WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluation programme wmep

  1. The scientific measurement and evaluation programme (WMEP). Annual evaluation 1996; Wissenschaftliches Mess- und Evaluierungsprogramm (WMEP) zum Breitentest '250 MW Wind'. Jahresauswertung 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durstewitz, M.; Ensslin, C.; Hahn, B.; Hoppe-Klipper, M. (comps.)

    1997-07-01

    The Bundesministerium fuer Bildung, Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technik (B.M.B.F.-Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology) funds the '250 MW Wind' test programme. This programme is designed to acquire statistically relevant data concerning the practical use of wind energy converters (WECs) in the Federal Republic of Germany. The technological and scientific areas of this supportive measure, the 'Wissenschaftliche Mess- und Evaluierungsprogramm' (WMEP - Scientific Measurement and Evaluation Programme), are implemented by the Institut fuer Solare Energieversorgungstechnik (ISET - Institute for Solar Energy Supply Technology) in Kassel. The WMEP acquires and evaluates performance data concerning all funded WECs for a 10 year period. The following areas are the main focal points of the programme: Wind Resources: Local and regional distribution of wind resources in Germany, wind conditions at specific sites. WEC Performance: Energy production and consumption of WECs, periods of grid interconnection, periods of full and partial load, performance characteristics. Reliability: Technical availability, causes of faults, malperformance, component failure. Economics: Income through the operation of the WEC, costs related to maintenance, repair and insurance. Intensive statistical evaluations concerning these focal points are implemented, based on the continuously acquired operational data of each WEC. The results are presented in this report, in a form compatible to the evaluations of recent years. (orig.)

  2. Wind energy report Germany 1999/2000. Annual evaluation of WMEP; Windenergie Report Deutschland 1999/2000. Jahresauswertung des WMEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durstewitz, M.; Ensslin, C.; Hahn, B.; Hoppe-Klipper, M.; Rohrig, K. (comps.)

    2001-07-01

    The 1999/2000 issue of the annual evaluations of the scientific measurement and evaluation programme (WMEP) is the tenth regular publication of operational results from the wind turbines included in the ''250 MW Wind'' funding programme. Besides depicting the current state of the technology, a reflection on the long-term and successful development of this still young technology is offered. With the approval of a fourth project phase (2000 - 2004) it has been ensured that, also in coming years, particular attention can be paid to long-term behaviour in regard to reliability, life span and operational costs. (orig.) [German] Die vorliegende Jahresauswertung 1999/2000 des ''wissenschaftlichen mess- und evaluierungsprogramms'' (WMEP) stellt bereits die zehnte Ausgabe der regelmaessigen Veroeffentlichung von Betriebsergebnissen der Windenergieanlagen im Foerderprogramm ''250 MW Wind'' dar. Sie bietet damit neben der Darstellung des aktuellen Stands der Technik auch einen Rueckblick auf die langjaehrige und erfolgreiche Entwicklung dieser noch jungen Technologie. Mit dem Auftrag einer vierten Projektphase (zunaechst 2000 bis 2002) ist sichergestellt, dass auch in den kommenden Jahren besonders auf das Langzeitverhalten hinsichtlich Zuverlaessigkeit, Lebensdauer und Betriebskosten eingegangen werden kann. (orig.)

  3. Conceptualizing Programme Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Salochana

    2013-01-01

    The main thrust of this paper deals with the conceptualization of theory-driven evaluation pertaining to a tutor training programme. Conceptualization of evaluation, in this case, is an integration between a conceptualization model as well as a theoretical framework in the form of activity theory. Existing examples of frameworks of programme…

  4. Programme evaluation: Maintaining quality in higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery ...

  5. Programme Evaluation: Maintaining Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, A.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery (coordinator inputs and…

  6. Reliability evaluation programmable logic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivani, L.; Murali, N.; Thirugnana Murthy, D.; Satya Murty, S.A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Programmable Logic Devices (PLD) are widely used as basic building modules in high integrity systems, considering their robust features such as gate density, performance, speed etc. PLDs are used to implement digital design such as bus interface logic, control logic, sequencing logic, glue logic etc. Due to semiconductor evolution, new PLDs with state-of-the-art features are arriving to the market. Since these devices are reliable as per the manufacturer's specification, they were used in the design of safety systems. But due to their reduced market life, the availability of performance data is limited. So evaluating the PLD before deploying in a safety system is very important. This paper presents a survey on the use of PLDs in the nuclear domain and the steps involved in the evaluation of PLD using Quantitative Accelerated Life Testing. (author)

  7. A theory evaluation of an induction programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenrick Hendricks

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: An induction programme is commonly used to help new employees understand their job within the organisation. Research purpose: The main aim of this study was to examine whether or not the programme theory of an induction programme was plausible and would lead to the intended outcomes as described by the programme manager. Motivation for the study: Induction training is one of the most common training programmes in an organisation. However, there is little research to evaluate whether or not the activities of an induction programme will lead to the intended outcomes of such a programme. Research design, approach and method: This theory evaluation used a descriptive design. One hundred and thirteen employees of a media company completed a ten-item, five-point Likert scale which measured their perceptions of the programme’s outcome, identification with the organisation and intentions to stay with the organisation. Main findings: From this theory evaluation it was apparent that an induction programme based on an implausible programme theory could be problematic. An implausible programme theory affects the design of the programme activities and unsuitable activities may not deliver the desired outcomes. Practical/managerial implications: The intention of the evaluation is to guide human resource managers through a process of replacing an implausible programme theory with one that is plausible, and which ensures better alignment of programme activities and outcomes. Contribution/value-add: The evaluators showed how a plausible programme theory could improve programme design. This redesigned induction programme may lead to benefits, such as staff retention and company identification, rather than the vague assumption that it has been conforming to a legal obligation.

  8. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

  9. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, O. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tiefenbeck, V. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Duvier, C. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Qin, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Cheney, K. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Akers, C. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States); Roth, K. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. The Fraunhofer team hypothesized that home occupants with high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostats. In this report, the team discusses results of a project in which the team monitored and compared programmable thermostats with basic thermostats in an affordable housing apartment complex.

  10. Evaluation of European energy behavioural change programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gynther, L.; Mikkonen, I. [Motiva Oy, Urho Kekkosenkatu 4-6 A, 00100 Helsinki (Finland); Smits, A. [NL Agency, Swentiboldstraat 21, 6137 AE Sittard (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    This article is based on the findings of the BEHAVE Project (Evaluation of Energy Behavioural Change Programmes) which was supported by the European Commission under the EU Intelligent Energy-Europe (IEE) Programme. The project started with a review of behavioural theories and their applicability in the development and evaluation of energy-related behavioural change programmes, progressed to a case study analysis and finished with a publication of guidelines for programme developers and policy makers. This paper concentrates on the results of the case study analysis and the recommendations arising from it. In the case study analysis, information was collected on almost 100 cases aiming at behavioural change in energy use from 11 European countries. More detailed information was collected on 41 cases which were subject to meta-analysis to identify success factors and weak points and to gather information on the current evaluation practices in such programmes. The meta-analysis was carried out in five phases: context (pre-planning), planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Planning and evaluation were recognised as two of the most critical phases. Many of the programmes operated with quite formal plans but were typically not based on scientific theories or evidence. In many cases, there was lack of market segmentation; the goals were not targeted and the programmes tried to offer 'everything to everybody'. A multitude of ex-post evaluation methods for programme impacts were reported ranging from participant surveys, testing and comparison with control groups to top-down method evaluating the impact of several programmes focusing on the same target group. Process evaluation (25 cases) was slightly less common than impact evaluation (29 cases). Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of the programmes was a rarity, most likely due to difficulties in quantitative impact evaluation.

  11. The need for theory evaluation in global citizenship programmes: The case of the GCSA programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodier, Sarah; Field, Carren; Goodman, Suki

    2018-02-01

    Many education programmes lack a documented programme theory. This is a problem for programme planners and evaluators as the ability to measure programme success is grounded in the plausibility of the programme's underlying causal logic. Where the programme theory has not been documented, conducting a theory evaluation offers a foundational evaluation step as it gives an indication of whether the theory behind a programme is sound. This paper presents a case of a theory evaluation of a Global Citizenship programme at a top-ranking university in South Africa, subsequently called the GCSA Programme. This evaluation highlights the need for documented programme theory in global citizenship-type programmes for future programme development. An articulated programme theory produced for the GCSA Programme, analysed against the available social science literature, indicated it is comparable to other such programmes in terms of its overarching framework. What the research found is that most other global citizenship programmes do not have an articulated programme theory. These programmes also do not explicitly link their specific activities to their intended outcomes, making demonstrating impact impossible. In conclusion, we argue that taking a theory-based approach can strengthen and enable outcome evaluations in global citizenship programmes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of a nurse leadership development programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Margaret; Smithgall, Lisa; Rosler, Greta; Winn, Erin

    2016-03-01

    The challenge for nursing leaders responsible for workforce planning is to predict the knowledge, skills and abilities required to lead future healthcare delivery systems effectively. Succession planning requires a constant, competitive pool of qualified nursing leader candidates, and retention of those interested in career growth. Formal nursing leadership education in the United States is available through graduate education and professional nursing organisation programmes, such as the Emerging Nurse Leader Institute of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. However, there is also a need for local development programmes tailored to the needs of individual organisations. Leaders at Geisinger Health System, one of the largest rural health systems in the US, identified the need for an internal professional development scheme for nurses. In 2013 the Nurses Emerging as Leaders programme was developed to prepare nurse leaders for effective leadership and successful role transition. This article describes the programme and an evaluation of its effectiveness.

  13. Evaluation of the cleaner technology programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou; Jørgensen, Ulrik

    The report presents an independent evaluation of the Danish development programme for cleaner technology 1986-1989 and of the Action Plan for Cleaner Technology 1990-1992. The evaluation focuses on the results of technology development and implementation projects, on an examination...... of the dissemination of cleaner technology solutions achieved in six industrial branches, and on the overall programme and its effects, in particular environmental impacts, but also results in the form of employment, environmental export, strenghtening of Danish know-how etc....

  14. A special evaluation: The ARCAL programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Regional Co-operative Arrangements for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America, ARCAL, came into being in 1983. At a meeting held in Vienna in September 1984, ten Latin American countries agreed to participate in the programme, the Guidelines setting up the structure of the programme were approved and nine areas of development were identified to initiate project activities. The programme, which is now in its second phase and in its ninth year of implementation, has 17 Member States and includes fifteen projects. Total disbursements under the ARCAL programme during the period 1983 - 1991 amounted to $8.5 million, including $5.4 million from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (TACF), $2.2 million from extrabudgetary sources, and some $0.9 million in the form of in-kind contributions. As of September 1992, equipment totaling $3.5 million, 385 man-months of expert services, and 108 fellowships for approximately 150 man-months of training had been provided to ARCAL Member States within the context of fifteen ARCAL projects. In addition, 1844 Latin Americans were trained in 194 ARCAL training courses. The evaluation concluded that, as a result of the ARCAL programme, there is now better knowledge in participating countries about nuclear techniques and technology, as well as greater awareness at most levels of the importance of radiological safety and of the need to implement radiation protection measures, both a the national and at the regional level. The programme has contributed to developing and/or improving capabilities in the region in various applications of nuclear techniques through training activities. The programme has further allowed the establishment of regional collaborative links, particularly between countries with similar interests, in important fields of application, such as agriculture and nuclear medicine. Figs and tabs

  15. Country programme frameworks. A special evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    As a result of the recommendations of the TC Policy Review Seminar held in 1994 the Department of Technical Co-operation initiated Country Programme Framework (CPF) related activities in early 1995. Draft Guidelines for carrying out the CPF process were issued in February 1995. An agenda was propose for carrying gout the CPF process, which also included field missions to those countries where the information on national programmes and priorities available at the Agency was believed to be insufficient. In December 1995 the Evaluation Section was requested by the TC management to evaluate the approach and the progress achieved to date. The findings and conclusions of this evaluation have been formulated after extensive discussions with both in-house staff and external evaluation consultants. They thus represent a distillation of the views expressed by all. 2 figs, 1 tab

  16. A formative evaluation of a staff reward and recognition programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleemah Salie

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The main aim of this evaluation was to test the plausibility of the programme theory underlying a staff reward and recognition programme within a retail setting. Secondary aims were to assess whether or not the programme was implemented as intended and whether or not its outcomes were well defined. Motivation for the study: Different groups of people may have different assumptions about whether a reward and recognition programme works or not. This evaluation was motivated by the different assumptions held by programme stakeholders, programme recipients and social science researchers regarding the programme. Research design, approach and method: This formative evaluation used a descriptive design. Primary qualitative data were collected by means of structured interviews with the Human Resource Development (HRD Facilitator and ten programme participants. Main findings: The results showed that the programme theory was not plausible and that the programme was not implemented as intended. Although the HRD Facilitator and the participants agreed that the programme led to improved customer service, they disagreed about the other programme outcomes. Practical/managerial implications: This evaluation contains practical suggestions for improving the programme theory, the programme implementation process and the redefinition of the outcomes of the programme as standard performance indicators. Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributed to the limited literature on the effect of reward and recognition programmes. Whilst there is a vast amount of literature pertaining to such programmes, very few formal evaluations exist about them.

  17. African Primary Care Research: Performing a programme evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on Primary Care Research in the African context and focuses on programme evaluation. Different types of programme evaluation are outlined: developmental, process, outcome and impact. Eight steps to follow in designing your programme evaluation are then described in some detail: engage stakeholders; establish what is known; describe the programme; define the evaluation and select a study design; define the indicators; plan and manage data collection an...

  18. Methods of evaluating market transformation programmes: experience in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neij, L.

    2001-01-01

    The evaluation of market transformation programmes requires the development of new methods, relative to methods used for the evaluation of traditional energy efficiency programmes. In this paper, a model for the evaluation of market transformation programmes is proposed, based in part on evaluation methods discussed in the literature. The proposed model entails an extensive evaluation process, including the evaluation of market transformation effects, the impact of these effects, and the evaluation of the outline of the programme. Furthermore, evaluations of Swedish market transformation programmes have been analysed in relation to the proposed model. The analysis shows that not all of the evaluations have been focused on market transformation, and those that have, are only partly consistent with the evaluation model proposed here. It is concluded that future evaluations of Swedish market transformation programmes should be extended and improved in accordance with the proposed model. (author)

  19. Multinational design evaluation programme - 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) was established in 2006 as a multinational initiative to develop innovative approaches to leverage the resources and knowledge of the national regulatory authorities who are currently or will be tasked with the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP comprises 13 countries' nuclear regulatory authorities and is structured under 3 design-specific working groups and 3 issue-specific working groups which meet several times a year. The OECD/NEA facilitates MDEP's activities by acting as technical secretariat for the programme. The MDEP Policy Group (PG) and the Steering Technical Committee (STC) oversee the programme. MDEP's main objectives can be defined as follows: - to enhance multilateral co-operation within existing regulatory frameworks; - to encourage multinational convergence of codes, standards and safety goals; - to implement the MDEP products in order to facilitate the licensing of new reactors, including those being developed by the Generation IV International Forum. To carry out the work, two main lines of activity have been implemented: - the exploration of opportunities for harmonisation of regulatory practices; - the cooperation on the safety reviews of specific reactor designs. MDEP engages with key stakeholders involved in ensuring the safety of new reactor designs, manufacturing, construction and operation. At this time, these stakeholders include other national regulatory authorities and international organisations involved in ensuring nuclear safety including the IAEA, Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA), NEA Committees on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), the various reactor vendors, nuclear component manufacturers, mechanical and electrical standards development organisations, reactor operators and licensees and key industry representatives such as World Nuclear Association (WNA). To this end, the MDEP has organised a

  20. A process evaluation of a supervisory development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Buys

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The study aimed to provide information about coverage, service delivery, organisational resources, and medium-term outcomes for a supervisory development programme (SDP in the hospitality industry. Motivation for the study: The primary motivation was to assist programme staff to understand their programme and also to generate information that the programme staff could use to reflect on the programme’s performance and future direction. Research design, approach and method: A mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods was employed, namely: a literature review; personal interviews; and internal programme documentation, such as e-mail correspondence, financial statements, attendance registers, and personnel records. Personal interviews were conducted with two stakeholders, namely the programme manager and programme administrator. The programme data of 69 participants in the SDP were utilised for the evaluation. Main findings: The evaluation’s main finding concluded that the ‘implemented programme’ was not congruent with the ‘planned programme’. Practical/managerial implications: It is recommended that programme activities and theory should be re-evaluated, as the programme is used mainly as a training programme for new appointees, rather than a management development programme to create a pool of potential supervisors. Programme uptake and output should also be closely aligned. The length of time that people in the pool of potential supervisors had to wait before they were appointed should also be reduced. Contribution/value-add: By explicating the basic programme theory and studying programme implementation, this evaluation serves as a starting point for future evaluations of the SDP.

  1. Cross-Evaluation of Degree Programmes in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to develop and describe the benchmarking approach of enhancement-led evaluation in higher education and to present a cross-evaluation process for degree programmes. Design/methodology/approach: The benchmarking approach produces useful information for the development of degree programmes based on self-evaluation,…

  2. Evaluation of Training Programme in Organizations. | Patwardhan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The training programme was developed on the basis of the assessment of training needs. The programme was executed for 125 operators in seven batches during nine months. They completed schooling and a technical course. Effect of the training on participants' job performance and in the factory at large also is checked ...

  3. An evaluation of a leadership development coaching and mentoring programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Comte, Lyndsay; McClelland, Beverley

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper was to determine the value and impact of the Leadership Development - Coaching and Mentoring Programme at Counties Manukau Health and understand how the skills gained are applied. Design/methodology/approach Mixed-methods approach including surveys of programme participants and senior staff and semi-structured interviews with programme participants. Findings The survey response rate was 24.4 per cent for programme participants and 30 per cent for senior staff. Eight programme participants participated in semi-structured interviews. Of the 70 programme participants, 69 utilised their learning from the programme; 45 of 70 changed their approach to managing staff; and 40 of 68 programme participants reported that meeting with peers for triad group coaching was the most challenging aspect of the programme. Key themes identified through interviews included: working with others; not owning others' problems; professional support and development; coaching and mentoring; future participants. Practical implications The majority of participants changed their leadership behaviours as a result of the programme, which has resulted in improved communication, a more supportive culture and distributed leadership. These changes contribute to better patient care. Originality value There is a paucity of evidence in the literature about the impact of coaching and mentoring programme on leadership development and how the skills gained in such programmes are applied in practice in a healthcare context. This evaluation helps to address that gap.

  4. Auditing as method of QA programme evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, H.

    1980-01-01

    The status and adequacy of a quality assurance programme should be regularly reviewed by the cognizant management. The programme audit is an independent review to determine the compliance with respective quality assurance requirements and to determine the effectiveness of that programme. This lecture gives an introduction of the method to perform audits under the following topics: 1. Definition and purpose of quality audits. 2. Organization of the quality audit function. 3. Unique requirements for auditors. 4. Audit preparation and planning. 5. Conduct of the audit. 6. Reporting the audit results. 7. Follow-up activities. (RW)

  5. Monitoring and evaluating astronomy outreach programmes: Challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chapman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of tools exist to guide the monitoring and evaluation of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM education and outreach programmes. Fewer tools exist for evaluating astronomy outreach programmes. In this paper we try to overcome this limitation by presenting a monitoring and evaluation framework developed for the International Astronomical Union's Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD. The mandate of the OAD is to stimulate sustainable development at an international level and to expand astronomy education and outreach globally. The broad assumptions of this programme are that astronomy has the potential to contribute to human development by means of the transferable nature of its science discoveries, as well as its potential to activate feelings of wonderment, inspiration and awareness of the universe. As a result, the programme potentially embodies a far broader mix of outcomes than conventionally considered in STEM evaluation approaches. Towards this aim, we operationalise our monitoring and evaluation approach by first outlining programme theories for three key OAD programmes: a programme for universities and research, another one for schools, and one for public outreach. We then identify outcomes, indicators and measures for each one of these programmes. We conclude with suggestions for evaluating the global impact of astronomy for development.

  6. Evaluating a nurse mentor preparation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Olivia; Brown, Donna

    Following the introduction of a regional nurse mentor preparation programme, research was undertaken within a health and social care trust to explore both the trainee mentors' and their supervisors' perception of this new programme. A qualitative study involving focus groups was undertaken. The focus groups comprised a total of twelve participants including five trainee mentors and seven supervisors (experienced mentors) who had recently completed a mentor preparation programme. Data were analysed using Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis. Three themes were identified from the data: personal investment (including the emotional impact of mentoring) contextual perceptions (environmental factors such as time) and intellectual facets (related to personal and professional growth). Comprehensive preparation for mentors appears to be effective in developing mentors with the ability to support nursing students in practice. However, further study is required to explore how to support mentors to balance the demands of the mentoring role with the delivery of patient care.

  7. Evaluation of a school-based intervention programme for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Parental divorce affects approximately 30 000 South African children annually. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Children of Divorce Intervention Programme (CODIP) at two South African schools. CODIP is a preventively oriented group programme which was developed to foster resilience ...

  8. Evaluating a Special Education Training Programme in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delkamiller, Julie; Swain, Kristine D.; Ritzman, Mitzi J.; Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined a two-year special education and inclusive practices in-service training programme with a university in Nicaragua. Participants included 14 teachers from nine schools in Nicaragua. Participants' knowledge of special education concepts were evaluated as part of assessing the training modules. In addition, programme evaluation…

  9. Does the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme Contribute to Quality Improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Diana Amado; Rosa, Maria Joao; Amaral, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to reflect on the relevance of the Institutional Evaluation Programme (IEP) of the European University Association (EUA) to universities' quality improvement. It aims to analyse IEP follow-up reports to determine whether the programme contributes to the development of a quality improvement culture.…

  10. Peer Sexual Health Education: Interventions for Effective Programme Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranganathan, Gobika; Jaworsky, Denise; Larkin, June; Flicker, Sarah; Campbell, Lisa; Flynn, Susan; Janssen, Jesse; Erlich, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Peer education is used as a health promotion strategy in a number of areas, including sexual health. Although peer education programmes have been around for some time, published systematic evaluations of youth sexual health peer education programmes are rare. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of youth sexual health peer…

  11. An outcome evaluation of a perinatal education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfeous Rundare

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The Perinatal Education Programme (PEP has been introduced in the Western Cape in South Africa, and the main aim of this evaluation was to provide information regarding the effectiveness of perinatal training in a single maternity hospital in this province. Motivation for the study: There are a few evaluation studies of the PEP in different South African contexts. These evaluations have shown that the programme was effective in improving the knowledge of midwives. The current evaluation was motivated by the need for more research on the programme’s effectiveness. Research design, approach and method: A quasi-experimental design was used to determine knowledge and skills acquisition of midwives. The sample consisted of 42 midwives. Programme records and questionnaire results were used as data. Main findings: This evaluation showed that the PEP is an effective programme endorsed by participants and supervisors alike. Practical/managerial implications: This specific hospital added group facilitation to the self-study mode of the programme. This mode of study produced additional increases in knowledge, skills and group work. Contributions/value-add: The evaluation has provided sound evidence for programme managers to increase programme coverage and continue the good work already evident from the results.

  12. QUALITY OF AN ACADEMIC STUDY PROGRAMME - EVALUATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Macur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of an academic study programme is evaluated by many: employees (internal evaluation and by external evaluators: experts, agencies and organisations. Internal and external evaluation of an academic programme follow written structure that resembles on one of the quality models. We believe the quality models (mostly derived from EFQM excellence model don’t fit very well into non-profit activities, policies and programmes, because they are much more complex than environment, from which quality models derive from (for example assembly line. Quality of an academic study programme is very complex and understood differently by various stakeholders, so we present dimensional evaluation in the article. Dimensional evaluation, as opposed to component and holistic evaluation, is a form of analytical evaluation in which the quality of value of the evaluand is determined by looking at its performance on multiple dimensions of merit or evaluation criteria. First stakeholders of a study programme and their views, expectations and interests are presented, followed by evaluation criteria. They are both joined into the evaluation model revealing which evaluation criteria can and should be evaluated by which stakeholder. Main research questions are posed and research method for each dimension listed.

  13. Evaluating community-based medical education programmes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-02

    May 2, 2015 ... regionally relevant research through locally led innovative ... inputs, activities, outputs, and expected outcomes of their programmes, and used these models to inform development of evaluation .... It was highly interactive, with.

  14. Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) - Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the aims of the NEA's Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is to work towards greater harmonisation of regulatory requirements. To achieve this aim, it is necessary that there is a degree of convergence on the safety goals that are required to be met by designers and operators. The term 'safety goals' is defined to cover all health and safety requirements which must be met: these may be deterministic rules and/or probabilistic targets. They should cover the safety of workers, public and the environment in line with the IAEA's Basic Safety Objective; encompassing safety in normal operation through to severe accidents. MDEP is also interested in how its work can be extended to future reactors, which may use significantly different technology to the almost ubiquitous LWRs used today and in the next generation, building on the close co-operation within MDEP between the regulators who are currently engaged in constructing or carrying out design reviews on new designs. For two designs this work has involved several regulators sharing their safety assessments and in some cases issuing statements on issues that need to be addressed. Work is also progressing towards joint regulatory position statements on specific assessment areas. Harmonisation of safety goals will enhance the cooperation between regulators as further developments in design and technology occur. All regulators have safety goals, but these are expressed in many different ways and exercises in comparing them frequently are done at a very low level eg specific temperatures in the reactor vessel of a specific reactor type. The differences in the requirements from different regulators are difficult to resolve as the goals are derived using different principles and assumptions and are often for a specific technology. Therefore a different approach is being investigated, starting with the top-level safety goals and try to derive a structure and means of deriving lower tier

  15. Implementation evaluation of the business process services incentive programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonceba Mashalaba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation evaluation of the business process services (BPS incentive programme undertaken by the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti and the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME as part of the 2012/2013 National Evaluation Plan. The evaluation started on 31 October 2012 and the final report was approved on 17 May 2013. The evaluation covers the period from the inception of the programme in January 2011 to December 2012. The BPS incentive programme was implemented to stimulate the business process sector which contributes to economic growth largely through employment creation. The main objectives of the programme are to attract investment and create employment opportunities through offshoring activities. Twenty-six indicators across the five Development Assistance Community (DAC evaluation criteria were developed. A multi-method approach was undertaken to collect data for each of the indicators. The key findings relate to the operation of the programme and a number of suggestions were made as to how to strengthen it. Overall 3807 jobs have been created through the BPS programme during the period under review. Estimated total investment provided by firms is approximately R2.7 billion. Amongst others, the study recommended that the design of the programme be reviewed and extended, potentially to a five-year period in order to maintain the competitiveness of South Africa as a business process off shoring destination. It is essential to address the skills shortage to ensure the growth and sustainability of the South African BPS industry and finally the uptake of the incentive programme.

  16. Evaluating Development Projects and Programmes in Africa: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluation. It is indicated that NEPAD has not prescribed any internal or external monitoring and evaluation of its projects and programmes, and therefore calls into doubt the level of professional competence in its delivery strategies. The article also examines selected monitoring and evaluation strategies such as the African

  17. Programme evaluation: Can it improve human resource management practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Louw

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This is the final article in the special edition on human resource (HR programmes and evaluation. Its starting point is that programme evaluation is the application of a wide range of social science research methods that provide credible information about the need, use, planning, effectiveness and cost of a programme. Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the other articles in this volume, and to draw out general conclusions about their contributions to knowledge in the field. Motivation for the study: If evaluations are undertaken in the HR domain in South Africa, they remain mostly unpublished, and thus cannot contribute to a knowledge base for the field. Research design, approach and method: This article provides a theory-based approach to programme evaluation. The seven articles were analysed in terms of two major functions of programme evaluation, namely to ask ‘How does a programme work?’, and ‘Does it work?‘ Main findings: Eight overarching themes are identified in the articles included in this volume. Practical/managerial implications: The evidence discussed here can be used to make better decisions, promote organisational learning, improve practice, and enhance employee wellbeing. Contribution/value-add: The main contribution of this concluding article is its argument that research and theory in this field can enhance the work of HR professionals, by providing evidence about how ‘good’ a programme is, and why it is good. This adds substantial value in a world characterised by accountability and evidence-based practice.

  18. SKIs evaluation of SKBs RD and D programme 92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Section 11 of the Act (1984:3) on Nuclear Activities stipulates that the holder of a licence to own or operate a nuclear power reactor shall ensure that the necessary comprehensive research and development work is conducted in order to safely handle and finally dispose of the nuclear waste produced and to safely decommission and dismantle installation where the nuclear activity is no longer carried out. According to section 12 of the Act on nuclear activities, the reactor owners shall, in consultation with each other, prepare or have prepared a programme for the necessary comprehensive research and development work and the other measures. The programme shall contain an overview of all measures that may be necessary and also specify, in detail, the measures that are intended to be taken within a period of at least six years. The programme shall be submitted to the Government or to the authority designated by the Government for examination and evaluation. According to section 22 of the ordinance on nuclear activities, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) shall ensure that the research and development work which the reactor owners are responsible for undertaking according to sections 11 and 12 of the act of nuclear activities, is actually carried out. SKIs premise for evaluating the programme has been to examine it as an integrated R and D programme, which essentially focusses on structure, strategy and planning in order to effectively realize the defined goals of the programme, i.e. finding a safe, final solution to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Keeping to the time-schedule should not be the controlling factor in carrying out the research and development programme. The essential objective is to attain the goal without jeopardizing quality. SKIs examination has been documented in the form of the following: summary and conclusions, evaluation report, report of comments by reviewing bodies, and consultants reports. SKIs statement to the Government has been

  19. Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, E, fl. 1905, artist

    2003-01-01

    A photograph of an illustrated programme listing dances. The illustration shows a snake charmer playing to a snake while another man watches. Buildings and trees can be seen behind a wall in the distance. In the lower right-hand corner of the programme is the signature 'E. Hobday'. The programme is almost certainly related to the Punjab Ball, Lahore. It is placed next to the Punjab Ball Menu in the album and the Menu is also illustrated by 'E. Hobday'.

  20. Peer mentoring: evaluation of a novel programme in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Sarah; Sukhani, Seema; Brightwell, Alex; Stoneham, Sara; Long, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Mentoring is important for personal and professional development of doctors. Peer mentoring is a core skill in the UK paediatric postgraduate curriculum. However, there is a paucity of peer mentoring programmes aimed at postgraduate doctors in training (postgraduate trainees), and there are no such schemes within paediatrics described in the literature. We developed a regional peer mentoring programme for postgraduate trainees in paediatrics to assess demand and need for peer mentoring and to explore the benefits for both peer mentees and mentors. Junior postgraduate trainees, randomly selected from volunteers, received peer mentoring from more senior trainees for 1 year. Peer mentors were selected by competitive application and undertook tailored training followed by an experiential learning programme. The programme was evaluated using structured questionnaires. 90% (76/84) of first-year postgraduate trainees in paediatrics applied to participate, demonstrating high demand. 18 peer mentor-mentee pairs were matched. Peer mentors and mentees reported high satisfaction rates, acquisition of new and transferable skills and changed behaviours. All peer mentors intended to use the skills in their workplace and, later, as an educational supervisor. Our programme represents a novel approach to meeting the demonstrated demand and the curriculum requirement for peer mentoring, and enabled peer mentors and mentees to develop a valuable and versatile skill set. To our knowledge, it is the first such programme in paediatrics and provides a feasibility model that may be adapted locally to allow education providers to offer this important experience to postgraduate trainees.

  1. Multinational design evaluation programme. Annual Report April 2015-April 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities that are, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP incorporates a broad range of activities including enhancing multilateral co-operation within existing regulatory frameworks, and increasing multinational convergence of codes, standards, guides, and safety goals. A key concept throughout the work of MDEP is that national regulators retain sovereign authority for all licensing and regulatory decisions. Working groups are implementing the activities in accordance with programme plans with specific activities and goals, and have established the necessary interfaces both within and outside of MDEP. This report provides a status of the programme after its eighth year of implementation. Content: Executive Summary; 1 - Introduction; 2 - Programme goals and outcomes; 3 - Programme implementation (Membership, Organizational structure, MDEP Library, Common positions); 4 - Interactions with other organizations; 5 - Current activities (EPR Working Group (EPRWG), AP1000 Working Group (AP1000WG), APR1400 Design-specific Working Group (APR1400WG), VVER Working Group (VVERWG), ABWR Working Group (ABWRWG), Vendor Inspection Co-operation Working Group (VICWG), Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG), Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG); 6 - Interim results; 7 - Next steps - future of the programme; appendix 1: List of abbreviations and acronyms; Appendix 2: Revised documents and publications; Appendix 3: Photographs of reactors considered within MDEP

  2. Preliminary evaluation of STRIDE programme in primary schools of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanjeet, K; Wan Rozita, W M; How, T B; Santhana Raj, L; Baharudin, Omar

    2007-12-01

    The Students' Resilience and Interpersonal Skills Development Education (STRIDE) is a preventive drug education programme. The rational of this programme is that preventive drug education has to begin early in age, before the development of social attitudes and behaviour of students. A pre and a post intervention surveys were performed to evaluate the impact of this programme. Nine schools from three states were identified to participate in the intervention. These schools were selected based on their locations in high-drug-use areas (where the prevalence of drug use exceeds 0.5% of the student population). The new intervention curriculum was put into practice for three months in the nine schools. The overall scores obtained by each respondent to assess their knowledge on drugs and its implications were analysed. The results showed that the programme made a positive impact from the pre to post intervention programme by using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (p < 0.05). A high percentage of the questions showed significant evidence through the McNemar matched pair Chi-Squared test with Bonferonni correction that there were positive shifts in the answers by comparing the pre and post intervention results (p < 0.05). Recommendations have been discussed with the Ministry of Education to integrate this programme into the national primary school curriculum.

  3. Multinational Design Evaluation Programme. Annual Report - April 2014-April 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities who are, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP incorporates a broad range of activities including enhancing multilateral co-operation within existing regulatory frameworks, and increasing multinational convergence of codes, standards, guides and safety goals. A key concept throughout the work of MDEP is that national regulators retain sovereign authority for all licensing and regulatory decisions. Working groups are implementing the activities in accordance with programme plans with specific activities and goals, and have established the necessary interfaces both within and outside of MDEP. This report provides a status of the programme after its seventh year of implementation. Content: Executive summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Programme goals and outcomes; 3. Programme implementation (Membership, Organisational structure, MDEP Library, Common positions); 4. Interactions with other organisations; 5. Current activities (EPR Working Group (EPRWG), AP1000 Working Group (AP1000WG), APR1400 Working Group (APR1400WG), VVER Working Group (VVERWG), AVBWR Working Group (ABWRWG), Vendor Inspection Co-operation Working Group (VICWG), Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG), Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG)); 6. Interim results; 7. Next steps - Future of the programme; Appendix 1 - List of abbreviations and acronyms; Appendix 2 - Revised documents and publications; Appendix 3 - Photographs of reactors considered within MDEP

  4. E-learning Programmes and Courses Evaluation Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Prag, Sidsel-Marie Winther; Monaco, Lucio

    the development, testing, and evaluation of a series of applications for training and entrepreneurship in the field of sustainable energy (project work package 2, 3, and 4). This report describes the project outcomes related to this work stream with focus on E-learning programmes and courses. It represents...... the project deliverable “D3.4 E-learning Programmes and Courses Evaluation Report”. The applications developed for entrepreneurship will be described and evaluated in the project deliverable “D4.3 e-link evaluation report”. The second work stream (work package 5) covers the development of E......-infrastructure eduGAIN2. The access point is a web portal – the VCH Portal – which is used to manage users and groups. The E-infrastructure of VCH will be described and evaluated in the project deliverable “5.4 Virtual Campus Hub Technology Evaluation Report”. The E-learning applications described in this report...

  5. Evaluation of a tele-education programme in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Novaes, Magdala A; Iyengar, Sriram; Machiavelli, Josiane L; Zhang, Jiajie; Vogler, Robert; Hsu, Chiehwen E

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated a tele-education programme for primary care staff in Pernambuco State, Brazil. During 2008 and 2009, tele-education sessions occurred four times each week for one hour per day. The topics included public health, child and adolescent health, mental health and nursing. After each session, participants completed an evaluation questionnaire. A total of 73 municipalities and 141 health centres participated in the programme. There were 254 tele-education sessions scheduled during the 20-month study period; of these, 224 sessions were successfully performed and 30 were cancelled. We collected 3504 responses from the satisfaction survey. There was high acceptance of the programme: 97% rated it as excellent or good.

  6. Evaluation of a Health Education Programme about Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jane Mertz; Sellers, Debra M.; Hilgendorf, Amy E.; Burnett, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to evaluate a health education programme (TBIoptions: Promoting Knowledge) designed to increase public awareness and understanding about traumatic brain injury (TBI) through in-person (classroom) and computer-based (electronic) learning environments. Design: We used a pre-post survey design with randomization of participants…

  7. Evaluation of the Better Parenting Programme in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassan, Suha M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the Better Parenting Programme (BPP) which has been implemented nationally in Jordan to enhance parents' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours related to caring for young children. The participants (N = 337, 94% female) were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group participated in…

  8. An Exploratory Product Evaluation of the Manchester Motor Skills Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodal, Katherine; Bond, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This study is an exploratory product evaluation of the Manchester Motor Skills Programme (MMSP). A mixed methodology was used to explore intended, unintended, positive and negative outcomes for four Key Stage 2 (KS2) children with motor skills difficulties who participated in the MMSP. The children's motor skills, social skills and self-esteem…

  9. Evaluating the FRIENDS Programme in a Scottish Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Ian; Macmillan, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study used an "indicated prevention" approach to attempt to replicate very positive international evaluations of the FRIENDS for Life programme. Using standardised self-report measures of anxiety, low mood and self esteem with groups of children from four schools, the study found significant improvements in all of these measures…

  10. The European-Japanese joint programme on neutron data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    Following an initiative by the NEA Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) at their meeting in September 1980, the NEA Steering Committee approved the setting up of a joint European-Japanese Programme on Neutron Data Evaluations. A Scientific Co-ordinating Group was formed to determine the content of the Joint Evaluated File (JEF) and to co-ordinate work in national research organisations associated with the periodic revisions to this library. The NEA Data Bank is taking care of the secretariat functions of the Programme and will also, among other things, assemble and maintain the Joint Evaluated File (JEF). The plans are to release a first version of the file at the end of 1982, followed by a period of re-evaluations and benchmark testing, which will lead to the release of a second version at the end of 1985. The availability of the file will be restricted to the member countries of the NEA Data Bank. (Auth.)

