WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluation review memo

  1. LSST Painting Risk Evaluation Memo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Justin E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-10

    The optics subsystem is required to paint the edges of optics black where possible. Due to the risks in applying the paint LSST requests a review of the impact of removing this requirement for the filters and L3.

  2. Annular dynamics of memo3D annuloplasty ring evaluated by 3D transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2018-04-01

    We assessed the mitral annular motion after mitral valve repair with the Sorin Memo 3D® (Sorin Group Italia S.r.L., Saluggia, Italy), which is a unique complete semirigid annuloplasty ring intended to restore the systolic profile of the mitral annulus while adapting to the physiologic dynamism of the annulus, using transesophageal real-time three-dimensional echocardiography. 17 patients (12 male; mean age 60.4 ± 14.9 years) who underwent mitral annuloplasty using the Memo 3D ring were investigated. Mitral annular motion was assessed using QLAB®version8 allowing for a full evaluation of the mitral annulus dynamics. The mitral annular dimensions were measured throughout the cardiac cycle using 4D MV assessment2® while saddle shape was assessed through sequential measurements by RealView®. Saddle shape configuration of the mitral annulus and posterior and anterior leaflet motion could be observed during systole and diastole. The mitral annular area changed during the cardiac cycle by 5.7 ± 1.8%.The circumference length and diameter also changed throughout the cardiac cycle. The annular height was significantly higher in mid-systole than in mid-diastole (p 3D ring maintained a physiological saddle-shape configuration throughout the cardiac cycle. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography analysis confirmed the motion and flexibility of the Memo 3D ring upon implantation.

  3. MBRRACE in simulation: an evaluation of a multi-disciplinary simulation training for medical emergencies in obstetrics (MEmO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Abthorpe, Jennifer; Simpson, Thomas; Reedy, Gabriel; Little, Fiona; Banerjee, Anita

    2018-03-21

    The majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions, known as 'indirect deaths'. The MBRRACE report identified serious gaps in clinicians' human factors skills, including communication, leadership and teamwork, which contributed to maternal death. In response, we developed the first multi-disciplinary simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Employing a mixed methods design, this study evaluated the educational impact of this training programme on the healthcare staff (n = 140), including the medical doctors (n = 91) and the midwives (n = 49). The training improved participants' clinical management of medical deterioration in pregnancy (p=.003) alongside improving their human factors skills (p=.004). Furthermore, participants reported the translation of these skills to their routine clinical practice. This flexible training is responsive to the changing national needs and contextualises the MBRRACE findings for healthcare staff. It is a promising avenue for reducing the rates of in-direct death in pregnancy. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The majority of maternal deaths in the UK are due to pre-existing or new-onset medical conditions. The management of medical conditions in pregnancy relies on a multi-professional approach. However, serious gaps in clinicians' human factors skills, highlighted by the MBRRACE report, may contribute to maternal death. What do the results of this study add? This study evaluated the first multi-disciplinary, simulation-based training programme designed to address Medical Emergencies in Obstetrics (MEmO). Training significantly improved participants' management of medical deterioration in pregnancy and human factors skills, particularly in the areas of leadership, communication and teamwork. Moreover, the participants learning translated into their clinical practice. What are the implications of

  4. Notification: Notification Memo for Evaluation of Management Controls for Alternative Asbestos Control Method Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY12-0011, February 27, 2012. This memorandum is to notify you that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) is initiating an evaluation on the Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) experiments.

  5. RTE - Memo 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A vibrant economy sustained by the electricity flowing across RTE's High and ultra-high-voltage electricity grid powers our industries and lights up our regions. RTE makes realtime adjustments to supply and demand. RTE fosters regional solidarity so that everyone can have access to electricity. In France and in Europe, second by second. The electricity system is changing more quickly than ever. In order to be prepared for the future, RTE must remain a step ahead. That is the purpose of the company's Impulsion et Vision project, which RTE initiated in 2016. Improving RTE's performance to continue fulfilling its role as a public utility. Innovating to become the first grid that combines electricity and digital technology. Reaching out to others so that the current continues to flow, whatever happens, from second to second, yesterday, today and tomorrow. This memo presents: RTE in 2016, RTE Profile and The grid, the Flow of electricity, the power Generation, Consumption and exchange, the Electricity market in Europe, its Major achievements in 2016 and the Main infrastructures of key energy transition investments, RTE's Financial results, the RTE Group, RTE Group organizational structure as of January 2017, and RTE socio-economic footprint

  6. Yellow-cedar in vitro clonal production and evaluation of propagules for reforestation. FRDA research memo No. 211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Technical note describing a project that was part of an ongoing effort to develop micropropagation techniques on an operation scale and to investigate their possible use in producing genetically improved stock for planting. The project developed a commercially viable process that uses organogenic micropropagation to produce yellow-cedar stock for operational reforestation; evaluated the techniques for developing genetically improved clones; and established demonstration plots of mircopropagules.

  7. Process Memos: Facilitating Dialogues about Writing between Students and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Heather Macpherson; Cherry, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We have created a new teaching tool--process memos--to improve student writing. Process memos are guided reflections submitted with scaffolded assignments that facilitate a written dialogue between students and instructors about the process of writing. Within these memos, students critically assess available teaching tools, discuss their writing…

  8. Technical memo : project 0-6132 (task 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The attached memo presents construction information on the test sections placed by Madden Construction on US 59 on March 26th 2010. The memo includes details of the mix design, shows photographs of the construction sequence, lab test data on the Cont...

  9. Strangeness fluctuations and MEMO production at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinheimer, Jan; Mitrovski, Michael; Schuster, Tim; Petersen, Hannah; Bleicher, Marcus; Stoecker, Horst

    2009-01-01

    We apply a coupled transport-hydrodynamics model to discuss the production of multi-strange meta-stable objects in Pb + Pb reactions at the FAIR facility. In addition to making predictions for yields of these particles we are able to calculate particle dependent rapidity and momentum distributions. We argue that the FAIR energy regime is the optimal place to search for multi-strange baryonic object (due to the high baryon density, favoring a distillation of strangeness). Additionally, we show results for strangeness and baryon density fluctuations. Using the UrQMD model we calculate the strangeness separation in phase space which might lead to an enhanced production of MEMOs compared to models that assume global thermalization.

  10. Developing Problem Solving and Communication Skills through Memo Assignments in a Management Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie Ann Stuart; Reid, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe how to structure a memo format for homework assignments in which a manager requests analysis of a particular issue from the student. The student must respond with a memo stating a recommendation and describing the solution approach. The results from using the memo format include improved student performance and professional…

  11. Memos with Personality: A Model from British Technical Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Carole

    1986-01-01

    Notes that while American technical writing texts stress brevity and directness as important characteristics of business correspondence, British texts stress qualities of personality and courtesy, especially in the memo. Shows how to incorporate personality into correspondence, thereby building cooperation among colleagues. (FL)

  12. Administrative memo relative to the delivery of energy conservation certificates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    This memo details the principles of the energy conservation certificates, the law texts of application, the part of the Government and the ADEME services, the certificates demand procedure, and the inscription of the certificates on the national registries. (A.L.B.)

  13. Researching Teacher Education for Inclusion: Using a Methodological Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kathryn S.; Florian, Lani

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how a methodological memo (MM) was used in a research and development project designed to reform initial teacher education (ITE). A MM was used to explore what often remains an opaque part of the research process--the relationships between theory and practice that underpin many research studies. Yet, without detailed…

  14. MEMO Organisation Modelling Language (1): Focus on organisational structure

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Organisation models are at the core of enterprise model, since they represent key aspects of a company's action system. Within MEMO, the Organisation Modelling Language (OrgML) supports the construction of organisation models. They can be divided into two main abstractions: a static abstraction is focusing on the structure of an organisation that reflects the division of labour with respect to static responsibilities and a dynamic abstraction that is focusing on models of business processes. ...

  15. FY94 CAG trip reports, CAG memos and other products: Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-15

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) of the US DOE is tasked with designing, constructing, and operating an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the YMP is to provide detailed characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential mined geologic repository for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Detailed characterization of properties of the site are to be conducted through a wide variety of short-term and long-term in-situ tests. Testing methods require the installation of a large number of test instruments and sensors with a variety of functions. These instruments produce analog and digital data that must be collected, processed, stored, and evaluated in an attempt to predict performance of the repository. The Integrated Data and Control System (IDCS) is envisioned as a distributed data acquisition that electronically acquires and stores data from these test instruments. IDCS designers are responsible for designing and overseeing the procurement of the system, IDCS Operation and Maintenance operates and maintains the installed system, and the IDCS Data Manager is responsible for distribution of IDCS data to participants. This report is a compilation of trip reports, interoffice memos, and other memos relevant to Computer Applications Group, Inc., work on this project.

  16. FY94 CAG trip reports, CAG memos and other products: Volume 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) of the US DOE is tasked with designing, constructing, and operating an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the YMP is to provide detailed characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential mined geologic repository for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Detailed characterization of properties of the site are to be conducted through a wide variety of short-term and long-term in-situ tests. Testing methods require the installation of a large number of test instruments and sensors with a variety of functions. These instruments produce analog and digital data that must be collected, processed, stored, and evaluated in an attempt to predict performance of the repository. The Integrated Data and Control System (IDCS) is envisioned as a distributed data acquisition that electronically acquires and stores data from these test instruments. IDCS designers are responsible for designing and overseeing the procurement of the system, IDCS Operation and Maintenance operates and maintains the installed system, and the IDCS Data Manager is responsible for distribution of IDCS data to participants. This report is a compilation of trip reports, interoffice memos, and other memos relevant to Computer Applications Group, Inc., work on this project

  17. The ’Torture Memos’: A Failure of Strategic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-11

    were issued in August 2002, both signed by Yoo’s superior, Assistant Attorney General (and OLC chief) Jay Bybee . 16 The first memo, addressed to...investigation into the professional responsibility of Yoo, Bybee , and another OLC attorney, underway for nearly 5 years, was completed in 2008 but has...Office of Legal Counsel, Jay S. Bybee , “Re: Standards of Conduct for Interrogation under 18 U.S.C. §§2340-2340A," memorandum for Alberto R. 23 Gonzales

  18. Reorganizing Freshman Business Mathematics II: Authentic Assessment in Mathematics through Professional Memos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kris; Emerson, Allen

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this two-part paper [see EJ787497] described the development of a new freshman business mathematics (FBM) course at our college. In this paper, we discuss our assessment tool, the business memo, as a venue for students to apply mathematical skills, via mathematical modelling, to realistic business problems. These memos have…

  19. A Novel Method of Enhancing Grounded Theory Memos with Voice Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Rachel; Close, Helen

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors present the recent discovery of a novel method of supplementing written grounded theory memos with voice recording, the combination of which may provide significant analytical advantages over solely the traditional written method. Memo writing is an essential component of a grounded theory study, however it is often…

  20. Evaluative Review in Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Fredricka L.; Horn, Bradley; Grabe, William; Robinson, Marin S.

    2006-01-01

    English for Academic Purposes (EAP) professionals know that initial efforts to produce or adapt materials generally require evaluative review and revision. A review process that solicits feedback from teacher and student users is critical because materials writers often find it difficult to envision the problems others may have with their…

  1. Flexible receiver adapter formal design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    This memo summarizes the results of the Formal (90%) Design Review process and meetings held to evaluate the design of the Flexible Receiver Adapters, support platforms, and associated equipment. The equipment is part of the Flexible Receiver System used to remove, transport, and store long length contaminated equipment and components from both the double and single-shell underground storage tanks at the 200 area tank farms

  2. EPA Region 8, Memo on Desktop Printer Ink Cartridges Policy & Voluntary Printer Turn-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memo requests EPA Region 8 users to voluntarily turn-in their desktop printers and notifies users of the Region 8 policy to not provide maintenance or ink and toner cartridges for desktop printers.

  3. RTE - Reseau de Transport d'Electricite - 2012 Memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This brochure, designed to promote greater transparency, presents key aspects of RTE's activity and covers everything from the running of the power system and the electricity market, to the operation and development of the transmission network. Memo 2012, which is being made available to the general public for the first time, is part of RTE's ongoing efforts to improve access to information for stakeholders and for power system participants. Contents: Balance of electrical energy flows on the RTE network (Net generation injected on the RTE network, Net deliveries on the RTE network); Consumption and physical exchanges (Record of annual maximum consumption values for France, Net physical export balance); Key figures for generation (Installed capacity in France, Energy generated in France, Evolution of installed Wind and Solar capacity); Key figures for the RTE network (Length, Number of RTE substations); Quality of supply and environment (Equivalent outage time on the RTE network, RTE's environmental action, Estimated carbon footprint of France's electricity generating fleet); Major current projects; Main network developments after ten years; Electricity market (Balancing Mechanism, Epex Spot, Cross-border contractual exchanges in 2011, Daily market coupling); Financial results for the RTE Group (Profit and loss account, RTE investment chart, Financial indicators, Simplified balance sheet); Human resources in 2011; RTE' Organization as of January 1, 2012; RTE's missions of public service

  4. RTE - Reseau de Transport d'Electricite - 2013 Memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This brochure, designed to promote transparency, presents key aspects of RTE's activity and covers everything from the running of the power system and the electricity market, to the operation and development of the transmission network. MEMO 2013, is part of RTE's ongoing efforts to improve access to information for stakeholders and for power system participants. Contents: Balance of electrical energy flows on the RTE network (Net generation injected on the RTE network, Net deliveries on the RTE network); Consumption and physical exchanges (Record of annual maximum consumption values for France, Net physical export balance); Key figures for generation (Installed capacity in France, Energy generated in France, Evolution of installed Wind and Solar capacity); Key figures for the RTE network (Length, Number of RTE substations); Quality of supply and environment (Equivalent outage time on the RTE network, RTE's environmental action, Estimated carbon footprint of France's electricity generating fleet); Major projects in 2012; Main projects; Electricity market (Balancing Mechanism, Epex Spot, Cross-border contractual exchanges in 2012, Daily market coupling); Financial results for the RTE Group (Profit and loss account, RTE investment chart, Financial indicators, Simplified balance sheet); Human resources in 2012; RTE' Organization as of January 1, 2013; RTE's missions of public service

  5. An Evaluation of Four Book Review Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Daniel

    1979-01-01

    Evaluates "Booklist,""Choice,""Library Journal," and "the New York Times Book Review" by measuring and comparing (1) total number of adult books reviewed, (2) total number of juvenile and young adult books reviewed, (3) percentage of randomly selected Notable Books reviewed, and (4) how quickly those Notable Books were reviewed. (Author)

  6. Six Memos for a Curious and Imaginative Future Scholarship in Entrepreneurship Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steyaert, Chris; Hjorth, Daniel; Gartner, William B.

    2011-01-01

    In this introductory article, we explain the purpose of this special issue that is set up as a Festschrift in honour of the (editorial) work of Bengt Johannisson. Inspired by Italo Calvino's Six Memos for the Next Millennium, the special issue is structured along six essays that are both commemor...

  7. How to Calculate the Costs or Savings of Tax Credit Voucher Policies. NEPC Policy Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welner, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    In this NEPC Policy Memo, Professor Welner explains that the most honest and conscientious approach to reporting the fiscal impact of tax credit vouchers is to provide a range of outcomes and let the readers--not the legislative analysts themselves--speculate on which is most likely. If a bottom line is demanded, it should be couched in as many…

  8. MeMo: a hybrid SQL/XML approach to metabolomic data management for functional genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Nigel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequencing projects have shown our limited knowledge regarding gene function, e.g. S. cerevisiae has 5–6,000 genes of which nearly 1,000 have an uncertain function. Their gross influence on the behaviour of the cell can be observed using large-scale metabolomic studies. The metabolomic data produced need to be structured and annotated in a machine-usable form to facilitate the exploration of the hidden links between the genes and their functions. Description MeMo is a formal model for representing metabolomic data and the associated metadata. Two predominant platforms (SQL and XML are used to encode the model. MeMo has been implemented as a relational database using a hybrid approach combining the advantages of the two technologies. It represents a practical solution for handling the sheer volume and complexity of the metabolomic data effectively and efficiently. The MeMo model and the associated software are available at http://dbkgroup.org/memo/. Conclusion The maturity of relational database technology is used to support efficient data processing. The scalability and self-descriptiveness of XML are used to simplify the relational schema and facilitate the extensibility of the model necessitated by the creation of new experimental techniques. Special consideration is given to data integration issues as part of the systems biology agenda. MeMo has been physically integrated and cross-linked to related metabolomic and genomic databases. Semantic integration with other relevant databases has been supported through ontological annotation. Compatibility with other data formats is supported by automatic conversion.

  9. Internet-based recruitment to a depression prevention intervention: lessons from the Mood Memos study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Amy Joanna; Jorm, Anthony Francis; Mackinnon, Andrew James

    2013-02-12

    Recruiting participants to randomized controlled trials of health interventions can be very difficult. Internet-based recruitment is becoming an increasingly important mode of recruitment, yet there are few detailed accounts of experiences recruiting participants to mental health interventions. To report on our experience with Internet-based recruitment to an online depression prevention intervention and pass on lessons we learned. Participants were recruited to the Mood Memos study, an online preventive depression intervention, purely through Internet-based sources. The study was targeted to adults with subthreshold depression symptoms from several English-speaking countries. A variety of online recruitment sources were trialed, including search engine advertising (Google, Yahoo!, Bing), Facebook advertising, posts in forums and online noticeboards, and promotion through relevant websites and email newsletters of mental health organizations. The study website received visits from 94,808 individuals over the 14-month recruitment period. The recruitment target was reached with 1699 individuals signing up to the randomized controlled trial and 1326 fully enrolling. Most visitors arrived via Google advertising, which promoted a depression-screening questionnaire. Google advertising accounted for nearly half of the total participants who signed up to the study, at an average cost of AUD $12 per participant. Promoting the study through trustworthy organizations and websites known to participants was also effective. Recruitment techniques that were less effective were contacting forums, email groups, and community noticeboards. Several techniques, including Google advertising, were successful in recruiting participants to a trial evaluating an online depression intervention. Results suggest that Internet-based recruitment to mental health interventions is feasible and can be relatively affordable. ACTRN12609000925246.

  10. Internet-Based Recruitment to a Depression Prevention Intervention: Lessons From the Mood Memos Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony Francis; Mackinnon, Andrew James

    2013-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants to randomized controlled trials of health interventions can be very difficult. Internet-based recruitment is becoming an increasingly important mode of recruitment, yet there are few detailed accounts of experiences recruiting participants to mental health interventions. Objective To report on our experience with Internet-based recruitment to an online depression prevention intervention and pass on lessons we learned. Methods Participants were recruited to the Mood Memos study, an online preventive depression intervention, purely through Internet-based sources. The study was targeted to adults with subthreshold depression symptoms from several English-speaking countries. A variety of online recruitment sources were trialed, including search engine advertising (Google, Yahoo!, Bing), Facebook advertising, posts in forums and online noticeboards, and promotion through relevant websites and email newsletters of mental health organizations. Results The study website received visits from 94,808 individuals over the 14-month recruitment period. The recruitment target was reached with 1699 individuals signing up to the randomized controlled trial and 1326 fully enrolling. Most visitors arrived via Google advertising, which promoted a depression-screening questionnaire. Google advertising accounted for nearly half of the total participants who signed up to the study, at an average cost of AUD $12 per participant. Promoting the study through trustworthy organizations and websites known to participants was also effective. Recruitment techniques that were less effective were contacting forums, email groups, and community noticeboards. Conclusions Several techniques, including Google advertising, were successful in recruiting participants to a trial evaluating an online depression intervention. Results suggest that Internet-based recruitment to mental health interventions is feasible and can be relatively affordable. Trial Registration ACTRN

  11. Soil Methanotrophy Model (MeMo v1.0): a process-based model to quantify global uptake of atmospheric methane by soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguia-Flores, Fabiola; Arndt, Sandra; Ganesan, Anita L.; Murray-Tortarolo, Guillermo; Hornibrook, Edward R. C.

    2018-06-01

    Soil bacteria known as methanotrophs are the sole biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas that is responsible for ˜ 20 % of the human-driven increase in radiative forcing since pre-industrial times. Soil methanotrophy is controlled by a plethora of factors, including temperature, soil texture, moisture and nitrogen content, resulting in spatially and temporally heterogeneous rates of soil methanotrophy. As a consequence, the exact magnitude of the global soil sink, as well as its temporal and spatial variability, remains poorly constrained. We developed a process-based model (Methanotrophy Model; MeMo v1.0) to simulate and quantify the uptake of atmospheric CH4 by soils at the global scale. MeMo builds on previous models by Ridgwell et al. (1999) and Curry (2007) by introducing several advances, including (1) a general analytical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion-reaction equation in porous media, (2) a refined representation of nitrogen inhibition on soil methanotrophy, (3) updated factors governing the influence of soil moisture and temperature on CH4 oxidation rates and (4) the ability to evaluate the impact of autochthonous soil CH4 sources on uptake of atmospheric CH4. We show that the improved structural and parametric representation of key drivers of soil methanotrophy in MeMo results in a better fit to observational data. A global simulation of soil methanotrophy for the period 1990-2009 using MeMo yielded an average annual sink of 33.5 ± 0.6 Tg CH4 yr-1. Warm and semi-arid regions (tropical deciduous forest and open shrubland) had the highest CH4 uptake rates of 602 and 518 mg CH4 m-2 yr-1, respectively. In these regions, favourable annual soil moisture content ( ˜ 20 % saturation) and low seasonal temperature variations (variations < ˜ 6 °C) provided optimal conditions for soil methanotrophy and soil-atmosphere gas exchange. In contrast to previous model analyses, but in agreement with recent observational data

  12. Soil Methanotrophy Model (MeMo v1.0: a process-based model to quantify global uptake of atmospheric methane by soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murguia-Flores

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria known as methanotrophs are the sole biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4, a potent greenhouse gas that is responsible for  ∼  20 % of the human-driven increase in radiative forcing since pre-industrial times. Soil methanotrophy is controlled by a plethora of factors, including temperature, soil texture, moisture and nitrogen content, resulting in spatially and temporally heterogeneous rates of soil methanotrophy. As a consequence, the exact magnitude of the global soil sink, as well as its temporal and spatial variability, remains poorly constrained. We developed a process-based model (Methanotrophy Model; MeMo v1.0 to simulate and quantify the uptake of atmospheric CH4 by soils at the global scale. MeMo builds on previous models by Ridgwell et al. (1999 and Curry (2007 by introducing several advances, including (1 a general analytical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion–reaction equation in porous media, (2 a refined representation of nitrogen inhibition on soil methanotrophy, (3 updated factors governing the influence of soil moisture and temperature on CH4 oxidation rates and (4 the ability to evaluate the impact of autochthonous soil CH4 sources on uptake of atmospheric CH4. We show that the improved structural and parametric representation of key drivers of soil methanotrophy in MeMo results in a better fit to observational data. A global simulation of soil methanotrophy for the period 1990–2009 using MeMo yielded an average annual sink of 33.5 ± 0.6 Tg CH4 yr−1. Warm and semi-arid regions (tropical deciduous forest and open shrubland had the highest CH4 uptake rates of 602 and 518 mg CH4 m−2 yr−1, respectively. In these regions, favourable annual soil moisture content ( ∼  20 % saturation and low seasonal temperature variations (variations  <   ∼  6 °C provided optimal conditions for soil methanotrophy and soil–atmosphere gas exchange

  13. Memo has a novel role in S1P signaling and is [corrected] crucial for vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shunya; Bottos, Alessia; Allegood, Jeremy C; Masson, Regis; Maurer, Francisca G; Genoud, Christel; Kaeser, Patrick; Huwiler, Andrea; Murakami, Masato; Spiegel, Sarah; Hynes, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Memo is a conserved protein that was identified as an essential mediator of tumor cell motility induced by receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we show that Memo null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are impaired in PDGF-induced migration and this is due to a defect in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. S1P is a bioactive phospholipid produced in response to multiple stimuli, which regulates many cellular processes. S1P is secreted to the extracellular milieu where it exerts its function by binding a family of G-protein coupled receptors (S1PRs), causing their activation in an autocrine or paracrine manner. The process, termed cell-autonomous S1PR signaling, plays a role in survival and migration. Indeed, PDGF uses cell-autonomous S1PR signaling to promote cell migration; we show here that this S1P pathway requires Memo. Using vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with Memo knock-down we show that their survival in conditions of serum-starvation is impaired. Furthermore, Memo loss in HUVECs causes a reduction of junctional VE-cadherin and an increase in sprout formation. Each of these phenotypes is rescued by S1P or S1P agonist addition, showing that Memo also plays an important role in cell-autonomous S1PR signaling in endothelial cells. We also produced conventional and endothelial cell-specific conditional Memo knock-out mouse strains and show that Memo is essential for embryonic development. Starting at E13.5 embryos of both strains display bleeding and other vascular problems, some of the phenotypes that have been described in mouse strains lacking S1PRs. The essential role of Memo in embryonic vascular development may be due in part to alterations in S1P signaling. Taken together our results show that Memo has a novel role in the S1P pathway and that Memo is needed to promote cell-autonomous S1PR activation.

  14. Conducting systematic reviews of economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomersall, Judith Streak; Jadotte, Yuri Tertilus; Xue, Yifan; Lockwood, Suzi; Riddle, Dru; Preda, Alin

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, a working group was established to review and enhance the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidance for conducting systematic review of evidence from economic evaluations addressing a question(s) about health intervention cost-effectiveness. The objective is to present the outcomes of the working group. The group conducted three activities to inform the new guidance: review of literature on the utility/futility of systematic reviews of economic evaluations and consideration of its implications for updating the existing methodology; assessment of the critical appraisal tool in the existing guidance against criteria that promotes validity in economic evaluation research and two other commonly used tools; and a workshop. The debate in the literature on the limitations/value of systematic review of economic evidence cautions that systematic reviews of economic evaluation evidence are unlikely to generate one size fits all answers to questions about the cost-effectiveness of interventions and their comparators. Informed by this finding, the working group adjusted the framing of the objectives definition in the existing JBI methodology. The shift is away from defining the objective as to determine one cost-effectiveness measure toward summarizing study estimates of cost-effectiveness and informed by consideration of the included study characteristics (patient, setting, intervention component, etc.), identifying conditions conducive to lowering costs and maximizing health benefits. The existing critical appraisal tool was included in the new guidance. The new guidance includes the recommendation that a tool designed specifically for the purpose of appraising model-based studies be used together with the generic appraisal tool for economic evaluations assessment to evaluate model-based evaluations. The guidance produced by the group offers reviewers guidance for each step of the systematic review process, which are the same steps followed in JBI reviews of other

  15. Growth of Business English and the Need to Teach Memo-Writing Skills to Indian Tertiary-Level Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Arputhamalar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available English has become an inevitable means of communication. Due to globalization and rapid growth in business communication, the need to learn the English language has also gained momentum. Employers are looking for employees who are skilled in the language skills. In India, English has become an important means of communication and learning in the education and professional setup. Though English is being taught in schools and colleges, Indian students miserably fail to produce a good quality lengthy composition. In this respect, this paper aims to focus on the need to teach memo-writing skills to tertiary students. To this end, a group of second year Indian BCA students was taken as samples for the study. The students were given a pre-test on memo writing. They lacked the essential skills in writing a memo. In order to improve their memo writing skills the students had to undergo four tasks. At the end of the tasks, they were able to write a good memo. The corporate world demands accurate business writings and our students have to be trained to meet the demands of the business world. This paper studies the growth of business English, the components of effective business writing and the need to teach business writing to tertiary students, which will enable them to be successful in the business world.

  16. Evaluating clinical librarian services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison; Maden-Jenkins, Michelle; Anderson, Lucy; McNally, Rosalind; Pratchett, Tracey; Tancock, Jenny; Thornton, Debra; Webb, Anne

    2011-03-01

      Previous systematic reviews have indicated limited evidence and poor quality evaluations of clinical librarian (CL) services. Rigorous evaluations should demonstrate the value of CL services, but guidance is needed before this can be achieved.   To undertake a systematic review which examines models of CL services, quality, methods and perspectives of clinical librarian service evaluations.   Systematic review methodology and synthesis of evidence, undertaken collaboratively by a group of 8 librarians to develop research and critical appraisal skills.   There are four clear models of clinical library service provision. Clinical librarians are effective in saving health professionals time, providing relevant, useful information and high quality services. Clinical librarians have a positive effect on clinical decision making by contributing to better informed decisions, diagnosis and choice of drug or therapy. The quality of CL studies is improving, but more work is needed on reducing bias and providing evidence of specific impacts on patient care. The Critical Incident Technique as part of a mixed method approach appears to offer a useful approach to demonstrating impact.   This systematic review provides practical guidance regarding the evaluation of CL services. It also provides updated evidence regarding the effectiveness and impact of CL services. The approach used was successful in developing research and critical appraisal skills in a group of librarians. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  17. NRC systematic evaluation program: seismic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The NRC Systematic Evaluation Program is currently making an assessment of the seismic design safety of 11 older nuclear power plant facilities. The general review philosophy and review criteria relative to seismic input, structural response, and equipment functionability are presented, including the rationale for the development of these guidelines considering the significant evolution of seismic design criteria since these plants were originally licensed. Technical approaches thought more realistic in light of current knowledge are utilized. Initial findings for plants designed to early seismic design procedures suggest that with minor exceptions, these plants possess adequate seismic design margins when evaluated against the intent of current criteria. However, seismic qualification of electrical equipment has been identified as a subject which requires more in-depth evaluation

  18. The Secret Downing Street Memo and the Politics of Truth: A Performance Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman K. Denzin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Reading forward from the recently released secret Downing Street Memos, to the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, in this performance text I critique the Bush Administration and its reliance on science, or evidence-based models of inquiry (SBR. SBR raises issues concerning the politics of truth and evidence. These issues intersect with the ways in which a given political regime fixes facts to fit ideology. Three versions of SBR are discussed, as is a model of science as disruptive cultural practice. I conclude by calling for a merger of critical pedagogy with a prophetic, feminist post-pragmatism.

  19. Detectability and acceptability of continuous pulse signals for the MemoPatch® device, an electronic skin patch intended to deliver tactile medication reminder signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham I

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivo Abraham,1–3 Jan De Geest,2 Wim De Geest,2 Elke De Troy,4 Karen MacDonald3 1Center for Health Outcomes and PharmacoEconomic Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2TheraSolve, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 3Matrix45, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4Jessa Ziekenhuis, Hasselt, Belgium Background: Unintended forgetfulness is the most common cause of medication nonadherence. MemoPatch® is an electronic skin patch intended to deliver discreet tactile medication reminder stimuli. This study aimed 1 to evaluate, within an experimental setup, the detectability and acceptability of fifteen continuous bipolar pulse signals; 2 to identify variables, if any, associated with differential perception of the candidate reminder signals; and 3 to collect safety data as reported by subjects or observed by staff. Methods: This was a laboratory experiment involving 147 healthy adult volunteers (55.1% female, 98.0% Caucasian, with age 41.8±16.0 years, body mass index [BMI] 24.7±4.4, upper body adiposity 28.5%±8.3% body fat, and skin impedance 367.6±140.8Ω and using an experimental version of the MemoPatch®. Following four training signals administered in fixed order, subjects were exposed to a set of fifteen randomly sequenced signals varying in rise and fall time, width, and current, to be rated in terms of detectability ("too weak", "appropriate", or "too strong" and acceptability. Results: Ratings of "appropriate" were virtually independent of such variables as sex, BMI, upper body adiposity, and skin impedance at the patch location. Five signals were rated as "appropriate" by ≥67% of subjects and acceptable by ≥95% of subjects, virtually independently of the indicators of interest, and were retained as candidate signals for use in next stages of development and commercialization. Nine adverse events, none serious, were observed in six subjects. Conclusion: This study yielded five effective and safe candidate signals for potential use in the Memo

  20. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    As requested in the guidance memo 1 , this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1x4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high x 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2x2, 4x2, and 4x4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline

  1. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  2. March 2016 Memo: Planning for Removal and Remedial Activities at Hardrock Mining and Mineral Processing Sites with Fluid Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memo from EPA Assistant Administrator Mathy Stanislaus, regarding planning for removal and remedial activities at hardrock mining and mineral processing sites with fluid hazards, and to share the Agency’s expectations for the work that is done at these sit

  3. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.O.; Chimenti, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the current state of quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE), this volume brings together papers by researchers working in government, private industry, and university laboratories. Their papers cover a wide range of interests and concerns for researchers involved in theoretical and applied aspects of quantitative NDE. Specific topics examined include reliability probability of detection--ultrasonics and eddy currents weldments closure effects in fatigue cracks technology transfer ultrasonic scattering theory acoustic emission ultrasonic scattering, reliability and penetrating radiation metal matrix composites ultrasonic scattering from near-surface flaws ultrasonic multiple scattering

  4. 45 CFR 1176.6 - Review and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT § 1176.6 Review and evaluation... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review and evaluation. 1176.6 Section 1176.6... also be designated an item of special interest to be reviewed during personnel management reviews. ...

  5. Review and evaluation of paleohydrologic methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Zimmerman, D.A.; Doesburg, J.M.; Thorne, P.D.

    1982-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify methodologies that could be used to interpret paleohydrologic environments. Paleohydrology is the study of past hydrologic systems or of the past behavior of an existing hydrologic system. The purpose of the review was to evaluate how well these methodologies could be applied to the siting of low-level radioactive waste facilities. The computer literature search queried five bibliographical data bases containing over five million citations of technical journals, books, conference papers, and reports. Two data-base searches (United States Geological Survey - USGS) and a manual search were also conducted. The methodologies were examined for data requirements and sensitivity limits. Paleohydrologic interpretations are uncertain because of the effects of time on hydrologic and geologic systems and because of the complexity of fluvial systems. Paleoflow determinations appear in many cases to be order-of-magnitude estimates. However, the methodologies identified in this report mitigate this uncertainty when used collectively as well as independently. That is, the data from individual methodologies can be compared or combined to corroborate hydrologic predictions. In this manner, paleohydrologic methodologies are viable tools to assist in evaluating the likely future hydrology of low-level radioactive waste sites.

  6. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  7. Review and evaluation of paleohydrologic methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Zimmerman, D.A.; Doesburg, J.M.; Thorne, P.D.

    1982-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify methodologies that could be used to interpret paleohydrologic environments. Paleohydrology is the study of past hydrologic systems or of the past behavior of an existing hydrologic system. The purpose of the review was to evaluate how well these methodologies could be applied to the siting of low-level radioactive waste facilities. The computer literature search queried five bibliographical data bases containing over five million citations of technical journals, books, conference papers, and reports. Two data-base searches (United States Geological Survey - USGS) and a manual search were also conducted. The methodologies were examined for data requirements and sensitivity limits. Paleohydrologic interpretations are uncertain because of the effects of time on hydrologic and geologic systems and because of the complexity of fluvial systems. Paleoflow determinations appear in many cases to be order-of-magnitude estimates. However, the methodologies identified in this report mitigate this uncertainty when used collectively as well as independently. That is, the data from individual methodologies can be compared or combined to corroborate hydrologic predictions. In this manner, paleohydrologic methodologies are viable tools to assist in evaluating the likely future hydrology of low-level radioactive waste sites

  8. Economic evaluations of homeopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viksveen, Petter; Dymitr, Zofia; Simoens, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Economic evaluations of commonly used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies such as homeopathy are needed to contribute to the evidence base on which policy makers, clinicians, health-care payers, as well as patients base their health-care decisions in an era of constrained resources. To review and assess existing economic evaluations of homeopathy. Literature search was made to retrieve relevant publications using AMED, the Cochrane Library, CRD (DARE, NHS EED, HTA), EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the journal Homeopathy (former British Homoeopathic Journal). A hand search of relevant publications was carried out. Homeopathy researchers were contacted. Identified publications were independently assessed by two authors. Fifteen relevant articles reported on 14 economic evaluations of homeopathy. Thirteen studies reported numbers of patients: a total of 3,500 patients received homeopathic treatment (median 97, interquartile range 48-268), and 10 studies reported on control group participants (median 57, IQR 40-362). Eight out of 14 studies found improvements in patients' health together with cost savings. Four studies found that improvements in homeopathy patients were at least as good as in control group patients, at comparable costs. Two studies found improvements similar to conventional treatment, but at higher costs. Studies were highly heterogeneous and had several methodological weaknesses. Although the identified evidence of the costs and potential benefits of homeopathy seemed promising, studies were highly heterogeneous and had several methodological weaknesses. It is therefore not possible to draw firm conclusions based on existing economic evaluations of homeopathy. Recommendations for future research are presented.

  9. Impacts of the financial crisis on climate and energy policy. Memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    By request of the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and the Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) have mapped the main effects of the credit crisis on Dutch climate and energy policy. This memo describes the effects of the credit crisis on the economy (question 1) and more particularly the effect on realizing the Dutch targets for 2020 for climate and energy policy as established in the policy program 'Clean and Efficient' (question 2). A distinction should be made between the short term effects (during the recession) and the longer term effects (the years after)(question 5). Moreover, the realization of the Kyoto target for 2008-2012 is addressed (question 3) as well as the question if the Dutch government can incentivise investments in climate and energy that can contribute to economic recovery in the short term (question 4) [mk] [nl

  10. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Chimenti, Dale

    1999-01-01

    This series provides a comprehensive review of the latest research results in quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Leading investigators working in government agencies, major industries, and universities present a broad spectrum of work extending from basic research to early engineering applications. An international assembly of noted authorities in NDE thoroughly cover such topics as: elastic waves, guided waves, and eddy-current detection, inversion, and modeling; radiography and computed tomography, thermal techniques, and acoustic emission; laser ultrasonics, optical methods, and microwaves; signal processing and image analysis and reconstruction, with an emphasis on interpretation for defect detection; and NDE sensors and fields, both ultrasonic and electromagnetic; engineered materials and composites, bonded joints, pipes, tubing, and biomedical materials; linear and nonlinear properties, ultrasonic backscatter and microstructure, coatings and layers, residual stress and texture, and constructi...

  11. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: LITERATURE REVIEW AND TIME EVOLUTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintea Mirela-Oana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation of an economic entity requires approaching several criteria, such as industry and economic entity type, managerial and entrepreneurial strategy, competitive environment, human and material resources available, using a system of appropriate performance indicators for this purpose.The exigencies of communication occurred on the growing number of phenomena that marked the global economy in recent decades (internationalization and relocation of business crises and turmoil in financial markets, demand performance measurement to be made in a comprehensive way by financial and non-financial criteria. Indicators are measures of performance used by management to measure, report and improve performance of the economic entity. The relationship between indicators and management is ensured by the existence of performance measurement systems. Studies to date indicate that economic entities using balanced performance measurement systems as a key management tool registered superior performance compared to entities not using such systems. This study attempts to address the issue of performance evaluation by presenting opinions of different authors concerning the process of performance measurement and to present, after revising the literature, the evolution of the performance evaluation systems. We tried to do this literature review because sustainable development and, therefore, globalization require new standards of performance that exceeds the economic field, both for domestic companies as well as international ones. So, these standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities undertaken by harmonizing the economic, social and environmental objectives. To assess the performance of economic entities it is required that performance evaluation to be done with a balanced multidimensional system, including both financial ratios and non-financial indicators in order to reduce the limits of

  12. 22 CFR 506.5 - Review and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Review and evaluation. 506.5 Section 506.5 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PART-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM § 506.5 Review and evaluation. The part-time career employment program will be reviewed through semiannual reports submitted by...

  13. 38 CFR 1.895 - Review and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS Part-Time Career Employment Program § 1.895 Review and evaluation. The part-time career employment... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review and evaluation. 1... management reviews. (Authority: 5 U.S.C. 3402) [61 FR 38571, July 25, 1996] ...

  14. Lessons learned from completed evaluation reviews (1983 to mid-1993). Special evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    With this in mind, the Agency in 1983 set up in the Department of Technical Co-operation an Evaluation Unit (upgraded to Section rank in 1986), to assist already existing self-evaluation efforts through a more systematic and independent approach and thus provide senior management with the information required for more efficient and effective programme planning and implementation. A first analysis of the lessons learned through technical co-operation evaluation was carried out after five years, in mid-1988. It included both lessons learned with regard to the procedures and components of the programme, in general, as well as the findings specific to individual projects or groups of projects, and reported on the resulting administrative changes introduced by the Agency with a view to improving the programme. The current review, covering the second five-year period, from mid-1988 to mid-1993, continued along the same lines, while also illustrating the changing pattern in the work of the Evaluation Section itself. In order to present a full picture of the activities and results of ten years of TC evaluation, this report combines the results of both reviews

  15. Lessons Learned about Post-Tenure Review from the AAHE Peer Review of Teaching Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes use of a strategy adapted from the American Association for Higher Education's Peer Review of Teaching Project, the "reflective memo," to provide backward and forward view of post-tenure reviews in the chemistry department of the University of Wisconsin (Madison). The approach served as a guide in review of research, teaching,…

  16. Performance evaluation based on data from code reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Andrej, Sekáč

    2016-01-01

    Context. Modern code review tools such as Gerrit have made available great amounts of code review data from different open source projects as well as other commercial projects. Code reviews are used to keep the quality of produced source code under control but the stored data could also be used for evaluation of the software development process. Objectives. This thesis uses machine learning methods for an approximation of review expert’s performance evaluation function. Due to limitations in ...

  17. Premarket Approval (PMA) Summary Review Memos for 180-Day Design Changes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A 180-day supplement is a request for a significant change in components, materials, design, specification, software, color additive, and labeling to an approved...

  18. Preliminary results from the MEMO multicomponent measurements of waves on-board INTERBALL 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    Full Text Available The MEMO (MEsure Multicomposante des Ondes experiment is a part of the INTERBALL 2 wave consortium. It is connected to a total of six electric and nine magnetic independent sensors. It provides waveforms associated with the measurement of two to five components in three frequency bands: ELF (5–1000 Hz, VLF (1–20 kHz, LF (20–250 kHz. Preliminary analyses of low and high resolution data are presented. The emphasis is put on the estimation of the propagation characteristics of the observed waves.VLF hiss emissions are shown to be mainly whistler mode emissions, but other modes are present. An accurate estimation of the local plasma frequency is proposed when the low L = 0 cutoff frequency is identified. AKR emissions observed just above source regions are studied. R-X and L-O modes are found: the first at the lowest frequencies and the second at the highest. Both propagate with wave normal directions weakly oblique or quasi-parallel to the Earth's magnetic field direction. Propagation characteristics are also determined for a (non-drifting fine structure of AKR. There is no fundamental difference with structurless events. Nightside and dayside bursts of ELF electromagnetic emissions are presented. It is not clear whether the two emissions belong to the "lion roar" emissions or not.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  19. Preliminary results from the MEMO multicomponent measurements of waves on-board INTERBALL 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lefeuvre

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The MEMO (MEsure Multicomposante des Ondes experiment is a part of the INTERBALL 2 wave consortium. It is connected to a total of six electric and nine magnetic independent sensors. It provides waveforms associated with the measurement of two to five components in three frequency bands: ELF (5–1000 Hz, VLF (1–20 kHz, LF (20–250 kHz. Preliminary analyses of low and high resolution data are presented. The emphasis is put on the estimation of the propagation characteristics of the observed waves.VLF hiss emissions are shown to be mainly whistler mode emissions, but other modes are present. An accurate estimation of the local plasma frequency is proposed when the low L = 0 cutoff frequency is identified. AKR emissions observed just above source regions are studied. R-X and L-O modes are found: the first at the lowest frequencies and the second at the highest. Both propagate with wave normal directions weakly oblique or quasi-parallel to the Earth's magnetic field direction. Propagation characteristics are also determined for a (non-drifting fine structure of AKR. There is no fundamental difference with structurless events. Nightside and dayside bursts of ELF electromagnetic emissions are presented. It is not clear whether the two emissions belong to the "lion roar" emissions or not.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  20. VCS-SSA Mainz Experiment. Measurement of the beam spin asymmetry in (e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma}) and (e polarized p {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0}). Final analysis - MEMO II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonvieille, H.; Bensafa, I. [LPC-Clermont-Fd, Universite Blaise Pascal, F-63170 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    MEMO-I was written in February 2006 to give details of the second pass analysis of the VCS-SSA experiment. Since then there was our VCS Meeting in March, the production of the PhD thesis by I. Bensafa in May, and complementary studies of the asymmetry which triggered some afterthoughts. Instead of updating MEMO-I which is long enough this memo summarizes these complementary remarks and proposes asymmetry results which are more finalized in view of publication. Various nomenclatures like cuts, variables,etc. have NOT been redefined: please read MEMO-I for that. (authors)

  1. The Evaluation of the Outside Matter in Dictionary Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Reviewing dictionaries is part of the ongoing work in lexicography, and several lexi­cographers have discussed the process and guidelines for reviews published in academic journals. However, few have addressed the evaluation of the outside matter and, if so, only in a cursory way. This article...... examines the evaluation of the outside matter in reviews published in Lexikos with a view to proposing some general principles for reviewing outer texts in printed and electronic dictionaries. The study shows that reviewers define the review object differently, some excluding the outside matter altogether......, and that the way in which the outside matter is assessed differs within and between reviews. It is proposed that the separate sections of dictionaries should not only be examined independently but that their relationship to each other should also be evaluated so as to represent faithfully the lexicographic...

  2. The Evaluation of the Outside Matter in Dictionary Reviews | Nielsen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reviewing dictionaries is part of the ongoing work in lexicography, and several lexi-cographers have discussed the process and guidelines for reviews published in academic journals. However, few have addressed the evaluation of the outside matter and, if so, only in a cursory way. This article examines the evaluation of ...

  3. A Review Paper on Camouflage Texture Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Amol Patil; Girraj Prasad Rathode

    2013-01-01

    Traditional evaluation method of camouflage texture effect is subjective evaluation. It’s very tedious and inconvenient to direct the texture designing. In this project, a systemic and rational method for direction and evaluation of camouflage texture designing is proposed. Camouflage consists of things such as leaves, branches, or brown and green paint, which are used to make it difficult for an enemy to see military forces and equipment. A camouflage texture evaluation method based on WSSIM...

  4. 39 CFR 273.6 - Evaluation by reviewing official.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supports the allegations of liability; (4) An estimate of the amount of money or the value of property or...)(4) and (5) of this section, the Reviewing Official recommends be demanded from the person alleged to... PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 273.6 Evaluation by reviewing official. (a) Based upon the...

  5. Evaluation of Reference Services--A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppu, Pali U.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the inherent deficiencies in reference service as provided is critical to providing effective, high quality service. Quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, as well as a combination of both, are being used to evaluate these services. The identification of appropriate research methodology is critical to an effective…

  6. Impact of the recession on the realization of the Kyoto target and the 2011 target of the working programme 'Clean and Efficient'. Memo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    By request of the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment the Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) drew up this memo on the impact of the recession on the realization of the Kyoto target and the intermediate target for 2011 from the working programme Clean and Efficient. The main conclusion of this memo is that both with and without the recession the Kyoto target will probably be realized. The main difference lies in the volume of emission allowances deployed by the government to realize the target [mk] [nl

  7. Social Comparison Theory and the Evaluation of Peer Evaluations: A Review and Some Applied Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Michael D.

    1983-01-01

    Reviewed characteristics of peer evaluations and notes their striking industrial validity. A review of the conditions under which peer evaluations yield strong validity coefficients as well as certain factor analytic and experimental studies indicated that social comparison theory might be useful for elucidating the nature of peer evaluation…

  8. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  9. Evaluating energy performance in non-domestic buildings : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgstein, E.H.; Lamberts, R.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation methods can be used to determine what constitutes good energy performance in a building. With an increasing focus on energy use of buildings worldwide, this evaluation assumes a fundamental importance. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the available methods for analysing,

  10. Referring Sex Offenders for Psychosexual Evaluation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Robert J.; Purdy, Linda A.

    1999-01-01

    Provides guidance to counselors who are referred identified and alleged sex offenders for psychosexual evaluations. Reviews the critical legal, ethical, and clinical issues that counselors should consider when responding to these referral requests. This article can be used to educate referral sources about the indications of evaluations of this…

  11. Evaluations of health promoting schools: a review of nine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mũkoma, Wanjirũ; Flisher, Alan J

    2004-09-01

    The concept of 'health promoting schools' has been embraced internationally as an effective way of promoting the health of children, adolescents, and the wider school community. It is only recently that attempts have been made to evaluate health promoting schools. This paper reviews evaluations of health promoting schools and draws useful evaluation methodology lessons. The review is confined to school-based interventions that are founded explicitly on the concept of the health promoting school and employ the concept beyond one school domain. We included nine evaluations in this review. Seven of these were published in the peer reviewed scientific literature. Two were unpublished reports. One study was a randomized controlled trial, while a quasi-experimental research design with comparison schools was used in three studies. With three exceptions, combinations of quantitative and qualitative data were collected. There was evidence that the health promoting school has some influence on various domains of health for the school community. It is also possible to integrate health promotion into the school curriculum and policies successfully. However, the evaluation of health promoting schools is complex. We discuss some of the methodological challenges of evaluating health promoting schools and make suggestions for improving future evaluations.

  12. Administrative memo relative to the delivery of energy conservation certificates; Circulaire relative a la delivrance des certificats d'economies d'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-15

    This memo details the principles of the energy conservation certificates, the law texts of application, the part of the Government and the ADEME services, the certificates demand procedure, and the inscription of the certificates on the national registries. (A.L.B.)

  13. Review of nuclear reaction data evaluation in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    The development of the nuclear reaction data evaluation activities in the US over the last 40 years is reviewed, starting with comments on several reports as early as 1944. The review moves on to the development of consortia to share the burden by interchanging sets of data and efforts toward putting together an encoding system and computer-oriented formats. It is predicted that future emphasis is likely to be on charged particle induced reactions. (LEW)

  14. Review of nuclear reaction data evaluation in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howerton, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    The development of the nuclear reaction data evaluation activities in the US over the last 40 years is reviewed, starting with comments on several reports as early as 1944. The review moves on to the development of consortia to share the burden by interchanging sets of data and efforts toward putting together an encoding system and computer-oriented formats. It is predicted that future emphasis is likely to be on charged particle induced reactions

  15. Literature Review on Modeling Cyber Networks and Evaluating Cyber Risks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelic, Andjelka; Campbell, Philip L

    2018-04-01

    The National Infrastructure Simulations and Analysis Center (NISAC) conducted a literature review on modeling cyber networks and evaluating cyber risks. The literature review explores where modeling is used in the cyber regime and ways that consequence and risk are evaluated. The relevant literature clusters in three different spaces: network security, cyber-physical, and mission assurance. In all approaches, some form of modeling is utilized at varying levels of detail, while the ability to understand consequence varies, as do interpretations of risk. This document summarizes the different literature viewpoints and explores their applicability to securing enterprise networks.

  16. Evaluating trauma nursing education: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Min; Metcalfe, Helene; Gallagher, Olivia; Hamdorf, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A review of the current literature evaluating trauma nursing education. A variety of trauma nursing courses exist, to educate nurses working in trauma settings, and to maintain their continuing professional development. Despite an increase in the number of courses delivered, there appears to be a lack of evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of trauma nursing education and in particular the justification for this resource allocation. Integrative literature review. A search of international literature on trauma nursing education evaluation published in English from 1985 to 2015 was conducted through electronic databases CINAHL Plus, Google Scholar, PubMed, Austhealth, Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), Sciverse Science Direct (Elsevier) & One file (Gale). Only peer reviewed journal articles identifying trauma course and trauma nursing course evaluation have been included in the selection criteria. An integrative review of both quantitative and qualitative literature guided by Whittemore and Knafl's theoretical framework using Bowling's and Pearson's validated appraisal checklists, has been conducted for three months. Only 17 studies met the inclusion criteria, including 14 on trauma course evaluation and 3 on trauma nursing course evaluation. Study findings are presented as two main themes: the historical evolution of trauma nursing education and evaluation of trauma nursing education outcomes. Trauma nursing remains in its infancy and education in this specialty is mainly led by continuing professional development courses. The shortage of evaluation studies on trauma nursing courses reflects the similar status in continuing professional development course evaluation. A trauma nursing course evaluation study will address the gap in this under researched area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Economic evaluation in patient safety: a literature review of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Bruna Alves; Or, Zeynep; Com-Ruelle, Laure; Michel, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Patient safety practices, targeting organisational changes for improving patient safety, are implemented worldwide but their costs are rarely evaluated. This paper provides a review of the methods used in economic evaluation of such practices. International medical and economics databases were searched for peer-reviewed publications on economic evaluations of patient safety between 2000 and 2010 in English and French. This was complemented by a manual search of the reference lists of relevant papers. Grey literature was excluded. Studies were described using a standardised template and assessed independently by two researchers according to six quality criteria. 33 articles were reviewed that were representative of different patient safety domains, data types and evaluation methods. 18 estimated the economic burden of adverse events, 3 measured the costs of patient safety practices and 12 provided complete economic evaluations. Healthcare-associated infections were the most common subject of evaluation, followed by medication-related errors and all types of adverse events. Of these, 10 were selected that had adequately fulfilled one or several key quality criteria for illustration. This review shows that full cost-benefit/utility evaluations are rarely completed as they are resource intensive and often require unavailable data; some overcome these difficulties by performing stochastic modelling and by using secondary sources. Low methodological transparency can be a problem for building evidence from available economic evaluations. Investing in the economic design and reporting of studies with more emphasis on defining study perspectives, data collection and methodological choices could be helpful for strengthening our knowledge base on practices for improving patient safety.

