coronary venous dissection and evaluate subsequent in-hospital adverse events in those with the complication. We studied 140,991 first-time CRT-D recipients in the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) Registry implanted between 2006 and 2011. Using hierarchical multivariable logistic regression adjusting for patient, implanting physician, and hospital characteristics, we examined predictors of coronary venous dissection and its association with other major complications, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. Coronary venous dissection occurred in 392 patients (0.28%). After multivariable adjustment, female gender and left bundle branch block were associated with greater odds of coronary venous dissection. Conversely, atrial fibrillation, previous coronary artery bypass graft, and higher implanter procedure volume were associated with lower odds of coronary venous dissection (all p values 3 days (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.29, p <0.0001), but not in-hospital death (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.12 to 5.25, p = 0.8012). In conclusion, in a large population of first-time CRT-D recipients, specific patient and implanter characteristics predicted coronary venous dissection risk. Coronary venous dissection was associated with major in-hospital complications and prolonged hospitalization, but not death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of Anemia and Its Impact on Mortality and Hospitalization Rate in Predialysis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormolen, N.; Grootendorst, D. C.; Urlings, T. A. J.; Boeschoten, E. W.; Sijpkens, Y. W.; Huisman, R. M.; Krediet, R. T.; Dekker, F. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: Anemia is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in both early and very late stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to assess whether anemia is a risk factor for mortality or hospitalization in CKD stage 4-5 predialysis patients not yet on

  15. Caesarian section rates in private and public hospitals in Eritrea in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Caesarian section is one of the skilled delivery attendance interventions that have proven to be a life saver. There are standard indications for its use in delivery. The practice of cesarean section in public and private hospitals has not been studied in Eritrea. Objective: The purpose of this retrospective ...

  16. Variations in pediatric asthma hospitalization rates and costs between and within Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocevar, Vasilisa Sazonov; Bisgaard, Hans; Jönsson, Linus

    2004-01-01

    databases for children patient-specific data from...... 1998/1999 were used to calculate the relative hazard of readmission (RHR) using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Nordic incidence of first hospital admission in 1999 was 2.17 per 1,000 children, readmission was noted in 16% of the patients, mean LOS was 2.64 days, and total...

  17. Agravos provocados por medicamentos em hospitais do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Drug adverse events in hospitals in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Rozenfeld

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A ocorrência de agravos provocados por medicamentos no meio hospitalar é elevada e gera custos excedentes. O objetivo do estudo foi identificar problemas relacionados a medicamentos ocorridos durante a internação hospitalar e estimar a prevalência desses agravos. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo realizado no Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Foram analisadas as internações pagas pelo Sistema Único de Saúde entre 1999 e 2002. Os dados foram extraídos do Sistema de Informações Hospitalares. Selecionaram-se as internações que apresentaram um dos códigos da CID-10 (2000 suspeitos de serem agravos provocados por medicamentos, que estivessem nos campos do diagnóstico principal e/ou do diagnóstico secundário. Para as variáveis contínuas estimou-se a média, e o desvio-padrão, sendo a significância estatística entre as diferenças testada por meio de análise de variância (ANOVA, com intervalo de confiança de 95%. RESULTADOS: Foram identificados 3.421 casos equivalentes à freqüência de 1,8 casos/1.000 internações, ocorridos, sobretudo, em homens (64,5%, nos hospitais contratados (34,9% e nos municipais (23,1%, nos leitos de psiquiatria (51,4% e de clínica médica (45,2%, dos quais 84,1% resultaram em alta. A maioria dos agravos foi por reações adversas e de intoxicações e, entre essas categorias, há diferenças significativas (pOBJECTIVE: The occurrence of drug adverse events in hospital settings is high and generates cost excess. The purpose of the study was to identify drug-related events during hospital admissions and to estimate their prevalence. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil. Hospitalizations from the Brazilian Health System's national hospital database during the period between 1999 and 2002 were assessed. Admitted cases including suspected drug adverse event cases with ICD-10 (2000 coding in the main diagnosis and/or secondary diagnosis fields