  11. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In response to a request from Finland in November 1992, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set up a Team of four experts (representatives from Belgium, Canada, Germany and Switzerland) to review the Finnish nuclear waste management programme within the auspices of IAEA's Waste Management programme (WATRP). During the early summer of 1993, the Team reviewed a large amount of documentation supplied by the Finnish industry, government and research organizations. The radioactive waste management programme areas within the Team's terms of reference included: (1) work being done in siting and building a conditional facility for spent nuclear fuel and siting and constructing a co-located repository, (2) the plans and activities for conditioning and disposing of the low and intermediate level waste from Finland's NPPs and (3) the plans for decommissioning Finland's reactors when that becomes necessary. The evaluation work and the recommendations of the Team are detailed in the report

  12. The biofuels programme at KFB, 1991-97. An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E; Thuriaux, B; Bernhardt, W; McGill, R; Weide van der, J [Technopolis, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    The projects funded under the programme were generally of solid technical quality and well executed. They were relevant to the Programme goals. Project performers were qualified to do the work and had a good understanding of both the technical and the social issues involved. Unusually in this type of evaluation, we did not identify a single project which was a disaster. Research projects generally had higher technical quality than demonstration projects. Future demonstrations could benefit from research support in setting up experimental designs which maximize the amount of useful knowledge produced and which collect semi standardized data that demonstrations can collectively be analyzed. Almost all the projects were additional: that is, they would not have gone ahead without the KFB funding. While it took some time at the beginning before many projects were running, participants were enthusiastic about the Programme. Those projects involving users were particularly appreciated, and many led to substantial technological learning. In the latter half of the programme, KFB has played a particularly strong role in buying projects to help `converge` the Programme on a useful set of answers to Parliament`s questions. These `systems studies` provide a relatively concise guide for the policy maker, and go a long way towards meeting the Department of Communications` and others` need for a guide to the policy implications of the work

  13. A qualitative evaluation of a pilot leadership programme for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jonathan; Taylor, Nicholas; Hough, Donna; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2015-07-06

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate a pilot training programme run by Health Education North West to promote clinical leadership amongst general dental practitioners (GDPs). New powers and responsibilities for clinicians have caused a fundamental shift in the way that local services are planned and delivered in England. GDPs are being appointed onto the boards of local professional networks (LPNs) to influence the way that services are delivered at a local level. Analogous to clinical commissioning groups in medicine, the role of LPNs is to ensure that GDPs lead change and drive up the quality of service provision. Clinical leadership has been argued to be fundamentally important in these new structures, but has received little attention in the dental literature. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were held with participants of the pilot to explore their understanding and experience of clinical leadership. These were recorded, transcribed verbatim and underwent thematic analysis. Nineteen codes were identified and organized into four themes: nature of clinical leadership, challenges for clinical leaders in dentistry, Leadership Exploration and Discovery programme evaluation and future direction. The research provides an understanding of how GDPs conceptualise clinical leadership and provides recommendations for future leadership training programmes. This is the first evaluation of a leadership programme for GDPs and so helps address the paucity of evidence in the dental literature.

  14. Cumbria PFT: Leadership Development Programme: interim evaluation report

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Paul K.; Grimwood, Tom; Relph, Nicola; Bargh, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This report investigates findings arising from participant feedback evaluations of the introduction day and first two modules (themselves spread over four days) of Cumbria Partnership Foundation Trust’s “Leadership Development” Programme, running 2012-2013, as part of a broader multi-method evaluation. The report summarises both quantitative and qualitative feedback, and synthesises results to provide a more three-dimensional overview. Specifically designed to provide insight into participant...

  15. Evaluation and impact of cardiotocography training programmes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, C; Sorensen, J L; Amer-Wåhlin, I

    2011-07-01

    The interpretation and management of cardiotocography (CTG) tracings are often criticised in obstetric malpractice cases. As a consequence, regular CTG training has been recommended, even though little is known about the effect of CTG training. To perform a systematic review of the existing literature on studies on CTG training in order to assess educational strategies, evaluation of training programmes, and impact of training programmes. The Medline database was searched to identify studies describing and/or evaluating CTG training programmes. The literature search resulted in 409 citations. Twenty studies describing and evaluating CTG training programmes were included. There was no restriction on study design. Data regarding study design, study quality, educational strategies used for training in CTG interpretation and decision making, target groups, number of participants, methods used for evaluation, quality of evaluation, level of evaluation and results of training was extracted from 20 articles, and analysed using Kirkpatrick's four-level model for the evaluation of education. Training was associated with improvements on all Kirkpatrick levels, resulting in increased CTG knowledge and interpretive skills, higher interobserver agreement, better management of intrapartum CTG, and improved quality of care. Computer-based training (CBT) might be less time-consuming than classroom teaching. Clinical skills seem to decrease faster than theoretical knowledge. Training can improve CTG competence and clinical practise. Further research on CBT, test-enhanced learning and long-term retention, evaluation of training and impact on clinical outcomes is recommended. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  16. Programme Evaluation Toolbox: Effective Evaluation Principles and Considerations in Career Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia; Conley, Abigail Holland

    2011-01-01

    In our ever-present age of accountability, career development professionals are increasingly called upon to document evidence-based outcomes and other metrics of programme effectiveness. In this article, we will review the key components of effective programme evaluation, including purposes and types of evaluation. Our review will span empirical…

  17. Clinical leadership training: an evaluation of the Welsh Fellowship programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Suzanne; Bullock, Alison

    2018-05-08

    Purpose UK fellowship schemes have been set up to address low-level engagement of doctors with leadership roles. Established in 2013, the Welsh Clinical Leadership Fellowship (WCLF) programme aims to recruit aspiring future clinical leaders and equip them with knowledge and skills to lead improvements in healthcare delivery. This paper aims to evaluate the 12-month WCLF programme in its first two years of operation. Design/methodology/approach Focused on the participants ( n = 8), the authors explored expectations of the programme, reactions to academic components (provided by Academi Wales) and learning from workplace projects and other opportunities. The authors adopted a qualitative approach, collecting data from four focus groups, 20 individual face-to-face or telephone interviews with fellows and project supervisors and observation of Academi Wales training days. Findings Although from diverse specialties and stages in training, all participants reported that the Fellowship met expectations. Fellows learned leadership theory, developing understanding of leadership and teamwork in complex organisations. Through workplace projects, they applied their knowledge, learning from both success and failure. The quality of communication with fellows distinguished the better supervisors and impacted on project success. Research limitations/implications Small participant numbers limit generalisability. The authors did not evaluate longer-term impact. Practical implications Doctors are required to be both clinically proficient and influence service delivery and improve patient care. The WCLF programme addresses both the need for leadership theory (through the Academi Wales training) and the application of learning through the performance of leadership roles in the projects. Originality/value This work represents an evaluation of the only leadership programme in Wales, and outcomes have led to improvements.

  18. Evaluation of the Community's nuclear reactor safety research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Goedkoop, J.A.; Jaumotte, A.; Malhouitre, G.; Tomkins, B.; Zorzoli, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of the 1980-85 CEC reactor safety programme prepared, at the invitation of the Commission, by a panel of six independent experts by means of examining the relevant document and by holding hearings with the responsible CEC staff. It contains the recommendations made by the panel on the following topics: the need for the JRC to continue to make its competence in the reactor safety field available to the Community; the importance of continuity in the JRC and shared-cost action programmes; the difficulty of developing reactor safety research programmes which satisfy the needs of users with diverse needs; the monitoring of the utilization of the research results; the maintenance of the JRC computer codes used by the Member States; the spin-off from research results being made available to other industrial sectors; the continued contact between the JRC researchers and the national experts; the coordination of LWR safety research with that of the Member States; and, the JRC work on fast breeders to be planned with regard to the R and D programmes of the Fast Reactor European Consortium

  19. Technology-Enhanced Physics Programme for Community-Based Science Learning: Innovative Design and Programme Evaluation in a Theme Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tho, Siew Wei; Chan, Ka Wing; Yeung, Yau Yuen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new physics education programme is specifically developed for a famous theme park in Hong Kong to provide community-based science learning to her visitors, involving her three newly constructed rides. We make innovative use of digital technologies in this programme and incorporate a rigorous evaluation of the learning…

  20. An evaluation of the Leading an Empowered Organisation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon J

    To evaluate outcomes from the NHS leadership development programme Leading an Empowered Organisation (LEO). A prospective case study based on a pre- and post-course quantitative analysis with interpretative methodological support. Role conflict, whether nurse or manager, was apparent in nurses' perceptions of their roles. Respondents claimed many positive leadership attributes but lacked assertiveness and the skills for handling conflict. The LEO programme had a statistically significant effect on workplace leadership performance and positive benefits related to communication competence, articulation of goals, networking, assertiveness, zones of responsibility and problem solving. LEO is having an effect on workplace performance. However it could be improved by considering the package holistically, including not only the course content, but the entry level, pre-course preparation and post-course mentorship.

  1. Evaluating deceased organ donation: a programme theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Ana; Pawson, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Organ donation and transplantation services represent a microcosm of modern healthcare organisations. They are complex adaptive systems. They face perpetual problems of matching supply and demand. They operate under fierce time and resource constraints. And yet they have received relatively little attention from a systems perspective. The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the fundamental issues in evaluating, improving and policy reform in such complex systems. The paper advocates an approach based on programme theory evaluation. The paper explains how the death to donation to transplantation process depends on the accumulation of series of embedded, institutional sub-processes. Evaluators need to be concerned with this whole system rather than with its discrete parts or sectors. Policy makers may expect disappointment if they seek to improve donation rates by applying nudges or administrative reforms at a single point in the implementation chain. These services represent concentrated, perfect storms of complexity and the paper offers guidance to practitioners with bio-medical backgrounds on how such services might be evaluated and improved. For the methodological audience the paper caters for the burgeoning interest in programme theory evaluation while illustrating the design phase of this research strategy.

  2. Gas research programme in Sweden 1994-1996. Evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustad, J E [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Jahkola, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland); Norhammar, U [STOSEB (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    This evaluation report is written by an international committee at the request of the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK). The committee was invited to look into the quality of a research programme funded jointly by Svenskt Gastekniskt Center SGC (Swedish Gas Technical Centre) and NUTEK. Criteria`s considered in the evaluation have in short been as follows: scientific value of the projects and of the results obtained; merits of the methods; capability of research groups and adequacy of resources; quality of research in the view of problem oriented applied research; necessity of future financial support. Although the projects are the main elements to be evaluated, the evaluators have paid attention to structural and other problems wherever such a need has been seen.

  3. International evaluation of the programme on engine-related combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcoumanis, D [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom); Magnusson, B F [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Peters, N [Institut fuer Technische Mechanik, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The 12 projects in the engine related combustion programme cover the entire range from fundamental and theoretical aspects of combustion to more applied subjects such as engine control. The common denominator in the programme clearly is the internal combustion engine, both the reciprocating as well as the gas turbine engine. Such a large coverage by a relatively small number of projects necessarily leads to an isolation of some of the projects in terms of their subject as well as the methodology that is used. On the other hand, all the research areas of interest in combustion technology are represented by at least one of the projects. These are: mathematical and numerical methods in combustion; modelling of turbulent combustion; laser diagnostics of flows with combustion; studies of engine performance and their control; semi-empirical model development for practical applications. As a conclusion, the evaluation committee believes that the programme is well balanced between fundamental and applied projects. It covers the entire range of modern methodologies that are used on the international level and thereby contributes to the application and further development of these research tools in Sweden

  4. Evaluation of a clinical leadership programme for nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jacqueline S; McCormack, Brendan; Fitzsimons, Donna; Spirig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This is an evaluation study of the impact of the adapted RCN Clinical Leadership Programme on the development of leadership competencies of nurse leaders in Switzerland. Transformational leadership competencies are essential for delivering high-quality care within health-care organizations. However, many countries have identified a lack of leadership skills in nurse leaders. Consequently, the development of leadership competencies is a major objective for health-care centres. This article describes the quantitative results of a mixed methods study. A one-group pre-test-post-test quasi-experimental design was used. A convenience sample of 14 ward leaders were assessed three times using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). Descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques were employed. In total 420 observer-assessment questionnaires and 42 self-assessment questionnaires were distributed. Our main finding was that nurse leaders following the programme, demonstrated significant improvement in two subscales of the LPI -'inspiring a shared vision' and 'challenging the process'. This study showed improvement in two leadership practices of nurse leaders following a programme that has been adapted to Swiss health care. Findings concur with others studies that suggest that investments in educational programs to facilitate leadership skills in nurse leaders are justified. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of an early childhood parenting programme in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Frances E

    2007-03-01

    To promote physical and mental development of children, parenting education programmes in developing countries focus on specific practices such as age-appropriate responsive stimulation and feeding. A programme delivered to groups of poor mothers of children, aged less than three years, in rural Bangladesh was evaluated using an intervention-control post-test design. Mothers (n=170) who had attended a year of educational sessions and their children were compared with those (n=159) from neighbouring villages who did not have access to such a programme. After covariates were controlled, the parenting mothers obtained higher scores on a test of child-rearing knowledge and on the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory of stimulation. The parenting mothers did not communicate differently with their children while doing a picture-talking task, and children did not show benefits in nutritional status or language comprehension. Parenting sessions offered by peer educators were informative and participatory, yet they need to include more practice, problem-solving, and peer-support if information is to be translated into behaviour.

  6. Evaluating the Level of Degree Programmes in Higher Education: Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexwinkel, Trudy; Haenen, Jacques; Pilot, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the level of degree programmes became crucial with the Bologna Agreement in 1999 when European ministers agreed to implement common bachelor's and master's degree programmes and a common system of quality assurance. The European Quality Assurance system demands evaluation of the degree programme level based on valid and reliable…

  7. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L

    2006-04-01

    This paper introduces the concept of instrumental variables (IVs) as a means of providing an unbiased estimate of treatment effects in evaluating disease management (DM) programme effectiveness. Model development is described using zip codes as the IV. Three diabetes DM outcomes were evaluated: annual diabetes costs, emergency department (ED) visits and hospital days. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and IV estimates showed a significant treatment effect for diabetes costs (P = 0.011) but neither model produced a significant treatment effect for ED visits. However, the IV estimate showed a significant treatment effect for hospital days (P = 0.006) whereas the OLS model did not. These results illustrate the utility of IV estimation when the OLS model is sensitive to the confounding effect of hidden bias.

  8. Leadership as a Health Research Policy Intervention: An Evaluation of the NIHR Leadership Programme (Phase 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Sonja; Cochrane, Gavin; Manville, Catriona; Harte, Emma; Chataway, Joanna; Jones, Molly Morgan

    2016-01-29

    In early 2012, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) leadership programme was re-commissioned for a further three years following an evaluation by RAND Europe. During this new phase of the programme, we conducted a real-time evaluation, the aim of which was to allow for reflection on and adjustment of the programme on an on-going basis as events unfold. This approach also allowed for participants on the programme to contribute to and positively engage in the evaluation. The study aimed to understand the outputs and impacts from the programme, and to test the underlying assumptions behind the NIHR Leadership Programme as a science policy intervention. Evidence on outputs and impacts of the programme were collected around the motivations and expectations of participants, programme design and individual-, institutional- and system-level impacts.

  9. Multinational design evaluation programme - Annual report March 2013-March 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities who are, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP incorporates a broad range of activities including enhancing multilateral cooperation within existing regulatory frameworks, and increasing multinational convergence of codes, standards, guides, and safety goals. A key concept throughout the work of MDEP is that national regulators retain sovereign authority for all licensing and regulatory decisions. Working groups are implementing the activities in accordance with programme plans with specific activities and goals, and have established the necessary interfaces both within and outside of the MDEP members. In the past year, MDEP has expanded to include cooperation on the VVER and ABWR designs and additional members have begun participating in the programme to share their experiences on these design reviews. This report provides the current status of the programme. Significant progress is being made on the overall MDEP goals of increased cooperation and enhanced convergence of requirements and practices. In addition, the lessons learnt from the 11 March 2011, events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are being incorporated into MDEP activities through the programme plans of design-specific working groups (DSWG). On this topic, the EPR Working Group has issued a common position which will be supplemented by five technical appendices by the end of 2014. Other DSWG are in the process of drafting such common positions. Several DSWGs' are facilitating the MDEP programme goal of enhanced cooperation: the EPRWG, the Vendor Inspection Cooperation Working Group (VICWG), the Digital Instrumentation and Controls Working Group (DICWG), the Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG). Accomplishments to date provide confidence that the MDEP membership, structure and processes

  10. The Agency's technical co-operation programme in the Islamic Republic of Iran 1982-1995 country programme evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This evaluation of the country programme in Iran was requested by the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The main reasons for the evaluation were the desire to determine the results of the Agency's TC programme in Iran since 1982 (the post-revolution period) and how they are being utilized, and to identify specific areas for future co-operation. The evaluation included a two-week field mission during November/December 1995, integrated by three outside experts and one Agency staff member. Figs, tabs

  11. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme in Chile, 1981-1991. Country programme evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Agency support for nuclear activities in Chile dates back to the early 1960s. During the last ten years, the period covered by this evaluation, this support has considerably expanded. In the period 1981-1991, 62 Agency projects with allotments amounting to over $7 million were completed or are under implementation. Through this co-operation Chile has received 360 man-months of expert services, $3.4 million worth of equipment, and 105 fellowships for some 390 man-months of training. In addition, 262 Chileans attended 219 Agency regional and interregional training courses, and Chilean institutions were awarded 40 research contracts worth over $325,000. This evaluation covers ten years of Agency technical co-operation with Chile, during which 35 projects were completed and 27 are still being implemented. Eight major sectors received assistance: general atomic energy development; nuclear physics; nuclear raw materials; nuclear engineering and technology; nuclear techniques in agriculture; nuclear medicine; hydrology; and nuclear safety. The evaluation concluded that, overall, the Agency's technical co-operation activities have, in keeping with the national priorities concerning peaceful nuclear applications, contributed substantially to the establishment of Chile's nuclear scientific and technical infrastructure, and played a major role in Chile's efforts to introduce nuclear applications in a number of sectors of the economy, with many benefits for broader national development objectives. Another strength of the Agency's programme with Chile is the high level of commitment and dedication that was noted in the great majority of recipient institutions, and in particular at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CChEN. Mention should also be made of the fact that bureaucracy appears to be less severe than in some other developing countries, and that constraints that frequently affect other countries, such as insufficient counterpart commitment and lack of continuity of

  12. Rethinking programme evaluation in health professions education: beyond 'did it work?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal; Morin, Marie-Paule; Parker, Kathryn

    2013-04-01

    For nearly 40 years, outcome-based models have dominated programme evaluation in health professions education. However, there is increasing recognition that these models cannot address the complexities of the health professions context and studies employing alternative evaluation approaches that are appearing in the literature. A similar paradigm shift occurred over 50 years ago in the broader discipline of programme evaluation. Understanding the development of contemporary paradigms within this field provides important insights to support the evolution of programme evaluation in the health professions. In this discussion paper, we review the historical roots of programme evaluation as a discipline, demonstrating parallels with the dominant approach to evaluation in the health professions. In tracing the evolution of contemporary paradigms within this field, we demonstrate how their aim is not only to judge a programme's merit or worth, but also to generate information for curriculum designers seeking to adapt programmes to evolving contexts, and researchers seeking to generate knowledge to inform the work of others. From this evolution, we distil seven essential elements of educational programmes that should be evaluated to achieve the stated goals. Our formulation is not a prescriptive method for conducting programme evaluation; rather, we use these elements as a guide for the development of a holistic 'programme of evaluation' that involves multiple stakeholders, uses a combination of available models and methods, and occurs throughout the life of a programme. Thus, these elements provide a roadmap for the programme evaluation process, which allows evaluators to move beyond asking whether a programme worked, to establishing how it worked, why it worked and what else happened. By engaging in this process, evaluators will generate a sound understanding of the relationships among programmes, the contexts in which they operate, and the outcomes that result from them

  13. The Evaluation Of An Insourced Employee Assistance Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshree Naicker

    2003-11-01

    Werkgewers wêreldwyd toon waardering vir die toenemende behoefte aan maksimum werknemerproduktiwiteit en doeltreffendheid in ‘n globale ekonomie. In lande met arbeids- en vaardigheidstekorte, is die strategiese waarde van werknemerwerwing en -behoud krities. Werkgewers gebruik dus werkplekdienste, soos Werknemerbystandsprogramme (EAPs en ander verwante programme, om die algehele menslikehulpbronstelsels te verbeter. Maar die blote ingebruikneming van ‘n EAP is opsigself nie genoegsaam om al die bogenoemde te bereik nie. EAPs is selde suksesvol, indien dit nie korrek geïmplementeer word nie en behoort om hierdie rede geëvalueer te word ten einde hulle doeltreffendheid te demonstreer. Ten einde die bogenoemde te bereik, is die teenswoordige studie ontwerp met die oorkoepelende oogmerk om die ingekontrakteerde werknemerbystandsprogram (EAP oor ‘n periode van een jaar te evalueer in terme van impak- en effektiwiteitsbeoordeling. Die metodologie en die resultate van die studie word in die artikel aangebied.

  14. Unintended outcomes evaluation approach: A plausible way to evaluate unintended outcomes of social development programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Sumera

    2018-06-01

    Social development programmes are deliberate attempts to bring about change and unintended outcomes can be considered as inherent to any such intervention. There is now a solid consensus among the international evaluation community regarding the need to consider unintended outcomes as a key aspect in any evaluative study. However, this concern often equates to nothing more than false piety. Exiting evaluation theory suffers from overlap of terminology, inadequate categorisation of unintended outcomes and lack of guidance on how to study them. To advance the knowledge of evaluation theory, methods and practice, the author has developed an evaluation approach to study unintended effects using a theory building, testing and refinement process. A comprehensive classification of unintended outcomes on the basis of knowability, value, distribution and temporality helped specify various type of unintended outcomes for programme evaluation. Corresponding to this classification, a three-step evaluation process was proposed including a) outlining programme intentions b) forecasting likely unintended effects c) mapping the anticipated and understanding unanticipated unintended outcomes. This unintended outcomes evaluation approach (UOEA) was then trialled by undertaking a multi-site and multi-method case study of a poverty alleviation programme in Pakistan and refinements were made to the approach.The case study revealed that this programme was producing a number of unintended effects, mostly negative, affecting those already disadvantaged such as the poorest, women and children. The trialling process demonstrated the effectiveness of the UOEA and suggests that this can serve as a useful guide for future evaluation practice. It also provides the discipline of evaluation with an empirically-based reference point for further theoretical developments in the study of unintended outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of programme for energy management in buildings; Evaluering av program for energiledelse i bygg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Enova SF needed to evaluate the programmes for energy management for greater and smaller building owners. The question was: What has been the impact of the Buildings Network and the energy management programmes for greater and smaller building owners on energy conservation and economic life , and are the programmes operated efficiently? The buildings which participated in the Buildings Network in 1996 - 2002 had an average reduction of the energy consumption of about 7 per cent, which is somewhat less than the supposed potential of 10 per cent. There is some uncertainty in this calculation and the true figure is probably 1 or 2 per cent higher. Whether this energy conservation tendency has continued after Enova took over the responsibility for the programme in 2002 is too early to measure. It is very probable that the public support to the projects has triggered off the saving, that is, there has been few free riders. After 2002, Enova has made the programme more efficient and the cost per building has been halved in the period 2001 - 2003. But some of the original infrastructure of the programme has been discontinued.

  16. Evaluation of a Swedish version of the Strengthening Families Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skärstrand, Eva; Sundell, Knut; Andréasson, Sven

    2014-08-01

    Adolescents' alcohol consumption is a public health concern in Sweden as well as in many other countries. Underage drinking is associated with increased risks of alcohol-related injuries, risky sexual behaviours and dependence later in life. Different strategies have been used in the effort to prevent this behaviour, and to postpone the onset of alcohol. The Strengthening Families Programme 10-14 (SFP 10-14) from the USA has been highlighted as one of the more effective prevention programmes. The aim of the present article was to evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Swedish version of the SFP 10-14. This was a cluster randomized controlled trial including 587 sixth-grade students (age 12) and their parents in 19 elementary schools in Stockholm. Schools were randomly assigned to either control (9 schools, 216 students) or to the family skills training intervention (10 schools, 371 students). The SFP Swedish version consisted of two parts with seven and five sessions, respectively, held separately for youths and parents except two joint family sessions. Measures of students' self-reported episodes of drunkenness, smoking, illicit drug use and other norm-breaking behaviours were collected at baseline (March 2003) and at three subsequent yearly surveys. Data were analysed using multilevel models with an intention-to-treat approach. No preventive effects were found for smoking, alcohol and illicit drug use and other norm-breaking behaviours, nor did moderators affect the outcome. The Swedish version of the SFP 10-14 was not effective in preventing youths' substance use in a Swedish context. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the national roll-out of parenting programmes across England: the parenting early intervention programme (PEIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence based parenting programmes can improve parenting skills and the behaviour of children exhibiting, or at risk of developing, antisocial behaviour. In order to develop a public policy for delivering these programmes it is necessary not only to demonstrate their efficacy through rigorous trials but also to determine that they can be rolled out on a large scale. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the UK government funded national implementation of its Parenting Early Intervention Programme, a national roll-out of parenting programmes for parents of children 8–13 years in all 152 local authorities (LAs) across England. Building upon our study of the Pathfinder (2006–08) implemented in 18 LAs. To the best of our knowledge this is the first comparative study of a national roll-out of parenting programmes and the first study of parents of children 8–13 years. Methods The UK government funded English LAs to implement one or more of five evidence based programmes (later increased to eight): Triple P, Incredible Years, Strengthening Families Strengthening Communities, Families and Schools Together (FAST), and the Strengthening Families Programme (10–14). Parents completed measures of parenting style (laxness and over-reactivity), and mental well-being, and also child behaviour at three time points: pre- and post-course and again one year later. Results 6143 parents from 43 LAs were included in the study of whom 3325 provided post-test data and 1035 parents provided data at one-year follow up. There were significant improvements for each programme, with effect sizes (Cohen’s d) for the combined sample of 0.72 parenting laxness, 0.85 parenting over-reactivity, 0.79 parent mental well-being, and 0.45 for child conduct problems. These improvements were largely maintained one year later. All four programmes for which we had sufficient data for comparison were effective. There were generally larger effects on both parent and child measures

  18. Evaluation of the national roll-out of parenting programmes across England: the parenting early intervention programme (PEIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Geoff; Strand, Steve

    2013-10-19

    Evidence based parenting programmes can improve parenting skills and the behaviour of children exhibiting, or at risk of developing, antisocial behaviour. In order to develop a public policy for delivering these programmes it is necessary not only to demonstrate their efficacy through rigorous trials but also to determine that they can be rolled out on a large scale. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the UK government funded national implementation of its Parenting Early Intervention Programme, a national roll-out of parenting programmes for parents of children 8-13 years in all 152 local authorities (LAs) across England. Building upon our study of the Pathfinder (2006-08) implemented in 18 LAs. To the best of our knowledge this is the first comparative study of a national roll-out of parenting programmes and the first study of parents of children 8-13 years. The UK government funded English LAs to implement one or more of five evidence based programmes (later increased to eight): Triple P, Incredible Years, Strengthening Families Strengthening Communities, Families and Schools Together (FAST), and the Strengthening Families Programme (10-14). Parents completed measures of parenting style (laxness and over-reactivity), and mental well-being, and also child behaviour at three time points: pre- and post-course and again one year later. 6143 parents from 43 LAs were included in the study of whom 3325 provided post-test data and 1035 parents provided data at one-year follow up. There were significant improvements for each programme, with effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the combined sample of 0.72 parenting laxness, 0.85 parenting over-reactivity, 0.79 parent mental well-being, and 0.45 for child conduct problems. These improvements were largely maintained one year later. All four programmes for which we had sufficient data for comparison were effective. There were generally larger effects on both parent and child measures for Triple P, but not all between

  19. An evaluation of the HM prison service "thinking skills programme" using psychometric assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbett, Matthew J; Sellen, Joselyn L

    2014-04-01

    The most widely implemented offending behaviour programme in the United Kingdom was Enhanced Thinking Skills (ETS), a cognitive-behavioural group intervention that aimed to develop participant's general cognitive skills. A new offending behaviour programme has been developed to replace ETS: the Thinking Skills Programme (TSP). This study reports an evaluation of the effectiveness of TSP using psychometric assessments. Phasing of the two programmes created an opportunity to compare the two programmes consecutively. Forty participants, 20 from each programme, completed a range of psychometric measures to examine cognition, attitudes, and thinking styles. Analysis of pre- and post-programme psychometric results indicated that participants of TSP demonstrated improvements on 14 of the 15 scales, 9 of which were statistically significant. Effect sizes between pre-post results were generally greater for TSP than ETS, demonstrating that TSP had a more positive impact on the thinking styles and attitudes of participants than the ETS programme.

  20. Reflect before you act: providing structure to the evaluation of rehabilitation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velema, Johan P; Cornielje, Huib

    2003-11-18

    This paper is concerned with understanding and evaluating potentially diverse rehabilitation programmes. It helps evaluators and programme managers to focus attention on specific aspects of the rehabilitation process and select evaluation questions relevant to each. Distinction is made between the rehabilitation programme itself, the programme environment and the relationships between the two. For each of these areas, evaluation questions have been formulated. For services offered to individual clients, questions address whether the status of clients has improved, what interventions are offered and who benefit from them, the relationships between the service providers and the clients, and who may be involved in the rehabilitation process besides the client. To assess the programme environment, questions address the epidemiology of disability, the resources available to persons with disabilities, the inclusiveness of education and employment and a number of eco-social variables. Relationships between the programme and its environment concern the support of the community for the programme, the way the programme seeks to influence the community, the referral of clients to other services available in the community and the extent to which the programme is a learning organization. Lists of evaluation questions are presented from which the evaluator can select those most relevant to the programme to be evaluated. This provides a framework for the evaluation and for the information to be gathered. Rather than providing a blue print, this framework permits flexibility to adapt to the specific situation of the programme to be evaluated. This paper presents a useful guideline that stimulates the thinking of those preparing for the evaluation of rehabilitation programmes.

  1. Energy technology programmes 1993-1998. Evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-09-01

    In the late 1980s Finland`s Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) initiated a series of research and development (R and D) programmes in the field of energy technology. Subsequently, in 1993, it launched a further suite of eleven Energy Technology Programmes scheduled to run over the period 1993-1998. Aimed at the development of efficient and environmentally sound energy technologies intended to be competitive in the international marketplace, the programmes sought to involve the research, industrial and public sectors in some FIM 1.2 billion of research and development activity. The technology areas spanned: Combustion and gasification techniques Bioenergy, Advanced energy systems and technologies (e.g. wind, solar energy), Fusion, Energy and environmental technology, Energy and the environment in transportation, Energy use in buildings, Energy in steel and metal production, Energy in paper and board production, District heating, Electricity distribution automation. In early 1995, the Technology Development Centre of Finland (Tekes) assumed responsibility for the funding, management and administration of the programmes. As the final year of activities began, Tekes commissioned Technopolis to assemble a team to conduct a major review of all eleven programmes over the course of 1998. The broad aim of the exercise was to review the experience of the eleven technology R and D programmes and to make suggestions for the future. In particular, the intention was to cover a number of distinct levels. Most important were the Programme and Portfolio levels. At the individual Programme level, the review was to comment on the relevance, calibre and impact of programmes, concentrating in particular on the following: Relevance - were programme and project level goals in line with Finnish interests and comparable agendas in other countries; Efficiency - how well were the programmes implemented and managed; Quality - how did the scientific and technological quality of the work

  2. An Impact Evaluation of Nomadic Education Programme in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper assessed the extent of the realization of the objectives of nomadic education programme in the northeast sub-region of Nigeria. The study showed that the programme performed satisfactorily and the impact on the nomads is significant. There are however some major problems militating against effective ...

  3. Evaluation of European Domestic Violence Perpetrator Programmes: Toward a Model for Designing and Reporting Evaluations Related to Perpetrator Treatment Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley-Walker, Sarah-Jane; Hester, Marianne; Turner, William

    2018-03-01

    This article is based on a review of 60 evaluations (published and unpublished) relating to European domestic violence perpetrator programmes, involving 7,212 programme participants across 12 countries. The purpose of the review, part of the "IMPACT: Evaluation of European Perpetrator Programmes" project funded by the European Commission (Daphne III Programme), was to provide detailed knowledge about the range of European evaluation studies with particular emphasis on the design, methods, input, output, and outcome measures used in order to identify the possibilities and challenges of a multicountry, Europe-wide evaluation methodology that could be used to assess perpetrator programmes in the future. We provide a model to standardise the reporting of evaluation studies and to ensure attention is paid to what information is being collected at different time points so as to understand what and how the behaviour and attitudes of perpetrators might change throughout the course of the programme.

  4. A framework for evaluating community-based physical activity promotion programmes in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas L; Librett, John; Neiman, Andrea; Pratt, Michael; Salmon, Art

    2006-01-01

    A growing interest in promoting physical activity through multi-sectoral community-based programmes has highlighted the need for effective programme evaluation. Meeting in Rio de Janeiro, an international workgroup of behavioural, medical, public health and other scientists and practitioners endorsed the principle of careful evaluation of all programmes and in a consensus process developed the Rio de Janeiro Recommendations for Evaluation of Physical Activity Interventions". Among these recommendations and principles were that when possible, evaluation should 'built into' the programme from the beginning. The workgroup also called for adequate funding for evaluation, setting a goal of about 10% of programme resources for evaluation. The group also determined that evaluations should be developed in conjunction with and the results shared with all appropriate stakeholders in the programme; evaluations should be guided by ethical standards such as those proposed by the American Evaluation Association and should assess programme processes as well as outcomes; evaluation outcomes should be used to revise and refine ongoing programmes and guide decisions about programme continuation or expansion. It was also recognised that additional training in programme evaluation is needed and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Physical Activity Evaluation Handbook could be easily adapted for use in culturally diverse communities, especially in Latin America. This paper describes a 6-step evaluation process and provides the full set of recommendations from the Rio de Janeiro Workgroup. The handbook has been translated and additional case studies from Colombia and Brazil have been added. Spanish and Portuguese language editions of the Evaluation Handbook are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Physical Activity and Health Branch.

  5. Evaluation of the Radiation Protection Research Programmes (1980-1984 and 1985-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Akehurst, R.L.; Marcus, F.; Proukakis, C.; Rajewsky, M.F.; Sinclair, W.K.

    1989-07-01

    The commission appointed a panel of six independent experts to evaluate its Radiation Protection Research Programmes (1980-84 and 1985-89). The evaluation was carried out according to the guidelines specified by the Council Resolution on the evaluation of R and D programmes (O.J. C213, 09.08.1983), and further developed by the Commission's Plan of Action on Evaluation (O.J. C2(1), 06.01.1987). The scientific evaluation was carried out separately for each of the six sectors of the programme ant the post-Chernobyl actions. The management and socio-economic evaluation was based on discussions with Commission and national officials, programme contractors and site visits to laboratories in the member states. A questionnaire was used to survey scientists involved in the programme

  6. Review and evaluation of SKB's account of RDandD Programme 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD Programme 2010 for planned research and development, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and the actions intended to be taken (Paragraph 26 Nuclear Regulation). This report describes the results of the examination and evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations

  7. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  8. Evaluating the level of degree programmes in higher education: Conceptual design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.B.; Haenen, J.P.P.; Pilot, A.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the level of degree programmes became crucial with the Bologna Agreement in 1999 when European ministers agreed to implement common bachelor’s and master’s degree programmes and a common system of quality assurance. The European Quality Assurance system demands evaluation of the degree

  9. an evaluation of pharmacy-based screening programmes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-12

    Sep 12, 1999 ... advisory role in health careY The major motivation for the extended role of ... coverage of screening programmes to include a larger section of the population. ..... function among hypertensive employees.] Chron Dis 1984; 37: ...

  10. The Evaluation Of An Insourced Employee Assistance Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeshree Naicker; Christa Fouché

    2003-01-01

    Employers worldwide are appreciating the increasing need for maximum employee productivity and effectiveness in a global economy. In countries with labour and/or skill shortages, the strategic value of worker recruitment and retention is vital. Employers are thus utilising workplace services, such as Employee Assistance Programmes (EAPs) and other related programmes to enhance their overall Human Resources systems. However, the mere introduction of an EAP is not in itself sufficient to achiev...

  11. Evaluation of an adaptive ice skating programme for children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Dumas, Helene M; Boyce, Megan; Peters, Christine Y; Haley, Stephen M

    2009-08-01

    To describe an adaptive ice skating programme designed by paediatric therapists. Twenty-two children, ages 5-12 years, with developmental disabilities participated in this once per week skating programme lasting 6 weeks. Ice skating instructors led the group lessons, while university student coaches provided individualized assistance to the children. The programme was evaluated using a summative evaluation design. Outcomes included participant attendance, incidence of injuries, skating skills and parent and student coach survey data. On average, participants attended 83% of the sessions and one minor injury was reported. Participants' parents were very satisfied with the programme and reported improvements in their child's skating skills, leg strength, endurance, balance, self-esteem/confidence and ability to participate in a group. Student coaches also reported high levels of satisfaction with this programme and reported similar improvements in the children they coached. The programme appeared promising, but may require minor modifications.