  18. Airline service quality evaluation: A review on concepts and models

    OpenAIRE

    Navid Haghighat

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews different major service quality concept and models which led to great developments in evaluating service quality with focusing on improvement process of the models through discussing criticisms of each model. Criticisms against these models are discussed to clarify development steps of newer models which led to the improvement of airline service quality models. The precise and accurate evaluation of service quality needs utilizing a reliable concept with comprehensive crite...

  19. Evaluating participation in water resource management: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, G.; BlöSchl, G.; Loucks, D. P.

    2012-11-01

    Key documents such as the European Water Framework Directive and the U.S. Clean Water Act state that public and stakeholder participation in water resource management is required. Participation aims to enhance resource management and involve individuals and groups in a democratic way. Evaluation of participatory programs and projects is necessary to assess whether these objectives are being achieved and to identify how participatory programs and projects can be improved. The different methods of evaluation can be classified into three groups: (i) process evaluation assesses the quality of participation process, for example, whether it is legitimate and promotes equal power between participants, (ii) intermediary outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of mainly nontangible outcomes, such as trust and communication, as well as short- to medium-term tangible outcomes, such as agreements and institutional change, and (iii) resource management outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of changes in resource management, such as water quality improvements. Process evaluation forms a major component of the literature but can rarely indicate whether a participation program improves water resource management. Resource management outcome evaluation is challenging because resource changes often emerge beyond the typical period covered by the evaluation and because changes cannot always be clearly related to participation activities. Intermediary outcome evaluation has been given less attention than process evaluation but can identify some real achievements and side benefits that emerge through participation. This review suggests that intermediary outcome evaluation should play a more important role in evaluating participation in water resource management.

  20. Subsurface barrier feasibility evaluation: External review meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, S.L.; Rouse, J.K.

    1994-12-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company -- Tank Waste Remediation System Division (TWRS) Program is evaluating subsurface barrier technologies for potential use in supporting remediation of the Hanford Tank Farms for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). An External Review Team (ERT) was assembled to perform an independent technical review of the work performed to-date supporting the evaluation process. A set of draft documents was forwarded to the ERT for their review, and a meeting was held August 10 through 12, 1994, to facilitate comments and resolutions. This document summarizes the meeting, the comments provided by the ERT, and the ongoing work to resolve the comments and support a pending decision by The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office; the Washington State Department of Ecology; and the US Environmental Protection Agency

  1. Review of the convolution algorithm for evaluating service integrated systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Villy Bæk

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we give a review of the applicability of the convolution algorithm. By this we are able to evaluate communication networks end--to--end with e.g. BPP multi-ratetraffic models insensitive to the holding time distribution. Rearrangement, minimum allocation, and maximum allocation...

  2. 42 CFR 121.10 - Reviews, evaluation, and enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... carry out her/his responsibilities under the Public Health Service Act and the Social Security Act. (b... Section 121.10 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.10 Reviews, evaluation, and...

  3. Review of the Educational Software Evaluation Forms and Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet ARSLAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to review existing evaluation forms and scales that have been prepared for educational software evaluation. In addition to this purpose, the study aims to provide insight and guidance for future studies in this context. In total, forty-two studies that including evaluation forms and scales have been taken into consideration. “Educational software evaluation”, “Software evaluation”, “Educational software evaluation forms/scales” were searched as keywords in the: “Education Resources Information Centre (ERIC”, “Marmara University e-Library”, “National Thesis Center” and “Science Direct” databases. Twenty-nine of them have met the review selection criteria and been evaluated. There is an increase in the number of evaluation tools between 2006 – 2010. However, it was noticed that there is no sufficient number of evaluation tools targeting “educational games”. It was concluded that reliability and validity studies are very important part of developing educational software evaluation tools and this is a matter that should be considered in future studies.

  4. Usability evaluation techniques in mobile commerce applications: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.

    2016-08-01

    Obviously, there are a number of literatures concerning the usability of mobile commerce (m-commerce) applications and related areas, but they do not adequately provide knowledge about usability techniques used in most of the empirical usability evaluation for m-commerce application. Therefore, this paper is aimed at producing the usability techniques frequently used in the aspect of usability evaluation for m-commerce applications. To achieve the stated objective, systematic literature review was employed. Sixty seven papers were downloaded in usability evaluation for m-commerce and related areas; twenty one most relevant studies were selected for review in order to extract the appropriate information. The results from the review shows that heuristic evaluation, formal test and think aloud methods are the most commonly used methods in m-commerce application in comparison to cognitive walkthrough and the informal test methods. Moreover, most of the studies applied control experiment (33.3% of the total studies); other studies that applied case study for usability evaluation are 14.28%. The results from this paper provide additional knowledge to the usability practitioners and research community for the current state and use of usability techniques in m-commerce application.

  5. Aging evaluation methodology of periodic safety review in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung-Bae; Jung, Sung-Gyu; Jin, Tae-Eun; Jeong, Ill-Seok

    2002-01-01

    In Korea plant lifetime management (PLIM) study for Kori Unit 1 has been performed since 1993. Meanwhile, periodic safety review (PSR) for all operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been started with Kori Unit 1 since 2000 per IAEA recommendation. The evaluation period is 10 years, and safety (evaluation) factors are 11 per IAEA guidelines as represented in table 1. The relationship between PSR factors and PLIM is also represented. Among these factors evaluation of 'management of aging' is one of the most important and difficult factor. This factor is related to 'actual condition of the NPP', 'use of experience from other nuclear NPPs and of research findings', and 'management of aging'. The object of 'management of aging' is to obtain plant safety through identifying actual condition of system, structure and components (SSCs) and evaluating aging phenomena and residual life of SSCs using operating experience and research findings. The paper describes the scope and procedure of valuation of 'management of aging', such as, screening criteria of SSCs, Code and Standards, evaluation of SSCs and safety issues as represented. Evaluating SSCs are determined using final safety analysis report (FSAR) and power unit maintenance system for Nuclear Ver. III (PUMAS/N-III). The screening criteria of SSCs are safety-related items (quality class Q), safety-impact items (quality class T), backfitting rule items (fire protection (10CFR50.48), environmental qualification (10CFR50.49), pressurized thermal shock (10CFR50.61), anticipated transient without scram (10CFR50.62), and station blackout (10CFR50.63)) and regulating authority requiring items[1∼3]. The purpose of review of Code and Standards is identifying actual condition of the NPP and evaluating aging management using effective Code and Standards corresponding to reactor facilities. Code and Standards is composed of regulating laws, FSAR items, administrative actions, regulating actions, agreement items, and other

  6. Systematic Review of Health Economic Impact Evaluations of Risk Prediction Models : Stop Developing, Start Evaluating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Giessen, Anoukh; Peters, Jaime; Wilcher, Britni; Hyde, Chris; Moons, Carl; de Wit, Ardine; Koffijberg, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although health economic evaluations (HEEs) are increasingly common for therapeutic interventions, they appear to be rare for the use of risk prediction models (PMs). Objectives: To evaluate the current state of HEEs of PMs by performing a comprehensive systematic review. Methods: Four

  7. The Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's Galileo safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.C.; Gray, L.B.; Huff, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The safety evaluation report (SER) for Galileo was prepared by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) coordinators in accordance with Presidential directive/National Security Council memorandum 25. The INSRP consists of three coordinators appointed by their respective agencies, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). These individuals are independent of the program being evaluated and depend on independent experts drawn from the national technical community to serve on the five INSRP subpanels. The Galileo SER is based on input provided by the NASA Galileo Program Office, review and assessment of the final safety analysis report prepared by the Office of Special Applications of the DOE under a memorandum of understanding between NASA and the DOE, as well as other related data and analyses. The SER was prepared for use by the agencies and the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the Present for use in their launch decision-making process. Although more than 20 nuclear-powered space missions have been previously reviewed via the INSRP process, the Galileo review constituted the first review of a nuclear power source associated with launch aboard the Space Transportation System

  8. Exploring outcomes and evaluation in narrative pedagogy: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Destiny R; Asselin, Marilyn E

    2016-10-01

    To identify narrative pedagogy learning outcomes and evaluation methods used for pre-licensure nursing students. Recommend areas for expanding narrative pedagogy research. An integrative review using a modified version of Cooper's 1998 framework, as described by Whittemore and Knafl (2005). A computer-assisted search of the literature from 1995 to 2015 was performed using the search terms narrative pedagogy and nursing. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Academic Search Premier, Educational Resources Information Center, Educational Research Complete, Medline, PsychArticles, PsychINFO, and the Teacher Reference Center. Ancestry searches led to the inclusion of additional articles. Twenty-six texts met the criteria for full review and were evaluated for methodological rigor and relevance to the review aims. Nine articles achieved an acceptable quality score and were used for thematic analysis. Learning outcomes associated with narrative pedagogy were grouped into five themes: thinking, empowerment, interconnectedness, learning as a process of making meaning, and ethical/moral judgment. Multiple methods of evaluation are necessary to evaluate these learning outcomes. Narrative pedagogy may be a beneficial philosophical approach to teaching. However, at this time, there is insufficient evidence to recommend its universal adoption. It is too broad in its approach to reliably measure its effectiveness. Future research should examine the effectiveness of specific teaching strategies to promote desired learning outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acknowledging patient heterogeneity in economic evaluation : a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutters, Janneke P C; Sculpher, Mark; Briggs, Andrew H; Severens, Johan L; Candel, Math J; Stahl, James E; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Boer, Albert; Ramaekers, Bram L T; Joore, Manuela A

    2013-02-01

    Patient heterogeneity is the part of variability that can be explained by certain patient characteristics (e.g. age, disease stage). Population reimbursement decisions that acknowledge patient heterogeneity could potentially save money and increase population health. To date, however, economic evaluations pay only limited attention to patient heterogeneity. The objective of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge regarding patient heterogeneity within economic evaluation of healthcare programmes. A systematic literature review was performed to identify methodological papers on the topic of patient heterogeneity in economic evaluation. Data were obtained using a keyword search of the PubMed database and manual searches. Handbooks were also included. Relevant data were extracted regarding potential sources of patient heterogeneity, in which of the input parameters of an economic evaluation these occur, methods to acknowledge patient heterogeneity and specific concerns associated with this acknowledgement. A total of 20 articles and five handbooks were included. The relevant sources of patient heterogeneity (demographics, preferences and clinical characteristics) and the input parameters where they occurred (baseline risk, treatment effect, health state utility and resource utilization) were combined in a framework. Methods were derived for the design, analysis and presentation phases of an economic evaluation. Concerns related mainly to the danger of false-positive results and equity issues. By systematically reviewing current knowledge regarding patient heterogeneity within economic evaluations of healthcare programmes, we provide guidance for future economic evaluations. Guidance is provided on which sources of patient heterogeneity to consider, how to acknowledge them in economic evaluation and potential concerns. The improved acknowledgement of patient heterogeneity in future economic evaluations may well improve the

  10. Financial evaluations of antibiotic stewardship programs - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem Hendrik Dik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThere is an increasing awareness to counteract problems due to incorrect antimicrobial use. Interventions that are implemented are often part of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASPs. Studies publishing results from these interventions are increasing, including reports on the economical effects of ASPs. This review will look at the economical sections of these studies and the methods that were used. MethodsA systematic review was performed of articles found in the PubMed and EMBASE databases published from 2000 until November 2014. Included studies found were scored for various aspects and the quality of the papers was assessed following an appropriate check list (CHEC criteria list.Results1233 studies were found, of which 149 were read completely. 99 were included in the final review. Of these studies, 57 only mentioned the costs associated with the antimicrobial medication. Others also included operational costs (n=23, costs for hospital stay (n=18 and/or other costs (n=19. 9 studies were further assessed for their quality. These studies scored between 2 and 14 out of a potential total score of 19.ConclusionsThis review gives an extensive overview of the current financial evaluation of ASPs and the quality of these economical studies. We show that there is still major potential to improve financial evaluations of ASPs. Studies do not use similar nor consistent methods or outcome measures, making it impossible draw sound conclusions and compare different studies. Finally, we make some recommendations for the future.

  11. Sustainability performance evaluation: Literature review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüközkan, Gülçin; Karabulut, Yağmur

    2018-07-01

    Current global economic activities are increasingly being perceived as unsustainable. Despite the high number of publications, sustainability science remains highly dispersed over diverse approaches and topics. This article aims to provide a structured overview of sustainability performance evaluation related publications and to document the current state of literature, categorize publications, analyze and link trends, as well as highlight gaps and provide research recommendations. 128 articles between 2007 and 2018 are identified. The results suggest that sustainability performance evaluation models shall be more balanced, suitable criteria and their interrelations shall be well defined and subjectivity of qualitative criteria inherent to sustainability indicators shall be considered. To address this subjectivity, group decision-making techniques and other analytical methods that can deal with uncertainty, conflicting indicators, and linguistic evaluations can be used in future works. By presenting research gaps, this review stimulates researchers to establish practically applicable sustainability performance evaluation frameworks to help assess and compare the degree of sustainability, leading to more sustainable business practices. The review is unique in defining corporate sustainability performance evaluation for the first time, exploring the gap between sustainability accounting and sustainability assessment, and coming up with a structured overview of innovative research recommendations about integrating analytical assessment methods into conceptual sustainability frameworks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. D 6.1 Interim biocomposite evaluation review

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, A.; Tjeerdsma, B.; Pina dos Santos, C.; Perremans, D.; Carra, G.; Bermejo, J.; Custódio, J.; Viegas, J.; Patrício, J.; Dzalto, J.; Ribeiro Nunes, L. M.; Real, L. P.; Veras, M.; Rodrigues, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Este registo pertence ao Repositório Científico do LNEC This deliverable is a review report which evaluates the progress and feasibility of the biocomposite systems, designs and installations, taking into account the information resulting from the work developed in the aim of Biobuild project. The main steps followed in the project up to this moment to develop bio-systems with such characteristics can be summarized as follows: · Use of additives and modifications to create d...

  13. Economic evaluation of vaccines in Canada: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chit, Ayman; Lee, Jason K H; Shim, Minsup; Nguyen, Van Hai; Grootendorst, Paul; Wu, Jianhong; Van Exan, Robert; Langley, Joanne M

    2016-05-03

    Economic evaluations should form part of the basis for public health decision making on new vaccine programs. While Canada's national immunization advisory committee does not systematically include economic evaluations in immunization decision making, there is increasing interest in adopting them. We therefore sought to examine the extent and quality of economic evaluations of vaccines in Canada. We conducted a systematic review of economic evaluations of vaccines in Canada to determine and summarize: comprehensiveness across jurisdictions, studied vaccines, funding sources, study designs, research quality, and changes over time. Searches in multiple databases were conducted using the terms "vaccine," "economics" and "Canada." Descriptive data from eligible manuscripts was abstracted and three authors independently evaluated manuscript quality using a 7-point Likert-type scale scoring tool based on criteria from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). 42/175 articles met the search criteria. Of these, Canada-wide studies were most common (25/42), while provincial studies largely focused on the three populous provinces of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia. The most common funding source was industry (17/42), followed by government (7/42). 38 studies used mathematical models estimating expected economic benefit while 4 studies examined post-hoc data on established programs. Studies covered 10 diseases, with 28/42 addressing pediatric vaccines. Many studies considered cost-utility (22/42) and the majority of these studies reported favorable economic results (16/22). The mean quality score was 5.9/7 and was consistent over publication date, funding sources, and disease areas. We observed diverse approaches to evaluate vaccine economics in Canada. Given the increased complexity of economic studies evaluating vaccines and the impact of results on public health practice, Canada needs improved, transparent and consistent processes

  14. Usability evaluation of complex systems. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norros, L.; Savioja, P.

    2004-04-01

    In this literature study the task of usability evaluation is approached through recent publications and known practises. The scope of the reviewed literature and the overall problematic of evaluating complex systems are first defined. Then existing evaluation methods and tools and a set of design guidelines and standards is introduced. In there view the distinction between the evaluation of the design process and evaluation of the outcome of the design process is made. Also the existing criteria for usability is provided. These criteria can be used as measures in the evaluation procedures described in the previous chapter. Then, the problem of validity in the evaluation and validation procedures of complex cognitive systems is shortly discusses. The final chapter covers the conclusions of the literature review. There is a need for deepening the relationship between usage and design. Usage must be the driver also in the design of process technology, plant's safety, and instrumentation and control as well as that of the design of man-machine interface. The collaborative activity is called activity-oriented design. In order to enable activity-oriented design we need to create design methods that drive the design activity into this direction. Criteria for evaluating what is good design are not available in present standards. Criteria for good tools and practices must consider human in a favourable role in the various tasks of operating an industrial plant as opposed to the view of human as a source of error. This is the way to create an optimal system, which takes advantage of the unique capabilities of both the human operators and the automation systems. (orig.)

  15. RPERT: Repetitive-Projects Evaluation and Review Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Fayek Aziz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimating expected completion probability of any repetitive construction project with a specified/certain duration including repetitive identical activities by using program evaluation and review technique is the most essential part in construction areas since the activities were had optimistic, most likely and pessimistic durations. This paper focuses on the calculation of expected completion probability of any repetitive construction project within a specified/certain duration (contract duration by using Line Of Balance technique (LOB in case of single or multiple number of crews integrated with Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT. Repetitive-Projects Evaluation and Review Technique (RPERT, which is a simplified software, will generate the expected project completion probability of a specified/certain duration (contract duration. RPERT software is designed by java programming code system to provide a number of new and unique capabilities, including: (1 Viewing the expected project completion probability according to a set of specified durations per each identical activity (optimistic time, most likely time, and pessimistic time in the analyzed project; (2 Providing seamless integration with available project time calculations. In order to provide the aforementioned capabilities of RPERT, the system is implemented and developed in four main modules: (1 A user interface module; (2 A database module; (3 A running module; and (4 A processing module. At the end, an illustrative example will be presented to demonstrate and verify the applications of proposed software (RPERT, by using probabilistic calculations for repetitive construction projects.

  16. Health economic evaluations in orthodontics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollenius, Ola; Petrén, Sofia; Björnsson, Liselotte; Norlund, Anders; Bondemark, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Economic evaluation is assuming increasing importance as an integral component of health services research. To conduct a systematic review of the literature and assess the evidence from studies presenting orthodontic treatment outcomes and the related costs. The literature review was conducted in four steps, according to Goodman's model, in order to identify all studies evaluating economic aspects of orthodontic interventions. The search covered the databases Medline, Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, Google Scholar, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, and SCOPUS, for the period from 1966 to September 2014. The inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing at least two different orthodontic interventions, evaluation of both economic and orthodontic outcomes, and study populations of all ages. The quality of each included study was assessed as limited, moderate, or high. The overall evidence was assessed according to the GRADE system (The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). The applied terms for searches yielded 1838 studies, of which 989 were excluded as duplicates. Application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria identified 26 eligible studies for which the full-text versions were retrieved and scrutinized. At the final analysis, eight studies remained. Three studies were based on cost-effectiveness analyses and the other five on cost-minimization analysis. Two of the cost-minimization studies included a societal perspective, i.e. the sum of direct and indirect costs. The aims of most of the studies varied widely and of studies comparing equivalent treatment methods, few were of sufficiently high study quality. Thus, the literature to date provides an inadequate evidence base for economic aspects of orthodontic treatment. This systematic review disclosed that few orthodontic studies have presented both economic and clinical outcomes. There is currently

  17. Airline service quality evaluation: A review on concepts and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Haghighat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews different major service quality concept and models which led to great developments in evaluating service quality with focusing on improvement process of the models through discussing criticisms of each model. Criticisms against these models are discussed to clarify development steps of newer models which led to the improvement of airline service quality models. The precise and accurate evaluation of service quality needs utilizing a reliable concept with comprehensive criteria and effective measurement techniques as the fundamentals of a valuable framework. In this paper, service quality models improvement is described based on three major service quality concepts, the disconfirmation, performance and hierarchical concepts which are developed subsequently. Reviewing various criteria and different measurement techniques such a statistical analysis and multi-criteria decision making assist researchers to have a clear understanding of the development of the evaluation framework in the airline industry. This study aims at promoting reliable frameworks for evaluating airline service quality in different countries and societies due to economic, cultural and social aspects of each society.

  18. A systematic review of clinical supervision evaluation studies in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutcliffe, John R; Sloan, Graham; Bashaw, Marie

    2018-02-15

    According to the international, extant literature published during the last 20 years or so, clinical supervision (CS) in nursing is now a reasonably common phenomenon. Nevertheless, what appears to be noticeably 'thin on the ground' in this body of literature are empirical evaluations of CS, especially those pertaining to client outcomes. Accordingly, the authors undertook a systematic review of empirical evaluations of CS in nursing to determine the state of the science. Adopting the approach documented by Stroup et al. (JAMA, 283, 2000, 2008), the authors searched for reports of evaluation studies of CS in nursing - published during the years 1995 to 2015. Keywords for the search were 'clinical supervision', 'evaluation', 'efficacy', 'nursing', and combinations of these keywords. Electronic databases used were CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychLIT, and the British Nursing Index. The research evidence from twenty-eight (28) studies reviewed is presented, outlining the main findings with an overview of each study presented. The following broad themes were identified and are each discussed in the study: narrative/anecdotal accounts of positive outcomes for clinical supervision, narrative/anecdotal accounts of negative outcomes for clinical supervision, empirical positive outcomes reported by supervisee, and empirical findings showing no effect by supervisee. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Economic evaluation of emergency obstetric care training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wilson-Jones, Megan; Madaj, Barbara; van den Broek, Nynke

    2017-12-04

    Training healthcare providers in Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) has been shown to be effective in improving their capacity to provide this critical care package for mothers and babies. However, little is known about the costs and cost-effectiveness of such training. Understanding costs and cost-effectiveness is essential in guaranteeing value-for-money in healthcare spending. This study systematically reviewed the available literature on cost and cost-effectiveness of EmOC trainings. Peer-reviewed and grey literature was searched for relevant papers published after 1990. Studies were included if they described an economic evaluation of EmOC training and the training cost data were available. Two reviewers independently searched, screened, and selected studies that met the inclusion criteria, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer. Quality of studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards statement. For comparability, all costs in local currency were converted to International dollar (I$) equivalents using purchasing power parity conversion factors. The cost per training per participant was calculated. Narrative synthesis was used to summarise the available evidence on cost effectiveness. Fourteen studies (five full and nine partial economic evaluations) met the inclusion criteria. All five and two of the nine partial economic evaluations were of high quality. The majority of studies (13/14) were from low- and middle-income countries. Training equipment, per diems and resource person allowance were the most expensive components. Cost of training per person per day ranged from I$33 to I$90 when accommodation was required and from I$5 to I$21 when training was facility-based. Cost-effectiveness of training was assessed in 5 studies with differing measures of effectiveness (knowledge, skills, procedure cost and lives saved) making comparison difficult. Economic evaluations of EmOC training are limited. There is a

  20. Methodology to identify, review, and evaluate components for license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.D.; Gregor, F.E.; Walker, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology has been developed to systematically identify, review, and evaluate plant equipment for license renewal. The method builds upon the existing licensing basis, operating history, and accepted deterministic and probabilistic techniques. Use of these approaches provides a focus for license renewal upon those safety-significant systems and components that are not routinely replaced, refurbished, or subject to detailed inspection as part of the plant's existing test, maintenance, and surveillance programs. Application of the method identified the PWR and BWR systems that should be subjected to detailed license renewal review. Detailed examination of two example systems demonstrates the approach. The review and evaluation of plant equipment for license renewal differ from the initial licensing of the plant. A substantial operating history has been established, the licensing basis has evolved from the original one, and plant equipment has been subject to periodic maintenance and surveillance throughout its life. In consideration of these differences, a basis for license renewal is needed. License renewal should be based upon continuation of the existing licensing basis and recognition of existing programs and operating history

  1. Wetlands Research Program. Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1. Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    activities (Shahane 1982). Models for quan- tifying the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al... Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech- relationship of blue

  2. Wetlands Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1: Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al. 198 1I/*L). 28. Direct Alteration (predictor for...Manage. 7:151-153. York. Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech

  3. Peer-supported review of teaching: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampy, Harish; Bourke, Michael; Naran, Prasheena

    2015-09-01

    Peer-supported review (also called peer observation) of teaching is a commonly implemented method of ascertaining teaching quality that supplements student feedback. A large variety of scheme formats with rather differing purposes are described in the literature. They range from purely formative, developmental formats that facilitate a tutor's reflection of their own teaching to reaffirm strengths and identify potential areas for development through to faculty- or institution-driven summative quality assurance-based schemes. Much of the current literature in this field focuses within general higher education and on the development of rating scales, checklists or observation tools to help guide the process. This study reports findings from a qualitative evaluation of a purely formative peer-supported review of teaching scheme that was implemented for general practice clinical tutors at our medical school and describes tutors' attitudes and perceived benefits and challenges when undergoing observation.

  4. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  5. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices

  6. Evaluation and impact of cardiotocography training programmes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, C; Sorensen, J L; Amer-Wåhlin, I

    2011-07-01

    The interpretation and management of cardiotocography (CTG) tracings are often criticised in obstetric malpractice cases. As a consequence, regular CTG training has been recommended, even though little is known about the effect of CTG training. To perform a systematic review of the existing literature on studies on CTG training in order to assess educational strategies, evaluation of training programmes, and impact of training programmes. The Medline database was searched to identify studies describing and/or evaluating CTG training programmes. The literature search resulted in 409 citations. Twenty studies describing and evaluating CTG training programmes were included. There was no restriction on study design. Data regarding study design, study quality, educational strategies used for training in CTG interpretation and decision making, target groups, number of participants, methods used for evaluation, quality of evaluation, level of evaluation and results of training was extracted from 20 articles, and analysed using Kirkpatrick's four-level model for the evaluation of education. Training was associated with improvements on all Kirkpatrick levels, resulting in increased CTG knowledge and interpretive skills, higher interobserver agreement, better management of intrapartum CTG, and improved quality of care. Computer-based training (CBT) might be less time-consuming than classroom teaching. Clinical skills seem to decrease faster than theoretical knowledge. Training can improve CTG competence and clinical practise. Further research on CBT, test-enhanced learning and long-term retention, evaluation of training and impact on clinical outcomes is recommended. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  7. Evaluation of Health Economics in Radiation Oncology: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Timothy K.; Goodman, Chris D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Boldt, R. Gabriel [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Warner, Andrew; Palma, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Rodrigues, George B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Lock, Michael I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Mishra, Mark V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zaric, Gregory S. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Ivey Business School, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Louie, Alexander V., E-mail: Dr.alexlouie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Despite the rising costs in radiation oncology, the impact of health economics research on radiation therapy practice analysis patterns is unclear. We performed a systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) and cost-utility analyses (CUAs) to identify trends in reporting quality in the radiation oncology literature over time. Methods and Materials: A systematic review of radiation oncology economic evaluations up to 2014 was performed, using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards guideline informed data abstraction variables including study demographics, economic parameters, and methodological details. Tufts Medical Center CEA registry quality scores provided a basis for qualitative assessment of included studies. Studies were stratified by 3 time periods (1995-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2014). The Cochran-Armitage trend test and linear trend test were used to identify trends over time. Results: In total, 102 articles were selected for final review. Most studies were in the context of a model (61%) or clinical trial (28%). Many studies lacked a conflict of interest (COI) statement (67%), a sponsorship statement (48%), a reported study time horizon (35%), and the use of discounting (29%). There was a significant increase over time in the reporting of a COI statement (P<.001), health care payer perspective (P=.019), sensitivity analyses using multivariate (P=.043) or probabilistic methods (P=.011), incremental cost-effectiveness threshold (P<.001), secondary source utility weights (P=.010), and cost effectiveness acceptability curves (P=.049). There was a trend toward improvement in Tuft scores over time (P=.065). Conclusions: Recent reports demonstrate improved reporting rates in economic evaluations; however, there remains significant room for improvement as reporting rates are still suboptimal. As fiscal pressures rise, we will rely on economic assessments to guide our practice decisions

  8. Evaluation of Health Economics in Radiation Oncology: A Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Timothy K.; Goodman, Chris D.; Boldt, R. Gabriel; Warner, Andrew; Palma, David A.; Rodrigues, George B.; Lock, Michael I.; Mishra, Mark V.; Zaric, Gregory S.; Louie, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the rising costs in radiation oncology, the impact of health economics research on radiation therapy practice analysis patterns is unclear. We performed a systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) and cost-utility analyses (CUAs) to identify trends in reporting quality in the radiation oncology literature over time. Methods and Materials: A systematic review of radiation oncology economic evaluations up to 2014 was performed, using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards guideline informed data abstraction variables including study demographics, economic parameters, and methodological details. Tufts Medical Center CEA registry quality scores provided a basis for qualitative assessment of included studies. Studies were stratified by 3 time periods (1995-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2014). The Cochran-Armitage trend test and linear trend test were used to identify trends over time. Results: In total, 102 articles were selected for final review. Most studies were in the context of a model (61%) or clinical trial (28%). Many studies lacked a conflict of interest (COI) statement (67%), a sponsorship statement (48%), a reported study time horizon (35%), and the use of discounting (29%). There was a significant increase over time in the reporting of a COI statement (P<.001), health care payer perspective (P=.019), sensitivity analyses using multivariate (P=.043) or probabilistic methods (P=.011), incremental cost-effectiveness threshold (P<.001), secondary source utility weights (P=.010), and cost effectiveness acceptability curves (P=.049). There was a trend toward improvement in Tuft scores over time (P=.065). Conclusions: Recent reports demonstrate improved reporting rates in economic evaluations; however, there remains significant room for improvement as reporting rates are still suboptimal. As fiscal pressures rise, we will rely on economic assessments to guide our practice decisions

  9. Review of Monte Carlo methods for particle multiplicity evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor

    2005-01-01

    I present a brief review of the existing models for particle multiplicity evaluation in heavy ion collisions which are at our disposal in the form of Monte Carlo simulators. Models are classified according to the physical mechanisms with which they try to describe the different stages of a high-energy collision between heavy nuclei. A comparison of predictions, as available at the beginning of year 2000, for multiplicities in central AuAu collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is provided.

  10. Review of Monte Carlo methods for particle multiplicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, Nestor

    2005-01-01

    I present a brief review of the existing models for particle multiplicity evaluation in heavy ion collisions which are at our disposal in the form of Monte Carlo simulators. Models are classified according to the physical mechanisms with which they try to describe the different stages of a high-energy collision between heavy nuclei. A comparison of predictions, as available at the beginning of year 2000, for multiplicities in central AuAu collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is provided

  11. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on advance science research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2002, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2001, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2004 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2003. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 24, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 4, 2003. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  12. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advance Science Research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2001, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2000, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2003 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 4, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  13. New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group - experience in reviewing WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group is to conduct an independent evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from WIPP--a radioactive waste facility intended to permanently dispose transuranic radioactive waste generated from the nation's nuclear weapons program. The concept of a State review of a proposed radioactive waste facility has been endorsed by both Federal and State legislative and executive agencies, and the experiences and interactions of the past four years to solve problems of this first-of-a-kind radioactive waste facility has led to many innovations in conflict resolution. The multidisciplinary Group's position is neither pro nor anti-WIPP and results are published and given broad dissemination to insure technical and public scrutiny of its work

  14. Usability evaluation of user interface of thesis title review system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tri, Y.; Erna, A.; Gellysa, U.

    2018-03-01

    Presentation of programs with user interface that can be accessed online through the website of course greatly provide user benefits. User can easily access the program they need. There are usability values that serve as a benchmark for the success of a user accessible program, ie efficiency, effectiveness, and convenience. These usability values also determine the development of the program for the better use. Therefore, on the review title thesis program that will be implemented in STT Dumai was measured usability evaluation. It aims to see which sides are not yet perfect and need to be improved to improve the performance and utilization of the program. Usability evaluation was measured by using smartPLS software. Database used was the result of respondent questionnaires that include questions about the experience when they used program. The result of a review of thesis title program implemented in STT Dumai has an efficiency value of 22.615, the effectiveness of 20.612, and satisfaction of 33.177.

  15. Memo of Readiness to Proceed with Phase 1 Privatization for the Tank Farm Contractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HONEYMAN, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    This Readiness to Proceed Memorandum provides the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. formal certification of readiness to proceed with provision of the waste feed and infrastructure to handle the products from the privatization contractor's waste processing plant. Summary information is included from the integrated scope-cost-schedule baseline, the analyses of the baseline, management systems, and systems reviews

  16. Pay for Performance Proposals in Race to the Top Round II Applications. Briefing Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    The Education Commission of the States reviewed all 36 Race to the Top (RttT) round II applications. Each of the 36 states that applied for round II funding referenced pay for performance under the heading of "Improving teacher and principal effectiveness based on performance." The majority of states outlined pay for performance…

  17. Performance Evaluation of Bluetooth Low Energy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Tosi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Small, compact and embedded sensors are a pervasive technology in everyday life for a wide number of applications (e.g., wearable devices, domotics, e-health systems, etc.. In this context, wireless transmission plays a key role, and among available solutions, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE is gaining more and more popularity. BLE merges together good performance, low-energy consumption and widespread diffusion. The aim of this work is to review the main methodologies adopted to investigate BLE performance. The first part of this review is an in-depth description of the protocol, highlighting the main characteristics and implementation details. The second part reviews the state of the art on BLE characteristics and performance. In particular, we analyze throughput, maximum number of connectable sensors, power consumption, latency and maximum reachable range, with the aim to identify what are the current limits of BLE technology. The main results can be resumed as follows: throughput may theoretically reach the limit of ~230 kbps, but actual applications analyzed in this review show throughputs limited to ~100 kbps; the maximum reachable range is strictly dependent on the radio power, and it goes up to a few tens of meters; the maximum number of nodes in the network depends on connection parameters, on the network architecture and specific device characteristics, but it is usually lower than 10; power consumption and latency are largely modeled and analyzed and are strictly dependent on a huge number of parameters. Most of these characteristics are based on analytical models, but there is a need for rigorous experimental evaluations to understand the actual limits.

  18. A Systematic Review of Reviews Evaluating Technology-Enabled Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Deborah A; Gee, Perry M; Fatkin, Kathy J; Peeples, Malinda

    2017-09-01

    Since the introduction of mobile phones, technology has been increasingly used to enable diabetes self-management education and support. This timely systematic review summarizes how currently available technology impacts outcomes for people living with diabetes. A systematic review of high quality review articles and meta analyses focused on utilizing technology in diabetes self-management education and support services was conducted. Articles were included if published between January 2013 and January 2017. Twenty-five studies were included for analysis. The majority evaluated the use of mobile phones and secure messaging. Most studies described healthy eating, being active and metabolic monitoring as the predominant self-care behaviors evaluated. Eighteen of 25 reviews reported significant reduction in A1c as an outcome measure. Four key elements emerged as essential for improved A1c: (1) communication, (2) patient-generated health data, (3) education, and (4) feedback. Technology-enabled diabetes self-management solutions significantly improve A1c. The most effective interventions incorporated all the components of a technology-enabled self-management feedback loop that connected people with diabetes and their health care team using 2-way communication, analyzed patient-generated health data, tailored education, and individualized feedback. The evidence from this systematic review indicates that organizations, policy makers and payers should consider integrating these solutions in the design of diabetes self-management education and support services for population health and value-based care models. With the widespread adoption of mobile phones, digital health solutions that incorporate evidence-based, behaviorally designed interventions can improve the reach and access to diabetes self-management education and ongoing support.

  19. EVALUATION OF MUSCLE STRENGTH IN MEDULLAR INJURY: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Valdameri Capelari

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the tools used to evaluate muscle strength in subjects with spinal cord injury in both clinical practice and scientific research. Methods: Initially, the literature review was carried out to identify the tools used in scientific research. The search was conducted in the following databases: Virtual Health Library (VHL, Pedro, and PubMed. Studies published between 1990 and 2016 were considered and selected, depicting an evaluation of muscle strength as an endpoint or for characterization of the sample. Next, a survey was carried out with physiotherapists to identify the instruments used for evaluation in clinical practice, and the degree of satisfaction of professionals with respect to them. Results: 495 studies were found; 93 were included for qualitative evaluation. In the studies, we verified the use of manual muscle test with different graduation systems, isokinetic dynamometer, hand-held dynamometer, and manual dynamometer. In clinical practice, the manual muscle test using the motor score recommended by the American Spinal Cord Injury Association was the most used method, despite the limitations highlighted by the physiotherapists interviewed. Conclusion: In scientific research, there is great variation in the methods and tools used to evaluate muscle strength in individuals with spinal cord injury, differently from clinical practice. The tools available and currently used have important limitations, which were highlighted by the professionals interviewed. No instrument depicts direct relationship of muscle strength and functionality of the subject. There is no consensus as to the best method for assessing muscle strength in spinal cord injury, and new instruments are needed that are specific for use in this population.

  20. INTEGRATING MULTIPLE CRITERIA EVALUATION AND GIS IN ECOTOURISM: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of 'Eco-tourism' is increasingly heard in recent decades. Ecotourism is one adventure that environmentally responsible intended to appreciate the nature experiences and cultures. Ecotourism should have low impact on environment and must contribute to the prosperity of local residents. This article reviews the use of Multiple Criteria Evaluation (MCE and Geographic Information System (GIS in ecotourism. Multiple criteria evaluation mostly used to land suitability analysis or fulfill specific objectives based on various attributes that exist in the selected area. To support the process of environmental decision making, the application of GIS is used to display and analysis the data through Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Integration between MCE and GIS tool is important to determine the relative weight for the criteria used objectively. With the MCE method, it can resolve the conflict between recreation and conservation which is to minimize the environmental and human impact. Most studies evidences that the GIS-based AHP as a multi criteria evaluation is a strong and effective in tourism planning which can aid in the development of ecotourism industry effectively.

  1. Clinical functional evaluation of female's pelvic floor: integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Nociti Lopes Fernandes

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT depends on the correct prescription of intensity, repetition and endurance of muscle contractions, which are provided by an adequate assessment of pelvic floor muscle. Objective: Verify the techniques, resources and strategies used for clinical functional evaluation of female pelvic floor (PF described in literature. Methods: It’s an integrative review of published studies and books from 2010 until December 2015. Relevant articles with complete description of PF evaluation were found through the use of Scielo, LILACS, PubMed and Medline databases. Results: 34 articles that fulfilled all the criteria were selected. Conclusion: The most used techniques, resources and strategies were: anamnesis, physical examination, measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity using Modified Oxford Scale or perineometry, and use of questionnaires to analyze patient's perspective of their own symptoms. Thus, we could use the parameters obtained in the evaluation to plan an ideal PFMT for each patient, so the physiotherapist would have a good database to analyze the evolution and define the end of therapy.

  2. Integrating Multiple Criteria Evaluation and GIS in Ecotourism: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Z. H.; Ujang, U.

    2016-09-01

    The concept of 'Eco-tourism' is increasingly heard in recent decades. Ecotourism is one adventure that environmentally responsible intended to appreciate the nature experiences and cultures. Ecotourism should have low impact on environment and must contribute to the prosperity of local residents. This article reviews the use of Multiple Criteria Evaluation (MCE) and Geographic Information System (GIS) in ecotourism. Multiple criteria evaluation mostly used to land suitability analysis or fulfill specific objectives based on various attributes that exist in the selected area. To support the process of environmental decision making, the application of GIS is used to display and analysis the data through Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). Integration between MCE and GIS tool is important to determine the relative weight for the criteria used objectively. With the MCE method, it can resolve the conflict between recreation and conservation which is to minimize the environmental and human impact. Most studies evidences that the GIS-based AHP as a multi criteria evaluation is a strong and effective in tourism planning which can aid in the development of ecotourism industry effectively.

  3. Perioperative Evaluation of Pregnant Surgical Patients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Gupta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant Females require special perioperative consideration as females react differently to treatment from physiologic and behavioural standpoints. Thus a standard perioperative assessment plays a crucial role for successful accomplishment of intraoperative and postoperative phase as well as to resist complications due to pregnancy. Each physiologic system is affected in such a way that may or may not have clinical significance for the surgeons. Thus affect of Pregnancy on cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrinal system have been reviewed. Moreover to decrease the hazards to the developing child, impact of surgery/treatment on the fetus has also been discussed. It was concluded that the goal of the perioperative evaluation of pregnant females is to identify its physiological effects on various systems and provide for the best efficacious perioperative treatment algorithm that shall minimize the patient morbidity.

  4. Economic evaluation of targeted cancer interventions: critical review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Elena B; Marshall, Deborah A; Kulin, Nathalie A; Ferrusi, Ilia L; Hassett, Michael J; Ladabaum, Uri; Phillips, Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Scientific advances have improved our ability to target cancer interventions to individuals who will benefit most and spare the risks and costs to those who will derive little benefit or even be harmed. Several approaches are currently used for targeting interventions for cancer risk reduction, screening, and treatment, including risk prediction algorithms for identifying high-risk subgroups and diagnostic tests for tumor markers and germline genetic mutations. Economic evaluation can inform decisions about the use of targeted interventions, which may be more costly than traditional strategies. However, assessing the impact of a targeted intervention on costs and health outcomes requires explicit consideration of the method of targeting. In this study, we describe the importance of this principle by reviewing published cost-effectiveness analyses of targeted interventions in breast cancer. Few studies we identified explicitly evaluated the relationships among the method of targeting, the accuracy of the targeting test, and outcomes of the targeted intervention. Those that did found that characteristics of targeting tests had a substantial impact on outcomes. We posit that the method of targeting and the outcomes of a targeted intervention are inextricably linked and recommend that cost-effectiveness analyses of targeted interventions explicitly consider costs and outcomes of the method of targeting.

  5. Quality Indicators for Evaluating Prehospital Emergency Care: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ian; Cameron, Peter; Wallis, Lee; Castren, Maaret; Lindstrom, Veronica

    2018-02-01

    all, 42.8% were categorized as primarily Clinical, with Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest contributing the highest number within this domain (30.4%). Of the QIs categorized as Non-Clinical (57.2%), Time-Based Intervals contributed the greatest number (28.8%). Population on Whom the Data Collection was Constructed made up the most commonly reported QI component (79.8%), followed by a Descriptive Statement (63.6%). Least reported were Timing of Data Collection (12.1%) and Timing of Reporting (12.1%). Pilot testing of the QIs was reported on 34.7% of QIs identified in the review. Overall, there is considerable interest in the understanding and development of PEC quality measurement. However, closer attention to the details and reporting of QIs is required for research of this type to be more easily extrapolated and generalized. Howard I , Cameron P , Wallis L , Castren M , Lindstrom V . Quality indicators for evaluating prehospital emergency care: a scoping review. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):43-52.

  6. LLNL Data Disk Evaluation Report and Information Gathering Document #449.R1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BeLue, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    This is a report on Data Storage Disk Evaluation and characterization. The purpose of this memo is to capture new recipients due to some recent characterization issues with the Hammer Mill process. The Data Storage Disk Evaluation report was generated utilizing data acquired during 2009 and 2010 from submitted storage media.

  7. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... process. Therefore, it is necessary to have only one separate periodic review each year (i.e., six months... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation...

  8. Systematic review of model-based cervical screening evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Diana; Bains, Iren; Vanni, Tazio; Jit, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Optimising population-based cervical screening policies is becoming more complex due to the expanding range of screening technologies available and the interplay with vaccine-induced changes in epidemiology. Mathematical models are increasingly being applied to assess the impact of cervical cancer screening strategies. We systematically reviewed MEDLINE®, Embase, Web of Science®, EconLit, Health Economic Evaluation Database, and The Cochrane Library databases in order to identify the mathematical models of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer progression used to assess the effectiveness and/or cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening strategies. Key model features and conclusions relevant to decision-making were extracted. We found 153 articles meeting our eligibility criteria published up to May 2013. Most studies (72/153) evaluated the introduction of a new screening technology, with particular focus on the comparison of HPV DNA testing and cytology (n = 58). Twenty-eight in forty of these analyses supported HPV DNA primary screening implementation. A few studies analysed more recent technologies - rapid HPV DNA testing (n = 3), HPV DNA self-sampling (n = 4), and genotyping (n = 1) - and were also supportive of their introduction. However, no study was found on emerging molecular markers and their potential utility in future screening programmes. Most evaluations (113/153) were based on models simulating aggregate groups of women at risk of cervical cancer over time without accounting for HPV infection transmission. Calibration to country-specific outcome data is becoming more common, but has not yet become standard practice. Models of cervical screening are increasingly used, and allow extrapolation of trial data to project the population-level health and economic impact of different screening policy. However, post-vaccination analyses have rarely incorporated transmission dynamics. Model calibration to country

  9. Memo on Some Target of Previous Meeting in 2004 and Now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Heki

    2014-01-01

    The necessity of deep borehole observation was pointed out in a 2002 WS entitled 'Physics of Active Faults' organized by USGS and NIED, and discussion on the utilization of deep borehole observation for design basis ground motion development was then was deepened at the 2004 OECD/NEED Tsukuba WS. In addition to this study history, a series of WSs on Seismic Observation in Deep Boreholes and its Application organized by OECD, IAEA and JNES was planned. The author also explained that at the first SODB WS, he expected deep borehole observation to be used to observe the activity of specific faults with high accuracy, to detect the detailed structure of those specific faults, and to estimate the asperity distribution in order to establish a practical approach to design basis earthquakes for nuclear power plant design. Recently, however, he has come to think that SODB will help find hidden faults and help observe the conditions of old faults. He also mentioned that he believes that in the future SODB can be used for re-activity evaluation of tertiary faults and evaluation of the movement of local fracture zones

  10. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  11. A systematic review of economic evaluations of cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Wai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR, a multidisciplinary program consisting of exercise, risk factor modification and psychosocial intervention, forms an integral part of managing patients after myocardial infarction (MI, revascularization surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions, as well as patients with heart failure (HF. This systematic review seeks to examine the cost-effectiveness of CR for patients with MI or HF and inform policy makers in Singapore on published cost-effectiveness studies on CR. Methods Electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, PEDro, CINAHL were searched from inception to May 2010 for published economic studies. Additional references were identified through searching bibliographies of included studies. Two independent reviewers selected eligible publications based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Quality assessment of economic evaluations was undertaken using Drummond’s checklist. Results A total of 22 articles were selected for review. However five articles were further excluded because they were cost-minimization analyses, whilst one included patients with stroke. Of the final 16 articles, one article addressed both centre-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation, as well as home-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation. Therefore, nine studies compared cost-effectiveness between centre-based supervised CR and no CR; three studies examined that between centre- and home based CR; one between inpatient and outpatient CR; and four between home-based CR and no CR. These studies were characterized by differences in the study perspectives, economic study designs and time frames, as well as variability in clinical data and assumptions made on costs. Overall, the studies suggested that: (1 supervised centre-based CR was highly cost-effective and the dominant strategy when compared to no CR; (2 home-based CR was no different from centre-based CR; (3 no difference existed

  12. A desk evaluation review of project RAF/4/004 nuclear instruments maintenance. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-15

    A Project Desk Evaluation (PDE) is an intensive review process, using agreed guidelines, of the design, implementation, and the outputs of a project. This project was originally intended for six selected countries in Africa, namely, Algeria, Egypt, Ghana, Libya, Zaire and Zambia. Ethiopia and Tanzania joined in 1993 and it has now been extended to two other countries, Madagascar and Sudan. This is a step forward towards developing the infrastructure for nuclear instrumentation and maintenance is as many countries in Africa as require this service. A project summary along with financial data and recommendations for improvements are given. A table where total assistance provided to ten selected african countries is included.

  13. A desk evaluation review of project RAF/4/004 nuclear instruments maintenance. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A Project Desk Evaluation (PDE) is an intensive review process, using agreed guidelines, of the design, implementation, and the outputs of a project. This project was originally intended for six selected countries in Africa, namely, Algeria, Egypt, Ghana, Libya, Zaire and Zambia. Ethiopia and Tanzania joined in 1993 and it has now been extended to two other countries, Madagascar and Sudan. This is a step forward towards developing the infrastructure for nuclear instrumentation and maintenance is as many countries in Africa as require this service. A project summary along with financial data and recommendations for improvements are given. A table where total assistance provided to ten selected african countries is included

  14. A systematic review evaluating the impact of task shifting on access ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A systematic review evaluating the impact of task shifting on access to antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Background: Task shifting, defined for this review as the shifting of ART initiation and ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  15. Research on Evaluation Use: A Review of the Empirical Literature from 1986 to 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelli; Greenseid, Lija O.; Toal, Stacie A.; King, Jean A.; Lawrenz, Frances; Volkov, Boris

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews empirical research on the use of evaluation from 1986 to 2005 using Cousins and Leithwood's 1986 framework for categorizing empirical studies of evaluation use conducted since that time. The literature review located 41 empirical studies of evaluation use conducted between 1986 and 2005 that met minimum quality standards. The…

  16. Bringing Back the Social Affordances of the Paper Memo to Aerospace Systems Engineering Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Scott; Holloway, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) is a relatively new field that brings together the interdisciplinary study of technological components of a project (systems engineering) with a model-based ontology to express the hierarchical and behavioral relationships between the components (computational modeling). Despite the compelling promises of the benefits of MBSE, such as improved communication and productivity due to an underlying language and data model, we observed hesitation to its adoption at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. To investigate, we conducted a six-month ethnographic field investigation and needs validation with 19 systems engineers. This paper contributes our observations of a generational shift in one of JPL's core technologies. We report on a cultural misunderstanding between communities of practice that bolsters the existing technology drag. Given the high cost of failure, we springboard our observations into a design hypothesis - an intervention that blends the social affordances of the narrative-based work flow with the rich technological advantages of explicit data references and relationships of the model-based approach. We provide a design rationale, and the results of our evaluation.

  17. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Department of Environmental Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support in Tokai Research Establishment at JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of 11 specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 11, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. (author)

  18. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Health Physics in Tokai Research Establishment and at related departments in other Establishments of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of six specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from October 2000 to January 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on October 10, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics. (author)

  19. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Department of Environmental Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support in Tokai Research Establishment at JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of 11 specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 11, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. (author)

  20. A Review of Microwave Thermography Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microwave thermography (MWT has many advantages including strong penetrability, selective heating, volumetric heating, significant energy savings, uniform heating, and good thermal efficiency. MWT has received growing interest due to its potential to overcome some of the limitations of microwave nondestructive testing (NDT and thermal NDT. Moreover, during the last few decades MWT has attracted growing interest in materials assessment. In this paper, a comprehensive review of MWT techniques for materials evaluation is conducted based on a detailed literature survey. First, the basic principles of MWT are described. Different types of MWT, including microwave pulsed thermography, microwave step thermography, microwave pulsed phase thermography, and microwave lock-in thermography are defined and introduced. Then, MWT case studies are discussed. Next, comparisons with other thermography and NDT methods are conducted. Finally, the trends in MWT research are outlined, including new theoretical studies, simulations and modelling, signal processing algorithms, internal properties characterization, automatic separation and inspection systems. This work provides a summary of MWT, which can be utilized for material failures prevention and quality control.