  18. Induction of psychogenic nonepileptic events: success rate influenced by prior induction exposure, ictal semiology, and psychological profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David K; Izadyar, Shahram; Collins, Robert L; Benge, Jared F; Lemaire, Ashley W; Hrachovy, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate whether certain preinduction clinical characteristics may influence the success rate of induction. We prospectively enrolled and attempted inductions on 51 patients who were suspected to have psychogenic nonepileptic events based on clinical grounds. In addition to careful examination of the reported ictal semiology, we administered a battery of four psychological instruments to our enrolled patients. We found that among 42 cases of successful induction, 92.9% (n=39) of these cases were successfully induced on the first attempt (i.e., without prior induction exposure). We observed that induction showed significantly higher rate of success in cases that demonstrate: (1) hypermotor ictal semiology (p=0.029); (2) more prevalent self-reporting of uncommon cognitive and affective symptoms (p=0.035); or (3) higher tendency to rely on coping strategies of "instrumental support" (p=0.013) and "active coping" (p=0.027), when compared to noninducible cases. Singular administration of placebo induction on preselected patients with these clinical characteristics may reduce costs by shortening video electroencephalography-(EEG) monitoring sessions and improve the diagnostic yield of video-EEG even for patients with very infrequent events. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Pulse Rate and Transit Time Analysis to Predict Hypotension Events After Spinal Anesthesia During Programmed Cesarean Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Juan; Lázaro, Jesús; Gil, Eduardo; Rovira, Eva; Remartínez, José M; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther; Navarro, Augusto; Bailón, Raquel

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment has been proved to reduce hypotension incidence after spinal anesthesia during cesarean labor. However, the use of pharmacological prophylaxis could carry out undesirable side-effects on mother and fetus. Thus, the prediction of hypotension becomes an important challenge. Hypotension events are hypothesized to be related to a malfunctioning of autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of blood pressure. In this work, ANS responses to positional changes of 51 pregnant women programmed for a cesarean labor were explored for hypotension prediction. Lateral and supine decubitus, and sitting position were considered while electrocardiographic and pulse photoplethysmographic signals were recorded. Features based on heart rate variability, pulse rate variability (PRV) and pulse transit time (PTT) analysis were used in a logistic regression classifier. The results showed that PRV irregularity changes, assessed by approximate entropy, from supine to lateral decubitus, and standard deviation of PTT in supine decubitus were found as the combination of features that achieved the best classification results sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 70% and accuracy of 72%, being normotensive the positive class. Peripheral regulation and blood pressure changes, measured by PRV and PTT analysis, could help to predict hypotension events reducing prophylactic side-effects in the low-risk population.

  20. Association between hospital rates of early Do-Not-Resuscitate orders and favorable neurological survival among survivors of inhospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendler, Timothy J; Spertus, John A; Kennedy, Kevin F; Chan, Paul S

    2017-11-01

    Current guidelines recommend deferring prognostication for 48 to 72 hours after resuscitation from inhospital cardiac arrest. It is unknown whether hospitals vary in making patients who survive an arrest Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) early after resuscitation and whether a hospital's rate of early DNR is associated with its rate of favorable neurological survival. Within Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation, we identified 24,899 patients from 236 hospitals who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after inhospital cardiac arrest between 2006 and 2012. Hierarchical models were constructed to derive risk-adjusted hospital rates of DNR status adoption ≤12 hours after ROSC and risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (without severe disability; Cerebral Performance Category ≤2). The association between hospitals' rates of early DNR and favorable neurological survival was evaluated using correlation statistics. Of 236 hospitals, 61.7% were academic, 83% had ≥200 beds, and 94% were urban. Overall, 5577 (22.4%) patients were made DNR ≤12 hours after ROSC. Risk-adjusted hospital rates of early DNR varied widely (7.1%-40.5%, median: 22.7% [IQR: 19.3%-26.1%]; median OR of 1.48). Significant hospital variation existed in risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (3.5%-44.8%, median: 25.3% [IQR: 20.2%-29.4%]; median OR 1.72). Hospitals' risk-adjusted rates of early DNR were inversely correlated with their risk-standardized rates of favorable neurological survival (r=-0.179, P=.006). Despite current guideline recommendations, many patients with inhospital cardiac arrest are made DNR within 12 hours after ROSC, and hospitals vary widely in rates of early DNR. Higher hospital rates of early DNR were associated with worse meaningful survival outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Network Events on Multiple Space and Time Scales in Cultured Neural Networks and in a Stochastic Rate Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Gigante