  12. Economic evaluation of occupational health and safety programmes in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, J; Tompa, E; Koehoorn, M; de Boer, H; Macdonald, S; Alamgir, H

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based resource allocation in the public health care sector requires reliable economic evaluations that are different from those needed in the commercial sector. To describe a framework for conducting economic evaluations of occupational health and safety (OHS) programmes in health care developed with sector stakeholders. To define key resources and outcomes to be considered in economic evaluations of OHS programmes and to integrate these into a comprehensive framework. Participatory action research supported by mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, including a multi-stakeholder working group, 25 key informant interviews, a 41-member Delphi panel and structured nominal group discussions. We found three resources had top priority: OHS staff time, training the workers and programme planning, promotion and evaluation. Similarly, five outcomes had top priority: number of injuries, safety climate, job satisfaction, quality of care and work days lost. The resulting framework was built around seven principles of good practice that stakeholders can use to assist them in conducting economic evaluations of OHS programmes. Use of a framework resulting from this participatory action research approach may increase the quality of economic evaluations of OHS programmes and facilitate programme comparisons for evidence-based resource allocation decisions. The principles may be applicable to other service sectors funded from general taxes and more broadly to economic evaluations of OHS programmes in general. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Process Evaluation of Student Participation in a Whole School Food Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Judy; Jones, Matthew; Salmon, Debra; Weitkamp, Emma; Kimberlee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Health promotion programmes are widely held to be more effective when the subjects of them actively participate in the process of change. The purpose of this paper is to report on an evaluation of the Food for Life Partnership programme, a multi-level initiative in England promoting healthier nutrition and food sustainability awareness…

  14. Evaluation of an Adoption Strategy for a Healthy Diet Programme for Lower Vocational Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessems, Kathelijne M. H. H.; van Assema, Patricia; Paulussen, Theo W. G. M.; de Vries, Nanne K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of an adoption strategy for the school-based healthy diet programme Krachtvoer. Health promotion (HP) professionals from five Regional Public Health Services (RPHSs) in The Netherlands were asked to recruit a total of 25 schools to adopt the Krachtvoer programme in accordance with this strategy. Afterwards, they…

  15. Brief Report: An Evaluation of an Australian Autism-Specific, Early Intervention Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Jessica M.; Riley, Emma P.; Beamish, Wendi; Scott, James G.; Heussler, Helen S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a relative paucity of evidence examining the effectiveness of early intervention for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, in particular those delivered through educationally-based programmes. This study aimed to evaluate the real world effectiveness of a community-based autism-specific early learning and intervention programme in…

  16. Evaluating the Impact of an Environmental Education Programme: An Empirical Study in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mallen, Isabel; Barraza, Laura; Bodenhorn, Barbara; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    This study draws on information from 11 in-depth interviews, two focus groups and 72 written questionnaires to evaluate an extra-curricular environmental education programme on forestry designed for preparatory school students from a small rural community in Mexico. Specifically, the study assessed the impact of the programme on the ecological…

  17. Evaluation of constrained mobility for programmability in network management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohoris, C.; Liotta, A.; Pavlou, G.; Ambler, A.P.; Calo, S.B.; Kar, G.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, a significant amount of research work has addressed the use of code mobility in network management. In this paper, we introduce first three aspects of code mobility and argue that constrained mobility offers a natural and easy approach to network management programmability. While

  18. Evaluation of the Start Programme: Case-Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Shona; Sharp, Caroline; Weaving, Harriet; Smith, Robert; Wheater, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This report presents five case studies of long-term partnerships (over three years) between arts organisations and schools. The Start programme enables arts venues and schools to work together to offer disadvantaged young people opportunities to engage in creative activities that inspire them and enhance their experience of the arts. It is…

  19. Evaluation of a computer-based teaching programme (CBTP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... opportunity to accept responsibility for learning, to identify learning needs and to follow a deep approach to learning. The criteria taken into account in the development of the CBTP were classified into three categories, namely teaching effectiveness, cosmetic, programme and curriculum effectiveness and were eventually ...

  20. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to the regression discontinuity design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L; Roberts, Nancy

    2006-04-01

    Although disease management (DM) has been in existence for over a decade, there is still much uncertainty as to its effectiveness in improving health status and reducing medical cost. The main reason is that most programme evaluations typically follow weak observational study designs that are subject to bias, most notably selection bias and regression to the mean. The regression discontinuity (RD) design may be the best alternative to randomized studies for evaluating DM programme effectiveness. The most crucial element of the RD design is its use of a 'cut-off' score on a pre-test measure to determine assignment to intervention or control. A valuable feature of this technique is that the pre-test measure does not have to be the same as the outcome measure, thus maximizing the programme's ability to use research-based practice guidelines, survey instruments and other tools to identify those individuals in greatest need of the programme intervention. Similarly, the cut-off score can be based on clinical understanding of the disease process, empirically derived, or resource-based. In the RD design, programme effectiveness is determined by a change in the pre-post relationship at the cut-off point. While the RD design is uniquely suitable for DM programme evaluation, its success will depend, in large part, on fundamental changes being made in the way DM programmes identify and assign individuals to the programme intervention.

  1. Evaluation of the fusion technology and safety programme of the Joint Research Centre (1980-85)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.; Cabibbo, N.; Crocker, J.G.; Lecomte, M.; Merz, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre, Ispra, has been involved in fusion research since 1973. In July 1985 the Commission of European Communities - DG XII, following a policy of systematically evaluating its RandD activities, appointed a panel of external experts to evaluate the fusion technology and safety programme carried out at the Joint Research Centre. This report describes the work of the panel in evaluating the research performed by the JRC within the framework of its 1984-87 programme. The achievements of the previous programme, 1980-83, were also taken into consideration. The different research areas covered in the programme, i.e.: reactor studies, breeding blanket technology, structural materials studies, risk assessment and tritium laboratory studies, are described and a draft proposal for the period 1987-90 presented. The evaluation panel has been asked to assess the following aspects: the scientific and technical achievements of the programme, the contribution of the programme to the development of other Community policies, the role played by the JRC in the European fusion research (including NET) and in international collaborations such as INTOR. From its assessment the evaluation panel has made a series of recommendations for the current programme and for future work

  2. Special evaluation review of the Agency's training course programme 1986-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    During discussions at the 1994 Policy Review Seminar, Member States supported the principle that socio-economic impact and cost-benefit be considered important factors in the approval of technical co-operation programmes. In line with this principle, it was considered timely to conduct an evaluation of the Agency's Training Course Programme, to assist the Department of Technical Co-operation in focusing this programme on relevant subjects, consistent with the objectives and trends of, and complementary to, the entire Technical Co-operation Programme. The main purpose of the evaluation was to (a) assess the continued relevance, effectiveness and impact of the Training Course Programme in its present form as a means of technology transfer to developing Member States; and (b) propose possible alternatives for handling the demand by Member States for training through regional and interregional training courses. 10 tab

  3. A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for medical ... The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS), Harare, which ... of community-based activities and the availability of a large teaching platform, ...

  4. Evaluating the implementation of a national clinical programme for diabetes to standardise and improve services: a realist evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S; Tracey, M L; Riordan, F; O'Neill, K; Mays, N; Kearney, P M

    2016-07-28

    Over the last three decades in response to the growing burden of diabetes, countries worldwide have developed national and regional multifaceted programmes to improve the monitoring and management of diabetes and to enhance the coordination of care within and across settings. In Ireland in 2010, against a backdrop of limited dedicated strategic planning and engrained variation in the type and level of diabetes care, a national programme was established to standardise and improve care for people with diabetes in Ireland, known as the National Diabetes Programme (NDP). The NDP comprises a range of organisational and service delivery changes to support evidence-based practices and policies. This realist evaluation protocol sets out the approach that will be used to identify and explain which aspects of the programme are working, for whom and in what circumstances to produce the outcomes intended. This mixed method realist evaluation will develop theories about the relationship between the context, mechanisms and outcomes of the diabetes programme. In stage 1, to identify the official programme theories, documentary analysis and qualitative interviews were conducted with national stakeholders involved in the design, development and management of the programme. In stage 2, as part of a multiple case study design with one case per administrative region in the health system, qualitative interviews are being conducted with frontline staff and service users to explore their responses to, and reasoning about, the programme's resources (mechanisms). Finally, administrative data will be used to examine intermediate implementation outcomes such as service uptake, acceptability, and fidelity to models of care. This evaluation is using the principles of realist evaluation to examine the implementation of a national programme to standardise and improve services for people with diabetes in Ireland. The concurrence of implementation and evaluation has enabled us to produce formative

  5. Do they practice what we teach? Follow-up evaluation of a Schema Therapy training programme

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Deborah; Moghaddam, Nima; Beckley, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated a three-day Schema Therapy training programme for trainee clinical psychologists. The training used an experiential model of learning, which was intended to encourage the transfer of knowledge and techniques from the learning environment into clinical practice. Using a mixed-methods approach, the training programme was evaluated in terms of: (1) self-reported changes in knowledge, confidence and willingness to use Schema Therapy-informed techniques; (2) whether the tra...

  6. Conduct of a meta review of programme evaluations : a case study of the SEARCH Program

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Rumona; Tight, Malcolm; Saunders, Murray

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a retrospective case study that critically examines the evaluations that were undertaken as part of a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for health care professionals. The case is the SEARCH Program, an innovative CPD programme, which was designed to promote the implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) within the existing health care system in Alberta, Canada. Two approaches from the ‘using’ branch of Alkin and Chrisite’s evaluation theory tree are...

  7. Criteria for evaluating programme theory diagrams in quality improvement initiatives: a structured method for appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issen, Laurel; Woodcock, Thomas; McNicholas, Christopher; Lennox, Laura; Reed, Julie E

    2018-04-09

    Despite criticisms that many quality improvement (QI) initiatives fail due to incomplete programme theory, there is no defined way to evaluate how programme theory has been articulated. The objective of this research was to develop, and assess the usability and reliability of scoring criteria to evaluate programme theory diagrams. Criteria development was informed by published literature and QI experts. Inter-rater reliability was tested between two evaluators. About 63 programme theory diagrams (42 driver diagrams and 21 action-effect diagrams) were reviewed to establish whether the criteria could support comparative analysis of different approaches to constructing diagrams. Components of the scoring criteria include: assessment of overall aim, logical overview, clarity of components, cause-effect relationships, evidence and measurement. Independent reviewers had 78% inter-rater reliability. Scoring enabled direct comparison of different approaches to developing programme theory; action-effect diagrams were found to have had a statistically significant but moderate improvement in programme theory quality over driver diagrams; no significant differences were observed based on the setting in which driver diagrams were developed. The scoring criteria summarise the necessary components of programme theory that are thought to contribute to successful QI projects. The viability of the scoring criteria for practical application was demonstrated. Future uses include assessment of individual programme theory diagrams and comparison of different approaches (e.g. methodological, teaching or other QI support) to produce programme theory. The criteria can be used as a tool to guide the production of better programme theory diagrams, and also highlights where additional support for QI teams could be needed.

  8. Using evaluability assessment to assess local community development health programmes: a Scottish case-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Belford

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of the potential effectiveness of a programme’s objectives (health or otherwise is important in demonstrating how programmes work. However, evaluations are expensive and can focus on unrealistic outcomes not grounded in strong theory, especially where there is pressure to show effectiveness. The aim of this research was to demonstrate that the evaluability assessment (a cost-effective pre-evaluation tool that primarily gives quick, constructive feedback can be used to help develop programme and outcome objectives to improve programmes while they run and to assist in producing more effective evaluations. This was done using the example of a community development programme aiming to improve health and reduce health inequalities in its target population. Methods The setting was Glasgow, Scotland, UK and focused on the Health Issues in the Community programme. Data were collected from documents and nine individual stakeholder interviews. Thematic analysis and a realist approach were used to analyse both datasets and, in conjunction with a workshop with stakeholders, produce a logic model of the programme theory and related evaluation options to explore further. Results Five main themes emerged from the analysis: History; Framework; Structure and Delivery of the Course; Theory of Action; and Barriers to Delivery and Successful Outcomes. These themes aided in drafting the logic model which revealed they key programme activities (e.g. facilitating group learning and 23 potential outcomes. The majority of these outcomes (16 were deemed to be short-term outcomes (more easily measured within the timeframe of an individual being involved in the programme e.g. increased self-esteem or awareness of individual/community health. The remaining 6 outcomes were deemed longer-term and included outcomes such as increased social capital and individual mental health and wellbeing. Conclusions We have shown that the evaluability

  9. Health promotion and sustainability programmes in Australia: barriers and enablers to evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rebecca; Kingsley, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    In an era characterised by the adverse impacts of climate change and environmental degradation, health promotion programmes are beginning to actively link human health with environmental sustainability imperatives. This paper draws on a study of health promotion and sustainability programmes in Australia, providing insights to evaluation approaches being used and barriers and enablers to these evaluations. The study was based on a multi-strategy research involving both quantitative and qualitative methods. Health promotion practitioners explained through surveys and semi-structured interviews that they focused on five overarching health and sustainability programme types (healthy and sustainable food, active transport, energy efficiency, contact with nature, and capacity building). Various evaluation methods and indicators (health, social, environmental, economic and demographic) were identified as being valuable for monitoring and evaluating health and sustainability programmes. Findings identified several evaluation enablers such as successful community engagement, knowledge of health and sustainability issues and programme champions, whereas barriers included resource constraints and competing interests. This paper highlights the need for ecological models and evaluation tools to support the design and monitoring of health promotion and sustainability programmes.

  10. Policy issues for improving monitoring and evaluation of agricultural extension programmes in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinnagbe O. Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring and evaluation are important, yet, frequently neglected functions in most organisations. In Nigeria, many programmes have been established over the years but only little monitoring and evaluation have been carried out because of many implementation problems and lack of realistic and/or stable policy framework. This paper was designed to X-ray policy issues for improving monitoring and evaluation of agricultural programmes in Nigeria. Inductive and deductive reasoning through a review of relevant literature was used in this philosophical paper. To improve the performance of agricultural extension programmes in Nigeria, the following policy issues must be addressed: The questions of what should be monitored or evaluated, when should monitoring and/or evaluation be carried out and who should monitor and/or evaluate; and the methodology to be adopted in any project should be included in any agricultural programmes and/or policies. Manpower and financial resources, effective communication and the issue of accountability must be properly considered. The tools for monitoring and evaluation are also very crucial. The paper concluded that planning a good agricultural programme is not a problem in Nigeria but poor implementation is, as a result of poor monitoring and evaluation. Therefore, attention should be on when, how and who should be involved in monitoring and evaluation.

  11. An evaluation system of the setting up of predictive maintenance programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnero, MaCarmen

    2006-01-01

    Predictive Maintenance can provide an increase in safety, quality and availability in industrial plants. However, the setting up of a Predictive Maintenance Programme is a strategic decision that until now has lacked analysis of questions related to its setting up, management and control. In this paper, an evaluation system is proposed that carries out the decision making in relation to the feasibility of the setting up. The evaluation system uses a combination of tools belonging to operational research such as: Analytic Hierarchy Process, decision rules and Bayesian tools. This system is a help tool available to the managers of Predictive Maintenance Programmes which can both increase the number of Predictive Maintenance Programmes set up and avoid the failure of these programmes. The Evaluation System has been tested in a petrochemical plant and in a food industry

  12. Evaluation Inquiry in Donor Funded Programmes in Northern Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An evaluation inquiry has been noted to have a significant influence on whether the evaluation outcomes are used or not. However, only limited studies have examined evaluation inquiry and its implication on the use of evaluation in Ghana. This study therefore seeks to contribute to knowledge on evaluation inquiry and the ...

  13. Survey and evaluation of the external research and development programme 1977-1983 of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Lars.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the external research programme of SSI is undertaken. The main research programme is in this report divided into five subprogrammes according to the main programmes of the Institute. This report covers research projects reported 1977-1983. An evaluation of the impact of the R and D programme is included in the report. The external R and D research programme of SSI has had an important impact on the radiation protection work in Sweden. The methods for evaluation of research programmes are also discussed in the report

  14. Evaluation of health promotion programmes in severe mental illness : theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, Fenneke M.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    Health promotion programmes for patients with severe mental illness (HPP) are not uniformly evaluated. We discuss the evaluation of HPP in theory and practice, as a prerequisite for future uniform evaluation. We explored the expected outcome and mechanism of HPP in the current literature. Based on

  15. Evaluating a Professional Development Programme for Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Science Subject

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Talitha Christine; Coenders, Ferdinand G.M.; Terlouw, C.; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate a professional development programme that prepares and assists teachers with the implementation of a multidisciplinary science module, basing the evaluation on participants’ reactions, the first level of Guskey’s five-level model for evaluation (2002). Positive

  16. Evaluation of the Dutch National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, K.; Boekholt, P.; Kaellen, E.; Downing, T.; Verbruggen, A.

    2002-02-01

    During 2001, the second phase of the National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NOP2) has been evaluated. In the period 1995-2001 the budget for NOP was 47 million Dutch guilders, which supported over 30 organisations in 100 projects and studies spanning four main themes: (1) dynamics of the climate system and its component parts; (2) vulnerability of natural and societal systems to climate change; (3) societal causes and solutions; (4) integration and assessment. Later in the life of the programme, two themes were added to widen the scope of the programme and add value to existing activities. These covered projects concerned with 'cross-cutting' or 'over-arching' issues and those dealing with 'internationalisation', i.e. projects specifically designed to support various initiatives in the development of international programmes. A further proportion of the research budget was dedicated to direct policy support. The evaluation was primarily intended to: Assess the scientific quality of the work undertaken in the programme and the attainment of scientific and technical goals. Also attention was paid to the relevancy of projects and project outputs to national and international policy formulation (policy relevance); the structure and operation of the programme to see if it promoted coherence and synergy between the constituent parts (synergy); and recommendations concerning the form, content and direction of a new programme in the area (new directions)

  17. Evaluating the co-benefits of low-income energy-efficiency programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffner, Grayson; Campbell, Nina

    2011-06-15

    The International Energy Agency's Energy Efficiency Unit (EEU) has begun a new programme of work on innovative energy-efficiency policies for mitigating fuel poverty. The IEA's current research focuses on the potential for low-income weatherisation programmes to address poor housing quality -- the main driver of fuel poverty -- as well as innovative methods for financing and evaluating such programmes. A common problem is that the energy-saving benefits accruing to fuel-poor households barely offset the investment required, suggesting a weak return on government spending. However, these investments have additional co-benefits for participants as well as for energy providers, property owners, local communities and society as a whole. This first IEA workshop focused on methods for incorporating the range of co-benefits into evaluation of low-income weatherisation programmes. The presentations given by top experts in the fuel poverty field are summarised in this report, along with conclusions and proposals for further research.

  18. Reflecting on an impact evaluation of the Grade R programme: Method, results and policy responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise Samuels

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the expansion since 2001 of a public pre-school programme in South Africa known as ‘Grade R’, summarises the findings from an impact evaluation of the introduction of Grade R, discusses the policy recommendations flowing from the evaluation and reflects on the process of implementing the recommendations. The Grade R programme has expanded dramatically, to the point where participation is nearly universal. Although a substantial literature points to large potential benefits from pre-school educational opportunities, the impact evaluation reported on in this article demonstrated that the Grade R programme, as implemented until 2011, had a limited impact on later educational outcomes. Improving the quality of Grade R, especially in schools serving low socio-economic status communities, thus emerges as a key policy imperative. Recommended responses include professionalising Grade R teachers, providing practical in-service support, increasing access to appropriate storybooks, empowering teachers to assess the development of their learners, and improving financial record-keeping of Grade R expenditure by provincial education departments. The impact evaluation was initiated by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME and the Department of Basic Education (DBE, and was conducted by independent researchers. The move towards increased evaluation of key government programmes is important for shifting the focus of programme managers and policymakers towards programme outcomes rather than only programme inputs. Yet the process is not without its challenges: following a clear process to ensure the implementation of the lessons learned from such an evaluation is not necessarily straightforward.

  19. Malta’s specialist training programme in family medicine : a pre-implementation evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: As a result of Malta’s EU accession in 2004, family medicine was accepted as a speciality and the Malta College of Family Doctors prepared a Specialist Training Programme in Family Medicine. To facilitate its launch, potential GP trainers and trainees participated in its preimplementation evaluation. Method: Participants’ views were gathered quantitatively through a questionnaire using scales to rate closed statements regarding the programme and its sections. Qualitative openend...

  20. Evaluation of maths training programme for children with learning difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Ehlert

    2013-06-01

    The study at hand focuses on the question of whether educationally impaired children with large deficits in mathematics can be supported successfully by means of a highly adaptive support measure (MARKO-T, and whether the effects of this support can be maintained over a certain period. For this, 32 educationally impaired third-graders with math deficits were supported individually with MARKO-T twice a week, over a period of ten weeks. As control group, 32 similarly impaired third-graders were paralleled according to the mathematical and cognitive achievements of the training group. Two further control groups, each with 32 unimpaired first-graders, were paralleled according to their mathematical and cognitive achievements, respectively. The results showed that the very poor mathematical performance of the educationally impaired children could be significantly improved with this support programme. Four months after the end of the training, significant support effects could still be established when compared to the educationally impaired control group. The comparison with the two control groups demonstrated that the developmental curve of the children with learning difficulties increased in a way that was comparable to that of the unimpaired first-graders.

  1. Evaluation of the high-temperature materials programme of the Joint Research Centre (1980-85)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenny, R.J.E.; Boehm, H.; Gellings, P.J.; Gobin, P.; Lanzavecchia, G.; Nicholaides, C.

    1986-01-01

    This report covers the findings of the external panel of experts set up to evaluate the results of the Community's programme in the field of high-temperature materials (1980-85), carried out at the Petten establishment of the Joint Research Centre. The evaluation covers the quality and relevance of the research, the usefulness of the results and the role played by the JRC in this field at the European level. The report describes and gives comments on the content, structure and management of the five projects constituting the current programme, outlines the methods and procedures used during the evaluation and gives a number of recommendations pertinent to future activities

  2. An Evaluation of a Diploma in English Programme: Students' Performance in Industrial Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizatulliza Muhamad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Programme evaluation is an essential part of any specific teaching and learning programme. The results of the evaluation, among others, would inform the relevance of the courses offered to the students in relation to their future in the working world This research study was an evaluation conducted to determine the extent to which the structure of a Diploma in English programme prepares students for the working world as well as the extent to which the graduates produced meet the requirements of the industry. The evaluation was carried out by investigating the performance of 69 students undergoing their industrial training. The data were collected through surveys and interviews. In addition to the students, 35 site supervisors were also surveyed and interviewed. The results revealed that the Diploma in English students were prepared for the working world and they had the qualities required by the industry. The results of the study also highlighted some issues on the additional courses needed for the betterment of the programme. Based on the findings of this research study, some changes were introduced in the programme which enforces the significance of the evaluation conducted.

  3. Programme evaluation training for health professionals in francophone Africa: process, competence acquisition and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banza Baya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evaluation is, in theory, a component of training programmes in health planning, training needs in this area remain significant. Improving health systems necessarily calls for having more professionals who are skilled in evaluation. Thus, the Université de Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso and the Université de Montréal (Canada have partnered to establish, in Burkina Faso, a master's-degree programme in population and health with a course in programme evaluation. This article describes the four-week (150-hour course taken by two cohorts (2005–2006/2006–2007 of health professionals from 11 francophone African countries. We discuss how the course came to be, its content, its teaching processes and the master's programme results for students. Methods The conceptual framework was adapted from Kirkpatrick's (1996 four-level evaluation model: reaction, learning, behaviour, results. Reaction was evaluated based on a standardized questionnaire for all the master's courses and lessons. Learning and behaviour competences were assessed by means of a questionnaire (pretest/post-test, one year after adapted from the work of Stevahn L, King JA, Ghere G, Minnema J: Establishing Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators. Am J Eval 2005, 26(1:43–59. Master's programme effects were tested by comparing the difference in mean scores between times (before, after, one year after using pretest/post-test designs. Paired sample tests were used to compare mean scores. Results The teaching is skills-based, interactive and participative. Students of the first cohort gave the evaluation course the highest score (4.4/5 for overall satisfaction among the 16 courses (3.4–4.4 in the master's programme. What they most appreciated was that the forms of evaluation were well adapted to the content and format of the learning activities. By the end of the master's programme, both cohorts of students considered that they had greatly improved their

  4. Evaluation of HeartMath Training Programme for Improving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of a HeartMath training apparatus on personal resilience and physiological coherence. A within group, pre-test and post-test, outcome evaluative design was employed to assess changes in dependent variables. A small convenience sample of 6 participants, 4 women and ...

  5. Small Answers to the Big Question: Learning from Language Programme Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores why the learning posited as an intrinsic dimension of evaluation practice and use has been difficult to achieve, and how it might be more effectively realized. In recent decades language programme evaluation has evolved from focused studies of teaching methods inspired by language learning theories to a curriculum management…

  6. The EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme: An Account of Institutional Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria Joao; Cardoso, Sonia; Dias, Diana; Amaral, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    When evaluating the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme (IEP), Nilsson "et al." emphasised the interest in creating a data bank on good practices derived from its reports that would contribute to disseminating examples of effective quality management practices and to supporting mutual learning among universities. In IEP, evaluated…

  7. The economic evaluation of a Participatory Ergonomics programme to prevent low back and neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.; Bosmans, J.; Proper, K.; Anema, J.; Bongers, P.; Beek, A. van der

    2012-01-01

    This study was an economic evaluation conducted alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial with a follow-up of 12 months. The aim was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit of the Stay@Work Participatory Ergonomics programme (PE) compared to a control group (no PE). In total, 37

  8. Evaluating the level of degree programmes in higher education: The case of nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.B.; Haenen, J.P.P.; Pilot, A.

    2013-01-01

    The European Quality Assurance system demands that the degree programme level is represented in terms of quantitative outcomes to be valid and reliable. To meet this need the Educational Level Evaluator (ELE) was devised. This conceptually designed procedure with instrumentation aiming to evaluate

  9. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowley Sinead

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deliberate self harm (DSH is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. Methods Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32 of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme and 37% (N = 17 of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme. A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children's difficulties. Results Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  10. A pilot study evaluating a support programme for parents of young people with suicidal behaviour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Lorna

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deliberate self harm (DSH) is a major public health concern and has increased among young people in Ireland. While DSH is undoubtedly the result of interacting factors, studies have identified an association between DSH and family dysfunction as well as the protective role of positive family relationships. Following a focus group meeting held to identify the needs of parents and carers of young people with DSH, a support programme (SPACE) was developed. The aims of the current study are to evaluate the effectiveness of the SPACE programme in decreasing parental psychological distress, reducing parental report of young peoples\\' difficulties, increasing parental satisfaction and increasing parents\\' ratings of their own defined challenges and goals. METHODS: Participants were recruited from a Mental Health Service within a paediatric hospital, Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Teams and family support services. All services were located within the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Forty-six parents of children who had engaged in or expressed thoughts of self harm attended the programme and participated in the evaluation study. The programme ran once a week over an 8-week period and included topics such as information on self harm in young people, parenting adolescents, communication and parental self-care. Seventy percent (N = 32) of the original sample at Time 1 completed measures at Time 2 (directly following the programme) and 37% (N = 17) of the original sample at Time 1 completed them at Time 3 (6 months following the programme).A repeated measures design was used to identify changes in parental wellbeing after attendance at the programme as well as changes in parental reports of their children\\'s difficulties. RESULTS: Participants had lower levels of psychological distress, increased parental satisfaction, lower ratings of their own defined challenges and higher ratings of their goals directly after the programme. These

  11. Pilot evaluation of an adolescent risk and injury prevention programme incorporating curriculum and school connectedness components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R L; Buckley, L; Sheehan, M; Shochet, I M

    2013-08-01

    School connectedness is an important protective factor for adolescent risk-taking behaviour. This study examined a pilot version of the Skills for Preventing Injury in Youth (SPIY) programme, combining teacher professional development (PD) for increasing school connectedness (connectedness component) with a risk and injury prevention curriculum for early adolescents (curriculum component). A process evaluation was conducted on the connectedness component, involving assessments of programme reach, participant receptiveness and initial use, and a preliminary impact evaluation was conducted on the combined connectedness and curriculum programme. The connectedness component was well received by teacher participants, who saw benefits for both themselves and their students. Classroom observation also showed that teachers who received PD made use of the programme strategies. Grade 8 students who participated in the SPIY programme were less likely to report violent behaviour at 6-month follow-up than were control students, and trends also suggested reduced transport injuries. The results of this research support the use of the combined SPIY connectedness and curriculum components in a large-scale effectiveness trial to assess the impact of the programme on students' connectedness, risk-taking and associated injuries.

  12. Contract Management Monitoring And Evaluation Of Ghana School Feeding Programme At Atwima Kwanwoma District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Osei Mensah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ghana School Feeding Programme was introduced at Atwima Kwanwoma District and other parts of the country in 2008 to alleviate hunger and to provide good nutrition for pupils in the public basic schools. Caterers were given contract to provide food to the school pupils on every school-going day under Ghana school feeding programme. Some years have lapsed and there is the need to look back and evaluate this programme taking into consideration the award and management of those contracts. The study also examined how the programme is monitored and evaluated. Data was collected from 80 respondents comprising 29 school pupils and 51 other actors through the use of questionnaire and interview guide It was realised that caterers who are well experience in catering services were awarded contracts based on their past experience and financial abilities through submission of their certificates but not necessarily through bidding. The main component of managing the caterers contract included monitoring payment of debt and problems solving as well as supervision through visiting the schools on quarterly basis. The programme has helped to increase enrolment and retaining pupils in school. It was found out that food giving to the pupils was not served on time not regularly bases and was not sufficient to the pupils as well. The health component of the programme has not been successful as expected. It is recommended that fruits and variety of foods need to be introduced together with de-worming the pupils.

  13. Management of remanent lifetime. Short-term benefits of the maintenance evaluation and improvement programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainero Garcia, J.

    1993-01-01

    Remanent Lifetime Management, which is scientifically based on knowing the degradatory phenomena associated with aging, today allows us to optimize plant life through a long-term maintenance strategy combining preventive maintenance and condition monitoring programmes. Within a project for Remanent Lifetime Management (RLM), the determination of methods of control and mitigation of degradations due to aging depends on the programme of Maintenance Evaluation and Improvement (MEI). This programme, underpinned by the analysis of degradatory phenomena to which plant components are subjected, evaluates current maintenance practices and defines the complementary actions which would facilitate establishment of a long-term strategy to control aging. Together with this main objective of the RLM project, the MEI programme achieves short-term benefits since, right from the beginning, it offers solutions to mitigate and guard against degradations in crucial plant components, and generally sets out a programme to control aging. The MEI programme further serves as a tool to reach the final objectives of the new 10CFR50.65 rule, 'Requirements for Maintenance Programs for NPPs'. The MEI always offers the option should the Utility Owner decide to extend plant life. (author)

  14. Process evaluation of a walking programme delivered through the workplace in the South Pacific island Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefken, Katja; Schofield, Grant; Schulenkorf, Nico

    2015-06-01

    The South Pacific region is experiencing significant rates of chronic diseases. Well-evaluated health promotion programmes are needed as a central piece of a strategic solution. Just as important as the evaluation itself is how that evaluation outcome can be communicated for future programme use by local programme planners. The objective of this study is to evaluate a physical activity (PA) programme that was designed for Pacific women in urban Vanuatu, and subsequently to develop new techniques to display data that support the understanding and communication of programme success and challenges. Data collection methods included quantitative Likert scale questions and qualitative open-ended questions. A new analysis technique visualises open-ended process evaluation data. We present themes using word sizes proportional to the frequency of the themes identified through thematic analysis. The Likert scale technique revealed little meaningful information; almost all participants rated most elements of the programme highly. This may be related to Pacific people being frequently inclined to assent with external ideas. Open-ended questions provided more significant insights. For example, we found a stronger change in eating habits (68.9%) than in exercise behaviour (28.2%). We present an evaluation of the first pedometer-based PA intervention in the Pacific and respond to the paucity of process evaluations that have been carried out in the context of low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, the new thematic data visualisation (TDV) approach may aid in understanding complex and cluttered data in a constructive and coordinated way; we present a new approach in health promotion research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Evaluation Inquiry in Donor Funded Programmes in Northern Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... Department of Administration and Management Studies, Wa Campus, ... therefore seeks to contribute to knowledge on evaluation inquiry and the implications .... poverty reduction strategy approach by the World Bank and ...

  16. Evaluation of various feeding programmes on growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compaq

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... Abstract. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various feeding ... broiler or layer diets, since these feeds are readily available and easy to purchase. ... Research was conducted on multiple-phase broiler feeding ...

  17. Evaluation a Community Maternal Health Programme: Lessons Learnt

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sheetal; Simkhada, Padam; Hundley, Vanora; Van Teijlingen, Edwin; Stephens, Jane; Silwal, R.C.; Angell, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Using the example of a community-based health promotion intervention, this paper explores the important triangle between health promotion theory, intervention design, and evaluation research. This paper first outlines the intervention and then the mixed-method evaluation. In 2007, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) designed and implemented an intervention to improve the uptake of maternal health provision in rural Nepal. A community-based needs assessment preceded this novel healt...

  18. Monitoring and evaluation of strategic change programme implementation-Lessons from a case analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jan; Robson, Andrew; Sloan, Diane

    2018-02-01

    This study considered the monitoring and evaluation of a large-scale and domestic and global strategic change programme implementation. It considers the necessary prerequisites to overcome challenges and barriers that prevent systematic and effective monitoring and evaluation to take place alongside its operationalisation. The work involves a case study based on a major industrial company from the energy sector. The change programme makes particular reference to changes in business models, business processes, organisation structures as well as Enterprise Resource Planning infrastructure. The case study focussed on the summative evaluation of the programme post-implementation. This assessment involved 25 semi-structured interviews with employees across a range of managerial strata capturing more than 65 roles within the change programme at both local and global levels. Data relating to their perception of evaluation effectiveness and shortcomings were analysed by means of template analysis. The study identifies responsibilities for executing an evaluation alongside various methods and tools that are appropriate, thereby focussing on the "Who" (roles, responsibility for particular activities) and "How" (methods and tools) rather than "What" to monitor and evaluate. The findings are presented generically so they offer new insights and transferability for practitioners involved in managing strategic change and its associated evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Undergraduate medical education programme renewal: a longitudinal context, input, process and product evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Hejri, Sara Mortaz; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Koochak, Hamid Emadi; Golestani, Abolfazl; Jafarian, Ali; Jalili, Mohammad; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Saleh, Narges; Shahi, Farhad; Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a comprehensive framework to guide initiating, planning, implementing and evaluating a revised undergraduate medical education programme. The eight-year longitudinal evaluation study consisted of four phases compatible with the four components of the CIPP model. In the first phase, we explored the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional programme as well as contextual needs, assets, and resources. For the second phase, we proposed a model for the programme considering contextual features. During the process phase, we provided formative information for revisions and adjustments. Finally, in the fourth phase, we evaluated the outcomes of the new undergraduate medical education programme in the basic sciences phase. Information was collected from different sources such as medical students, faculty members, administrators, and graduates, using various qualitative and quantitative methods including focus groups, questionnaires, and performance measures. The CIPP model has the potential to guide policy makers to systematically collect evaluation data and to manage stakeholders' reactions at each stage of the reform in order to make informed decisions. However, the model may result in evaluation burden and fail to address some unplanned evaluation questions.

  20. Communities of teaching practice in the workplace: Evaluation of a faculty development programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Marie-Louise; Huveneers, Wilma; Dolmans, Diana

    2016-08-01

    The focus of faculty development (FD) has recently shifted from individual and formal learning to formal and informal learning by a team of teachers in the workplace where the teaching is actually effected. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a faculty development programme on teachers' educational workplace environment. We invited 23 teachers, who had successfully completed a University Teaching Qualification (UTQ) programme, to evaluate the faculty development programme and participate in focus group discussions. This UTQ programme spanned one year and covered 185 hours of formal and informal learning and training activities and formal coaching. After having obtained their UTQ, teachers reported that coaching enhances reflection and feedback, to participate more frequently in educational networks, which enhances consultation among teachers, increased awareness of organizational educational policies and more confidence in fulfilling educational tasks and activities. The evaluation of the UTQ programme demonstrated to enhance the development of a community of teachers at the workplace who share a passion for education and provide each other with support and feedback, which triggered a change in culture enhancing improvement of education. However, this did not hold for all teachers. Inhibiting factors hold sway, such as a prevailing commitment to research over education in some departments and a lack of interest in education by some department chairs.

  1. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes: Strengthening outcome indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Nelisiwe Maleka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are number of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs in South Africa that use sport as a tool to respond to Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS, however, little is reported about the outcomes and impact of these programmes. The aim of this study is to contribute to a generic monitoring and evaluation framework by improving the options for the use of outcome indicators of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of selected NGOs in South Africa. A qualitative method study was carried out with seven employees of five selected NGOs that integrate sport to deliver HIV/AIDS programmes in South Africa. The study further involved six specialists/experts involved in the field of HIV/AIDS and an official from Sport Recreation South Africa (SRSA. Multiple data collection instruments including desktop review, narrative systematic review, document analysis, one-on-one interviews and focus group interview were used to collect information on outcomes and indicators for sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. The information was classified according to the determinants of HIV/AIDS. The overall findings revealed that the sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of five selected NGOs examined in this study focus on similar HIV prevention messages within the key priorities highlighted in the current National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB of South Africa. However, monitoring and evaluating outcomes of sport-based HIV/AIDS programmes of the selected NGOs remains a challenge. A need exists for the improvement of the outcome statements and indicators for their sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. This study proposed a total of 51 generic outcome indicators focusing on measuring change in the knowledge of HIV/AIDS and change in attitude and intention towards HIV risk behaviours. In addition, this study further proposed a total of eight generic outcome indicators to measure predictors of HIV risk behaviour

  2. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes: Strengthening outcome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleka, Elma Nelisiwe

    2017-12-01

    There are number of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in South Africa that use sport as a tool to respond to Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), however, little is reported about the outcomes and impact of these programmes. The aim of this study is to contribute to a generic monitoring and evaluation framework by improving the options for the use of outcome indicators of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of selected NGOs in South Africa. A qualitative method study was carried out with seven employees of five selected NGOs that integrate sport to deliver HIV/AIDS programmes in South Africa. The study further involved six specialists/experts involved in the field of HIV/AIDS and an official from Sport Recreation South Africa (SRSA). Multiple data collection instruments including desktop review, narrative systematic review, document analysis, one-on-one interviews and focus group interview were used to collect information on outcomes and indicators for sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. The information was classified according to the determinants of HIV/AIDS. The overall findings revealed that the sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of five selected NGOs examined in this study focus on similar HIV prevention messages within the key priorities highlighted in the current National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB of South Africa. However, monitoring and evaluating outcomes of sport-based HIV/AIDS programmes of the selected NGOs remains a challenge. A need exists for the improvement of the outcome statements and indicators for their sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. This study proposed a total of 51 generic outcome indicators focusing on measuring change in the knowledge of HIV/AIDS and change in attitude and intention towards HIV risk behaviours. In addition, this study further proposed a total of eight generic outcome indicators to measure predictors of HIV risk behaviour. The selected

  3. Evaluation Of A Safer Male Circumcision Training Programme For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluation of the training consisted of a prospective assessment of knowledge and attitude immediately prior to and after training. Significant improvement in knowledge and/or attitudes was observed in legal aspects, STI, HIV and environmental aspects, attitudes in terms of improved collaboration with biomedical health ...