  1. A Review of Microwave Thermography Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze; Foudazi, Ali; Cheng, Liang; Tian, Guiyun

    2017-05-15

    Microwave thermography (MWT) has many advantages including strong penetrability, selective heating, volumetric heating, significant energy savings, uniform heating, and good thermal efficiency. MWT has received growing interest due to its potential to overcome some of the limitations of microwave nondestructive testing (NDT) and thermal NDT. Moreover, during the last few decades MWT has attracted growing interest in materials assessment. In this paper, a comprehensive review of MWT techniques for materials evaluation is conducted based on a detailed literature survey. First, the basic principles of MWT are described. Different types of MWT, including microwave pulsed thermography, microwave step thermography, microwave pulsed phase thermography, and microwave lock-in thermography are defined and introduced. Then, MWT case studies are discussed. Next, comparisons with other thermography and NDT methods are conducted. Finally, the trends in MWT research are outlined, including new theoretical studies, simulations and modelling, signal processing algorithms, internal properties characterization, automatic separation and inspection systems. This work provides a summary of MWT, which can be utilized for material failures prevention and quality control.

  2. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Pacemaker Telemonitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Villegas, Antonio; Catalán-Matamoros, Daniel; Martín-Saborido, Carlos; Villegas-Tripiana, Irene; Robles-Musso, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, telemedicine applied to pacemaker monitoring has undergone extraordinary growth. It is not known if telemonitoring is more or less efficient than conventional monitoring. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review analyzing the available evidence on resource use and health outcomes in both follow-up modalities. We searched 11 databases and included studies published up until November 2014. The inclusion criteria were: a) experimental or observational design; b) studies based on complete economic evaluations; c) patients with pacemakers, and d) telemonitoring compared with conventional hospital monitoring. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 2852 patients, with a mean age of 81 years. The main indication for device implantation was atrioventricular block. With telemonitoring, cardiovascular events were detected and treated 2 months earlier than with conventional monitoring, thus reducing length of hospital stay by 34% and reducing routine and emergency hospital visits as well. There were no significant intergroup differences in perceived quality of life or number of adverse events. The cost of telemonitoring was 60% lower than that of conventional hospital monitoring. Compared with conventional monitoring, cardiovascular events were detected earlier and the number or hospitalizations and hospital visits was reduced with pacemaker telemonitoring. In addition, the costs associated with follow-up were lower with telemonitoring. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Oklo. A review and critical evaluation of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterstroem, Lena

    2000-10-01

    The Oklo natural fossil fission reactors in Gabon, Equatorial Africa, have been studied as a natural analogue for spent nuclear fuel in a geological environment. For these studies, it is important to know what has happened to these reactors since they formed. This review is focussed on existing geological and geochronological information concerning the Oklo reactors and the surrounding ore. A sequence of geological and geochemical events in the Oklo area, as described in the literature, is given. The data and the studies behind this established geochronology are discussed and evaluated. Of the regional geology, special attention is given to the dating of the Francevillian sediments, and the intrusion of a dolerite dyke swarm. The processes that led to the mineralisation at Oklo, the subsequent formation of the nuclear reactors and later migration of fission products are described. Further discussion concerns the studies of the dolerite dyke swarm, since this appears to be one of the most important events related to fission product migration. A close look at the data related to this event shows that further study of the age of the dolerite dykes, and their effect on the uraninite in the Oklo reactors, is needed

  4. School feeding in Jamaica: a review of its evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, D T

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews two studies that evaluated the school feeding program in Jamaica. The first examined 115 children aged 12-13 y who were enrolled in three classes in a poor, rural school. One class was served the standard school meal at 0900 whereas the other two classes served as controls. The outcome variables included school achievement, attendance, and weight gain. After one semester, the class receiving the meal showed improved arithmetic scores and school attendance compared with the control classes; however, they showed no weight gain. The academic improvement remained significant after school attendance was controlled for. It was therefore hypothesized that the gains in arithmetic resulted from the alleviation of hunger in the classroom. The other study, conducted in a metabolic ward, examined the effects of missing breakfast on cognitive function in 90 children aged 9-10 y and of differing nutritional status. Using a crossover design, the investigators tested each child on two mornings 1 wk apart, once after serving them breakfast and second without. Breakfast, consisting of the school program meal, was served at 0800. When severely malnourished, stunted, or wasted children received no breakfast, their performance in various cognitive tests deteriorated. These results indicate that alleviation of hunger was one of the mechanisms by which school feeding improved academic achievement in the previous study. Undernourished children are more likely to benefit from school feeding programs than are adequately nourished children.

  5. Techniques to Evaluate Dental Erosion: A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mahasweta; Joshi, Nikhil; Kathariya, Rahul; Angadi, Prabhakar; Raikar, Sonal

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews different techniques for evaluating dental erosion, weighs the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques, and presents the latest trends in the study of dental erosion. In May 2014, an initial search was carried out in the PubMed/MEDLINE database of indexed journals from 1975 to 2013 using the following keywords: dental erosion; dental erosion In-vitro; and dental erosion in-vivo. Bibliographic citations from the papers found were then used to find other useful sources. The authors categorize the techniques into three classes: in-vitro, in-vivo and in-vitro/in-vivo. The article discusses the instrumentation required to use each of these techniques, as well as their rationale, merits and applications. The emergence of in-vitro/in-vivo techniques offers the potential to accurately quantify tooth wear in clinical situations. Cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies show that these techniques will improve diagnosis, treatment planning and management of dental erosion.

  6. Evaluation and management of Periocular Capillary Hemangioma: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Motowa, Saeed A.; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.

    2006-01-01

    To review the salient features of periocular capillary hemangioma, provide the ophthalmologist with clinical, diagnostic and histological features characteristic of the tumor and discuss various methods of management. Methods were literature review of periocular capillary hemangioma, diagnostic evaluation with emphasis on treatment through the presentation of illustrative clinical cases. Capillary hemangioma is the most common benign vascular tumor found on the head and neck area including eyelids and orbit. The lesion typically manifests within the first few weeks of life, grows rapidly in the first year during the proliferative phase, then invariably and slowly regresses over the next 4 to 5 years during the involutional phase. The lesion may resolve without leaving any significant cosmetic sequelae in vast majority of patients, however, the functional defects in the form of amblyopia, squint, facial disfigurement and rarely optic atrophy may persist long after complete resolution of the tumor. The diagnosis of the capillary hemangioma requires a combination of clinical and imaging studies such as ultrasonography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography in selected cases. With the advent of less invasive diagnostic techniques, the need for biopsy in capillary hemangioma has decreased. Nevertheless, it should be differentiated from other periocular tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma, lymphangioma, chloroma, neuroblastoma, orbital cyst, and orbital cellulites. Treatment is indicated to prevent amblyopia or cosmetic disfigurement. If indicated, intra-lesional corticosteroids may be used to enhance resolution of the tumor. Other forms of treatment tried with variable success include systematic and topical corticosteroids, radiation, surgical excision and intravenous embolization of the tumor. Indecent years, laser ablation of the tumor has been found effective in some cases. Interferon-u has been utilized effectively in cases of capillary

  7. Strengthening of the nuclear safety regulatory body. Field evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    As a result of a request from the Preparation Committee of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) in 1992, and as recommended by the CEC/RAMG (Commission of European Communities/Regulatory Assistance Management Group) and the Agency mission in July 1993 to the Slovak Republic, the project SLR/9/005 was approved in 1993 as a model project for the period 1994-1996. Current budge is $401,340 and disbursements to date amount to $312,873. The project time schedule has been extended to 1997. The major conclusions of this evaluation are as follows: The project responded to an urgent national need, as well as to a statutory mandate of the Agency, and was adequately co-ordinated with other international assistance programmes to NRA. The project was designed as a structured programme of assistance by means of expert missions, scientific visits and a limited amount of equipment, acting upon several key areas of NRA regulatory responsibilities. Agency assistance was provided in a timely manner. A high concentration of expert missions was noticed at the initial stages of the project, which posed some managements problems. This was corrected to some extent in the course of implementation. Additionally, some overlapping of expert mission recommendations suggests that improvements are needed in the design of such missions. The exposure to international regulatory practice and expertise has resulted in substantial developments of NRA, both in organizational and operational terms. The project can claim to have contributed to NRA having gained governmental and international confidence. NRA's role in the safety assessment of Bohunice V1 reconstruction, as well as in Bohunice V2 safety review, Bohunice A1 decommissioning and in informing the public, also points at the success achieved by the project. The institutional and financial support of the Government contributed decisively to the project achievements. (author). Figs, tabs

  8. An Evaluative Review of Simulated Dynamic Smart 3d Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeijn, H.; Sheth, F.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of plants can be an asset for creating agricultural based visualisation products. The continuum of 3D plants models ranges from static to dynamic objects, also known as smart 3D objects. There is an increasing requirement for smarter simulated 3D objects that are attributed mathematically and/or from biological inputs. A systematic approach to plant simulation offers significant advantages to applications in agricultural research, particularly in simulating plant behaviour and the influences of external environmental factors. This approach of 3D plant object visualisation is primarily evident from the visualisation of plants using photographed billboarded images, to more advanced procedural models that come closer to simulating realistic virtual plants. However, few programs model physical reactions of plants to external factors and even fewer are able to grow plants based on mathematical and/or biological parameters. In this paper, we undertake an evaluation of plant-based object simulation programs currently available, with a focus upon the components and techniques involved in producing these objects. Through an analytical review process we consider the strengths and weaknesses of several program packages, the features and use of these programs and the possible opportunities in deploying these for creating smart 3D plant-based objects to support agricultural research and natural resource management. In creating smart 3D objects the model needs to be informed by both plant physiology and phenology. Expert knowledge will frame the parameters and procedures that will attribute the object and allow the simulation of dynamic virtual plants. Ultimately, biologically smart 3D virtual plants that react to changes within an environment could be an effective medium to visually represent landscapes and communicate land management scenarios and practices to planners and decision-makers.

  9. A Literature Review on Recommender Systems Algorithms, Techniques and Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Madadipouya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most crucial issues, nowadays, is to provide personalized services to each individual based on their preferences. To achieve this goal, recommender system could be utilized as a tool to help the users in decision-making process offering different items and options. They are utilized to predict and recommend relevant items to end users. In this case an item could be anything such as a document, a location, a movie, an article or even a user (friend suggestion. The main objective of the recommender systems is to suggest items which have great potential to be liked by users. In modern recommender systems, various methods are combined together with the aim of extracting patterns in available datasets. Combination of different algorithms make prediction more convoluted since various parameters should be taken into account in providing recommendations. Recommendations could be personalized or non-personalized. In non-personalized type, selection of the items for a user is based on the number of the times that an item has been visited in the past by other users. However, in the personalized type, the main objective is to provide the best items to the user based on her taste and preferences. Although, in many domains recommender systems gained significant improvements and provide better services for users, it still requires further research to improve accuracy of recommendations in many aspects. In fact, the current available recommender systems are far from the ideal model of the recommender system. This paper reviews state of art in recommender systems algorithms and techniques which is necessary to identify the gaps and improvement areas. In addition to that, we provide possible solutions to overcome shortages and known issues of recommender systems as well as discussing about recommender systems evaluation methods and metrics in details.

  10. Economic evaluation studies in reproductive medicine: a systematic review of methodologic quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Vijgen, Sylvia M. C.; Hompes, Peter; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Opmeer, Brent C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the methodologic quality of economic analyses published in the field of reproductive medicine. Systematic review. Centers for reproductive care. Infertility patients. We performed a Medline search to identify economic evaluation studies in reproductive medicine. We included studies that

  11. Clinical diagnostic evaluation for scaphoid fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter H.; Henny, Erik P.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kamminga, Sjoerd P.; van Enst, Wynanda A.; Kloen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of available clinical evaluation tests for scaphoid fractures and to compare their diagnostic accuracies. PWe performed a systematic review of all studies assessing diagnostic characteristics of clinical evaluation in scaphoid fractures by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane,

  12. Evaluating Management Information Systems, A Protocol for Automated Peer Review Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Gordon C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses key issues in evaluating an automated Peer Review System. Included are the conceptual base, design, steps in planning structural components, operation parameters, criteria, costs and a detailed outline or protocol for use in the evaluation.

  13. General Guidelines on Criteria for Adoption or Rejection of Evaluated Libraries and Data by the Nuclear Data Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neudecker, Denise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gray, Mark Girard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCartney, Austin Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parsons, Donald Kent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-12

    This memo contains general guidelines on what documentation and tools need to be in place as well as format and data testing requirements such that evaluated nuclear data sets or entire libraries can be adopted by the nuclear data team. Additional requirements beyond this memo might apply for specific nuclear data observables. These guidelines were established based on discussions between J.L. Conlin, M.G. Gray, A.P. McCartney, D. Neudecker, D.K. Parsons and M.C. White.

  14. Evaluation of Dermatology Practice Online Reviews: Lessons From Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J; Lipoff, Jules B

    2016-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is an increasingly important component of health care quality measures. Online reviews of physicians represent a promising platform for capturing patient perspectives of care. To identify qualitative themes associated with patient reviews of dermatologic care on consumer reporting websites. A qualitative analysis was conducted of patient-generated reviews of dermatology practices on 2 consumer review platforms. Yelp is an online consumer portal for users to review their experience with local businesses; ZocDoc is an online patient-scheduling portal that provides opportunity for patients to write reviews of physician practices. A total of 518 reviews from 45 dermatology practices on Yelp and 4921 reviews from 45 dermatology providers on ZocDoc were collected from 3 geographically diverse cities: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Washington. The study was conducted from January 15 to July 15, 2015. Reviews were separated into high-scoring and low-scoring groups. An inductive qualitative method was used to code and identify key themes associated with positive and negative patient experiences. Analysis was completed upon reaching thematic saturation. Reported as mean (95% CI), the overall Yelp score for the 45 selected practices was 3.46 of 5 stars (3.17-3.75) and overall ZocDoc score for the 45 selected practices was 4.72 of 5 stars (4.47-4.80). The proportion of individual reviews giving a score of 5.0 was significantly higher on ZocDoc (3986 [81.0%]) than on Yelp (229 [44.2%]) (P dermatology providers. Online consumer review websites are designed to facilitate instantaneous and public communication among patients. These platforms provide elaborate and timely data for dermatologists to garner insight into their patients' experiences. The themes identified in this study are consistent with past satisfaction studies and may aid dermatologists in optimizing the patient care experience.

  15. Evaluation of the Service Review Model with Performance Scorecards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Thomas G.; Williams, W. Larry; Rafacz, Sharlet D.; Newsome, William; Lydon, Christina A.

    2012-01-01

    The current study combined a management technique termed "Service Review" with performance scorecards to enhance staff and consumer behavior in a human service setting consisting of 11 supervisors and 56 front-line staff working with 9 adult consumers with challenging behaviors. Results of our intervention showed that service review and…

  16. RTE - Memo 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This report proposes tables, figures and maps of data which illustrate RTE activities in 2015 (turnover, income employees), its profile (lengths of overhead, underground and refurbished lines, number of substations), the flow of electricity (injected energy, delivered energy), electricity generation (installed power and generated energy for different sources, evolution of wind and photovoltaic generation), electricity consumption and exchange (evolution of consumption and of export balance), the electricity market (contractual cross-border exchanges, 2015 results of the balancing mechanism, breakdown of the adjustment mechanism), the European situation (high interconnection, daily prices on the electricity markets), major achievements and projects on the French territory, and financial results for the RTE group (income statement, financial indicators, simplified balance sheet, history of investments). A chart describes the group's organisation, and members of the different boards (management board, executive committee, supervisory board) are indicated

  17. RTE - Memo 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    RTE is the operator of the high and extra high-voltage transmission system in France. RTE operates, develops and maintains it. This brochure summarised the 2013 key figures of RTE Group: RTE in 2013, Profile, The grid, The flow of electricity, Generation, Consumption and exchange, The electricity market, Major achievements in 2013, Major ten-year projects, Financial results for the RTE Group, RTE Group organizational structure

  18. A Memo from Machiavelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Daniel J.; Pfeffer, Jeffrey; Baldridge, J. Victor

    1999-01-01

    A fictitious memorandum from Niccolo Machiavelli, a 15th-century author, to college presidents, senior administrators, and faculty leaders seeking change in higher education offers suggestions for organizational development and governance in the form of ten rules and related change tactics. Topics addressed include integrity, team-building,…

  19. A desk evaluation review of project URT/5/007 tsetse fly eradication. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    Project URT/5/007 was initiated in 1984 to assist the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania in developing membrane feeding technology for the mass breeding of tsetse flies, which is required for the application of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the tsetse fly from the island of Zanzibar. As the project progressed the objectives focused on the development of inter-related management practices with SIT to control and eventually eradicate the tsetse species infesting Zanzibar. As depicted by the project title, tsetse fly eradication on Zanzibar is the ultimate goal of on-going work of project URT/5/007; however, tsetse fly eradication is not the immediate objective of this project. The total budget of the project for the years 1984 through 1994 includes 53 man-months of expert services, $402,755 for equipment, and $1,959 for fellowship training. Additional funds for 57 man-months of fellowship training were provided from sources outside of the project. Resources provided by the United Republic of Tanzania for the project included staff, local facilities, and local running costs. A Desk Evaluation Review (DER) of Project URT/5/007 was requested by the Africa Section to provide an assessment of project achievements and to determine to what end the project may lead in the near future. Also the review could help determine how experiences gained during the developments of this project might be utilized in the management and implementation of similar projects in Tanzania or the region.

  20. A desk evaluation review of project URT/5/007 tsetse fly eradication. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Project URT/5/007 was initiated in 1984 to assist the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania in developing membrane feeding technology for the mass breeding of tsetse flies, which is required for the application of the sterile insect technique to eradicate the tsetse fly from the island of Zanzibar. As the project progressed the objectives focused on the development of inter-related management practices with SIT to control and eventually eradicate the tsetse species infesting Zanzibar. As depicted by the project title, tsetse fly eradication on Zanzibar is the ultimate goal of on-going work of project URT/5/007; however, tsetse fly eradication is not the immediate objective of this project. The total budget of the project for the years 1984 through 1994 includes 53 man-months of expert services, $402,755 for equipment, and $1,959 for fellowship training. Additional funds for 57 man-months of fellowship training were provided from sources outside of the project. Resources provided by the United Republic of Tanzania for the project included staff, local facilities, and local running costs. A Desk Evaluation Review (DER) of Project URT/5/007 was requested by the Africa Section to provide an assessment of project achievements and to determine to what end the project may lead in the near future. Also the review could help determine how experiences gained during the developments of this project might be utilized in the management and implementation of similar projects in Tanzania or the region

  1. 75 FR 26283 - Proposed Collection, Submission for OMB Review, Museums for America Grant Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Review, Museums for America Grant Program Evaluation AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services..., Submission for OMB Review. SUMMARY: The Institute of Museum and Library Services announces the following... functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; Evaluate the...

  2. Ethical review from the inside: repertoires of evaluation in Research Ethics Committee meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jean Philippe; van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Willems, Dick L.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the practice of ethical review by Research Ethics Committees (REC) could help protect the interests of human participants and promote scientific progress. To facilitate such evaluations, we conducted an ethnographic study of how an REC reviews research proposals during its meetings. We

  3. Evaluation in Moves: An Integrated Analysis of Chinese MA Thesis Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate communicative purpose of literature reviews is to convince the reader of the worthiness of the writer's research, which is realized stage by stage and evaluation plays an important role in achieving this end. However, concerns about evaluation demonstration in novice academic writers' literature reviews have been repeatedly voiced in…

  4. Review and Evaluation of Reservoir Management Strategies for Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Abstract The purpose of this report is to review and evaluate available infor- mation regarding reservoir operation strategies for management of...12 3 Operations Management Examples ............................................................................ 16...report is to review and evaluate available information regarding reservoir operation strategies for management of harmful algal ERDC/EL TR-17-11 2

  5. Effect of Memo®, a natural formula combination, on Mini-Mental State Examination scores in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakoot M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa Yakoot,1 Amel Salem,2 Sherine Helmy3 1Green Clinic and Research Center, 2Mabarrah Clinics, 3Pharco Pharmaceutical Industries, Alexandria, Egypt Background: Mild cognitive impairment encompasses the clinical continuum between physiologic age-related cognitive changes and dementia. A variety of medications, including herbal preparations (in particular Ginkgo biloba and Panax ginseng, have been advocated as treatments for cognitive impairment in the elderly. In this study, we investigated the effect of an already marketed dietary supplement (Memo® combining 750 mg of lyophilized royal jelly with standardized extracts of G. biloba 120 mg and P. ginseng 150 mg on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Methods: Sixty-six subjects presenting with forgetfulness and satisfying the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR clinical criteria for mild cognitive impairment were randomly divided into an experimental group treated with one Memo capsule before breakfast daily for 4 weeks and a control group who took placebo. The mean change in MMSE score from baseline and reported adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean change in MMSE score in the group treated with Memo for 4 weeks was significantly greater than in the control group (+2.07 versus +0.13, respectively by the Student’s t-test (t = 6.485, P < 0.0001. This was also true after adjusting for age as a covariate and educational level as a factor nested within the treatment groups in a general linear model (analysis of covariance, F = 9.675 [corrected model], P < 0.0001. Conclusion: This combined triple formula may be beneficial in treating the cognitive decline that occurs during the aging process as well as in the early phases of pathologic cognitive impairment typical of insidious-onset vascular dementia and in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Larger

  6. The epidemiology of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD in community-living seniors: protocol of the MemoVie cohort study, Luxembourg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perquin Magali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are increasingly considered a major public health problem. The MemoVie cohort study aims to investigate the living conditions or risk factors under which the normal cognitive capacities of the senior population in Luxembourg (≥ 65 year-old evolve (1 to mild cognitive impairment (MCI – transitory non-clinical stage – and (2 to AD. Identifying MCI and AD predictors undeniably constitutes a challenge in public health in that it would allow interventions which could protect or delay the occurrence of cognitive disorders in elderly people. In addition, the MemoVie study sets out to generate hitherto unavailable data, and a comprehensive view of the elderly population in the country. Methods/design The study has been designed with a view to highlighting the prevalence in Luxembourg of MCI and AD in the first step of the survey, conducted among participants selected from a random sample of the general population. A prospective cohort is consequently set up in the second step, and appropriate follow-up of the non-demented participants allows improving the knowledge of the preclinical stage of MCI. Case-control designs are used for cross-sectional or retrospective comparisons between outcomes and biological or clinical factors. To ensure maximal reliability of the information collected, we decided to opt for structured face to face interviews. Besides health status, medical and family history, demographic and socio-cultural information are explored, as well as education, habitat network, social behavior, leisure and physical activities. As multilingualism is expected to challenge the cognitive alterations associated with pathological ageing, it is additionally investigated. Data relative to motor function, including balance, walk, limits of stability, history of falls and accidents are further detailed. Finally, biological examinations, including ApoE genetic polymorphism are

  7. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation in Ireland: A review of the process

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tilson, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the pharmacoeconomic assessment process in Ireland and to provide examples of recent appraisals and the subsequent impact on pricing and reimbursement decisions.\\r\

  8. Evidence-Based versus Junk-Based Evaluation Research: Some Lessons from 35 Years of the Evaluation Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Along with the late Howard Freeman, Richard Berk was a founding editor of "Evaluation Review" (then "Evaluation Quarterly") in 1977. He resigned as editor of this journal at the end of 2010. In this article, he reflects on his experiences. (Contains 3 notes.)

  9. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  10. Review of evaluations of crushing results for the seedbed preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Anisch

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For evaluating the work results of tillage operations today only inaccurate parameters are available which cannot be readily measured. Thus, evaluating and comparing the work results of machines and developing suitable sensors are difficult. At the Technical University of Dresden, till 1990, research projects for determining aggregate size composition of soil have been done. Based on this work, this study will show suggestions for measuring, displaying and evaluation of soil crushing results depending on tillage work conditions.

  11. Performance evaluation of constructed wetlands: A review of arid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aiming at environmental pollution control through the use of constructed wetlands systems (CWs) in arid and semi arid climatic region, a detailed review of CWs was undertaken. Given the practical application and simplicity of the technology, principles for building phytotechnology-ecohydrology environment used for ...

  12. A Review of the Chinese Higher Education Evaluation Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Laura Pan; Dehai, Wang

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss the Higher Education Evaluation Center, the administrative body under the auspices of the Chinese Ministry of Education responsible for organizing and conducting evaluation of baccalaureate and associate degree programs offered at different universities and colleges in China. The Center also conducts research on regulations and…

  13. Evaluation of Adult Literacy Education in the United States: A Review of Methodological Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Tsang, Mun C.

    2008-01-01

    This is a critical review of methodological issues in the evaluation of adult literacy education programs in the United States. It addresses the key research questions: What are the appropriate methods for evaluating these programs under given circumstances. It identifies 15 evaluation studies that are representative of a range of adult literacy…

  14. Test methods for evaluating hot cracking: Review and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of hot cracking is described and discussed, and criteria for tests to assess hot cracking are elucidated. The historical development of hot cracking tests is traced from the 1930s to present, with categorization of tests into several types. It is noted that the number of tests developed continues to increase dramatically. The number of literature citations also increases with time, with few popular tests receiving a major share of interest. Predominant countries of origin of both tests and citations shift with time, and a few journals account for most of the published information. Reviews of hot cracking are reviewed, and it is predicted that modeling and other developing analytical techniques will contribute greatly to an increase in our understanding of hot cracking. 30 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Evaluation and management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jada, Ajit; Mackel, Charles E; Hwang, Steven W; Samdani, Amer F; Stephen, James H; Bennett, James T; Baaj, Ali A

    2017-10-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a 3D spinal deformity affecting children between the ages of 11 and 18, without an identifiable etiology. The authors here reviewed the available literature to provide spine surgeons with a summary and update on current management options. Smaller thoracic and thoracolumbar curves can be managed conservatively with observation or bracing, but corrective surgery may be indicated for rapidly growing or larger curves. The authors summarize the atypical features to look for in patients who may warrant further investigation with MRI during diagnosis and review the fundamental principles of the surgical management of AIS. Patients with AIS can be managed very well with a combination of conservative and surgical options. Outcomes for these children are excellent with sustained longer-term results.

  16. Review and evaluation of alternative chemical disposal technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    .... In light of the fact that alternative technologies have evolved since the 1994 study, this new volume evaluates five Army-chosen alternatives to the baseline incineration system for the disposal...

  17. 7 CFR 249.17 - Management evaluations and reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... address the deficiencies and prevent their future recurrence. (iii) If the corrective action plan is... needed. Compliance buys can be required if, during FNS management evaluations by regional offices, a...

  18. Musical Evaluation in a Mexican University Music School: Student Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation is one of the components of the educational process that has begun to become increasingly relevant as a result of new educational approaches to learning opportunities. The field of arts education has its educational idiosyncrasies, most perilously “the subjectivity” involved in production and artistic creation attempting to achieve “beauty” or “musicality.” For this reason, the overall educational process, and evaluation of music in particular, should be studied in order to avoid p...

  19. A Thorough Scrutiny of ELT Textbook Evaluations: A Review Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Gholami

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is thoroughly agreed that English language textbooks stand amongst the foremost components in any language classrooms worldwide, being referred to as valid, beneficial and labor-saving tools to fulfill an extensive range of needs. An ELT textbook is not merely a set of sheets of paper fastened together to hinge at one side, but is the beating heart of any education system whereupon the whole learning revolves. Notwithstanding their interminable benefits, it is admitted that still the compiled textbooks, especially the ones prescribed in Educational systems have to be evaluated and assessed to confirm whether they fulfil the objectives they are meant for or not, as it is said no perfect textbook exists. Having dealt with evaluation in general, this research meticulously elaborates on textbook evaluation more specifically concluding that there is a dearth of inquiry on textbook selection and evaluation. Afterwards, this research introduces the most common approaches for evaluating ELT textbooks and materials. The paper culminates with concluding remarks and implications, hoping to shed light on how textbook evaluation is practiced worldwide.

  20. Central presbycusis: a review and evaluation of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Larry E; Dubno, Judy R; Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Lister, Jennifer J; Cacace, Anthony T; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Gates, George A; Wilson, Richard H; Wingfield, Arthur

    2012-09-01

    The authors reviewed the evidence regarding the existence of age-related declines in central auditory processes and the consequences of any such declines for everyday communication. This report summarizes the review process and presents its findings. The authors reviewed 165 articles germane to central presbycusis. Of the 165 articles, 132 articles with a focus on human behavioral measures for either speech or nonspeech stimuli were selected for further analysis. For 76 smaller-scale studies of speech understanding in older adults reviewed, the following findings emerged: (1) the three most commonly studied behavioral measures were speech in competition, temporally distorted speech, and binaural speech perception (especially dichotic listening); (2) for speech in competition and temporally degraded speech, hearing loss proved to have a significant negative effect on performance in most of the laboratory studies; (3) significant negative effects of age, unconfounded by hearing loss, were observed in most of the studies of speech in competing speech, time-compressed speech, and binaural speech perception; and (4) the influence of cognitive processing on speech understanding has been examined much less frequently, but when included, significant positive associations with speech understanding were observed. For 36 smaller-scale studies of the perception of nonspeech stimuli by older adults reviewed, the following findings emerged: (1) the three most frequently studied behavioral measures were gap detection, temporal discrimination, and temporal-order discrimination or identification; (2) hearing loss was seldom a significant factor; and (3) negative effects of age were almost always observed. For 18 studies reviewed that made use of test batteries and medium-to-large sample sizes, the following findings emerged: (1) all studies included speech-based measures of auditory processing; (2) 4 of the 18 studies included nonspeech stimuli; (3) for the speech-based measures

  1. Central Presbycusis: A Review and Evaluation of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Larry E.; Dubno, Judy R.; Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Lister, Jennifer J.; Cacace, Anthony T.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Gates, George A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Wingfield, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    Background The authors reviewed the evidence regarding the existence of age-related declines in central auditory processes and the consequences of any such declines for everyday communication. Purpose This report summarizes the review process and presents its findings. Data Collection and Analysis The authors reviewed 165 articles germane to central presbycusis. Of the 165 articles, 132 articles with a focus on human behavioral measures for either speech or nonspeech stimuli were selected for further analysis. Results For 76 smaller-scale studies of speech understanding in older adults reviewed, the following findings emerged: (1) the three most commonly studied behavioral measures were speech in competition, temporally distorted speech, and binaural speech perception (especially dichotic listening); (2) for speech in competition and temporally degraded speech, hearing loss proved to have a significant negative effect on performance in most of the laboratory studies; (3) significant negative effects of age, unconfounded by hearing loss, were observed in most of the studies of speech in competing speech, time-compressed speech, and binaural speech perception; and (4) the influence of cognitive processing on speech understanding has been examined much less frequently, but when included, significant positive associations with speech understanding were observed. For 36 smaller-scale studies of the perception of nonspeech stimuli by older adults reviewed, the following findings emerged: (1) the three most frequently studied behavioral measures were gap detection, temporal discrimination, and temporal-order discrimination or identification; (2) hearing loss was seldom a significant factor; and (3) negative effects of age were almost always observed. For 18 studies reviewed that made use of test batteries and medium-to-large sample sizes, the following findings emerged: (1) all studies included speech-based measures of auditory processing; (2) 4 of the 18 studies included

  2. Standard review plan for applications for sealed source and device evaluations and registrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the reviewer of a request for a sealed source or device safety evaluation with the information and materials necessary to make a determination that the product is acceptable for licensing purposes. It provides the reviewer with a listing of the applicable regulations and industry standards, policies affecting evaluation and registration, certain administrative procedures to be followed, and information on how to perform the evaluation and write the registration certificate. Standard review plans are prepared for the guidance of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards staff responsible for the review of a sealed source or device application. This document is made available to the public as part of the Commission's policy to inform the nuclear industry and the general public of regulatory procedures and policies. Standard review plans are not substitutes for regulatory guides or the Commission's regulations and compliance with them is not required

  3. Standard review plan for applications for sealed source and device evaluations and registrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the reviewer of a request for a sealed source or device safety evaluation with the information and materials necessary to make a determination that the product is acceptable for licensing purposes. It provides the reviewer with a listing of the applicable regulations and industry standards, policies affecting evaluation and registration, certain administrative procedures to be followed, and information on how to perform the evaluation and write the registration certificate. Standard review plans are prepared for the guidance of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards staff responsible for the review of a sealed source or device application. This document is made available to the public as part of the Commission`s policy to inform the nuclear industry and the general public of regulatory procedures and policies. Standard review plans are not substitutes for regulatory guides or the Commission`s regulations and compliance with them is not required.

  4. Review of experimental methods for evaluating effective delayed neutron fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Yoshihiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The International Effective Delayed Neutron Fraction ({beta}{sub eff}) Benchmark Experiments have been carried out at the Fast Critical Assembly of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute since 1995. Researchers from six countries, namely France, Italy, Russia, U.S.A., Korea, and Japan, participate in this FCA project. Each team makes use of each experimental method, such as Frequency Method, Rossi-{alpha} Method, Nelson Number Method, Cf Neutron Source Method, and Covariance Method. In this report these experimental methods are reviewed. (author)

  5. Review of Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria of Some Countries (USA, Canada, EC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mikhailovna Nikiforova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a brief review of the evolution in developing and designing trusted computer system evaluation criteria from specific national to common international standards is given/suggested.

  6. An Evaluative Review of School Accreditation Implementation Program in Indonesian Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryati, Sri

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically reviews and evaluates the implementation of School Accreditation Program for the period of 2013 with a particular reference to Central Java Schools, consisting of Kindergarten (TK) Elementary School (SD), Junior High School (SMP) and Senior High School (SMA) (Note 1). The aim of the review is to see to what extent they can…

  7. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2010 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held June 7-11, 2010 in Washington, D.C.

  8. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Schelvis, R.M.C.; Boot, C.R.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, J.R.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. Methods A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or secondary

  9. DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-10-01

    This document summarizes the project evaluations and comments from the DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Program Review. Hydrogen production, delivery and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; and education R&D projects funded by DOE in FY2004 are reviewed.

  10. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havermans, B.M.; Schlevis, Roosmarijn Mc; Boot, Cécile Rl; Brouwers, E.P.M.; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or

  11. Evaluating Management Information Systems, A Protocol for Automated Peer Review Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Gordon C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses key issues in evaluating an automated Peer Review System. Included are the conceptual base, design, steps in planning structural components, operation parameters, criteria, costs and a detailed outline or protocol for use in the evaluation. At the heart of the Peer Review System is the criteria utilized for measuring quality. Criteria evaluation should embrace, as a minimum, appropriateness, validity and reliability, and completemess or comprehensiveness of content. Such an evaluation is not complete without determining the impact (clinical outcome) of the service system or the patient and the population served.

  12. Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants

  13. Assessing the effects of employee assistance programs: a review of employee assistance program evaluations.

    OpenAIRE

    Colantonio, A.

    1989-01-01

    Employee assistance programs have grown at a dramatic rate, yet the effectiveness of these programs has been called into question. The purpose of this paper was to assess the effectiveness of employee assistance programs (EAPs) by reviewing recently published EAP evaluations. All studies evaluating EAPs published since 1975 from peer-reviewed journals in the English language were included in this analysis. Each of the articles was assessed in the following areas: (a) program description (subj...

  14. Review and evaluation of metallic TRU nuclear waste consolidation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.R.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1983-08-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Commercial Waste Treatment Program to develop, demonstrate, and deploy waste treatment technology. In this report, viable methods are identified that could consolidate the volume of metallic wastes generated in a fuel reprocessing facility. The purpose of this study is to identify, evaluate, and rate processes that have been or could be used to reduce the volume of contaminated/irradiated metallic waste streams and to produce an acceptable waste form in a safe and cost-effective process. A technical comparative evaluation of various consolidation processes was conducted, and these processes were rated as to the feasibility and cost of producing a viable product from a remotely operated radioactive process facility. Out of the wide variety of melting concepts and consolidation systems that might be applicable for consolidating metallic nuclear wastes, the following processes were selected for evaluation: inductoslay melting, rotating nonconsumable electrode melting, plasma arc melting, electroslag melting with two nonconsumable electrodes, vacuum coreless induction melting, and cold compaction. Each process was evaluated and rated on the criteria of complexity of process, state and type of development required, safety, process requirements, and facility requirements. It was concluded that the vacuum coreless induction melting process is the most viable process to consolidate nuclear metallic wastes. 11 references

  15. Safety evaluation review of the prototype license application safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and consultants reviewed a Prototype License Application Safety Analysis Report (PLASAR) submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the belowground vault (BGV) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste disposal. In Volume 1 of NUREG-1375, the NRC staff provided the safety review results for an earth-mounded concrete bunker PLASAR. In the current report, the staff focused its review on the design, construction, and operational aspects of the BGV PLASAR. The staff developed review comments and questions using the Standard Review Plan (SRP), Rev. 1 (NUREG-1200) as the basis for evaluating the acceptability of the information provided in the BGV PLASAR. The detailed review comments provided in this report are intended to be useful guidance to facility developers and State regulators in addressing issues likely to be encountered in the review of a license application for a low-level-waste disposal facility. 44 refs

  16. Economic evaluation of pharmacist-led medication reviews in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Thiruchelvam, Kaeshaelya; Kow, Chia Siang; Ghori, Muhammad Usman; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2017-10-01

    Medication reviews is a widely accepted approach known to have a substantial impact on patients' pharmacotherapy and safety. Numerous options to optimise pharmacotherapy in older people have been reported in literature and they include medication reviews, computerised decision support systems, management teams, and educational approaches. Pharmacist-led medication reviews are increasingly being conducted, aimed at attaining patient safety and medication optimisation. Cost effectiveness is an essential aspect of a medication review evaluation. Areas covered: A systematic searching of articles that examined the cost-effectiveness of medication reviews conducted in aged care facilities was performed using the relevant databases. Pharmacist-led medication reviews confer many benefits such as attainment of biomarker targets for improved clinical outcomes, and other clinical parameters, as well as depict concrete financial advantages in terms of decrement in total medication costs and associated cost savings. Expert commentary: The cost-effectiveness of medication reviews are more consequential than ever before. A critical evaluation of pharmacist-led medication reviews in residential aged care facilities from an economical aspect is crucial in determining if the time, effort, and direct and indirect costs involved in the review rationalise the significance of conducting medication reviews for older people in aged care facilities.

  17. IACUC evaluation and external scientific review. IACUC Overstepping its Bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, Ted M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Penner, Jocelyn D.

    2010-08-30

    I was asked to submit a response to the Protocol Review forum for the journal LabAnimal by Dr. Jerald Silverman. This forum request views and opinions on issues that are faced by research animal welfare committees. The particular issue is: Dr. John Smith, a distinguished investigator at Great Eastern University, had spent his career searching for a treatment for hearing loss. After 20 years of research, he developed a drug that potentially could improve auditory function after damage to the inner ear. The drug was administered by injection into the middle ear with the use of a fine needle inserted through the eardrum. Smith submitted a protocol to the IACUC to conduct a small study on cats, proposing to treat one group of animals with the drug and another with saline, to determine if it prevented the changes in the anatomy of the inner ear that normally occur with aging.

  18. Electricity price forecasting in deregulated markets: A review and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev Kumar; Saini, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Ashwani [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra, Haryana (India)

    2009-01-15

    The main methodologies used in electricity price forecasting have been reviewed in this paper. The following price-forecasting techniques have been covered: (i) stochastic time series, (ii) causal models, and (iii) artificial intelligence based models. The quantitative analysis of the work done by various authors has been presented based on (a) time horizon for prediction, (b) input variables, (c) output variables, (d) results, (e) data points used for analysis, (f) preprocessing technique employed, and (g) architecture of the model. The results have been presented in the form of tables for ease of comparison. Classification of various price-influencing factors used by different researchers has been done and put for reference. Application of various models as applied to different electricity markets is also presented for consideration. (author)

  19. Electricity price forecasting in deregulated markets: A review and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev Kumar; Saini, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2009-01-01

    The main methodologies used in electricity price forecasting have been reviewed in this paper. The following price-forecasting techniques have been covered: (i) stochastic time series, (ii) causal models, and (iii) artificial intelligence based models. The quantitative analysis of the work done by various authors has been presented based on (a) time horizon for prediction, (b) input variables, (c) output variables, (d) results, (e) data points used for analysis, (f) preprocessing technique employed, and (g) architecture of the model. The results have been presented in the form of tables for ease of comparison. Classification of various price-influencing factors used by different researchers has been done and put for reference. Application of various models as applied to different electricity markets is also presented for consideration. (author)

  20. A systematic review of COTS evaluation and selection approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, a number of researchers have made their significant contributions to develop different approaches for solving a very challenging problem of commercial off-the shelf (COTS selection. The development of software with high quality and minimum development time has always been a difficult job for the software developers. Therefore, in today’s scenario, software developers move towards the implementation of component based software engineering that relies on the integration of small pieces of code namely (COTS. In this study, we present a comprehensive descriptive explanation of the various COTS evaluation and selection approaches developed by various researchers in the past to understand the concept of COTS selection. The advantages and disadvantages of each COTS selection approach are also provided, which will give a better prospect to the readers to understand the various existing COTS evaluation and selection approaches.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty: Fundamentals and practical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Ignacio

    2003-08-01

    Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty is a book written for anyone who makes and reports measurements. It attempts to fill the gaps in the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement, or the GUM, and does a pretty thorough job. The GUM was written with the intent of being applicable by all metrologists, from the shop floor to the National Metrology Institute laboratory; however, the GUM has often been criticized for its lack of user-friendliness because it is primarily filled with statements, but with little explanation. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty gives lots of explanations. It is well written and makes use of many good figures and numerical examples. Also important, this book is written by a metrologist from a National Metrology Institute, and therefore up-to-date ISO rules, style conventions and definitions are correctly used and supported throughout. The author sticks very closely to the GUM in topical theme and with frequent reference, so readers who have not read GUM cover-to-cover may feel as if they are missing something. The first chapter consists of a reprinted lecture by T J Quinn, Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), on the role of metrology in today's world. It is an interesting and informative essay that clearly outlines the importance of metrology in our modern society, and why accurate measurement capability, and by definition uncertainty evaluation, should be so important. Particularly interesting is the section on the need for accuracy rather than simply reproducibility. Evaluating the Measurement Uncertainty then begins at the beginning, with basic concepts and definitions. The third chapter carefully introduces the concept of standard uncertainty and includes many derivations and discussion of probability density functions. The author also touches on Monte Carlo methods, calibration correction quantities, acceptance intervals or guardbanding, and many other interesting cases. The book goes

  2. Environmental monitoring in the Middle East. Special evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident some Middles East countries approached the IAEA with their concerns about contamination. Therefore, a regional project (RER/9/003, Environmental Monitoring in the Middle East) was established in 1987. The present document is a progress report of this project. It discusses project design, project management, its implementation and achievements. Certain conclusions and recommendations are given based on the evaluation of the findings

  3. Environmental monitoring in the Middle East. Special evaluation review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-19

    After the Chernobyl accident some Middles East countries approached the IAEA with their concerns about contamination. Therefore, a regional project (RER/9/003, Environmental Monitoring in the Middle East) was established in 1987. The present document is a progress report of this project. It discusses project design, project management, its implementation and achievements. Certain conclusions and recommendations are given based on the evaluation of the findings.

  4. Evaluation Of Methadone Poisoning in Hospitalized Children: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Maamouri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Upload poisoning is one of the most dangerous and common poisoning in Iranian children. Depression of the respiratory and central nervous systems may lead to significant toxicity. Even low doses of uploads are dangerous in pediatrics under 6 years old. Methadone is the most toxic of the uploads; small doses as low as a single tablet can lead to death. According to this information we decided to evaluate methadone poisoning in Hospitalized Children

  5. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2007 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, J.

    2007-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2007, in Washington, D.C. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  6. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2006 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, J.

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2006 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 16-19, 2006, in Arlington, Virginia. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  7. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2005 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S. G.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2005 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 23-26, 2005, in Arlington, Virginia. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  8. Energy Efficiency Policies around the World: Review and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-01-15

    Since 1992 the World Energy Council (WEC) and ADEME (Agency for Environment and Energy Efficiency, France) have been collaborating on a joint project ''Energy Efficiency Policies and Indicators'' with technical assistance by ENERDATA (France). The latest report presents and evaluates energy efficiency policies in nearly 70 countries around the world, with a specific focus on five policy measures: mandatory energy audits, ESCO's, energy incentives for cars, energy efficiency obligations for utilities, and 'packages of measures' for solar water heaters. The report describes the implemented measures and identifies those proven most effective.

  9. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  10. Spatial prediction models for landslide hazards: review, comparison and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brenning

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The predictive power of logistic regression, support vector machines and bootstrap-aggregated classification trees (bagging, double-bagging is compared using misclassification error rates on independent test data sets. Based on a resampling approach that takes into account spatial autocorrelation, error rates for predicting 'present' and 'future' landslides are estimated within and outside the training area. In a case study from the Ecuadorian Andes, logistic regression with stepwise backward variable selection yields lowest error rates and demonstrates the best generalization capabilities. The evaluation outside the training area reveals that tree-based methods tend to overfit the data.

  11. Economic evaluation of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, Elena; Donald, Faith; DiCenso, Alba; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Carter, Nancy; Reid, Kim; Marshall, Deborah A

    2017-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (e.g., nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists) have been introduced internationally to increase access to high quality care and to tackle increasing health care expenditures. While randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated the effectiveness of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles, their cost-effectiveness has been challenged. The poor quality of economic evaluations of these roles to date raises the question of whether current economic evaluation guidelines are adequate when examining their cost-effectiveness. To examine whether current guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles. Our methodological review was informed by a qualitative synthesis of four sources of information: 1) narrative review of literature reviews and discussion papers on economic evaluation of advanced practice nursing roles; 2) quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials; 3) review of guidelines for economic evaluation; and, 4) input from an expert panel. The narrative literature review revealed several challenges in economic evaluations of advanced practice nursing roles (e.g., complexity of the roles, variability in models and practice settings where the roles are implemented, and impact on outcomes that are difficult to measure). The quality assessment of economic evaluations of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles alongside randomised controlled trials identified methodological limitations of these studies. When we applied the Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada to the identified challenges and limitations, discussed those with experts and qualitatively synthesized all findings, we concluded that standard guidelines for economic evaluation are appropriate for economic

  12. End user orientation of TC projects. Special evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The present review of the end use orientation of TC projects was undertaken as requested by the TC Department to identify: (a) end users and beneficiaries beyond the boundaries of the counterpart laboratories, as appropriate; (b) means provided or planned to reach the end users and beneficiaries; (c) performance indicators in quantifiable terms, including those related to the counterpart activities that could be foreseen during and after completion of Agency assistance; and (d) recommendations of additional means, if necessary, to reach the end users and beneficiaries. A total of 13 TC projects with large budgets of around $200,000 and above were selected from those first approved under the 1995-1996 biennial programme and supported under the TCF, representing diverse fields of Agency activities and covering all the geographical areas of the Agency's technical co-operation. The projects thus selected were one each from Argentina, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Jordan, Mexico, Mongolia, Slovenia, Turkey and Viet-Nam. The overall budget of the 13 projects as originally approved for 1995 to 1998, amounted to $5,510,980. The current budget as of 8 November 1996 stands at $5,446,719, representing a decrease of more than one percent. Figs, tabs

  13. Evaluation of pavement life cycle cost analysis: Review and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Babashamsi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cost of road construction consists of design expenses, material extraction, construction equipment, maintenance and rehabilitation strategies, and operations over the entire service life. An economic analysis process known as Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA is used to evaluate the cost-efficiency of alternatives based on the Net Present Value (NPV concept. It is essential to evaluate the above-mentioned cost aspects in order to obtain optimum pavement life-cycle costs. However, pavement managers are often unable to consider each important element that may be required for performing future maintenance tasks. Over the last few decades, several approaches have been developed by agencies and institutions for pavement Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA. While the transportation community has increasingly been utilising LCCA as an essential practice, several organisations have even designed computer programs for their LCCA approaches in order to assist with the analysis. Current LCCA methods are analysed and LCCA software is introduced in this article. Subsequently, a list of economic indicators is provided along with their substantial components. Collecting previous literature will help highlight and study the weakest aspects so as to mitigate the shortcomings of existing LCCA methods and processes. LCCA research will become more robust if improvements are made, facilitating private industries and government agencies to accomplish their economic aims. Keywords: Life-Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA, Pavement management, LCCA software, Net Present Value (NPV

  14. Methods to Evaluate Corrosion in Buried Steel Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena-de Arriba-Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, there are thousands of metal structures completely or partially buried in the soil. The main concern in their design is corrosion. Corrosion is a mechanism that degrades materials and causes structural failures in infrastructures, which can lead to severe effects on the environment and have direct impact on the population health. In addition, corrosion is extremely complex in the underground environment due to the variability of the local conditions. The problem is that there are many methods to its evaluation but none have been clearly established. In order to ensure the useful life of such structures, engineers usually consider an excess thickness that increases the economic cost of manufacturing and does not satisfy the principles of efficiency in the use of resources. In this paper, an extended revision of the existing methods to evaluate corrosion is carried out to optimize the design of buried steel structures according to their service life. Thus, they are classified into two categories depending on the information they provide: qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, it is concluded that the most exhaustive methodologies for estimating soil corrosion are quantitative methods fed by non-electrochemical data based on experimental studies that measure the mass loss of structures.

  15. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hem, M.H.; Pedersen, R.; Norvoll, R.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five

  16. 78 FR 30303 - National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ...] National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey... regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the previously approved... customer service levels to those of private industry contact centers. A notice was published in the Federal...

  17. 75 FR 6032 - National Contact Center; Submission for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... for OMB Review; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Citizen Services and Communications, Federal Consumer Information Center, GSA. ACTION: Notice of request for comments regarding a... collection requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation survey. A request for public...

  18. A Narrative Review of Greek Myths as Interpretative Metaphors in Educational Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cano, Antonio; Torralbo, Manuel; Vallejo, Monica; Fernandez-Guerrero, Ines M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews a series of Greek myths put forward as cultural narratives that could be used as metaphors or interpretative similes for explanatory and evaluative purposes in educational research and evaluation. These myths have been used in educational research literature, and most of them were found by carrying out an exhaustive search of…

  19. Review and evaluation of SKB's account of RDandD Programme 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD Programme 2010 for planned research and development, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and the actions intended to be taken (Paragraph 26 Nuclear Regulation). This report describes the results of the examination and evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations

  20. Online and Paper Evaluations of Courses: A Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on comparing online and paper course evaluations in higher education and provides a case study of a very large randomised trial on the topic. It presents a mixed but generally optimistic picture of online course evaluations with respect to response rates, what they indicate, and how to increase them. The paper…

  1. The Child in the Garden: An Evaluative Review of the Benefits of School Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    Although educators widely use school gardens for experiential education, researchers have not systematically examined the evaluative literature on school-gardening outcomes. The author reviewed the U.S. literature on children's gardening, taking into account potential effects, school-gardening outcomes, teacher evaluations of gardens as learning…

  2. Lessons learned from NRC systematic evaluation program seismic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, T.M.; Hermann, R.A.; Russell, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    In October 1977, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved initiation of Phase II of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) which consists of a plant-specific reassessment of the safety of 11 older operating nuclear reactors. Many safety criteria have rapidly evolved since the time of initial licensing of these plants. The purpose of the SEP is to develop a current documented basis for the safety of these older facilities by comparing them to current criteria. Phase I of the SEP developed a comprehensive list of 137 topics of safety significance which collectively affect the plant's capability to respond to various Design Basis Events (DBEs). Seismic Design Consideration is one of the 137 safety topics. (orig./GL)

  3. Richard Trueswell's Contribution to Collection Evaluation and Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Nash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Trueswell, R. L. (1969. Some behavioral patterns of library users: The 80/20 rule. Wilson Library Bulletin, 43(5, 458-461. Objective – To demonstrate the relationship between library circulation and the percent of a library's holdings satisfying circulation. Design – Retrospective cohort study of library circulation data. Setting – Cambridge and Northampton, Massachusetts, United States of America. Subjects – The users of the monographic holdings of the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory Library and the Forbes Public Library. Methods – Trueswell compiled circulation data from the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory Library over a period of 5 years, ostensibly from 1964-1969. Additionally, he gathered circulation data from Forbes Public Library. Trueswell compared each respective collection of data against the entire holdings of each library, after which he converted each measure to a percentage of the whole. Main Result – Based on the collected data, Trueswell found that the percentages of both libraries’ holdings that satisfy circulation follow a power law distribution. He compared this with a previous study measuring journal circulation at a Health Sciences Library that exhibited the same pattern. He stated that these similar distributions demonstrated the "80/20 Rule." The distribution is such that any given percent of circulation will provide the percent of a library’s circulating holdings necessary to satisfy it. Additionally, Trueswell found that 75 percent of current circulation had circulated at least once within the preceding year. Conclusion – The findings have implications for core collection development, purchasing multiple copies of a given title, determining the optimal size of a library's collection, and weeding. Trueswell also submits the idea of developing regional interlibrary loan centers for books that do not circulate often, as a cost saving measure for most libraries.