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cortical networks, in-vitro as well as in-vivo, can spontaneously generate a variety of collective dynamical events such as network spikes, UP and DOWN states, global oscillations, and avalanches. Though each of them has been variously recognized in previous works as expression of the excitability of the cortical tissue and the associated nonlinear dynamics, a unified picture of the determinant factors (dynamical and architectural is desirable and not yet available. Progress has also been partially hindered by the use of a variety of statistical measures to define the network events of interest. We propose here a common probabilistic definition of network events that, applied to the firing activity of cultured neural networks, highlights the co-occurrence of network spikes, power-law distributed avalanches, and exponentially distributed 'quasi-orbits', which offer a third type of collective behavior. A rate model, including synaptic excitation and inhibition with no imposed topology, synaptic short-term depression, and finite-size noise, accounts for all these different, coexisting phenomena. We find that their emergence is largely regulated by the proximity to an oscillatory instability of the dynamics, where the non-linear excitable behavior leads to a self-amplification of activity fluctuations over a wide range of scales in space and time. In this sense, the cultured network dynamics is compatible with an excitation-inhibition balance corresponding to a slightly sub-critical regime. Finally, we propose and test a method to infer the characteristic time of the fatigue process, from the observed time course of the network's firing rate. Unlike the model, possessing a single fatigue mechanism, the cultured network appears to show multiple time scales, signalling the possible coexistence of different fatigue mechanisms.

  2. Prior event rate ratio adjustment: numerical studies of a statistical method to address unrecognized confounding in observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Menggang; Xie, Dawei; Wang, Xingmei; Weiner, Mark G; Tannen, Richard L

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a statistical method, prior event rate ratio (PERR) adjustment, and an alternative, PERR-ALT, both of which have the potential to overcome "unmeasured confounding," both analytically and via simulation. Formulae were derived for the target estimates of both PERR methods, which were compared with results from simulations to ensure their validity. In addition to the theoretical insights gained, relative biases of both PERR methods for estimating exposure effects were also investigated via simulation studies and compared empirically with electronic medical record database study results. Theoretical derivations closely matched simulated results. In simulation studies, both PERR methods significantly reduce bias from unmeasured confounding compared with the standard Cox model. When there is no interaction between unmeasured confounders and time intervals, the estimate from PERR-ALT is unbiased, whereas the estimate from PERR has well-controlled relative bias. When interactions exist, relative biases tend to increase but not greatly, especially when the exposure effect is relatively large in comparison with the interaction effects. When the event rate is low and the sample size is limited, PERR is more computationally stable than PERR-ALT. In empiric study comparisons with randomized controlled trials, both PERR methods show potential to reduce bias from the standard Cox model similarly when unmeasured confounding is present. Extensive simulation studies and theoretical derivation show that PERR-based methods may reduce bias from unmeasured confounders when the exposure effect is relatively large in comparison with confounder-exposure interaction. The rare study event situation warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  4. Tracks FAQs: How Do Heart Attack Hospitalization Rates In My Community Compare With Other Counties Or States?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-09-01

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss how to compare heart attack hospitalization rates in your community with other counties or states. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 9/1/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 9/1/2011.

  5. Tracks FAQs: How Can I Tell If Asthma Hospitalization Rates In My Area Are Changing Over Time?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-07

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss asthma hospitalization rates and how you can tell if they've changed in your area over time. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 6/7/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 6/7/2011.