  4. The Development and Evaluation of a Life Skills Programme for Young Adult Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordaan, Jacques; Beukes, Roelf; Esterhuyse, Karel

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop, implement, and evaluate a Life Skills programme for young adult male long-term offenders with the aim of improving their life skills that, in turn, could enable them to adjust more effectively in the correctional environment. Experimental research was used to investigate the effectiveness of the programme. In this study, 96 literate young adult male offenders between the ages of 21 and 25 years, with long sentences, were selected randomly. The participants were assigned randomly into an experimental and a control group. The Solomon four-group design was utilized to control for the effect of pretest sensitization. The measurements of the effectiveness of the programme were conducted before the programme commenced, directly (short term) after, 3 months (medium term) after, and 6 months (long term) after. The findings indicated that the programme had limited success in equipping the offenders with the necessary skills crucial to their survival in a correctional centre. The programme did, however, have significant effects, especially on problem solving and anger management in the short and medium term. These improvements were not long lived.

  5. An evaluation of an interprofessional master's level programme in children's palliative care. Part 1 the students' evaluation of the programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicholl, Honor

    2014-04-01

    In 2010\\/12 an innovative children\\'s palliative care interprofessional educational project funded by the Irish Hospice Foundation was undertaken in a University faculty (Trinity College Dublin). This initiative responded to international educational recommendations to meet the palliative care needs of children. The project involved the development and delivery of 3 standalone modules at Master\\'s level and a substantive research evaluation of the project to examine stakeholders and students perspectives to provide an insight into their experiences and to gather data for future developments. The research evaluation was conducted in two parts, part one sought students\\' evaluation and part two sought stakeholders\\

  6. Gender equity programmes in academic medicine: a realist evaluation approach to Athena SWAN processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Louise; Wyatt, David; Fudge, Nina; Mattingley, Helena; Williamson, Catherine; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-09-08

    Gender inequity has persisted in academic medicine. Yet equity is vital for countries to achieve their full potential in terms of translational research and patient benefit. This study sought to understand how the gender equity programme, Athena SWAN, can be enabled and constrained by interactions between the programme and the context it is implemented into, and whether these interactions might produce unintended consequences. Multimethod qualitative case studies using a realist evaluation approach. 5 departments from a university medical school hosting a Translational Research Organisation. 25 hours of observations of gender equality committee meetings, 16 in-depth interviews with Heads of Departments, Committee Leads and key personnel involved in the initiative. 4 focus groups with 15 postdoctoral researchers, lecturers and senior lecturers. The implementation of Athena SWAN principles was reported to have created social space to address gender inequity and to have highlighted problematic practices to staff. However, a number of factors reduced the programme's potential to impact gender inequity. Gender inequity was reproduced in the programme's enactment as female staff was undertaking a disproportionate amount of Athena SWAN work, with potential negative impacts on individual women's career progression. Early career researchers experienced problems accessing Athena SWAN initiatives. Furthermore, the impact of the programme was perceived to be undermined by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms, which are beyond the programme's remit. Gender equity programmes have the potential to address inequity. However, paradoxically, they can also unintentionally reproduce and reinforce gender inequity through their enactment. Potential programme impacts may be undermined by barriers to staff availing of career development and training initiatives, and by wider institutional practices, national policies and societal norms. Published by the

  7. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ON THE EDUCATIONAL MASTER PROGRAMME EVALUATION OF RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABLE TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA-MARIA BUȘ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of this article, I presented theoretical aspects concerning evaluation methods of students’ perception. In the second part, I presented my research results on students’ perception about the new educational master programmeEvaluation of Resources and Sustainable Territorial Development” (ERSTD. The main purpose of this paper was to identify the strengths and drawbacks of this master programme in order to improve it. My research was based on my own experience as a master student at ERSTD and on a questionnaire administered to my colleagues. The results reveal that students are generally pleased with the master programme, but there is need for improvement, especially regarding the teaching and learning methods. Furthermore, this study points out the necessity of advertising among undergraduates, in order to attract new students at ERSTD in the future, and suggests several methods for improving the quality of teaching and learning.

  8. Evaluation of a web-based ECG-interpretation programme for undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mikael; Bolinder, Gunilla; Held, Claes; Johansson, Bo-Lennart; Fors, Uno; Ostergren, Jan

    2008-04-23

    Most clinicians and teachers agree that knowledge about ECG is of importance in the medical curriculum. Students at Karolinska Institute have asked for more training in ECG-interpretation during their undergraduate studies. Clinical tutors, however, have difficulties in meeting these demands due to shortage of time. Thus, alternative ways to learn and practice ECG-interpretation are needed. Education offered via the Internet is readily available, geographically independent and flexible. Furthermore, the quality of education may increase and become more effective through a superior educational approach, improved visualization and interactivity. A Web-based comprehensive ECG-interpretation programme has been evaluated. Medical students from the sixth semester were given an optional opportunity to access the programme from the start of their course. Usage logs and an initial evaluation survey were obtained from each student. A diagnostic test was performed in order to assess the effect on skills in ECG interpretation. Students from the corresponding course, at another teaching hospital and without access to the ECG-programme but with conventional teaching of ECG served as a control group. 20 of the 32 students in the intervention group had tested the programme after 2 months. On a five-graded scale (1- bad to 5 - very good) they ranked the utility of a web-based programme for this purpose as 4.1 and the quality of the programme software as 3.9. At the diagnostic test (maximal points 16) by the end of the 5-month course at the 6th semester the mean result for the students in the intervention group was 9.7 compared with 8.1 for the control group (p = 0.03). Students ranked the Web-based ECG-interpretation programme as a useful instrument to learn ECG. Furthermore, Internet-delivered education may be more effective than traditional teaching methods due to greater immediacy, improved visualisation and interactivity.

  9. Evaluation of a web-based ECG-interpretation programme for undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Bo-Lennart

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most clinicians and teachers agree that knowledge about ECG is of importance in the medical curriculum. Students at Karolinska Institutet have asked for more training in ECG-interpretation during their undergraduate studies. Clinical tutors, however, have difficulties in meeting these demands due to shortage of time. Thus, alternative ways to learn and practice ECG-interpretation are needed. Education offered via the Internet is readily available, geographically independent and flexible. Furthermore, the quality of education may increase and become more effective through a superior educational approach, improved visualization and interactivity. Methods A Web-based comprehensive ECG-interpretation programme has been evaluated. Medical students from the sixth semester were given an optional opportunity to access the programme from the start of their course. Usage logs and an initial evaluation survey were obtained from each student. A diagnostic test was performed in order to assess the effect on skills in ECG interpretation. Students from the corresponding course, at another teaching hospital and without access to the ECG-programme but with conventional teaching of ECG served as a control group. Results 20 of the 32 students in the intervention group had tested the programme after 2 months. On a five-graded scale (1- bad to 5 – very good they ranked the utility of a web-based programme for this purpose as 4.1 and the quality of the programme software as 3.9. At the diagnostic test (maximal points 16 by the end of the 5-month course at the 6th semester the mean result for the students in the intervention group was 9.7 compared with 8.1 for the control group (p = 0.03. Conclusion Students ranked the Web-based ECG-interpretation programme as a useful instrument to learn ECG. Furthermore, Internet-delivered education may be more effective than traditional teaching methods due to greater immediacy, improved visualisation and

  10. The evaluation of a frame-of-reference training programme for intern psychometrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdi Mulder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The use of assessment centres (ACs has drastically increased over the past decade. However, ACs are constantly confronted with the lack of construct validity. One aspect of ACs that could improve the construct validity significantly is that of assessor training. Unfortunately untrained or poorly trained assessors are often used in AC processes. Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate a frame-of-reference (FOR programme to train intern psychometrists as assessors at an assessment centre. Motivation of study: The role of an assessor is important in an AC; therefore it is vital for an assessor to be able to evaluate and observe candidates’ behaviour adequately. Commencing with this training in a graduate psychometrist programme gives the added benefit of sending skilled psychometrists to the workplace. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research approach was implemented, utilising a randomised pre-test-post-test comparison group design. Industrial Psychology postgraduate students (N = 22 at a South African university were used and divided into an experimental group (n = 11 and control group (n = 11. Three typical AC simulations were utilised as pre- and post-tests, and the ratings obtained from both groups were statistically analysed to determine the effect of the FOR training programme. Main findings: The data indicated that there was a significant increase in the familiarity of the participants with the one-on-one simulation and the group discussion simulation. Practical/managerial implications: Training intern psychometrists in a FOR programme could assist organisations in the appointment of more competent assessors. Contribution/value-add: To design an assessor training programme using FOR training for intern psychometrists in the South African context, specifically by incorporating this programme into the training programme for Honours students at universities.

  11. Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miani, Celine; Marjanovic, Sonja; Jones, Molly Morgan; Marshall, Martin; Meikle, Samantha; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is seen to be central to improving the quality of healthcare and existing research suggests that absence of leadership is related to poor quality and safety performance. Leadership training might therefore provide an important means through which to promote quality improvement and, more widely, performance within the healthcare environment. This article presents an evaluation of the Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme, which combines leadership training and quality improvement initiatives with the placement of temporary external clinical champions in Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. We assessed impacts of the Programme on individual and organisational change, alongside core enablers and barriers for Programme success. Analyses drew on the principles of a theory-of-change-led realist evaluation, using logic modelling to specify the underlying causal mechanisms of the Programme. Data collection involved a stakeholder workshop, online questionnaires of programme participants, senior managers and support staff (n=114), and follow-up in-depth semi-structured interviews with a subsample of survey participants (n=15). We observed that the Programme had notable impacts at individual and organisational levels. Examples of individual impact included enhanced communication and negotiation skills or increased confidence as a result of multi-modal leadership training. At the organisational level, participants reported indications of behaviour change among staff, with evidence of spill-over effects to non-participants towards a greater focus on patient-centred care. Our findings suggest that there is potential for combined leadership training and quality improvement programmes to contribute to strengthening a culture of care quality in healthcare organisations. Our study provides useful insights into strategies seeking to achieve sustainable improvement in NHS organisations.

  12. Quality of care in reproductive health programmes: monitoring and evaluation of quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwast, B E

    1998-12-01

    As 200 million women become pregnant every year, at least 30 million will develop life-threatening complications requiring emergency treatment at any level of society where they live. But it is a basic human right that pregnancy be made safe for all women as complications are mostly unpredictable. This requires reproductive health programmes which are responsive to women's and their families' needs and expectations on the one hand and enhancement of community participation, high quality obstetric services, and both provider collaboration and satisfaction on the other. Monitoring and evaluation of these facets need to be an integral part of any safe motherhood programme, not only to assess progress, but also to use this information for subsequent planning and implementation cycles of national programmes. Lessons learned from ten years' implementation of Safe Motherhood programmes indicate that process and outcome indicators are more feasible for short-term evaluation purposes than impact indicators, such as maternal mortality reduction. The former are described in this paper with relevant country examples. This is the third, and last, article in a series on quality of care in reproductive health programmes. The first (Kwast 1998a) contains an overview of concepts, assessments, barriers and improvements of quality of care. The second (Kwast 1998b) addresses education issues for quality improvement.

  13. Evaluation of the Undergraduate Physics Programme at Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Mishra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate science programme was launched at the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU in 1991-92 with an enrolment of 1,210 students. The programme was well received, and enrolments increased over the years. However, the success rates have not kept pace with enrolment.In this paper, the authors report the results of an evaluation of the undergraduate Physics programme at IGNOU. The evaluation, the first of its type for this programme, adapted the major tenets of the CIPP model. The findings are based on the responses from a randomly chosen sample of 509 learners across India. The methods employed for the study include records, document, and database analysis, surveys, and case studies.Although the University has enhanced access to higher science education, the attrition rate is high (73%, and the success rate is low. The authors recommend that the University review and reorient its strategies for providing good quality, learner-centred higher education in science subjects. The programme should address the concerns of the learners about the effectiveness of the student support systems, the difficulty level, and the learner-friendliness of study materials with the goal of achieving long-term sustainability while maintaining parity with the conventional system. The need for improving the presentation of the courses and simplifying the mathematical details is emphasised.

  14. Assessment and evaluation of nurses training programme on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessho, Y.; Kusama, T.

    1996-01-01

    Many nurses in hospitals and clinics are concerned about the care of patients diagnosed or treated with radiation. Knowledge about radiation effects and radiological protection was in limited supply among nurses. Some nurses are anxious about the effects of occupational radiation, and they have not appropriately coped with their patients' questions about radiation effects of medical exposure. We investigated the level of knowledge about radiation among nurses and required knowledge for nurses in hospitals and clinics. Based on the results of the investigation, we designed an education and training program of lectures and practice for nurses in hospitals. After the education and training by our program was done, we evaluated the effects of the education and training with an interview and a questionnaire for each nurse. (author)

  15. Five road safety education programmes for young adolescent pedestrians and cyclists: a multi-programme evaluation in a field setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twisk, Divera A M; Vlakveld, Willem P; Commandeur, Jacques J F; Shope, Jean T; Kok, Gerjo

    2014-05-01

    A practical approach was developed to assess and compare the effects of five short road safety education (RSE) programmes for young adolescents that does not rely on injury or crash data but uses self reported behaviour. Questionnaires were administered just before and about one month after participation in the RSE programmes, both to youngsters who had participated in a RSE programme, the intervention group, and to a comparable reference group of youngsters who had not, the reference group. For each RSE programme, the answers to the questionnaires in the pre- and post-test were checked for internal consistency and then condensed into a single safety score using categorical principal components analysis. Next, an analysis of covariance was performed on the obtained safety scores in order to compare the post-test scores of the intervention and reference groups, corrected for their corresponding pre-test scores. It was found that three out of five RSE programmes resulted in significantly improved self-reported safety behaviour. However, the proportions of participants that changed their behaviour relative to the reference group were small, ranging from 3% to 20%. Comparisons among programme types showed cognitive approaches not to differ in effect from programmes that used fear-appeal approaches. The method used provides a useful tool to assess and compare the effects of different education programmes on self-reported behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the In-Service Education and Training Programme for Kuwait Army Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Najat; Al-Furaih, Suad

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the In-Service Education and Training (INSET) programme organised for Kuwait Army instructors. The focus is on their perceptual gain in related topics and skills, as they attended 10 courses at the College of Education--Kuwait University. Pre- and post-assessments involved 20 trainees. The analysis indicates significant…

  17. Evaluation of the industrial internship for the Diploma IT programme at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Høgh, Stig; Lauridsen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the result of analyzing data based on more than 5 years’ systematic collection of questionnaire survey data on the evaluation of the industrial internship for the Diploma IT programme at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Since 2005, we have been tutors for all...

  18. Monitoring and Evaluation of an Early Childhood Development Programme: Implications for Leadership and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Sarah; Papatheodorou, Theodora; James, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to discuss preliminary findings from a participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework, used in a community-based early childhood development (ECD) programme in KwaZulu-Natal South Africa, and their implications for leadership and management. The purposes of the M&E were for LETCEE, the implementing organization,…

  19. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate a South African workplace HIV I AIDS peer-education programme running since 1997. Methods. In 2001 a cross-sectional study was done of 900 retail-section employees in three geographical areas. The study measured HIV I AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people living with HIV I AIDS, belief ...

  20. Evaluation of Follow-Up Effects of the International Child Development Programme on Caregivers in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar, Ane-Marthe Solheim; Sherr, Lorraine; Clucas, Claudine; von Tetzchner, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Parenting programs have been used to good effect in many settings, yet few are systematically introduced and evaluated in developing countries. This study explores the relative long-term effect of participation in the International Child Development Programme (ICDP) in a group of caregivers in Mozambique. A quasi-experimental design was used to…

  1. Improving Vision Awareness in Autism Services: Evaluation of a Dedicated Education Programme for Support Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph J.; Butchart, Maggie; Brown, Michael; Bain, Janice; McMillan, Anne; Karatzias, Thanos

    2018-01-01

    Background: The research reported here sought to evaluate whether a dedicated education programme in vision awareness improved the knowledge and skills of autism support practitioners in identifying visual impairment in autistic people with intellectual disabilities and providing better support to those individuals identified as visually impaired.…

  2. Effective Teacher? Student Self-Evaluation of Development and Progress on a Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Peter; Horder, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This article examines 28 teachers' views about their teacher education requirements. The participants were enrolled on a one-year full-time pre-service teacher education programme with a focus on post-compulsory education and training. The study examines how student teachers' self-evaluations against aspects of teaching professional practice…

  3. Process Evaluation of the Teacher Training for an AIDS Prevention Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nazeema; Flisher, Alan J.; Mathews, Catherine; Jansen, Shahieda; Mukoma, Wanjiru; Schaalma, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a process evaluation of a 6-day teacher training programme which forms part of a sexuality education project. The training aimed at providing teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively teach a 16-lesson Grade 8 (14 year olds) life skills curriculum consisting of participatory exercises on sexual…

  4. An Evaluation of Participation in a Schools-Based Youth Mental Health Peer Education Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Barry, James; Neary, Marie-Louise; Lane, Sabrina; O'Keeffe, Lynsey

    2016-01-01

    The use of peer education has been well documented within the discipline of health promotion, but not within the youth mental health domain. This paper describes an evaluation of an innovative schools-based peer education training programme that involved preparing young people to deliver a mental health workshop to their peers. Participants…

  5. Drawing Instead of Answering to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Food Safety Programmes in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Elena; Costa, Norberto; Losasso, Carmen; Barrucci, Federica; Mantovani, Claudio; Cibin, Veronica; Andrighetto, Iginio; Ricci, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The high incidence of foodborne disease among children suggests the value of health promotion. Children are a high-risk group so far as foodborne disease is concerned, although they may be hard to reach with training programmes. This research investigated the use of drawings, compared with questionnaires, to evaluate the impact of a…

  6. Seroepidemiology of diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis and pertussis : evaluation of the national immunisation programme in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melker, de H.

    1999-01-01

    In view of the evaluation of the National Immunisation Programme in the Netherlands the main objectives were to obtain insight into the immunity to diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis, into the occurrence of pertussis and to improve serodiagnosis of pertussis.

    In a

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness Roles of Variables in the Novice Programmers Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Nianfeng; Cui, Wen; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Ximing

    2018-01-01

    This research applies the roles of variables to the novice programmers in the C language programming. The results are evaluated using the Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) taxonomy. The participants were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The students from the control group learned programming in the traditional…

  8. Evaluation of Kilifi epilepsy education programme: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibinda, Fredrick; Mbuba, Caroline K; Kariuki, Symon M; Chengo, Eddie; Ngugi, Anthony K; Odhiambo, Rachael; Lowe, Brett; Fegan, Greg; Carter, Julie A; Newton, Charles R

    2014-02-01

    The epilepsy treatment gap is largest in resource-poor countries. We evaluated the efficacy of a 1-day health education program in a rural area of Kenya. The primary outcome was adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as measured by drug levels in the blood, and the secondary outcomes were seizure frequency and Kilifi Epilepsy Beliefs and Attitudes Scores (KEBAS). Seven hundred thirty-eight people with epilepsy (PWE) and their designated supporter were randomized to either the intervention (education) or nonintervention group. Data were collected at baseline and 1 year after the education intervention was administered to the intervention group. There were 581 PWE assessed at both time points. At the end of the study, 105 PWE from the intervention group and 86 from the nonintervention group gave blood samples, which were assayed for the most commonly used AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine). The proportions of PWE with detectable AED levels were determined using a standard blood assay method. The laboratory technicians conducting the assays were blinded to the randomization. Secondary outcomes were evaluated using questionnaires administered by trained field staff. Modified Poisson regression was used to investigate the factors associated with improved adherence (transition from nonoptimal AED level in blood at baseline to optimal levels at follow-up), reduced seizures, and improved KEBAS, which was done as a post hoc analysis. This trial is registered in ISRCTN register under ISRCTN35680481. There was no significant difference in adherence to AEDs based on detectable drug levels (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.74-2.90, p = 0.28) or by self-reports (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.71-1.40, p = 1.00) between the intervention and nonintervention group. The intervention group had significantly fewer beliefs about traditional causes of epilepsy, cultural treatment, and negative stereotypes than the nonintervention group. There was no

  9. Evaluating a Research Training Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities Participating in Inclusive Research: The Views of Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullana, Judit; Pallisera, Maria; Català, Elena; Puyalto, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    This article presents the results of evaluating a research training programme aimed at developing the skills of people with intellectual disabilities to actively participate in inclusive research. The present authors opted for a responsive approach to evaluation, using a combination of interviews, questionnaires and focus groups to gather information on the views of students, trainers and members of the research team regarding how the programme progressed, the learning achieved and participants' satisfaction with the programme. The evaluation showed that most of the participants were satisfied with the programme and provided guidelines for planning contents and materials, demonstrating the usefulness of these types of programme in constructing the research group and empowering people with intellectual disabilities to participate in research. The evaluation revealed that the programme had been a positive social experience that fostered interest in lifelong learning for people with intellectual disabilities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An evaluation of the UK programme for CO{sub 2} reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchdahl, J.M.; Longhurst, J.W.S.; Rowe, E.J. [Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom). Atmospheric Research and Information Centre, Dept. of Environmental and Geographic Sciences

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with an evaluation of the UK national programme for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction, in the context of the Framework Convention on Climate Change. It assesses whether the precautionary approach, as it stands, fully meets the objective of the FCCC (Articla 2), in the light of current scientific evidence. It examines the approach of one developed economy, the UK, in developing its national programme and also the major issues which may affect the attainment of emissions abatement targets. 13 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Multinational design evaluation programme. Annual Report April 2016-April 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The Multinational Design Evaluation Program (MDEP) is a multinational initiative to leverage the resources and knowledge of national regulatory authorities that are currently, or will shortly be, undertaking the review of new reactor power plant designs. MDEP was launched in 2006. In the past ten years, MDEP's reputation as an effective organisation for leveraging the resources and experiences of multiple nations in the regulatory review of new reactors has grown significantly. As a result, the portfolio of new reactor designs that are being addressed have increased from two in 2006 to five in 2017, with a possibility of adding more new reactor designs in the coming years. MDEP's membership has grown from the original 10 national regulators to 15. Over the past year, MDEP design specific working groups have all completed their common positions to address the impact of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident on new reactor designs. New reactor commissioning activities are a major part of all design specific working groups. The EPR and AP1000 Working Groups are particularly active in this area, as together they are overseeing 12 new reactor constructions worldwide. The design specific working groups have finalised a common position to provide high-level guidance to applicants and licensees that wish to take credit for a first plant only test (FPOT). This common position was first implemented in March 2017 at the Taishan 1 plant in China, where regulators and licensees from the United Kingdom, France and Finland witnessed reactor pressure vessel internals vibration tests. The FPOT marked a significant milestone for MDEP since it provided a unique opportunity for regulators involved to demonstrate the efficiency of using common positions to effectively collaborate and share information on test results. This model should be followed as much as possible in other MDEP co-operation areas. Another significant step in multinational regulatory co

  12. An evaluation of the 18- and 12-month basic postgraduate training programmes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte; Kodal, Troels

    2010-01-01

    equipped and less ready for continued specialisation than doctors of the 18-month programme and they requested a downward adjustment of the learning objectives associated with the educational positions which follow their basic training. Physicians do not expect the increased focus on learning...... and new programmes evaluate their training, and it explores their attitudes towards the new postgraduate training programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We developed a questionnaire by which quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The questionnaire was sent to all physicians following basic...... and supervision to compensate for the six-month reduction of the training period. Internal medicine should be included in the basic postgraduate training of all physicians. Training in secondary as well as primary health care was requested. CONCLUSION: The young physicians were reluctant towards the new basic...

  13. SKI's evaluation of SKB's Supplement to RD and D Programme 92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    On December 16, 1993, the Government decided (M93/2525/6), with regard to the 1992 Programme for Research, Development, Demonstration and Other Measures (RD and D Programme 92), compiled by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) in accordance with Section 12 of the Act on Nuclear Activities, that RD and D Programme 92 should be supplemented by SKB in the manner specified in the decision. On August 19, 1992, SKB submitted the requested supplement to the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). SKI has examined the supplement and has requested and obtained comments from a large number of reviewing bodies. SKI hereby submits the documents on the matter along with its own review report. The review report contains an evaluation of SKB's supplement in relation to the government decision and certain recommendations for the structuring of the licensing procedure for planned facilities. These recommendations have taken into account the statements of the reviewing bodies

  14. Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV treatment programme: Successes, challenges and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Cameron, D

    2017-09-22

    Task shifting has enabled South Africa (SA) to rapidly expand its HIV treatment programme. This has been achieved by training and mentoring primary-care nurses in nurse initiation and management of antiretroviral therapy (NIMART). Five years into its clinical mentoring programme, the Foundation for Professional Development conducted an evaluation that identified improved knowledge, attitudes and confidence perceived by nurses who received NIMART mentoring. Low completion rates for the Department of Health (DoH) NIMART training process were identified and therefore targeted mentoring was introduced; this increased the percentage of primary nurses eligible for DoH certificates of clinical competence in NIMART from 12%, adding a further 30%. There remain a large number of primary nurses who require mentoring in order to complete the NIMART process. For those who have completed the process, there remains a need for ongoing mentoring as SA's HIV programme evolves, complex cases emerge and primary care undergoes change.

  15. The Ash Programme 2009 - 2011. Evaluation and recommendations; Askprogrammet 2009 - 2011. Utvaerdering och rekommendationer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axberg, Stefan

    2010-10-15

    The present evaluation deals with the third period of the Ash Programme, extending between 2009 and 2011. There are no final reports from most of the research projects financed by the Programme available, and some uncertainties might still be present and the assessments and recommendations made in this report should be read bearing this in mind. The purpose of this assignment is to evaluate the activities of the national research program 'Environmentally friendly uses of Ashes 2009 - 2011'. The evaluation is based on the initial conditions. In addition, the evaluation shall culminate in a recommendation for the continuation or not of the program after the current programming period and, where appropriate, what changes can or should take place. This work was conducted in four stages -scanning, data collection and observation, analysis and reporting. Analysis has been carried out in seven main areas: Organization, Financing, Research, Quality, Utility, Communication/Information and Potential threats. The programme manager is well informed and knowledgeable and seems to lead the program in a structured and objective way that inspires respect. The program is administered efficiently and at a relatively low cost compared to universities and colleges. The Ash Programme uses a 3-shared funding model meaning that programme participants may gain results from some 35 research projects for a fee roughly equivalent to that of one project. Generally, the program keeps a good academic standard. Variations are, of course, ranging from the more study-oriented reports to the traditional (peer review) scientific articles. That the financiers persist and return to the programme can be interpreted as they are satisfied and that they are aware of the long-term nature of the programme - something that was hardly self-evident when the programme started. However, the Ash Programme has large and serious gaps in its ability to communicate the obtained results to policy makers at

  16. Energy policies for increased industrial energy efficiency: Evaluation of a local energy programme for manufacturing SMEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thollander, Patrik; Danestig, Maria; Rohdin, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    The most extensive action targeting the adoption of energy efficiency measures in small- and medium-sized manufacturing industries in Sweden over the past 15 years was project Highland. This paper presents an evaluation of the first part of this local industrial energy programme, which shows an adoption rate of more than 40% when both measures that have already been implemented and measures that are planned to be implemented are included. A comparison between this programme and another major ongoing programme for the Swedish energy-intensive industry indicates that the approach used in project Highland aimed at small- and medium-sized industries is an effective way to increase energy efficiency in the Swedish industry. The major barriers to energy efficiency among the firms were related to the low priority of the energy efficiency issue

  17. The development and evaluation of a Biblically-based therapy programme for a congregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L. Joubert

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research underlying this article was to develop a Biblically-based therapy programme for a congregation and to evaluate its impact. The aim of the programme was to enhance participants’ acceptance of self, their acceptance of others and their ability to have a meaningful relationship with God. A preand post-test design that included an experimental group (n = 27 and a control group (n = 23 was used. The programme consisted of six weekly individual therapy sessions that were conducted by one of the researchers, and a support and prayer group that supported the experimental group. The impact of the programme presentation was assessed by nine measuring instruments. Results obtained indicated that the participants in the experimental group experienced significant growth in almost all the psychological and spiritual dimensions that had been assessed. It was concluded that a Biblically-based therapy programme could be used to enhance individuals’ intra-psychic, interpersonal and, ultimately, spiritual growth.

  18. Evaluation of physical activity programmes for elderly people - a descriptive study using the EFQM' criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Rute

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past years, there has been a growing concern in designing physical activity (PA programmes for elderly people, because evidence suggests that such health promotion interventions may reduce the deleterious effects of the ageing process. Quality is an important issue when designing a PA programme for older people. Some studies support the Excellence Model of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM as an operational framework for evaluating the quality of an organization. Within this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the quality management models of the PA programmes developed by Portuguese Local Administration to enhance quality of life for elderly people, according to the criteria of the EFQM Excellence Model. Methods A methodological triangulation was conducted in 26 PA programmes using questionnaire surveys, semi-structured interviews and document analysis. We used standard approaches to the statistical analysis of data including frequencies and percentages for the categorical data. Results Results showed that Processes (65,38%, Leadership (61,03%, Customer results (58,46 and People (51,28% had high percentage occurrences of quality practices. In contrast, Partnerships and resources (45,77%, People results (41,03%, Policy and strategy (37,91%, Key performance results (19,23% and Society results (19,23% had lower percentage occurrences. Conclusions Our findings suggest that although there are some good practices in PA programmes, there are still relevant areas that require improvement.

  19. An evaluation of the Parents Plus-Parenting When Separated programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Adele; Sharry, John; Murphy, Michelle; Rooney, Brendan; Carr, Alan

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the Parents Plus-Parenting when Separated Programme, an intervention specifically designed to address the needs of separated parents in an Irish context. In a randomized control trial, 82 separated parents with young children were assigned to the Parents Plus-Parenting when Separated Programme treatment group and 79 to a waiting-list control group. They were assessed on measures of client goals, parenting satisfaction, child and parental adjustment and interparental conflict at baseline (Time 1) and 6 weeks later (Time 2), after the treatment group completed the Parents Plus-Parenting when Separated Programme. From Time 1 to 2, significant goal attainment, increases in parenting satisfaction and decreases in child behaviour problems, parental adjustment problems and interparental conflict occurred in the Parents Plus-Parenting when Separated Programme group, but not in the control group. These results supported the effectiveness of Parents Plus-Parenting when Separated Programme, which should be made more widely available to separated parents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Evaluation of an educational programme with workshops for families of children with food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Porta, J; Ruiz-Baqués, A; Gabarron Hortal, E; Capel Torres, F; Ariño Pla, M N; Zorrozua Santisteban, A; Sáinz de la Maza, E

    2016-01-01

    When a child is diagnosed with a food allergy, prevention and patient education are the key interventions for maintaining the child's health and quality of life and that of his or her whole family. However, health education activities for the families of children with food allergies are very limited, and most of these activities have not been evaluated. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to develop an educational programme, to empower its participants through workshops, and to evaluate its results. Several types of educational materials were created specifically for the programme, called "Proyecto CESA" ("STOP-FAR Project: Stop Food-Induced Allergic Reactions"). The programme was carried out in seven Spanish cities and was attended by parents and caregivers. The workshops were led by physicians specialising in allergies and by expert patients. Afterwards, participant learning and satisfaction were evaluated based on questionnaires that were completed both before and after the workshops. A significant improvement was observed in 29 items out of 40 (McNemar's test). Participant satisfaction with the programme was also very high: 90% rated the course between 8 and 10 points out of a possible 10 (41% rated it as a 10). The face-to-face workshops, which included utilisation of educational materials, had positive results in terms of learning as well as in levels of satisfaction in participating families. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. A mixed method, multiperspective evaluation of a near peer teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon, Sinéad; O'Connor, Paul; Mongan, Orla; Gorecka, Miroslawa; McVicker, Lyle; Stankard, Aiden; Byrne, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Peer teaching (PT) has become increasingly popular. PT may offer benefits for students, tutors and institutions. Although resistance to PT has been identified among faculty, research has typically focused on students' experiences and perceptions, rather than those of the peer tutors or senior doctors/medical faculty. The current study comprised of a comprehensive, multiperspective evaluation of a near PT programme delivered by interns to final-year medical students in the Republic of Ireland. This study employed a mixed methods design, using both interviews and questionnaires to assess students' (n=130), interns' (n=49) and medical faculty's or senior doctors' (n=29) perceptions of the programme. All three groups were emphatic about the programme's benefits, although senior doctors and faculty reported significantly more positive attitudes than the others. Mean ratings of the programme's value, out of 10, were 8.2 among students, 8.2 among interns and 9.1 among senior doctors and faculty. Challenges identified were largely organisational in nature. Perceived benefits for students included the informality of teaching sessions, increased opportunities in the clinical environment and improvements in exam preparedness. Perceived benefits for the interns included improvements in knowledge and teaching ability and experience as a role model. PT programmes have been posited as an 'easy fix' to growing numbers of students. However, it is apparent that PT has substantial value outside of this. Future research that conducts economic evaluations of such programmes and that collects objective data on teaching quality and student learning would be of much interest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. What EFL Student Teachers Think about Their Professional Preparation: Evaluation of an English Language Teacher Education Programme in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Agudo, Juan de Dios

    2017-01-01

    Given the importance of programme evaluation in the EFL teacher education, this research paper of exploratory-interpretive nature mainly focuses on both strengths and weaknesses identified through the analysis and/or critical evaluation of an EFL teacher education programme carried out in Spain. Both quantitative and qualitative research…

  3. Evaluating the co-benefits of low-income energy-efficiency programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffner, Grayson; Campbell, Nina

    2011-06-15

    The International Energy Agency's Energy Efficiency Unit (EEU) has begun a new programme of work on innovative energy-efficiency policies for mitigating fuel poverty. The IEA's current research focuses on the potential for low-income weatherisation programmes to address poor housing quality -- the main driver of fuel poverty -- as well as innovative methods for financing and evaluating such programmes. A common problem is that the energy-saving benefits accruing to fuel-poor households barely offset the investment required, suggesting a weak return on government spending. However, these investments have additional co-benefits for participants as well as for energy providers, property owners, local communities and society as a whole. This first IEA workshop focused on methods for incorporating the range of co-benefits into evaluation of low-income weatherisation programmes. The presentations given by top experts in the fuel poverty field are summarised in this report, along with conclusions and proposals for further research.

  4. Irish nursing students' changing self-esteem and fear of negative evaluation during their preregistration programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Cecily M; White, Patricia

    2003-05-01

    Studies on Irish nursing and midwifery professions have demonstrated that stress and bullying are frequent problems that may lead to depression and low self-esteem. Self-esteem is linked to social anxiety and is therefore related to fear of negative evaluation. It is important to study nursing students' feelings about self-esteem and negative evaluation, and to assess whether or not both these constructs change as students progress through their preregistration education programme. This study explored nursing students' perceived levels of self-esteem and their fear of negative evaluation prior to, and nearing the completion of, their 3-year preregistration programme. A descriptive, quantitative, comparative survey design was used. All students in the first intake of 1995 in two general nursing schools in Southern Ireland agreed to take part (n = 72). A questionnaire developed from the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and the Watson and Friend Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale was used to collect data at the start of their programme and again 2 months before completion. In general, students' reported self-esteem rose as they neared the end of their education programme and their fear of negative evaluation decreased; however, their overall self-esteem levels at their highest were only average. Many of the studies examining self-esteem have produced contradictory results. An examination of the organizational factors that contribute to self-esteem may increase our understanding of the phenomenon. Self-esteem is a complex, multifaceted phenomenon. While there is no single factor that can increase or decrease a person's self-esteem, this study has explored the potential impact of the fear of negative evaluation on self-esteem. Nursing students' self-esteem might be increased by expansion of intrinsic job characteristics, improving their job satisfaction and providing frequent positive feedback.