  4. 2017 GTO Project review Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The objectives and purpose of this research has been to produce laboratory-based experimental and numerical analyses to provide a physics-based understanding of shear stimulation phenomena (hydroshearing) and its evolution during stimulation. Water was flowed along fractures in hot and stressed fractured rock, to promote slip. The controlled laboratory experiments provide a high resolution/high quality data resource for evaluation of analysis methods developed by DOE to assess EGS “behavior” during this stimulation process. Segments of the experimental program will provide data sets for model input parameters, i.e., material properties, and other segments of the experimental program will represent small scale physical models of an EGS system, which may be modeled. The coupled lab/analysis project has been a study of the response of a fracture in hot, water-saturated fractured rock to shear stress experiencing fluid flow. Under this condition, the fracture experiences a combination of potential pore pressure changes and fracture surface cooling, resulting in slip along the fracture. The laboratory work provides a means to assess the role of “hydroshearing” on permeability enhancement in reservoir stimulation. Using the laboratory experiments and results to define boundary and input/output conditions of pore pressure, thermal stress, fracture shear deformation and fluid flow, and models were developed and simulations completed by the University of Oklahoma team. The analysis methods are ones used on field scale problems. The sophisticated numerical models developed contain parameters present in the field. The analysis results provide insight into the role of fracture slip on permeability enhancement-“hydroshear” is to be obtained. The work will provide valuable input data to evaluate stimulation models, thus helping design effective EGS.

  5. Evaluations of Structural Interventions for HIV Prevention: A Review of Approaches and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskarpatyoti, Brittany S; Lebov, Jill; Hart, Lauren; Thomas, Jim; Mandal, Mahua

    2018-04-01

    Structural interventions alter the social, economic, legal, political, and built environments that underlie processes affecting population health. We conducted a systematic review of evaluations of structural interventions for HIV prevention in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to better understand methodological and other challenges and identify effective evaluation strategies. We included 27 peer-reviewed articles on interventions related to economic empowerment, education, and substance abuse in LMICs. Twenty-one evaluations included clearly articulated theories of change (TOCs); 14 of these assessed the TOC by measuring intermediary variables in the causal pathway between the intervention and HIV outcomes. Although structural interventions address complex interactions, no evaluation included methods designed to evaluate complex systems. To strengthen evaluations of structural interventions, we recommend clearly articulating a TOC and measuring intermediate variables between the predictor and outcome. We additionally recommend adapting study designs and analytic methods outside traditional epidemiology to better capture complex results, influences external to the intervention, and unintended consequences.

  6. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    in clinical practice are present, economic evaluation is needed in order to facilitate the decision-makers' budget allocations. NHS Economic Evaluation Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched. Two independent reviewers (one clinical content expert and one economic content expert) applied...... that the clinical effects are statistically synonymous, it does not support the use of high-cost techniques. There is a great potential for improvement of methodological quality in economic evaluations of lumbar spinal fusion and further research is imperative....

  7. Human factors evaluation of man-machine interface for periodic safety review of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Jang, Tong Il; Ku, Jin Young; Kim, Soo Jin

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs). As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area

  8. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of 12 experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the whole R and D subjects in fusion research, including post-review for those completed in FY1998, intermediate-review for those started in FY1999, and pre-review for those to be implemented in FY2001. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on March 9, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research result/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  9. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use

  10. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. Evaluation procedures and guidelines for human factors engineering reviews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Baker, C.C.; Welch, D.L.; Granda, T.M.; Vingelis, P.J. [Carlow International Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support. NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  11. Progress in centralised ethics review processes: Implications for multi-site health evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Brenton; Davey, Rachel; Gibson, Diane

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly, public sector programmes respond to complex social problems that intersect specific fields and individual disciplines. Such responses result in multi-site initiatives that can span nations, jurisdictions, sectors and organisations. The rigorous evaluation of public sector programmes is now a baseline expectation. For evaluations of large and complex multi-site programme initiatives, the processes of ethics review can present a significant challenge. However in recent years, there have been new developments in centralised ethics review processes in many nations. This paper provides the case study of an evaluation of a national, inter-jurisdictional, cross-sector, aged care health initiative and its encounters with Australian centralised ethics review processes. Specifically, the paper considers progress against the key themes of a previous five-year, five nation study (Fitzgerald and Phillips, 2006), which found that centralised ethics review processes would save time, money and effort, as well as contribute to more equitable workloads for researchers and evaluators. The paper concludes with insights for those charged with refining centralised ethics review processes, as well as recommendations for future evaluators of complex multi-site programme initiatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A review of Grey and academic literature of evaluation guidance relevant to public health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denford, Sarah; Abraham, Charles; Callaghan, Margaret; Aighton, Peter; De Vocht, Frank; Arris, Steven

    2017-09-12

    Public Health evaluation is essential to understanding what does and does not work, and robust demonstration of effectiveness may be crucial to securing future funding. Despite this, programs are often implemented with poor, incomplete or no evaluation. Public health practitioners are frequently required to provide evidence for the effectiveness of their services; thus, there is a growing need for evaluation guidance on how to evaluate public health programs. The aim of this study is to identify accessible high-quality, evaluation guidance, available to researchers and practitioners and to catalogue, summarise and categorise the content of a subset of accessible, quality guides to evaluation. We systematically reviewed grey and academic literature for documents providing support for evaluation of complex health interventions. Searches were conducted January to March 2015, and included academic databases, internet search engines, and consultations with academic and practicing public health experts. Data were extracted by two authors and sent to the authors of the guidance documents for comments. Our initial search identified 402 unique documents that were screened to identify those that were (1) developed by or for a national or international organization (2) freely available to all (3) published during or after 2000 (4) specific to public health. This yielded 98 documents from 43 organisations. Of these, 48 were reviewed in detail. This generated a detailed catalogue of quality evaluation guidance. The content included in documents covers 37 facets of evaluation. A wide range of guidance on evaluation of public health initiatives is available. Time and knowledge constraints may mean that busy practitioners find it challenging to access the most, up-to-date, relevant and useful guidance. This review presents links to and reviews of 48 quality guides to evaluation as well as categorising their content. This facilitates quick and each access to multiple selected

  13. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  14. Evaluation of a Web-based Online Grant Application Review Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Daniel PETRISOR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the evaluation of a web-based application used in grant application evaluations, software developed in our university, and underlines the need for simple solutions, based on recent technology, specifically tailored to one’s needs. We asked the reviewers to answer a short questionnaire, in order to assess their satisfaction with such a web-based grant application evaluation solution. All 20 reviewers accepted to answer the questionnaire, which contained 8 closed items (YES/NO answers related to reviewer’s previous experience in evaluating grant applications, previous use of such software solutions and his familiarity in using computer systems. The presented web-based application, evaluated by the users, shown a high level of acceptance and those respondents stated that they are willing to use such a solution in the future.

  15. Methods for systematic reviews of health economic evaluations: a systematic review, comparison, and synthesis of method literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Tim; Walgenbach, Maren; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    The quality of systematic reviews of health economic evaluations (SR-HE) is often limited because of methodological shortcomings. One reason for this poor quality is that there are no established standards for the preparation of SR-HE. The objective of this study is to compare existing methods and suggest best practices for the preparation of SR-HE. To identify the relevant methodological literature on SR-HE, a systematic literature search was performed in Embase, Medline, the National Health System Economic Evaluation Database, the Health Technology Assessment Database, and the Cochrane methodology register, and webpages of international health technology assessment agencies were searched. The study selection was performed independently by 2 reviewers. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. On the basis of the overlaps in the recommendations for the methods of SR-HE in the included papers, suggestions for best practices for the preparation of SR-HE were developed. Nineteen relevant publications were identified. The recommendations within them often differed. However, for most process steps there was some overlap between recommendations for the methods of preparation. The overlaps were taken as basis on which to develop suggestions for the following process steps of preparation: defining the research question, developing eligibility criteria, conducting a literature search, selecting studies, assessing the methodological study quality, assessing transferability, and synthesizing data. The differences in the proposed recommendations are not always explainable by the focus on certain evaluation types, target audiences, or integration in the decision process. Currently, there seem to be no standard methods for the preparation of SR-HE. The suggestions presented here can contribute to the harmonization of methods for the preparation of SR-HE. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Evaluation of patient self-management outcomes in health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S; Yuan, C

    2010-06-01

    The importance of self-management and its intervention for improving the ability and skill of self-management has been discussed in literatures. It is, however, unclear how to choose the fitted, objective and accurate evaluation system when assessing the outcome. The aim of this article was to establish a general evaluation system for skill and ability of self-management in chronic diseases through systematic review on different evaluation indicators and scales. A systematic search of six electronic databases was conducted. Two authors independently reviewed each qualified study for relevance and significance. Subsequently, main evaluation indicators and scales were identified and categorized into themes and sub-themes. Nineteen articles were identified in this review. Among them, six main evaluation indicators of self-management, including frequently used scales, were extracted and tabulated. Self-efficacy, health behaviour/attitude, health status, health service utilization, quality of life and psychological indicators were the main indicators in evaluating self-management outcome, and they could be used alone or in combination flexibly according to the different goals of programmes. Accurate evaluation of skill and ability of self-management is crucial not only in baseline data collection but also in proving the effectiveness of intervention. The outcomes of this study provide future researchers or caregivers with a better understanding and a series of good choices in self-management outcome evaluation.

  17. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2017 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-16

    The fiscal year 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  18. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-11-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2016, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  19. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of monogenic disorders: an optimized protocol using MEMO qPCR with miniSTR as internal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guissart, Claire; Debant, Vanessa; Desgeorges, Marie; Bareil, Corinne; Raynal, Caroline; Toga, Caroline; Pritchard, Victoria; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Vincent, Marie-Claire

    2015-02-01

    Analysis of circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal plasma is very promising for early diagnosis of monogenic diseases. However, this approach is not yet available for routine use and remains technically challenging because of the low concentration of cffDNA, which is swamped by the overwhelming maternal DNA. To make clinical applications more readily accessible, we propose a new approach based on mutant enrichment with 3'-modified oligonucleotides (MEMO) PCR along with real-time PCR to selectively amplify from the maternal blood the paternally inherited fetal allele that is not present in the maternal genome. The first proof of concept of this strategy was displayed for cystic fibrosis by the accuracy of our detection of the p.Gly542* mutation used as the initial developmental model. Subsequently, a retrospective study of plasmas originating from two pregnant women carrying a fetus with private mutation confirmed the effectiveness of our method. We confirmed the presence of cffDNA in the studied samples by the identification of a tri-allelic DNA profile using a miniSTR kit. This new non-invasive prenatal diagnosis test offers numerous advantages over current methods: it is simple, cost effective, time efficient and does not require complex equipment or bioinformatics settings. Moreover, our assays for different private mutations demonstrate the viability of this approach in clinical settings for monogenic disorders.

  20. Evaluation of a Surveillance Review Software based on Automatic Image Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, S.; Hadfi, G.; John, M.; Moeslinger, M.; Murray, J.; Juengling, K.; Sequeira, V.; Versino, C.; )

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance streams from safeguards instruments contain thousands of images. Inspectors review them in order to find safeguards-relevant events. Statistically a very small fraction of the images is expected to be safeguards-relevant. For this reason inspectors need a tool which helps them to focus their attention directly to the relevant parts of the surveillance stream. The current approach for surveillance review makes use of scene change detection within areas of interest (AOIs). The data reduction provided can be effective for the review of regular processes, and requires specific knowledge of the process/environment under review for the proper setting of the AOIs. The VideoZoom approach, developed by the European Commission Joint Research Centre-Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), detects scene changes on the whole image plane. Changes are then summarized and rendered at different levels of abstraction in four layers of summaries, each one revealing more information about the image changes. By means of a zooming interface, the reviewer is able to navigate the summary layers and decide which are to be examined with full photographic detail or skipped because they are clearly not safeguards-relevant. In this way reviewers can make best use of their time by investigating what really requires their attention. VideoZoom was evaluated by a group of IAEA inspectors on a benchmark of image reviews, with promising results in terms of identification of safeguards-relevant events, efficiency and usability. Following the positive results collected during the preliminary benchmark, the IAEA initiated a task under the European Commission Support Programme (EC SP), aimed at the research, development, and evaluation of surveillance review software based on VideoZoom and compatible with surveillance streams produced by NGSS cameras, the current safeguards surveillance technology deployed by the IAEA. This paper provides a description of the VideoZoom approach to

  1. Evaluating mobile phone applications for health behaviour change: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Fiona H; Cheng, Christina; Wright, Annemarie; Shill, Jane; Stephens, Hugh; Uccellini, Mary

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Increasing smartphones access has allowed for increasing development and use of smart phone applications (apps). Mobile health interventions have previously relied on voice or text-based short message services (SMS), however, the increasing availability and ease of use of apps has allowed for significant growth of smartphone apps that can be used for health behaviour change. This review considers the current body of knowledge relating to the evaluation of apps for health behaviour change. The aim of this review is to investigate approaches to the evaluation of health apps to identify any current best practice approaches. Method A systematic review was conducted. Data were collected and analysed in September 2016. Thirty-eight articles were identified and have been included in this review. Results Articles were published between 2011- 2016, and 36 were reviews or evaluations of apps related to one or more health conditions, the remaining two reported on an investigation of the usability of health apps. Studies investigated apps relating to the following areas: alcohol, asthma, breastfeeding, cancer, depression, diabetes, general health and fitness, headaches, heart disease, HIV, hypertension, iron deficiency/anaemia, low vision, mindfulness, obesity, pain, physical activity, smoking, weight management and women's health. Conclusion In order to harness the potential of mobile health apps for behaviour change and health, we need better ways to assess the quality and effectiveness of apps. This review is unable to suggest a single best practice approach to evaluate mobile health apps. Few measures identified in this review included sufficient information or evaluation, leading to potentially incomplete and inaccurate information for consumers seeking the best app for their situation. This is further complicated by a lack of regulation in health promotion generally.

  2. A review of multi-criteria decision making techniques for supplier evaluation and selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Agarwal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Supplier evaluation and selection has been a vital issue of strategic importance for long time. Different multi-criteria decision making (MCDM approaches have been proposed by the researchers in past, to solve the supplier evaluation and selection problem. In this paper, we present a review of various MCDM methodologies reported in the literature for solving the supplier evaluation and selection process. The review is solely based on sixty-eight research articles, including eight review articles in the academic literature from 2000 to 2011. We try to find out the most prevalent approach in the articles and thereby present the future scope of arriving at an optimal solution to the problem, based on the specifications, the strategies and the requirements of the buyers. The study presents that with the change in processes and the requirements, how the approach of the manufacturing industry has shifted from striving for operational effectiveness to the strategic partnership in the dyadic relationship.

  3. Evaluation and treatment of childhood physical abuse and neglect: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Marissa; Berkowitz, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    According to 2010 CDC estimates, 1 in 5 US children have experienced maltreatment. Risk factors for child maltreatment include child characteristics such as non-compliance and diagnostic conditions that increase caregiver burden. Parent characteristic risk factors include parental mental illness and low social support. New developments in radiologic evaluation of child maltreatment will be reviewed. New findings in evidence based psychotherapies for childhood maltreatment will be discussed. A review of the role of pharmacotherapy in child maltreatment cases will also be presented. New evidence from prevention models targeting young mothers and families are also reviewed.

  4. The development and evaluation of guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes a general approach to advanced human-system interface review, development of human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems, and the results of a guideline test and evaluation program

  5. Addressing Clinical Faculty Need: Creating a Process and Evaluation for Peer Review of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Y. Moon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the evolving process and evaluate the perceived value of peer review for clinical faculty. Methods: Using a 5-point Likert scale, clinical faculty rated the value of an electronic peer review process by completing an electronic 30 item survey across six areas of clinical faculty practice-related activity. Based on feedback, modifications were made and faculty were re-surveyed the following year. Results: Initially, 78% of faculty found peer review to be beneficial, mostly in the area of practice development and portions of practice dissemination. After modifications, 45% found peer review to be beneficial. Conclusions: Clinical faculty are challenged to leverage their practice into teaching and scholarly activities; however, clinical faculty often need feedback to accomplish this. Although the peer review process was designed to address perceived needs of clinical faculty, the process is dynamic and needs further refinement. Overall, clinical faculty find value in a peer review process. This evaluation of peer review illustrates the challenges to provide feedback across six key areas of clinical faculty activity.   Type: Original Research

  6. Standardizing the evaluation criteria on treatment outcomes of mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Young; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this review was to analyze the evaluation criteria on mandibular implant overdentures through a systematic review and suggest standardized evaluation criteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) and clinical trial studies comparing attachment systems on mandibular implant overdentures until December, 2011 were selected. Twenty nine studies were finally selected and the data about evaluation methods were collected. RESULTS Evaluation criteria could be classified into 4 groups (implant survival, peri-implant tissue evaluation, prosthetic evaluation, and patient satisfaction). Among 29 studies, 21 studies presented implant survival rate, while any studies reporting implant failure did not present cumulative implant survival rate. Seventeen studies evaluating peri-implant tissue status presented following items as evaluation criteria; marginal bone level (14), plaque Index (13), probing depth (8), bleeding index (8), attachment gingiva level (8), gingival index (6), amount of keratinized gingiva (1). Eighteen studies evaluating prosthetic maintenance and complication also presented following items as evaluation criteria; loose matrix (17), female detachment (15), denture fracture (15), denture relining (14), abutment fracture (14), abutment screw loosening (11), and occlusal adjustment (9). Atypical questionnaire (9), Visual analog scales (VAS) (4), and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) (1) were used as the format of criteria to evaluate patients satisfaction in 14 studies. CONCLUSION For evaluation of implant overdenture, it is necessary to include cumulative survival rate for implant evaluation. It is suggested that peri-implant tissue evaluation criteria include marginal bone level, plaque index, bleeding index, probing depth, and attached gingiva

  7. The pilot evaluation for the National Evaluation System in South Africa – A diagnostic review of early childhood development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Davids

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Policymaking in many instances does not follow proper diagnosis of a problem using evidence to justify why particular decisions have been taken. This article describes findings of a diagnostic review of existing challenges facing early childhood development (ECD in South Africa. The review is part of the government’s attempt to use information to drive policy in strategic areas. It is part of the role that the Presidency is seeking to play in ensuring government programmes are evaluated to ensure that money that is spent is spent on programmes that have an impact and that there is value for money. This article summarises the key findings of the diagnostic review that was conducted of policy, services and coordination.The results reveal that a broader definition of ECD programmes is needed to cover all aspects of children’s development, growth and health, from conception to the foundation phase of schooling. Many elements of comprehensive ECD support and services are already in place and some are performing well. However, there are important gaps. Key ECD strategies for the future are identified. The diagnostic evaluation used a variety of methods, including desktop analysis, interviews and data analysis. Issues emerged around how to link the evaluation with other processes in the involved departments. A particular challenge was how to handle the transition to implementation of the findings, as responsibility shifted from the steering committee to the departments. The process worked well despite past challenges with coordination across government.

  8. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee and Research Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research composed of twelve experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY2000 in the Nuclear Safety Research Center (Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support). The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on January 20, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  9. Economic evaluation of nurse staffing and nurse substitution in health care: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Griffiths, Peter; Maben, Jill

    2011-04-01

    Several systematic reviews have suggested that greater nurse staffing as well as a greater proportion of registered nurses in the health workforce is associated with better patient outcomes. Others have found that nurses can substitute for doctors safely and effectively in a variety of settings. However, these reviews do not generally consider the effect of nurse staff on both patient outcomes and costs of care, and therefore say little about the cost-effectiveness of nurse-provided care. Therefore, we conducted a scoping literature review of economic evaluation studies which consider the link between nurse staffing, skill mix within the nursing team and between nurses and other medical staff to determine the nature of the available economic evidence. Scoping literature review. English-language manuscripts, published between 1989 and 2009, focussing on the relationship between costs and effects of care and the level of registered nurse staffing or nurse-physician substitution/nursing skill mix in the clinical team, using cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, or cost-benefit analysis. Articles selected for the review were identified through Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Google Scholar database searches. After selecting 17 articles representing 16 unique studies for review, we summarized their main findings, and assessed their methodological quality using criteria derived from recommendations from the guidelines proposed by the Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health Care. In general, it was found that nurses can provide cost effective care, compared to other health professionals. On the other hand, more intensive nurse staffing was associated with both better outcomes and more expensive care, and therefore cost effectiveness was not easy to assess. Although considerable progress in economic evaluation studies has been reached in recent years, a number of methodological issues remain. In the future

  10. A systematic review of studies evaluating diffusion and dissemination of selected cancer control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Peter; Robinson, Paula; Ciliska, Donna; Armour, Tanya; Brouwers, Melissa; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Sussman, Jonathan; Raina, Parminder

    2005-09-01

    With this review, the authors sought to determine what strategies have been evaluated (including the outcomes assessed) to disseminate cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of behavior change. Five topic areas along the cancer care continuum (smoking cessation, healthy diet, mammography, cervical cancer screening, and control of cancer pain) were selected to be representative. A systematic review was conducted of primary studies evaluating dissemination of a cancer control intervention. Thirty-one studies were identified that evaluated dissemination strategies in the 5 topic areas. No strong evidence currently exists to recommend any one dissemination strategy as effective in promoting the uptake of cancer control interventions. The authors conclude that there is a strong need for more research into dissemination of cancer control interventions. Future research should consider methodological issues such as the most appropriate study design and outcomes to be evaluated. (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Photogrammetry as a tool for the postural evaluation of the spine: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Tássia Silveira; Sedrez, Juliana Adami; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2016-02-18

    To evaluate the use of photogrammetry and identify the mathematical procedures applied when evaluating spinal posture. A systematic search using keywords was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Science and Medicine(®) databases. The following inclusion criteria adopted were: (1) the use of photogrammetry as a method to evaluate spinal posture; (2) evaluations of spinal curvature in the sagittal and/or frontal plane; (3) studies published within the last three decades; and (4) written entirely in English. The exclusion criteria were: (1) studies which objective involved the verification of some aspect of validation of instruments; (2) studies published as abstracts and those published in scientific events; and (3) studies using evaluation of the anteriorization of the head to determine the angular positioning of the cervical spine. The articles in this review were included and evaluated for their methodological quality, based on the Downs and Black scale, by two independent reviewers. Initially, 1758 articles were found, 76 of which were included upon reading the full texts and 29 were included in accordance with the predetermined criteria. In addition, after analyzing the references in those articles, a further six articles were selected, so that 35 articles were included in this review. This systematic review revealed that the photogrammetry has been using in observational studies. Furthermore, it was also found that, although the data collection methodologies are similar across the studies, in relation to aspects of data analysis, the methodologies are very different, especially regarding the mathematical routines employed to support different postural evaluation software. With photogrammetry, the aim of the assessment, whether it is for clinical, research or collective health purposes, must be considered when choosing which protocol to use to evaluate spinal posture.

  12. Evidence used in model-based economic evaluations for evaluating pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jaime L; Cooper, Chris; Buchanan, James

    2015-11-11

    Decision models can be used to conduct economic evaluations of new pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests to ensure they offer value for money to healthcare systems. These models require a great deal of evidence, yet research suggests the evidence used is diverse and of uncertain quality. By conducting a systematic review, we aim to investigate the test-related evidence used to inform decision models developed for the economic evaluation of genetic tests. We will search electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and NHS EEDs to identify model-based economic evaluations of pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic tests. The search will not be limited by language or date. Title and abstract screening will be conducted independently by 2 reviewers, with screening of full texts and data extraction conducted by 1 reviewer, and checked by another. Characteristics of the decision problem, the decision model and the test evidence used to inform the model will be extracted. Specifically, we will identify the reported evidence sources for the test-related evidence used, describe the study design and how the evidence was identified. A checklist developed specifically for decision analytic models will be used to critically appraise the models described in these studies. Variations in the test evidence used in the decision models will be explored across the included studies, and we will identify gaps in the evidence in terms of both quantity and quality. The findings of this work will be disseminated via a peer-reviewed journal publication and at national and international conferences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. A desk evaluation review of project RAF/9/005 radiation protection development. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Agency has been assisting member nations through a number of national TC projects in radiation protection and related areas over the years. In addition, a regional project RAF/9/005 - Radiation Protection Development (which is under this review) was approved in 1988, with the aim of assessing existing radiation protection practices in the African Member States in relation to the Agency's new basic safety standards for radiation protection, and to advise Governments on improvements. The project was subsequently extended up to 1994 as an umbrella project to assist all African Member States in the development of appropriate radiation protection services; to co-ordinate the implementation of the relevant national TC projects; and to develop co-operation amongst groups of Member States on a regional and sub-regional basis. Particular emphasis was to be given to manpower development through workshops, seminars and training courses in radiation protection and safety. In parallel thereto, the Agency's Radiation Protection Advisory Teams (RAPATs) visited nineteen African Member States during the period 1986 through 1993, to review and assess their radiation protection activities, identify priorities, and design long-term radiation protection programmes. RAPAT findings and recommendations were considered in drawing up programmes for implementation under project RAF/9/005

  14. Methodology for evaluating gloves in relation to the effects on hand performance capabilities: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianat, Iman; Haslegrave, Christine M; Stedmon, Alex W

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to review the literature on the methods that have been considered appropriate for evaluation of the effects of gloves on different aspects of hand performance, to make recommendations for the testing and assessment of gloves, and to identify where further research is needed to improve the evaluation protocols. Eighty-five papers meeting the criteria for inclusion were reviewed. Many studies show that gloves may have negative effects on manual dexterity, tactile sensitivity, handgrip strength, muscle activity and fatigue and comfort, while further research is needed to determine glove effects on pinch strength, forearm torque strength and range of finger and wrist movements. The review also highlights several methodological issues (including consideration of both task type and duration of glove use by workers, guidance on the selection and allocation of suitable glove(s) for particular tasks/jobs, and glove design features) that need to be considered in future research. Practitioner Summary: The relevant literature on the effects of protective gloves on different aspects of hand performance was reviewed to make recommendations for the testing and assessment of gloves, and to improve evaluation protocols. The review highlights research areas and methodological issues that need to be considered in future research.

  15. Environmental scan and evaluation of best practices for online systematic review resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robin M N; Boulos, Leah M; Visintini, Sarah; Ritchie, Krista; Hayden, Jill

    2018-04-01

    Online training for systematic review methodology is an attractive option due to flexibility and limited availability of in-person instruction. Librarians often direct new reviewers to these online resources, so they should be knowledgeable about the variety of available resources. The objective for this project was to conduct an environmental scan of online systematic review training resources and evaluate those identified resources. The authors systematically searched for electronic learning resources pertaining to systematic review methods. After screening for inclusion, we collected data about characteristics of training resources and assigned scores in the domains of (1) content, (2) design, (3) interactivity, and (4) usability by applying a previously published evaluation rubric for online instruction modules. We described the characteristics and scores for each training resource and compared performance across the domains. Twenty training resources were evaluated. Average overall score of online instructional resources was 61%. Online courses (n=7) averaged 73%, web modules (n=5) 64%, and videos (n=8) 48%. The top 5 highest scoring resources were in course or web module format, featured high interactivity, and required a longer (>5hrs) time commitment from users. This study revealed that resources include appropriate content but are less likely to adhere to principles of online training design and interactivity. Awareness of these resources will allow librarians to make informed recommendations for training based on patrons' needs. Future online systematic review training resources should use established best practices for e-learning to provide high-quality resources, regardless of format or user time commitment.

  16. A systematic review of evaluated suicide prevention programs targeting indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Alyssa F; Bohanna, India; Clough, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous young people have significantly higher suicide rates than their non-indigenous counterparts. There is a need for culturally appropriate and effective suicide prevention programs for this demographic. This review assesses suicide prevention programs that have been evaluated for indigenous youth in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. The databases MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched for publications on suicide prevention programs targeting indigenous youth that include reports on evaluations and outcomes. Program content, indigenous involvement, evaluation design, program implementation, and outcomes were assessed for each article. The search yielded 229 articles; 90 abstracts were assessed, and 11 articles describing nine programs were reviewed. Two Australian programs and seven American programs were included. Programs were culturally tailored, flexible, and incorporated multiple-levels of prevention. No randomized controlled trials were found, and many programs employed ad hoc evaluations, poor program description, and no process evaluation. Despite culturally appropriate content, the results of the review indicate that more controlled study designs using planned evaluations and valid outcome measures are needed in research on indigenous youth suicide prevention. Such changes may positively influence the future of research on indigenous youth suicide prevention as the outcomes and efficacy will be more reliable.

  17. A protocol for a systematic review of the use of process evaluations in knowledge translation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shannon D; Rotter, Thomas; Hartling, Lisa; Chambers, Thane; Bannar-Martin, Katherine H

    2014-12-23

    Experimental designs for evaluating knowledge translation (KT) interventions for professional behavior change can provide strong estimates of intervention effectiveness but offer limited insight how the intervention worked or not. Furthermore, trials provide little insight into the ways through which interventions lead to behavior change and how they are moderated by different facilitators and barriers. As a result, the ability to generalize the findings from one study to a different context, organization, or clinical problem is severely compromised. Consequently, researchers have started to explore the causal mechanisms in complementary studies (process evaluations) alongside experimental designs for evaluating KT interventions. This study focuses on improving process evaluations by synthesizing current evidence on process evaluations conducted alongside experimental designs for evaluating KT interventions. A medical research librarian will develop and implement search strategies designed to identify evidence that is relevant to process evaluations in health research. Studies will not be excluded based on design. Included studies must contain a process evaluation component aimed at understanding or evaluating a KT intervention targeting professional behavior change. Two reviewers will perform study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction using standard forms. Disagreements will be resolved through discussion or third party adjudication. Data to be collected include study design, details about data collection approaches and types, theoretical influences, approaches to evaluate intervention dose delivered, intervention dose received, intervention fidelity, intervention reach, data analysis, and study outcomes. This study is not registered with PROSPERO. There is widespread acceptance that the generalizability of quantitative trials of KT interventions would be significantly enhanced to other contexts, health professional groups, and clinical conditions

  18. Recall and Consumer Consideration Sets: Influencing Choice without Altering Brand Evaluations.

    OpenAIRE

    Nedungadi, Prakash

    1990-01-01

    This article focuses on memory-based choice situations where changes in a brand's accessibility may affect the probability that it is retrieved and considered for choice. In such instances, factors other than evaluation may affect which brands are brought to mind at purchase. Two experiments are described that manipulate the determinants of brand accessibility and measure consequent effects on retrieval, consideration, choice, and evaluation. Results provide evidence for the influence of memo...

  19. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the research subjects in the field of advanced science research (FY2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of eight experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the research themes completed in FY1999, those to be ended through FY2000, and those planned for five years starting in FY2001 in the Advanced Science Research Center. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on July 17, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research result/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Research Group Leaders. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  20. Early economic evaluation of emerging health technologies: protocol of a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The concept of early health technology assessment, discussed well over a decade, has now been collaboratively implemented by industry, government, and academia to select and expedite the development of emerging technologies that may address the needs of patients and health systems. Early economic evaluation is essential to assess the value of emerging technologies, but empirical data to inform the current practice of early evaluation is limited. We propose a systematic review of early economic evaluation studies in order to better understand the current practice. Methods/design This protocol describes a systematic review of economic evaluation studies of regulated health technologies in which the evaluation is conducted prior to regulatory approval and when the technology effectiveness is not well established. Included studies must report an economic evaluation, defined as the comparative analysis of alternatives with respect to their associated costs and health consequences, and must evaluate some regulated health technology such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, high-risk medical devices, or biomarkers. We will conduct the literature search on multiple databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination Databases, and EconLit. Additional citations will be identified via scanning reference lists and author searching. We suspect that many early economic evaluation studies are unpublished, especially those conducted for internal use only. Additionally, we use a chain-referral sampling approach to identify authors of unpublished studies who work in technology discovery and development, starting out with our contact lists and authors who published relevant studies. Citation screening and full-text review will be conducted by pairs of reviewers. Abstracted data will include those related to the decision context and decision problem of the early evaluation, evaluation methods (e.g., data sources, methods, and assumptions used to

  1. Qualitative Evaluation Methods in Ethics Education: A Systematic Review and Analysis of Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Logan L; Todd, E Michelle; Mulhearn, Tyler J; Medeiros, Kelsey E; Mumford, Michael D; Connelly, Shane

    2017-01-01

    Although qualitative research offers some unique advantages over quantitative research, qualitative methods are rarely employed in the evaluation of ethics education programs and are often criticized for a lack of rigor. This systematic review investigated the use of qualitative methods in studies of ethics education. Following a review of the literature in which 24 studies were identified, each study was coded based on 16 best practices characteristics in qualitative research. General thematic analysis and grounded theory were found to be the dominant approaches used. Researchers are effectively executing a number of best practices, such as using direct data sources, structured data collection instruments, non-leading questioning, and expert raters. However, other best practices were rarely present in the courses reviewed, such as collecting data using multiple sources, methods, raters, and timepoints, evaluating reliability, and employing triangulation analyses to assess convergence. Recommendations are presented for improving future qualitative research studies in ethics education.

  2. Evaluation of a new method for librarian-mediated literature searches for systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Bramer (Wichor); Rethlefsen, M.L. (Melissa L.); F. Mast (Frans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate and validate the time of completion and results of a new method of searching for systematic reviews, the exhaustive search method (ESM), using a pragmatic comparison. Methods: Single-line search strategies were prepared in a text document. Term completeness was

  3. Assessment Revisited: A Review of Research in "Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diana; Flores, Maria Assunção; Niklasson, Laila

    2016-01-01

    A review of articles published in "Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education," over the last eight years (2006-2013) on assessment in higher education, since the introduction of the Bologna process, is the subject of the paper. The first part discusses the key issue of assessment in higher education and the method used for selecting…

  4. Conduct and results of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel's evaluation of the Ulysses space mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholtis, J.A. Jr.; Gray, L.B.; Huff, D.A.; Klug, N.P.; Winchester, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    The recent 6 October 1990 launch and deployment of the nuclear-powered Ulysses spacecraft from the Space Shuttle Discovery culminated an extensive safety review and evaluation effort by the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP). After more than a year of detailed independent review, study, and analysis, the INSRP prepared a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) on the Ulysses mission, in accordance with Presidential Directive-National Security Council memorandum 25. The SER, which included a review of the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and an independent characterization of the mission risks, was used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in its decision to request launch approval as well as by the Executive Office of the President in arriving at a launch decision based on risk-benefit considerations. This paper provides an overview of the Ulysses mission and the conduct as well as the results of the INSRP evaluation. While the mission risk determined by the INSRP in the SER was higher than that characterized by the Ulysses project in the FSAR, both reports indicated that the radiological risks were relatively small. In the final analysis, the SER proved to be supportive of a positive launch decision. The INSRP evaluation process has demonstrated its effectiveness numerous times since the 1960s. In every case, it has provided the essential ingredients and perspective to permit an informed launch decision at the highest level of our Government

  5. 77 FR 56853 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Process Evaluation of the Early Independence Award...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... respondents is estimated at $9,774. There are no Capital Costs to report. A.12.1--Annualized Estimate of Hour... Collection: Title: Process Evaluation of the Early Independence Award (EIA) Program. Type of Information.... Type of Respondents: Applicants, reviewers, and awardees. The annual reporting burden is as follows...

  6. Reviewing the Concept of Brand Equity and Evaluating Consumer-Based Brand Equity (CBBE) Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Farjam; Xu Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of brand equity and discuss its different perspectives, we try to review existing literature of brand equity and evaluate various Customer-based brand equity models to provide a collection from well-known databases for further research in this area.Classification-JEL: M00

  7. A literature review for large-scale health information system project planning, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sligo, Judith; Gauld, Robin; Roberts, Vaughan; Villa, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Information technology is perceived as a potential panacea for healthcare organisations to manage pressure to improve services in the face of increased demand. However, the implementation and evaluation of health information systems (HIS) is plagued with problems and implementation shortcomings and failures are rife. HIS implementation is complex and relies on organisational, structural, technological, and human factors to be successful. It also requires reflective, nuanced, multidimensional evaluation to provide ongoing feedback to ensure success. This article provides a comprehensive review of the literature about evaluating and implementing HIS, detailing the challenges and recommendations for both evaluators and healthcare organisations. The factors that inhibit or promote successful HIS implementation are identified and effective evaluation strategies are described with the goal of informing teams evaluating complex HIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Software Quality Evaluation Models Applicable in Health Information and Communications Technologies. A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor Ordozgoiti, Alberto; Delgado Hito, Pilar; Guix Comellas, Eva María; Fernandez Sanchez, Carlos Manuel; Garcia Hernandez, Milagros; Lluch Canut, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Information and Communications Technologies in healthcare has increased the need to consider quality criteria through standardised processes. The aim of this study was to analyse the software quality evaluation models applicable to healthcare from the perspective of ICT-purchasers. Through a systematic literature review with the keywords software, product, quality, evaluation and health, we selected and analysed 20 original research papers published from 2005-2016 in health science and technology databases. The results showed four main topics: non-ISO models, software quality evaluation models based on ISO/IEC standards, studies analysing software quality evaluation models, and studies analysing ISO standards for software quality evaluation. The models provide cost-efficiency criteria for specific software, and improve use outcomes. The ISO/IEC25000 standard is shown as the most suitable for evaluating the quality of ICTs for healthcare use from the perspective of institutional acquisition.

  9. Application of proximal surrogate indicators for safety evaluation: A review of recent developments and research needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Sohel Mahmud

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been a number of recent reviews on the use of traffic conflict techniques (TCTs, none have focused on the use of proximal surrogate indicators. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and application of proximal surrogate safety indicators to address this gap. There is a particular focus on more recent advancements in the application of such indicators. For each of the main indicators reviewed, the paper provides a synthesis of the main guiding principles, as well as the most prominent features, including critical or threshold values used in the past. In addition, the main advantages and disadvantages of the reviewed indicators are highlighted. Finally, a number of research gaps are identified together with recommendations for potentially useful avenues of future research. Keywords: Safety evaluation, Traffic conflict, Surrogate, Proximal, Indicators

  10. Economic evaluations of pharmacist-managed services in people with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yeo, Q Q; Ko, Y

    2016-04-01

    To review and evaluate the most recent literature on the economic outcomes of pharmacist-managed services in people with diabetes. The global prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Although pharmacist-managed services have been shown to improve people's health outcomes, the economic impact of these programmes remains unclear. A systematic review was conducted of six databases. Study inclusion criteria were: (1) original research; (2) evaluation of pharmacist-managed services in people with diabetes; (3) an economic evaluation; (4) English-language publication; and (5) full-text, published between January 2006 and December 2014. The quality of the full economic evaluations reviewed was evaluated using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. A total of 2204 articles were screened and 25 studies were selected. These studies were conducted in a community pharmacy (n = 10), a clinic- /hospital-based outpatient facility (n = 8), or others. Pharmacist-managed services included targeted education (n = 24), general pharmacotherapeutic monitoring (n = 21), health screening or laboratory testing services (n = 9), immunization services (n = 2) and pharmacokinetic monitoring (n = 1). Compared with usual care, pharmacist-managed services resulted in cost savings that varied from $7 to $65,000 ($8 to $85,000 in 2014 US dollars) per person per year, and generated higher quality-adjusted life years with lower costs. Benefit-to-cost ratios ranged from 1:1 to 8.5:1. Among the 25 studies reviewed, 11 were full economic evaluations of moderate quality. Pharmacist-managed services had a positive return in terms of economic viability. With the expanding role of pharmacists in the healthcare sector, alongside increasing health expenditure, future economic studies of high quality are needed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of these services. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  11. Automatic Evaluations and Exercising: Systematic Review and Implications for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkoeth, Michaela; Antoniewicz, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    The general purpose of this systematic review was to summarize, structure and evaluate the findings on automatic evaluations of exercising. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they reported measuring automatic evaluations of exercising with an implicit measure and assessed some kind of exercise variable. Fourteen nonexperimental and six experimental studies (out of a total N = 1,928) were identified and rated by two independent reviewers. The main study characteristics were extracted and the grade of evidence for each study evaluated. First, results revealed a large heterogeneity in the applied measures to assess automatic evaluations of exercising and the exercise variables. Generally, small to large-sized significant relations between automatic evaluations of exercising and exercise variables were identified in the vast majority of studies. The review offers a systematization of the various examined exercise variables and prompts to differentiate more carefully between actually observed exercise behavior (proximal exercise indicator) and associated physiological or psychological variables (distal exercise indicator). Second, a lack of transparent reported reflections on the differing theoretical basis leading to the use of specific implicit measures was observed. Implicit measures should be applied purposefully, taking into consideration the individual advantages or disadvantages of the measures. Third, 12 studies were rated as providing first-grade evidence (lowest grade of evidence), five represent second-grade and three were rated as third-grade evidence. There is a dramatic lack of experimental studies, which are essential for illustrating the cause-effect relation between automatic evaluations of exercising and exercise and investigating under which conditions automatic evaluations of exercising influence behavior. Conclusions about the necessity of exercise interventions targeted at the alteration of automatic evaluations of exercising should therefore

  12. State of health economic evaluation research in Saudi Arabia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa A

    2012-01-01

    If evaluation of economic evidence is to be used increasingly in Saudi Arabia, a review of the published literature would be useful to inform policy decision-makers of the current state of research and plan future research agendas. The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical review of the state of health economic evaluation research within the Saudi context with regard to the number, characteristics, and quality of published articles. A literature search was conducted on May 8, 2011 to identify health economic articles pertaining to Saudi Arabia in the PubMed, Embase, and EconLit databases, using the following terms alone or in combination: "cost*", "economics", "health economics", "cost-effectiveness", "cost-benefit", "cost minimization", "cost utility analysis", and "Saudi". Reference lists of the articles identified were also searched for further articles. The tables of contents of the Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal and the Saudi Medical Journal were reviewed for the previous 5 years. The search identified 535 citations. Based on a reading of abstracts and titles, 477 papers were excluded. Upon reviewing the full text of the remaining 58 papers, 43 were excluded. Fifteen papers were included. Ten were categorized as full economic evaluations and five as partial economic evaluations. These articles were published between 1997 and 2010. The majority of the studies identified did not clearly state the perspective of their evaluation. There are many concerns about the methods used to collect outcome and costs data. Only one study used some sort of sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of uncertainty on the robustness of its conclusions. This review highlights major flaws in the design, analysis, and reporting of the identified economic analyses. Such deficiencies mean that the local economic evidence available to decision-makers is not very useful. Thus, building research capability in health economics is warranted.

  13. Low health literacy and evaluation of online health information: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviani, Nicola; van den Putte, Bas; Giani, Stefano; van Weert, Julia Cm

    2015-05-07

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to design high-quality online health information. However, little attention has been devoted to how consumers, in particular people with low health literacy, evaluate online health information. The main aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the association between low health literacy and (1) people's ability to evaluate online health information, (2) perceived quality of online health information, (3) trust in online health information, and (4) use of evaluation criteria for online health information. Five academic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete) were systematically searched. We included peer-reviewed publications investigating differences in the evaluation of online information between people with different health literacy levels. After abstract and full-text screening, 38 articles were included in the review. Only four studies investigated the specific role of low health literacy in the evaluation of online health information. The other studies examined the association between educational level or other skills-based proxies for health literacy, such as general literacy, and outcomes. Results indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) are negatively related to the ability to evaluate online health information and trust in online health information. Evidence on the association with perceived quality of online health information and use of evaluation criteria is inconclusive. The findings indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) play a role in the evaluation of online health information. This topic is therefore worth more scholarly attention. Based on the results of this review

  14. A systematic review of health economic evaluations of vaccines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Rozman, Luciana Martins; Decimoni, Tassia Cristina; Leandro, Roseli; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; de Soárez, Patrícia Coelho

    2017-06-03

    In Brazil, since 2005, the Ministry of Health requires Health Economic Evaluation (HEE) of vaccines for introduction into the National Immunization Program. To describe and analyze the full HEE on vaccines conducted in Brazil from 1980 to 2013. Systematic review of the literature. We searched multiple databases. Two researchers independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The methodological quality of individual studies was evaluated using CHEERS items. Twenty studies were reviewed. The most evaluated vaccines were pneumococcal (25%) and HPV (15%). The most used types of HEE were cost-effectiveness analysis (45%) and cost-utility analysis (20%). The research question and compared strategies were stated in all 20 studies and the target population was clear in 95%. Nevertheless, many studies did not inform the perspective of analysis or data sources. HEE of vaccines in Brazil has increased since 2008. However, the studies still have methodological deficiencies.

  15. Food Safety Evaluation Based on Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, due to the increasing consciousness of food safety and human health, much progress has been made in developing rapid and nondestructive techniques for the evaluation of food hazards, food authentication, and traceability. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and imaging techniques have gained wide acceptance in many fields because of their advantages over other analytical techniques. Following a brief introduction of NIR spectroscopy and imaging basics, this review mainly focuses on recent NIR spectroscopy and imaging applications for food safety evaluation, including (1) chemical hazards detection; (2) microbiological hazards detection; (3) physical hazards detection; (4) new technology-induced food safety concerns; and (5) food traceability. The review shows NIR spectroscopy and imaging to be effective tools that will play indispensable roles for food safety evaluation. In addition, on-line/real-time applications of these techniques promise to be a huge growth field in the near future.

  16. Meta-evaluation of published studies on evaluation of health disaster preparedness exercises through a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbardsiri, Hojjat; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Nekoei-Moghadam, Mahmoud; Raeisi, Ahmad Reza

    2018-01-01

    Exercise evaluation is one of the most important steps and sometimes neglected in designing and taking exercises, in this stage of exercise, it systematically identifying, gathering, and interpreting related information to indicate how an exercise has fulfilled its objectives. The present study aimed to assess the most important evaluation techniques applied in evaluating health exercises for emergencies and disasters. This was meta-evaluation study through a systematic review. In this research, we searched papers based on specific and relevant keywords in research databases including ISI web of science, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Ovid, ProQuest, Wiley, Google Scholar, and Persian database such as ISC and SID. The search keywords and strategies are followed; "simulation," "practice," "drill," "exercise," "instrument," "tool," "questionnaire," " measurement," "checklist," "scale," "test," "inventory," "battery," "evaluation," "assessment," "appraisal," "emergency," "disaster," "cricise," "hazard," "catastrophe,: "hospital", "prehospital," "health centers," "treatment centers," were used in combination with Boolean operators OR and AND. The research findings indicate that there are different techniques and methods for data collection to evaluate performance exercises of health centers and affiliated organizations in disasters and emergencies including debriefing inventories, self-report, questionnaire, interview, observation, shooting video, and photographing, electronic equipment which can be individually or collectively used depending on exercise objectives or purposes. Taking exercise in the health sector is one of the important steps in preparation and implementation of disaster risk management programs. This study can be thus utilized to improve preparedness of different sectors of health system according to the latest available evaluation techniques and methods for better implementation of disaster exercise evaluation stages.

  17. Process evaluations in neurological rehabilitation: a mixed-evidence systematic review and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson-Algar, Patricia; Burton, Christopher R; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-11-08

    To systematically review how process evaluations are currently designed, what methodologies are used and how are they developed alongside or within neurological rehabilitation trials. This mixed-methods systematic review had two evidence streams: stream I, studies reporting process evaluations alongside neurorehabilitation trials research and stream II, methodological guidance on process evaluation design and methodology. A search strategy was designed for each evidence stream. Data regarding process evaluation core concepts and design issues were extracted using a bespoke template. Evidence from both streams was analysed separately and then synthesised in a final overarching synthesis proposing a number of recommendations for future research. A total of 124 process evaluation studies, reporting on 106 interventions, were included in stream I evidence. 30 studies were included as stream II evidence. Synthesis 1 produced 9 themes, and synthesis 2 identified a total of 8 recommendations for process evaluation research. The overall synthesis resulted in 57 'synthesis recommendations' about process evaluation methodology grouped into 9 research areas, including the use of theory, the investigation of context, intervention staff characteristics and the delivery of the trial intervention. There remains no consensus regarding process evaluation terminology within the neurological rehabilitation field. There is a need for process evaluations to address the nature and influence of context over time. Process evaluations should clearly describe what intervention staff bring to a trial, including skills and experience prior to joining the research. Process evaluations should monitor intervention staff's learning effects and the possible impact that these may have on trial outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Bo M; Schlevis, Roosmarijn Mc; Boot, Cécile Rl; Brouwers, Evelien Pm; Anema, Johannes; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-09-01

    This systematic review aimed to explore which process variables are used in stress management intervention (SMI) evaluation research. A systematic review was conducted using seven electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on an SMI aimed at primary or secondary stress prevention, were directed at paid employees, and reported process data. Two independent researchers checked all records and selected the articles for inclusion. Nielsen and Randall's model for process evaluation was used to cluster the process variables. The three main clusters were context, intervention, and mental models. In the 44 articles included, 47 process variables were found, clustered into three main categories: context (two variables), intervention (31 variables), and mental models (14 variables). Half of the articles contained no reference to process evaluation literature. The collection of process evaluation data mostly took place after the intervention and at the level of the employee. The findings suggest that there is great heterogeneity in methods and process variables used in process evaluations of SMI. This, together with the lack of use of a standardized framework for evaluation, hinders the advancement of process evaluation theory development.

  19. A desk evaluation review of project BGD/5/010 food irradiation. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-26

    To increase the availability of food, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), through its institute of Food and Radiation Biology (IFRB), has for many years pursued research studies in the use of ionizing radiation for food disinfestation and preservation. The Agency has been assisting these research efforts since the late 1970s. Project BGD/5/010, Food Irradiation, as reformulated in 1984, was to take on-going activities ones step further, with the main objective of demonstrating on a semi-commercial scale the efficacy and profitability of food irradiation in reducing the high storage losses of economically important food, such as potatoes, onions, dried fish and other seafood. A further objective was the transfer of food irradiation technology to the relevant industries in Bangladesh. The total budget of the project for the years 1983 through 1992 includes 5.1 man-months of expert services, $1,064,634 for equipment and $29,200 for training. The review was undertaken upon request by the Asia and the Pacific Section, to assess the current status of this ten-year project, which has encountered numerous delays and set-backs and is now nearing completion, and to determine to what extent the experience gained on the project could be useful in the implementation of similar on-going and future projects.

  20. A desk evaluation review of project BGD/5/010 food irradiation. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    To increase the availability of food, the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC), through its institute of Food and Radiation Biology (IFRB), has for many years pursued research studies in the use of ionizing radiation for food disinfestation and preservation. The Agency has been assisting these research efforts since the late 1970s. Project BGD/5/010, Food Irradiation, as reformulated in 1984, was to take on-going activities ones step further, with the main objective of demonstrating on a semi-commercial scale the efficacy and profitability of food irradiation in reducing the high storage losses of economically important food, such as potatoes, onions, dried fish and other seafood. A further objective was the transfer of food irradiation technology to the relevant industries in Bangladesh. The total budget of the project for the years 1983 through 1992 includes 5.1 man-months of expert services, $1,064,634 for equipment and $29,200 for training. The review was undertaken upon request by the Asia and the Pacific Section, to assess the current status of this ten-year project, which has encountered numerous delays and set-backs and is now nearing completion, and to determine to what extent the experience gained on the project could be useful in the implementation of similar on-going and future projects

  1. A review of methods of clinical image quality evaluation in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanpeng; Poulos, Ann; McLean, Donald; Rickard, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Consistency in evaluation of mammography images in research and clinical practice is dependent on a standardised clinical image quality evaluation system. Currently two such systems are available-one developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the other by the European Commission (EU guidelines). The purpose of this study was to review mammography clinical evaluation methods in research studies and their adherence to these systems. Method: A total of 23 research articles were reviewed from the period 2000-2006, 11 of these studies used digital images. The focus of the review was the criteria and rating scales used. Results: Only 5 studies used either the ACR (3) or EU guidelines (2). The remainder included aspects of these systems together with a range of other criteria and rating scales. Variation was found in the categories of criteria used, number of criteria, the descriptors of the criteria and the instructions used to evaluate the criteria. Instructions were frequently not specific and open to individual interpretation. Although breast density is an important criterion of image quality and contributes to perception of breast lesions, inclusion of this criterion was not universal, and even when used the area of breast density to be evaluated was not identified, thus enhancing inter-observer variability. Scales that were absolute or relative were used for evaluation, all of which incorporated inconsistent numbers of steps. Conclusion: Low adherence to ACR and EU Guidelines has resulted in considerable variation in the evaluation methods used in research studies. The implications of this variability are considerable both for evaluation of image quality in research outcomes and clinical practice.