  6. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals : inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, R. de; Zwaan, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Timmermans, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis) is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  7. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals: inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, de H.C.W.; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis: is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  8. Analysis of unintended events in hospitals: inter-rater reliability of constructing causal trees and classifying root causes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Janssen, J.; Vet, R. de; Zwaan, L.; Timmermans, D.; Groenewegen, P.; Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Root cause analysis is a method to examine causes of unintended events. PRISMA (Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis) is a root cause analysis tool. With PRISMA, events are described in causal trees and root causes are subsequently classified with the

  9. Exploring the effect of hospital admission on contraction patterns and labour outcomes using women's perceptions of events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Teresa C

    2009-06-01

    this study investigated the phenomenon of spontaneous labour contractions becoming less frequent on admission to hospital, which is observed anecdotally but is not evident in the literature. Anxiety in response to hospitalisation has been proposed to be responsible by initiating the biochemical response termed 'fight or flight'. A non-experimental prospective design and a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis. Data were collected using self-report labour diaries, postnatal questionnaires and hospital records of labour. Univariate analysis using t-test and chi(2)-test was performed to examine relationships between variables, and content analysis was undertaken on qualitative data regarding reactions to hospitalisation. hospital and community maternity services provided by a National Health Service hospital in Southern England in 1997. about 87 women at least 37-week gestation, uncomplicated singleton pregnancy anticipating spontaneous labour with a live fetus. labour diaries were analysed from 26 births. In three home births and 11 hospital births, labour contractions became more frequent, but in the remaining 12 labours, contractions decreased after admission to hospital. Women whose contractions slowed were not more anxious, but they rarely had cervical dilatation over 5cm and usually assumed a recumbent position in hospital. Artificial rupture of membranes was performed more frequently in these women, they used more pain relief and had a higher incidence of complicated childbirth; however, these differences were not statistically significant. labour contractions can increase or decrease in frequency following admission to hospital, and the change of frequency may be associated with stage of cervical dilatation and posture rather than anxiety. routine intervention to speed up labour on the basis of admission observations is called into question, and women should be made aware that slowing of contractions can occur as a normal part of changing the

  10. Association of Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating With Outcomes in Advanced Laparoscopic Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Christina Y; Inaba, Colette S; Sujatha-Bhaskar, Sarath; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2017-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating to help patients compare hospitals based on a 5-star scale. The star rating was designed to assess overall quality of the institution; thus, its validity toward specifically assessing surgical quality is unknown. To examine whether CMS high-star hospitals (HSHs) have improved patient outcomes and resource use in advanced laparoscopic abdominal surgery compared with low-star hospitals (LSHs). Using the University HealthSystem Consortium database (which includes academic centers and their affiliate hospitals) from January 1, 2013, through December 31, 2015, this administrative database observational study compared outcomes of 72 662 advanced laparoscopic abdominal operations between HSHs (4-5 stars) and LSHs (1-2 stars). The star rating includes 57 measures across 7 areas of quality. Patients who underwent advanced laparoscopic abdominal surgery, including bariatric surgery (sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass), colorectal surgery (colectomy, proctectomy), or hiatal hernia surgery (paraesophageal hernia repair, Nissen fundoplication), were included. Risk adjustment included exclusion of patients with major and extreme severity of illness. Main outcome measures included serious morbidity, in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit admissions, and cost. A total of 72 662 advanced laparoscopic abdominal operations were performed in patients at 66 HSHs (n = 38 299; mean [SD] age, 51.26 [15.25] years; 12 096 [31.5%] male and 26 203 [68.4%] female; 28 971 [75.6%] white and 9328 [24.4%] nonwhite) and 78 LSHs (n = 34 363; mean [SD] age, 49.77 [14.77] years; 9902 [28.8%] male and 24 461 [71.2%] female; 21 876 [67.6%] white and 12 487 [32.4%] nonwhite). The HSHs were observed to have fewer intensive care unit admissions (1007 [2.6%] vs 1711 [5.0%], P abdominal surgery. No significant difference was found in serious morbidity between HSHs and