  5. Economic evaluation of vaccination programme of mumps vaccine to the birth cohort in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Shu-ling; Kondo, Masahide; Okubo, Ichiro

    2014-07-16

    The most common preventative measure against mumps is vaccination with mumps vaccine. In most parts of the world, mumps vaccine is routinely delivered through live attenuated Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine. In Japan, receiving mumps vaccine is voluntary and vaccine uptake rate is less than 30%. The introduction of mumps vaccine into routine vaccination schedule has become one of the current topics in health policy and has raised the need to evaluate efficient ways in protecting children from mumps-related diseases in Japan. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis with Markov model and calculated incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of 11 different programmes; a single-dose programme at 12-16 months and 10 two-dose programmes with second dose uptakes at ages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11. Our base-case analyse set the cost per shot at ¥6951 (US$72; 1US$=96.8). Results show that single-dose programme dominates status quo. On the other hand, ICERs of all 10 two-dose programmes are under ¥6,300,000 (US$65,082) per QALY from payer's perspective while it ranged from cost-saving to <¥7,000,000 (US$72,314) per QALY from societal perspective. By adopting WHO's classification that an intervention is cost-effective if ICER (in QALY) is between one and three times of GDP as a criterion, either of the vaccination programme is concluded as cost-effective from payer's or societal perspectives. Likewise, to uptake second dose at 3-5 years old is more favourable than an uptake at any other age because of lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical care of type 2 diabetes in German disease management programmes: a population-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Reneé G; Schunk, Michaela V; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Leidl, Reiner; Holle, Rolf

    2011-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes disease management programmes (DDMPs) are offered by German social health insurance to promote healthcare consistent with evidence-based medical guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare healthcare quality and medical endpoints between diabetes management programme participants and patients receiving usual care designated as controls. All patients with type 2 diabetes (age range: 36-81) in a cross-sectional survey of a cohort study, performed by the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg, received a self-administered questionnaire regarding their diabetes care. Physical examination and laboratory tests were also performed. The analysis only included patients with social health insurance and whose participation status in a diabetes disease management program was validated by the primary physician (n = 166). Regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, baseline waist circumference and clustering regarding primary physician were conducted. Evaluation of healthcare processes showed that those in diabetes disease management programmes (n = 89) reported medical examination of eyes and feet and medical advice regarding diet [odds ratio (OR): 2.39] and physical activity (OR: 2.87) more frequently, received anti-diabetic medications (OR: 3.77) and diabetes education more often (OR: 2.66) than controls. Both groups had satisfactory HbA(1c) control but poor low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Blood pressure goals (management programmes (OR: 2.21). German diabetes disease management programmes are associated with improved healthcare processes and blood pressure control. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control must be improved for all patients with diabetes. Further research will be required to assess the long-term effects of this diabetes disease management programme. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Evaluation of disease management programmes--assessing methods and initial outcomes from a health economic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Dana Sophie; Braun, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation represents a substantial component of the concept of Disease Management Programmes. This and the fact that the implementation of Disease Management Programmes constitutes a major change in the German healthcare system require that the criteria established by the German Federal Social Insurance Authority (Bundesversicherungsamt) be carefully reviewed. The present paper focuses on the evaluation method and the economic data. The pre-/-post study design used in the evaluation is known to be vulnerable to threats to internal validity. The objective of this paper is to analyze whether these threats to internal validity which have been known theoretically are confirmed by the results of the final reports. A review of the final reports of health insurance companies like the AOK, Barmer and a group of the BKK in Westfalen-Lippe shows that this question can be answered in the affirmative. The pre-/-post design without control groups is unable to recognize the failure or success of the Disease Management concept. The reasons include a high drop-out rate as well as the lack of consideration of the characteristics of chronic disease. Hence the evaluation method has failed to prove the quality of Disease Management Programmes in Germany. This is why consistent further development is needed.

  8. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan, M.; Giardili, S.; Das, V.; Rabin, T. L.; Raj, S. S.; Schwartz, J. I.; Seth, A.; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. D.; Miller, G.; Vera-Hernández, M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme - the World Health Partners' Sky Program. METHODS: We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were ...

  9. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan, Manoj; Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hern?ndez, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme ? the World Health Partners? Sky Program. Methods We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Provider...

  10. The regulatory evaluation of radiation protection training programmes at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legare, M.; Tennant, D.

    1996-01-01

    The responsibility for providing the necessary assurance that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment is vested with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This responsibility has led the Operator Certification Division of the AECB to develop methods to obtain assurance that nuclear power plant operations personnel are well trained and adequately competent to perform their duties. The features of the AECB approach to evaluation of training programmes based on a systematic approach to training is described. An overview of the Canadian nuclear power plants' radiation protection qualification levels is given. The developing evaluation process is contributing to the improvement of licensee radiation protection training programmes. This is making possible the transfer of part of the responsibility for licensed personnel radiation protection qualification assessment to the licensees, thus enabling a reduction in the operator certification division formal qualification activities. (author)

  11. Evaluation of the nutrition counselling component of a fitness programme for children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Bradford, Laura; Haley, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    To describe and evaluate the nutrition counselling component of a fitness programme for children with disabilities. Twenty-eight children with disabilities, ages 6-14 years, participated in a 16-week comprehensive fitness programme consisting of twice weekly exercise sessions, nutrition counselling and physical activity promotion education sessions. Nutrition sessions consisted of three individual and two group sessions. Individual nutrition goals were developed for each child using 3-day food intake diaries and parent interview. Body Mass Index (BMI) and progress towards nutrition goals were documented. No significant BMI changes were recorded for the entire group (n=28) or a sub-group with a goal to decrease BMI (n=8). Most of the children made improvements in individual goals indicating improvements in healthy eating habits. This included eating the daily recommended amount of servings of each food group, trying new foods and limiting foods containing saturated and trans fats, sodium and sugar. Short-term changes were noted in eating habits and behaviours during the 16-week fitness programme, although the effects did not influence overall BMI during the 16-week programme. Children with disabilities are at nutritional risk, and long-term follow-up is needed to determine if initial changes in parent-reported child eating behaviours will impact long-term nutrition, BMI and overall health.

  12. SWOT analysis of a pediatric rehabilitation programme: a participatory evaluation fostering quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Chantal; Swaine, Bonnie; Tétreault, Sylvie; Bergeron, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    To present the results of a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis used as part of a process aimed at reorganising services provided within a pediatric rehabilitation programme (PRP) in Quebec, Canada and to report the perceptions of the planning committee members regarding the usefulness of the SWOT in this process. Thirty-six service providers working in the PRP completed a SWOT questionnaire and reported what they felt worked and what did not work in the existing model of care. Their responses were used by a planning committee over a 12-month period to assist in the development of a new service delivery model. Committee members shared their thoughts about the usefulness of the SWOT. Current programme strengths included favourable organisational climate and interdisciplinary work whereas weaknesses included lack of psychosocial support to families and long waiting times for children. Opportunities included working with community partners, whereas fear of losing professional autonomy with the new service model was a threat. The SWOT results helped the planning committee redefine the programme goals and make decisions to improve service coordination. SWOT analysis was deemed as a very useful tool to help guide service reorganisation. SWOT analysis appears to be an interesting evaluation tool to promote awareness among service providers regarding the current functioning of a rehabilitation programme. It fosters their active participation in the reorganisation of a new service delivery model for pediatric rehabilitation.

  13. Behavioural science at the Auckland Medical School: introduction and evaluation of a revised programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeburn, J M; Dubignon, J M; Grant, V J; Richmond, D E

    1989-12-13

    This paper provides an overview of developments in the Auckland Medical School behavioural science programme. From 1984 to 1987, an entirely new five year course was phased in, its design based on a survey of 165 clinical teachers. This course has eight topic streams oriented towards producing a behaviourally knowledgeable and skilled clinician. Evaluation of the course shows good acceptance by students. Recent and planned modifications to the course are described.

  14. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF A BREEDING PROGRAMME FOR SETTING UP TWO HIGH PERFORMANCES BEE LINES

    OpenAIRE

    POPESCU, A.; RADOI, C.

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate costs, incomes and financial results related to the creation of two Apis Mellifica Carpatica lines, based on a specific Breeding Programme within a closed population. The two beelines have been carefully selected for the bee populations living in two areas of Romania: North Moldavia and South Muntenia. A new selection technology is set up in order to produce high performance queen bees, well adapted to the environmental conditions mainly to picking. Genetic gain w...

  15. An evaluation of Lincolnshire Sports’ ‘Workplace Challenge’ physical activity programme

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Alice; Bishop, Daniel; Middleton, Geoff; Evans, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Workplace Challenge, a County Sport Partnership led physical activity programme which utilises a website designed to engage people from workplaces in physical activity. The Workplace Challenge operated within the geographical boundary of Lincolnshire and thus targeted workplaces within this region. The overarching aim of the Workplace Challenge was to enact culture change within organisations in terms of employees’ physical activity habits. Metho...

  16. An Evaluation of the Use of Biomass as an Energy Source: The Brazilian Alcohol Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Leo da Rocha; Tourinho, Octavio A.F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the prehmmaiy results of Brazil's Economic and Social Planmng lnst1tute's BIOMASS linear programming model with emphasis on three aspects: temporal and spatial crop mix patterns along the analysis horizon; evaluation of the social cost of alcohol fuel; and the impact of alcohol production on the balance of payments. Brazil's national alcohol programme (PROALCOOL) increases domestic costs but its impact on the balance of payments is positive and substantial.

  17. Missed opportunities in the evaluation of public health interventions: a case study of physical activity programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hanson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based approaches are requisite in evaluating public health programmes. Nowhere are they more necessary than physical activity interventions where evidence of effectiveness is often poor, especially within hard to reach groups. Our study reports on the quality of the evaluation of a government funded walking programme in five ‘Walking Cities’ in England. Cities were required to undertake a simple but robust evaluation using the Standard Evaluation Framework (SEF for physical activity interventions to enable high quality, consistent evaluation. Our aim was not to evaluate the outcomes of this programme but to evaluate whether the evaluation process had been effective in generating new and reliable evidence on intervention design and what had worked in ‘real world’ circumstances. Methods Funding applications and final reports produced by the funder and the five walking cities were obtained. These totalled 16 documents which were systematically analysed against the 52 criteria in the SEF. Data were cross checked between the documents at the bid and reporting stage with reference to the SEF guidance notes. Results Generally, the SEF reporting requirements were not followed well. The rationale for the interventions was badly described, the target population was not precisely specified, and neither was the method of recruitment. Demographics of individual participants, including socio-economic status were reported poorly, despite being a key criterion for funding. Conclusions Our study of the evaluations demonstrated a missed opportunity to confidently establish what worked and what did not work in walking programmes with particular populations. This limited the potential for evidence synthesis and to highlight innovative practice warranting further investigation. Our findings suggest a mandate for evaluability assessment. Used at the planning stage this may have ensured the development of realistic objectives and

  18. Major Results of the OECD BEMUSE (Best Estimate Methods; Uncertainty and Sensitivity Evaluation) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reventos, F.

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of computer code models of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) is to demonstrate that these are designed to respond safely at postulated accidents. Models and codes are an approximation of the real physical behaviour occurring during a hypothetical transient and the data used to build these models are also known with certain accuracy. Therefore code predictions are uncertain. The BEMUSE programme is focussed on the application of uncertainty methodologies to large break LOCAs. The programme intends to evaluate the practicability, quality and reliability of best-estimate methods including uncertainty evaluations in applications relevant to nuclear reactor safety, to develop common understanding and to promote/facilitate their use by the regulator bodies and the industry. In order to fulfil its objectives BEMUSE is organized in to steps and six phases. The first step is devoted to the complete analysis of a LB-LOCA (L2-5) in an experimental facility (LOFT) while the second step refers to an actual Nuclear Power Plant. Both steps provide results on thermalhydraulic Best Estimate simulation as well as Uncertainty and sensitivity evaluation. At the time this paper is prepared, phases I, II and III are fully completed and the corresponding reports have been issued. Phase IV draft report is by now being reviewed while participants are working on Phase V developments. Phase VI consists in preparing the final status report which will summarizes the most relevant results of the whole programme.

  19. Designing and Evaluating a Professional Development Programme for Basic Technology Integration in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansyari, Muhammad Fauzan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a professional development programme for technology integration in an Indonesian university's English language teaching setting. The study explored the characteristics of this programme to English lecturers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) development. This design-based research employed…

  20. Mum to mum : an evaluation of a community based health promotion programme for first-time mothers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanrahan-Cahuzak, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the Dutch Mothers Inform Mothers (MIM) programme. In that programme a visiting mother meets with a first-time mother in her home on a monthly basis to discuss the caring and rearing

  1. Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Upton, Penney; Taylor, Charlotte

    2013-06-01

    Although previous research has shown that the Food Dudes programme increases children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, there has been limited evaluation of the extent to which changes are maintained in the long term. Furthermore, despite knowledge that the nutritional content of home-supplied meals is lower than that of school-supplied meals, little consideration has been given to the programme's impact on meals provided from home. The present study therefore assessed the long-term effectiveness of the Food Dudes programme for both school- and home-supplied lunches. Two cohorts of children participated, one receiving the Food Dudes intervention and a matched control group who did not receive any intervention. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was assessed pre-intervention, then at 3 and 12 months post-intervention. Consumption was measured across five consecutive days in each school using weighed intake (school-provided meals) and digital photography (home-provided meals). Fifteen primary schools, six intervention (n 1282) and seven control schools (n 1151). Participants were children aged 4-11 years. A significant increase in the consumption of fruit and vegetables was found at 3 months for children in the intervention schools, but only for those eating school-supplied lunches. However, increases were not maintained at 12 months. The Food Dudes programme has a limited effect in producing even short-term changes in children's fruit and vegetable consumption at lunchtime. Further development work is required to ensure the short- and long-term effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in children such as the Food Dudes programme.

  2. A prospective study to evaluate a new residential community reintegration programme for severe chronic brain injury: the Brain Integration Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurtsen, G J; Martina, J D; Van Heugten, C M; Geurts, A C H

    2008-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a residential community reintegration programme for participants with chronic sequelae of severe acquired brain injury that hamper community functioning. Prospective cohort study. Twenty-four participants with acquired brain injury (traumatic n = 18; stroke n = 3, tumour n = 2, encephalitis n = 1). Participants had impaired illness awareness, alcohol and drug problems and/or behavioural problems. A skills-oriented programme with modules related to independent living, work, social and emotional well-being. The Community Integration Questionnaire, CES-Depression, EuroQOL, Employability Rating Scale, living situation and work status were scored at the start (T0), end of treatment (T1) and 1-year follow-up (T2). Significant effects on the majority of outcome measures were present at T1. Employability significantly improved at T2 and living independently rose from 42% to over 70%. Participants working increased from 38% to 58% and the hours of work per week increased from 8 to 15. The Brain Integration Programme led to a sustained reduction in experienced problems and improved community integration. It is concluded that even participants with complex problems due to severe brain injury who got stuck in life could improve their social participation and emotional well-being through a residential community reintegration programme.

  3. Five road safety education programmes for young adolescent pedestrians and cyclists : A multi-programme evaluation in a field setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, Divera A.M.; Vlakveld, Willem P.; Commandeur, Jacques J.F.; Shope, Jean T.; Kok, Gerjo

    A practical approach was developed to assess and compare the effects of five short road safety education (RSE) programmes for young adolescents that does not rely on injury or crash data but uses self reported behaviour. Questionnaires were administered just before and about one month after

  4. Five road safety education programmes for young adolescent pedestrians and cyclists : a multi-programme evaluation in a field setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, D.A.M. Vlakveld, W.P. Commandeur, J.J.F. Shope, J.T. & Kok, G.

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach was developed to assess and compare the effects of five short road safety education (RSE) programmes for young adolescents that does not rely on injury or crash data but uses self reported behaviour. Questionnaires were administered just before and about one month after

  5. Evaluation of the third community programme 'Radioactive waste management and storage' (1985-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, G.; Cottenie, A.; Harrisson, J.; Schmitt-Tegge, J.D.; Schuettenhelm, R.T.E.; Wright, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    This evaluation report fits into the general framework of the Commission's evaluation policy (submitted in the form of a plan of action to the Council. O.J.C14 20.01.87). For the production of evaluation reports of Community research programmes, this plan envisages the use of independent external experts. The report consists of the following six chapters: - A general introduction covering the basis and procedure of the work, - An executive summary, available in each of the Community official languages, - A general review of the problems of radioactive waste, - The main reports, representing the actual evaluation of the programme, - The conclusion, which summarizes the main points, - Finally, policy action recommendations, followed by a recapitulation of the more specific recommendation from chapter IV and by a special note on the problem of public acceptance. At the end of the volume, annexes are added that provide the terms of reference given to the panel, list several more detailed documents which were used by the panel during the evaluation, and list people visited or interviewed by the evaluators

  6. Evaluation of a cooking skills programme in parents of young children--a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ada L; Vargas, Elisa; Lam, Po S; Shennan, David B; Smith, Fiona; Parrett, Alison

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate longitudinally the effectiveness of a cooking programme on self-reported confidence about cooking skills and food consumption patterns in parents of young children. An evaluation of cooking programmes delivered by National Health Service (NHS) community food workers using a single group pre-test/post-test repeated measures design. A shortened version of a validated questionnaire at baseline, post intervention and 1-year follow-up determined confidence in cooking using basic ingredients, following a simple recipe, tasting new foods, preparing and cooking new foods on consumption of ready meals, vegetables and fruit. Deprived communities in Ayrshire and Arran, Scotland. Parents of nursery age children, 97 % were female and cooking increased significantly from baseline to post intervention (P recipe and preparing and cooking new foods. Improved food consumption patterns were reported from baseline to post intervention (ready-meal consumption reduced from 2-4 times/week to 1 time/week, P cooking programmes appeared to improve cooking confidence and food consumption patterns in the target group and some of these changes were retained after 1 year.

  7. Evaluating nurses' knowledge, attitude and competency after an education programme on suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sally Wai-chi; Chien, Wai-tong; Tso, Steve

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an education programme on suicide prevention for nurses working in general hospitals. A mixed method design that included a single group pretest-posttest analysis and focus group interviews was used. A convenient sample of 54 registered nurses was recruited from the medical and surgical units of two regional general hospitals. An 18-hour education programme on suicide prevention based on reflective learning principles was provided to the participants. The outcome measures used included participants' attitudes towards, knowledge of, competence in and stress levels arising from suicide prevention and management. Eighteen participants joined the focus group interviews. There were statistically significant positive changes in the pre- and post-test measures of participants' attitudes and competence levels. Qualitative data showed that participants had applied the new knowledge they acquired in clinical practice. They perceived themselves as being more aware of the problem of suicide and more competent in managing suicide risk. Participants highlighted certain barriers that exist to providing optimal care, including inadequate manpower, lack of support from senior staff and a lack of guidelines. Ongoing education may be necessary to expedite changes. The education programme provided can be delivered to other health care professional groups and the results further evaluated.

  8. A qualitative evaluation of the Scottish Staff and Associate Specialist Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Burr, Jacqueline; Johnston, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The continued professional development of staff and associate specialist doctors in the UK was ill served prior to the introduction of the new staff and associate specialist doctor's contract in 2008. The aim of this study was to independently evaluate NHS Education for Scotland's approach to improving professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the staff and associate specialist Professional Development Fund. Semi-structured telephone interviews with key stakeholders, framed by a realistic approach to evaluate what works, for whom and in how and under what circumstances. An inductive and data-driven thematic analysis was carried out and then the realist framework was applied to the data. We interviewed 22 key stakeholders: staff and associate specialist doctors, staff and associate specialist educational advisors, programme architects and clinical directors, between end February and May 2014. The resultant data indicated five broad themes: organisational barriers to continued professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the purpose of funding, gains from funding, the need for better communication about the staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund, and the interplay between individual and systems factors. The staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund has changed the opportunities available to staff and associate specialist doctors in Scotland and, in that sense, has changed the context for this group - or at least those who have realised the opportunities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Evaluating the impact of agricultural extension programmes in sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailemichael Taye

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA, impact evaluation has been used to assess whether agricultural extension interventions have brought the intended result or to establish causal linkages between interventions and outcomes. However, there is some scepticism about the validity and reliability of the results of the impact evaluation reports due to some contradictory and exaggerated results. Objectives: This article analyses some impact evaluation studies conducted in SSA as to why contradictions and exaggerations are manifested in some reports and what would be the future prospects of impact evaluation of agricultural extension programmes in the region. Methods: Impact evaluation reports and results of agricultural extension programmes from 10 SSA countries were reviewed and analysed based on impact evaluation principles and theories. Results: The results show that most of the evaluations reported positive impacts. There are also conflicting reports on extension performance. The fact that the overwhelming majority of impact evaluation reports claim positive extension impacts is not in line with the reports on agricultural productivity growth in the region. There are various reasons for over estimated impacts and contradictory results, which include use of poor impact evaluation methodologies, lack of reliable data and insufficient capacity to conduct rigorous impact evaluations. Conclusion: Due to these challenges and the shift in agricultural research and extension approaches, it is recommended that rather than investing effort in trying to prove impact, greater attention should be given to improving impact as well as using other innovative monitoring and evaluation (M&E and learning tools that consider the dynamic nature of agricultural development.

  10. Development and formative evaluation of a family-centred adolescent HIV prevention programme in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maretha; Thurman, Tonya R; Spyrelis, Alexandra; Taylor, Tory M; Nice, Johanna K; Finestone, Michelle

    2018-03-06

    Preventing HIV among young people is critical to achieving and sustaining global epidemic control. Evidence from Western settings suggests that family-centred prevention interventions may be associated with greater reductions in risk behaviour than standard adolescent-only models. Despite this, family-centred models for adolescent HIV prevention are nearly non-existent in South Africa - home to more people living with HIV than any other country. This paper describes the development and formative evaluation of one such intervention: an evidence-informed, locally relevant, adolescent prevention intervention engaging caregivers as co-participants. The programme, originally consisting of 19 sessions for caregivers and 14 for adolescents, was piloted with 12 groups of caregiver-adolescent dyads by community-based organizations (CBOs) in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces. Literature and expert reviews were employed in the development process, and evaluation methods included analysis of attendance records, session-level fidelity checklists and facilitator feedback forms collected during the programme pilot. Facilitator focus group discussions and an implementer programme workshop were also held. Results highlighted the need to enhance training content related to cognitive behavioural theory and group management techniques, as well as increase the cultural relevance of activities in the curriculum. Participant attendance challenges were also identified, leading to a shortened and simplified session set. Findings overall were used to finalize materials and guidance for a revised 14-week group programme consisting of individual and joint sessions for adolescents and their caregivers, which may be implemented by community-based facilitators in other settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. How valuable are environmental health interventions? Evaluation of water and sanitation programmes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Subhrendu K; Poulos, Christine; Yang, Jui-Chen; Patil, Sumeet

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate and quantify the economic benefits attributable to improvements in water supply and sanitation in rural India. We combined propensity-score "pre-matching" and rich pre-post panel data on 9500 households in 242 villages located in four geographically different districts to estimate the economic benefits of a large-scale community demand-driven water supply programme in Maharashtra, India. We calculated coping costs and cost of illness by adding across several elements of coping and illness and then estimated causal impacts using a difference-in-difference strategy on the pre-matched sample. The pre-post design allowed us to use a difference-in-difference estimator to measure "treatment effect" by comparing treatment and control villages during both periods. We compared average household costs with respect to out-of-pocket medical expenses, patients' lost income, caregiving costs, time spent on collecting water, time spent on sanitation, and water treatment costs due to filtration, boiling, chemical use and storage. Three years after programme initiation, the number of households using piped water and private pit latrines had increased by 10% on average, but no changes in hygiene-related behaviour had occurred. The behavioural changes observed suggest that the average household in a programme community could save as much as 7 United States dollars per month (or 5% of monthly household cash expenditures) in coping costs, but would not reduce illness costs. Poorer, socially marginalized households benefited more, in alignment with programme objectives. Given the renewed interest in water, sanitation and hygiene outcomes, evaluating the economic benefits of environmental interventions by means of causal research is important for understanding the true value of such interventions.

  12. An evaluation of a public health practitioner registration programme: lessons learned for workforce development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Em; Wills, Jane

    2014-09-01

    This article explores the lessons learned for workforce development from an evaluation of a regional programme to support the assessment and registration of public health practitioners to the UK Public Health Register (UKPHR) in England. A summative and process evaluation of the public health practitioner programme in Wessex was adopted. Data collection was by an online survey of 32 public health practitioners in the Wessex area and semi-structured interviews with 53 practitioners, programme support, employers and system leaders. All survey respondents perceived regulation of the public health workforce as very important or important. Managers and system leaders saw a register of those fit to practise and able to define themselves as a public health practitioner as a necessary assurance of quality for the public. Yet, because registration is voluntary for practitioners, less value was currently placed on this than on completing a master's qualification. The local programme supports practitioners in the compilation of a retrospective portfolio of evidence that demonstrates fitness to practise; practitioners and managers stated that this does not support current and future learning needs or the needs of those working at a senior level. One of the main purposes of statutory regulation of professionals is to protect the public by an assurance of fitness to practise where there is a potential for harm. The widening role for public health practitioners without any regulation means that there is the risk of inappropriate interventions or erroneous advice. Regulators, policy makers and system leaders need to consider how they can support the development of the public health workforce to gain professional recognition at all levels of public health, including practitioners alongside specialists, and support a professional career framework for the public health system. © Royal Society for Public Health 2014.

  13. Considering consumer choice in the economic evaluation of mandatory health programmes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bonny; Goodall, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Governments are increasing their focus on mandatory public health programmes following positive economic evaluations of their impact. This review aims to examine whether loss of consumer choice should be included in economic evaluations of mandatory health programmes (MHP). A systematic literature review was conducted to identify economic evaluations of MHP, whether they discuss the impact on consumer choice and any methodological limitations. Overall 39 economic evaluations were identified, of which 10 discussed the loss of consumer choice and 6 attempted to place a value on the loss of consumer choice. Methodological limitations included: measuring the marginal cost of compliance, unavailability of price elasticity estimates, the impact of income effects, double counting health impacts, biased willingness-to-pay responses, and "protest" responses. Overall it was found that the inclusion of the loss of consumer choice rarely impacted on the final outcome of the study. The impact of MHP on the loss of consumer choice has largely been ignored in economic evaluations. Its importance remains uncertain due to its infrequent inclusion and significant methodological limitations. Further research regarding which methodology is best for valuing the loss of consumer choice and whether it is important to the final implementation decision is warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An implementation evaluation of a voluntary counselling and testing programme for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarryn N. Anderson

    2012-07-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this evaluation was to assess whether or not a Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT programme for HIV and AIDS, at a South African university, was implemented as intended. Motivation for the study: The evaluators were motivated to explore indications in the existing literature about these programmes that participants in VCT programmes are often not the intended target population who live a high risk lifestyle. Research design, approach and method: A descriptive design was used to evaluate service utlisation, service delivery and organisational support. Questionnaire data from 285 respondents who participated in the programme and programme records supplied by the programme staff were consulted to answer the evaluation questions. Main findings: The evaluation showed that the highest uptake for the programme occurred amongst female students. The low uptake amongst men was a concern. It was found that the programme was delivered as intended and that there were enough resources to implement it according to standards set. Practical/managerial implications: The systematic report on the programme process provided the programme managers with practical suggestions for programme improvement. Contribution/value-add: This was the first implementation evaluation of a VCT programme in a South African university context. As such it aimed to educate programme managers to think evaluatively about introducing new or continuing existing programmes.

  15. Economic evaluation of type 2 diabetes prevention programmes: Markov model of low- and high-intensity lifestyle programmes and metformin in participants with different categories of intermediate hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Samantha; Craig, Dawn; Adler, Amanda; McPherson, Klim; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2018-01-30

    National guidance on preventing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the UK recommends low-intensity lifestyle interventions for individuals with intermediate categories of hyperglycaemia defined in terms of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or 'at-risk' levels of HbA1c. In a recent systematic review of economic evaluations of such interventions, most studies had evaluated intensive trial-based lifestyle programmes in participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This study examines the costs and effects of different intensity lifestyle programmes and metformin in participants with different categories of intermediate hyperglycaemia. We developed a decision tree and Markov model (50-year horizon) to compare four approaches, namely (1) a low-intensity lifestyle programme based on current NICE guidance, (2) a high-intensity lifestyle programme based on the US Diabetes Prevention Program, (3) metformin, and (4) no intervention, modelled for three different types of intermediate hyperglycaemia (IFG, IGT and HbA1c). A health system perspective was adopted and incremental analysis undertaken at an individual and population-wide level, taking England as a case study. Low-intensity lifestyle programmes were the most cost-effective (£44/QALY, £195/QALY and £186/QALY compared to no intervention in IGT, IFG and HbA1c, respectively). Intensive lifestyle interventions were also cost-effective compared to no intervention (£2775/QALY, £6820/QALY and £7376/QALY, respectively, in IGT, IFG and HbA1c). Metformin was cost-effective relative to no intervention (£5224/QALY, £6842/QALY and £372/QALY in IGT, IFG and HbA1c, respectively), but was only cost-effective relative to other treatments in participants identified with HbA1c. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000/QALY, low- and high-intensity lifestyle programmes were cost-effective 98%, 99% and 98% and 81%, 81% and 71% of the time in IGT, IFG and HbA1c, respectively. An England-wide programme for 50-59 year olds

  16. Private animal health and welfare standards in quality assurance programmes: a review and proposed framework for critical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, S J; Hanlon, A; Marchewka, J; Boyle, L

    2017-06-24

    In recent years, 'private standards' in animal health and welfare have become increasingly common, and are often incorporated into quality assurance (QA) programmes. Here, we present an overview of the use of private animal health and welfare standards in QA programmes, and propose a generic framework to facilitate critical programme review. Private standards are being developed in direct response to consumer demand for QA, and offer an opportunity for product differentiation and a means to drive consumer choice. Nonetheless, a range of concerns have been raised, relating to the credibility of these standards, their potential as a discriminatory barrier to trade, the multiplicity of private standards that have been developed, the lack of consumer input and compliance costs. There is a need for greater scrutiny of private standards and of associated QA programmes. We propose a framework to clarify the primary programme goal(s) and measureable outputs relevant to animal health and welfare, the primary programme beneficiaries and to determine whether the programme is effective, efficient and transparent. This paper provides a theoretical overview, noting that this framework could be used as a tool directly for programme evaluation, or as a tool to assist with programme development and review. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Qualitative evaluation of a physical activity health promotion programme for people with intellectual disabilities in a group home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Ibarra, A; Driver, S; Nery-Hurwit, M; VanVolkenburg, H

    2018-01-01

    There is a lack of health promotion programming designed to change the physical activity environment of the group home setting. The Menu-Choice programme assists staff in creating physical activity goals alongside residents with intellectual disabilities and provides strategies to incorporate activity into the group home schedule. The purpose of this study was to complete a process evaluation of Menu-Choice utilizing qualitative methods. Twelve participants, who completed a 10-week pilot intervention (n = 7 staff, mean age 42; n = 5 residents, mean age 52), participated in face-to-face interviews. Participants represented five group home sites involved in the intervention. Meta-themes included: (i) Programme training, (ii) Programme implementation, (iii) Programme physical activity, (iv) Programme barriers, (v) Programme facilitators and (vi) Programme feedback. Changes in programme training and simplified programme materials are needed to accommodate identified barriers for implementation. The importance of obtaining increased agency support and policy change is highlighted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A process evaluation of the 'Aware' and 'Supportive Communities' gambling harm-minimisation programmes in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolandai-Matchett, Komathi; Bellringer, Maria; Landon, Jason; Abbott, Max

    2018-04-01

    The Gambling Act 2003 mandated a public health strategy for preventing and minimising gambling harm in New Zealand. Aware Communities and Supportive Communities are two public health programmes subsequently implemented nationwide. These programmes differed from common health promotion initiatives such as media or education campaigns as they were community-action based (requiring community involvement in programme planning and delivery). We carried out a process evaluation to determine their implementation effectiveness and inform improvement and future programme planning. Our qualitative dominant mixed methods design comprised analysis of over a hundred implementer progress reports (submitted July 2010 - June 2013), a staff survey and a staff focus group interview. The programmes demonstrated capacity to not only achieve expected outcomes (e.g. enhanced community awareness about harmful gambling), but also to enhance social sustainability at the community level (e.g. established trustful relationships) and achieve some programme sustainability (e.g. community ownership over ongoing programme delivery). The evaluation noted the potential for a sustainable gambling harm-minimisation model. Community-action based harm-minimisation programmes offer programme sustainability potential which in turn offers funding cost-effectiveness when there are continual public health outcomes beyond initial funding. Although resource intensive, the community-action based approach enables culturally appropriate public health programmes suitable for societies where specific ethnic groups have higher gambling risk. Recognition of such harm-minimisation programmes' contribution to social sustainability is important considering the potential for broader public health outcomes (e.g. better life quality, lesser social problems) within socially sustainable societies.

  19. Cost-benefit evaluation in a quality control programme for conventional radiodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallini, R.; Belletti, S.; Giugni, U.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is being made between the cost of the staff and equipment in a quality control programme of conventional radiodiagnosis and the benefit obtained in the reduction of spoilt films and in the reduction of dose to patients and workers. For over two years the programme has followed a protocol verified on about 50 X-ray tubes, 25 radiological devices and four automatic processors. The present research, based on previous data, works on a limited but representative sample of radiological X-ray tubes and accessories. The control procedures are carried out periodically to improve and make constant the efficiency of the radiological devices. An evaluation of the cost of these procedures is made. In the meantime the dose to the patients undergoing radiodiagnostic examinations is evaluated by a transmission chamber. Comparison between the values obtained before and after the control enables the benefits to be evaluated. Rejection of radiographic films is evaluated before and after the control to obtain the cost reduction. During the one year control period, there were no variations in the technical characteristics of the personnel, in the operational procedures or in the work-load. (author)

  20. Evaluation of a school-based intervention programme for South African children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Cornelius J; Wild, Lauren G

    2013-01-01

    Parental divorce affects approximately 30 000 South African children annually. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Children of Divorce Intervention Programme (CODIP) at two South African schools. CODIP is a preventively oriented group programme which was developed to foster resilience by helping children cope more effectively with possible academic, behavioural, and emotional problems brought about by their parents' divorce. Twenty-five 10- to 14-year-old boys from two primary schools were randomly assigned to 2 experimental groups and 1 delayed intervention control group. The experimental groups attended 12 one-hour weekly sessions; the control group received no intervention until after the study was completed. Children's understanding of divorce related events and social, emotional and behavioural adjustment was assessed one week before the intervention and three months thereafter using a battery of self-rated, teacher-rated and parent-rated questionnaires. One-way ANOVAs indicated no statistically significant decline in children's self-reported problematic beliefs about divorce or total difficulties. However, teachers' and parents' ratings indicated that compared to the control group, the combined experimental groups showed significant improvement in their general behavioural, emotional and social adjustment after programme participation. The results suggest that South African children who experience parental divorce may benefit from participation in CODIP.

  1. Possibilities of enhancing school students' well-being: Evaluation of the effectiveness of integrative teaching programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skuskovnika D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Integrative Teaching Programme in enhancing school students' well-being and in lowering their level of school's anxiety1. In total, 608 students with different kinds of learning difficulties (aged from 10 till 19 from 17 schools from different administrative districts of Latvia participated in the implementation of this project. Participants filled out a specially developed questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of one school year. Among other scales integrated in Student's Questionnaire, students filled in a School Anxiety scale and Student's well-beingscale. Results show, that after realization of the Integrative Teaching Programme, a significant decrease was found in the students' school's anxiety level, and significant increase in theirs' well-being level. Developed Integrative Teaching Programme is an effective tool for enhancing students' self-regulation ability, self-confidence, social competence etc. Development of these skills and interaction with teachers and classmates in creative, stimulating and free atmosphere can decrease school's anxiety and as result enchase students' subjective well-being which is a necessary step for integrating students with learning difficulties in normal school life.

  2. Development and evaluation of a newborn care education programme in primiparous mothers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sharmila; Adachi, Kumiko; Petrini, Marcia A; Shrestha, Sarita; Rana Khagi, Bina

    2016-11-01

    the health and survival of newborns depend on high levels of attention and care from caregivers. The growth and development of some infants are unhealthy because of their mother's or caregiver's lack of knowledge or the use of inappropriate or traditional child-rearing practices that may be harmful. to develop a newborn care educational programme and evaluate its impact on infant and maternal health in Nepal. a randomised controlled trial. one hundred and forty-three mothers were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=69) and control (n=74) groups. Eligible participants were primiparous mothers who had given birth to a single, full-term, healthy infant, and were without a history of obstetric, medical, or psychological problems. prior to being discharged from the postnatal unit, the intervention group received our structured newborn care education programme, which consisted of one-on-one educational sessions lasting 10-15minutes each and one postpartum follow-up telephone support within two weeks after discharge, in addition to the hospital's routine general newborn care education. The control group received only the regular general newborn care education. Outcomes were measured by using Newborn care Knowledge Questionnaires, Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults and infant health and care status. the number of mothers attending the health centre due to the sickness of their babies was significantly decreased in the intervention group compared to the control group. Moreover, the intervention group had significant increases in newborn care knowledge and confidence, and decreases in anxiety, compared with the control group. the structured newborn care education programme enhanced the infant and mother health. Moreover, it increased maternal knowledge of newborn care and maternal confidence; and reduced anxiety in primiparous mothers. Thus, this educational programme could be integrated into routine educational programs to

  3. Evaluation of a comprehensive slip, trip and fall prevention programme for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer L; Collins, James W; Wolf, Laurie; Gronqvist, Raoul; Chiou, Sharon; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Sorock, Gary S; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Evanoff, Bradley

    2008-12-01

    In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the incidence rate of lost workday injuries from slips, trips and falls (STFs) on the same level in hospitals was 35.2 per 10,000 full-time equivalents (FTE), which was 75% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined (20.2 per 10,000 FTEs). The objectives of this 10-year (1996-2005) longitudinal study were to: 1) describe occupational STF injury events in hospitals; 2) evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive programme for reducing STF incidents among hospital employees. The comprehensive prevention programme included analysis of injury records to identify common causes of STFs, on-site hazard assessments, changes to housekeeping procedures and products, introduction of STF preventive products and procedures, general awareness campaigns, programmes for external ice and snow removal, flooring changes and slip-resistant footwear for certain employee subgroups. The hospitals' total STF workers' compensation claims rate declined by 58% from the pre-intervention (1996-1999) rate of 1.66 claims per 100 FTE to the post-intervention (2003-2005) time period rate of 0.76 claims per 100 FTE (adjusted rate ratio = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.33-0.54). STFs due to liquid contamination (water, fluid, slippery, greasy and slick spots) were the most common cause (24%) of STF claims for the entire study period 1996-2005. Food services, transport/emergency medical service and housekeeping staff were at highest risk of a STF claim in the hospital environment. Nursing and office administrative staff generated the largest numbers of STF claims. STF injury events in hospitals have a myriad of causes and the work conditions in hospitals are diverse. This research provides evidence that implementation of a broad-scale prevention programme can significantly reduce STF injury claims.