  2. Evaluating a Skills Centre: The Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills in Nursing--A Review of the Literature. [and] Evaluating a Skills Centre: The Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills in Nursing--A Review of the Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Carolyn M.

    1998-01-01

    Article 1 reviews literature on psychomotor skill acquisition, finding inconclusive research based on a positivist approach. Article 2 reviews theories of skill acquisition. Both reviews will be used to evaluate a skills center for nurses that is based on a constructivist approach. (SK)

  3. Phytotoxicity and weed control of oxyfluorfen and napropamide on container-grown conifer seedlings. Research memo No. 123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Factsheet assessing the affects of oxyfluorfen and napropamide applications on the designated crop plants and evaluating how well the herbicides controlled typical weed species. The study used recently-seeded Douglas-fir, white spruce and lodgepole pine and one-year-old Douglas-fir and white spruce. The oxyfluorfen formulation used was Goal and the napropamide formulation was Devrinol.

  4. Learning What Works in Educational Technology with a Case Study of EDUSTAR. Policy Memo 2016-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Aaron K.; Jones, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite much fanfare, new technologies have yet to fundamentally advance student outcomes in K-12 schools or other educational settings. We believe that the system that supports the development and dissemination of educational technology tools is falling short. The key missing ingredient is rigorous evaluation. No one knows what works and for…

  5. Economic evaluation, human immunodeficiency virus infection and screening: a review and critical appraisal of economic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibosa-Osadolor, Onome; Roberts, Tracy

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to review, systematically and critically, evidence used to derive estimates of cost-effectiveness of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening. A systematic review was conducted. Searched were three main electronic bibliographic databases from 1993 to 2008 using key words including HIV, mass screening, HAART, economic evaluation, cost-effectiveness analysis, modeling. We included studies of sexually transmitted HIV infection in both sexes, including studies comparing diagnostic testing protocols and partner notification. Outcomes included were cases of HIV infection detected, deterioration to the AIDS state, secondary transmission of HIV, the quality-adjusted life-years/survival, costs, and cost-effectiveness of HIV screening. Eighty-four papers were identified; ten of which were formal economic evaluations, one cost study, three effectiveness studies, and three systematic reviews of HIV prevention programs. The predominant assertion was that HIV screening is cost-effective; methodological problems, such as the preponderance of static models which are inappropriate for infectious diseases, varying perspectives from which the studies were analyzed, and arbitrary threshold incremental cost-effectiveness ratio levels, limited the validity of these findings, and their usefulness in informing health policy decisions. The majority of published economic evaluations are based on inappropriate static models. This flaw renders the results of these studies as inconclusive and the purported cost-effectiveness of HIV screening debatable. The results of this review could form a basis for consideration of further research and analysis by health economists into the cost-effectiveness of HIV screening.

  6. Review and evaluation of online tobacco dependence treatment training programs for health care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Peter; Goncharenko, Karina; Barker, Megan; Fahim, Myra; Timothy, Valerie; Dragonetti, Rosa; Kemper, Katherine; Herie, Marilyn; Hays, J Taylor

    2015-04-17

    Training health care professionals is associated with increased capacity to deliver evidence-based smoking cessation interventions and increased quit rates among their patients. Online training programs hold promise to provide training but questions remain regarding the quality and usability of available programs. The aim was to assess the quality of English-language online courses in tobacco dependence treatment using a validated instrument. An environmental scan was conducted using the Google search engine to identify available online tobacco dependence treatment courses. The identified courses were then evaluated using the Peer Review Rubric for Online Learning, which was selected based on its ability to evaluate instructional design. It also has clear and concise criteria descriptions to ensure uniformity of evaluations by trained experts. A total of 39 courses were identified, of which 24 unique courses were assessed based on their accessibility and functionality during the period of evaluation. Overall, the course ratings indicated that 17 of 24 courses evaluated failed to meet minimal quality standards and none of the courses evaluated could be ranked as superior. However, many excelled in providing effective navigation, course rationale, and content. Many were weak in the use of instructional design elements, such as teaching effectiveness, learning strategies, instructor's role, and assessment and evaluation. Evaluation results and suggestions for improvement were shared with course administrators. Based on the courses evaluated in this review, course developers are encouraged to employ best practices in instructional design, such as cohesiveness of material, linearity of design, practice exercises, problem solving, and ongoing evaluation to improve existing courses and in the design of new online learning opportunities.

  7. Evaluation of Role of Myofibroblasts in Oral Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhon, Harjeet K; Sircar, Keya; Kaur, Gurbani; Marwah, Muneet

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review on the role of myofibroblasts in progression of oral cancer. The myofibroblast is essential for the integrity of the mammalian body by virtue of its role in wound healing, but it also plays a negative role due to their role in promoting tumor development. Systematic review. Bibliographic searches were conducted in several electronic databases using all publications in PubMed, PubMed central, EMBASE, CancerLit, Google scholar, and Cochrane CCTR between 1990 and June 2015. The search of all publications from various electronic databases revealed 1,371 citations. The total number of studies considered for systematic review was 43. The total number of patients included in the studies was 990. Myofibroblasts are a significant component in stroma of oral cancer cases, though not identified in all cases. This systematic review shows that clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemistry tests have correlated the presence of high myofibroblast count in oral cancer cell stroma. Myofibroblasts play a significant role in oral cancer invasion and progression. Various studies have demonstrated their association with oral cancer. This review tends to highlight their role in the pathogenesis of oral cancer over the decade. Sekhon HK, Sircar K, Kaur G, Marwah M. Evaluation of Role of Myofibroblasts in Oral Cancer: A Systematic Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):233-239.

  8. Systematic reviews in Library and Information Science: analysis and evaluation of the search process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Salvador-Oliván

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An essential component of a systematic review is the development and execution of a literature search to identify all available and relevant published studies. The main objective of this study is to analyse and evaluate whether the systematic reviews in Library and Information Science (LIS provide complete information on all the elements that make up the search process. Methods: A search was launched in WOS, Scopus, LISTA, Library Science Database, Medline databases and a wiki published from 2000 to February 2017, in order to find and identify systematic reviews. The search was designed to find those records whose titles included the words “systematic review” and/or “meta-analysis”. A list was created with the twelve items recommended from of the main publication guides, to assess the information degree on each of them. Results and conclusions: Most of the reviews in LIS are created by information professionals. From the 94 systematic reviews selected for analysis, it was found that only a 4.3% provided the complete reporting on the search method. The most frequently included item is the name of the database (95.6% and the least one is the name of the host (35.8%. It is necessary to improve and complete the information about the search processes in the complete reports from LIS systematic reviews for reproducibility, updating and quality assessment improvement.

  9. Evaluation methods for physical activity-promoting mobile technologies: an interdisciplinary scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McCallum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many thousands of mobile apps, wearables and other technologies available to support and promote physical activity. However, the rapidly evolving nature of these technologies means that the methodologies traditionally used to evaluate the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions (such as the randomised controlled trial may not be appropriate to evaluate their effectiveness. A scoping review was conducted to identify the methods currently being used to evaluate physical activity-promoting mobile technologies across health and computing science disciplines. In addition to the range of methods used, the review explored their strengths and weaknesses. The results improve understandings of when and why to use existing methods from health and computing science. Opportunities for combining and hybridising methods across the two disciplines are also identified. The review will be used to inform the development and piloting of novel, ‘fit-for-purpose’ research designs that will allow rigorous evaluation of the effectiveness of rapidly-evolving physical activity-promoting mobile technologies and their ‘active ingredients’ to build an evidence base of what works, why and for whom.

  10. Using theory of change to design and evaluate public health interventions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Erica; Lee, Lucy; De Silva, Mary; Lund, Crick

    2016-05-06

    Despite the increasing popularity of the theory of change (ToC) approach, little is known about the extent to which ToC has been used in the design and evaluation of public health interventions. This review aims to determine how ToCs have been developed and used in the development and evaluation of public health interventions globally. We searched for papers reporting the use of "theory of change" in the development or evaluation of public health interventions in databases of peer-reviewed journal articles such as Scopus, Pubmed, PsychInfo, grey literature databases, Google and websites of development funders. We included papers of any date, language or study design. Both abstracts and full text papers were double screened. Data were extracted and narratively and quantitatively summarised. A total of 62 papers were included in the review. Forty-nine (79 %) described the development of ToC, 18 (29 %) described the use of ToC in the development of the intervention and 49 (79 %) described the use of ToC in the evaluation of the intervention. Although a large number of papers were included in the review, their descriptions of the ToC development and use in intervention design and evaluation lacked detail. The use of the ToC approach is widespread in the public health literature. Clear reporting of the ToC process and outputs is important to strengthen the body of literature on practical application of ToC in order to develop our understanding of the benefits and advantages of using ToC. We also propose a checklist for reporting on the use of ToC to ensure transparent reporting and recommend that our checklist is used and refined by authors reporting the ToC approach.

  11. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. Ex-post evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D results achieved for five years until Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from October 2003 to February 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on November 14, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 8, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  12. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on advanced photon and synchrotron radiation research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Advanced Photon Research Center and at Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Kansai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 21, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research. (author)

  13. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs pertaining to the establishment and utilization of the Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2001 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering and Department of Environmental Sciences of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from February to March 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on February 9, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. (author)

  14. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of seven specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to March 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 27, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering. (author)

  15. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of HTTR Project and Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology in Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 8, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. (author)

  16. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on radiation application research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Material Development, at Department of Ion-Beam-Applied Biology and at Advanced Radiation Technology Center in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 25, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research. (author)

  17. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  18. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  19. The Science Consistency Review A Tool To Evaluate the Use of Scientific Information in Land Management Decisionmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin; David Cawrse; Russell Graham; Miles Hemstrom; Linda Joyce; Steve Kessler; Ranotta McNair; George Peterson; Charles G. Shaw; Peter Stine; Mark Twery; Jeffrey Walter

    2003-01-01

    The paper outlines a process called the science consistency review, which can be used to evaluate the use of scientific information in land management decisions. Developed with specific reference to land management decisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, the process involves assembling a team of reviewers under a review administrator to...

  20. Markers for nutrition studies: review of criteria for the evaluation of markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; Antoine, Jean-Michel; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Chiodini, Alessandro; Gibney, Mike; Kuhnle, Gunter; Méheust, Agnès; Pijls, Loek; Rowland, Ian

    2013-10-01

    Markers are important tools to assess the nutrition status and effects of nutrition interventions. There is currently insufficient consensus in nutrition sciences on how to evaluate markers, despite the need for properly evaluating them. To identify the criteria for the evaluation of markers related to nutrition, health and disease and to propose generic criteria for evaluation. The report on "Evaluation of Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease" from the Institute of Medicine was the starting point for the literature search. Additionally, specific search strategies were developed for Pubmed. In nutrition, no set of criteria or systematic approach to evaluate markers is currently available. There is a reliance on the medical area where statistical methods have been developed to quantify the evaluation of markers. Even here, a systematic approach is lacking-markers are still evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The review of publications from the literature search resulted in a database with definitions, criteria for validity and the rationale behind the criteria. It was recognized that, in nutrition, a number of methodological aspects differ from medical research. The following criteria were identified as essential elements in the evaluation of markers: (1) the marker has a causal biological link with the endpoint, (2) there is a significant association between marker and endpoint in the target population, (3) marker changes consistently with the endpoint, e.g., in response to an intervention, and (4) change in the marker explains a substantial proportion of the change in the endpoint in response to the intervention.

  1. Evaluation in medical education: A topical review of target parameters, data collection tools and confounding factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Feufel, Markus A.; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Evaluation is an integral part of education in German medical schools. According to the quality standards set by the German Society for Evaluation, evaluation tools must provide an accurate and fair appraisal of teaching quality. Thus, data collection tools must be highly reliable and valid. This review summarises the current literature on evaluation of medical education with regard to the possible dimensions of teaching quality, the psychometric properties of survey instruments and potential confounding factors. Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX for literature on evaluation in medical education and included studies published up until June 30, 2011 as well as articles identified in the “grey literature”. Results are presented as a narrative review. Results: We identified four dimensions of teaching quality: structure, process, teacher characteristics, and outcome. Student ratings are predominantly used to address the first three dimensions, and a number of reliable tools are available for this purpose. However, potential confounders of student ratings pose a threat to the validity of these instruments. Outcome is usually operationalised in terms of student performance on examinations, but methodological problems may limit the usability of these data for evaluation purposes. In addition, not all examinations at German medical schools meet current quality standards. Conclusion: The choice of tools for evaluating medical education should be guided by the dimension that is targeted by the evaluation. Likewise, evaluation results can only be interpreted within the context of the construct addressed by the data collection tool that was used as well as its specific confounding factors. PMID:26421003

  2. Trends on the application of serious games to neuropsychological evaluation: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares-Rodríguez, Sonia; Pérez-Rodríguez, Roberto; Anido-Rifón, Luis; Fernández-Iglesias, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    The dramatic technological advances witnessed in recent years have resulted in a great opportunity for changing the way neuropsychological evaluations may be performed in clinical practice. Particularly, serious games have been posed as the cornerstone of this still incipient paradigm-shift, as they have characteristics that make them especially advantageous in trying to overcome limitations associated with traditional pen-and-paper based neuropsychological tests: they can be easily administered and they can feature complex environments for the evaluation of neuropsychological constructs that are difficult to evaluate through traditional tests. The objective of this study was to conduct a scoping literature review in order to map rapidly the key concepts underpinning this research area during the last 25years on the use of serious games for neuropsychological evaluation. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus and IEEE Xplore databases were systematically searched. The main eligibility criteria were to select studies published in a peer-reviewed journal; written in English; published in the last 25years; focused on the human population, and classified in the neuropsychological field. Moreover, to avoid risk of bias, studies were selected by consensus of experts, focusing primarily in psychometric properties. Therefore, selected studies were analyzed in accordance with a set of dimensions of analysis commonly used for evaluating neuropsychological tests. After applying the selected search strategy, 57 studies -including 54 serious games- met our selection criteria. The selected studies deal with visuospatial capabilities, memory, attention, executive functions, and complex neuropsychological constructs such as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Results show that the implementation of serious games for neuropsychological evaluation is tackled in several different ways in the selected studies, and that studies have so far been mainly exploratory, just aiming at testing the

  3. Evaluation of Technology-Enhanced Learning Programs for Health Care Professionals: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Pam; MacRury, Sandra; van Woerden, Hugo C; Smyth, Keith

    2018-04-11

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) programs are increasingly seen as the way in which education for health care professionals can be transformed, giving access to effective ongoing learning and training even where time or geographical barriers exist. Given the increasing emphasis on this mode of educational support for health care practitioners, it is vital that we can effectively evaluate and measure impact to ensure that TEL programs are effective and fit for purpose. This paper examines the current evidence base for the first time, in relation to the evaluation of TEL programs for health care professionals. We conducted a systematic review of the current literature relating to the evaluation of TEL programs for health care professionals and critically appraised the quality of the studies. This review employed specific search criteria to identify research studies that included evaluation of TEL for health care professionals. The databases searched included Medline Ovid, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus Advanced, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, ZETOC, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Explore Digital Library, Allied and Complementary Medicine, and Education Resources Information Center between January 2006 and January 2017. An additional hand search for relevant articles from reference lists was undertaken. Each of the studies identified was critically appraised for quality using the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool. This approach produced a percentage total score for each study across specified categories. A proportion of the studies were independently assessed by an additional two reviewers. The review identified 21 studies that met the inclusion criteria. The studies included scored totals across eight categories within a range of 37%-95% and an average score of 68%. Studies that measured TEL using learner satisfaction surveys, or combined pretest and posttest knowledge score testing with learner

  4. A systematic review of economic evaluations of treatments for patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Ben F M; van Mastrigt, Ghislaine A P G; Evers, Silvia M A A; Gershuni, Olga; Lambrechts, Danielle A J E; Majoie, Marian H J M; Postulart, Debby; Aldenkamp, Bert A P; de Kinderen, Reina J A

    2017-05-01

    The increasing number of treatment options and the high costs associated with epilepsy have fostered the development of economic evaluations in epilepsy. It is important to examine the availability and quality of these economic evaluations and to identify potential research gaps. As well as looking at both pharmacologic (antiepileptic drugs [AEDs]) and nonpharmacologic (e.g., epilepsy surgery, ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation) therapies, this review examines the methodologic quality of the full economic evaluations included. Literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Econlit, Web of Science, and CEA Registry. In addition, Cochrane Reviews, Cochrane DARE and Cochrane Health Technology Assessment Databases were used. To identify relevant studies, predefined clinical search strategies were combined with a search filter designed to identify health economic studies. Specific search strategies were devised for the following topics: (1) AEDs, (2) patients with cognitive deficits, (3) elderly patients, (4) epilepsy surgery, (5) ketogenic diet, (6) vagus nerve stimulation, and (7) treatment of (non)convulsive status epilepticus. A total of 40 publications were included in this review, 29 (73%) of which were articles about pharmacologic interventions. Mean quality score of all articles on the Consensus Health Economic Criteria (CHEC)-extended was 81.8%, the lowest quality score being 21.05%, whereas five studies had a score of 100%. Looking at the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS), the average quality score was 77.0%, the lowest being 22.7%, and four studies rated as 100%. There was a substantial difference in methodology in all included articles, which hampered the attempt to combine information meaningfully. Overall, the methodologic quality was acceptable; however, some studies performed significantly worse than others. The heterogeneity between the studies stresses the need to

  5. A systematic review of factors influencing student ratings in undergraduate medical education course evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-03-05

    Student ratings are a popular source of course evaluations in undergraduate medical education. Data on the reliability and validity of such ratings have mostly been derived from studies unrelated to medical education. Since medical education differs considerably from other higher education settings, an analysis of factors influencing overall student ratings with a specific focus on medical education was needed. For the purpose of this systematic review, online databases (PubMed, PsycInfo and Web of Science) were searched up to August 1st, 2013. Original research articles on the use of student ratings in course evaluations in undergraduate medical education were eligible for inclusion. Included studies considered the format of evaluation tools and assessed the association of independent and dependent (i.e., overall course ratings) variables. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were checked by two independent reviewers, and results were synthesised in a narrative review. Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. Qualitative research (2 studies) indicated that overall course ratings are mainly influenced by student satisfaction with teaching and exam difficulty rather than objective determinants of high quality teaching. Quantitative research (23 studies) yielded various influencing factors related to four categories: student characteristics, exposure to teaching, satisfaction with examinations and the evaluation process itself. Female gender, greater initial interest in course content, higher exam scores and higher satisfaction with exams were associated with more positive overall course ratings. Due to the heterogeneity and methodological limitations of included studies, results must be interpreted with caution. Medical educators need to be aware of various influences on student ratings when developing data collection instruments and interpreting evaluation results. More research into the reliability and validity of overall course ratings as typically used in the

  6. Methods for the evaluation of hospital cooperation activities (Systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotter Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital partnerships, mergers and cooperatives are arrangements frequently seen as a means of improving health service delivery. Many of the assumptions used in planning hospital cooperatives are not stated clearly and are often based on limited or poor scientific evidence. Methods This is a protocol for a systematic review, following the Cochrane EPOC methodology. The review aims to document, catalogue and synthesize the existing literature on the reported methods for the evaluation of hospital cooperation activities as well as methods of hospital cooperation. We will search the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and bibliographic databases including PubMed (via NLM, Web of Science, NHS EED, Business Source Premier (via EBSCO and Global Health for publications that report on methods for evaluating hospital cooperatives, strategic partnerships, mergers, alliances, networks and related activities and methods used for such partnerships. The method proposed by the Cochrane EPOC group regarding randomized study designs, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series will be followed. In addition, we will also include cohort, case-control studies, and relevant non-comparative publications such as case reports. We will categorize and analyze the review findings according to the study design employed, the study quality (low versus high quality studies and the method reported in the primary studies. We will present the results of studies in tabular form. Discussion Overall, the systematic review aims to identify, assess and synthesize the evidence to underpin hospital cooperation activities as defined in this protocol. As a result, the review will provide an evidence base for partnerships, alliances or other fields of cooperation in a hospital setting. PROSPERO

  7. Evaluation of imaging methods in the diagnosis of urolithiasis: review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de; Silva, Luciana Costa; Santos, Jovita Lane Soares; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare helical computed tomography with imaging studies currently used to evaluate patients with acute low back pain. In addition, we briefly review the pathophysiology of urolithiasis. The literature published in the last 30 years was reviewed, and the following methods were discussed: plain abdominal radiographs, intravenous pyelography, ultrasound of the urinary tract, and helical computed tomography. Helical computed tomography showed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting urolithiasis, virtually showing all stones, except in patients receiving indinavir. The accuracy of plain abdominal radiographs associated with ultrasound was similar to helical computed tomography, although the latter showed superiority as an isolated method. Data from literature suggest that whenever helical computed tomography is available, it is helpful in the evaluation of low back pain and also allows differential diagnosis between conditions that mimic the symptoms of urolithiasis.(author)

  8. Consumer evaluation of food with nutritional benefits: a systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogendi, Joseph Birundu; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Makokha, Anselimo

    2016-06-01

    As a consequence of the growing interest in, and development of, various types of food with nutritional benefits, the modern consumer views their kitchen cabinet more and more as a medicine cabinet. Given that consumer evaluation of food is considered key to the successful production, marketing and finally consumption of food, a procedure commonly used in medical fields was employed to systematically review and summarize evidence of consumer evaluation studies on nutritious foods. The focus is primarily on consumer understanding of nutritious food and the underlying determinants of consumer evaluation. Our results highlight four groups of key determinants: (1) nutrition knowledge and information; (2) attitudes, beliefs, perceptions and behavioural determinants; (3) price, process and product characteristics; and (4) socio-demographics. The findings also point to the importance of understanding consumer acceptance as one many concepts in the consumer evaluation process, and provide support for developing appropriate strategies for improving health and well-being of consumers.

  9. Economic Evaluation Methodology Review on KAERI's Recent Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jin Sam; Kim, Jee Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In technology utilization, economics evaluation is helpful to R and D program managers by giving them economic information needed to improve the usefulness of their projects. Moreover it can help them to communicate to others participants keeping all of them value-oriented minded through the whole development process. In this context, KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been performed economic evaluation on recent some projects. So, in this study, it has been made brief reviews on KAERI's economic evaluation methodology to its recent some projects of which evaluation we engage in, especially PEFP(Proton Engineering frontier Project) and SMART(Small Medium advanced ReacTor): Methodology comparison and their pros and cons

  10. Review and evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's RDandD Programme 2010. Statement to the Government and summary of the review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-03-15

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD programme 2010, in terms of planned research and development activity, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and intended measures (Section 26 of the Nuclear Activities Ordinance). This report presents the results of the review and the evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations.

  11. Review and evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's RDandD Programme 2010. Statement to the Government and summary of the review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD programme 2010, in terms of planned research and development activity, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and intended measures (Section 26 of the Nuclear Activities Ordinance). This report presents the results of the review and the evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations

  12. Seismic hazard review for the systematic evaluation program: a use of probability in decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, L.; Jackson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    This document presents the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Geosciences Branch review and recommendations with respect to earthquake ground motion considerations in the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) Phases I and II. It evaluates the probabilistic estimates presented in the 5-volume report entitled Seismic Hazard Analysis (NUREG/CR-1582) and compares and modifies them to take into account deterministic estimates. It presents the NRC's Geosciences Branch first approach to utilizing complex state-of-the-art probabilistic studies in an area where probabilistic criteria have not yet been set and where decisions for specific plants have been previously made in a non-probabilistic way

  13. Review of effectiveness-evaluation methodologies for safeguards and security systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, E.J.; Mangan, D.L.

    1982-06-01

    We discuss the factors that influence the effectiveness of safeguards and security measures and the characteristics required of effectiveness evaluation methodologies. Within this context and from a utility standpoint, we review those effectiveness evaluation methodologies that have been developed. Our principal recommendation concerns the application and concomitant validation of existing methodologies. This recommendation derives from our conclusion that there has been a gross imbalance between the effort spent on methodology development and the application of those methodologies. Only for those safeguards measures that do not seem to be covered by existing methodologies or that seem to be inadequately covered do we suggest development. 44 references

  14. Methods for the reactivity evaluation in subcritical systems analysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Carta, M.

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the subcritical source-driven system technology for waste incineration and power production requires the development of reliable and efficient techniques for the reactivity evaluation and monitoring. Starting from the standard methods developed for close-to-criticality systems, extensive research activities have been carried out to analyze the behavior of subcritical assembly in time-dependent condition and to infer the subcriticality level from local flux values. In the present work, a review of some key aspects in the method development for ADS analysis is proposed, with special attention to the techniques for reactivity evaluation. (author)

  15. Review, analysis and evaluation of systems for multimedia asset management in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cascón-Katchadourian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organizations have faced the growing management of digital assets of audiovisual and multimedia nature, many of them of heritage interest. This article reviews and analyzes five multimedia asset managers of contemporary full significance. After systematizing an analysis sheet on the general characteristics and modules that this type of systems must satisfy, we proceeded to evaluate each one of the selected digital management systems, offering as a result the discussion of the advantages provided by each one of them, their distinctive characteristics, as well as the evaluation of their professional suitability.

  16. Review of Micro/Nano Nondestructive Evaluation Technique (II): Measurement of Acoustic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Seok; Park, Ik Keun

    2012-01-01

    The present paper reviews the micro and nano nondestructive evaluation(NDE) technique that is possible to investigate the surface and measure the acoustic properties. The technical theory, features and applications of the ultrasonic atomic force microscopy(UAFM) and scanning acoustic microscopy(SAM) are illustrated. Especially, these technologies are possible to evaluate the mechanical properties in micro/nano structure and surface through the measurement of acoustic properties in addition to the observation of surface and subsurface. Consequently, it is thought that technique developments and applications of these micro/nano NDE in advanced industrial parts together with present nondestructive industry are widely possible hereafter.

  17. Considering consumer choice in the economic evaluation of mandatory health programmes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bonny; Goodall, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Governments are increasing their focus on mandatory public health programmes following positive economic evaluations of their impact. This review aims to examine whether loss of consumer choice should be included in economic evaluations of mandatory health programmes (MHP). A systematic literature review was conducted to identify economic evaluations of MHP, whether they discuss the impact on consumer choice and any methodological limitations. Overall 39 economic evaluations were identified, of which 10 discussed the loss of consumer choice and 6 attempted to place a value on the loss of consumer choice. Methodological limitations included: measuring the marginal cost of compliance, unavailability of price elasticity estimates, the impact of income effects, double counting health impacts, biased willingness-to-pay responses, and "protest" responses. Overall it was found that the inclusion of the loss of consumer choice rarely impacted on the final outcome of the study. The impact of MHP on the loss of consumer choice has largely been ignored in economic evaluations. Its importance remains uncertain due to its infrequent inclusion and significant methodological limitations. Further research regarding which methodology is best for valuing the loss of consumer choice and whether it is important to the final implementation decision is warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Review of GIF PR and PP Evaluation Case Study for Application to Pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. M.; Ahn, S. K.; Kwon, E. H.; Kim, H. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This paper has summarized and reviewed the ESFR case study, as it relates to the application of the evaluation methods to pyroprocessing facilities as well as the sodium fast reactor fuel cycle in the future as a self-assessment study. The GIF PR and PP evaluation methodology and the case study both addressed physical protection, but this paper focuses only on proliferation resistance. It does not consider physical protection. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) emphasizes proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) as one of the main aspects to be considered regarding future nuclear energy systems (NESs). As such, the PR and PP Working Group developed an evaluation methodology and applied it to the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) as a case study. This paper has summarized and reviewed the ESFR case study, as it relates to the application of the evaluation methods to pyroprocessing facilities as well as the sodium fast reactor fuel cycle in the future as a self-assessment study. The GIF PR and PP evaluation methodology and the case study both addressed physical protection, but this paper focuses only on proliferation resistance. It does not consider physical protection.

  19. Review of GIF PR and PP Evaluation Case Study for Application to Pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. M.; Ahn, S. K.; Kwon, E. H.; Kim, H. D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has summarized and reviewed the ESFR case study, as it relates to the application of the evaluation methods to pyroprocessing facilities as well as the sodium fast reactor fuel cycle in the future as a self-assessment study. The GIF PR and PP evaluation methodology and the case study both addressed physical protection, but this paper focuses only on proliferation resistance. It does not consider physical protection. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) emphasizes proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) as one of the main aspects to be considered regarding future nuclear energy systems (NESs). As such, the PR and PP Working Group developed an evaluation methodology and applied it to the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) as a case study. This paper has summarized and reviewed the ESFR case study, as it relates to the application of the evaluation methods to pyroprocessing facilities as well as the sodium fast reactor fuel cycle in the future as a self-assessment study. The GIF PR and PP evaluation methodology and the case study both addressed physical protection, but this paper focuses only on proliferation resistance. It does not consider physical protection

  20. Assessing the effects of employee assistance programs: a review of employee assistance program evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, A

    1989-01-01

    Employee assistance programs have grown at a dramatic rate, yet the effectiveness of these programs has been called into question. The purpose of this paper was to assess the effectiveness of employee assistance programs (EAPs) by reviewing recently published EAP evaluations. All studies evaluating EAPs published since 1975 from peer-reviewed journals in the English language were included in this analysis. Each of the articles was assessed in the following areas: (a) program description (subjects, setting, type of intervention, format), (b) evaluation design (research design, variables measured, operational methods), and (c) program outcomes. Results indicate numerous methodological and conceptual weaknesses and issues. These weaknesses included lack of controlled research designs and short time lags between pre- and post-test measures. Other problems identified are missing information regarding subjects, type of intervention, how variables are measured (operational methods), and reliability and validity of evaluation instruments. Due to the aforementioned weaknesses, positive outcomes could not be supported. Recommendations are made for future EAP evaluations.

  1. Evaluation models and criteria of the quality of hospital websites: a systematic review study

    OpenAIRE

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Gilasi, Hamidreza; Khademi, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hospital websites are important tools in establishing communication and exchanging information between patients and staff, and thus should enjoy an acceptable level of quality. The aim of this study was to identify proper models and criteria to evaluate the quality of hospital websites. Methods This research was a systematic review study. The international databases such as Science Direct, Google Scholar, PubMed, Proquest, Ovid, Elsevier, Springer, and EBSCO together with regiona...

  2. Review and Evaluation of Mindfulness-Based iPhone Apps

    OpenAIRE

    Mani, Madhavan; Kavanagh, David J; Hides, Leanne; Stoyanov, Stoyan R

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence for the positive impact of mindfulness on wellbeing. Mindfulness-based mobile apps may have potential as an alternative delivery medium for training. While there are hundreds of such apps, there is little information on their quality. Objective This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of mindfulness-based iPhone mobile apps and to evaluate their quality using a recently-developed expert rating scale, the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS). It al...

  3. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in ...

  4. A systematic review of factors influencing student ratings in undergraduate medical education course evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Background Student ratings are a popular source of course evaluations in undergraduate medical education. Data on the reliability and validity of such ratings have mostly been derived from studies unrelated to medical education. Since medical education differs considerably from other higher education settings, an analysis of factors influencing overall student ratings with a specific focus on medical education was needed. Methods For the purpose of this systematic review, online databases (Pu...

  5. Evaluating employee assistance programs. A review of methods, outcomes, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, J M; Rightmyer, J F

    1982-01-01

    Renewed interest in assisting troubled employees has led to an upsurge in the development of employee assistance programs, coupled with demands for demonstrable effectiveness. This review examines the nature and scope of these programs, their administrative and methodological context, and the types and outcomes of evaluation studies conducted thus far. Proposals for improving future investigations through a number of different approaches and strategies are then made.

  6. Integrating social justice concerns into economic evaluation for healthcare and public health: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhanin, Vadim; Searle, Alexandra; Zwerling, Alice; Dowdy, David W; Taylor, Holly A; Merritt, Maria W

    2018-02-01

    Social justice is the moral imperative to avoid and remediate unfair distributions of societal disadvantage. In priority setting in healthcare and public health, social justice reaches beyond fairness in the distribution of health outcomes and economic impacts to encompass fairness in the distribution of policy impacts upon other dimensions of well-being. There is an emerging awareness of the need for economic evaluation to integrate all such concerns. We performed a systematic review (1) to describe methodological solutions suitable for integrating social justice concerns into economic evaluation, and (2) to describe the challenges that those solutions face. To be included, publications must have captured fairness considerations that (a) involve cross-dimensional subjective personal life experience and (b) can be manifested at the level of subpopulations. We identified relevant publications using an electronic search in EMBASE, PubMed, EconLit, PsycInfo, Philosopher's Index, and Scopus, including publications available in English in the past 20 years. Two reviewers independently appraised candidate publications, extracted data, and synthesized findings in narrative form. Out of 2388 publications reviewed, 26 were included. Solutions sought either to incorporate relevant fairness considerations directly into economic evaluation or to report them alongside cost-effectiveness measures. The majority of reviewed solutions, if adapted to integrate social justice concerns, would require their explicit quantification. Four broad challenges related to the implementation of these solutions were identified: clarifying the normative basis; measuring and determining the relative importance of criteria representing that basis; combining the criteria; and evaluating trade-offs. All included solutions must grapple with an inherent tension: they must either face the normative and operational challenges of quantifying social justice concerns or accede to offering incomplete policy

  7. Evaluation Studies of Robotic Rollators by the User Perspective: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Christian; Ullrich, Phoebe; Geravand, Milad; Peer, Angelika; Hauer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Robotic rollators enhance the basic functions of established devices by technically advanced physical, cognitive, or sensory support to increase autonomy in persons with severe impairment. In the evaluation of such ambient assisted living solutions, both the technical and user perspectives are important to prove usability, effectiveness and safety, and to ensure adequate device application. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the methodology of studies evaluating robotic rollators with focus on the user perspective and to give recommendations for future evaluation studies. A systematic literature search up to December 31, 2014, was conducted based on the Cochrane Review methodology using the electronic databases PubMed and IEEE Xplore. Articles were selected according to the following inclusion criteria: evaluation studies of robotic rollators documenting human-robot interaction, no case reports, published in English language. Twenty-eight studies were identified that met the predefined inclusion criteria. Large heterogeneity in the definitions of the target user group, study populations, study designs and assessment methods was found across the included studies. No generic methodology to evaluate robotic rollators could be identified. We found major methodological shortcomings related to insufficient sample descriptions and sample sizes, and lack of appropriate, standardized and validated assessment methods. Long-term use in habitual environment was also not evaluated. Apart from the heterogeneity, methodological deficits in most of the identified studies became apparent. Recommendations for future evaluation studies include: clear definition of target user group, adequate selection of subjects, inclusion of other assistive mobility devices for comparison, evaluation of the habitual use of advanced prototypes, adequate assessment strategy with established, standardized and validated methods, and statistical analysis of study results. Assessment

  8. Isokinetic Evaluation of the Hip Flexor and Extensor Muscles: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapparoli, Fabricio Yuri; Riberto, Marcelo

    2017-11-01

    Isokinetic dynamometry testing is a safe and reliable method accepted as the "gold standard" in the evaluation of muscle strength in the open kinetic chain. Isokinetic hip examinations face problems in the standardization of the position of the equipment axis, in the individual being examined, and in the adjustment of the lever arm and in stabilization strategies for the patients during the tests. Identification of the methodologic procedures with best reproducibility is also needed. To review the literature to evaluate the parameters used for the isokinetic evaluation of the hip flexor and extensor muscles and its reproducibility. This is a systematic literature review of the Cochrane, LILACS, PEDro, PubMed, and SciELO databases. The inclusion criteria were articles on the evaluation of hip flexor and/or extensor muscular strength with an isokinetic dynamometer and articles that analyzed the ICC or Pearson's reproducibility. The information extracted was positioning of the patient; positioning of the dynamometer axis; positioning of the lever arm; angular speed; sample size, pathology; type of contraction; and ICC and Pearson's results. 204 articles were found, from which 14 were selected that evaluated hip flexor and extensor muscles, involving 550 individuals who were submitted to an isokinetic hip evaluation. Five articles obtained the best result in reproducibility and had their methodology analyzed. To obtain better reproducibility of the isokinetic evaluation of the hip flexor and extensor muscles, the following recommendations must be followed: the individual must be positioned in the supine position and the dynamometer axis must be aligned with the greater trochanter of the femur. The positioning of the lever arm must be in the most distal region of the thigh possible. The angular speed used to analyze torque peak and muscle work was 60°/s, and to evaluate the muscle power it was 180°/s, with concentric and eccentric contractions being analyzed.

  9. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use

  10. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  11. The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration Instrument Review Project: a methodology to promote rigorous evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara C; Stanick, Cameo F; Martinez, Ruben G; Weiner, Bryan J; Kim, Mimi; Barwick, Melanie; Comtois, Katherine A

    2015-01-08

    Identification of psychometrically strong instruments for the field of implementation science is a high priority underscored in a recent National Institutes of Health working meeting (October 2013). Existing instrument reviews are limited in scope, methods, and findings. The Society for Implementation Research Collaboration Instrument Review Project's objectives address these limitations by identifying and applying a unique methodology to conduct a systematic and comprehensive review of quantitative instruments assessing constructs delineated in two of the field's most widely used frameworks, adopt a systematic search process (using standard search strings), and engage an international team of experts to assess the full range of psychometric criteria (reliability, construct and criterion validity). Although this work focuses on implementation of psychosocial interventions in mental health and health-care settings, the methodology and results will likely be useful across a broad spectrum of settings. This effort has culminated in a centralized online open-access repository of instruments depicting graphical head-to-head comparisons of their psychometric properties. This article describes the methodology and preliminary outcomes. The seven stages of the review, synthesis, and evaluation methodology include (1) setting the scope for the review, (2) identifying frameworks to organize and complete the review, (3) generating a search protocol for the literature review of constructs, (4) literature review of specific instruments, (5) development of an evidence-based assessment rating criteria, (6) data extraction and rating instrument quality by a task force of implementation experts to inform knowledge synthesis, and (7) the creation of a website repository. To date, this multi-faceted and collaborative search and synthesis methodology has identified over 420 instruments related to 34 constructs (total 48 including subconstructs) that are relevant to implementation

  12. Review of economic evaluations of mask and respirator use for protection against respiratory infection transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, Shohini; MacIntyre, C Raina; Newall, Anthony T

    2015-10-13

    There has been increasing debate surrounding mask and respirator interventions to control respiratory infection transmission in both healthcare and community settings. As decision makers are considering the recommendations they should evaluate how to provide the most efficient protection strategies with minimum costs. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate the existing economic evaluation literature in this area and to offer advice on how future evaluations on this topic should be conducted. We searched the Scopus database for all literature on economic evaluation of mask or respirator use to control respiratory infection transmission. Reference lists from the identified studies were also manually searched. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria from the initial 806 studies identified by the search strategy and our manual search. Five studies considered interventions for seasonal and/or pandemic influenza, with one also considering SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome). The other two studies focussed on tuberculosis transmission control interventions. The settings and methodologies of the studies varied greatly. No low-middle income settings were identified. Only one of the reviewed studies cited clinical evidence to inform their mask/respirator intervention effectiveness parameters. Mask and respirator interventions were generally reported by the study authors to be cost saving or cost-effective when compared to no intervention or other control measures, however the evaluations had important limitations. Given the large cost differential between masks and respirators, there is a need for more comprehensive economic evaluations to compare the relative costs and benefits of these interventions in situations and settings where alternative options are potentially applicable. There are at present insufficient well conducted cost-effectiveness studies to inform decision-makers on the value for money of alternative mask/respirator options.

  13. Systematic review of economic evaluation analyses of available vaccines in Spain from 1990 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Isabel; Pérez-Camarero, Santiago; Del Llano, Juan; Peña, Luz María; Hidalgo-Vega, Alvaro

    2013-08-02

    The objective of this survey was to describe the evolution of economic evaluation studies on vaccines available in Spain. We conducted a systematic review of the economic evaluations published by Spanish researchers in major bibliographic databases available online from 1990 to 2012. For all references identified, we limited them to full economic evaluation carried out in Spanish vaccine programs. The following variables were analyzed: type of study, year of publication, vaccine evaluated, the herd immunity and the main methodological aspects proposed by international guidelines. The type of vaccines studied were Hepatitis A and B, Rotavirus, Influenza, Varicella, Tetanus, Measles, Human papillomavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae infection and Neisseria meningitides serogroup C infection. A total of 34 references was included in the study. The number of economic evaluations has been increasing over the years by 86%. For many of the vaccines there were no economic evaluations, while others such as the vaccine against S. pneumoniae infection took up most of the studies. The non-vaccinated comparison was the most used strategy. The cost-effectiveness model was selected in 60% of cases. The most common health outcome was "cost per case prevented" and in 82% of the studies did not consider herd immunity. The results showed a cost-effectiveness ratio which was below breakeven. It is clear that the existence of a huge gap in this kind of work compared to other countries. Although the quality of the work discussed here was significant, we found many areas which could be improved. The reviewed literature exposed the great benefit of vaccination for society by analysing the health outcomes achieved for decades since its implementation. However, the evidence on the efficiency and effectiveness vaccination is not very high, and there are few studies about economic evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Building an evidence base for community health: a review of the quality of program evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Gwyn M; Lawless, Angela P; Baum, Fran E; Hurley, Catherine J; Fry, Denise

    2007-11-01

    An assessment of the quality of program evaluations conducted in South Australian community health services investigated how effective evaluation reporting is in producing an evidence base for community health. Evaluation reports were assessed by a team of reviewers. Practitioner workshops allowed an understanding of the uses of evaluation and what promotes or acts as a barrier to undertaking evaluations. Community health services do undertake a good deal of evaluation. However, reports were not generally explicit in dealing with the principles that underpin community health. Few engaged with program theory or rationale. Typically, reports were of short-term projects with uncertain futures so there may seem little point in considering issues of long-term health outcomes and transferability to other settings. The most important issue from our study is the lack of investment in applied health services research of the sort that will be required to produce the evidence for practice that policy makers desire. The current lack of evidence for community health reflects failure of the system to invest in research and evaluation that is adequately resourced and designed for complex community settings.

  15. A review of psychological assessment instruments for use in bariatric surgery evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lavery, Megan; Merrell Rish, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for patients with extreme obesity and associated medical comorbidities; however, optimal surgical outcomes are not universal. Surgical societies, such as the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), recommend that patients undergo a presurgical psychological evaluation that includes reviewing patients' medical charts, conducting a comprehensive clinical interview, and employing some form of objective psychometric testing. Despite numerous societies recommending the inclusion of self-report assessments, only about 2/3 of clinics actively use psychological testing-some of which have limited empirical support to justify their use. This review aims to critically evaluate the psychometric properties of self-report measures when used in bariatric surgery settings and provide recommendations to help guide clinicians in selecting instruments to use in bariatric surgery evaluations. Recommended assessment batteries include use of a broadband instrument along with a narrowband eating measure. Suggestions for self-report measures to include in a presurgical psychological evaluation in bariatric surgery settings are also provided. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Evaluation Criteria of Noninvasive Telemonitoring for Patients With Heart Failure: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Troskah; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Steichen, Olivier

    2018-01-16

    Telemonitoring can improve heart failure (HF) management, but there is no standardized evaluation framework to comprehensively evaluate its impact. Our objectives were to list the criteria used in published evaluations of noninvasive HF telemonitoring projects, describe how they are used in the evaluation studies, and organize them into a consistent scheme. Articles published from January 1990 to August 2015 were obtained through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Articles were eligible if they were original reports of a noninvasive HF telemonitoring evaluation study in the English language. Studies of implantable telemonitoring devices were excluded. Each selected article was screened to extract the description of the telemonitoring project and the evaluation process and criteria. A qualitative synthesis was performed. We identified and reviewed 128 articles leading to 52 evaluation criteria classified into 6 dimensions: clinical, economic, user perspective, educational, organizational, and technical. The clinical and economic impacts were evaluated in more than 70% of studies, whereas the educational, organizational, and technical impacts were studied in fewer than 15%. User perspective was the most frequently covered dimension in the development phase of telemonitoring projects, whereas clinical and economic impacts were the focus of later phases. Telemonitoring evaluation frameworks should cover all 6 dimensions appropriately distributed along the telemonitoring project lifecycle. Our next goal is to build such a comprehensive evaluation framework for telemonitoring and test it on an ongoing noninvasive HF telemonitoring project. ©Troskah Farnia, Marie-Christine Jaulent, Olivier Steichen. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 16.01.2018.

  17. A desk evaluation review of project VIE/4/009 design and production of nuclear instruments. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A Project Desk Evaluation (PDE) is an intensive review process, using agreed guidelines, of the design, implementation, and the output of a project. This project is exclusively dealing with the design and production of nuclear instruments. The aim of this project would be to develop a viable capability for maintenance and repair of the nuclear instruments at the Dalat Research Institute (DNRI), the premier nuclear centre in Viet Nam, and also to meet the steadily increasing needs of DNRI, as well as of other national institutions, hospitals and universities engaged in the application of nuclear technologies, particularly in the southern part of the country. Project Summary with financial data is given along with training programme. 1 tab

  18. A desk evaluation review of project VIE/4/009 design and production of nuclear instruments. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-09

    A Project Desk Evaluation (PDE) is an intensive review process, using agreed guidelines, of the design, implementation, and the output of a project. This project is exclusively dealing with the design and production of nuclear instruments. The aim of this project would be to develop a viable capability for maintenance and repair of the nuclear instruments at the Dalat Research Institute (DNRI), the premier nuclear centre in Viet Nam, and also to meet the steadily increasing needs of DNRI, as well as of other national institutions, hospitals and universities engaged in the application of nuclear technologies, particularly in the southern part of the country. Project Summary with financial data is given along with training programme. 1 tab.

  19. Report of the Review Committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the fields of Environmental Science and Health Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods, etc., the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of nine experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY2000 in the Department of Environmental Science and Department of Health Physics. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on August 30, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on March 14, 2000. As a result, the Research Evaluation Committee acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  20. A desk evaluation review of project POL/5/006 plant breeding using induced mutations. Project desk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Projects POL/5/006 was initiated in 1985 to assist the Government of Poland in improving the mutation breeding efforts in the country to promote the development of new and higher yielding crop varieties. The difficult economic situation in the country at this time restricted the procurement of special equipment, spare parts and supplies from abroad and, therefore, impeded research and development work in this field. The project was implemented using a distinctive approach and design characterized by having six recipient institutions and the establishment of one central gamma-irradiation facility to be made available to all participating institutions for mutation induction. The project was formally closed in 1989. The review of project POL/5/006 was undertaken in accord with the expressed wishes of the Board of Governors for selected ex-post evaluations of completed projects. The main purpose of the review was to ascertain if the project objectives were achieved, and to determine what impact the technical assistance provided may have had on continued post-project and current plant breeding programmes in Poland

  1. A desk evaluation review of project POL/5/006 plant breeding using induced mutations. Project desk evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-14

    Projects POL/5/006 was initiated in 1985 to assist the Government of Poland in improving the mutation breeding efforts in the country to promote the development of new and higher yielding crop varieties. The difficult economic situation in the country at this time restricted the procurement of special equipment, spare parts and supplies from abroad and, therefore, impeded research and development work in this field. The project was implemented using a distinctive approach and design characterized by having six recipient institutions and the establishment of one central gamma-irradiation facility to be made available to all participating institutions for mutation induction. The project was formally closed in 1989. The review of project POL/5/006 was undertaken in accord with the expressed wishes of the Board of Governors for selected ex-post evaluations of completed projects. The main purpose of the review was to ascertain if the project objectives were achieved, and to determine what impact the technical assistance provided may have had on continued post-project and current plant breeding programmes in Poland.

  2. Evaluating and comparing imaging techniques: a review and classification of study designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The design of studies to evaluate and compare imaging techniques are reviewed. Thirteen principles for the design of studies of diagnostic accuracy are given. Because of the 'independence principle' these studies are not able directly to evaluate the contribution of a technique to clinical management. For the latter, the 'clinical value' study design is recommended. A classification of study designs is proposed in parallel with the standard classification of clinical trials. Studies of diagnostic accuracy are analogous to Phase II, whereas studies evaluating the contribution to clinical management correspond to the Phase III category. Currently the majority of published studies employ the Phase II design. More emphasis on Phase III studies is required. (author)

  3. A Review on VSC-HVDC Reliability Modeling and Evaluation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L.; Tang, Q.; Li, T.; Wang, Y.; Song, F.

    2017-05-01

    With the fast development of power electronics, voltage-source converter (VSC) HVDC technology presents cost-effective ways for bulk power transmission. An increasing number of VSC-HVDC projects has been installed worldwide. Their reliability affects the profitability of the system and therefore has a major impact on the potential investors. In this paper, an overview of the recent advances in the area of reliability evaluation for VSC-HVDC systems is provided. Taken into account the latest multi-level converter topology, the VSC-HVDC system is categorized into several sub-systems and the reliability data for the key components is discussed based on sources with academic and industrial backgrounds. The development of reliability evaluation methodologies is reviewed and the issues surrounding the different computation approaches are briefly analysed. A general VSC-HVDC reliability evaluation procedure is illustrated in this paper.