  11. Comparison of the rates of fight-related trauma admissions in Ramadan and the non-Ramadan months during 8 years in public hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohseni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ramadan is a time when Muslims are expected to be calm and peaceful in daily life both mentally and physiologically. Some people believe that they should try to don’t have be involved in bad and deviant behaviors in Ramadan. As increasing social safety and reducing crime in society are the most important concerns of the authorities , psychologists, sociologists and governments, they are try to find ways to increase the social safety and decrease the crime rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the statisticaltraumas Due to fights and rate of ’deviant behaviors during Ramadan compared to Non-Ramadan months  of the years 2001 to 2008 in public hospitals in the city of Kermanshah, Iran. Method: Our study was a prospective study. It included patients who were involved in four types of traumas including beating, gunshot, falling from height and car-accident during Ramadan and the Non-Ramadan months of the years 2001 to 2008 admitted to the Emergency Trauma Center Departments (ETCDs of Taleghani and Imam Reza Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran. Results: The study included 168753 patients. 155705 patients (442.34 mean ± 436.77 SD were admitted in Non-Ramadan months and the remaining 13048 patients (407.75 mean ± 427.16 SD in Ramadan month. Based on the results, the average of trauma instances in Non-Ramadan months was higher, but no statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups. We did not observe significant differences for types of traumatic events in Ramadan compared to Non-Ramadan months, but for Non Ramadan months all types of traumatic except gunshot and beating were significant. Conclusion: Although Ramadan is not a special controlling factor for trauma admissions, but it can has an important effect on the reduction of numbers and types of fight-related trauma admissions in ETCD of hospitals.

  12. Adverse events of ERCP at San José Hospital of Bogotá (Colombia Eventos adversos de la CPRE en el Hospital de San José de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peñaloza-Ramírez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP has become the preferred treatment method for hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. Despite technological progress this technique continues to account for the greatest morbidity and mortality caused by digestive endoscopic procedures. ERCP carries a risk of pancreatitis, perforation, hemorrhage, cholangitis and cardiopulmonary events occurring in upto 10% of patients in referral centers, implying a mortality of up to 1%, not including therapeutic failures or the need for re-intervention. A greater mortality rate has been demonstrated in prospective studies rather than in retrospective studies, but overall, the number of complications described in the literature is much lower than the number of complications that actually occur. A descriptive prospective study was conducted at San José Hospital from April 1, 2006 to April 30, 2007 in patients who underwent an ERCP and had a 1-month follow-up. A total of 381 patients were included; 9 (2.3% were excluded, and of the remaining 372 there was an overall success in 79.6% of cases, 8.3% had a second intervention, 7.6% developed complications (pancreatitis, perforation, hemorrhage, cholangitis, pain, intolerance to sedatives, and cardiopulmonary events, and 4.3% were failed ERCP studies. The mortality rate of the ERCP procedure was 0.8%. ERCP-related complications were determined at a teaching center, and this suggests the need to implement centers of excellence in order to improve the efficacy of the procedure.La colangiopancreatografía retrograda endoscópica (CPRE se ha convertido en el procedimiento terapéutico por excelencia de la vía biliopancreática. A pesar de los avances tecnológicos continúa siendo la técnica con mayor morbimortalidad de la endoscopia digestiva. Las complicaciones de la CPRE incluyen la pancreatitis, perforación, hemorragia, colangitis y eventos cardiopulmonares que en centros de referencia ocurren hasta en un 10

  13. Event rate and reaction time performance in ADHD: Testing predictions from the state regulation deficit hypothesis using an ex-Gaussian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Baris; Wiersema, Jan R; Verguts, Tom; Gasthuys, Roos; van Der Meere, Jacob J; Roeyers, Herbert; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund

    2014-12-06

    According to the state regulation deficit (SRD) account, ADHD is associated with a problem using effort to maintain an optimal activation state under demanding task settings such as very fast or very slow event rates. This leads to a prediction of disrupted performance at event rate extremes reflected in higher Gaussian response variability that is a putative marker of activation during motor preparation. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using ex-Gaussian modeling, which distinguishes Gaussian from non-Gaussian variability. Twenty-five children with ADHD and 29 typically developing controls performed a simple Go/No-Go task under four different event-rate conditions. There was an accentuated quadratic relationship between event rate and Gaussian variability in the ADHD group compared to the controls. The children with ADHD had greater Gaussian variability at very fast and very slow event rates but not at moderate event rates. The results provide evidence for the SRD account of ADHD. However, given that this effect did not explain all group differences (some of which were independent of event rate) other cognitive and/or motivational processes are also likely implicated in ADHD performance deficits.