  4. Enhancing public health practice through a capacity-building educational programme: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negandhi, Preeti; Negandhi, Himanshu; Sharma, Kavya; Wild, Sarah; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-05-13

    The Post-Graduate Diploma in Public Health Management, launched by the Govt. of India under the aegis of the National Rural Health Mission in 2008, aims to enhance the managerial capabilities of public health professionals to improve the public health system. The Govt. of India invested enormous resources into this programme and requested an evaluation to understand the current processes, assess the graduates' work performance and identify areas for improvement. Quantitative telephone surveys as well as qualitative in-depth interviews were used. Graduates from the first three batches, their supervisors, peers and subordinates and faculty members were interviewed. Quantitative data were analysed using proportions, means and interpretative descriptions. Qualitative analyses involved transcription, translation, sorting, coding and filing into domains. Of the 363 graduates whose contact details were available, 138 could not be contacted. Two hundred twenty-three (223) graduates (61.43% of eligible participants) were interviewed by telephone; 52 in-depth interviews were conducted. Of the graduates who joined, 63.8% graduates were motivated to join the programme for career advancement and gaining public health knowledge. The content was theoretically good, informative and well-designed. Graduates expressed need for more practical and group work. After graduating, they reported being equipped with some new skills to implement programmes effectively. They reported that attitudes and healthcare delivery practices had improved; they had better self-esteem, increased confidence, better communication skills and implementation capacity. While they were able to apply some skills, they encountered some barriers, such as governance, placements, lack of support from the system and community, inadequate implementation authority and lack of planning by the state government. Incentives (both monetary and non-monetary) played a major role in motivating them to deliver public health

  5. Nursing students' spiritual talks with patients - evaluation of a partnership learning programme in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Kari; Carlsen, Liv B; Tveit, Bodil

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of a partnership learning programme designed to support undergraduate nursing students' competence in speaking with patients about spiritual issues. Spiritual care is an oft-neglected and underexposed area of nursing practice. Despite the increasing amount of research on spiritual care in educational programmes, little is known about nursing students' experiences with existential/spiritual talks and the process of learning about spiritual care in the clinical placement. The project used a qualitative evaluation design to evaluate the impact of a partnership-initiated intervention focusing on student learning of spiritual care in a hospital ward. Data were collected through three focus group interviews with bachelor of nursing students from one Norwegian university college and supplemented with notes. Data were analysed by means of qualitative interpretative content analysis. The intervention was found to enhance students' competence in spiritual talks. The students developed an extended understanding of spirituality, became more confident in speaking with patients about spiritual issues and more active in grasping opportunities to provide spiritual care. Participating nurses significantly contributed to the students' learning process by being role models, mentoring the students and challenging them to overcome barriers in speaking with patients about spiritual issues. The partnership learning programme proved to be a useful model in terms of enhancing students' confidence in speaking with patients about spiritual concerns. Collaboration between nursing university colleges and clinical placements could help nursing students and clinical nurses to develop competencies in spiritual care and bridge the gap between academic education and clinical education, to the benefit of both. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Comparison of visual analogue and Likert scales in evaluation of an emergency department bedside teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenza, Antonio; Rogers, Ian R

    2011-02-01

    The present study compares visual analogue scale (VAS) to Likert-type scale (LTS) instruments in evaluating perceptions of an ED bedside clinical teaching programme. A prospective study was conducted in the ED of an urban, adult tertiary hospital. Prospective pairing occurred of a teaching consultant and registrar who were relatively quarantined from normal clinical duties. Registrars received 3 months of the teaching intervention, and 3 months without the intervention in a cross-over fashion. Evaluation questionnaires were completed using both the LTS and 100 mm horizontal VAS for each question. Correlation between VAS and LTS gave a measure of validity, and test-retest stability and internal consistency gave measures of reliability. Registrar perceptions of the teaching programme were positive, but no differences were found between the pre- and post-intervention groups. The test-retest reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficient) for the questionnaires were 0.51 and 0.54 for the VAS, and 0.58 and 0.58 for the LTS. Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.79 and 0.91 for the VAS, and 0.79 and 0.81 for the LTS. Correlations between the two methods varied from 0.35 to 0.94 for each question. A linear regression equation describing the relationship approximated VAS = 19.5 × LTS-9 with overall r= 0.89. An ED bedside teaching programme is perceived to be a beneficial educational intervention. The VAS is a reliable and valid alternative to the LTS for educational evaluation and might provide advantages in educational measurement. Further research into the significance of extreme values and educationally important changes in scores is required. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF A BREEDING PROGRAMME FOR SETTING UP TWO HIGH PERFORMANCES BEE LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A POPESCU

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate costs, incomes and financial results related to the creation of two Apis Mellifica Carpatica lines, based on a specific Breeding Programme within a closed population. The two beelines have been carefully selected for the bee populations living in two areas of Romania: North Moldavia and South Muntenia. A new selection technology is set up in order to produce high performance queen bees, well adapted to the environmental conditions mainly to picking. Genetic gain will be get by selling the mated selected queens belonging to the two lines to various beekeepers interested to obtain more and high quality bee products.

  8. Evaluation of a serological Salmonella Mix-ELISA for poultry used in a national surveillance programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feld, Niels Christian; Ekeroth, Lars; Gradel, K.O.

    2000-01-01

    by Mix-ELISA and by faecal culture, and in case of a positive result in either of these a repeated, serological testing was performed, and 60 animals were organ-cultured. If one of these samplings was positive, the flock was declared salmonella infected. In a period of 3 months, 35 flocks were found......A Mix-ELISA using lipopolysaccharide antigens from Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis and Typhimurium? was evaluated using samples collected over time in the Danish salmonella surveillance programme for poultry. Serological samples (n = 42813) taken from broiler-breeder flocks after a year...

  9. Participatory methods for Inuit public health promotion and programme evaluation in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manpreet

    2017-01-01

    Engaging stakeholders is crucial for health promotion and programme evaluations; understanding how to best engage stakeholders is less clear, especially within Indigenous communities. The objectives of this thesis research were to use participatory methods to: (1) co-develop and evaluate a whiteboard video for use as a public health promotion tool in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and (2) develop and validate a framework for participatory evaluation of Inuit public health initiatives in Nunatsiavut, Labrador. Data collection tools included interactive workshops, community events, interviews, focus-group discussions and surveys. Results indicated the whiteboard video was an engaging and suitable medium for sharing public health messaging due to its contextually relevant elements. Participants identified 4 foundational evaluation framework components necessary to conduct appropriate evaluations, including: (1) community engagement, (2) collaborative evaluation development, (3) tailored evaluation data collection and (4) evaluation scope. This research illustrates stakeholder participation is critical to develop and evaluate contextually relevant public health initiatives in Nunatsiavut, Labrador and should be considered in other Indigenous communities.

  10. Evaluation of a nurse-led dementia education and knowledge translation programme in primary care: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Ullah, Shahid; He, Guo-Ping; De Bellis, Anita

    2017-02-01

    The lack of dementia education programmes for health professionals in primary care is one of the major factors contributing to the unmet demand for dementia care services. To determine the effectiveness of a nurse-led dementia education and knowledge translation programme for health professionals in primary care; participants' satisfaction with the programme; and to understand participants' perceptions of and experiences in the programme. A cluster randomized controlled trial was used as the main methodology to evaluate health professionals' knowledge, attitudes and care approach. Focus groups were used at the end of the project to understand health professionals' perceptions of and experiences in the programme. Fourteen community health service centres in a province in China participated in the study. Seven centres were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group respectively and 85 health professionals in each group completed the programme. A train-the-trainer model was used to implement a dementia education and knowledge translation programme. Outcome variables were measured at baseline, on the completion of the programme and at 3-month follow-up. A mixed effect linear regression model was applied to compare the significant differences of outcome measures over time between the two groups. Focus groups were guided by four semi-structured questions and analysed using content analysis. Findings revealed significant effects of the education and knowledge translation programme on participants' knowledge, attitudes and a person-centred care approach. Focus groups confirmed that the programme had a positive impact on dementia care practice. A dementia education and knowledge translation programme for health professionals in primary care has positive effects on their knowledge, attitudes, care approach and care practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An evaluation of staff engagement programmes in four National Health Service Acute Trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewison, Alistair; Gale, Nicola; Yeats, Rowena; Shapiro, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from an evaluation project conducted to investigate the impact of two staff engagement programmes introduced to four National Health Service (NHS) hospital Trusts in England. It seeks to examine this development in the context of current policy initiatives aimed at increasing the level of staff involvement in decision-making, and the related literature. A mixed-methods approach incorporating document analysis, interviews, a survey and appreciative inquiry, informed by the principles of impact evaluation design, was used. The main finding to emerge was that leadership was crucial if widespread staff engagement was to be achieved. Indeed, in some of the trusts the staff engagement programmes were seen as mechanisms for developing leadership capability. The programmes had greater impact when they were "championed" by the Chief Executive. Effective communication throughout the organisations was reported to be a prerequisite for staff engagement. Problems were identified at the level of middle management where the lack of confidence in engaging with staff was a barrier to implementation. The nature of the particular organisational context is crucial to the success of efforts to increase levels of staff engagement. The measures that were found to work in the trusts would need to be adapted and applied to best meet the needs of other organisations. Many health care organisations in England will need to harness the efforts of their workforce if they are to meet the significant challenges of dealing with financial restraint and increasing patient demand. This paper provides some insights on how this can be done.

  12. Case study of evaluations that go beyond clinical outcomes to assess quality improvement diabetes programmes using the Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette-Warren, Jann; Harris, Stewart B; Naqshbandi Hayward, Mariam; Tompkins, Jordan W

    2016-10-01

    Investments in efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes on patients and health care are critical; however, more evaluation is needed to provide evidence that informs and supports future policies and programmes. The newly developed Diabetes Evaluation Framework for Innovative National Evaluations (DEFINE) incorporates the theoretical concepts needed to facilitate the capture of critical information to guide investments, policy and programmatic decision making. The aim of the study is to assess the applicability and value of DEFINE in comprehensive real-world evaluation. Using a critical and positivist approach, this intrinsic and collective case study retrospectively examines two naturalistic evaluations to demonstrate how DEFINE could be used when conducting real-world comprehensive evaluations in health care settings. The variability between the cases and the evaluation designs are described and aligned to the DEFINE goals, steps and sub-steps. The majority of the theoretical steps of DEFINE were exemplified in both cases, although limited for knowledge translation efforts. Application of DEFINE to evaluate diverse programmes that target various chronic diseases is needed to further test the inclusivity and built-in flexibility of DEFINE and its role in encouraging more comprehensive knowledge translation. This case study shows how DEFINE could be used to structure or guide comprehensive evaluations of programmes and initiatives implemented in health care settings and support scale-up of successful innovations. Future use of the framework will continue to strengthen its value in guiding programme evaluation and informing health policy to reduce the burden of diabetes and other chronic diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Access to justice: evaluating law, health and human rights programmes in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruskin, Sofia; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Ezer, Tamar; Gathumbi, Anne; Cohen, Jonathan; Kameri-Mbote, Patricia

    2013-11-13

    In Kenya, human rights violations have a marked impact on the health of people living with HIV. Integrating legal literacy and legal services into healthcare appears to be an effective strategy to empower vulnerable groups and address underlying determinants of health. We carried out an evaluation to collect evidence about the impact of legal empowerment programmes on health and human rights. The evaluation focused on Open Society Foundation-supported legal integration activities at four sites: the Academic Model of Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) facility, where the Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret (LACE) operates, in Eldoret; Kenyatta National Hospital's Gender-based Violence Recovery Centre, which hosts the COVAW legal integration program; and Christian Health Association of Kenya (CHAK) facilities in Mombasa and Naivasha. In consultation with the organizations implementing the programs, we designed a conceptual logic model grounded in human rights principles, identified relevant indicators and then coded structure, process and outcome indicators for the rights-related principles they reflect. The evaluation included a resource assessment questionnaire, a review of program records and routine data, and semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with clients and service providers. Data were collected in May-August 2010 and April-June 2011. Clients showed a notable increase in practical knowledge and awareness about how to access legal aid and claim their rights, as well as an enhanced ability to communicate with healthcare providers and to improve their access to healthcare and justice. In turn, providers became more adept at identifying human rights violations and other legal difficulties, which enabled them to give clients basic information about their rights, refer them to legal aid and assist them in accessing needed support. Methodological challenges in evaluating such activities point to the need to strengthen rights-oriented evaluation

  14. Evaluation of different delivery modes of an interactive e-learning programme for teaching cultural diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Kamila; Prout, Hayley; Kinnersley, Paul; Houston, Helen

    2009-01-01

    UK medical schools find it challenging to provide standardised teaching to expanding year intakes. In addition, developing and implementing diversity training can cause difficulties. This paper describes the evaluation of an interactive e-learning programme to raise awareness and understanding of communication difficulties in diversity consultations. The programme was part of an undergraduate portfolio-based community module. Three hundred and two students were assigned to one of three delivery methods--a large group setting, small groups with a facilitator, and as part of distance learning while on community placement. The evaluation included analysis of their coursework marks, a self-completed evaluation questionnaire, and small group discussions. Two hundred and twenty-three students took part in the evaluation. They were able to apply the concepts they learnt to clinical examples from their own experiences. Type of delivery did not affect coursework marks, but students tended to prefer the e-learning as part of a distance learning package. They offered helpful suggestions to improve its complexity and range. The acceptability and utility of this e-learning module both in face to face teaching and remote placement has been demonstrated, and evaluation by the students has provided valuable information for its further development. All medical schools should include some diversity training, and further research should concentrate on the effects of this type of learning on longer term outcomes such as attitude and performance tests. Such tools could reduce demands on staff time in facilitation of small groupwork, and their cost effectiveness could be increased by making them available to other medical schools.

  15. Cluster randomized evaluation of Adolescent Girls Empowerment Programme (AGEP: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Hewett

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents in less developed countries such as Zambia often face multi-faceted challenges for achieving successful transitions through adolescence to early adulthood. The literature has noted the need to introduce interventions during this period, particularly for adolescent girls, with the perspective that such investments have significant economic, social and health returns to society. The Adolescent Girls Empowerment Programme (AGEP was an intervention designed as a catalyst for change for adolescent girls through themselves, to their family and community. Methods/design AGEP was a multi-sectoral intervention targeting over 10,000 vulnerable adolescent girls ages 10–19 in rural and urban areas, in four of the ten provinces of Zambia. At the core of AGEP were mentor-led, weekly girls’ group meetings of 20 to 30 adolescent girls participating over two years. Three curricula ― sexual and reproductive health and lifeskills, financial literacy, and nutrition ― guided the meetings. An engaging and participatory pedagogical approach was used. Two additional program components, a health voucher and a bank account, were offered to some girls to provide direct mechanisms to improve access to health and financial services. Embedded within AGEP was a rigorous multi-arm randomised cluster trial with randomization to different combinations of programme arms. The study was powered to assess the impact across a set of key longer-term outcomes, including early marriage and first birth, contraceptive use, educational attainment and acquisition of HIV and HSV-2. Baseline behavioural surveys and biological specimen collection were initiated in 2013. Impact was evaluated immediately after the program ended in 2015 and will be evaluated again after two additional years of follow-up in 2017. The primary analysis is intent-to-treat. Qualitative data are being collected in 2013, 2015 and 2017 to inform the programme implementation and the

  16. Evaluation of the impact of intervention programmes on education organisations: Application to a Quality Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Díaz, Mª Jose; Rodríguez-Mantilla, Jesús Miguel; Jover-Olmeda, Gonzalo

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyses the importance of evaluating the various components of the programmes or actions carried out by education organisations. It highlights the need to assess the impact of the intervention on the organisation and consider how changes are consolidated over time in interaction with the context. We propose an impact evaluation model and as an example have chosen the implementation of Quality Management Systems in schools. The paper analyses the results obtained in 40 schools in three regions (Spanish Autonomous Communities) with varying levels of implementation. The results show overall impact on these education centres as the teachers and management teams of the centres perceive it. This impact is more evident in some of the dimensions considered in the study than in others. The results also confirm the differences between regional contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A scientometric evaluation of the Chagas disease implementation research programme of the PAHO and TDR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Carbajal-de-la-Fuente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO. This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997-2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity.

  18. Coffee, Cake & Culture: Evaluation of an art for health programme for older people in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Brenda; McCormick, Sheila; Lucas, Terri; Gallagher, Wendy; Winn, Andrea; Elkin, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Arts for health initiatives and networks are being developed in a number of countries and an international literature is emerging on the evidence of their benefits to people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. Engagement in cultural and creative arts by older people can increase their morale and self-confidence and provides opportunities for social connection. Museums and galleries are increasingly required to justify their expenditure, reach and impact and some are working in partnership with local councils, hospitals, schools and communities to improve access to their collections. There is a body of literature emerging that describes such initiatives but empirical evidence of their benefits is less developed. This article reports an evaluation of an art for health initiative - Coffee, Cake & Culture organised and delivered by Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum in 2012 for older people living in a care home and a supported living facility. The study has identified the benefits and impacts of the arts for health programme and its feasibility for older people, with or without diagnosed memory loss - dementia, living in a care home or supported living facility and their care staff. The findings demonstrate there were benefits to the older people and their care staff in terms of wellbeing, social engagement, learning, social inclusion and creativity. These benefits were immediate and continued in the short term on their return home. The majority of older people and care staff had not previously been to the art gallery or museum and the programme encouraged creative arts and cultural appreciation which promoted social inclusion, wellbeing and quality of life. The programme is feasible and important lessons were identified for future planning. Further research involving partnerships of researchers, arts for health curators, artists, care staff, older people and their families is warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Evaluation of the COPING parent online universal programme: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Dawn Adele; Griffith, Nia; Hutchings, Judy

    2017-04-26

    Bangor University, Brigantia Building, College Road, Bangor, LL57 2AS, UK INTRODUCTION: The COPING parent online universal programme is a web-based parenting intervention for parents of children aged 3-8 years with an interest in positive parenting. The programme focuses on strengthening parent-child relationships and encouraging positive child behaviour. This trial will evaluate whether the intervention is effective in increasing the use of positive parenting strategies outlined in the programme using parent report and blind observation measures. This is a pilot randomised controlled trial with intervention and wait-list control conditions. The intervention is a 10-week online parenting programme to promote positive parent-child relations by teaching core social learning theory principles that encourage positive child behaviour, primarily through the use of praise and rewards. Health visitors and school nurses will circulate a recruitment poster to parents of children aged 3-8 years on their current caseloads. Recruitment posters will also be distributed via local primary schools and nurseries. Parents recruited to the trial will be randomised on a 2:1 ratio to intervention or wait-list control conditions (stratified according to child gender and age). The primary outcome measure is positive parenting as measured by a behavioural observation of parent-child interactions using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System. Secondary outcomes include parent report of child behaviour, and self-reported parental sense of competence, parenting behaviour and parental mental health. Data will be collected at baseline and 3 months later (postintervention) for all participants and 6 months postbaseline for the intervention group only. Analysis of covariance will be the main statistical method used. The trial has received ethical approval from the NHS Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board Ethics Committee (REC) and the School of Psychology, Bangor University REC (15

  20. Vaccine-preventable diseases: evaluation of vaccination programmes and optimisation of surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Nicoline van der

    2018-01-01

    The Netherlands has a National Immunisation Programme (NIP) and a seasonal influenza vaccination programme. Surveillance enables countries to monitor and assess the impact of these programmes. Dutch surveillance is coordinated by the Centre for Infectious Disease Control and consists of 5 pillars,

  1. Monitoring and evaluation of corporate social responsibility programmes in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renitha Rampersad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The South African corporate sector invests millions to support community development and social programs. One of the more fundamental issues about sustainability in a business context is the fact that directors have a fiduciary duty to take into account interests of those stakeholders other than investors/shareholders. This therefore places major importance on sustainability reporting through reports on governance, economic, social and environmental performance and is increasingly being regarded as a key form of stakeholder engagement, and the most accepted formal way of communicating measured outcomes to all stakeholders. A number of methodologies may exist for the development of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR strategies or “how-to guides” for community engagement and investment, however, it lacks development in the field of CSR Programme Evaluation. Integrated approaches to the measurement thereof are still in expanding stages of development and statistical data and/or empirical evidence is lacking at this point. Trust and relationships take time to build but are valuable assets, therefore a company must show it has listened and acted in response to stakeholder concerns, this means that ongoing communication and reporting back to stakeholders is a very important component in any engagement strategy. It is therefore important for the corporate sector to not only evaluate the effectiveness of their CSR Programmes, but also to measure the impact on both their beneficiary communities and their business and subsequently on the Return on Investment (ROI. This paper will highlight a case of the South African corporate sectors attempts to evaluate its effectiveness and impact on beneficiary communities and how they quantify the impact of the investment through successful CSR interventions.

  2. International evaluation of the programme on fluid bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, H [Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany); Magnusson, B F [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Reed, T [Colorado School of Mines (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This report on the Swedish National Program on Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification is part of the on-going evaluation process adopted by the funding organization NUTEK. This agency has invited the undersigned to act as members of an international panel responsible for evaluating the progress made in 9 projects initiated between 1993-1996. The output of this evaluation procedure is given in this report. The main aim of the Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification Program is to develop industrially relevant knowledge and competence in experimental and computational techniques capable of characterizing the flow, heat transfer, combustion, gasification, ash formation and deposition and emissions in fluid bed gasifiers and combustors. To achieve this aim NUTEK is sponsoring research in a number of universities and encourages close cooperation between universities and industry. In the evaluation of the various sponsored research programs, the evaluation committee has considered the following key points: relevance of research to industrial needs; originality of research; program management; adequacy of resources; degree of collaboration between industry and academia; international standing of research. In this report comments and recommendations are made on individual projects as well as on the programme in general and they express the unanimous view of the panel members

  3. International evaluation of the programme on fluid bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, H. [Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany); Magnusson, B.F. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Reed, T. [Colorado School of Mines (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This report on the Swedish National Program on Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification is part of the on-going evaluation process adopted by the funding organization NUTEK. This agency has invited the undersigned to act as members of an international panel responsible for evaluating the progress made in 9 projects initiated between 1993-1996. The output of this evaluation procedure is given in this report. The main aim of the Fluid Bed Combustion and Gasification Program is to develop industrially relevant knowledge and competence in experimental and computational techniques capable of characterizing the flow, heat transfer, combustion, gasification, ash formation and deposition and emissions in fluid bed gasifiers and combustors. To achieve this aim NUTEK is sponsoring research in a number of universities and encourages close cooperation between universities and industry. In the evaluation of the various sponsored research programs, the evaluation committee has considered the following key points: relevance of research to industrial needs; originality of research; program management; adequacy of resources; degree of collaboration between industry and academia; international standing of research. In this report comments and recommendations are made on individual projects as well as on the programme in general and they express the unanimous view of the panel members

  4. Developing the Model for Optimal Learning and Transfer (MOLT) Following an Evaluation of Outdoor Groupwork Skills Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Sam Joseph; Cumming, Jennifer; Holland, Mark J. G.; Burns, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to evaluate the perceived efficacy of outdoor groupwork skills programmes for the undergraduate and postgraduate students, and the factors that influence its success. It also illustrates the use of Kirkpatrick's (1994) 4-level model of training evaluation as a framework for qualitative investigation of learning and…

  5. Evaluating the Prince's Trust's Young People's Business Start-Up Programme, 1994?1999: Reflections and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukos, Stratis; Shutt, John; Sutherland, John

    2005-01-01

    The authors were the principals in the evaluation of the Prince's Trust's Young People's Business Start-up Programme, 1994?1999, as it operated nationally in the UK and in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. In this paper they report the methodologies used in the evaluation and the key findings. They then use their reflections on both…

  6. Effect of a school feeding programme on nutritional status and anaemia in an urban slum: a preliminary evaluation in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neervoort, Femke; von Rosenstiel, Ines; Bongers, Karlien; Demetriades, Matthew; Shacola, Marina; Wolffers, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    To reduce malnutrition and improve child survival, school feeding programmes have been established in many parts of Africa, although prevalence of child malnutrition and anaemia remains high, especially in urban slums. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a school feeding programme in the slums of Nairobi (Kenya) on anaemia and nutritional status, together with an investigation for socioeconomic determinants that may overrule this effect. Sixty-seven children at the St. George primary school in Kibera participated in the school feeding programme for 1 year and data concerning anaemia rate, nutritional status and socioeconomic status were collected during a medical health check. Data were compared with a control group of children attending the same school, of the same age and with the same gender distribution without participation in a feeding programme. Data were analyzed with statistical software (SPSS 17.0). Children participating in the school feeding programme were less stunted (p = 0.02) and wasted (p = 0.02) than children in the control group, and levels of anaemia were lower (p = 0.01). Having no father (p = 0.01) and living in small families (p = 0.003) overruled the effect of the feeding programme. Also, the higher the mother's education, the more wasting was seen (p = 0.04) despite participation in the programme. The programme reduced anaemia and malnutrition and has improved child growth in our study group greatly, but we found that education level of the mother, family size and absence of a father overruled the effect of the school feeding programme. Because sample size of our study is small, we encourage further large-scaled research on reviewing programmatic interventions to develop optimal feeding strategies and improve nutritional status of children.

  7. Evaluation of a nurse-led social rehabilitation programme for neurological patients and carers: an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Mari Carmen; Corchón, Silvia; López-Dicastillo, Olga; Cowley, Sarah

    2009-02-01

    Very few neurological rehabilitation programmes have successfully dealt with patients' and relatives' social needs. Furthermore, the nurses' contribution in those programmes is poor or unclear. To determine the rationale, effectiveness and adequacy of a nurse-led social rehabilitation programme implemented with neurological patients and their carers. In this action research study Hart and Bond's experimental and professionalizing typologies were applied through Lewinian cycles. A social rehabilitation programme was planned, based on the results of an in-depth baseline assessment of the context and individual needs. The programme focused on increasing the level of acceptance/adaptation of the disease through verbal and written education, easing the discharge planning, and offering social choices based on the social assessment of individual needs and possibilities at home. Two neurological wards of a hospital in Spain. The programme evaluation included 27 nurses, and two groups of patients and relatives (control group=18 patients and 19 relatives, intervention group=17 patients and 16 relatives). The two groups of patients and relatives were compared before and after discharge to determine the effectiveness of the programme. Socio-demographic forms, semi-structured interviews, participant observations, and validated scales to measure activities of daily living and social life were used, and data were analysed using content (QSR Nudist Vivo, v.2.0) and statistical (SPSS v. 13.0) analyses. The new programme resulted in social care being integrated in daily practice and developed knowledge about social rehabilitation. This had a positive impact on nurses' attitudes. Patients and relatives had more realistic expectations and positive attitudes towards social life, and developed a wider variety of choices for social changes. Better adaptation, and more coping skills and satisfaction were achieved. This rehabilitation programme was feasible and effective. Patients and

  8. A national public health programme on gambling policy development in New Zealand: insights from a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolandai-Matchett, Komathi; Landon, Jason; Bellringer, Maria; Abbott, Max

    2018-03-06

    In New Zealand, a public health programme on gambling policy development is part of a national gambling harm reduction and prevention strategy mandated by the Gambling Act 2003. Funded by the Ministry of Health, the programme directs workplace/organisational gambling policies, non-gambling fundraising policies, and local council policies on electronic gaming machines (EGMs). We carried out a process evaluation of this programme to identify practical information (e.g. advocacy approaches; challenges and ameliorating strategies) that can be used by programme planners and implementers to reinforce programme effectiveness and serve to guide similar policy-focused public health initiatives elsewhere. Evaluation criteria, based on the programme's official service specifications, guided our evaluation questions, analysis and reporting. To identify informative aspects of programme delivery, we thematically analysed over 100 six-monthly implementer progress reports (representing 3 years of programme delivery) and transcript of a focus group with public health staff. Identified output-related themes included purposeful awareness raising to build understanding about gambling harms and the need for harm-reduction policies and stakeholder relationship development. Outcome-related themes included enhanced community awareness about gambling harms, community involvement in policy development, some workplace/organisational policy development, and some influences on council EGM policies. Non-gambling fundraising policy development was not common. The programme offers an unprecedented gambling harm reduction approach. Although complex (due to its three distinct policy focus areas targeting different sectors) and challenging (due to the extensive time and resources needed to develop relationships and overcome counteractive views), the programme resulted in some policy development. Encouraging workplace/organisational policy development requires increased awareness of costs to

  9. Evaluation of service users' experiences of participating in an exercise programme at the Western Australian State Forensic Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynaden, Dianne; Barr, Lesley; Omari, Omar; Fulton, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Approximately 210 patients are admitted each year to the Western Australian State Forensic Mental Health Service, and most present with psychotic illness, along with other physical and mental comorbidities. In 2010, a healthy lifestyle programme, which included a formal exercise programme coordinated by an exercise physiologist, was introduced at the service. A self-report questionnaire was developed to obtain feedback on the programme, and 56 patients completed the questionnaire during the 6-month evaluation period. As well as providing patients with access to regular physical activity, the programme also supports the recovery philosophy, where patients work in partnership with forensic mental health staff. Overall, patients reported that the programme assisted them to manage their psychiatric symptoms, as well as improving their level of fitness, confidence, and self-esteem. In addition, patients received education about the importance of regular exercise to their mental health, and the role exercise plays in preventing chronic illness and obesity. While the benefits of exercise on mental health outcomes for people with depression and anxiety are well established, this evaluation adds to the evidence that such programmes provide similar benefits to people who have a psychotic illness and are hospitalized in an acute secure setting. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Entrepreneurial training for girls empowerment in Lesotho: A process evaluation of a model programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mary O'Neill; Kuriansky, Judy; Lytle, Megan; Vistman, Bozhena; Mosisili, 'Mathato S; Hlothoane, Lieketso; Matlanyane, Mapeo; Mokobori, Thabang; Mosuhli, Silas; Pebane, Jane

    2013-12-01

    A Girls Empowerment Programme held in 2010 in Lesotho, Sub-Saharan Africa, focused on HIV/AIDS risk reduction and prevention, life skills and entrepreneurial training (income-generating activities). Entrepreneurial training was a crucial part of equipping the camp attendees with basic skills to help them develop sustainable livelihoods. Such skills and financial independence are essential to enable rural girls to complete their secondary schooling (in a fee-based educational system) and to pursue a career, as well as to further help them be less susceptible to transactional sex and its significant risks. The results of a brief process evaluation with some nested supporting data showed considerable improvement in the girls' knowledge about income-generating activities. In addition, almost half of the camp attendees participated in further entrepreneurial training and about half of these girls went on to develop small businesses. Replication of this model of camp training is recommended and being explored in other African countries.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  12. Evaluation of the observation of breast glands condition in mammographic early detection programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleszczewska, J.; Zomer-Drozda, J.; Tarlowska, L.; Romejko, M.

    1993-01-01

    The results of mammography tests were evaluated for 542 female employees of higher schools during an observation continued over 1 to 7.5 years, and they were compared with the results of the first test. Among 22 cancers detected and confirmed by macroscopic examination, mammography result turned out to be false negative in 2 cases. A positive error occurred in 7 cases. Cancer developed during observation in 8 women, that is, in 4 women from the group of 365 who earlier had correct mammography results (1.1%) and another 4 in the group of 154 women originally showing benign changes in their breast glands (2.6%). This work confirms the importance of regular checkups in the mammographic early detection programme. (author)

  13. [Methods in health services research. The example of the evaluation of the German disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfeld, M; Wirtz, M

    2006-02-01

    According to the established definition of Pfaff, health services research analyses patients' path through the institutions of the health care system. The focus is on development, evaluation and implementation of innovative measures of health care. By increasing its quality health services research strives for an improvement of efficacy and efficiency of the health care system. In order to allow for an appropriate evaluation it is essential to differentiate between structure, process and outcome quality referring to (1) the health care system in its entirety, (2) specific health care units as well as (3) processes of communication in different settings. Health services research comprises a large array of scientific disciplines like public health, medicine, social sciences and social care. For the purpose of managing its tasks adequately a special combination of instruments and methodological procedures is needed. Thus, diverse techniques of evaluation research as well as special requirements for study designs and assessment procedures are of vital importance. The example of the German disease management programmes illustrates the methodical requirements for a scientific evaluation.

  14. Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole‐body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, C T J; Verbeek, J H A M; Braam, I T J; Bovenzi, M; van Dijk, F J H

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole‐body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. Methods An experimental pretest/post‐test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services (OHS) in the experimental group in the use of the programme. OHS in the control group were asked to deliver care as usual. In total, 15 OHS, 32 OHS professionals, 26 companies, and 260 forklift drivers were involved. Post‐test measurements were carried out one year after the start of the programme. Results Baseline data before the start of the programme showed no difference between experimental and control group. Results of the outcome evaluation indicate a slight, although not statistically significant, reduction of WBV exposure in the experimental group (p = 0.06). Process evaluation revealed a positive influence on company policy toward WBV, attitude and intended behaviour of forklift drivers, and a trend towards an increase in knowledge of OHS professionals and company managers. The number of observed control measures with a major impact (levelling of surface and reduction of speed) was rather low. In those cases where control measures had been taken, there was a significant reduction in WBV exposure. This limited effect of the programme might be caused by the short period of follow up and the dropout of participants. The feasibility and the usefulness of the programme within the OHS setting were rated good by the participants. Conclusions This programme to decrease WBV exposure was partially effective. Significant effects on intermediate objectives were observed. More research on the effectiveness of intervention in the field of WBV is needed. PMID:16551762

  15. Discounting in the evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of a vaccination programme: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Mibei, Walter

    2015-07-31

    Discounting future costs and health benefits usually has a large effect on results of cost-effectiveness evaluations of vaccination because of delays between the initial expenditure in the programme and the health benefits from averting disease. Most guidelines currently recommend discounting both costs and health effects at a positive, constant, common rate back to a common point in time. A review of 84 published economic evaluations of vaccines found that most of them apply these recommendations. However, both technical and normative arguments have been presented for discounting health at a different rate to consumption (differential discounting), discounting at a rate that changes over time (non-constant discounting), discounting intra-generational and inter-generational effects at a different rate (two-stage discounting), and discounting the health gains from an intervention to a different discount year from the time of intervention (delayed discounting). These considerations are particularly acute for vaccines, because their effects can occur in a different generation from the one paying for them, and because the time of vaccination, of infection aversion, and of disease aversion usually differ. Using differential, two-stage or delayed discounting in model-based cost-effectiveness evaluations of vaccination raises technical challenges, but mechanisms have been proposed to overcome them. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of the regulator in promoting and evaluating safety culture. Operating experience feedback programme approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture (S.C.) in Operating Organizations must be one of the main Nuclear Regulator goals to achieve. This can be possible only if each and every one of the regulatory activities inherently involves S.C. It can be seen throughout attitudes, values, uses and practices in both individuals and the whole regulatory organization. One among all the regulatory tools commonly used by regulators to promote and evaluate the commitment of the licensees with safety culture as a whole involves organizational factors and particular attention is directed to the operating organization. This entailed a wide range of activities, including all those related with management of safety performance. Operating Experience Feedback Programme as a tool to enhance safety operation is particularly useful for regulators in the evaluation of the role of S.C. in operating organization. Safety Culture is recognized as a subset of the wider Organizational Culture. Practices that improve organizational effectiveness can also contribute to enhance safety. An effective event investigation methodology is a specific practice, which contributes to a healthy Safety Culture. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  18. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunskaar, Steinar; Breivik, Jarle; Siebke, Maje; Tømmerås, Karin; Figenschau, Kristian; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-01-01

    Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes access to PhD courses before the

  19. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Manoj; Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hernández, Marcos

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme - the World Health Partners' Sky Program. We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were assessed using hypothetical patient vignettes and the standardized patient method both before and after programme implementation, in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Differences in providers' performance between implementation and nonimplementation areas were assessed using multivariate difference-in-difference linear regression models. The programme did not significantly improve health-care providers' knowledge or performance with regard to childhood diarrhoea or pneumonia in Bihar. There was a persistent large gap between knowledge of appropriate care and the care actually delivered. Social franchising has received attention globally as a model for delivering high-quality care in rural areas in the developing world but supporting data are scarce. Our findings emphasize the need for sound empirical evidence before social franchising programmes are scaled up.

  20. The use of a modified pairwise comparison method in evaluating critical success factors for community-based rural homestay programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Shahidah Md; Ramli, Razamin; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Kayat, Kalsom; Razak, Rafidah Abd

    2014-12-01

    Tourism industry has become the highlighted sector which has amazingly increased the national income level. Despite the tourism industry being one of the highest income generating sectors, Homestay Programme as a Community-Based Tourism (CBT) product in Malaysia does not absorbed much of the incoming wealth. Homestay Programme refers to a programme in a community where a tourist stays together with a host family and experiences the everyday way of life of the family in both direct and indirect manner. There are over 100 Homestay Programme currently being registered with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism Malaysia which mostly are located in rural areas, but only a few excel and enjoying the fruit of the booming industry. Hence, this article seeks to identify the critical success factors for a Community-Based Rural Homestay Programme in Malaysia. A modified pairwise method is utilized to further evaluate the identified success factors in a more meaningful way. The findings will help Homestay Programme function as a community development tool that manages tourism resources. Thus, help the community in improving local economy and creating job opportunities.