  4. Medication reviews led by community pharmacists in Switzerland: a qualitative survey to evaluate barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niquille A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1 To evaluate the participation rate and identify the practical barriers to implementing a community pharmacist-led medication review service in francophone Switzerland and, 2 To assess the effectiveness of external support.Methods: A qualitative survey was undertaken to identify barriers to patient inclusion and medication review delivery in daily practice among all contactable independent pharmacists working in francophone Switzerland (n=78 who were members of a virtual chain (pharmacieplus, regardless of their participation in a simultaneous cross-sectional study. This study analyzed the dissemination of a medication review service including a prescription and drug utilization review with access to clinical data, a patient interview and a pharmaceutical report to the physicians. In addition, we observed an exploratory and external coaching for pharmacists that we launched seven months after the beginning of the cross-sectional study. Results: Poor motivation on the part of pharmacists and difficulties communicating with physicians and patients were the primary obstacles identified. Lack of time and lack of self-confidence in administering the medication review process were the most commonly perceived practical barriers to the implementation of the new service. The main facilitators to overcome these issues may be well-planned workflow organization techniques, strengthened by an adequate remuneration scheme and a comprehensive and practice-based training course that includes skill-building in pharmacotherapy and communication. External support may partially compensate for a weak organizational framework.Conclusions: To facilitate the implementation of a medication review service, a strong local networking with physicians, an effective workflow management and a practice- and communications-focused training for pharmacists and their teams seem key elements required. External support can be useful to help some pharmacists improve their

  5. Systematic Review of Health Economic Evaluation Studies Developed in Brazil from 1980 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimoni, Tassia Cristina; Leandro, Roseli; Rozman, Luciana Martins; Craig, Dawn; Iglesias, Cynthia P; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; de Soárez, Patrícia Coelho

    2018-01-01

    Brazil has sought to use economic evaluation to support healthcare decision-making processes. While a number of health economic evaluations (HEEs) have been conducted, no study has systematically reviewed the quality of Brazilian HEE. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an overview regarding the state of HEE research and to evaluate the number, characteristics, and quality of reporting of published HEE studies conducted in a Brazilian setting. We systematically searched electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Latin American, and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences Database, Scientific Electronic Library Online, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, health technology assessment Database, Bireme, and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde Economia da Saúde ); citation indexes (SCOPUS, Web of Science), and Sistema de Informação da Rede Brasileira de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde . Partial and full HEEs published between 1980 and 2013 that referred to a Brazilian setting were considered for inclusion. In total, 535 studies were included in the review, 36.8% of these were considered to be full HEE. The category of healthcare technologies more frequently assessed were procedures (34.8%) and drugs (28.8%) which main objective was treatment (72.1%). Forty-four percent of the studies reported their funding source and 36% reported a conflict of interest. Overall, the full HEE quality of reporting was satisfactory. But some items were generally poorly reported and significant improvement is required: (1) methods used to estimate healthcare resource use quantities and unit costs, (2) methods used to estimate utility values, (3) sources of funding, and (4) conflicts of interest. A steady number of HEE have been published in Brazil since 1980. To improve their contribution to inform national healthcare policy efforts need to be made to enhance the quality of reporting of HEEs and promote improvements in the way HEEs are designed, implemented (i.e., using sound

  6. Evaluating healthcare priority setting at the meso level: A thematic review of empirical literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waithaka, Dennis; Tsofa, Benjamin; Barasa, Edwine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Decentralization of health systems has made sub-national/regional healthcare systems the backbone of healthcare delivery. These regions are tasked with the difficult responsibility of determining healthcare priorities and resource allocation amidst scarce resources. We aimed to review empirical literature that evaluated priority setting practice at the meso (sub-national) level of health systems. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google scholar databases and supplemented these with manual searching for relevant studies, based on the reference list of selected papers. We only included empirical studies that described and evaluated, or those that only evaluated priority setting practice at the meso-level. A total of 16 papers were identified from LMICs and HICs. We analyzed data from the selected papers by thematic review. Results: Few studies used systematic priority setting processes, and all but one were from HICs. Both formal and informal criteria are used in priority-setting, however, informal criteria appear to be more perverse in LMICs compared to HICs. The priority setting process at the meso-level is a top-down approach with minimal involvement of the community. Accountability for reasonableness was the most common evaluative framework as it was used in 12 of the 16 studies. Efficiency, reallocation of resources and options for service delivery redesign were the most common outcome measures used to evaluate priority setting. Limitations: Our study was limited by the fact that there are very few empirical studies that have evaluated priority setting at the meso-level and there is likelihood that we did not capture all the studies. Conclusions: Improving priority setting practices at the meso level is crucial to strengthening health systems. This can be achieved through incorporating and adapting systematic priority setting processes and frameworks to the context where used, and making considerations of both process

  7. Systematic mapping review about costs and economic evaluations of skin conditions and diseases in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Hahnel, Elisabeth; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Skin conditions and dermatological diseases associated with advanced age (e.g. fungal infection, dry skin and itch) receive increasingly attention in clinical practice and research. Cost and economic evaluations are important sources to inform priority setting and ressource allocation decisions in healthcare. The economics of skin conditions in aged populations has not been systematically reviewed so far. The aim of this mapping review was to summarize the economic evidence of selected skin conditions in the aged (65 + years). A mapping literature review and evidence summary was conducted. Searches were conducted in data bases Medline and Embase via OVID. Cinahl was searched using EBSCO. References lists of potential eligible studies, reviews, guidelines or other sources were screened for additional literature. For evaluation of methodological quality of full economic analyses the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC) checklist was used. Database searches resulted in 1388 records. A total of 270 articles were read in full-text. Thirty-five publications were finally included in the data analysis reporting 38 economic analyses. Ten cost of illness analyses and 26 cost-effectiveness analyses reporting about pressure ulcers, skin tears, pressure ulcers, incontinence associated dermatitis and intertrigo/contact dermatitis/candidiasis treatment and prevention and onychomycosis testing were identified. Limited evidence indicated that low air loss beds were more cost effective than standard beds for prevention of pressure ulcers. Standardized skin care regimens seem to lower the incidence of pressure ulcers, skin tears and IAD but a cost saving effect was not always observed. Findings of this mapping review indicate that there is a paucity of high quality evidence regarding the economic impact of age-associated skin conditions and diseases. Substantial heterogeneity in terms of study design, evaluation perspective, time period, and way of cost estimation was

  8. Toxicological Evaluations of Rare Earths and Their Health Impacts to Workers: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Taek Rim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In concert with the development of new materials in the last decade, the need for toxicological studies of these materials has been increasing. These new materials include a group of rare earths (RE. The use of RE nanotechnology is being considered in some green applications, to increase their efficiency by using nano-sized RE compounds, and therefore hazard evaluation and risk assessment are highly recommended. This review was conducted through an extensive contemplation of the literatures in toxicology with in vitro and in vivo studies. Major aspects reviewed were the toxicological evaluations of these elements and metallic compounds at the molecular and cellular level, animal and human epidemiological studies and environmental and occupational health impacts on workers. We also discuss the future prospect of industries with appliances using RE together with the significance of preventive efforts for workers’ health. To establish a safe and healthy working environment for RE industries, the use of biomarkers is increasing to provide sustainable measure, due to demand for information about the health risks from unfavorable exposures. Given the recent toxicological results on the exposure of cells, animals and workers to RE compounds, it is important to review the toxicological studies to improve the current understanding of the RE compounds in the field of occupational health. This will help to establish a sustainable, safe and healthy working environment for RE industries.

  9. Evaluation of Nutrition Interventions in Children in Conflict Zones: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Grace J; Lama, Sonam D; Martinez-Brockman, Josefa L; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    Food and nutrition insecurity becomes increasingly worse in areas affected by armed conflict. Children affected by conflict, or in war-torn settings, face a disproportionate burden of malnutrition and poor health outcomes. As noted by humanitarian response reviews, there is a need for a stronger evidence-based response to humanitarian crises. To achieve this, we systematically searched and evaluated existing nutrition interventions carried out in conflict settings that assessed their impact on children's nutrition status. To evaluate the impact of nutrition interventions on children's nutrition and growth status, we identified published literature through EMBASE, PubMed, and Global Health by using a combination of relevant text words and Medical Subject Heading terms. Studies for this review must have included children (aged ≤18 y), been conducted in conflict or postconflict settings, and assessed a nutrition intervention that measured ≥1 outcome for nutrition status (i.e., stunting, wasting, or underweight). Eleven studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria for this review. Five different nutrition interventions were identified and showed modest results in decreasing the prevalence of stunting, wasting, underweight, reduction in severe or moderate acute malnutrition or both, mortality, anemia, and diarrhea. Overall, nutrition interventions in conflict settings were associated with improved children's nutrition or growth status. Emergency nutrition programs should continue to follow recent recommendations to expand coverage and access (beyond refugee camps to rural areas) and ensure that aid and nutrition interventions are distributed equitably in all conflict-affected populations. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-05-03

    This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation - 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD).

  11. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT NDT values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ''primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary

  12. A systematic review of economic evaluations of health and health-related interventions in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehlmoos Tracey P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Economic evaluation is used for effective resource allocation in health sector. Accumulated knowledge about economic evaluation of health programs in Bangladesh is not currently available. While a number of economic evaluation studies have been performed in Bangladesh, no systematic investigation of the studies has been done to our knowledge. The aim of this current study is to systematically review the published articles in peer-reviewed journals on economic evaluation of health and health-related interventions in Bangladesh. Methods Literature searches was carried out during November-December 2008 with a combination of key words, MeSH terms and other free text terms as suitable for the purpose. A comprehensive search strategy was developed to search Medline by the PubMed interface. The first specific interest was mapping the articles considering the areas of exploration by economic evaluation and the second interest was to scrutiny the methodological quality of studies. The methodological quality of economic evaluation of all articles has been scrutinized against the checklist developed by Evers Silvia and associates. Result Of 1784 potential articles 12 were accepted for inclusion. Ten studies described the competing alternatives clearly and only two articles stated the perspective of their articles clearly. All studies included direct cost, incurred by the providers. Only one study included the cost of community donated resources and volunteer costs. Two studies calculated the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER. Six of the studies applied some sort of sensitivity analysis. Two of the studies discussed financial affordability of expected implementers and four studies discussed the issue of generalizability for application in different context. Conclusion Very few economic evaluation studies in Bangladesh are found in different areas of health and health-related interventions, which does not provide a strong basis

  13. A systematic review of economic evaluations of health and health-related interventions in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Economic evaluation is used for effective resource allocation in health sector. Accumulated knowledge about economic evaluation of health programs in Bangladesh is not currently available. While a number of economic evaluation studies have been performed in Bangladesh, no systematic investigation of the studies has been done to our knowledge. The aim of this current study is to systematically review the published articles in peer-reviewed journals on economic evaluation of health and health-related interventions in Bangladesh. Methods Literature searches was carried out during November-December 2008 with a combination of key words, MeSH terms and other free text terms as suitable for the purpose. A comprehensive search strategy was developed to search Medline by the PubMed interface. The first specific interest was mapping the articles considering the areas of exploration by economic evaluation and the second interest was to scrutiny the methodological quality of studies. The methodological quality of economic evaluation of all articles has been scrutinized against the checklist developed by Evers Silvia and associates. Result Of 1784 potential articles 12 were accepted for inclusion. Ten studies described the competing alternatives clearly and only two articles stated the perspective of their articles clearly. All studies included direct cost, incurred by the providers. Only one study included the cost of community donated resources and volunteer costs. Two studies calculated the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). Six of the studies applied some sort of sensitivity analysis. Two of the studies discussed financial affordability of expected implementers and four studies discussed the issue of generalizability for application in different context. Conclusion Very few economic evaluation studies in Bangladesh are found in different areas of health and health-related interventions, which does not provide a strong basis of knowledge in the area. The

  14. Economic evaluation of HBV vaccination: A systematic review of recent publications (2000-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Mannocci, Alice; Saulle, Rosella; Colamesta, Vittoria; Meggiolaro, Angela; Mipatrini, Daniele; Sinopoli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the economic evaluations (EE) of HBV vaccination, taking also into account the studies published in the new millennium. An extensive scientific literature review was conducted using two electronic medical journal databases: Scopus and PubMed engines for published studies on EE of HBV vaccination. 22 articles were reviewed, 9, 5 and 8 cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit and cost-utility analysis, respectively. Studies were mainly concerning EE of universal vaccination (UV), mostly with regards to low or low-medium income countries. For high income countries, EE were focused on the possible implementation of HBV vaccination in particular settings, such as diabetic, renal and other chronic conditions care, as well as infectious diseasesUV has usually a very good cost-effectiveness ratio (80%), ranging from cost-saving (China) or few Euro per LY/QALY gained (in Thailand, and Vietnam) to 630.00$/QALY in USA (Asian and Pacific Islands) Moreover, EE of HBV vaccination are favorable in the infectious diseases field as well as for chronic conditions. In relation to diabetes the studies gave controversial results. This systematic review highlighted the importance of introducing HBV vaccination not only for infant UV program but also for other settings in which patients are people affected by communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  15. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 enriched uranium receipt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-01-01

    Review of NMP-NCS-930087, open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-04 Enriched Uranium Receipt (U), July 30, 1993, close quotes was requested of SRTC (Savannah River Technology Center) Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine the mass limit for Engineered Low Level Trench (ELLT) waste uranium burial. The intent is to bury uranium in pits that would be separated by a specified amount of undisturbed soil. The scope of the technical review, documented in this report, consisted of (1) an independent check of the methods and models employed, (2) independent HRXN/KENO-V.a calculations of alternate configurations, (3) application of ANSI/ANS 8.1, and (4) verification of WSRC Nuclear Criticality Safety Manual procedures. The NCSE under review concludes that a 500 gram limit per burial position is acceptable to ensure the burial site remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. This reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  16. Review and evaluation of TDI diesel generator owner's group program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This report documents a review, performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), of the Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI) Diesel Generator Owner's Group Program Plan. This report was prepared as part of the technical support PNL is providing to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Division of Licensing, on matters pertaining to the reliability of TDI diesel generators as emergency power sources for safety-related nuclear systems. The report presents the comments and conclusions reached by PNL, with the advice and counsel of five diesel engine consultants, on the principal elements of the Owners' Group Plan: Generic Problem Resolution, Design Review/Quality Revalidation, and Engine Testing and Inspection. Also included are PNL's comments on the related issues of Surveillance and Maintenance, and Administrative Controls. The conclusions drawn from PNL's evaluation of these issues form the basis for two additional topics addressed in the report: Critical Elements Required to Establish Diesel Engine Operability and Reliability, and Considerations for Interim Licensing

  17. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutenkova, E., E-mail: len--k@yandex.ru; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M., E-mail: khodanovich@mail.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenina pr., 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  18. Evaluation of Fatigue Behavior in Dental Implants from In Vitro Clinical Tests: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Rojo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the area of dentistry, there is a wide variety of designs of dental implant and materials, especially titanium, which aims to avoid failures and increase their clinical durability. The purpose of this review was to evaluate fatigue behavior in different connections and implant materials, as well as their loading conditions and response to failure. In vitro tests under normal and dynamic loading conditions evaluating fatigue at implant and abutment connection were included. A search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. Data extraction was performed independently by two reviewers. The quality of selected studies was assessed using the Cochrane Handbook proposed by the tool for clinical trials. Nineteen studies were included. Fourteen studies had an unclear risk and five had high risk of bias. Due to the heterogeneity of the data and the evaluation of the quality of the studies, meta-analysis could not be performed. Evidence from this study suggests that both internal and morse taper connections presented a better behavior to failure. However, it is necessary to unify criteria in the methodological design of in vitro studies, following methodological guidelines and establishing conditions that allow the homogenization of designs in ISO (International Organization for Standardization standards.

  19. Economic evaluations of comprehensive geriatric assessment in surgical patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamer, Gilgamesh; Saravana-Bawan, Bianka; van der Westhuizen, Brenden; Chambers, Thane; Ohinmaa, Arto; Khadaroo, Rachel G

    2017-10-01

    Seniors presenting with surgical disease face increased risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality and have increased treatment costs. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is proposed to reduce morbidity, mortality, and the cost after surgery. A systematic review of CGA in emergency surgical patients was conducted. The primary outcome was cost-effectiveness; secondary outcomes were length of stay, return of function, and mortality. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were predefined. Systematic searches of MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, and National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database were performed. Text screening, bias assessment, and data extraction were performed by two authors. There were 560 articles identified; abstract review excluded 499 articles and full-text review excluded 53 articles. Eight studies were included; one nonorthopedic trauma and seven orthopedic trauma studies. Bias assessment revealed moderate to high risk of bias for all studies. Economic evaluation assessment identified two high-quality studies and six moderate or low quality studies. Pooled analysis from four studies assessed loss of function; loss of function decreased in the experimental arm (odds ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88-0.97). Pooled results for length of stay from five studies found a significant decrease (mean difference: -1.17, 95% CI: -1.63 to -0.71) after excluding the nonorthopedic trauma study. Pooled mortality was significantly decreased in seven studies (risk ratio: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.67-0.90). All studies decreased cost and improved health outcomes in a cost-effective manner. CGA improved return of function and mortality with reduced cost or improved utility. Our review suggests that CGA is economically dominant and the most cost-effective care model for orthogeriatric patients. Further research should examine other surgical fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating Platelet-Rich Therapy for Facial Aesthetics and Alopecia: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motosk O, Catherine C; Khouri, Kimberly S; Poudrier, Grace; Sinno, Sammy; Hazen, Alexes

    2018-05-01

    Despite the growing popularity of platelet-rich plasma, existing evidence supporting its efficacy remains controversial due to the lack of large-scale studies and standardized protocols for preparation and application. This article reviews its use in facial rejuvenation, fat grafting, acne scarring, and androgenic alopecia. Emphasis is placed on comparing methods of platelet-rich plasma preparation and application across studies. A systematic review was performed for articles published between 2006 and 2015. All clinical studies and case reports that addressed platelet-rich plasma alone and/or in combination with fat grafting for facial rejuvenation, acne scarring, or androgenic alopecia were included. Of the 22 articles included in the analysis, seven studies used platelet-rich plasma alone for facial rejuvenation, seven in combination with fat grafting, two for treatment of acne scarring, and six for treatment of androgenic alopecia. Individual study procedures, means of evaluation, and significant results are summarized. Although the majority of studies in this review report positive results, significant variation exists in preparation protocols and in the number and frequency of clinical treatments. The majority of studies report positive results for all indications evaluated in this review, but the procedure is limited by the lack of a standardized method for preparation and application of platelet-rich plasma. The extent to which significant variability in platelet-rich plasma preparation and/or application methods may affect clinical outcomes is not completely clear. In the interim, we present a consolidation of platelet-rich plasma treatment techniques and outcomes currently in use to help guide physicians in their clinical practice.

  1. Economic Evaluations of Pathology Tests, 2010-2015: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Rory D; Li, Ian W; Geelhoed, Elizabeth A; Sanfilippo, Frank M; St John, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Concerns about pathology testing such as the value provided by new tests and the potential for inappropriate utilization have led to a greater need to assess costs and benefits. Economic evaluations are a formal method of analyzing costs and benefits, yet for pathology tests, questions remain about the scope and quality of the economic evidence. To describe the extent and quality of published evidence provided by economic evaluations of pathology tests from 2010 to 2015. Economic evaluations relating to pathology tests from 2010 to 2015 were reviewed. Eight databases were searched for published studies, and details recorded for the country, clinical focus, type of testing, and consideration of sensitivity, specificity, and false test results. The reporting quality of studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist and cost-effectiveness ratios were analyzed for publication bias. We found 356 economic evaluations of pathology tests, most of which regarded developed countries. The most common economic evaluations were cost-utility analyses and the most common clinical focus was infectious diseases. More than half of the studies considered sensitivity and specificity, but few studies considered the impact of false test results. The average Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist score was 17 out of 24. Cost-utility ratios were commonly less than $10,000/quality-adjusted life-year or more than $200,000/quality-adjusted life-year. The number of economic evaluations of pathology tests has increased in recent years, but the rate of increase has plateaued. Furthermore, the quality of studies in the past 5 years was highly variable, and there is some question of publication bias in reporting cost-effectiveness ratios. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmaceutical priority setting and the use of health economic evaluations: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erntoft, Sandra

    2011-06-01

    To investigate which factors and criteria are used in priority setting of pharmaceuticals, in what contexts health economic evaluations are used, and barriers to the use of health economic evaluations at micro, meso, and macro health-care levels. The search for empirical articles was based on the MeSH index (Medical Substance Heading), including the search terms "economic evaluation," "cost-effectiveness analysis," "cost-utility analysis," "cost-benefit analysis," "pharmacoeconomic," AND "drug cost(s)," AND "eligibility determination," AND "decision-making," AND "rationing," AND formulary. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EconLit, Cochrane, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. More than 3100 studies were identified, 31 of which were included in this review. The use of health economic evaluations at all three health-care levels was investigated in three countries (United States [US], United Kingdom [UK], and Sweden). Postal and telephone survey methods dominated (n = 17) followed by interviews (n = 13), document analysis (n = 10), and observations of group deliberations (n = 9). The cost-effectiveness criterion was most important at the macro level. A number of contextual uses of health economic evaluations were identified, including importantly the legitimizing of decisions, structuring the priority-setting process, and requesting additional budgets to finance expensive pharmaceuticals. Factors that seem to support the increased use of health economic evaluations are well-developed frameworks for evaluations, the presence of health economic skills, and an explicit priority-setting process. Differences in how economic evaluations are used at macro, meso, and micro levels are attributed to differences in the preconditions at each level. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Usability Evaluation Methods for Gesture-Based Games: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simor, Fernando Winckler; Brum, Manoela Rogofski; Schmidt, Jaison Dairon Ebertz; Rieder, Rafael; De Marchi, Ana Carolina Bertoletti

    2016-10-04

    Gestural interaction systems are increasingly being used, mainly in games, expanding the idea of entertainment and providing experiences with the purpose of promoting better physical and/or mental health. Therefore, it is necessary to establish mechanisms for evaluating the usability of these interfaces, which make gestures the basis of interaction, to achieve a balance between functionality and ease of use. This study aims to present the results of a systematic review focused on usability evaluation methods for gesture-based games, considering devices with motion-sensing capability. We considered the usability methods used, the common interface issues, and the strategies adopted to build good gesture-based games. The research was centered on four electronic databases: IEEE, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Springer, and Science Direct from September 4 to 21, 2015. Within 1427 studies evaluated, 10 matched the eligibility criteria. As a requirement, we considered studies about gesture-based games, Kinect and/or Wii as devices, and the use of a usability method to evaluate the user interface. In the 10 studies found, there was no standardization in the methods because they considered diverse analysis variables. Heterogeneously, authors used different instruments to evaluate gesture-based interfaces and no default approach was proposed. Questionnaires were the most used instruments (70%, 7/10), followed by interviews (30%, 3/10), and observation and video recording (20%, 2/10). Moreover, 60% (6/10) of the studies used gesture-based serious games to evaluate the performance of elderly participants in rehabilitation tasks. This highlights the need for creating an evaluation protocol for older adults to provide a user-friendly interface according to the user's age and limitations. Through this study, we conclude this field is in need of a usability evaluation method for serious games, especially games for older adults, and that the definition of a methodology

  4. Methods Used in Economic Evaluations of Chronic Kidney Disease Testing — A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Andrew J.; Breheny, Katie; Deeks, Jon; Khunti, Kamlesh; Sharpe, Claire; Ottridge, Ryan S.; Stevens, Paul E.; Cockwell, Paul; Kalra, Philp A.; Lamb, Edmund J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high in general populations around the world. Targeted testing and screening for CKD are often conducted to help identify individuals that may benefit from treatment to ameliorate or prevent their disease progression. Aims This systematic review examines the methods used in economic evaluations of testing and screening in CKD, with a particular focus on whether test accuracy has been considered, and how analysis has incorporated issues that may be important to the patient, such as the impact of testing on quality of life and the costs they incur. Methods Articles that described model-based economic evaluations of patient testing interventions focused on CKD were identified through the searching of electronic databases and the hand searching of the bibliographies of the included studies. Results The initial electronic searches identified 2,671 papers of which 21 were included in the final review. Eighteen studies focused on proteinuria, three evaluated glomerular filtration rate testing and one included both tests. The full impact of inaccurate test results was frequently not considered in economic evaluations in this setting as a societal perspective was rarely adopted. The impact of false positive tests on patients in terms of the costs incurred in re-attending for repeat testing, and the anxiety associated with a positive test was almost always overlooked. In one study where the impact of a false positive test on patient quality of life was examined in sensitivity analysis, it had a significant impact on the conclusions drawn from the model. Conclusion Future economic evaluations of kidney function testing should examine testing and monitoring pathways from the perspective of patients, to ensure that issues that are important to patients, such as the possibility of inaccurate test results, are properly considered in the analysis. PMID:26465773

  5. Innovative use of the integrative review to evaluate evidence of technology transformation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2015-12-01

    Healthcare is in a period significant transformational activity through the accelerated adoption of healthcare technologies, new reimbursement systems that emphasize shared savings and care coordination, and the common place use of mobile technologies by patients, providers, and others. The complexity of healthcare creates barriers to transformational activity and has the potential to inhibit the desired paths toward change envisioned by policymakers. Methods for understanding how change is occurring within this complex environment are important to the evaluation of delivery system reform and the role of technology in healthcare transformation. This study examines the use on an integrative review methodology to evaluate the healthcare literature for evidence of technology transformation in healthcare. The methodology integrates the evaluation of a broad set of literature with an established evaluative framework to develop a more complete understanding of a particular topic. We applied this methodology and the framework of punctuated equilibrium (PEq) to the analysis of the healthcare literature from 2004 to 2012 for evidence of technology transformation, a time during which technology was at the forefront of healthcare policy. The analysis demonstrated that the established PEq framework applied to the literature showed considerable potential for evaluating the progress of policies that encourage healthcare transformation. Significant inhibitors to change were identified through the integrative review and categorized into ten themes that describe the resistant structure of healthcare delivery: variations in the environment; market complexity; regulations; flawed risks and rewards; change theories; barriers; ethical considerations; competition and sustainability; environmental elements, and internal elements. We hypothesize that the resistant nature of the healthcare system described by this study creates barriers to the direct consumer involvement and engagement

  6. Modeling companion diagnostics in economic evaluations of targeted oncology therapies: systematic review and methodological checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Brett; Tan, Marcus; Harris, Anthony; Lorgelly, Paula

    2015-02-01

    The successful use of a targeted therapy is intrinsically linked to the ability of a companion diagnostic to correctly identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment. The aim of this study was to review the characteristics of companion diagnostics that are of importance for inclusion in an economic evaluation. Approaches for including these characteristics in model-based economic evaluations are compared with the intent to describe best practice methods. Five databases and government agency websites were searched to identify model-based economic evaluations comparing a companion diagnostic and subsequent treatment strategy to another alternative treatment strategy with model parameters for the sensitivity and specificity of the companion diagnostic (primary synthesis). Economic evaluations that limited model parameters for the companion diagnostic to only its cost were also identified (secondary synthesis). Quality was assessed using the Quality of Health Economic Studies instrument. 30 studies were included in the review (primary synthesis n = 12; secondary synthesis n = 18). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios may be lower when the only parameter for the companion diagnostic included in a model is the cost of testing. Incorporating the test's accuracy in addition to its cost may be a more appropriate methodological approach. Altering the prevalence of the genetic biomarker, specific population tested, type of test, test accuracy and timing/sequence of multiple tests can all impact overall model results. The impact of altering a test's threshold for positivity is unknown as it was not addressed in any of the included studies. Additional quality criteria as outlined in our methodological checklist should be considered due to the shortcomings of standard quality assessment tools in differentiating studies that incorporate important test-related characteristics and those that do not. There is a need to refine methods for incorporating the characteristics

  7. Millstone 3 risk evaluation report. An overall review and evaluation of the Millstone Unit 3 probabilistic safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.; Barrett, R.; Buslik, A.

    1986-06-01

    In 1981, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Northeast Utilities to perform a design-specific probabilistic safety study (PSS) for Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Millstone 3). In 1983, Northeast Utilities submitted the Millstone 3 Probabilistic Safety Study for review by the NRC staff. The NRC staff prepared the Millstone 3 Risk Evaluation Report, which discusses the findings regarding the PSS. The PSS estimates that the mean annual core damage frequency due to internal and external events is 5 x 10 -5 and 2 x 10 -5 , respectively. The NRC staff's Risk Evaluation Report estimates that the mean annual core damage frequency is about 2 x 10 -4 for internal events and lies between 1 x 10 -5 and 2 x 10 -4 for external events. The NRC staff estimates that station blackout dominates internal and external event core damage frequencies. The staff recommends that Northeast Utilities perform an engineering analysis on upgrading the diesel generator lube oil cooler anchorage system and on adding a manually operated, AC-independent containment spray system. The staff also recommends that Northeast Utilities prepare two emergency procedures (loss of room cooling and relay chatter due to an earthquake) to help reduce uncertainties. (Subsequent to the completion of this document, Northeast Utilities and the NRC staff have continued a dialogue regarding station blackout from events other than earthquakes. Both Northeast Utilities and the staff have performed additional evaluations, which have drawn their results closer together. Final requirements, if any, for the prevention or mitigation of station blackout from events other than earthquakes have not yet been determined.) 26 refs., 16 tabs

  8. The peer review process for awarding funds to international science research consortia: a qualitative developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, Stefanie; Dean, Laura; Cole, Donald C; Bates, Imelda

    2017-01-01

    Background:  Evaluating applications for multi-national, multi-disciplinary, dual-purpose research consortia is highly complex. There has been little research on the peer review process for evaluating grant applications and almost none on how applications for multi-national consortia are reviewed. Overseas development investments are increasingly being channelled into international science consortia to generate high-quality research while simultaneously strengthening multi-disciplinary research capacity. We need a better understanding of how such decisions are made and their effectiveness. Methods:  An award-making institution planned to fund 10 UK-Africa research consortia. Over two annual rounds, 34 out of 78 eligible applications were shortlisted and reviewed by at least five external reviewers before final selections were made by a face-to-face panel. We used an innovative approach involving structured, overt observations of award-making panel meetings and semi-structured interviews with panel members to explore how assessment criteria concerning research quality and capacity strengthening were applied during the peer review process. Data were coded and analysed using pre-designed matrices which incorporated categories relating to the assessment criteria. Results:  In general the process was rigorous and well-managed. However, lack of clarity about differential weighting of criteria and variations in the panel's understanding of research capacity strengthening resulted in some inconsistencies in use of the assessment criteria. Using the same panel for both rounds had advantages, in that during the second round consensus was achieved more quickly and the panel had increased focus on development aspects. Conclusion:  Grant assessment panels for such complex research applications need to have topic- and context-specific expertise. They must also understand research capacity issues and have a flexible but equitable and transparent approach. This study has

  9. Economic evaluation and cost of interventions for cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy T F; Tonmukayakul, Utsana; Imms, Christine; Reddihough, Dinah; Graham, H Kerr; Cox, Liz; Carter, Rob

    2018-06-01

    Economic appraisal can help guide policy-making for purchasing decisions, and treatment and management algorithms for health interventions. We conducted a systematic review of economic studies in cerebral palsy (CP) to inform future research. Economic studies published since 1970 were identified from seven databases. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and extracted data following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Any discrepancies were resolved by discussion. Of 980 identified references, 115 were included for full-text assessment. Thirteen articles met standard criteria for a full economic evaluation, two as partial economic evaluations, and 18 as cost studies. Six were full economic evaluations alongside clinical studies or randomized controlled trials, whereas seven involved modelling simulations. The economic case for administration of magnesium sulfate for imminent preterm birth is compelling, achieving both health gain and cost savings. Current literature suggests intrathecal baclofen therapy and botulinum toxin injection are cost-effective, but stronger evidence for long-term effects is needed. Lifestyle and web-based interventions are inexpensive, but broader measurement of outcomes is required. Prevention of CP would avoid significant economic burden. Some treatments and interventions have been shown to be cost-effective, although stronger evidence of clinical effectiveness is needed. What this paper adds Cost-effectiveness evidence shows prevention is the most significant strategy. Some treatments are cost-effective, but stronger evidence for long-term effectiveness is required. Comparison of treatment costs is challenging owing to variations in methodologies and varying clinical indications. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Systematic Review of Health Economic Evaluations of Diagnostic Tests in Brazil: How accurate are the results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes; Leandro, Roseli; Decimoni, Tassia Cristina; Rozman, Luciana Martins; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh; De Soárez, Patrícia Coelho

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and characterize the health economic evaluations (HEEs) of diagnostic tests conducted in Brazil, in terms of their adherence to international guidelines for reporting economic studies and specific questions in test accuracy reports. We systematically searched multiple databases, selecting partial and full HEEs of diagnostic tests, published between 1980 and 2013. Two independent reviewers screened articles for relevance and extracted the data. We performed a qualitative narrative synthesis. Forty-three articles were reviewed. The most frequently studied diagnostic tests were laboratory tests (37.2%) and imaging tests (32.6%). Most were non-invasive tests (51.2%) and were performed in the adult population (48.8%). The intended purposes of the technologies evaluated were mostly diagnostic (69.8%), but diagnosis and treatment and screening, diagnosis, and treatment accounted for 25.6% and 4.7%, respectively. Of the reviewed studies, 12.5% described the methods used to estimate the quantities of resources, 33.3% reported the discount rate applied, and 29.2% listed the type of sensitivity analysis performed. Among the 12 cost-effectiveness analyses, only two studies (17%) referred to the application of formal methods to check the quality of the accuracy studies that provided support for the economic model. The existing Brazilian literature on the HEEs of diagnostic tests exhibited reasonably good performance. However, the following points still require improvement: 1) the methods used to estimate resource quantities and unit costs, 2) the discount rate, 3) descriptions of sensitivity analysis methods, 4) reporting of conflicts of interest, 5) evaluations of the quality of the accuracy studies considered in the cost-effectiveness models, and 6) the incorporation of accuracy measures into sensitivity analyses.

  11. Systematic review of economic evaluations of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Velasco, Román; Praditsitthikorn, Naiyana; Wichmann, Kamonthip; Mohara, Adun; Kotirum, Surachai; Tantivess, Sripen; Vallenas, Constanza; Harmanci, Hande; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2012-01-01

    Although public health guidelines have implications for resource allocation, these issues were not explicitly considered in previous WHO pandemic preparedness and response guidance. In order to ensure a thorough and informed revision of this guidance following the H1N1 2009 pandemic, a systematic review of published and unpublished economic evaluations of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics was conducted. The search was performed in September 2011 using 10 electronic databases, 2 internet search engines, reference list screening, cited reference searching, and direct communication with relevant authors. Full and partial economic evaluations considering both costs and outcomes were included. Conversely, reviews, editorials, and studies on economic impact or complications were excluded. Studies were selected by 2 independent reviewers. 44 studies were included. Although most complied with the cost effectiveness guidelines, the quality of evidence was limited. However, the data sources used were of higher quality in economic evaluations conducted after the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Vaccination and drug regimens were varied. Pharmaceutical plus non-pharmaceutical interventions are relatively cost effective in comparison to vaccines and/or antivirals alone. Pharmaceutical interventions vary from cost saving to high cost effectiveness ratios. According to ceiling thresholds (Gross National Income per capita), the reduction of non-essential contacts and the use of pharmaceutical prophylaxis plus the closure of schools are amongst the cost effective strategies for all countries. However, quarantine for household contacts is not cost effective even for low and middle income countries. The available evidence is generally inconclusive regarding the cost effectiveness of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics. Studies on their effectiveness and cost effectiveness should be readily implemented in forthcoming events that

  12. Evaluating Simulation in Training for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetaimish, Bandar; Elbadawi, Hussein; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the reported outcomes for measuring the effectiveness of simulation during knee arthroscopy training and determine the consistency of reporting and validation of simulation used in knee arthroscopy training. Four databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were screened for studies involving knee arthroscopy simulation training. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the searched studies, and a quality assessment was completed for included studies. The reviewers searched the references list in each of the eligible studies to identify other relevant studies that was not captured by our search strategy. We identified 13 eligible studies. The mean number of participants per study was 24 (range: 9 to 42 participants). The 3 most commonly reported surgical skills were the mean time to perform the task (100%), the visualization and probing tasks (77%), and the number of cartilage collisions with measurement of the surgical force (46%). The most commonly described measurement instruments included the Simulation Built-In Scoring System (54%), motion analysis system (23%), and Basic Arthroscopic Knee Skill Scoring System global rating scale (15%). The most frequently reported type of validity for the simulator was construct validity (54%) and concurrent validity (31%). Moreover, construct validity (69%) and concurrent validity (54%) were the most commonly reported type of validity for the measurement instrument. There is significant variation in reported learning outcomes and measurement instruments for evaluating the effectiveness of knee arthroscopic simulation-based education. Despite this, time to perform a task was the most commonly reported skill-evaluating outcome of simulation. The included studies in this review were of variable strength in terms of their evidence and methodologic quality. This study highlights the need for consistent outcome reporting after arthroscopic simulation training. Level IV

  13. Systematic review of economic evaluations of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Pérez Velasco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although public health guidelines have implications for resource allocation, these issues were not explicitly considered in previous WHO pandemic preparedness and response guidance. In order to ensure a thorough and informed revision of this guidance following the H1N1 2009 pandemic, a systematic review of published and unpublished economic evaluations of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics was conducted. METHODS: The search was performed in September 2011 using 10 electronic databases, 2 internet search engines, reference list screening, cited reference searching, and direct communication with relevant authors. Full and partial economic evaluations considering both costs and outcomes were included. Conversely, reviews, editorials, and studies on economic impact or complications were excluded. Studies were selected by 2 independent reviewers. RESULTS: 44 studies were included. Although most complied with the cost effectiveness guidelines, the quality of evidence was limited. However, the data sources used were of higher quality in economic evaluations conducted after the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Vaccination and drug regimens were varied. Pharmaceutical plus non-pharmaceutical interventions are relatively cost effective in comparison to vaccines and/or antivirals alone. Pharmaceutical interventions vary from cost saving to high cost effectiveness ratios. According to ceiling thresholds (Gross National Income per capita, the reduction of non-essential contacts and the use of pharmaceutical prophylaxis plus the closure of schools are amongst the cost effective strategies for all countries. However, quarantine for household contacts is not cost effective even for low and middle income countries. CONCLUSION: The available evidence is generally inconclusive regarding the cost effectiveness of preparedness strategies and interventions against influenza pandemics. Studies on their effectiveness and cost

  14. Do economic evaluation studies inform effective healthcare resource allocation in Iran? A critical review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To aid informed health sector decision-making, data from sufficient high quality economic evaluations must be available to policy makers. To date, no known study has analysed the quantity and quality of available Iranian economic evaluation studies. This study aimed to assess the quantity, quality and targeting of economic evaluation studies conducted in the Iranian context. The study systematically reviewed full economic evaluation studies (n = 30) published between 1999 and 2012 in international and local journals. The findings of the review indicate that although the literature on economic evaluation in Iran is growing, these evaluations were of poor quality and suffer from several major methodological flaws. Furthermore, the review reveals that economic evaluation studies have not addressed the major health problems in Iran. While the availability of evidence is no guarantee that it will be used to aid decision-making, the absence of evidence will certainly preclude its use. Considering the deficiencies in the data identified by this review, current economic evaluations cannot be a useful source of information for decision makers in Iran. To improve the quality and overall usefulness of economic evaluations we would recommend; 1) developing clear national guidelines for the conduct of economic evaluations, 2) highlighting priority areas where information from such studies would be most useful and 3) training researchers and policy makers in the calculation and use of economic evaluation data. PMID:25050084

  15. A Self-Instructional Course in Student Financial Aid Administration. Module 17--Evaluation of Student Aid Management: Self-Evaluation, Audit, and Program Review. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Consulting Group, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The 17th module in the 17-module self-instructional course on student financial aid administration discusses the evaluation of student aid management in terms of self-evaluation, audit, and program review. The full course offers a systematic introduction to the management of federal financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the Higher…

  16. Review and evaluation of extractants for strontium removal using magnetically assisted chemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.B.; Rogers, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    A literature review on extractants for strontium removal was initially performed at Northern Illinois University to assess their potential in magnetically assisted chemical separation. A series of potential strontium extractants was systematically evaluated there using radioanalytical methods. Initial experiments were designed to test the uptake of strontium from nitric acid using several samples of magnetic extractant particles that were coated with various crown ether ligands. High partition coefficient (K d ) values for stimulant tank waste were obtained. Further studies demonstrated that the large partitioning was due to uncoated particles

  17. Review and evaluation of technology, equipment, codes and standards for digitization of industrial radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This reports contains a review and evaluation of the technology, equipment, and codes and standards related to the digitization of industrial radiographic film. The report presents recommendations and equipment-performance specifications that will allow the digitization of radiographic film from nuclear power plant components in order to produce faithful reproductions of flaw images of interest on the films. Justification for the specifications selected are provided. Performance demonstration tests for the digitization process are required and criteria for such tests is presented. Also several comments related to implementation of the technology are presented and discussed

  18. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  19. Using Vector Projection Method to evaluate maintainability of mechanical system in design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lu; Cai Jianguo

    2003-01-01

    Maintainability of a mechanical system is one of the system design parameters that has a great impact in terms of ease of maintenance. In this article, based on the definition of the terms of maintenance and maintainability, an important tool of Design for Maintenance is developed as a way to improve maintainability through design. A set of standard and organized guidelines is provided and maintainability factors in terms of physical design, logistics support and ergonomics are identified. As a specific application of design review, a methodology so called Vector Projection Method is developed to evaluate the maintainability of the mechanical system. Lastly, an example is discussed

  20. Review and evaluation of extractants for strontium removal using magnetically assisted chemical separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.B.; Rogers, R.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Nunez, L.; Ziemer, M.D.; Pleune, T.T.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A literature review on extractants for strontium removal was initially performed at Northern Illinois University to assess their potential in magnetically assisted chemical separation. A series of potential strontium extractants was systematically evaluated there using radioanalytical methods. Initial experiments were designed to test the uptake of strontium from nitric acid using several samples of magnetic extractant particles that were coated with various crown ether ligands. High partition coefficient (K{sub d}) values for stimulant tank waste were obtained. Further studies demonstrated that the large partitioning was due to uncoated particles.

  1. Review of evaluation on ecological carrying capacity: The progress and trend of methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. F.; Xu, Y.; Liu, T. J.; Ye, J. M.; Pan, B. L.; Chu, C.; Peng, Z. L.

    2018-02-01

    The ecological carrying capacity (ECC) has been regarded as an important reference to indicate the level of regional sustainable development since the very beginning of twenty-first century. By a brief review of the main progress in ECC evaluation methodologies in recent five years, this paper systematically discusses the features and differences of these methods and expounds the current states and future development trend of ECC methodology. The result shows that further exploration in terms of the dynamic, comprehensive and intelligent assessment technologies needs to be provided in order to form a unified and scientific ECC methodology system and to produce a reliable basis for environmental-economic decision-makings.

  2. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users' Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Jacqueline Susan; Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-06-30

    The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users' experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main limitations in the research were the nascency of the topic

  3. Review of methodologies and polices for evaluation of energy efficiency in high energy-consuming industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming-Jia; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The classification of the industrial energy efficiency index has been summarized. • The factors of energy efficiency and their implement in industries are discussed. • Four main evaluation methodologies of energy efficiency in industries are concluded. • Utilization of the methodologies in energy efficiency evaluations are illustrated. • Related polices and suggestions based on energy efficiency evaluations are provided. - Abstract: Energy efficiency of high energy-consuming industries plays a significant role in social sustainability, economic performance and environmental protection of any nation. In order to evaluate the energy efficiency and guide the sustainability development, various methodologies have been proposed for energy demand management and to measure the energy efficiency performance accurately in the past decades. A systematical review of these methodologies are conducted in the present paper. First, the classification of the industrial energy efficiency index has been summarized to track the previous application studies. The single measurement indicator and the composite index benchmarking are highly recognized as the modeling tools for power industries and policy-making in worldwide countries. They are the pivotal figures to convey the fundamental information in energy systems for improving the performance in fields such as economy, environment and technology. Second, the six factors that influence the energy efficiency in industry are discussed. Third, four major evaluation methodologies of energy efficiency are explained in detail, including stochastic frontier analysis, data envelopment analysis, exergy analysis and benchmarking comparison. The basic models and the developments of these methodologies are introduced. The recent utilization of these methodologies in the energy efficiency evaluations are illustrated. Some drawbacks of these methodologies are also discussed. Other related methods or influential indicators

  4. Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.; Rhia, B.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2010-01-01

    Two major remedial campaigns have been applied to a plume of trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated groundwater near the former X-740 facility at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon Ohio. The two selected technologies, phytoremediation using a stand of hybrid poplar trees from 1999-2007 and in situ chemical oxidation using modified Fenton's Reagent from 2008-2009, have proven ineffective in achieving remedial action objectives (RAOs). The 'poor' performance of these technologies is a direct result of site specific conditions and the local contaminant hydrogeology. Key among these challenges is the highly heterogeneous subsurface geology with a thin contaminated aquifer zone (the Gallia) - the behavior of the contamination in the Gallia is currently dominated by slow release of TCE from the clay of the overlying Minford formation, from the sandstone of the underlying Berea formation, and from clayey layers within the Gallia itself. In response to the remediation challenges for the X-740 plume, the Portsmouth team (including the US Department of Energy (DOE), the site contractor (CDM), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA)) is evaluating the feasibility of remediation at this site and identifying specific alternatives that are well matched to site conditions and that would maximize the potential for achieving RAOs. To support this evaluation, the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) assembled a team of experts to serve as a resource and provide input and recommendations to Portsmouth. Despite the challenging site conditions and the failure of the previous two remediation campaigns to adequately move the site toward RAOs, the review team was unanimous in the conclusion that an effective combination of cost effective technologies can be identified. Further, the team expressed optimism that RAOs can be achieved if realistic timeframes are accepted by all parties. The initial efforts of the review team focused on reviewing the

  5. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  6. Special evaluation review of the Agency's training course programme 1986-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    During discussions at the 1994 Policy Review Seminar, Member States supported the principle that socio-economic impact and cost-benefit be considered important factors in the approval of technical co-operation programmes. In line with this principle, it was considered timely to conduct an evaluation of the Agency's Training Course Programme, to assist the Department of Technical Co-operation in focusing this programme on relevant subjects, consistent with the objectives and trends of, and complementary to, the entire Technical Co-operation Programme. The main purpose of the evaluation was to (a) assess the continued relevance, effectiveness and impact of the Training Course Programme in its present form as a means of technology transfer to developing Member States; and (b) propose possible alternatives for handling the demand by Member States for training through regional and interregional training courses. 10 tab

  7. Measurement properties of exsisting clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Juul-Kristensen, B; Lund, H

    (COSMIN checklist), the methodological quality in the reliability and validity domains was ‘fair’ (57%) to ‘poor’ (43%), with only one study rated as ‘good’. The reliability domain was most often investigated. Fewof the assessment methods in the included studies that had ‘fair’ or ‘good’ measurement......MEASUREMENT PROPERTIES OF EXISTING CLINICAL ASSESSMENT METHODS EVALUATING SCAPULAR POSITIONING AND FUNCTION. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW1,2Camilla Marie Larsen, 1,3Birgit Juul-Kristensen, 1,3Hans Lund, 1Karen Søgaard1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark2......,2]. Rehabilitation exercises are aiming at altering abnormal/asymmetric scapular positioning and/or function. Numerous assessment methods have measured the degree of scapular dyskinesis, subjectively by visual evaluation and objectively by measurements of static and dynamic scapular positioning, by either a 3...

  8. Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Lund, Hans

    %), with only one study rated as ‘good’. The reliability domain was most often investigated. Fewof the assessment methods in the included studies that had ‘fair’ or ‘good’ measurement properties demonstrated acceptable results for both reliability and validity.ConclusionWe found a substantially larger number......ABSTRACT OARSI Measurement properties of existing clinical assessment methods evaluating scapular positioning and function. A systematic review Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Lund H1,2, Søgaard K11University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics2Institute...... assessment methods have measured the degree of scapular dyskinesis, subjectively by visual evaluation and objectively by measurements of static and dynamic scapular positioning, by either a 3-dimensional electromagnetic device or 2-dimensional clinically applicable methods. Since advanced equipment (i.e. 3D...

  9. Road safety effects of porous asphalt: a systematic review of evaluation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, R.; Greibe, Poul

    2005-01-01

    of eighteen estimates of the effect of porous asphalt on accident rates. No clear effect on road safety of porous asphalt was found. All summary estimates of effect indicated very small changes in accident rates and very few were statistically significant at conventional levels. Studies that have evaluated...... of these changes in risk factors on accident occurrence cannot be predicted. On the whole, the research that has been reported so far regarding road safety effects of porous asphalt is inconclusive. The studies are not of high quality and the findings are inconsistent.......This paper presents a systematic review of studies that have evaluated the effects on road safety of porous asphalt. Porous asphalt is widely used on motorways in Europe, mainly in order to reduce traffic noise and increase road capacity. A meta-analysis was made of six studies, containing a total...

  10. Central Sensitization Syndrome and the Initial Evaluation of a Patient with Fibromyalgia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Fleming

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In both primary care and consultative practices, patients presenting with fibromyalgia (FM often have other medically unexplained somatic symptoms and are ultimately diagnosed as having central sensitization (CS. Central sensitization encompasses many disorders where the central nervous system amplifies sensory input across many organ systems and results in myriad symptoms. A pragmatic approach to evaluate FM and related symptoms, including a focused review of medical records, interviewing techniques, and observations, is offered here, giving valuable tools for identifying and addressing the most relevant symptoms. At the time of the clinical evaluation, early consideration of CS may improve the efficiency of the visit, reduce excessive testing, and help in discerning between typical and atypical cases so as to avoid an inaccurate diagnosis. Discussion of pain and neurophysiology and sensitization often proves helpful.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2011 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satypal, S.

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 9-13, 2011 in Arlington, Virginia

  12. Economic Evaluations of Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacogenomic Screening Tests: A Systematic Review. Second Update of the Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J J Berm

    Full Text Available Due to extended application of pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic screening (PGx tests it is important to assess whether they provide good value for money. This review provides an update of the literature.A literature search was performed in PubMed and papers published between August 2010 and September 2014, investigating the cost-effectiveness of PGx screening tests, were included. Papers from 2000 until July 2010 were included via two previous systematic reviews. Studies' overall quality was assessed with the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES instrument.We found 38 studies, which combined with the previous 42 studies resulted in a total of 80 included studies. An average QHES score of 76 was found. Since 2010, more studies were funded by pharmaceutical companies. Most recent studies performed cost-utility analysis, univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and discussed limitations of their economic evaluations. Most studies indicated favorable cost-effectiveness. Majority of evaluations did not provide information regarding the intrinsic value of the PGx test. There were considerable differences in the costs for PGx testing. Reporting of the direction and magnitude of bias on the cost-effectiveness estimates as well as motivation for the chosen economic model and perspective were frequently missing.Application of PGx tests was mostly found to be a cost-effective or cost-saving strategy. We found that only the minority of recent pharmacoeconomic evaluations assessed the intrinsic value of the PGx tests. There was an increase in the number of studies and in the reporting of quality associated characteristics. To improve future evaluations, scenario analysis including a broad range of PGx tests costs and equal costs of comparator drugs to assess the intrinsic value of the PGx tests, are recommended. In addition, robust clinical evidence regarding PGx tests' efficacy remains of utmost importance.

  13. A systematic review evaluating the psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbourn, Ben; Martin, Robyn; Buchanan, Angus; Chung, Donna; Speyer, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Improving social inclusion opportunities for population health has been identified as a priority area for international policy. There is a need to comprehensively examine and evaluate the quality of psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion that are used to guide social policy and outcomes. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature on all current measures of social inclusion for any population group, to evaluate the quality of the psychometric properties of identified measures, and to evaluate if they capture the construct of social inclusion. Methods A systematic search was performed using five electronic databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and Pubmed and grey literature were sourced to identify measures of social inclusion. The psychometric properties of the social inclusion measures were evaluated against the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties using pre-set psychometric criteria. Results Of the 109 measures identified, twenty-five measures, involving twenty-five studies and one manual met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the reviewed measures was variable, with the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short, Social Connectedness Scale and the Social Inclusion Scale demonstrating the strongest evidence for sound psychometric quality. The most common domain included in the measures was connectedness (21), followed by participation (19); the domain of citizenship was covered by the least number of measures (10). No single instrument measured all aspects within the three domains of social inclusion. Of the measures with sound psychometric evidence, the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short captured the construct of social inclusion best. Conclusions The overall quality of the psychometric properties demonstrate that the current suite of available instruments for the measurement of social inclusion are promising but need further refinement. There is a need for a universal working

  14. A systematic review evaluating the psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Milbourn, Ben; Martin, Robyn; Buchanan, Angus; Chung, Donna; Speyer, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Improving social inclusion opportunities for population health has been identified as a priority area for international policy. There is a need to comprehensively examine and evaluate the quality of psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion that are used to guide social policy and outcomes. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on all current measures of social inclusion for any population group, to evaluate the quality of the psychometric properties of identified measures, and to evaluate if they capture the construct of social inclusion. A systematic search was performed using five electronic databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and Pubmed and grey literature were sourced to identify measures of social inclusion. The psychometric properties of the social inclusion measures were evaluated against the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties using pre-set psychometric criteria. Of the 109 measures identified, twenty-five measures, involving twenty-five studies and one manual met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the reviewed measures was variable, with the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short, Social Connectedness Scale and the Social Inclusion Scale demonstrating the strongest evidence for sound psychometric quality. The most common domain included in the measures was connectedness (21), followed by participation (19); the domain of citizenship was covered by the least number of measures (10). No single instrument measured all aspects within the three domains of social inclusion. Of the measures with sound psychometric evidence, the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short captured the construct of social inclusion best. The overall quality of the psychometric properties demonstrate that the current suite of available instruments for the measurement of social inclusion are promising but need further refinement. There is a need for a universal working definition of social inclusion as an overarching

  15. Primary hyperparathyroidism: review and recommendations on evaluation, diagnosis, and management. A Canadian and international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Hanley, D A; Rizzoli, R; Bollerslev, J; Young, J E M; Rejnmark, L; Thakker, R; D'Amour, P; Paul, T; Van Uum, S; Shrayyef, M Zakaria; Goltzman, D; Kaiser, S; Cusano, N E; Bouillon, R; Mosekilde, L; Kung, A W; Rao, S D; Bhadada, S K; Clarke, B L; Liu, J; Duh, Q; Lewiecki, E Michael; Bandeira, F; Eastell, R; Marcocci, C; Silverberg, S J; Udelsman, R; Davison, K Shawn; Potts, J T; Brandi, M L; Bilezikian, J P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the most recent evidence in the management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and provide updated recommendations for its evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. A Medline search of "Hyperparathyroidism. Primary" was conducted and the literature with the highest levels of evidence were reviewed and used to formulate recommendations. PHPT is a common endocrine disorder usually discovered by routine biochemical screening. PHPT is defined as hypercalcemia with increased or inappropriately normal plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is most commonly seen after the age of 50 years, with women predominating by three to fourfold. In countries with routine multichannel screening, PHPT is identified earlier and may be asymptomatic. Where biochemical testing is not routine, PHPT is more likely to present with skeletal complications, or nephrolithiasis. Parathyroidectomy (PTx) is indicated for those with symptomatic disease. For asymptomatic patients, recent guidelines have recommended criteria for surgery, however PTx can also be considered in those who do not meet criteria, and prefer surgery. Non-surgical therapies are available when surgery is not appropriate. This review presents the current state of the art in the diagnosis and management of PHPT and updates the Canadian Position paper on PHPT. An overview of the impact of PHPT on the skeleton and other target organs is presented with international consensus. Differences in the international presentation of this condition are also summarized.