  14. Event rate and reaction time performance in ADHD: Testing predictions from the state regulation deficit hypothesis using an ex-Gaussian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Baris; Wiersema, Jan R; Verguts, Tom; Gasthuys, Roos; van Der Meere, Jacob J; Roeyers, Herbert; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    According to the state regulation deficit (SRD) account, ADHD is associated with a problem using effort to maintain an optimal activation state under demanding task settings such as very fast or very slow event rates. This leads to a prediction of disrupted performance at event rate extremes reflected in higher Gaussian response variability that is a putative marker of activation during motor preparation. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using ex-Gaussian modeling, which distinguishes Gaussian from non-Gaussian variability. Twenty-five children with ADHD and 29 typically developing controls performed a simple Go/No-Go task under four different event-rate conditions. There was an accentuated quadratic relationship between event rate and Gaussian variability in the ADHD group compared to the controls. The children with ADHD had greater Gaussian variability at very fast and very slow event rates but not at moderate event rates. The results provide evidence for the SRD account of ADHD. However, given that this effect did not explain all group differences (some of which were independent of event rate) other cognitive and/or motivational processes are also likely implicated in ADHD performance deficits.

  15. A proposed approach in defining population-based rates of major injury from a trauma registry dataset: Delineation of hospital catchment areas (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Ronan A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining population-based rates for major injury poses methodological challenges. We used hospital discharge data over a 10-year period (1996–2005 from a national trauma registry, the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN Manchester, to construct valid numerators and denominators so that we can calculate population-based rates of major injury in the future. Methods We examined data from all hospitals reporting to TARN for continuity of numerator reporting; rates of completeness for patient postcodes, and clear denominator populations. We defined local market areas (>70% of patients originating from the same postcode district as the hospital. For relevant hospitals we assessed data quality: consistency of reporting, completeness of patient postcodes and for one selected hospital, North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary (NSRI, the capture rate of numerator data reporting. We used an established method based on patient flow to delineate market areas from hospitals discharges. We then assessed the potential competitors, and characterized these denominator areas. Finally we performed a denominator sensitivity analysis using a patient origin matrix based on Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES to validate our approach. Results Sixteen hospitals met the data quality and patient flow criteria for numerator and denominator data, representing 12 hospital catchment areas across England. Data quality issues included fluctuations numbers of reported cases and poor completion of postcodes for some years. We found an overall numerator capture rate of 83.5% for the NSRI. In total we used 40,543 admissions to delineate hospital catchment areas. An average of 3.5 potential hospital competitors and 15.2 postcode districts per area were obtained. The patient origin matrix for NSRI confirmed the accuracy of the denominator/hospital catchment area from the patient flow analysis. Conclusion Large national trauma registries, including TARN, hold

  16. Adverse drug events in German hospital routine data: A validation of International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10 diagnostic codes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Kuklik

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events (ADEs during hospital stays are a significant problem of healthcare systems. Established monitoring systems lack completeness or are cost intensive. Routinely assigned International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD codes could complement existing systems for ADE identification. To analyze the potential of using routine data for ADE detection, the validity of a set of ICD codes was determined focusing on hospital-acquired events.The study utilized routine data from four German hospitals covering the years 2014 and 2015. A set of ICD, 10th Revision, German Modification (ICD-10-GM diagnoses coded most frequently in the routine data and identified as codes indicating ADEs was analyzed. Data from psychiatric and psychotherapeutic departments were excluded. Retrospective chart review was performed to calculate positive predictive values (PPV and sensitivity.Of 807 reviewed ADE codes, 91.2% (95%-confidence interval: 89.0, 93.1 were identified as disease in the medical records and 65.1% (61.7, 68.3 were confirmed as ADE. For code groups being predominantly hospital-acquired, 78.5% (73.7, 82.9 were confirmed as ADE, ranging from 68.5% to 94.4% dependent on the ICD code. However, sensitivity of inpatient ADEs was relatively low. 49.7% (45.2, 54.2 of 495 identified hospital-acquired ADEs were coded as disease in the routine data, from which a subgroup of 12.1% (9.4, 15.3 was coded as drug-associated disease.ICD codes from routine data can provide an important contribution to the development and improvement of ADE monitoring systems. Documentation quality is crucial to further increase the PPV, and actions against under-reporting of ADEs in routine data need to be taken.