  1. Evaluation of a Sexual and Reproductive Health Education Programme: Students' Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour in Bolgatanga Municipality, Northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geugten, Jolien; van Meijel, Berno; den Uyl, Marion H G; de Vries, Nanne K

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation research concerning the impact of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) education in sub-Saharan Africa is scarce. This study obtained more insight into the knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intentions of students concerning SRH in Bolgatanga municipality in northern Ghana, and studied the effects of an SRH programme for this group. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post-intervention design, with an SRH programme as intervention. A questionnaire was filled in by 312 students before, and by 272 students after the SRH programme. The results showed that before the programme, students answered half of the knowledge questions correctly, they thought positively about deciding for themselves whether to have a relationship and whether to have sex, and their intentions towards SRH behaviour, such as condom use were positive. The SRH intervention led to a small but significant increase in the students' knowledge. It was also found that the attitude of the students aged 18-20 significantly improved. Finally, it was found that female students aged 18-20 were more positive towards changing their behaviour after following the SRH programme. It can be concluded that the impact of the SRH programme in general was positive. Significant effects were found for gender and age.

  2. Evaluation of a social franchising and telemedicine programme and the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia, Bihar, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardili, Soledad; Das, Veena; Rabin, Tracy L; Raj, Sunil S; Schwartz, Jeremy I; Seth, Aparna; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Miller, Grant; Vera-Hernández, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the impact on the quality of the care provided for childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in Bihar, India, of a large-scale, social franchising and telemedicine programme – the World Health Partners’ Sky Program. Methods We investigated changes associated with the programme in the knowledge and performance of health-care providers by carrying out 810 assessments in a representative sample of providers in areas where the programme was and was not implemented. Providers were assessed using hypothetical patient vignettes and the standardized patient method both before and after programme implementation, in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Differences in providers’ performance between implementation and nonimplementation areas were assessed using multivariate difference-in-difference linear regression models. Findings The programme did not significantly improve health-care providers’ knowledge or performance with regard to childhood diarrhoea or pneumonia in Bihar. There was a persistent large gap between knowledge of appropriate care and the care actually delivered. Conclusion Social franchising has received attention globally as a model for delivering high-quality care in rural areas in the developing world but supporting data are scarce. Our findings emphasize the need for sound empirical evidence before social franchising programmes are scaled up. PMID:28479635

  3. Positive parenting: a randomised controlled trial evaluation of the Parents Plus Adolescent Programme in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, Eileen; Hannon, Geraldine; Rickard, Eóin; Houghton, Sharon; Sharry, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Parents Plus Adolescents Programme (PPAP)-a parent training course specifically targeting parents of young adolescents (aged 11-16 years)-when delivered as a preventative programme in community school settings. A sample of 126 parents (mean age of children = 12.34 years; range = 10-16 years) were randomly assigned to either a treatment (PPAP; n = 82) or a waiting-list control condition (WC; n = 44). Analyses are based on a study-completer sample post-treatment (n = 109 parents: PPAP n = 70; WC n = 39) and sample at 6 month follow up (n = 42 parents). Both post-treatment (between groups) and 6-month follow-up comparisons of study completers (within PPAP group) revealed significant positive effects of the parenting intervention with respect to adolescent behaviour problems and parenting stress. The post treatment comparisons demonstrated large effect sizes on global measures of child difficulties (partial eta squared = 0.15) and self-reported parent stress (partial eta squared = 0.22); there was a moderate effect size on the self-reported parent satisfaction (partial eta squared = 0.13). This study provides preliminary evidence that PPAP may be an effective model of parent-training implemented in a community-based setting. The strengths and limitations of the study are discussed.

  4. Testing measurement invariance of the Learning Programme Management and Evaluation scale across academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelekanyo C. Mulaudzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Measurement invariance is one of the most precarious aspects of the scale development process without which the interpretation of research findings on population subgroups may be ambiguous and even invalid. Besides tests for validity and reliability, measurement invariance represents the hallmark for psychometric compliance of a new measuring instrument and provides the basis for inference of research findings across a range of relevant population sub-groups. Research purpose: This study tested the measurement invariance of a Learning Programme Management and Evaluation (LPME scale across levels of academic achievement. Motivation for the study: It is important for any researcher involved in new scale development to ensure that the measurement instrument and its underlying constructs have proper structural alignment and that they both have the same level of meaning and significance across comparable heterogeneous groups. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative, non-experimental, cross-sectional survey design was used, and data were obtained from 369 participants who were selected from three public sector organisations using a probabilistic simple random sampling technique. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences and Analysis of Moment Structures software (versions 21.0.0 were used to analyse the data. Main findings: The findings show that all the four invariance models tested have achieved acceptable goodness-of-fit indices. Furthermore, the findings show that the factorial structure of the LPME scale and the meaning of its underlying constructs are invariant across different levels of academic achievement for human resource development (HRD practitioners and learners or apprentices involved in occupational learning programmes. Practical implications: The findings of this study suggest practical implications for HRD scholars as they are enabled to make informed decisional balance comparisons involving educational

  5. An evaluation of a paediatric radiation oncology teaching programme incorporating a SCORPIO teaching model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Many radiation oncology registrars have no exposure to paedi atrics during their training, To address this, the Paediatric Special Interest Group of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists has convened a biennial teaching course since 1997. The 2009 course incorpo rated the use of a Structured, Clinical, Objective-Referenced, Problem orientated, Integrated and Organized (SCORPIO) teaching model for small group tutorials. This study evaluates whether the paediatric radiation oncol ogy curriculum can be adapted to the SCORPIO teaching model and to evaluate the revised course from the registrars' perspective. Methods: Teaching and learning resources included a pre-course reading list, a lecture series programme and a SCORPIO workshop. Three evaluation instruments were developed: an overall Course Evaluation Survey for all participants, a SCORPIO Workshop Survey for registrars and a Teacher's SCORPIO Workshop Survey. Results: Forty-five radiation oncology registrars, 14 radiation therapists and five paediatric oncology registrars attended. Seventy-three per cent (47/64) of all participants completed the Course Evaluation Survey and 95% (38/40) of registrars completed the SCORPIO Workshop Survey. All teachers com pleted the Teacher's SCORPIO Survey (10/10). The overall educational expe rience was rated as good or excellent by 93% (43/47) of respondents. Ratings of satisfaction with lecture sessions were predominantly good or excellent. Registrars gave the SCORPIO workshop high ratings on each of 10 aspects of quality, with 82% allocating an excellent rating overall for the SCORPIO activity. Both registrars and teachers recommended more time for the SCORPIO stations. Conclusions: The 2009 course met the educational needs of the radiation oncology registrars and the SCORPIO workshop was a highly valued educa tional component.

  6. An evaluation of a paediatric radiation oncology teaching programme incorporating a SCORPIO teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Verity; Klein, Linda; Bentvelzen, Adam; Garlan, Karen; Jeffery, Heather

    2011-04-01

    Many radiation oncology registrars have no exposure to paediatrics during their training. To address this, the Paediatric Special Interest Group of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists has convened a biennial teaching course since 1997. The 2009 course incorporated the use of a Structured, Clinical, Objective-Referenced, Problem-orientated, Integrated and Organized (SCORPIO) teaching model for small group tutorials. This study evaluates whether the paediatric radiation oncology curriculum can be adapted to the SCORPIO teaching model and to evaluate the revised course from the registrars' perspective. Teaching and learning resources included a pre-course reading list, a lecture series programme and a SCORPIO workshop. Three evaluation instruments were developed: an overall Course Evaluation Survey for all participants, a SCORPIO Workshop Survey for registrars and a Teacher's SCORPIO Workshop Survey. Forty-five radiation oncology registrars, 14 radiation therapists and five paediatric oncology registrars attended. Seventy-three per cent (47/64) of all participants completed the Course Evaluation Survey and 95% (38/40) of registrars completed the SCORPIO Workshop Survey. All teachers completed the Teacher's SCORPIO Survey (10/10). The overall educational experience was rated as good or excellent by 93% (43/47) of respondents. Ratings of satisfaction with lecture sessions were predominantly good or excellent. Registrars gave the SCORPIO workshop high ratings on each of 10 aspects of quality, with 82% allocating an excellent rating overall for the SCORPIO activity. Both registrars and teachers recommended more time for the SCORPIO stations. The 2009 course met the educational needs of the radiation oncology registrars and the SCORPIO workshop was a highly valued educational component. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2011 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. A statistical evaluation of the effects of a structured postdoctoral programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessudnov, Alexey; Guardiancich, Igor; Marimon, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Postdoctoral programmes have recently become an important step leading from doctoral education to permanent academic careers in the social sciences. This paper investigates the effects of a large and structured postdoctoral programme in the social sciences on a number of academic and non-academic......Postdoctoral programmes have recently become an important step leading from doctoral education to permanent academic careers in the social sciences. This paper investigates the effects of a large and structured postdoctoral programme in the social sciences on a number of academic and non...

  8. Confidence and authority through new knowledge: An evaluation of the national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergert, Pernilla; Af Sandeberg, Margareta; Andersson, Nina; Márky, Ildikó; Enskär, Karin

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of nurse specialists in many paediatric hospitals in Sweden. This lack of competence is devastating for childhood cancer care because it is a highly specialised area that demands specialist knowledge. Continuing education of nurses is important to develop nursing practice and also to retain them. The aim of this study was to evaluate a Swedish national educational programme in paediatric oncology nursing. The nurses who participated came from all of the six paediatric oncology centres as well as from general paediatric wards. At the time of the evaluation, three groups of registered nurses (n=66) had completed this 2year, part-time educational programme. A study specific questionnaire, including closed and open-ended questions was sent to the 66 nurses and 54 questionnaires were returned. Answers were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. The results show that almost all the nurses (93%) stayed in paediatric care after the programme. Furthermore, 31% had a position in management or as a consultant nurse after the programme. The vast majority of the nurses (98%) stated that the programme had made them more secure in their work. The nurses were equipped, through education, for paediatric oncology care which included: knowledge generating new knowledge; confidence and authority; national networks and resources. They felt increased confidence in their roles as paediatric oncology nurses as well as authority in their encounters with families and in discussions with co-workers. New networks and resources were appreciated and used in their daily work in paediatric oncology. The programme was of importance to the career of the individual nurse and also to the quality of care given to families in paediatric oncology. The national educational programme for nurses in Paediatric Oncology Care meets the needs of the highly specialised care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mixed methods evaluation of an interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people who have an acquired physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Sharek, Danika; Nolan, Maeve; Sheerin, Barbara; Flanagan, Paul; Slaicuinaite, Sniguole; Mc Donnell, Sinead; Walsh, Heather

    2012-11-01

    .  To report a study evaluating the effectiveness of a 1-day interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people with acquired physical disability.   Changes associated with an acquired physical disability can diminish a person's self-esteem, sense of attractiveness, relationships, and sexual functioning. Research suggests that people are dissatisfied with the quality of information and support around sexuality during their rehabilitation.   A mixed methods design was used, involving pretest and posttest questionnaires and interviews. Questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics and paired samples t-tests to evaluate the effects of the programme on knowledge, skills, and comfort. Interview data were analyzed thematically, with particular emphasis on participants' opinions about the application of the course within practice. Participants were working in the area of acquired disability and rehabilitation, and were drawn from a number of disciplines. Data were collected between 2008-2009.   Comparison of the pre- and postmeasures, based on paired samples t-tests, showed that the programme statistically significantly increased participants' knowledge, skills, and comfort. Participants felt positive and enthusiastic about the programme and reported numerous incidents where they were more willing to raise issues for discussion and create a supportive listening space for patients to talk about their concerns around sexuality.   Providing healthcare practitioners with a 1-day programme leads to positive changes in knowledge, skills, and comfort towards sexuality. Sexuality education may be an ideal topic for bringing practitioners together within an interdisciplinary education context. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. [Evaluation a parenting skills pilot programme from a public health perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pilar; Vázquez, Noelia; Pasarín, M Isabel; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the process and the results of the pilot phase of the Parenting skills development programme for families (PSP), an evidence-based strategy to promote positive parenting skills in socio-educational and community settings. Before-after quasi-experimental design without a control group for the evaluation of the pilot phase of the PSD carried out in Barcelona (Spain) between October 2011 and June 2013. Eleven groups were established with the participation of 128 parents and 28 professionals. The intervention consisted of 10 or 11 sessions. Information was collected through questionnaires for parents and in-depth individual or group interviews for professionals. Parenting skills were identified through a questionnaire with six dimensions. The situation before the intervention (T0) and immediately after (T1) was compared. In T1 the number of participants decreased to 83 (retention=64.8%). Participants showed a high level of satisfaction with different dimensions of the program. On a maximum score of 10, the satisfaction of professionals was 8.7. Several key aspects and areas for improvement were identified for the future of the intervention. The quantitative analysis revealed improvements in all parenting skills dimensions and these improvements were consistent with the results of the qualitative analysis. The results of the pilot phase of this program suggest that a universal intervention on parenting skills can improve wellbeing among parents. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the patient safety Leadership Walkabout programme of a hospital in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Ng, Benjamin Boon Lui; Ng, Kok Mun

    2014-02-01

    The Patient Safety Leadership Walkabout (PSLWA) programme is a commonly employed tool in the West, in which senior leaders visit sites within the hospital that are involved in patient care to talk to healthcare staff about patient safety issues. As there is a lack of perspective regarding PSLWA in Asia, we carried out an evaluation of its effectiveness in improving the patient safety culture in Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. A mixed methods analysis approach was used to review and evaluate all documents, protocols, meeting minutes, post-walkabout surveys, action plans and verbal feedback pertaining to the walkabouts conducted from January 2005 to October 2012. A total of 321 patient safety issues were identified during the study period. Of these, 308 (96.0%) issues were resolved as of November 2012. Among the various categories of issues raised, issues related to work environment were the most common (45.2%). Of all the issues raised during the walkabouts, 72.9% were not identified through other conventional methods of error detection. With respect to the hospital's patient safety culture, 94.8% of the participants reported an increased awareness in patient safety and 90.2% expressed comfort in openly and honestly discussing patient safety issues. PSLWA serves as a good tool to uncover latent errors before actual harm reaches the patient. If properly implemented, it is an effective method for engaging leadership, identifying patient safety issues, and supporting a culture of patient safety in the hospital setting.

  12. Evaluation of the Danish Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme EDDP 2007-2010; Evaluering af Energiteknologisk Udviklings- og Demonstrationsprogram EUDP 2007-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    As one of the largest recipients of energy research and development funds in Denmark, EDDP (Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme) is a central granting programme. The programme allocates funds to interesting and promising energy technologies that are either under development or ready to be tested in real life - also called demonstration. The 'Act on Energy Technology Development and Demonstration programme' shows that EDDP projects must contribute to meeting the energy and climate policy objectives for security of supplies, respect for the global climate and a cleaner environment and cost efficiency. These three objectives are related, which means that the projects supported in principle must contribute to several objectives. In addition, the programme shall support the further development of the Danish energy technological strategic strongholds, where prospects for Danish research and industry looks particularly favorable. With the desire to reveal which outputs EDDP actually generates, the EDDP's Board in January 2011 launched an evaluation of the EDDP's results and effects. The focus of the evaluation has particularly been to identify the programme's industrial effects and its contribution to reach the energy and climate policy objectives. The evaluation is thus an effect evaluation and not an actual programme evaluation. Participants from both completed and uncompleted projects participated in the evaluation. The evaluation reveals, therefore, both the results and effects that have already been achieved under the auspices of EDDP projects, and the results and effects which the various project participants expect to achieve in the longer term based on their project participation. In brief, the evaluation shows that: - EDDP projects are largely expected to contribute to Denmark's energy and climate policy objectives; - Satisfactory technological results are created in the projects; - Many projects also generate

  13. Evaluating the Implementation of the Empowering Coaching™ Programme: Balancing Fidelity and Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søvik, Margaret L.; Larsen, Torill; Tjomsland, Hege; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of a theoretically grounded coach education training programme for youth football coaches in Norway, through observational methods. In particular, it focuses on implementation fidelity and programme adaptation, and possible differences between the coach educators (CEs) according…

  14. Evaluation of programmes for the prevention of behavioural problems and for development of social competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsmoen, Hege; Holth, Per; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    Rapport om forskningsbaseret vurdering af programmer med henblik på reduktion af problemadfærd og udvikling af social kompetence i Norge......Rapport om forskningsbaseret vurdering af programmer med henblik på reduktion af problemadfærd og udvikling af social kompetence i Norge...

  15. An Impact Evaluation of the "FoodMate" Programme: Perspectives of Homeless Young People and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Sarah J.; Barbour, Liza; Palermo, Claire E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Food insecurity remains an issue for vulnerable populations in developed countries. The potential dietary and food security impacts of nutrition education programmes in Australia remain largely undocumented. This study investigated the impacts of an eight-session nutrition education programme delivered within community case management…

  16. Sustainable protein technology : an evaluation on the STW Protein programme and an outlook for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voudouris, Panagiotis; Tamayo Tenorio, Angelica; Lesschen, Jan Peter; Kyriakopoulou, Konstantina; Sanders, Johan P.M.; Goot, van der Atze Jan; Bruins, Marieke E.

    2017-01-01

    In 2013 a new STW research programme was started on sustainable protein recovery. This STW Protein Programme consisted of five sustainable protein technology projects, which aimed at developing innovative methods to extract proteins from plant leaves, microalgae and insects to meet the increasing

  17. Evaluating a Pregnancy and STI Prevention Programme in Rural, At-Risk, Middle School Girls in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Julie C.; Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D.; Graber, Julia A.; Johnson, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Young people in urban areas are often the focus of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention programmes because of their high risk of unwanted pregnancy and contracting an STI. Young people in rural areas are far less studied but also have a high risk of similar outcomes. This study evaluates Giving Our Girls…

  18. Effect of a School Feeding Programme on Nutritional Status and Anaemia in an Urban Slum: A Preliminary Evaluation in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neervoort, F.; Von Rosenstiel, I.; Bongers, K.; Demetriades, M.; Shacola, M.; Wolffers, I.N.

    2013-01-01

    To reduce malnutrition and improve child survival, school feeding programmes have been established in many parts of Africa, although prevalence of child malnutrition and anaemia remains high, especially in urban slums. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a school feeding

  19. An economic evaluation of a proprioceptive balance board training programme for the prevention of ankle sprains in volleyball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; van Tulder, M.; van der Beek, A.J.; Bouter, L.M.; van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost effectiveness of a proprioceptive balance board training programme for the prevention of ankle sprains in volleyball. METHODS: A total of 116 volleyball teams participated in this study which was carried out during the 2001-2002 volleyball season. Teams were randomly

  20. Evaluation of an occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration in forklift truck drivers: a controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, C. T. J.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.; Braam, I. T. J.; Bovenzi, M.; van Dijk, F. J. H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate process and outcome of a multifaceted occupational health intervention programme on whole-body vibration (WBV) in forklift truck drivers. METHODS: An experimental pretest/post-test control group study design. The authors trained occupational health services (OHS) in the

  1. Evaluation of an Innovative Interest-Based Post-School Transition Programme for Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburner, Jill K.; Bobir, Natasha I.; van Dooren, Kate

    2018-01-01

    After leaving school, young people with autism spectrum disorder often struggle with social, educational and employment participation. A post-school transition programme underpinned by individualised case management, where mentees are guided to complete self-selected projects by mentors with multimedia skills, was evaluated using a qualitative…

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of a Social Skills Training and Facilitated Play Early Intervention Programme for Extremely Shy Young Children in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Coplan, Robert J.; Wang, Yuemin; Yin, Jingtong; Zhu, Jingjing; Gao, Zhuqing; Li, Linhui

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of a social skills and facilitated play early intervention programme to promote social interaction, prosocial behaviours and socio-communicative skills among young extremely shy children in China. Participants were a sample of n = 16 extremely shy young children attending kindergarten…

  3. The World Starts With Me : A multilevel evaluation of a comprehensive sex education programme targeting adolescents in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsdijk, Liesbeth E.; Bos, Arjan E. R.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.; Leerlooijer, Joanne N.; de Haas, Billie; Schaalma, Herman P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This paper evaluates the effect of the World Starts With Me (WSWM), a comprehensive sex education programme in secondary schools in Uganda. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of WSWM on socio-cognitive determinants of safe sex behaviour (delay; condom use and

  4. The World Starts With Me: A multilevel evaluation of a comprehensive sex education programme targeting adolescents in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsdijk, L.E.; Bos, A.E.R.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Leerlooijer, J.N.; Haas, B.; Schaalma, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper evaluates the effect of the World Starts With Me (WSWM), a comprehensive sex education programme in secondary schools in Uganda. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of WSWM on socio-cognitive determinants of safe sex behaviour (delay; condom use and

  5. Controlled ecological evaluation of an implemented exercise training programme to prevent lower limb injuries in sport: differences in implementation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Alex; Gabbe, Belinda J; Lloyd, David G; Cook, Jill; Finch, Caroline F

    2018-04-24

    The public health benefits of injury prevention programmes are maximised when programmes are widely adopted and adhered to. Therefore, these programmes require appropriate implementation support. This study evaluated implementation activity outcomes associated with the implementation of FootyFirst, an exercise training injury prevention programme for community Australian football, both with (FootyFirst+S) and without (FootyFirst+NS) implementation support. An evaluation plan based on the Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) Sports Setting Matrix was applied in a controlled ecological evaluation of the implementation of FootyFirst. RE-AIM dimension-specific (range: 0-2) and total RE-AIM scores (range: 0-10) were derived by triangulating data from a number of sources (including surveys, interviews, direct observations and notes) describing FootyFirst implementation activities. The mean dimension-specific and total scores were compared for clubs in regions receiving FootyFirst+S and FootyFirst+NS, through analysis of variance. The mean total RE-AIM score forclubs in the FootyFirst+S regions was 2.4 times higher than for clubs in the FootyFirst+NS region (4.73 vs 1.94; 95% CI for the difference: 1.64 to 3.74). Similarly, all dimension-specific scores were significantly higher for clubs in the FootyFirst+S regions compared with clubs in the FootyFirst+NS region. In all regions, the dimension-specific scores were highest for reach and adoption, and lowest for implementation. Implementing exercise training injury prevention programmes in community sport is challenging. Delivering programme content supported by a context-specific and evidence-informed implementation plan leads to greater implementation activity, which is an important precursor to injury reductions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  6. Economic evaluation of the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country: retrospective cost-effectiveness and budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrospide, Arantzazu; Rue, Montserrat; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Comas, Merce; Soto-Gordoa, Myriam; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Mar, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer screening in the Basque Country has shown 20 % reduction of the number of BC deaths and an acceptable overdiagnosis level (4 % of screen detected BC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the breast cancer early detection programme in the Basque Country in terms of retrospective cost-effectiveness and budget impact from 1996 to 2011. A discrete event simulation model was built to reproduce the natural history of breast cancer (BC). We estimated for lifetime follow-up the total cost of BC (screening, diagnosis and treatment), as well as quality-adjusted life years (QALY), for women invited to participate in the evaluated programme during the 15-year period in the actual screening scenario and in a hypothetical unscreened scenario. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated with the use of aggregated costs. Besides, annual costs were considered for budget impact analysis. Both population level and single-cohort analysis were performed. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was applied to assess the impact of parameters uncertainty. The actual screening programme involved a cost of 1,127 million euros and provided 6.7 million QALYs over the lifetime of the target population, resulting in a gain of 8,666 QALYs for an additional cost of 36.4 million euros, compared with the unscreened scenario. Thus, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 4,214€/QALY. All the model runs in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio lower than 10,000€/QALY. The screening programme involved an increase of the annual budget of the Basque Health Service by 5.2 million euros from year 2000 onwards. The BC screening programme in the Basque Country proved to be cost-effective during the evaluated period and determined an affordable budget impact. These results confirm the epidemiological benefits related to the centralised screening system and support the continuation of the programme.

  7. Mum to mum : an evaluation of a community based health promotion programme for first-time mothers in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hanrahan-Cahuzak, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the Dutch Mothers Inform Mothers (MIM) programme. In that programme a visiting mother meets with a first-time mother in her home on a monthly basis to discuss the caring and rearing of her infant. The first-time mothers went also to the well-baby clinics in their locality where they discussed topics in the areas of psychosocial, cognitive and physical development, language, pla...

  8. Evaluation of clinical skills for first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and objective structured clinical evaluation as a tool of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate specialities require a combination of knowledge and clinical skills. The internship year is less structured. Clinical and practical skills that are picked up during training are not well regulated and the impact is not assessed. In this study, we assessed knowledge and skills using objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Aim: To evaluate the clinical skills of new first-year surgical residents using orientation programme and OSCE as a tool for assessment. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty new first-year surgical residents (10 each in 2008 and 2009 participated in a detailed structured orientation programme conducted over a period of 7 days. Clinically important topics and skills expected at this level (e.g., suturing, wound care etc. were covered. The programme was preceded by an OSCE to test pre-programme knowledge (the "pre-test". The questions were validated by senior department staff. A post-programme OSCE (the "post-test" helped to evaluate the change in clinical skill level brought about by the orientation programme. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxson matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Passing performance was achieved by all participants in both pre- and post-tests. Following the orientation programme, significant improvement was seen in tasks testing the psychomotor and cognitive domains. (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.0401, respectively. Overall reliability of the OSCE was found to be 0.7026 (Cronbach′s coefficient alpha. Conclusions: This study highlighted the lacunae in current internship training, especially for skill-based tasks. There is a need for universal inclusion of structured orientation programmes in the training of first-year residents. OSCE is a reliable, valid and effective method for the assessment of clinical skills.

  9. Scientific evaluation on the NKS programme 1998-2001; Facklig utvaerdering av NKS-programmet 1998-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenhielm, G. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI (Sweden); Mustonen, R. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, STUK (Finland)

    2002-11-01

    The Board of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) decided in the autumn 2000 to contract out two separate evaluations on the NKS Programme 1998-2001. Martin Oeiby from the NorwegiOe Radiation Protection Authority was requested to perform an evaluation on overall administration of the NKS Programme. Two experts conducted the scientific evaluation. Gustaf Lowenhielm from the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was requested to assess projects on nuclear safety issues and waste management, and Raimo Mustonen from the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority to evaluate projects on radiation protection and nuclear emergency preparedness. This report deals with the scientific evaluation. The report contains brief review on the history of the Nordic nuclear and radiation safety co-operation and on the development of Programme for 1998-2001. Brief summaries of activities in all the projects are given, together with the main results of the projects. The evaluators give their subjective assessments on the success and effectiveness of the projects based on the evaluation criteria agreed With the NKS Board in the beginning of work. Also some general recommendations for the future co-operation are given. (au)

  10. The development, implementation and evaluation of a transitional care programme to improve outcomes of frail older patients after hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heim, Noor; Rolden, Herbert; van Fenema, Esther M

    2016-01-01

    samples. CONCLUSIONS: by involving stakeholders in designing and developing the transitional care programme, commitment of healthcare providers was secured. Feasible innovations in integrated transitional care for frail older patients after hospitalisation were sustainably implemented from within......BACKGROUND: fragmented healthcare systems are poorly suited to treat the increasing number of older patients with multimorbidity. OBJECTIVE: to report on the development, implementation and evaluation of a regional transitional care programme, aimed at improving the recovery rate of frail...... hospitalised older patients. METHODS: the programme was drafted in co-creation with organisations representing older adults, care providers and knowledge institutes. Conducting an action research project, the incidence of adverse outcomes within 3 months after hospital admission, and long-term care expenses...

  11. How to use programme theory to evaluate the effectiveness of schemes designed to improve the work environment in small businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kirsten; Legg, Stephen; Hasle, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Due to the many constraints that small businesses (SBs) face in meeting legislative requirements, occupational health and safety (OHS) regulatory authorities and other OSH actors have developed programmes which can reach out to SBs and motivate and assist them in improving the work environment. A number of conceptual models help to enhance our understanding of OHS interventions in SBs and their effectiveness. However, they have mainly been evaluated on output rather than the process relating to the change theory underlying the intervention, and hence have seldom been rigorously evaluated. Thus little is known about how particular features of SBs can be taken into account when designing and implementing national programmes. This paper shows how realist analysis and programme theory may be used as a framework for evaluating, developing and improving national intervention programmes for the improvement of the work environment and reducing injuries in SBs. It illustrates this for a specific New Zealand intervention: the Workplace Safety Discount scheme and its implementation in the agriculture sector. In practice, realist analysis should be performed during the planning, implementation and management stages so that ongoing findings can be fed back to the participant social actors to help them make appropriate changes to enhance the likelihood of success.

  12. Community health workers programme in Luanda, Angola: an evaluation of the implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliani, Camila; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Harzheim, Erno; Lavor, Antônio Carlile Holanda; Lavor, Míria Campos; Machado, Márcia Maria Tavares; Barbosa, Maria Idalice; Bornstein, Vera Joana; Pontes, Ana Lúcia; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-12-09

    The Community Health Workers (CHWs) Programme was launched in Luanda, Angola, in 2007 as an initiative of the provincial government. The aim of this study was to assess its implementation process. This is a case study with documental analysis, CHWs reports data, individual interviews and focus groups. Until June 2009, the programme had placed in the community 2,548 trained CHWs, providing potential coverage for 261,357 families. Analysis of qualitative data suggested an association of CHWs with improvements in maternal and child access to health care, as well as an increase in the demand for health services, generating further need to improve service capacity. Nevertheless, critical points for programme sustainability were identified. For continuity and scaling up, the programme needs medium- and long-term technical, political and financial support. The results of this study may be useful in strengthening and reformulating the planning of the CHWs programme in Luanda and in Angola. Moreover, the lessons learned with this experience can also provide insight for the development of CHWs programmes in other parts of the world. By means of cooperation, Brazil has supported the implementation of this CHWs programme and can potentially contribute to its improvement.

  13. Rapid prototyping and evaluation of programmable SIMD SDR processors in LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Hengzhu; Zhang, Botao; Liu, Dongpei

    2013-03-01

    With the development of international wireless communication standards, there is an increase in computational requirement for baseband signal processors. Time-to-market pressure makes it impossible to completely redesign new processors for the evolving standards. Due to its high flexibility and low power, software defined radio (SDR) digital signal processors have been proposed as promising technology to replace traditional ASIC and FPGA fashions. In addition, there are large numbers of parallel data processed in computation-intensive functions, which fosters the development of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture in SDR platform. So a new way must be found to prototype the SDR processors efficiently. In this paper we present a bit-and-cycle accurate model of programmable SIMD SDR processors in a machine description language LISA. LISA is a language for instruction set architecture which can gain rapid model at architectural level. In order to evaluate the availability of our proposed processor, three common baseband functions, FFT, FIR digital filter and matrix multiplication have been mapped on the SDR platform. Analytical results showed that the SDR processor achieved the maximum of 47.1% performance boost relative to the opponent processor.

  14. Evaluation of the implementation of sport science programme in Malaysian secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Eng Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a new sport science curriculum in Malaysian secondary schools. Four implementation dimensions (‘teaching ability’, ‘administration of sport science programme’, ‘teaching duty allocation’ and ‘non-human factors’ were examined. 135 schools and 94 teachers were surveyed. 81% teachers were male and 85% were under 40. About half of the respondents were trained in sport science and had 1-2 years teaching experience. Over 90% of teachers perceived they have knowledge to teach and can manage students. However, 80% felt they need more exposure and training. Male teachers were better than female teachers in managing students and conducting activities/experiments. Experienced teachers were better in conducting activities and experiments. Teachers majoring in sport science were more knowledgeable while PE majors found teaching sport science challenging. Most teachers perceived that teaching facilities, financial allocation and reference resources were inadequate. Majority of the administrators consulted teachers before assigning teaching load but failed to observe teaching. This research provides invaluable feedbacks on the implementation of the programme.

  15. The Syrian Vulnerable Person Resettlement Programme: evaluation of Edinburgh's reception arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Katherine E A; Wilson, Sheila J; Gorman, Dermot R

    2017-11-07

    During 2015 and 2016 a group of Syrian refugees were resettled in Edinburgh, Scotland under the United Kingdom Government Syrian Vulnerable Person Resettlement Programme. We evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the settling in arrangements for these refugees. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five Arabic interpreters who had worked extensively with these refugees. Interviews sought their impressions about what went well or was not successful. Interviews were transcribed and key themes extracted and analysed. Six themes emerged: 'first impressions', language skills, different healthcare systems, health of the refugees, relationships between the interpreters and refugees and support for the interpreters. The welcoming arrangements went well and exceeded refugees' and interpreters' expectations. There was perhaps too much information given immediately and reinforcing details about various public services and facilities after a first few months would be worthwhile. The Syrians were unfamiliar with NHS structures and found lack of direct specialist access surprising. Problems were amplified by low English levels. A need for Arabic literacy classes was also identified. Interpreters were often used informally out-of-hours and a better system with first contact in Arabic should be established. Interpreters find this work particularly stressful and the provision of psychological support for them should be prioritized. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. The use of electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate a core strengthening exercise programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja; Szpala, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    The question that was asked in the study was whether a training routine based on curl-up exercises with a load provided by body mass of the person increases local muscle strength or local muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 4 weeks training based on a small load and low movement velocity on electrical activity (EMG), cross-sectional area (CSA) of core stabilisers. The EMG activity was measured in the rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus abdominis externus and erector spinae (ES) muscles. CSA of the muscles: RA, anterolateral abdominal, psoas major, quadratus lumborum, ES, and multifidus at the level of L3-L4 were measured too. The training increased the CSA and thickness in most of the muscles studied. Statistically significant correlation was found only for the ES circumference (left side) and EMG activity for the right side (r= 0.627, p= 0.022) and left side (r= 0.624, p= 0.023). The training programme resulted in a increase in the number of curl-up repetitions revealing an endurance increase in abdominal muscles. Furthermore, there was a increase in the EMG activity of the RA. An increase of the CSA of all tested muscles showed an increase of muscle active force.

  17. Molecular Fingerprinting Approach in Plant Species Evaluation for a Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as a tool for marker technology is found to be remarkable, advanced and exciting in recent years. DNA markers are valuable tools and important in various plant breeding analyses for identification, gene mapping, marker systems and mutagenesis response. As gene expression is related to concurrent cellular activities and is mobilised in the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions, changes at the DNA levels can be detected simultaneously. The changes also reflect response onto plant traits in which selection for better quality plant materials can be made and/or used as bio-indicator response in tracking any environmental change. The objective of the present study is to show Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers as an important technique in differentiating plant DNA genomic in various species for the evaluation of their diversity and radiation effects in population. The technique has been found to be rapid, simple, reliable and robust in generating molecular fingerprinting database in bio surveillance for a nuclear power programme. (author)

  18. Fundamentals for the evaluation of irradiation experiments on enrichment reduction in the FRJ-2 (AF-Programme)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchardt, G.; Krug, W.; Weise, L.

    1984-01-01

    For the evaluation of irradiation experiments in the framework of the AF-Programme (Enrichment Reduction for Research Reactors) a computer code for the determination of burn-up was developed. The energy-integral cross-sections, which were needed for this purpose, has been determined appropriate to the specific problem in question. First results of an evaluation are reported in this paper. (orig.) [de

  19. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  20. The development and evaluation of a web-based programme to support problem-solving skills following brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Laurie Ehlhardt; Wild, Michelle R; Glang, Ann; Ibarra, Summer; Gau, Jeff M; Perez, Amanda; Albin, Richard W; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Wade, Shari L; Keating, Tom; Saraceno, Carolyn; Slocumb, Jody

    2017-10-24

    Cognitive impairments following brain injury, including difficulty with problem solving, can pose significant barriers to successful community reintegration. Problem-solving strategy training is well-supported in the cognitive rehabilitation literature. However, limitations in insurance reimbursement have resulted in fewer services to train such skills to mastery and to support generalization of those skills into everyday environments. The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate an integrated, web-based programme, ProSolv, which uses a small number of coaching sessions to support problem solving in everyday life following brain injury. We used participatory action research to guide the iterative development, usability testing, and within-subject pilot testing of the ProSolv programme. The finalized programme was then evaluated in a between-subjects group study and a non-experimental single case study. Results were mixed across studies. Participants demonstrated that it was feasible to learn and use the ProSolv programme for support in problem solving. They highly recommended the programme to others and singled out the importance of the coach. Limitations in app design were cited as a major reason for infrequent use of the app outside of coaching sessions. Results provide mixed evidence regarding the utility of web-based mobile apps, such as ProSolv to support problem solving following brain injury. Implications for Rehabilitation People with cognitive impairments following brain injury often struggle with problem solving in everyday contexts. Research supports problem solving skills training following brain injury. Assistive technology for cognition (smartphones, selected apps) offers a means of supporting problem solving for this population. This project demonstrated the feasibility of a web-based programme to address this need.