  16. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating diagnostic test accuracy: A practical review for clinical researchers-Part I. general guidance and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Choi, Sang Hyun; Huh, Jimi; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, June Young

    2015-01-01

    In the field of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA), the use of systematic review and meta-analyses is steadily increasing. By means of objective evaluation of all available primary studies, these two processes generate an evidence-based systematic summary regarding a specific research topic. The methodology for systematic review and meta-analysis in DTA studies differs from that in therapeutic/interventional studies, and its content is still evolving. Here we review the overall process from a practical standpoint, which may serve as a reference for those who implement these methods

  17. Multi-stage open peer review: scientific evaluation integrating the strengths of traditional peer review with the virtues of transparency and self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich ePöschl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional forms of scientific publishing and peer review do not live up to the demands of efficient communication and quality assurance in today’s highly diverse and rapidly evolving world of science. They need to be advanced and complemented by interactive and transparent forms of review, publication, and discussion that are open to the scientific community and to the public.The advantages of open access, public peer review and interactive discussion can be efficiently and flexibly combined with the strengths of traditional scientific peer review. Since 2001 the benefits and viability of this approach are clearly demonstrated by the highly successful interactive open access journal Atmo¬sphe¬ric Chemistry and Physics (ACP and a growing number of sister journals launched and operated by the European Geosciences Union (EGU and the open access publisher Copernicus.The interactive open access journals are practicing an integrative multi-stage process of publication and peer review combined with interactive public discussion, which effectively resolves the dilemma between rapid scientific exchange and thorough quality assurance. The high efficiency and predictive validity of multi-stage open peer review have been confirmed in a series of dedicated studies by evaluation experts from the social sciences, and the same or similar concepts have recently also been adopted in other disciplines, including the life sciences and economics. Multi-stage open peer review can be flexibly adjusted to the needs and peculiarities of different scientific communities. Due to the flexibility and compatibility with traditional structures of scientific publishing and peer review, the multi-stage open peer review concept enables efficient evolution in scientific communication and quality assurance. It has the potential for swift replacement of hidden peer review as the standard of scientific quality assurance, and it provides a basis for open evaluation in

  18. Psychometric Properties of Patient-Facing eHealth Evaluation Measures: Systematic Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nazi, Kim M; Holman, John E; Hogan, Timothy P; Shimada, Stephanie L; Kennedy, Diana R

    2017-10-11

    Significant resources are being invested into eHealth technology to improve health care. Few resources have focused on evaluating the impact of use on patient outcomes A standardized set of metrics used across health systems and research will enable aggregation of data to inform improved implementation, clinical practice, and ultimately health outcomes associated with use of patient-facing eHealth technologies. The objective of this project was to conduct a systematic review to (1) identify existing instruments for eHealth research and implementation evaluation from the patient's point of view, (2) characterize measurement components, and (3) assess psychometrics. Concepts from existing models and published studies of technology use and adoption were identified and used to inform a search strategy. Search terms were broadly categorized as platforms (eg, email), measurement (eg, survey), function/information use (eg, self-management), health care occupations (eg, nurse), and eHealth/telemedicine (eg, mHealth). A computerized database search was conducted through June 2014. Included articles (1) described development of an instrument, or (2) used an instrument that could be traced back to its original publication, or (3) modified an instrument, and (4) with full text in English language, and (5) focused on the patient perspective on technology, including patient preferences and satisfaction, engagement with technology, usability, competency and fluency with technology, computer literacy, and trust in and acceptance of technology. The review was limited to instruments that reported at least one psychometric property. Excluded were investigator-developed measures, disease-specific assessments delivered via technology or telephone (eg, a cancer-coping measure delivered via computer survey), and measures focused primarily on clinician use (eg, the electronic health record). The search strategy yielded 47,320 articles. Following elimination of duplicates and non

  19. [Review of assessment methods used to evaluate feeding for children with pervasive developmental disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadon, G; Ehrmann Feldman, D; Gisel, E

    2008-08-01

    Current evaluations used by occupational therapists to assess and treat feeding problems derive mainly from the domain of dysphagia. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with tools used, in research, for children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) and to determine if any of these meet the needs of occupational therapists. The following data bases were searched: Medline, CINAHL, HAPI and PsyINFO, using the terms pervasive developmental disorder, autism, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, eating behavior, eating disorder, food preference, food selectivity, feeding disorders, picky eater and child. All articles published between 1980 and 2006 (n=27) were reviewed. A total of 20 studies met our selection criteria. Assessment methods are compared using the Disability Creation Model (DCP). The DCP is the Quebec alternative to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). None of the evaluation tools reviewed met all factors that may influence eating in children with PDD. Implications for research and practice in occupational therapy are discussed.

  20. Economic Evaluations of the Health Impacts of Weather-Related Extreme Events: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Laetitia H. M.; Graham, Hilary M.; White, Piran C. L.

    2016-01-01

    The frequency and severity of extreme events is expected to increase under climate change. There is a need to understand the economic consequences of human exposure to these extreme events, to underpin decisions on risk reduction. We undertook a scoping review of economic evaluations of the adverse health effects from exposure to weather-related extreme events. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases with no restrictions to the type of evaluations. Twenty studies were included, most of which were recently published. Most studies have been undertaken in the U.S. (nine studies) or Asia (seven studies), whereas we found no studies in Africa, Central and Latin America nor the Middle East. Extreme temperatures accounted for more than a third of the pool of studies (seven studies), closely followed by flooding (six studies). No economic study was found on drought. Whilst studies were heterogeneous in terms of objectives and methodology, they clearly indicate that extreme events will become a pressing public health issue with strong welfare and distributional implications. The current body of evidence, however, provides little information to support decisions on the allocation of scarce resources between risk reduction options. In particular, the review highlights a significant lack of research attention to the potential cost-effectiveness of interventions that exploit the capacity of natural ecosystems to reduce our exposure to, or ameliorate the consequences of, extreme events. PMID:27834843

  1. 46 XX karyotype during male fertility evaluation; case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Majzoub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-six XX disorder of sex development is an uncommon medical condition observed at times during the evaluation of a man′s fertility. The following is a case series and literature review of phenotypically normal men diagnosed with this karyotype. Our goal is to comprehend the patients′ clinical presentation as well as their laboratory results aiming to explore options available for their management. A formal literature review through PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed using "46 XX man" as a word search. A total of 55 patients, including those conveyed in this article were diagnosed with a 46 XX karyotype during their fertility evaluation. The patients′ mean age ± s.d. was 34 ± 10 years and their mean height ± s.d. was 166 ± 6.5 cm. Overall, they presented with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Sexual dysfunction, reduced hair distribution, and gynecomastia were reported in 20% (4/20, 25.8% (8/31, and 42% (13/31 of the patients, respectively. The SRY gene was detected in 36 (83.7% and was absent in the remaining seven (16.3% patients. We found that a multidisciplinary approach to management is preferred in 46 XX patients. Screening for remnants of the mullerian ducts and for malignant transformation in dysgenetic gonads is imperative. Hypogonadism should be addressed, while fertility options are in vitro fertilization with donor sperm or adoption.

  2. Enhanced Peer Assessment in MOOC Evaluation Through Assignment and Review Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Alcarria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of MOOCs in recent years has produced a change in the education of students and in the development of professional skills. There is an increasing pressure on universities to establish procedures for the recognition and certification of student participation in MOOCs. In order to guarantee that the evaluation procedures are in line with the quality of the procedures traditionally established in the university, a proposal for an enhanced peer assessment is required to allow a more precise review of the students' tasks and the assessments provided by his colleagues, considering procedures of verification of originality and a complete rubric for the peer review that takes into account reviewer’s history for a correct grade calibration. This paper describes the implementation of the evaluation tool, and an experimental validation that indicates that the majority of the students who have used the tool for the revision of assignments have generated grades closer to the revisions generated by the professors in the study.

  3. Economic evaluation of bone stimulation modalities: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Melissa L; Sprague, Sheila; Gharsaa, Osama; Latouche, Sandra; Bhandari, Mohit

    2009-04-01

    Various bone stimulation modalities are commonly used in treatment of fresh fractures and nonunions; however, the effectiveness and efficiency of these modalities remain uncertain. A systematic review of trials evaluating the clinical and economical outcomes of ultrasounds, electrical stimulation, and extracorporeal sound waves on fracture healing was conducted. We searched four electronic databases for economic evaluations that assessed bone stimulation modalities using ultrasound therapy, electrical stimulation, or extracorporeal shock waves. In addition, we searched the references and related articles of eligible studies, and a content expert was contacted. Information on the clinical and economical outcomes of patients was independently extracted by reviewers. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria; therefore, very limited research was found on the cost associated with treatments and the corresponding outcomes. The data available focus primarily on the efficacy of newly introduced treatment methods for bone growth, but failed to incorporate the costs of implementing such treatments. One economic analysis was identified that assessed different treatment paths using ultrasound. A total cost savings of 24-40% per patient occurred when ultrasound was used for fresh fractures and nonunions (grade C recommendation). The results suggest that the ultrasound is a viable alternative for bone stimulation; however, the impacts of the other modalities are left unknown due to the lack of research available. Methodological limitations leave the overall economic and clinical impact of these modalities uncertain. Large, prospective, randomized controlled trials that include cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to further define the clinical effectiveness and financial burden associated with bone stimulation modalities.

  4. Is the smile line a valid parameter for esthetic evaluation? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passia, Nicole; Blatz, Markus; Strub, Jörg Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The "smile line" is commonly used as a parameter to evaluate and categorize a person's smile. This systematic literature review assessed the existing evidence on the validity and universal applicability of this parameter. The latter was evaluated based on studies on smile perception by orthodontists, general clinicians, and laypeople. A review of the literature published between October 1973 and January 2010 was conducted with the electronic database Pubmed and the search terms "smile," "smile line," "smile arc," and "smile design." The search yielded 309 articles, of which nine studies were included based on the selection criteria. The selected studies typically correlate the smile line with the position of the upper lip during a smile while, on average, 75 to 100% of the maxillary anterior teeth are exposed. A virtual line that connects the incisal edges of the maxillary anterior teeth commonly follows the upper border of the lower lip. Average and parallel smile lines are most common, influenced by the age and gender of a person. Orthodontists, general clinicians, and laypeople have similar preferences and rate average smile lines as most attractive. The smile line is a valid tool to assess the esthetic appearance of a smile. It can be applied universally as clinicians and laypersons perceive and judge it similarly.

  5. Economic Evaluations of the Health Impacts of Weather-Related Extreme Events: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia H. M. Schmitt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and severity of extreme events is expected to increase under climate change. There is a need to understand the economic consequences of human exposure to these extreme events, to underpin decisions on risk reduction. We undertook a scoping review of economic evaluations of the adverse health effects from exposure to weather-related extreme events. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases with no restrictions to the type of evaluations. Twenty studies were included, most of which were recently published. Most studies have been undertaken in the U.S. (nine studies or Asia (seven studies, whereas we found no studies in Africa, Central and Latin America nor the Middle East. Extreme temperatures accounted for more than a third of the pool of studies (seven studies, closely followed by flooding (six studies. No economic study was found on drought. Whilst studies were heterogeneous in terms of objectives and methodology, they clearly indicate that extreme events will become a pressing public health issue with strong welfare and distributional implications. The current body of evidence, however, provides little information to support decisions on the allocation of scarce resources between risk reduction options. In particular, the review highlights a significant lack of research attention to the potential cost-effectiveness of interventions that exploit the capacity of natural ecosystems to reduce our exposure to, or ameliorate the consequences of, extreme events.

  6. Predonation psychosocial evaluation of living kidney and liver donor candidates: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinckx, Nathalie; Timmerman, Lotte; Van Gogh, Johan; van Busschbach, Jan; Ismail, Sohal Y; Massey, Emma K; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating a person's suitability for living organ donation is crucial, consisting not only of a medical but also of a thorough psychosocial screening. We performed a systematic literature review of guidelines, consensus statements, and protocols on the content and process of psychosocial screening of living kidney and liver donor candidates. We searched PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO until June 22, 2011, following the PRISMA guidelines, complemented by scrutinizing guidelines databases and references of identified publications. Thirty-four publications were identified, including seven guidelines, six consensus statements, and 21 protocols or programs. Guidelines and consensus statements were inconsistent and lacked concreteness for both their content and process, possibly explaining the observed variability in center-specific evaluation protocols and programs. Overall, recommended screening criteria are not evidence-based and an operational definition of the concept "psychosocial" is missing, causing heterogeneity in terminology. Variation also exists on methods used to psychosocially evaluate potential donors. The scientific basis of predonation psychosocial evaluation needs to be strengthened. There is a need for high-quality prospective psychosocial outcome studies in living donors, a uniform terminology to label psychosocial screening criteria, and validated instruments to identify risk factors. © 2013 Steunstichting ESOT. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET: A Formative Peer Review Supporting Scholarly Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L. Crabtree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Peer Observation and Evaluation Tool (POET is a valid and reliable measure developed for formative peer evaluation of pharmacy faculty. The authors replicated a study conducted on the POET in pharmacy in order to report the instrument’s validity and reliability in occupational therapy and to explore its potential as a formative teaching evaluation for occupational therapy educators. To verify item importance, seven participants from the faculty in an occupational therapy department rated each item. To establish inter-rater reliability, the participants evaluated one videotaped 55 min lecture. The POET was reliable with ICC at 0.93. There were high levels of agreement with the importance ratings among the participants with all scales. The POET appears to be a valid and reliable formative measure of teaching. At a time of significant change in the level of occupational therapy education, this measure may be an important support for scholarly teaching in two ways: First, this measure offers several opportunities to document the instructor’s strengths and, second, it offers the instructor suggestions about ways to improve teaching quality. Finally, the POET may facilitate faculty professional growth and development through systematic, strategic, and constructive peer review feedback.

  8. Nuclear medicine procedures for the evaluation of male sexual organs: a brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Carter, Kevin [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Brigham and Women' s Hospital. Dept. of Radiology; Missailidis, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences

    2008-12-15

    Sexuality consists of three aspects that are interrelated and inseparable, biological, physiological and social. The biological aspect considers the individual's capability to give and to receive pleasure. In consequence, it covers the functionality of the sexual organs and the physiology of human sexual response cycle. Diagnostic imaging modalities, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used to evaluate clinical disorders of the male reproductive system. PET and SPECT procedures basically involve the administration of a radiopharmaceutical that has a higher uptake in a specific tumor or tissue. The aim of this brief review is to present some radiopharmaceuticals that have been used in the clinical evaluation of the male sexual organs (testes, prostate, seminal vesicles, penis) related with male sexuality. This information could be useful in better understanding the male sexual response cycle, as well as the sexual disorders, when considering the male sexual organs and the pelvic floor. Moreover, the findings obtained with PET and SPECT imaging could help to evaluate the efficacy of clinical results of therapeutic procedures. In conclusion, the knowledge from these images could aid in better understanding the physiology of the different organs related with sexuality. Furthermore, they could be important tools to evaluate the physiological integrity of the involved organs, to improve clinical strategies and to accompany the patients under treatment. (author)

  9. Nuclear medicine procedures for the evaluation of male sexual organs: a brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Carter, Kevin; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    Sexuality consists of three aspects that are interrelated and inseparable, biological, physiological and social. The biological aspect considers the individual's capability to give and to receive pleasure. In consequence, it covers the functionality of the sexual organs and the physiology of human sexual response cycle. Diagnostic imaging modalities, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used to evaluate clinical disorders of the male reproductive system. PET and SPECT procedures basically involve the administration of a radiopharmaceutical that has a higher uptake in a specific tumor or tissue. The aim of this brief review is to present some radiopharmaceuticals that have been used in the clinical evaluation of the male sexual organs (testes, prostate, seminal vesicles, penis) related with male sexuality. This information could be useful in better understanding the male sexual response cycle, as well as the sexual disorders, when considering the male sexual organs and the pelvic floor. Moreover, the findings obtained with PET and SPECT imaging could help to evaluate the efficacy of clinical results of therapeutic procedures. In conclusion, the knowledge from these images could aid in better understanding the physiology of the different organs related with sexuality. Furthermore, they could be important tools to evaluate the physiological integrity of the involved organs, to improve clinical strategies and to accompany the patients under treatment. (author)

  10. Practice Parameter: Evaluation of the child with microcephaly (an evidence-based review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Stephen; Michelson, David; Plawner, Lauren; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To make evidence-based recommendations concerning the evaluation of the child with microcephaly. Methods: Relevant literature was reviewed, abstracted, and classified. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered scheme of evidence classification. Results: Microcephaly is an important neurologic sign but there is nonuniformity in its definition and evaluation. Microcephaly may result from any insult that disturbs early brain growth and can be seen in association with hundreds of genetic syndromes. Annually, approximately 25,000 infants in the United States will be diagnosed with microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (−2 to −3 SD; ∼40%). Coexistent conditions include epilepsy (∼40%), cerebral palsy (∼20%), mental retardation (∼50%), and ophthalmologic disorders (∼20% to ∼50%). Recommendations: Neuroimaging may be considered useful in identifying structural causes in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly (Level C). Targeted and specific genetic testing may be considered in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly who has clinical or imaging abnormalities that suggest a specific diagnosis or who shows no evidence of an acquired or environmental etiology (Level C). Screening for coexistent conditions such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and sensory deficits may also be considered (Level C). Further study is needed regarding the yield of diagnostic testing in children with microcephaly. GLOSSARY CP = cerebral palsy; GDD = global developmental delay; HC = head circumference; MRE = medically refractory epilepsy; OMIM = Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. PMID:19752457

  11. Wearable Inertial Sensor Systems for Lower Limb Exercise Detection and Evaluation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Martin; Caulfield, Brian; Ward, Tomas; Johnston, William; Doherty, Cailbhe

    2018-05-01

    Analysis of lower limb exercises is traditionally completed with four distinct methods: (1) 3D motion capture; (2) depth-camera-based systems; (3) visual analysis from a qualified exercise professional; and (4) self-assessment. Each method is associated with a number of limitations. The aim of this systematic review is to synthesise and evaluate studies which have investigated the capacity for inertial measurement unit (IMU) technologies to assess movement quality in lower limb exercises. A systematic review of studies identified through the databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect and Scopus was conducted. Articles written in English and published in the last 10 years which investigated an IMU system for the analysis of repetition-based targeted lower limb exercises were included. The quality of included studies was measured using an adapted version of the STROBE assessment criteria for cross-sectional studies. The studies were categorised into three groupings: exercise detection, movement classification or measurement validation. Each study was then qualitatively summarised. From the 2452 articles that were identified with the search strategies, 47 papers are included in this review. Twenty-six of the 47 included studies were deemed as being of high quality. Wearable inertial sensor systems for analysing lower limb exercises is a rapidly growing field of research. Research over the past 10 years has predominantly focused on validating measurements that the systems produce and classifying users' exercise quality. There have been very few user evaluation studies and no clinical trials in this field to date.

  12. Economic evaluation of chronic disease self-management for people with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teljeur, C; Moran, P S; Walshe, S; Smith, S M; Cianci, F; Murphy, L; Harrington, P; Ryan, M

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. Self-management support is the provision of education and supportive interventions to increase patients' skills and confidence in managing their health problems, potentially leading to improvements in HbA 1c levels in people with diabetes. Randomized controlled trials, observational studies or economic modelling studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. The target population was adults with diabetes. Interventions had to have a substantial component of self-management support and be compared with routine care. Study quality was evaluated using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria and International Society of Pharmacoeconomic Outcomes Research questionnaires. A narrative review approach was used. A total of 16 costing and 21 cost-effectiveness studies of a range of self-management support interventions were identified. There was reasonably consistent evidence across 22 studies evaluating education self-management support programmes suggesting these interventions are cost-effective or superior to usual care. Telemedicine-type interventions were more expensive than usual care and potentially not cost-effective. There was insufficient evidence regarding the other types of self-management interventions, including pharmacist-led and behavioural interventions. The identified studies were predominantly of poor quality, with outcomes based on short-term follow-up data and study designs at high risk of bias. Self-management support education programmes may be cost-effective. There was limited evidence regarding other formats of self-management support interventions. The poor quality of many of the studies undermines the evidence base regarding the economic efficiency of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  13. Psoriasis treatment and management - a systematic review of full economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M P; Ntais, D; Griffiths, C E M; Davies, L M

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis frequently requires lifetime control and current therapies vary significantly in price. High-quality economic evaluations are necessary to determine if higher-cost treatments are value for money. This review aims to identify the cost-effectiveness of psoriasis care (whether more expensive interventions are associated with savings in health care and psoriasis management and/or improve patients' health); assess the level of uncertainty and transferability of this evidence to policy and practice; and, identify future research needs. Searches of electronic databases Embase, MEDLINE and NHS EED for full economic evaluations were conducted in January 2012 (updated April 2014). Included articles were screened, selected and critically appraised using predefined inclusion criteria and data extraction forms: 1355 articles were identified; 37 papers reporting 71 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Treatments evaluated were systemic (n = 45), topical (n = 22), phototherapies (n = 14) and combination (n = 4). Despite a significant number of recent economic evaluations, the cost-effectiveness of all therapies remains unclear. This uncertainty arises from a diversity in settings, perspective and design. Economic evaluations were constrained by limited availability of high-quality short- and long-term head-to-head comparisons of the effectiveness, safety and adherence of different interventions. The economic evidence is dominated by comparisons of interventions to placebo, with implicit comparisons of different therapies. There is a lack of evaluations of service model innovations to deliver complex packages of care for psoriasis. Primary and secondary integrated clinical and economic research is needed to address the limitations and to identify patient preferences and barriers/facilitators to treatment. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Psycho-social and Economic Evaluation of Onchocerciasis: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Moya Alonso

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Onchocerciasis or river blindness is a chronic parasitic disease caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca Volvulus. It occurs in 38 countries in the world, including Africa, Latin America and the Arabian Peninsula. The infection predominantly causes visual impairment and blindness and skin disease. Objectives: The aim of this project is to review the literature on the psycho-social and economic consequences of onchocerciasis in endemic areas. Economic evaluation studies on onchocerciasis and its control programmes were also reviewed. Methods: Electronic searches of PUBMED and Google were made. In addition, the Cochrane Library and WHO website were searched. Different types of economic analysis were reviewed to quantify the relationship between the programme costs and impacts. Results: Eighty papers were identified from different sources, most of which are quantitative studies or literature reviews, and only two were clinical trials. Onchocerciasis has severe socio-economic and psychological consequences. The stigma associated with the disease may reduce marital prospects among affected individuals, disrupt social relationships and cause loss of self-confidence. Also among agricultural workers onchocerciasis has been associated with increased time away from work and reduced productivity, leading to lower income. Discussion: Most of the papers analysed were cross-sectional studies based on data collection through questionnaires. Although there is an increasing number of published papers about the importance of the psycho-social and economic perspective of onchocerciasis, further research is still necessary to quantify and control its consequences. Conclusion: Onchocerciasis is still a serious problem in poor countries. Infected people face physical disability and social stigma that can dramatically reduce the quality of life and land productivity. Control programmes, though costly, have been very successful and cost

  15. Evaluating Patient Empowerment in Association With eHealth Technology: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risling, Tracie; Martinez, Juan; Young, Jeremy; Thorp-Froslie, Nancy

    2017-09-29

    The prioritization of sustainable patient-centered care in contemporary health care has resulted in an increased focus on patient empowerment, which in turn is considered to facilitate patient independence, self-management, and self-efficacy. However, a definitional consensus of empowerment remains elusive, impeding efforts to translate the conceptual ideals of empowerment into a measurable entity associated with changes in health care behavior or outcomes. The rapid integration of technology in health care serves to add another layer of complexity in the measurability and operationalization of empowerment and helps to create a specific context in which this conceptual entity should be further examined. The primary objective of this scoping review was to explore the concept of patient empowerment within the electronic health (eHealth) context. A further focus on the association or measurement of this concept in conjunction with tethered patient portal use was also employed. In this scoping review, a six-step framework was used to guide the search and paper selection process. The review was initiated with two broad research questions, which are as follows: (1) What is the relationship between empowerment and the use of eHealth technologies from a patient perspective? (2) How is patient empowerment (and/or engagement or activation) influenced by accessing personal health information through a tethered patient portal? Multiple databases were employed in a comprehensive search strategy, and papers were primarily evaluated and selected for inclusion by 2 review authors, and a third author was consulted to resolve any issues in reaching consensus. From an initial count of 1387 publications, this review returned nine systematic or literature review papers and 19 empirical studies that pertained to patient empowerment (and/or engagement and activation) in relation to the use of tethered patient portals providing access to electronic health records (EHRs). Of the 19

  16. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Saad, E-mail: saad.zafar@riphah.edu.pk [Riphah International University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Safdar, Saima, E-mail: saima.safdar@riphah.edu.pk [Riphah International University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zafar, Aasma N., E-mail: aasmarad@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Senior Registrar Shifa College of Medicine and Assistant Consultant Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We have systematically reviewed the literature on use of e-Learning in Radiology at the undergraduate level. • Kirkpatrick's Learning Model is used to evaluate the learning outcomes of the reported studies. • There is an increase in positive response for learning management systems used in blended learning environments. • There are wide range of technologies being used for e-Learning including use of audio response system and customized PAC solutions. • There is a clear trend toward highly interactive, self directed learning environment to support the concept of life long independent learners. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Materials and methods: Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. Results: The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of

  17. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Saad; Safdar, Saima; Zafar, Aasma N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have systematically reviewed the literature on use of e-Learning in Radiology at the undergraduate level. • Kirkpatrick's Learning Model is used to evaluate the learning outcomes of the reported studies. • There is an increase in positive response for learning management systems used in blended learning environments. • There are wide range of technologies being used for e-Learning including use of audio response system and customized PAC solutions. • There is a clear trend toward highly interactive, self directed learning environment to support the concept of life long independent learners. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Materials and methods: Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. Results: The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of

  18. Systematic Review of Health Economic Evaluation Studies Developed in Brazil from 1980 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassia Cristina Decimoni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBrazil has sought to use economic evaluation to support healthcare decision-making processes. While a number of health economic evaluations (HEEs have been conducted, no study has systematically reviewed the quality of Brazilian HEE. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an overview regarding the state of HEE research and to evaluate the number, characteristics, and quality of reporting of published HEE studies conducted in a Brazilian setting.MethodsWe systematically searched electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Latin American, and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences Database, Scientific Electronic Library Online, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, health technology assessment Database, Bireme, and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde Economia da Saúde; citation indexes (SCOPUS, Web of Science, and Sistema de Informação da Rede Brasileira de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde. Partial and full HEEs published between 1980 and 2013 that referred to a Brazilian setting were considered for inclusion.ResultsIn total, 535 studies were included in the review, 36.8% of these were considered to be full HEE. The category of healthcare technologies more frequently assessed were procedures (34.8% and drugs (28.8% which main objective was treatment (72.1%. Forty-four percent of the studies reported their funding source and 36% reported a conflict of interest. Overall, the full HEE quality of reporting was satisfactory. But some items were generally poorly reported and significant improvement is required: (1 methods used to estimate healthcare resource use quantities and unit costs, (2 methods used to estimate utility values, (3 sources of funding, and (4 conflicts of interest.ConclusionA steady number of HEE have been published in Brazil since 1980. To improve their contribution to inform national healthcare policy efforts need to be made to enhance the quality of reporting of HEEs and promote improvements in the way HEEs are

  19. Economic Evaluation of Family Planning Interventions in Low and Middle Income Countries; A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neily Zakiyah

    Full Text Available A significant number of women in low and middle income countries (L-MICs who need any family planning, experience a lack in access to modern effective methods. This study was conducted to review potential cost effectiveness of scaling up family planning interventions in these regions from the published literatures and assess their implication for policy and future research.A systematic review was performed in several electronic databases i.e Medline (Pubmed, Embase, Popline, The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER, EBSCOHost, and The Cochrane Library. Articles reporting full economic evaluations of strategies to improve family planning interventions in one or more L-MICs, published between 1995 until 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Data was synthesized and analyzed using a narrative approach and the reporting quality of the included studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS statement.From 920 references screened, 9 studies were eligible for inclusion. Six references assessed cost effectiveness of improving family planning interventions in one or more L-MICs, while the rest assessed costs and consequences of integrating family planning and HIV services, concerning sub-Saharan Africa. Assembled evidence suggested that improving family planning interventions is cost effective in a variety of L-MICs as measured against accepted international cost effectiveness benchmarks. In areas with high HIV prevalence, integrating family planning and HIV services can be efficient and cost effective; however the evidence is only supported by a very limited number of studies. The major drivers of cost effectiveness were cost of increasing coverage, effectiveness of the interventions and country-specific factors.Improving family planning interventions in low and middle income countries appears to be cost-effective. Additional economic evaluation studies with improved reporting quality are necessary

  20. Components of Standing Postural Control Evaluated in Pediatric Balance Measures: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Beauchamp, Marla K; Van Ooteghem, Karen; Paterson, Marie; Wittmeier, Kristy D

    2017-10-01

    To identify measures of standing balance validated in pediatric populations, and to determine the components of postural control captured in each tool. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL databases using key word combinations of postural balance/equilibrium, psychometrics/reproducibility of results/predictive value of tests, and child/pediatrics; gray literature; and hand searches. Inclusion criteria were measures with a stated objective to assess balance, with pediatric (≤18y) populations, with at least 1 psychometric evaluation, with at least 1 standing task, with a standardized protocol and evaluation criteria, and published in English. Two reviewers independently identified studies for inclusion. There were 21 measures included. Two reviewers extracted descriptive characteristics, and 2 investigators independently coded components of balance in each measure using a systems perspective for postural control, an established framework for balance in pediatric populations. Components of balance evaluated in measures were underlying motor systems (100% of measures), anticipatory postural control (72%), static stability (62%), sensory integration (52%), dynamic stability (48%), functional stability limits (24%), cognitive influences (24%), verticality (9%), and reactive postural control (0%). Assessing children's balance with valid and comprehensive measures is important for ensuring development of safe mobility and independence with functional tasks. Balance measures validated in pediatric populations to date do not comprehensively assess standing postural control and omit some key components for safe mobility and independence. Existing balance measures, that have been validated in adult populations and address some of the existing gaps in pediatric measures, warrant consideration for validation in children. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tools for evaluation of restriction on auditory participation: systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Valquíria Conceição; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review studies that used questionnaires for the evaluation of restriction on auditory participation in adults and the elderly. Studies from the last five years were selected through a bibliographic collection of data in national and international journals in the following electronic databases: ISI Web of Science and Virtual Health Library - BIREME, which includes the LILACS and MEDLINE databases. Studies available fully; published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish; whose participants were adults and/or the elderly and that used questionnaires for the evaluation of restriction on auditory participation. Initially, the studies were selected based on the reading of titles and abstracts. Then, the articles were fully and the information was included in the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Three-hundred seventy studies were found in the researched databases; 14 of these studies were excluded because they were found in more than one database. The titles and abstracts of 356 articles were analyzed; 40 of them were selected for full reading, of which 26 articles were finally selected. In the present review, nine instruments were found for the evaluation of restriction on auditory participation. The most used questionnaires for the assessment of the restriction on auditory participation were the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults (HHIA), and Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly - Screening (HHIE-S). The use of restriction on auditory participation questionnaires can assist in validating decisions in audiology practices and be useful in the fitting of hearing aids and results of aural rehabilitation.

  2. Economic Evaluation of Family Planning Interventions in Low and Middle Income Countries; A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakiyah, Neily; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; Roijmans, Frank; Postma, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    A significant number of women in low and middle income countries (L-MICs) who need any family planning, experience a lack in access to modern effective methods. This study was conducted to review potential cost effectiveness of scaling up family planning interventions in these regions from the published literatures and assess their implication for policy and future research. A systematic review was performed in several electronic databases i.e Medline (Pubmed), Embase, Popline, The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), EBSCOHost, and The Cochrane Library. Articles reporting full economic evaluations of strategies to improve family planning interventions in one or more L-MICs, published between 1995 until 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Data was synthesized and analyzed using a narrative approach and the reporting quality of the included studies was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) statement. From 920 references screened, 9 studies were eligible for inclusion. Six references assessed cost effectiveness of improving family planning interventions in one or more L-MICs, while the rest assessed costs and consequences of integrating family planning and HIV services, concerning sub-Saharan Africa. Assembled evidence suggested that improving family planning interventions is cost effective in a variety of L-MICs as measured against accepted international cost effectiveness benchmarks. In areas with high HIV prevalence, integrating family planning and HIV services can be efficient and cost effective; however the evidence is only supported by a very limited number of studies. The major drivers of cost effectiveness were cost of increasing coverage, effectiveness of the interventions and country-specific factors. Improving family planning interventions in low and middle income countries appears to be cost-effective. Additional economic evaluation studies with improved reporting quality are necessary to generate

  3. Evaluation of the Uterine Causes of Female Infertility by Ultrasound: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Irani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Various uterine disorders lead to infertility in women of reproductive ages. This study was performed to describe the common uterine causes of infertility and sonographic evaluation of these causes for midwives. Methods: This literature review was conducted on the manuscripts published at such databases as Elsevier, PubMed, Google Scholar, and SID as well as the original text books between 1985 and 2015. The search was performed using the following keywords: infertility, uterus, ultrasound scan, transvaginal sonography, endometrial polyp, fibroma, leiomyoma, endometrial hyperplasia, intrauterine adhesion, Asherman’s syndrome, uterine synechiae, adenomyosis, congenital uterine anomalies, and congenital uterine malformations. Results: Atotal of approximately 180 publications were retrieved from the respective databases out of which 44 articles were more related to our topic and studied as suitable references. In addition, 11 published books on ultrasonography and infertility were evaluated to provide more precise knowledge on the mentioned areas. According to the literature, ultrasonography has a crucial role in the investigation and differentiation of uterine disorders in females with infertility. However, the diagnosis depends on the day of menstruation, clinical prese-ntations, and the suspected uterine disorder. In this review, we provided the key notes about proper timing of the ultrasound examination. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is the first step imaging tool in the investigation of female infertility, which provides information for the diagnosis of uterine disorders. However, the accurate diagnosis depends on the “time of evaluation”. Therefore, every midwife needs to learn about the “optimum timing” for ultrasound evaluation based on each patient.

  4. A systematic review and overview of health economic evaluations of emergency laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Bampoe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the economic impact of emergency laparotomy (EL surgery in healthcare systems around the world. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the primary resource utilisation, healthcare economic and societal costs of EL in adults in different countries. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Central Register Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CINAHL were searched for full and partial economic analyses of EL published between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 2015. Quality of studies was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC checklist. Results Sixteen studies were included from a range of countries. One study was a full economic analysis. Fifteen studies were partial economic evaluations. These studies revealed that emergency abdominal surgery is expensive compared to similar elective surgery when comparing primary resource utilisation costs, with an important societal impact. Most contemporaneous studies indicate that in-hospital costs for EL are in excess of US$10,000 per patient episode, rising substantially when societal costs are considered. Discussion EL is a high-risk and costly procedure with a disproportionate financial burden for healthcare providers, relative to national funding provisions and wider societal cost impact. There is substantial heterogeneity in the methodologies and quality of published economic evaluations of EL; therefore, the true economic costs of EL are yet to be fully defined. Future research should focus on developing strategies to embed health economic evaluations within national programmes aiming to improve EL care, including developing the required measures and infrastructure. Conclusions Emergency laparotomy is expensive, with a significant cost burden to healthcare and systems and society worldwide. Novel strategies for reducing this econmic burden should urgently be explored if greater access to

  5. A systematic review and overview of health economic evaluations of emergency laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampoe, Sohail; Odor, Peter M; Ramani Moonesinghe, S; Dickinson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the economic impact of emergency laparotomy (EL) surgery in healthcare systems around the world. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the primary resource utilisation, healthcare economic and societal costs of EL in adults in different countries. MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Central Register Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and CINAHL were searched for full and partial economic analyses of EL published between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 2015. Quality of studies was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC) checklist. Sixteen studies were included from a range of countries. One study was a full economic analysis. Fifteen studies were partial economic evaluations. These studies revealed that emergency abdominal surgery is expensive compared to similar elective surgery when comparing primary resource utilisation costs, with an important societal impact. Most contemporaneous studies indicate that in-hospital costs for EL are in excess of US$10,000 per patient episode, rising substantially when societal costs are considered. EL is a high-risk and costly procedure with a disproportionate financial burden for healthcare providers, relative to national funding provisions and wider societal cost impact. There is substantial heterogeneity in the methodologies and quality of published economic evaluations of EL; therefore, the true economic costs of EL are yet to be fully defined. Future research should focus on developing strategies to embed health economic evaluations within national programmes aiming to improve EL care, including developing the required measures and infrastructure. Emergency laparotomy is expensive, with a significant cost burden to healthcare and systems and society worldwide. Novel strategies for reducing this econmic burden should urgently be explored if greater access to this type of surgery is to be pursued as a global health target. PROSPERO

  6. Evaluation of factors that affect hip moment impulse during gait: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inai, Takuma; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Edama, Mutsuaki; Kubo, Masayoshi

    2018-03-01

    Decreasing the daily cumulative hip moments in the frontal and sagittal planes may lower the risk of hip osteoarthritis. Therefore, it may be important to evaluate factors that affect hip moment impulse during gait. It is unclear what factors affect hip moment impulse during gait. This systematic review aimed to evaluate different factors that affect hip moment impulse during gait in healthy adults and patients with hip osteoarthritis. Four databases (Scopus, ScienceDirect, PubMed, and PEDro) were searched up to August 2017 to identify studies that examined hip moment impulse during gait. Data extracted for analysis included the sample size, age, height, body mass, type of intervention, and main findings. After screening, 10 of the 975 studies identified were included in our analysis. Several factors, including a rocker bottom shoe, FitFlop™ sandals, ankle push-off, posture, stride length, body-weight unloading, a rollator, walking poles, and a knee brace, were reviewed. The main findings were as follows: increasing ankle push-off decreased both the hip flexion and extension moment impulses; body-weight unloading decreased both the hip extension and adduction moment impulses; the FitFlop™ sandal increased the sum of the hip flexion and extension moment impulses; long strides increased the hip extension moment impulse; and the use of a knee brace increased hip flexion moment impulse. Of note, none of the eligible studies included patients with hip osteoarthritis. The hip moment impulses can be modified by person-specific factors (ankle push-off and long strides) and external factors (body-weight unloading and use of the FitFlop™ sandals and a knee brace). Effects on the progression of hip osteoarthritis remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of use of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saad; Safdar, Saima; Zafar, Aasma N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate the evaluative outcomes present in the literature according to Kirkpatrick's learning model and to examine the nature and characteristics of the e-Learning interventions in radiology education at undergraduate level. Four databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Eric) are searched for publications related to the application of e-Learning in undergraduate radiology education. The search strategy is a combination of e-Learning and Mesh and non Mesh radiology and undergraduate related terms. These search strategies are established in relation to experts of respective domains. The full text of thirty pertinent articles is reviewed. Author's country and study location data is extracted to identify the most active regions and year's are extracted to know the existing trend. Data regarding radiology subfields and undergraduate year of radiology education is extracted along with e-Learning technologies to identify the most prevalent or suitable technologies or tools with respect to radiology contents. Kirkpatricks learning evaluation model is used to categorize the evaluative outcomes reported in the identified studies. The results of this analysis reveal emergence of highly interactive games, audience response systems and designing of wide range of customized tools according to learner needs assessment in radiology education at undergraduate level. All these initiatives are leading toward highly interactive self directed learning environments to support the idea of life-long independent learners. Moreover, majority of the studies in literature regarding e-Learning in radiology at undergraduate level are based on participant satisfaction followed by participant results or outcomes either before or after an intervention or both. There was no research particularly demonstrating performance change in clinical practice or patient outcome as they may be difficult to measure in medical education. Thus clinical competences and performances are

  8. A Systematic Literature Review of Economic Evaluations of Antibiotic Treatments for Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Hannah E; Mitchell, Stephen A; Watt, Maureen

    2017-11-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is associated with high management costs, particularly in recurrent cases. Fidaxomicin treatment results in lower recurrence rates than vancomycin and metronidazole, but has higher acquisition costs in Europe and the USA. This systematic literature review summarises economic evaluations (EEs) of fidaxomicin, vancomycin and metronidazole for treatment of CDI. Electronic databases (MEDLINE ® , Embase, Cochrane Library) and conference proceedings (ISPOR, ECCMID, ICAAC and IDWeek) were searched for publications reporting EEs of fidaxomicin, vancomycin and/or metronidazole in the treatment of CDI. Reference bibliographies of identified manuscripts were also reviewed. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated according to the overall population of patients with CDI, as well as in subgroups with severe CDI or recurrent CDI, or those at higher risk of recurrence or mortality. Overall, 27 relevant EEs, conducted from the perspective of 12 different countries, were identified. Fidaxomicin was cost-effective versus vancomycin and/or metronidazole in 14 of 24 EEs (58.3%), vancomycin was cost-effective versus fidaxomicin and/or metronidazole in five of 27 EEs (18.5%) and metronidazole was cost-effective versus fidaxomicin and/or vancomycin in two of 13 EEs (15.4%). Fidaxomicin was cost-effective versus vancomycin in most of the EEs evaluating specific patient subgroups. Key cost-effectiveness drivers were cure rate, recurrence rate, time horizon, drug costs and length and cost of hospitalisation. In most EEs, fidaxomicin was demonstrated to be cost-effective versus metronidazole and vancomycin in patients with CDI. These results have relevance to clinical practice, given the high budgetary impact of managing CDI and increasing restrictions on healthcare budgets. This analysis was initiated and funded by Astellas Pharma Inc.

  9. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear criticality safety evaluation 94-02, uranium solidification facility pencil tank module spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1994-01-01

    Review of NMP-NCS-94-0087, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 94-02: Uranium Solidification Facility Pencil Tank Module Spacing (U), April 18, 1994,'' was requested of the SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to show that the USF process module spacing, as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045, remains safe for operation. The NCSE under review concludes that the module spacing as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045 remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. After a thorough review of the NCSE, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  10. The impact of Cochrane Reviews: a mixed-methods evaluation of outputs from Cochrane Review Groups supported by the National Institute for Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Frances; Trivedi, Daksha; Alderson, Phil; Hamilton, Laura; Martin, Alice; Pinkney, Emma; Iliffe, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The last few decades have seen a growing emphasis on evidence-informed decision-making in health care. Systematic reviews, such as those produced by Cochrane, have been a key component of this movement. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Systematic Review Programme currently supports 20 Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs) in the UK and it is important that this funding represents value for money. The overall aim was to identify the impacts and likely impacts on health care, patient outcomes and value for money of Cochrane Reviews published by 20 NIHR-funded CRGs during the years 2007-11. We sent questionnaires to CRGs and review authors, undertook interviews with guideline developers (GDs) and used bibliometrics and documentary review to get an overview of CRG impact and to evaluate the impact of a sample of 60 Cochrane Reviews. The evaluation was guided by a framework with four categories (knowledge production, research targeting, informing policy development and impact on practice/services). A total of 3187 new and updated reviews were published on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews between 2007 and 2011, 1502 (47%) of which were produced by the 20 CRGs funded by the NIHR. We found 40 examples where reviews appeared to have influenced primary research and reviews had contributed to the creation of new knowledge and stimulated debate. Twenty-seven of the 60 reviews had 100 or more citations in Google Scholar™ (Google, CA, USA). Overall, 483 systematic reviews had been cited in 247 sets of guidance. This included 62 sets of international guidance, 175 sets of national guidance (87 from the UK) and 10 examples of local guidance. Evidence from the interviews suggested that Cochrane Reviews often play an instrumental role in informing guidance, although reviews being a poor fit with guideline scope or methods, reviews being out of date and a lack of communication between CRGs and GDs were barriers to their use. Cochrane Reviews appeared to have led

  11. Evaluation of Wet Cupping Therapy: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bedah, Abdullah M N; Khalil, Mohamed K M; Posadzki, Paul; Sohaibani, Imen; Aboushanab, Tamer Shaaban; AlQaed, Meshari; Ali, Gazzaffi I M

    2016-10-01

    Wet cupping is a widely used traditional therapy in many countries, which justifies a continuous scientific evaluation of its efficacy and safety. To perform a systematic review to critically evaluate and update the available evidence of wet cupping in traditional and complementary medicine. Ten electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2016. Included studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated wet cupping against any type of control interventions in patients with any clinical condition, as well as healthy individuals. Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to appraise the included RCTs. Fourteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. The included studies evaluated the following clinical conditions: nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), hypertension, brachialgia, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), chronic neck pain, metabolic syndrome, migraine headaches, oxygen saturation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease. Two RCTs evaluated physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals. Overall, 9 RCTs favored wet cupping over various control interventions in NSLBP (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), brachialgia (n = 1), CTS (n = 1), chronic neck pain (n = 2), oxygen saturation in smokers with COPD (n = 1), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease (n = 1). Five RCTs showed no statistically significant between-group differences: NSLBP (n = 1), metabolic syndrome (n = 1), migraine headaches (n = 1), and physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals (n = 2). Included RCTs had a variable risk of bias across all domains and suffered methodologic limitations. There is a promising evidence in favor of the use of wet cupping for musculoskeletal pain, specifically NSLBP, neck pain, CTS, and brachialgia. Better-quality trials are needed to generate solid evidence and firmly inform policy makers.

  12. Health economic evaluations of medical devices in the People's Republic of China: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongrong; Modaresi, Farhang; Borisenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify and review the methodological quality of health economic evaluations of medical devices performed in the People's Republic of China. To our knowledge, no such investigations have been performed to date. A systematic literature review involving searches of Medline, Medline In-Process, the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry of the Tufts Medical Center, and the Wanfang Database was performed. The search spanned the period from 1990 to 2013. Studies on health economic evaluations of medical devices, in-vitro diagnostics, procedures, and the use of medical devices in Chinese health care settings were included. Full-text articles and conference abstracts in English and Chinese were included. Fifty-seven publications were included, 26 (46%) of which were in English and 31 (54%) of which were in Chinese. The included publications covered a wide range of clinical areas, such as surgery (n=23, 40%), screening (n=9, 16%), imaging use (n=6, 11%), kidney intervention (n=4, 7%), and nine other technological areas. Most of the studies (n=31, 54%) were cost analyses. Among the others, 13 (50%) studies used modeling, and another 13 (50%) were within-trial evaluations. Among studies that used modeling, eleven (85%) conducted sensitivity analyses, six of which had one-way sensitivity analysis, whereas one conducted both one-way and two-way sensitivity analyses; four of these eleven modeling-based analyses included probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was reported in ten (18%) studies, eight of which were screening studies. The remaining two modeling studies were in areas of imaging and oncology. This study indicates that there are major limitations and deficiencies in the health economic evaluations on medical devices performed in the People's Republic of China. Further efforts are required from different stakeholders - academic, governmental

  13. Evaluating Structural Change Approaches to Health Promotion: An Exploratory Scoping Review of a Decade of U.S. Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yuka; Lieberman, Lisa D.; Neubauer, Leah C.; Hanneke, Rosie; Fagen, Michael C.

    2018-01-01

    Structural change approaches--also known as policy and environmental changes--are becoming increasingly common in health promotion, yet our understanding of how to evaluate them is still limited. An exploratory scoping review of the literature was conducted to understand approaches and methods used to evaluate structural change interventions in…

  14. Evaluating Prior Scholarship in Literature Reviews of Research Articles: A Comparative Study of Practices in Two Research Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Becky S. C.; Chan, Hang; Lam, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Evaluations of prior scholarship play a crucial role in the literature review (LR) of a research article by showing how the boundary of an area of inquiry can be further advanced by the writer's work. Yet, many inexperienced writers find evaluating others' work a major challenge. Although the task has received some attention in research and…

  15. Economic evaluation studies in nuclear medicine. A methodological review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.S.; Schwimmer, J.

    2000-01-01

    The growing need for evaluation of the utility of new nuclear medicine technologies has spawned a few economic studies ranging from preliminary indications of cost savings to complete decision analysis models incorporating costs and quality of life. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the methodological quality of economic analyses of nuclear medicine procedures which targeted cost-effectiveness or cost-utility issues published in the medical literature during the years 1985-1999. A computerized literature search was used to identify original investigations from the medical literature which included an economic analysis of a nuclear medicine procedure. Each economic analysis article was evaluated by two independent reviewers for adherence to ten accepted methodological criteria. Of the 29 articles meeting the search criteria, only six (21%) conformed to all ten methodological criteria. Published economic analyses of nuclear medicine procedures usually do not meet accepted methodological standards and could be significantly improved to achieve overall better quality relative to similar analyses in the literature from other medical fields. Continued improvement in the number and quality of economic studies is critically needed for the future competitiveness of nuclear medicine studies

  16. The design, implementation, and evaluation of online credit nutrition courses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Nancy L; Carbone, Elena T; Beffa-Negrini, Patricia A

    2011-01-01

    To assess how postsecondary online nutrition education courses (ONEC) are delivered, determine ONEC effectiveness, identify theoretical models used, and identify future research needs. Systematic search of database literature. Postsecondary education. Nine research articles evaluating postsecondary ONEC. Knowledge/performance outcomes and student satisfaction, motivation, or perceptions. Systematic search of 922 articles and review of 9 articles meeting search criteria. Little research regarding ONEC marketing/management existed. Studies primarily evaluated introductory courses using email/websites (before 2000), or course management systems (after 2002). None used true experimental designs; just 3 addressed validity or reliability of measures or pilot-tested instruments. Three articles used theoretical models in course design; few used theories to guide evaluations. Four quasi-experimental studies indicated no differences in nutrition knowledge/performance between online and face-to-face learners. Results were inconclusive regarding student satisfaction, motivation, or perceptions. Students can gain knowledge in online as well as in face-to-face nutrition courses, but satisfaction was mixed. More up-to-date investigations on effective practices are warranted, using theories to identify factors that enhance student outcomes, addressing emerging technologies, and documenting ONEC marketing, management, and delivery. Adequate training/support for faculty is needed to improve student experiences and faculty time management. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Discounting in the evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of a vaccination programme: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Mibei, Walter

    2015-07-31

    Discounting future costs and health benefits usually has a large effect on results of cost-effectiveness evaluations of vaccination because of delays between the initial expenditure in the programme and the health benefits from averting disease. Most guidelines currently recommend discounting both costs and health effects at a positive, constant, common rate back to a common point in time. A review of 84 published economic evaluations of vaccines found that most of them apply these recommendations. However, both technical and normative arguments have been presented for discounting health at a different rate to consumption (differential discounting), discounting at a rate that changes over time (non-constant discounting), discounting intra-generational and inter-generational effects at a different rate (two-stage discounting), and discounting the health gains from an intervention to a different discount year from the time of intervention (delayed discounting). These considerations are particularly acute for vaccines, because their effects can occur in a different generation from the one paying for them, and because the time of vaccination, of infection aversion, and of disease aversion usually differ. Using differential, two-stage or delayed discounting in model-based cost-effectiveness evaluations of vaccination raises technical challenges, but mechanisms have been proposed to overcome them. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Review and evaluation of the effects of xenobiotic chemicals on microorganisms in soil. [139 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Van Voris, P.

    1988-02-01

    The primary objective was to review and evaluate the relevance and quality of existing xenobiotic data bases and test methods for evaluating direct and indirect effects (both adverse and beneficial) of xenobiotics on the soil microbial community; direct and indirect effects of the soil microbial community on xenobiotics; and adequacy of test methods used to evaluate these effects and interactions. Xenobiotic chemicals are defined here as those compounds, both organic and inorganic, produced by man and introduced into the environment at concentrations that cause undesirable effects. Because soil serves as the main repository for many of these chemicals, it therefore has a major role in determining their ultimate fate. Once released, the distribution of xenobiotics between environmental compartments depends on the chemodynamic properties of the compounds, the physicochemical properties of the soils, and the transfer between soil-water and soil-air interfaces and across biological membranes. Abiotic and biotic processes can transform the chemical compound, thus altering its chemical state and, subsequently, its toxicity and reactivity. Ideally, the conversion is to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral elements, or at least, to some harmless substance. However, intermediate transformation products, which can become toxic pollutants in their own right, can sometimes be formed. 139 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. European Approaches to Work-Related Stress: A Critical Review on Risk Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Zoni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various international organizations have raised awareness regarding psychosocial risks and work-related stress. European stakeholders have also taken action on these issues by producing important documents, such as position papers and government regulations, which are reviewed in this article. In particular, 4 European models that have been developed for the assessment and management of work-related stress are considered here. Although important advances have been made in the understanding of work-related stress, there are still gaps in the translation of this knowledge into effective practice at the enterprise level. There are additional problems regarding the methodology in the evaluation of work-related stress. The European models described in this article are based on holistic, global and participatory approaches, where the active role of and involvement of workers are always emphasized. The limitations of these models are in the lack of clarity on preventive intervention and, for two of them, the lack of instrument standardization for risk evaluation. The comparison among the European models to approach work-related stress, although with limitations and socio-cultural differences, offers the possibility for the development of a social dialogue that is important in defining the correct and practical methodology for work stress evaluation and prevention.

  20. European approaches to work-related stress: a critical review on risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoni, Silvia; Lucchini, Roberto G

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, various international organizations have raised awareness regarding psychosocial risks and work-related stress. European stakeholders have also taken action on these issues by producing important documents, such as position papers and government regulations, which are reviewed in this article. In particular, 4 European models that have been developed for the assessment and management of work-related stress are considered here. Although important advances have been made in the understanding of work-related stress, there are still gaps in the translation of this knowledge into effective practice at the enterprise level. There are additional problems regarding the methodology in the evaluation of work-related stress. The European models described in this article are based on holistic, global and participatory approaches, where the active role of and involvement of workers are always emphasized. The limitations of these models are in the lack of clarity on preventive intervention and, for two of them, the lack of instrument standardization for risk evaluation. The comparison among the European models to approach work-related stress, although with limitations and socio-cultural differences, offers the possibility for the development of a social dialogue that is important in defining the correct and practical methodology for work stress evaluation and prevention.

  1. Review Article : Utilization of Environmental Radiochemistry Techniques for Selection and Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.R.; Madbouly, A.M.; Zakaria, Kh.M.

    2016-01-01

    This research review puts necessary considerations on the available environmental radiochemistry techniques for selection and evaluation of a nuclear facility sites.The main bjective in site evaluation for nuclear facilities in terms of nuclear safety is to protect the site workers, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation release from nuclear facilities due to accidents. The extreme sensitivity and speed of radiochemical methods make their applications of considerable importance in several fields and they have found many uses. Information about the existed radioactivity in the different nuclear facilities is an essential requirement for their environmental assessment. It is necessary to estimate the various radioactivity levels in the environment through qualitative and quantitative analytical techniques and to assess the potential effects of the nuclear facility in the region by considering the characteristics of sites.The siting and site evaluation requirements are discussed. Emphasis was given to types of radiochemical techniques used for characterization of the site parameters which determine the potential hazards of the site on the facility and the facility on the site. Emphasis has been also given to the quantitative and qualitative analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides for monitoring and control .There are some techniques employed such as radioactive tracer technique, liquid scintillation technique, gamma spectrometry technique, neutron activation analysis technique, fluorimetric technique and isotope hydrology technique.

  2. Evaluation of lean manufacturing implementation: review of the proceedings of the NMPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Maria Formigoni Carvalho Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Through a review of the proceedings of the National Meeting of Production Engineering (NMPE over the past 10 years, this article aims to identify the profile of Brazilian research regarding methods that assess the implementation of Lean Manufacturing (LM, proposing a classification for the methods analyzed. We identified 28 articles that specifically address the assessment of the implementation of LM, which accounts for 16 evaluation methods because some methods have been found in more than one article. The results show that the type of research most widely used is the case study. Lean practices more addressed are: Quality Tools, Multifunctional Teams, Quick-Changeover Techniques, Continuous Improvement and Visual Control. The presence of the researcher was found more than half of the studies analyzed. Less than half showed the full data collection instrument. Moreover most of the papers evaluate the LM industry, specifically on the shop floor. This article will be useful both to researchers and to professionals in Production Engineering interested in evaluating the progress of LM implementation, because it shows the profile of all the methods presented in NMIE, which reflects the progress in the Brazilian research on the subject.

  3. INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF THE X-701B GROUNDWATER REMEDY, PORTSMOUTH, OHIO: TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Costanza, J.; Rossabi, J.; Early, T.; Skubal, K.; Magnuson, C.

    2008-12-15

    The Department of Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office requested assistance from Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM-22) to provide independent technical experts to evaluate past and ongoing remedial activities at the Portsmouth facility that were completed to address TCE contamination associated with the X-701B groundwater plume and to make recommendations for future efforts. The Independent Technical Review team was provided with a detailed and specific charter. The charter requested that the technical team first review the past and current activities completed for the X-701B groundwater remedy for trichloroethene (TCE) in accordance with a Decision Document that was issued by Ohio EPA on December 8, 2003 and a Work Plan that was approved by Ohio EPA on September 22, 2006. The remedy for X-701B divides the activities into four phases: Phase I - Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II - Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III - Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV - Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase I of the remedy was completed during FY2006, and DOE has now completed six oxidant injection events within Phase II. The Independent Technical Review team was asked to evaluate Phase II activities, including soil and groundwater results, and to determine whether or not the criteria that were defined in the Work Plan for the Phase II end point had been met. The following criteria are defined in the Work Plan as an acceptable Phase II end point: (1) Groundwater samples from the identified source area monitoring wells have concentrations below the Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) for TCE in groundwater, or (2) The remedy is no longer effective in removing TCE mass from the source area. In addition, the charter specifies that if the Review Team determines that the Phase II endpoint has not been reached, then the team should address the following issues: (1) If additional injection events are

  4. A Systematic Review of the State of Economic Evaluation for Health Care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Chauhan, Akashdeep Singh; Angell, Blake; Gupta, Indrani; Jan, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Economic evaluations are one of the important tools in policy making for rational allocation of resources. Given the very low public investment in the health sector in India, it is critical that resources are used wisely on interventions proven to yield best results. Hence, we undertook this study to assess the extent and quality of evidence for economic evaluation of health-care interventions and programmes in India. A comprehensive search was conducted to search for published full economic evaluations pertaining to India and addressing a health-related intervention or programme. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, ScienceDirect, and York CRD database and websites of important research agencies were identified to search for economic evaluations published from January 1980 to the middle of November 2014. Two researchers independently assessed the quality of the studies based on Drummond and modelling checklist. Out of a total of 5013 articles enlisted after literature search, a total of 104 met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The majority of these papers were cost-effectiveness studies (64%), led by a clinician or public-health professional (77%), using decision analysis-based methods (59%), published in an international journal (80%) and addressing communicable diseases (58%). In addition, 42% were funded by an international funding agency or UN/bilateral aid agency, and 30% focussed on pharmaceuticals. The average quality score of these full economic evaluations was 65.1%. The major limitation was the inability to address uncertainties involved in modelling as only about one-third of the studies assessed modelling structural uncertainties (33%), or ran sub-group analyses to account for heterogeneity (36.5%) or analysed methodological uncertainty (32%). The existing literature on economic evaluations in India is inadequate to feed into sound policy making. There is an urgent need to generate awareness within the government of how economic evaluation can

  5. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users’ Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. Objective This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Results Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users’ experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. Conclusions There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main

  6. A brief review and evaluation of earthworm biomarkers in soil pollution assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Congying

    2017-05-01

    Earthworm biomarker response to pollutants has been widely investigated in the assessment of soil pollution. However, whether and how the earthworm biomarker-approach can be actually applied to soil pollution assessment is still a controversial issue. This review is concerned about the following points: 1. Despite much debate, biomarker is valuable to ecotoxicology and biomarker approach has been properly used in different fields. Earthworm biomarker might be used in different scenarios such as large-scale soil pollution survey and soil pollution risk assessment. Compared with physicochemical analysis, they can provide more comprehensive and straightforward information about soil pollution at low cost. 2. Although many earthworm species from different ecological categories have been tested, Eisenia fetida/andrei is commonly used. Many earthworm biomarkers have been screened from the molecular to the individual level, while only a few biomarkers, such as avoidance behavior and lysosomal membrane stability, have been focused on. Other aspects of the experimental design were critically reviewed. 3. More studies should focus on determining the reliability of various earthworm biomarkers in soil pollution assessment in future research. Besides, establishing a database of a basal level of each biomarker, exploring biomarker response in different region/section/part of earthworm, and other issues are also proposed. 4. A set of research guideline for earthworm biomarker studies was recommended, and the suitability of several earthworm biomarkers was briefly evaluated with respect to their application in soil pollution assessment. This review will help to promote further studies and practical application of earthworm biomarker in soil pollution assessment.

  7. Review and Evaluation of Mindfulness-Based iPhone Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Madhavan; Kavanagh, David J; Hides, Leanne; Stoyanov, Stoyan R

    2015-08-19

    There is growing evidence for the positive impact of mindfulness on wellbeing. Mindfulness-based mobile apps may have potential as an alternative delivery medium for training. While there are hundreds of such apps, there is little information on their quality. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of mindfulness-based iPhone mobile apps and to evaluate their quality using a recently-developed expert rating scale, the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS). It also aimed to describe features of selected high-quality mindfulness apps. A search for "mindfulness" was conducted in iTunes and Google Apps Marketplace. Apps that provided mindfulness training and education were included. Those containing only reminders, timers or guided meditation tracks were excluded. An expert rater reviewed and rated app quality using the MARS engagement, functionality, visual aesthetics, information quality and subjective quality subscales. A second rater provided MARS ratings on 30% of the apps for inter-rater reliability purposes. The "mindfulness" search identified 700 apps. However, 94 were duplicates, 6 were not accessible and 40 were not in English. Of the remaining 560, 23 apps met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The median MARS score was 3.2 (out of 5.0), which exceeded the minimum acceptable score (3.0). The Headspace app had the highest average score (4.0), followed by Smiling Mind (3.7), iMindfulness (3.5) and Mindfulness Daily (3.5). There was a high level of inter-rater reliability between the two MARS raters. Though many apps claim to be mindfulness-related, most were guided meditation apps, timers, or reminders. Very few had high ratings on the MARS subscales of visual aesthetics, engagement, functionality or information quality. Little evidence is available on the efficacy of the apps in developing mindfulness.

  8. Mental health literacy measures evaluating knowledge, attitudes and help-seeking: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; McGrath, Patrick J; Hayden, Jill; Kutcher, Stan

    2015-11-17

    Mental health literacy has received increasing attention as a useful strategy to promote early identification of mental disorders, reduce stigma and enhance help-seeking behaviors. However, despite the abundance of research on mental health literacy interventions, there is the absence of evaluations of current available mental health literacy measures and related psychometrics. We conducted a scoping review to bridge the gap. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and ERIC for relevant studies. We only focused on quantitative studies and English publications, however, we didn't limit study participants, locations, or publication dates. We excluded non-English studies, and did not check the grey literature (non peer-reviewed publications or documents of any type) and therefore may have missed some eligible measures. We located 401 studies that include 69 knowledge measures (14 validated), 111 stigma measures (65 validated), and 35 help-seeking related measures (10 validated). Knowledge measures mainly investigated the ability of illness identification, and factual knowledge of mental disorders such as terminology, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and consequences. Stigma measures include those focused on stigma against mental illness or the mentally ill; self-stigma ; experienced stigma; and stigma against mental health treatment and help-seeking. Help-seeking measures included those of help-seeking attitudes, intentions to seek help, and actual help-seeking behaviors. Our review provides a compendium of available mental health literacy measures to facilitate applying existing measures or developing new measures. It also provides a solid database for future research on systematically assessing the quality of the included measures.

  9. Quantifying Overdiagnosis in Cancer Screening: A Systematic Review to Evaluate the Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripping, Theodora M; Ten Haaf, Kevin; Verbeek, André L M; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2017-10-01

    Overdiagnosis is the main harm of cancer screening programs but is difficult to quantify. This review aims to evaluate existing approaches to estimate the magnitude of overdiagnosis in cancer screening in order to gain insight into the strengths and limitations of these approaches and to provide researchers with guidance to obtain reliable estimates of overdiagnosis in cancer screening. A systematic review was done of primary research studies in PubMed that were published before January 1, 2016, and quantified overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening. The studies meeting inclusion criteria were then categorized by their methods to adjust for lead time and to obtain an unscreened reference population. For each approach, we provide an overview of the data required, assumptions made, limitations, and strengths. A total of 442 studies were identified in the initial search. Forty studies met the inclusion criteria for the qualitative review. We grouped the approaches to adjust for lead time in two main categories: the lead time approach and the excess incidence approach. The lead time approach was further subdivided into the mean lead time approach, lead time distribution approach, and natural history modeling. The excess incidence approach was subdivided into the cumulative incidence approach and early vs late-stage cancer approach. The approaches used to obtain an unscreened reference population were grouped into the following categories: control group of a randomized controlled trial, nonattenders, control region, extrapolation of a prescreening trend, uninvited groups, adjustment for the effect of screening, and natural history modeling. Each approach to adjust for lead time and obtain an unscreened reference population has its own strengths and limitations, which should be taken into consideration when estimating overdiagnosis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. An output evaluation of a health research foundation's enhanced grant review process for new investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gregory W; Lê, Mê-Linh; Novotny, Tannis; Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Pierce, Grant N; Wade, John

    2017-06-19

    We assessed the ability of the Manitoba Medical Service Foundation (MMSF, a small not-for-profit foundation affiliated with Manitoba Blue Cross) to determine the best candidates for selection to receive research funding support among new researchers applying to the Research Operating Grants Programme (ROGP). Using bibliometric and grants funding analyses, we retrospectively compared indices of academic outputs from five cohorts of MMSF-funded and not MMSF-funded applicants to the annual MMSF ROGP over 2008 to 2012, from 1 to 5 years after having received evaluation decisions from the MMSF enhanced grant review process. Those researchers funded by the MMSF competition (MMSF-funded) had a statistically significant greater number of publications, a higher h-index and greater national Tri-Council (TC) funding, versus those not selected for funding (not MMSF-funded). MMSF-funded applicants and the Manitoba research community have created a strong and rapid (within 1 to 5 years of receiving the MMSF grant) local economic return on investment associated with the MMSF ROGP that supports new investigators, of approximately nine-fold for TC grants by the principal investigator, and of 34-fold for the principal investigator on collaborative (total) TC grants. The use of small amounts of seed money for competitive research grants at early stages of an MMSF-funded applicant's career correlates with future short-term success of that applicant. The ability to correctly select promising candidates who subsequently demonstrate greater academic performance after the MMSF funding shows the selection process and the ROGP to be of merit. Multiple components may have contributed to this outcome, including a direct presentation and interview process of the candidate with five-person selection subcommittees, plus an assessment by an external reviewer (the enhanced grant review process). The selection methods used here may add value to the research grant selection processes of new

  11. Independent review of Oak Ridge HCTW test program and development of seismic evaluation criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    Many of the existing buildings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are steel frame construction with unreinforced hollow clay tile infill walls (HCTW). The HCTW infill provides some lateral seismic resistance to the design/evaluation basis earthquake; however acceptance criteria for this construction must be developed. The basis for the development of seismic criteria is the Oak Ridge HCTW testing and analysis program and the target performance goals of DOE 5480.28 and DOE-STD-1020-94. This report documents and independent review of the testing and analysis program and development of recommended acceptance criteria for Oak Ridge HCTW construction. The HCTW test program included ''macro'' wall in-plane and out-of-plane tests, full-scale wall in-plane and out-of-plane tests, in-situ out-of-plane test, shake table tests, and masonry component tests

  12. The use of economic evaluations in NHS decision-making: a review and empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I; McIver, S; Moore, D; Bryan, S

    2008-04-01

    To determine the extent to which health economic information is used in health policy decision-making in the UK, and to consider factors associated with the utilisation of such research findings. Major electronic databases were searched up to 2004. A systematic review of existing reviews on the use of economic evaluations in policy decision-making, of health and non-health literature on the use of economic analyses in policy making and of studies identifying actual or perceived barriers to the use of economic evaluations was undertaken. Five UK case studies of committees from four local and one national organisation [the Technology Appraisal Committee of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)] were conducted. Local case studies were augmented by documentary analysis of new technology request forms and by workshop discussions with members of local decision-making committees. The systematic review demonstrated few previous systematic reviews of evidence in the area. At the local level in the NHS, it was an exception for economic evaluation to inform technology coverage decisions. Local decision-making focused primarily on evidence of clinical benefit and cost implications. And whilst information on implementation was frequently requested, cost-effectiveness information was rarely accessed. A number of features of the decision-making environment appeared to militate against emphasis on cost-effectiveness analysis. Constraints on the capacity to generate, access and interpret information, led to a minor role for cost-effectiveness analysis in the local decision-making process. At the national policy level in the UK, economic analysis was found to be highly integrated into NICE's technology appraisal programme. Attitudes to economic evaluation varied between committee members with some significant disagreement and extraneous factors diluted the health economics analysis available to the committee. There was strong evidence of an ordinal

  13. Material Compatibility Evaluation for DWPF Nitric-Glycolic Acid - Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction.

  14. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation. Volume 8A and Volume 8B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.O.; Chimenti, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Volume 8 contains the edited papers presented at the 1988 Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation meeting. The 288 papers discuss such topics as fundamental techniques as acoustic testing, eddy current testing, and x-ray radiography; advanced techniques using x-ray computed tomography and laser ultrasonics; interpretive signal and image processing using expert systems and adaptive analysis; NDE probes and sensors and NDE systems and instrumentation; materials process control and inspection reliability including human factors. Materials discussed range from electronic circuit materials, coatings, adhesive bonds, smart structures, composite materials, welded joints, ferrous materials, and steels and alloys. Stress, texture, structural and fracture properties of materials are characterized using various NDE techniques. Applications to reactor, aircraft, and space vehicle components are investigated

  15. Review of the TMI-2 accident evaluation and vessel investigation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladekarl Thomsen, Knud

    1998-03-01

    The results of the TMI-2 Accident Evaluation Programme and the Vessel Investigation Project have been reviewed as part of a literature study on core meltdown and in-vessel coolability. The emphasis is placed on the late phase melt progression, which is of special relevance to the NKS-sponsored RAK-2.1 project on Severe Accident Phenomenology. The body of the report comprises three main sections, The TMI-2 Accident Scenario, Core Region and Relocation Path Investigations, and Lower Head Investigations. In the final discussion, the lower head gap formation mechanism is explained in terms of thermal contraction and fracturing of the debris crust. This model seems more plausible than the MAAP model based on creep expansion of the lower head. (au) 1 tab., 33 ills., 31 refs.

  16. Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme...... "Medisam" was launched in 2009 at the University of Copenhagen with the aim of "developing, implementing and evaluating a collaboration model for HMRs and medicine reconciliations in Denmark". The Medisam programme involves patients, pharmacy internship students, the (pharmacist) supervisor of the pharmacy...... students and physicians. Objective To explore if it was possible through the Medisam programme to obtain a fruitful HMR collaboration between pharmacy internship students and physicians as a means to develop HMR collaboration between trained pharmacists and physicians further. Setting Ten matching pairs...

  17. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a review of evaluation and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A S; Shoskes, D A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), also known as NIH Category III Prostatitis is a highly prevalent syndrome with significant impact on quality of life. As a heterogeneous syndrome, there exists no 'one size fits all' therapy with level 1 evidence to guide therapy. This often leads to a nihilistic approach to patients and clinical outcomes are poor. In this review, we examine the evidence for CP/CPPS therapies and discuss our technique of clinical phenotyping combined with multimodal therapy. Review of Medline articles with terms 'non-bacterial prostatitis', 'abacterial prostatitis' and 'chronic pelvic pain syndrome'. Many individual therapies have been evaluated in the treatment of CP/CPPS; antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications (including bioflavonoids), neuromodulators, alpha blockers, pelvic floor physical therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. Each of these has been found to have varying success in alleviating symptoms. UPOINT is a system of clinical phenotyping for CP/CPPS patients that has 6 defined domains, which guide multimodal therapy. It has been validated to correlate with symptom burden and therapy guided by UPOINT leads to significant symptom improvement in 75-84% of patients based on three independent studies. CP/CPPS is a heterogeneous condition and, much like with prostate cancer, optimal therapy can only be achieved by classifying patients into clinically meaningful phenotypic groups (much like TNM) and letting the phenotype drive therapy.

  18. [Evaluation of quality of service in Early Intervention: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemes Campaña, Inmaculada Concepción; Romero-Galisteo, Rita Pilar; Labajos Manzanares, María Teresa; Moreno Morales, Noelia

    2018-06-07

    Early Intervention (EI), as a paediatric service, has the duty of quantifying the results and the quality of its services provided. The accessibility of valid and reliable tools allows professionals to evaluate the quality of these services. The aim of this study is to review the scientific literature on tools used to measure the methodological and service quality in EI. A search was made in different databases: Medline (from PubMed), Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane, Scopus, ERIC and Scielo. The methodological quality of the studies was tested using the COSMIN scale. A total of 13 manuscripts met the criteria to be included in this review. Ten of them received a "good" or "reasonable" score based on the COSMIN scale. Despite its importance, there is no consensus among authors on the measurement of service quality in EI. It is often the family of the children attended in EI that are considered the target to study, although the opinion of professionals carries more weight and completes the information. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  19. Evaluating the Impact of Radio Frequency Identification Retained Surgical Instruments Tracking on Patient Safety: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnock, Kumiko O; Biggs, Bonnie; Fladger, Anne; Bates, David W; Rozenblum, Ronen

    2017-02-22

    Retained surgical instruments (RSI) are one of the most serious preventable complications in operating room settings, potentially leading to profound adverse effects for patients, as well as costly legal and financial consequences for hospitals. Safety measures to eliminate RSIs have been widely adopted in the United States and abroad, but despite widespread efforts, medical errors with RSI have not been eliminated. Through a systematic review of recent studies, we aimed to identify the impact of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology on reducing RSI errors and improving patient safety. A literature search on the effects of RFID technology on RSI error reduction was conducted in PubMed and CINAHL (2000-2016). Relevant articles were selected and reviewed by 4 researchers. After the literature search, 385 articles were identified and the full texts of the 88 articles were assessed for eligibility. Of these, 5 articles were included to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of using RFID for preventing RSI-related errors. The use of RFID resulted in rapid detection of RSI through body tissue with high accuracy rates, reducing risk of counting errors and improving workflow. Based on the existing literature, RFID technology seems to have the potential to substantially improve patient safety by reducing RSI errors, although the body of evidence is currently limited. Better designed research studies are needed to get a clear understanding of this domain and to find new opportunities to use this technology and improve patient safety.

  20. Advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapists in post arthroplasty review clinics: a state wide implementation program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Paula; Burge, Angela; Walter, Kerrie; Shaw, Bridget; Page, Carolyn; Phan, Uyen; Terrill, Desiree; Liew, Susan

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate outcomes following a state-wide implementation of post arthroplasty review (PAR) clinics for patients following total hip and knee arthroplasty, led by advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopaedic specialists. A prospective observational study analysed data collected by 10 implementation sites (five metropolitan and five regional/rural centres) between September 2014 and June 2015. The Victorian Innovation and Reform Impact Assessment Framework was used to assess efficiency, effectiveness (access to care, safety and quality, workforce capacity, utilisation of skill sets, patient and workforce satisfaction) and sustainability (stakeholder engagement, succession planning and availability of ongoing funding). 2362 planned occasions of service (OOS) were provided for 2057 patients. Reduced patient wait times from referral to appointment were recorded and no adverse events occurred. Average cost savings across 10 sites was AUD$38 per OOS (Baseline $63, PAR clinic $35), representing a reduced pathway cost of 44%. Average annual predicted total value of increased orthopaedic specialist capacity was $11,950 per PAR clinic (range $6149 to $23,400). The Australian Orthopaedic Association review guidelines were met (8/10 sites, 80%) and patient-reported outcome measures were introduced as routine clinical care. High workforce and patient satisfaction were expressed. Eighteen physiotherapists were trained creating a sustainable workforce. Eight sites secured ongoing funding. The PAR clinics delivered a safe, cost-efficient model of care that improved patient access and quality of care compared to traditional specialist-led workforce models. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of speech errors in Putonghua speakers with cleft palate: a critical review of methodology issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chenghui; Whitehill, Tara L

    2014-04-01

    Speech errors associated with cleft palate are well established for English and several other Indo-European languages. Few articles describing the speech of Putonghua (standard Mandarin Chinese) speakers with cleft palate have been published in English language journals. Although methodological guidelines have been published for the perceptual speech evaluation of individuals with cleft palate, there has been no critical review of methodological issues in studies of Putonghua speakers with cleft palate. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant studies published over the past 30 years in Chinese language journals. Only studies incorporating perceptual analysis of speech were included. Thirty-seven articles which met inclusion criteria were analyzed and coded on a number of methodological variables. Reliability was established by having all variables recoded for all studies. This critical review identified many methodological issues. These design flaws make it difficult to draw reliable conclusions about characteristic speech errors in this group of speakers. Specific recommendations are made to improve the reliability and validity of future studies, as well to facilitate cross-center comparisons.

  2. Evaluating Chagas disease progression and cure through blood-derived biomarkers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena-Méndez, Ana; López, Manuel Carlos; Angheben, Andrea; Izquierdo, Luis; Ribeiro, Isabela; Pinazo, Maria-Jesús; Gascon, Joaquim; Muñoz, José

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the usefulness of various types of blood-derived biomarkers that are currently being studied to predict the progression of Chagas disease in patients with the indeterminate form, to assess the efficacy of antiparasitic drugs and to identify early cardiac and gastrointestinal damage. The authors used a search strategy based on MEDLINE, Cochrane Library Register for systematic review, EmBase, Global Health and LILACS databases. Out of 1716 screened articles, only 166 articles were eligible for final inclusion. The authors classified the biomarkers according to their biochemical structure and primary biological activity in four groups: i) markers of inflammation and cellular injury, ii) metabolic biomakers, iii) prothrombotic biomarkers and iv) markers derived from specific antigens of the parasite. Several potential biomarkers might have clinical potential for the detection of early cardiopathy. Such capacity is imperative in order to detect high-risk patients who require intensive monitoring and earlier therapy. Prospective studies with longer follow-ups are needed for the appraisal of biomarkers assessing clinical or microbiological cure after therapy. At the same time, studies evaluating more than one biomarker are useful to compare the efficacy among them given the lack of a recognized gold standard.

  3. A Review of Scales to Evaluate Sleep Disturbances in Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica M. Kurtis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with movement disorders have a high prevalence of sleep disturbances that can be classified as (1 nocturnal sleep symptoms, such as insomnia, nocturia, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movements (PLM, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and REM sleep behavior disorder; and (2 diurnal problems that include excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and sleep attacks. The objective of this review is to provide a practical overview of the most relevant scales that assess these disturbances to guide the choice of the most useful instrument/s depending on the line of research or clinical focus. For each scale, the reader will find a brief description of practicalities and psychometric properties, use in movement disorder cohorts and analyzed strengths and limitations. To assess insomnia, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a generic scale, and three disease-specific scales: the Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS, the PDSS-2, and Scales for outcomes in Parkinson’s disease (PD-Sleep-Nocturnal Sleep subscale are discussed. To evaluate nocturia, there are no specific tools, but some extensively validated generic urinary symptom scales (the Overall Bladder Questionnaire and the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score and some PD-specific scales that include a nocturia item are available. To measure RLS severity, there are currently four domain-specific generic scales: The International Restless Legs Scale, the Johns Hopkins Restless Legs Severity Scale, the Restless Legs Syndrome-6 measure, a Pediatric RLS Severity Scale, and the Augmentation Severity Rating Scale (a scale to evaluate augmentation under treatment and several instruments that assess impact on quality of sleep and health-related quality of life. To evaluate the presence of PLM, no clinical scales have been developed to date. As far as OSA, commonly used instruments such as the Sleep Apnea Scale of the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, the STOP-Bang questionnaire, and the Berlin Questionnaire

  4. Human Factors Evaluation of Man-Machine Interface for Periodic Safety Review of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2. As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area

  5. Human Factors Evaluation of Man-Machine Interface for Periodic Safety Review of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang (and others)

    2006-01-15

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2. As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area.

  6. Diagnostic tests and algorithms used in the investigation of haematuria: systematic reviews and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M; Nixon, J; Hempel, S; Aho, T; Kelly, J; Neal, D; Duffy, S; Ritchie, G; Kleijnen, J; Westwood, M

    2006-06-01

    To determine the most effective diagnostic strategy for the investigation of microscopic and macroscopic haematuria in adults. Electronic databases from inception to October 2003, updated in August 2004. A systematic review was undertaken according to published guidelines. Decision analytic modelling was undertaken, based on the findings of the review, expert opinion and additional information from the literature, to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of plausible alternative tests that are part of diagnostic algorithms for haematuria. A total of 118 studies met the inclusion criteria. No studies that evaluated the effectiveness of diagnostic algorithms for haematuria or the effectiveness of screening for haematuria or investigating its underlying cause were identified. Eighteen out of 19 identified studies evaluated dipstick tests and data from these suggested that these are moderately useful in establishing the presence of, but cannot be used to rule out, haematuria. Six studies using haematuria as a test for the presence of a disease indicated that the detection of microhaematuria cannot alone be considered a useful test either to rule in or rule out the presence of a significant underlying pathology (urinary calculi or bladder cancer). Forty-eight of 80 studies addressed methods to localise the source of bleeding (renal or lower urinary tract). The methods and thresholds described in these studies varied greatly, precluding any estimate of a 'best performance' threshold that could be applied across patient groups. However, studies of red blood cell morphology that used a cut-off value of 80% dysmorphic cells for glomerular disease reported consistently high specificities (potentially useful in ruling in a renal cause for haematuria). The reported sensitivities were generally low. Twenty-eight studies included data on the accuracy of laboratory tests (tumour markers, cytology) for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. The majority of tumour marker studies

  7. Technical review of WSRC-TR-93-614 criticality safety evaluation for disassembly basin sand filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The study documented in WSRC-TR-93-614 performed an evaluation of the criticality potential associated with the Disassembly Basin Sand Filter for K and L Areas. The document reviewed incorporated results of calculations documented in the engineering calculation N-CLC-K-00151. Analyses of the contents of disassembly basin sludge has indicated that the sludge contains fissile material in excess of subcritical mass limits as specified in ANSI/ANS standards. Previous studies had determined that the fissile material can not collect into a critical configuration in the basin. Since the sand filter is intended to remove suspended particles from the basin water and could serve as a mechanism to collect the fissile material into a critical configuration, the study examined conditions under which criticality could occur in the sand filter. The study shows that criticality is not considered possible in the sand filter. This review emphasized the technical accuracy and presentation of the evaluation. The evaluation was also examined for the elements required for NCSEs. The review was performed in accordance with the NRTSC technical review requirements and procedures and the E7 Manual technical review requirements. The technical review (per the E7 manual) of the engineering calculation (N-CLC-K-0 1 5 1) was previously performed by this reviewer

  8. Economic evaluation of bone stimulation modalities: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Button Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Various bone stimulation modalities are commonly used in treatment of fresh fractures and nonunions; however, the effectiveness and efficiency of these modalities remain uncertain. A systematic review of trials evaluating the clinical and economical outcomes of ultrasounds, electrical stimulation, and extracorporeal sound waves on fracture healing was conducted. We searched four electronic databases for economic evaluations that assessed bone stimulation modalities using ultrasound therapy, electrical stimulation, or extracorporeal shock waves. In addition, we searched the references and related articles of eligible studies, and a content expert was contacted. Information on the clinical and economical outcomes of patients was independently extracted by reviewers. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria; therefore, very limited research was found on the cost associated with treatments and the corresponding outcomes. The data available focus primarily on the efficacy of newly introduced treatment methods for bone growth, but failed to incorporate the costs of implementing such treatments. One economic analysis was identified that assessed different treatment paths using ultrasound. A total cost savings of 24-40% per patient occurred when ultrasound was used for fresh fractures and nonunions (grade C recommendation. The results suggest that the ultrasound is a viable alternative for bone stimulation; however, the impacts of the other modalities are left unknown due to the lack of research available. Methodological limitations leave the overall economic and clinical impact of these modalities uncertain. Large, prospective, randomized controlled trials that include cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to further define the clinical effectiveness and financial burden associated with bone stimulation modalities.

  9. Blood pressure reduction, persistence and costs in the evaluation of antihypertensive drug treatment – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasford Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood pressure lowering drugs are usually evaluated in short term trials determining the absolute blood pressure reduction during trough and the duration of the antihypertensive effect after single or multiple dosing. A lack of persistence with treatment has however been shown to be linked to a worse cardiovascular prognosis. This review explores the blood pressure reduction and persistence with treatment of antihypertensive drugs and the cost consequences of poor persistence with pharmaceutical interventions in arterial hypertension. Methods We have searched the literature for data on blood pressure lowering effects of different antihypertensive drug classes and agents, on persistence with treatment, and on related costs. Persistence was measured as patients' medication possession rate. Results are presented in the form of a systematic review. Results Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARBs have a competitive blood pressure lowering efficacy compared with ACE-inhibitors (ACEi and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, beta-blockers (BBs and diuretics. 8 studies describing the persistence with treatment were identified. Patients were more persistent on ARBs than on ACEi and CCBs, BBs and diuretics. Thus the product of blood pressure lowering and persistence was higher on ARBs than on any other drug class. Although the price per tablet of more recently developed drugs (ACEi, ARBs is higher than that of older ones (diuretics and BBs, the newer drugs result in a more favourable cost to effect ratio when direct drug costs and indirect costs are also considered. Conclusion To evaluate drugs for the treatment of hypertension several key variables including the blood pressure lowering effect, side effects, compliance/persistence with treatment, as well as drug costs and direct and indirect costs of medical care have to be considered. ARBs, while nominally more expensive when drug costs are considered only, provide substantial cost savings

  10. Review of tri-generation technologies: Design evaluation, optimization, decision-making, and selection approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Moussawi, Houssein; Fardoun, Farouk; Louahlia-Gualous, Hasna

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Trigeneration technologies classified and reviewed according to prime movers. • Relevant heat recovery equipment discussed with thermal energy storage. • Trigeneration evaluated based on energy, exergy, economy, environment criteria. • Design, optimization, and decision-making methods classified and presented. • System selection suggested according to user preferences. - Abstract: Electricity, heating, and cooling are the three main components constituting the tripod of energy consumption in residential, commercial, and public buildings all around the world. Their separate generation causes higher fuel consumption, at a time where energy demands and fuel costs are continuously rising. Combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) or trigeneration could be a solution for such challenge yielding an efficient, reliable, flexible, competitive, and less pollutant alternative. A variety of trigeneration technologies are available and their proper choice is influenced by the employed energy system conditions and preferences. In this paper, different types of trigeneration systems are classified according to the prime mover, size and energy sequence usage. A leveled selection procedure is subsequently listed in the consecutive sections. The first level contains the applied prime mover technologies which are considered to be the heart of any CCHP system. The second level comprises the heat recovery equipment (heating and cooling) of which suitable selection should be compatible with the used prime mover. The third level includes the thermal energy storage system and heat transfer fluid to be employed. For each section of the paper, a survey of conducted studies with CHP/CCHP implementation is presented. A comprehensive table of evaluation criteria for such systems based on energy, exergy, economy, and environment measures is performed, along with a survey of the methods used in their design, optimization, and decision-making. Moreover, a classification

  11. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Pedersen, Reidar; Norvoll, Reidun; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-06-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five studies were included. The ethics support activities described were moral case deliberations and ethics rounds. Different qualitative and quantitative research methods were utilized. The results show that (a) participants felt that they gained an increased insight into moral issues through systematic reflection; (b) there was improved cooperation among multidisciplinary team members; (c) it was uncertain whether clinical ethics support services led to better patient care; (d) the issue of patient and client participation is complex; and (e) the implementation process is challenging. Clinical ethics support services have mainly been studied through the experiences of the participating facilitators and healthcare professionals. Hence, there is limited knowledge of whether and how various types of clinical ethics support services influence the quality of care and how patients and relatives may evaluate clinical ethics support services. Based on the six excluded 'grey zone articles', in which there was an implicit focus on ethics reflection, other ways of working with ethical reflection in practice are discussed. Implementing and evaluating clinical ethics support services as approaches to clinical ethics support that are more integrated into the development of good practice are in focus. In order to meet some of the shortcomings of the field of clinical ethics support services, a research project that aims to strengthen ethics support in the mental health services, including patients' and caregivers' views on ethical challenges, is presented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    CD-ROM REVIEW (551) Essential Physics BOOK REVIEWS (551) Collins Advanced Science: Physics, 2nd edition Quarks, Leptons and the Big Bang, 2nd edition Do Brilliantly: A2 Physics IGCSE Physics Geophysics in the UK Synoptic Skills in Advanced Physics Flash! The hunt for the biggest explosions in the universe Materials Maths for Advanced Physics

  13. Evaluating Quality of Decision-Making Processes in Medicines' Development, Regulatory Review, and Health Technology Assessment: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujar, Magdalena; McAuslane, Neil; Walker, Stuart R; Salek, Sam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, and health technology assessment (HTA) agencies have been increasingly using decision-making frameworks, it is not certain whether these enable better quality decision making. This could be addressed by formally evaluating the quality of decision-making process within those organizations. The aim of this literature review was to identify current techniques (tools, questionnaires, surveys, and studies) for measuring the quality of the decision-making process across the three stakeholders. Methods: Using MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, and other Internet-based search engines, a literature review was performed to systematically identify techniques for assessing quality of decision making in medicines development, regulatory review, and HTA. A structured search was applied using key words and a secondary review was carried out. In addition, the measurement properties of each technique were assessed and compared. Ten Quality Decision-Making Practices (QDMPs) developed previously were then used as a framework for the evaluation of techniques identified in the review. Due to the variation in studies identified, meta-analysis was inappropriate. Results: This review identified 13 techniques, where 7 were developed specifically to assess decision making in medicines' development, regulatory review, or HTA; 2 examined corporate decision making, and 4 general decision making. Regarding how closely each technique conformed to the 10 QDMPs, the 13 techniques assessed a median of 6 QDMPs, with a mode of 3 QDMPs. Only 2 techniques evaluated all 10 QDMPs, namely the Organizational IQ and the Quality of Decision Making Orientation Scheme (QoDoS), of which only one technique, QoDoS could be applied to assess decision making of both individuals and organizations, and it possessed generalizability to capture issues relevant to companies as well as regulatory authorities. Conclusion: This review confirmed a general

  14. A systematic review and economic evaluation of exercise referral schemes in primary care: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Fiona; Holmes, Mike; Everson-Hock, Emma; Davis, Sarah; Buckley Woods, Helen; Anokye, Nana; Tappenden, Paul; Kaltenthaler, Eva

    2015-07-01

    It is estimated that only 39% of men and 29% of women in England achieve the levels of physical activity that are recommended to protect health and prevent disease. One approach to addressing this problem has been the development of exercise referral schemes (ERSs), in which health professionals refer patients to external exercise providers. These schemes have been widely rolled out across the UK despite concerns that they may not produce sustained changes in levels of physical activity and, therefore, may not be cost-effective interventions. The evidence to determine clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness was evaluated in 2009. This review seeks to update this earlier work by incorporating new evidence and re-examining the cost-effectiveness. To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ERSs compared with usual care. Exhaustive searches of relevant electronic databases and journals were undertaken to identify new studies evaluating ERSs using a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. RCTs that incorporated a qualitative evaluation of the intervention were identified in order to explore the barriers and facilitators to the uptake of and adherence to ERSs. Data were extracted using a previously designed tool and study quality assessed for potential bias. Where data could be pooled, meta-analyses were carried out. Qualitative analysis was also undertaken using a thematic approach. The cost-effectiveness was evaluated using a Markov structure which estimated the likelihood of becoming physically active and the subsequent risk reduction on coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The model adopts a lifetime horizon, and a NHS and Personal Social Services perspective was taken with discounting at 1.5% for both costs and benefits. The search identified one new RCT and one new qualitative study. The new data were pooled with existing data from the 2011 review by Pavey et al. [Pavey TG, Anokye N, Taylor AH, Trueman P

  15. Open evaluation (OE: A vision for entirely transparent post-publication peer review and rating for science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus eKriegeskorte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The two major functions of a scientific publishing system are to provide access to and evaluation of scientific papers. While open access (OA is becoming a reality, open evaluation (OE, the other side of coin, has received less attention. Evaluation steers the attention of the scientific community and thus the very course of science. It also influences the use of scientific findings in public policy. The current system of scientific publishing provides only journal prestige as an indication of the quality of new papers and relies on a non-transparent and noisy pre-publication peer review process, which delays publication by many months on average. Here I propose an OE system, in which papers are evaluated post-publication in an ongoing fashion by means of open peer review and rating. Through signed ratings and reviews, scientists steer the attention of their field and build their reputation. Reviewers are motivated to be objective, because low-quality or self-serving signed evaluations will negatively impact their reputation. A core feature of this proposal is a division of powers between the accumulation of evaluative evidence and the analysis of this evidence by paper evaluation functions (PEFs. PEFs can be freely defined by individuals or groups (e.g. scientific societies and provide a plurality of perspectives on the scientific literature. Simple PEFs will use averages of ratings, weighting reviewers (e.g. by H-factor and rating scales (e.g. by relevance to a decision process in different ways. Complex PEFs will use advanced statistical techniques to infer the quality of a paper. Papers with initially promising ratings will be more deeply evaluated. The continual refinement of PEFs in response to attempts by individuals to influence evaluations in their own favor will make the system ungameable. OA and OE together have the power to revolutionize scientific publishing and usher in a new culture of transparency, constructive criticism, and

  16. Applying the Analytic Hierarchy Process in healthcare research: A systematic literature review and evaluation of reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katharina; Aumann, Ines; Hollander, Ines; Damm, Kathrin; von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf

    2015-12-24

    The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), developed by Saaty in the late 1970s, is one of the methods for multi-criteria decision making. The AHP disaggregates a complex decision problem into different hierarchical levels. The weight for each criterion and alternative are judged in pairwise comparisons and priorities are calculated by the Eigenvector method. The slowly increasing application of the AHP was the motivation for this study to explore the current state of its methodology in the healthcare context. A systematic literature review was conducted by searching the Pubmed and Web of Science databases for articles with the following keywords in their titles or abstracts: "Analytic Hierarchy Process," "Analytical Hierarchy Process," "multi-criteria decision analysis," "multiple criteria decision," "stated preference," and "pairwise comparison." In addition, we developed reporting criteria to indicate whether the authors reported important aspects and evaluated the resulting studies' reporting. The systematic review resulted in 121 articles. The number of studies applying AHP has increased since 2005. Most studies were from Asia (almost 30%), followed by the US (25.6%). On average, the studies used 19.64 criteria throughout their hierarchical levels. Furthermore, we restricted a detailed analysis to those articles published within the last 5 years (n = 69). The mean of participants in these studies were 109, whereas we identified major differences in how the surveys were conducted. The evaluation of reporting showed that the mean of reported elements was about 6.75 out of 10. Thus, 12 out of 69 studies reported less than half of the criteria. The AHP has been applied inconsistently in healthcare research. A minority of studies described all the relevant aspects. Thus, the statements in this review may be biased, as they are restricted to the information available in the papers. Hence, further research is required to discover who should be interviewed and how, how

  17. [Economic evaluation on breast cancer screening in mainland China: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Shi, J F; Huang, H Y; Zhu, J; Li, J; Fang, Y; Dai, M

    2016-12-10

    Objective: To gather available evidence related to the economic evaluation on breast cancer screening in mainland China and to provide reference for further research. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to identify articles in PubMed and three Chinese databases (CNKI, Wanfang and VIP) during 1995-2015. Data related to descriptive characteristics, rates on participation and detection for population-based studies, methods for model-based studies, types of economic evaluation and results, were extracted. A Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) was used to assess the reporting quality of included studies. Results: Of the 356 records searched in the databases, 13 studies (all published between 2012 and 2015) were included in the current paper involving 11 population-based studies and 3 model-based evaluations (1 study using both methods). Age of the participants who started to be engaged in the screening program ranged from 18 to 45 years old, but terminated at the age of 59 years or older. The screening modalities included single-used clinical breast examination, mammography and ultrasound or combined applications. Study persepectives were described in 7 studies, with 5 from the healthcare providers, and 2 from societal angles. Only 5 studies discounted cost or effectiveness. Out of 11 papers, 9 showed the results on cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) that reporting the cost per breast cancer detection, with median as 145.0 thousand Chinese Yuan (CNY), ranging from 49.7 thousand to 2 293.0 thousand CNY. From 4 papers with results of cost-utility analysis (CUA), the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained or cost per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted, were evaluated. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was from 2.9 thousand to 270.7 thousand CNY (GDP per capita of China was CNY 49.3 thousand in 2015). In 13 studies, the quality of reporting varied, with an average score of 14.5 (range: 9.5-21.0). In

  18. Multi-Stage Open Peer Review: Scientific Evaluation Integrating the Strengths of Traditional Peer Review with the Virtues of Transparency and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The traditional forms of scientific publishing and peer review do not live up to all demands of efficient communication and quality assurance in today’s highly diverse and rapidly evolving world of science. They need to be advanced and complemented by interactive and transparent forms of review, publication, and discussion that are open to the scientific community and to the public. The advantages of open access, public peer review, and interactive discussion can be efficiently and flexibly combined with the strengths of traditional scientific peer review. Since 2001 the benefits and viability of this approach are clearly demonstrated by the highly successful interactive open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP, www.atmos-chem-phys.net) and a growing number of sister journals launched and operated by the European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) and the open access publisher Copernicus (www.copernicus.org). The interactive open access journals are practicing an integrative multi-stage process of publication and peer review combined with interactive public discussion, which effectively resolves the dilemma between rapid scientific exchange and thorough quality assurance. Key features and achievements of this approach are: top quality and impact, efficient self-regulation and low rejection rates, high attractivity and rapid growth, low costs, and financial sustainability. In fact, ACP and the EGU interactive open access sister journals are by most if not all standards more successful than comparable scientific journals with traditional or alternative forms of peer review (editorial statistics, publication statistics, citation statistics, economic costs, and sustainability). The high efficiency and predictive validity of multi-stage open peer review have been confirmed in a series of dedicated studies by evaluation experts from the social sciences, and the same or similar concepts have recently also been adopted in other disciplines, including

  19. Evaluation of endometriosis-associated pain and influence of conventional treatment: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bernadete Trovó de Marqui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease characterized by sustained painful symptoms that are responsible for a decline in the quality of life of sufferers. Conventional treatment includes surgical and pharmacological therapy aiming at reducing painful symptoms. This study aimed to evaluate pain levels in women with endometriosis, focusing on the influence of conventional treatment in controlling this variable. To do so, a literature search was conducted in the Medline/Pubmed databases, with 119 scientific articles found. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 were selected for reading and elaboration of this review. Thus, 9 studies evaluated the contribution of surgery, 17 the use of drugs to reduce pain levels in patients with endometriosis and one assessed surgical and medical treatment. The main results of these searches are presented and discussed in this revision. Surgery and the use of drugs provided reduced pain scores in patients with endometriosis but nevertheless exhibit disadvantages, such as risk of recurrence and side effects, respectively. Treatment of endometriosis is, therefore, a challenge for gynecologists and patients, as they must select the best therapeutic approach for this disease. However, improved quality of life in these patients has been obtained with the use of conventional treatment.

  20. A literature review about usability evaluation methods for e-learning platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Luciana Lopes; Arezes, Pedro Miguel; Campos, José Creissac

    2012-01-01

    The usability analysis of information systems has been the target of several research studies over the past thirty years. These studies have highlighted a great diversity of points of view, including researchers from different scientific areas such as Ergonomics, Computer Science, Design and Education. Within the domain of information ergonomics, the study of tools and methods used for usability evaluation dedicated to E-learning presents evidence that there is a continuous and dynamic evolution of E-learning systems, in many different contexts -academics and corporative. These systems, also known as LMS (Learning Management Systems), can be classified according to their educational goals and their technological features. However, in these systems the usability issues are related with the relationship/interactions between user and system in the user's context. This review is a synthesis of research project about Information Ergonomics and embraces three dimensions, namely the methods, models and frameworks that have been applied to evaluate LMS. The study also includes the main usability criteria and heuristics used. The obtained results show a notorious change in the paradigms of usability, with which it will be possible to discuss about the studies carried out by different researchers that were focused on usability ergonomic principles aimed at E-learning.

  1. Staff supplement to the draft report on human engineering guide to control room evaluation: response to comments, sample checklist, draft systems review guidelines, and evaluation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This staff supplement to Draft Report NUREG/CR-1580, Human Engineering Guide to Control Room Evaluation, provides staff responses to comments on the draft report and supplemental material not provided in the draft report. The supplemental material includes new draft guidelines for the systems review of nuclear power plant control rooms and sample checklists and corresponding human engineering guidelines

  2. A systematic review and economic evaluation of bisphosphonates for the prevention of fragility fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sarah; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Sanderson, Jean; Stevens, John; Goka, Edward; Rawdin, Andrew; Sadler, Susi; Wong, Ruth; Campbell, Fiona; Stevenson, Matt; Strong, Mark; Selby, Peter; Gittoes, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Fragility fractures are fractures that result from mechanical forces that would not ordinarily result in fracture. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates [alendronic acid (Fosamax ® and Fosamax ® Once Weekly, Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd), risedronic acid (Actonel ® and Actonel Once a Week ® , Warner Chilcott UK Ltd), ibandronic acid (Bonviva ® , Roche Products Ltd) and zoledronic acid (Aclasta ® , Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd)] for the prevention of fragility fracture and to assess their cost-effectiveness at varying levels of fracture risk. For the clinical effectiveness review, six electronic databases and two trial registries were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and BIOSIS Previews, Clinicaltrials.gov and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Searches were limited by date from 2008 until September 2014. A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) of effectiveness studies were conducted. A review of published economic analyses was undertaken and a de novo health economic model was constructed. Discrete event simulation was used to estimate lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for each bisphosphonate treatment strategy and a strategy of no treatment for a simulated cohort of patients with heterogeneous characteristics. The model was populated with effectiveness evidence from the systematic review and NMA. All other parameters were estimated from published sources. A NHS and Personal Social Services perspective was taken, and costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Fracture risk was estimated from patient characteristics using the QFracture ® (QFracture-2012 open source revision 38, Clinrisk Ltd, Leeds, UK) and FRAX ® (web version 3.9, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK) tools. The relationship between fracture risk and incremental net benefit (INB) was

  3. A systematic review and economic evaluation of diagnostic strategies for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowsill, Tristan; Huxley, Nicola; Hoyle, Martin; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Coelho, Helen; Cooper, Chris; Frayling, Ian; Hyde, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterised by an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other cancers, and caused by mutations in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair genes. To evaluate the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of strategies to identify LS in newly diagnosed early-onset CRC patients (aged strategies for individuals in whom LS is identified. Systematic reviews were conducted of the test accuracy of microsatellite instability (MSI) testing or immunohistochemistry (IHC) in individuals with CRC at risk of LS, and of economic evidence relating to diagnostic strategies for LS. Reviews were carried out in April 2012 (test accuracy); and in February 2012, repeated in February 2013 (economic evaluations). Databases searched included MEDLINE (1946 to April week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1980 to week 17, 2012) and Web of Science (inception to 30 April 2012), and risk of bias for test accuracy was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) quality appraisal tool. A de novo economic model of diagnostic strategies for LS was developed. Inconsistencies in study designs precluded pooling of diagnostic test accuracy results from a previous systematic review and nine subsequent primary studies. These were of mixed quality, with significant methodological concerns identified for most. IHC and MSI can both play a part in diagnosing LS but neither is gold standard. No UK studies evaluated the cost-effectiveness of diagnosing and managing LS, although studies from other countries generally found some strategies to be cost-effective compared with no testing. The de novo model demonstrated that all strategies were cost-effective compared with no testing at a threshold of £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), with the most cost-effective strategy utilising MSI and BRAF testing [incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) = £5491 per QALY]. The maximum health benefit to the

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2017 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-18

    The fiscal year 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  5. Economic evaluations of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongmelaxme, Bunchai; Hammanee, Maythika; Phooaphirak, Wariya; Kotirum, Surachai; Hutubessy, Raymond; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, but China and Thailand have not used Hib vaccination in their national immunization programs. This systematic review aimed to update published economic evaluations of Hib vaccinations and to determine factors that potentially affected their cost-effectiveness. Searches were performed from the inception until December 2015 using 13 d