  1. Evaluation and modelling of SWIW tests performed within the SKB site characterisation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordqvist, Rune

    2008-08-01

    In this report, a comprehensive overview of SWIW (Single Well Injection-Withdrawal) tests carried out within the SKB site investigations at Oskarshamn and Forsmark is presented. The purpose of this study is to make a general review and a comparison of performed SWIW tests within the site investigation programmes at the two sites. The study summarises experimental conditions for each test and discusses factors that may influence the experimental results and evaluation of the tests. Further, an extended model evaluation is carried out using a one- dimensional radial flow and transport model with matrix diffusion and matrix sorption. The intended outcome is an improved understanding of various mechanisms that may influence the SWIW test results and also to improve interpretation of the tests. Six SWIW test at each site have been carried out, generally resulting in high-quality and well documented experimental data with high tracer recovery. The tests have been performed in surface boreholes at repository depth, ranging approximately between 300 to 700 m borehole lengths. In all of the tests, a non-sorbing tracer (Uranine) and one or two sorbing tracers (cesium and rubidium) have been used simultaneously. A general result is that all of the tests demonstrate a very clear and relatively large retardation effect for the sorbing tracers. Basic initial modelling of the SWIW tests data, using a one-dimensional radial flow model with advection and dispersion, generally resulted in relatively good agreement between model and experimental data. However, a consistent feature of the initial modelling was a discrepancy between model and experimental data in the later parts of the recovery tracer breakthrough curve. It was concluded that this likely was caused by processes occurring in the tested rock formation and therefore an extended model evaluation (presented in this report) including matrix diffusion was carried out on all of the performed tests. Evaluated retardation

  2. Evaluation and modelling of SWIW tests performed within the SKB site characterisation programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordqvist, Rune (Geosigma AB, Uppsala (SE))

    2008-08-15

    In this report, a comprehensive overview of SWIW (Single Well Injection-Withdrawal) tests carried out within the SKB site investigations at Oskarshamn and Forsmark is presented. The purpose of this study is to make a general review and a comparison of performed SWIW tests within the site investigation programmes at the two sites. The study summarises experimental conditions for each test and discusses factors that may influence the experimental results and evaluation of the tests. Further, an extended model evaluation is carried out using a one- dimensional radial flow and transport model with matrix diffusion and matrix sorption. The intended outcome is an improved understanding of various mechanisms that may influence the SWIW test results and also to improve interpretation of the tests. Six SWIW test at each site have been carried out, generally resulting in high-quality and well documented experimental data with high tracer recovery. The tests have been performed in surface boreholes at repository depth, ranging approximately between 300 to 700 m borehole lengths. In all of the tests, a non-sorbing tracer (Uranine) and one or two sorbing tracers (cesium and rubidium) have been used simultaneously. A general result is that all of the tests demonstrate a very clear and relatively large retardation effect for the sorbing tracers. Basic initial modelling of the SWIW tests data, using a one-dimensional radial flow model with advection and dispersion, generally resulted in relatively good agreement between model and experimental data. However, a consistent feature of the initial modelling was a discrepancy between model and experimental data in the later parts of the recovery tracer breakthrough curve. It was concluded that this likely was caused by processes occurring in the tested rock formation and therefore an extended model evaluation (presented in this report) including matrix diffusion was carried out on all of the performed tests. Evaluated retardation

  3. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV I AIDS peer-education programme for its employees aimed at addressing the growing ..... m:JI education intervention in a mining community reports essentially no effect.17 ... yet to be determined. Such data are crucial for the development.

  4. Geoscientific programme for investigation and evaluation of candidate sites for the deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroem, Anders; Almen, K.E.; Andersson, Johan; Christiansson, R.; Follin, S.; Pettersson, Stig; Selroos, J.O.

    2000-08-01

    Methods and technology for the geoscientific studies of the rock are the main subjects for this report, but programmes for studying the surface ecosystems and other conditions at the surface are also described

  5. Economic evaluation alongside a single RCT of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Bakker, Ton J E M; Al, Maiwenn; van der Lee, Jacqueline; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Ribbe, Miel W; Huijsman, Robbert

    2013-09-30

    There is an 80% prevalence of two or more psychiatric symptoms in psychogeriatric patients. Multiple psychiatric symptoms (MPS) have many negative effects on quality of life of the patient as well as on caregiver burden and competence. Irrespective of the effectiveness of an intervention programme, it is important to take into account its economic aspects. The economic evaluation was performed alongside a single open RCT and conducted between 2001 and 2006. The patients who met the selection criteria were asked to participate in the RCT. After the patient or his caregiver signed a written informed consent form, he was then randomly assigned to either IRR or UC.The costs and effects of IRR were compared to those of UC. We assessed the cost-utility of IRR as well as the cost-effectiveness of both conditions. Primary outcome variable: severity of MPS (NPI) of patients; secondary outcome variables: general caregiver burden (CB) and caregiver competence (CCL), quality of life (EQ5D) of the patient, and total medical costs per patient (TiC-P). Cost-utility was evaluated on the basis of differences in total medical costs). Cost-effectiveness was evaluated by comparing differences of total medical costs and effects on NPI, CB and CCL (Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio: ICER). CEAC-analyses were performed for QALY and NPI-severity. All significant testing was fixed at pprinciple. A complete cases approach (CC) was used. IRR turned out to be non-significantly, 10.5% more expensive than UC (€ 36 per day). The number of QALYs was 0.01 higher (non-significant) in IRR, resulting in € 276,290 per QALY. According to the ICER-method, IRR was significantly more cost-effective on NPI-sum-severity of the patient (up to 34%), CB and CCL (up to 50%), with ICERs varying from € 130 to € 540 per additional point of improvement. No significant differences were found on QALYs. In IRR patients improved significantly more on severity of MPS, and caregivers on general burden and

  6. Evaluation of a seasonal-breeding artificial insemination programme in Uruguay using milk progesterone radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavestany, D.; Juanbeltz, R.; Canclini, E.; ElHordoy, D.; Lanzzeri, S.; Gama, S.; Martinez, E.; Galina, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate artificial insemination (AI) services and reproductive efficiency in dairy herds in Uruguay two surveys were conducted in 1995 and 1996. The 1995 survey was done in 10 dairy farms of 3 regions on 696 lactating Holstein cows. The 1996 survey was done in 5 dairy farms in one region and included 768 cows. Precision of oestrus detection and efficiency of AI services were determined by milk progesterone samples taken at days 0, 10 and 23 after breeding and by analysis of the records. In 1995 and 1996, the intervals from calving to first service were 123 and 101 days, and to conception were 158 and 134 days, respectively. Parity, body weight and body condition at calving influenced these parameters, but not body weight or body condition at breeding nor milk production. Accuracy of pregnancy diagnosis by milk progesterone was 70.4%. Heat detection rate was 37.5% and pregnancy rate was 15.6%. In 1997 a second study was done to determine the factors affecting reproductive efficiency in a seasonal breeding AI programme in 328 lactating cows on 3 dairy farms. Milk progesterone measurement revealed that 12.5% of the cows were anoestrous at the beginning of the season and remained so during the trial. The category mostly affected were first-calf heifers (82%). Also, 8.5% of the cows cycling were never reported in heat and this was influenced by farm. Oestrus detection efficiency for cows determined to be cycling by progesterone profiles was evaluated in three periods of 21 days and overall efficiency was 46.9%. Main factor affecting it was farm, with an effect of parity (67.8% in mature cows and 33.2% in first-calf heifers) but no effect of days postpartum. Mean interval from the beginning of the breeding season to first service was 27.4 days, again with a strong farm variation but no effect of parity or days postpartum. In an attempt to improve reproductive efficiency in lactating dairy cows, a treatment protocol was designed, where 414 cows in two herds were

  7. Difficulties experienced in setting and achieving goals by participants of a falls prevention programme: a mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Romi; Mason, Wendy; Haines, Terry P

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of participants of a falls prevention programme to set and achieve goals. The study used a prospective longitudinal design and a mixed-methods approach to data collection. Study participants were (1) 220 older adults participating in a 15-week combined exercise and education falls prevention programme and (2) 9 practitioners (3 home-care nurses, 5 community workers, and an exercise physiologist) involved in delivering the programme. Data from goal-setting forms were analyzed, and descriptive statistics were used to determine the number of appropriate goals set and achieved. Data were analyzed according to programme setting (home- or group-based) and whether or not participants were classified as being from a Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) background in the Australian context. Semi-structured interviews with programme practitioners were thematically analyzed. A total of 144 respondents (n=75 CALD group, n=41 non-CALD group, n=6 CALD home, n=22 non-CALD home) set 178 goals. Only 101 (57%) goals could be evaluated according to achievement, because participants set goals that focused on health state instead of behaviour, set goals not relevant to falls prevention, used inappropriate constructs to measure goal achievement, and either did not review their goals or dropped out of the programme before goal review. Of these 101 goals, 64 were achieved. Practitioners described their own difficulties in understanding the process of setting health behaviour goals along with communication, cultural, and logistic difficulties. Both CALD and non-CALD participants and those participating in both group- and home-based programmes experienced difficulty in setting and achieving goals to facilitate behaviour change for falls prevention. Data suggest that home-based participants had more difficulty in setting goals than their group-based counterparts and, to a lesser extent, that CALD participants experienced more difficulty in setting goals than

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of a metacognitive programme for disadvantaged learners in the Foundation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Learners in South Africa lag behind in literacy and numeracy skills relative to their peers in other countries. This is ascribed to a lack of quality education in the preschool and Foundation Phases of schooling, and conditions related to poverty. The Basic Concepts Mediated Learning Programme (BCMLP aims to promote the conceptual development of young children through training teachers to be mediators in a metacognitive educational programme. The BCMLP was implemented in the Foundation Phase (Grade R to Grade 3 in two schools in impoverished areas of the Northern Cape over three years (20082010. Baseline testing found that children at both schools experienced significant delays in their conceptual and scholastic development. After being trained as mediators, teachers implemented this approach with groups, eventually integrating it into the curriculum. There was variable continuity of implementation at the two schools, with one school only implementing the programme for the first year. The conceptual development and scholastic functioning of learners were monitored pre-intervention to post-intervention. Results found that implementation of the programme was consistent with considerable improvements in conceptual and scholastic functioning. Further, improvements were more pronounced, where the programme was implemented continually for three years. The researcher concluded that the programme made a positive impact on participating learners' knowledge and understanding of basic conceptual systems and scholastic functioning.

  9. “Learning together, growing with family”: The implementation and evaluation of a family support programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Amorós-Martí

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The "Learning together, growing with family" programme is targeted to at-risk parents and children from 6 to 11 years old, with a preventive focus on promoting positive parent-child relationships. In this study, we examined the quality of the programme implementation and its influence on the programme results in a sample of 425 parents and 138 facilitators drawn from the first trial. Mixed methods were used, consisting of: parental self-reports on parenting dimensions, professionals´ records on parental attendance and appraisals on six topics of the implementation process, and focus group discussions in which facilitators reported on the initial steps of the implementation. Results showed a high quality of implementation with respect to the group facilitator and the programme organization factors, followed by the coordination with services and the support facilities offered to participants and, finally, by the factors of fidelity and prior organization steps. Results of the focus groups confirmed that the prior steps were challenging and offered the more effective strategies. Better quality in the implementation factors predicted better parenting styles and parental competencies after the programme, as well as a higher attendance rate. In sum, this study demonstrates the importance of good implementation in at-risk contexts and provides some clues as to the key elements that moderate programme effectiveness.

  10. Bridging the qualitative-quantitative divide: Experiences from conducting a mixed methods evaluation in the RUCAS programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrakis, Vassilios; Kostoulas-Makrakis, Nelly

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative and qualitative approaches to planning and evaluation in education for sustainable development have often been treated by practitioners from a single research paradigm. This paper discusses the utility of mixed method evaluation designs which integrate qualitative and quantitative data through a sequential transformative process. Sequential mixed method data collection strategies involve collecting data in an iterative process whereby data collected in one phase contribute to data collected in the next. This is done through examples from a programme addressing the 'Reorientation of University Curricula to Address Sustainability (RUCAS): A European Commission Tempus-funded Programme'. It is argued that the two approaches are complementary and that there are significant gains from combining both. Using methods from both research paradigms does not, however, mean that the inherent differences among epistemologies and methodologies should be neglected. Based on this experience, it is recommended that using a sequential transformative mixed method evaluation can produce more robust results than could be accomplished using a single approach in programme planning and evaluation focussed on education for sustainable development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An evaluation of two guidance programmes to promote breast-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steyn

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years a comprehensive research project has been undertaken to develop a guidance programme in three adjacent communities in the South- Western Cape with the aim o f lowering the high incidence o f coronary heart disease. The purpose o f this substudy was to determine whether the guidance provided in the different communities had any influence on the knowledge o f and attitudes towards the nutrition o f pregnant women, babies and infants as well as breast-feeding practices o f the women who gave birth during the period 1980 to 1986. In the first community guidance was provided by means o f small mass media and interpersonal communication whereas only the small mass media were employed in the second. The third served as the control community. The findings suggest that the combined interpersonal and mass media programme was more successful than the mass media programme alone.

  12. Geoscientific programme for investigation and evaluation of sites for the deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    SKB's goal is to be able to commence site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository. This report describes the investigation and evaluation programme, which is focused on a deep repository in accordance with the KBS-3 method for spent nuclear fuel. When areas for site investigations have been chosen, the programmes will be adapted to the site-specific conditions. The geoscientific work during the site investigation phase is supposed to provide the broad knowledge base that is required to evaluate the suitability of investigated sites for a deep repository. The material must be comprehensive enough to: show whether the selected site satisfies fundamental safety requirements; permit comparisons with other investigated sites; and serve as a basis for adaptation of the deep repository to the properties and characteristics of the site with an acceptable impact on society and the environment. The work is being carried out in consultation with municipalities, regulatory authorities and nearby residents. The main product of the investigations is a site description, which presents collected data and interpreted parameters that are of importance both for the overall scientific understanding of the site and for the analyses and assessments that are made of design and safety assessment with respect to the deep repository's layout and construction as well as its long-term performance and radiological safety. The site description should furthermore present an integrated description of the site (geosphere and biosphere) and its regional environs with respect to current state and naturally ongoing processes. A technical risk evaluation is carried out, by which is meant a description of uncertainties in calculations and the environmental impact of the civil engineering work. The main product of the safety assessment is a safety report, which analyzes whether long-term safety

  13. Geoscientific programme for investigation and evaluation of sites for the deep repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    SKB's goal is to be able to commence site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository. This report describes the investigation and evaluation programme, which is focused on a deep repository in accordance with the KBS-3 method for spent nuclear fuel. When areas for site investigations have been chosen, the programmes will be adapted to the site-specific conditions. The geoscientific work during the site investigation phase is supposed to provide the broad knowledge base that is required to evaluate the suitability of investigated sites for a deep repository. The material must be comprehensive enough to: show whether the selected site satisfies fundamental safety requirements; permit comparisons with other investigated sites; and serve as a basis for adaptation of the deep repository to the properties and characteristics of the site with an acceptable impact on society and the environment. The work is being carried out in consultation with municipalities, regulatory authorities and nearby residents. The main product of the investigations is a site description, which presents collected data and interpreted parameters that are of importance both for the overall scientific understanding of the site and for the analyses and assessments that are made of design and safety assessment with respect to the deep repository's layout and construction as well as its long-term performance and radiological safety. The site description should furthermore present an integrated description of the site (geosphere and biosphere) and its regional environs with respect to current state and naturally ongoing processes. A technical risk evaluation is carried out, by which is meant a description of uncertainties in calculations and the environmental impact of the civil engineering work. The main product of the safety assessment is a safety report, which analyzes whether long

  14. Evaluating the usability of an interactive, bi-lingual, touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme: application of Nielson's heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ashish; Perin, Douglas M Puricelli; Amadi, Chioma; Trout, Kate

    2015-03-05

    The study purpose was to conduct heuristic evaluation of an interactive, bilingual touchscreen-enabled breastfeeding educational programme for Hispanic women living in rural settings in Nebraska. Three raters conducted the evaluation during May 2013 using principles of Nielson's heuristics. A total of 271 screens were evaluated and included: interface (n = 5), programme sections (n = 223) and educational content (n = 43). A total of 97 heuristic violations were identified and were mostly related to interface (8 violations/5 screens) and programme components (89 violations/266 screens). The most common heuristic violations reported were recognition rather than recall (62%, n = 60), consistency and standards (14%, n = 14) and match between the system and real world (9%, n = 9). Majority of the heuristic violations had minor usability issues (73%, n = 71). The only grade 4 heuristic violation reported was due to the visibility of system status in the assessment modules. The results demonstrated that the system was more consistent with Nielsen's usability heuristics. With Nielsen's usability heuristics, it is possible to identify problems in a timely manner, and help facilitate the identification and prioritisation of problems needing urgent attention at an earlier stage before the final deployment of the system.

  15. Evaluation of an intervention programme addressing ability to perform activities of daily living among persons with chronic conditions: study protocol for a feasibility trial (ABLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidetti, Susanne; Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; von Bülow, Cecilie

    2018-01-01

    version of the ABLE intervention programme was developed. Methods and analysis This feasibility study examine the perceived value and acceptability of the ABLE programme by evaluating the fidelity, reach, dose and potential outcomes using a pretest and post-test design involving 30 persons living...

  16. Evaluating the Application and Applicability of Treatment Guidelines in Daily Clinical Practice. Closing the loop with the Euro Heart Survey programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Lenzen (Mattie)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe main research questions in this thesis correspond to those of the Netherlands Heart Foundation (NHF)-Health Care programme and were closely related to the aims of the Euro Heart Survey (EHS) programme, namely to evaluate to which extend every day clinical practice corresponds with

  17. "We Didn't Even Realize that Kids like Us Could Go on the Radio"--An Evaluation of a Victorian Schools Youth Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Robyn S.; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a comprehensive evaluation of the Advance programme by Victoria University in 2007/08. Advance is a flexible school-based programme for young people to volunteer or implement a project of benefit to their communities in the state of Victoria, in Australia. It is a partnership between the Office for Youth, Victorian government…

  18. Continuity, Support, Togetherness and Trust: Findings from an Evaluation of a University-Administered Early Professional Development Programme for Teachers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Joanna; Hobson, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the evaluation of a unique university-based early professional development (EPD) programme in England that enabled newly and recently qualified teachers to have continued contact with their initial teacher preparation provider. The programme was designed to enhance the induction, EPD and retention of beginning teachers of…

  19. Impact and economic evaluations of a combination prevention programme for men who have sex with men in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colchero, M Arantxa; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Cortés-Ortiz, María A; Romero-Martinez, Martín; Salas, Jessica; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G; Uribe, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high-profile support for combination prevention programmes (CPPs) since 2008, there is little rigorous evidence on their impact and cost-effectiveness. In 2010, Mexico received funds from the Global Fund to implement a series of behavioural, biomedical, and structural interventions over 3 years targeted to men who have sex with men. The aims of the study were to estimate the impact of the programme across a range of outcomes and cost-effectiveness. A quasi-experiment was designed before the implementation of the CPP, in which 24 cities were randomly selected for impact evaluation and 12 pairs of cities were matched. In practice, though, implementation of the programme was staggered over 1 year. Therefore, we used two different approaches to estimate impact: a difference-in-difference estimation comparing both groups and a dose-response approach using time exposure to the programme at the city level. Results from the difference-in-difference estimation showed modest impact on condom use. However, the dose-response findings revealed a 7.5% increase in HIV testing per additional year exposed to the programme, relative to baseline coverage; an increase in awareness of HIV status among HIV-positive individuals of 6.6%; a 6.4% increase in HIV-positive individuals on treatment; and an 8% reduction in the perception of stigma/discrimination from healthcare personnel. The cost per person not exposed to an untreated HIV-positive individual was gauged to be US$400. The study provides evidence of the effectiveness and cost of a CPP along the HIV treatment cascade: access to HIV tests, awareness of HIV status, and antiretroviral therapy initiation.

  20. Evaluation of tuberculosis control programme in Khartoum State for the year 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed Suleiman, M M; Aro, Arja R.; Sodemann, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) is among the top ten causes of global mortality. Sudan is among the countries with high TB prevalence; with an estimated incidence of 90/100,000 smear-positive cases. In 1993, the Khartoum State tuberculosis control programme was established. Since its establishment,...

  1. SKI`s Evaluation of SKB`s RD and D Programme 95. Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    SKI (the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate) has sent SKB`s (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) RD and D Programme 95 to sixty authorities and organizations for review. 35 reviewing bodies have replied. In various ways, most of the comments are related to the decision-making process, both with regard to site selection and choice of method and only a small number of reviewing bodies have dealt with the more purely technical issues such as the function of the barriers and the safety assessment methodology. SKI`s review of the programme is based on the premises of establishing whether and how the programme can fulfill its actual purpose to identify and implement solutions for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power plants. SKI`s statement to the Government includes a `Summary and Conclusions` of the `Review Report`. In (the present) `Review Report` SKI reviews the programme and deals with comments from the other reviewing bodies. Furthermore, SKI has commissioned a separate report with the `Comments of the Reviewing Bodies`. 32 refs.

  2. Recognition Organisations That Evaluate Agencies Accrediting Medical Education Programmes: "Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The goals of agencies that accredit medical education programmes or institutions are to ensure high quality student experiences and to certify the readiness of graduates to further their training or begin practice as physicians. While accreditation provides a level of legitimacy, the agencies conducting the reviews vary in their organisation,…

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Metacognitive Programme for Disadvantaged Learners in the Foundation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Learners in South Africa lag behind in literacy and numeracy skills relative to their peers in other countries. This is ascribed to a lack of quality education in the preschool and Foundation Phases of schooling, and conditions related to poverty. The Basic Concepts Mediated Learning Programme (BCMLP) aims to promote the conceptual development of…

  4. Communication between nurses and simulated patients with cancer: evaluation of a communication training programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, I.P.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Kerssens, J.J.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Wiel, H.B.M. van de

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effect of a communication training programme on the instrumental and affective communication skills employed by ward nurses during the admittance interview with recently diagnosed cancer patients was investigated. The training focused on teaching nurses skills to discuss and handle

  5. Outsourcing Physical Education in Primary Schools: Evaluating the Impact of Externally Provided Programmes on Generalist Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, Peter R.; Hutton, Heidi; Grove, J. Robert; Jackson, Ben

    2011-01-01

    In place of generalist delivery, externally provided physical activity programmes (EPPAPs) are potentially an effective method for offering primary school students specialist physical education (PE) instruction, as well as providing training for generalist classroom teachers. In the present study, a group of generalist teachers were interviewed…

  6. SKI's Evaluation of SKB's RD and D Programme 95. Review Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    SKI (the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate) has sent SKB's (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) RD and D Programme 95 to sixty authorities and organizations for review. 35 reviewing bodies have replied. In various ways, most of the comments are related to the decision-making process, both with regard to site selection and choice of method and only a small number of reviewing bodies have dealt with the more purely technical issues such as the function of the barriers and the safety assessment methodology. SKI's review of the programme is based on the premises of establishing whether and how the programme can fulfill its actual purpose to identify and implement solutions for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power plants. SKI's statement to the Government includes a 'Summary and Conclusions' of the 'Review Report'. In (the present) 'Review Report' SKI reviews the programme and deals with comments from the other reviewing bodies. Furthermore, SKI has commissioned a separate report with the 'Comments of the Reviewing Bodies'. 32 refs

  7. Lichen elements as pollution indicators: evaluation of methods for large monitoring programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Will-Wolf; Sarah Jovan; Michael C. Amacher

    2017-01-01

    Lichen element content is a reliable indicator for relative air pollution load in research and monitoring programmes requiring both efficiency and representation of many sites. We tested the value of costly rigorous field and handling protocols for sample element analysis using five lichen species. No relaxation of rigour was supported; four relaxed protocols generated...

  8. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators : evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Molewijk, Bert; de Bree, Menno; Moraal, Marloes; Verkerk, Marian; Widdershoven, Guy A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  9. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, M.; Molewijk, A.C.; de Bree, M.; Moraal, M.; Verkerk, M.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  10. Evaluation of an HIV-risk reduction programme for first-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results indicated that HIV-related knowledge; condom knowledge and risk perception were enhanced by the HIV- related risk reduction programme. However, there is a need for improvement, especially with regard to attitudes towards condoms since some students still had negative attitudes even after the intervention ...

  11. Evaluating Initial Teacher Education Programmes: Perspectives from the Republic of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Marie; Lodge, Anne; Shevlin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Research studies in teacher education have focussed on the outcomes of preparatory programmes. Less attention has been paid to the processes through which professional learning is acquired. This article argues that the study of attitudes and persuasion is very important in teacher education. The elaboration likelihood model (ELM) of persuasion…

  12. Course Evaluation Matters: Improving Students' Learning Experiences with a Peer-Assisted Teaching Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Angela; Ross, Bella; Phelan, Liam; Lindsay, Katherine; Drew, Steve; Stoney, Sue; Cottman, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    In the rapidly changing global higher education sector, greater attention is being paid to the quality of university teaching. However, academics have traditionally not received formal teacher training. The peer-assisted teaching programme reported on in this paper provides a structured yet flexible approach for peers to assist each other in…

  13. Capacity building of midwifery faculty to implement a 3-years midwifery diploma curriculum in Bangladesh: A process evaluation of a mentorship programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Kerstin; Doraiswamy, Sathyanarayanan; Wallin, Lars; Bogren, Malin

    2018-03-01

    When a midwifery diploma-level programme was introduced in 2010 in Bangladesh, only a few nursing faculty staff members had received midwifery diploma-level. The consequences were an inconsistency in interpretation and implementation of the midwifery curriculum in the midwifery programme. To ensure that midwifery faculty staff members were adequately prepared to deliver the national midwifery curriculum, a mentorship programme was developed. The aim of this study was to examine feasibility and adherence to a mentorship programme among 19 midwifery faculty staff members who were lecturing the three years midwifery diploma-level programme at ten institutes/colleges in Bangladesh. The mentorship programme was evaluated using a process evaluation framework: (implementation, context, mechanisms of impact and outcomes). An online and face-to-face blended mentorship programme delivered by Swedish midwifery faculty staff members was found to be feasible, and it motivated the faculty staff members in Bangladesh both to deliver the national midwifery diploma curriculum as well as to carry out supportive supervision for midwifery students in clinical placement. First, the Swedish midwifery faculty staff members visited Bangladesh and provided a two-days on-site visit prior to the initiation of the online part of the mentorship programme. The second on-site visit was five-days long and took place at the end of the programme, that being six to eight months from the first visit. Building on the faculty staff members' response to feasibility and adherence to the mentorship programme, the findings indicate opportunities for future scale-up to all institutes/collages providing midwifery education in Bangladesh. It has been proposed that a blended online and face-to-face mentorship programme may be a means to improving national midwifery programmes in countries where midwifery has only recently been introduced. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the implementation of a whole-workplace walking programme using the RE-AIM framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Emma J; Chalkley, Anna E; Esliger, Dale W; Sherar, Lauren B

    2017-05-18

    Promoting walking for the journey to/from work and during the working day is one potential approach to increase physical activity in adults. Walking Works was a practice-led, whole-workplace walking programme delivered by employees (walking champions). This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of Walking Works using the RE-AIM framework and provide recommendations for future delivery of whole-workplace walking programmes. Two cross sectional surveys were conducted; 1544 (28%) employees completed the baseline survey and 918 employees (21%) completed the follow-up survey. Effectiveness was assessed using baseline and follow-up data; reach, implementation and maintenance were assessed using follow-up data only. For categorical data, Chi square tests were conducted to assess differences between surveys or groups. Continuous data were analysed to test for significant differences using a Mann-Whitney U test. Telephone interviews were conducted with the lead organisation co-ordinator, eight walking champions and three business representatives at follow-up. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify key themes related to adoption, implementation and maintenance. Adoption: Five workplaces participated in Walking Works. Reach: 480 (52.3%) employees were aware of activities and 221 (24.1%) participated. A variety of walking activities were delivered. Some programme components were not delivered as planned which was partly due to barriers in using walking champions to deliver activities. These included the walking champions' capacity, skills, support needs, ability to engage senior management, and the number and type of activities they could deliver. Other barriers included lack of management support, difficulties communicating information about activities and challenges embedding the programme into normal business activities. Effectiveness: No significant changes in walking to/from work or walking during the working day were observed. Maintenance

  15. Evaluation of the implementation of a whole-workplace walking programme using the RE-AIM framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Adams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Promoting walking for the journey to/from work and during the working day is one potential approach to increase physical activity in adults. Walking Works was a practice-led, whole-workplace walking programme delivered by employees (walking champions. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of Walking Works using the RE-AIM framework and provide recommendations for future delivery of whole-workplace walking programmes. Methods Two cross sectional surveys were conducted; 1544 (28% employees completed the baseline survey and 918 employees (21% completed the follow-up survey. Effectiveness was assessed using baseline and follow-up data; reach, implementation and maintenance were assessed using follow-up data only. For categorical data, Chi square tests were conducted to assess differences between surveys or groups. Continuous data were analysed to test for significant differences using a Mann-Whitney U test. Telephone interviews were conducted with the lead organisation co-ordinator, eight walking champions and three business representatives at follow-up. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify key themes related to adoption, implementation and maintenance. Results Adoption: Five workplaces participated in Walking Works. Reach: 480 (52.3% employees were aware of activities and 221 (24.1% participated. Implementation: A variety of walking activities were delivered. Some programme components were not delivered as planned which was partly due to barriers in using walking champions to deliver activities. These included the walking champions’ capacity, skills, support needs, ability to engage senior management, and the number and type of activities they could deliver. Other barriers included lack of management support, difficulties communicating information about activities and challenges embedding the programme into normal business activities. Effectiveness: No significant changes in walking to

  16. Key indicators for the monitoring and evaluation of control programmes of human African trypanosomiasis due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, B; Legros, D; Lee, E

    1998-06-01

    Very little research has been devoted to the design of epidemiological tools for the monitoring and evaluation of National Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) Control Programmes and daily management decisions are made in the absence of accurate knowledge of the situation. This paper identifies key indicators necessary to make decisions in the field and constantly adjust control activities to changing situations. Examples are derived from the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HAT Control Programme in Adjumani, Uganda. Based on the principles of quality assurance, the focus is placed on process indicators. A conceptual framework derived from a system view/planning cycle perspective is also described for the construction of indicators. Finally, some specific challenging aspects of the epidemiology of HAT are presented and the limitations of the interpretation of the indicators discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Corporate Social Responsibility Programme by Application of Balanced Scorecard: A Case Study of Fiat Automobiles’ Cooperárvore Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Maurício de Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out to assess Cooperárvore, FIAT Automobiles’ labour corporative project within its “Árvore da Vida” Corporate Social Responsibility Programme, in the city of Betim, in the State of Minas Gerais. This is a descriptive case study whose overall aim is to measure the scope of the automaker’s social actions promoting the development of Jardim Teresópolis neighbourhood, by way of job and income generation, reduction of social vulnerability and economic and human development. Its specific objective is to present an evaluation and monitoring pattern of a social responsibility project by application of the Balanced Scorecard tool (BSC, in order to allow for improving management and inspire other corporate social initiatives. In the theoretical framework, the importance of corporate social responsibility has been studied in sustainable development, as well as concepts and models of evaluation of social projects. The survey was conducted based on documents related to Árvore da Vida and on interviews involving the programme’s managers and beneficiaries, in a qualitative perspective. From data analysis, positive results with significant advances in the beneficiaries and community development can be noticed. However, at some points it can be seen that the cooperative is not yet able to sustain itself, mainly due to its market limitations, depending on financial contributions and participation of the current sponsor in its management. This requires the management team to adopt some strategic definitions in order to implement short and medium term solutions to broaden the cooperative market to ensure their autonomy and sustainability.

  18. Preparing palliative home care nurses to act as facilitators for physicians' learning: Evaluation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Van den Eynden, Bart; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-05-01

    Palliative care requires a multidisciplinary care team. General practitioners often ask specialised palliative home care teams for support. Working with specialised nurses offers learning opportunities, also called workplace learning. This can be enhanced by the presence of a learning facilitator. To describe the development and evaluation of a training programme for nurses in primary care. The programme aimed to prepare palliative home care team nurses to act as facilitators for general practitioners' workplace learning. A one-group post-test only design (quantitative) and semi-structured interviews (qualitative) were used. A multifaceted train-the-trainer programme was designed. Evaluation was done through assignments with individual feedback, summative assessment through videotaped encounters with simulation-physicians and individual interviews after a period of practice implementation. A total of 35 nurses followed the programme. The overall satisfaction was high. Homework assignments interfered with the practice workload but showed to be fundamental in translating theory into practice. Median score on the summative assessment was 7 out of 14 with range 1-13. Interviews revealed some aspects of the training (e.g. incident analysis) to be too difficult for implementation or to be in conflict with personal preferences (focus on patient care instead of facilitating general practitioners' learning). Training palliative home care team nurses as facilitator of general practitioners' workplace learning is a feasible but complex intervention. Personal characteristics, interpersonal relationships and contextual variables have to be taken into account. Training expert palliative care nurses to facilitate general practitioners' workplace learning requires careful and individualised mentoring. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Social participation of people with cognitive problems and their caregivers: a feasibility evaluation of the Social Fitness Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkers, H W; van der Veen, D J; Vernooij-Dassen, M J; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M W G; Graff, M J L

    2017-12-01

    We developed a tailor-made intervention aimed at improving social participation of people with cognitive problems and their caregivers. This programme consists of an integration of healthcare and welfare interventions: occupational therapy, physiotherapy and guidance by a welfare professional. This article describes the feasibility evaluation of this Social Fitness Programme. Feasibility in terms of acceptability, demand, implementation, practicability and limited efficacy was evaluated based on experiences from professionals (programme deliverers), people with cognitive problems and their caregivers (programme recipients). We used qualitative research methods (focus group discussions, interviews, collection of treatment records) and applied thematic analyses. The intervention was feasible according to stakeholders, and limited efficacy showed promising results. However, we found feasibility barriers. First, an acceptability barrier: discussing declined social participation was difficult, hindering recruitment. Second, a demand barrier: some people with cognitive problems lacked motivation to improve declined social participation, sometimes in contrast to their caregivers' wishes. Third, implementation and practicability barriers: shared decision-making, focusing the intervention and interdisciplinary collaboration between healthcare and welfare professionals were suboptimal during implementation. Although this intervention builds upon scientific evidence, expert opinions and stakeholder needs, implementation was challenging. Healthcare and welfare professionals need to overcome obstacles in their collaboration and focus on integrated intervention delivery. Also, they need to find ways to (empower caregivers to) motivate people with cognitive problems to participate socially. After modifying the intervention and additional training of professionals, a consecutive pilot study to assess feasibility of the research design and outcome measures is justified. Copyright

  20. Evaluation of the safety research programme 1985-1989 by the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.

    1990-01-01

    Joint Nordic research programmes in nuclear safety have been conducted since 1977 under the direction of the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy. Each of these four-year programmes is evaluated according to a procedure established by the Nordic Committee for Safety Research, NKS. The latest programme covered the period 1985-89 and included items that are of interest to countries that have nuclear power plants (Finland and Sweden) as well as to countries without (Denmark, Iceland and Norway). This last programme has been evaluated in 1990. The first area (AKT) deals with phenomena that might occur within the reactor containment during accidents. It also deals with potential pathways of radioactive material that could be released, as well as effects in the environment and possible counter-measures. The second area (KAV) investigates several topics related to waste management, such as waste arising in Scandinavia from power plant operation and decommissioning, and related transportation needs. It also deals with the methods used for modelling possible leaks from waste repositories and the uncertainty related to such calculations. The third area (RAS) deals with risk management - how decisions on safety issues are made, and what is the relative risk of nuclear activities. It also deals with methods for safety calculations that are based on a probabilistic approach. In the fourth area (MAT), the tendency of materials to develop cracks under tough external conditions is examined together with corrosion issues relevant to nuclear plants. Finally, the fifth area (INF) deals with the possibility of using modern information technology to support communication and decision making during emergency situations at compelx industrial plants. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the properties of cemented low level radioactive wastes through an extensive characterization programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, G.; De Angelis, G.

    1990-01-01

    The immobilized radioactive wastes have to fulfill the demands for packing, interim storage, trasportation and final disposal. For this purpose the possession of various properties, more or less relevant, are required by authorized agencies. In addition to transport regulations the attention is generally focused on physico-chemical and mechanical properties, thermal, radiation and water stability, as well as confinement ability. The assessment of such requirements needs the set up of experimental procedured. With this in mind an extensive programme for the characterization of cemented low level wastes has been undertaken at ENEA Casaccia in the frame of the Third (1985-1989) Europen Communities Programme on Radioactive Waste Management (Contract No. FI1W-0101-I(A)). Three types of waste streams of general interest have been taken into account: bead ion-exchange resins, BWR evaporator concentrates (Sulphates) and filter sludges. Both labo. and full scale experiments have been carried out

  2. Evaluation of the cycling city and towns programme: Qualitative research with residents

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, J.; Chatterjee, K.; Marsh, S.; Sherwin, H.; Jain, J.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, the Department for Transport , Cycling England and the Department of Health invested over £43m (plus local match funding) to create the twelve Cycling City and Towns (CCTs): Greater Bristol, Blackpool, Cambridge, Chester, Colchester, Leighton-Linslade, Shrewsbury, Stoke-on-Trent, Southend, Southport, Woking and York. The aim of the programme was to explore the relationship between investment in cycling, as part of a whole-town strategy, and the number of cyclists and fr...

  3. Do clinical safety charts improve paramedic key performance indicator results? (A clinical improvement programme evaluation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, Phillip; Middleton, Paul M; Bonner, Ann; Loudfoot, Allan; Elliott, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Is the Clinical Safety Chart clinical improvement programme (CIP) effective at improving paramedic key performance indicator (KPI) results within the Ambulance Service of New South Wales? The CIP intervention area was compared with the non-intervention area in order to determine whether there was a statistically significant improvement in KPI results. The CIP was associated with a statistically significant improvement in paramedic KPI results within the intervention area. The strategies used within this CIP are recommended for further consideration.

  4. An Evaluation of Employability in Maritime Degree Programmes: The Undergraduate Students' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ŞEREMET

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the main aim is to investigate opinions of the students who study in 4th grade of the department of maritime transportation and management engineering of the maritime faculty on employability potential of the maritime degree programmes. In accordance with this purpose, in 2014-2015 academic year, opinions of 154 final year students (candidate seafarer from three different universities were qualitatively assessed. The major finding of the study is that professional experience based on internship causes various differences in the perception of seafarer candidates towards the profession and in their choice of profession. Moreover, the students' self-assessment on their transferable skills development showed that foreign language skills were not well improved, which is principally one of the most necessities in the job market. As a result, according to the opinions of the students it can be said that practical education and internship opportunities of the department make the biggest contribution to the profession. Nevertheless, after graduation, they feel that they might meet some challenges in the job market such as job shortages and tendency to lowering rates in the wages. The study was finalised by a set of suggestions which might help to improve employability potential of the programmes as well as the quality of student's learning experience in maritime programmes.

  5. Evaluation of Random Blinded Re-Checking of AFB Slides under Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in Solapur District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Vishnu Lale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the important components of revised national tuberculosis control programme is ‘Good quality diagnosis, primarily by sputum smear microscopy’. All efforts are made to ensure that the designated microscopy centers function at optimal level. The process of ‘Random Blinded Re-Checking’ (RBRCof Acid Fast Bacillus slides is built in the programme. Objectives: To study the relationship of different types of errors detected in RBRC with respect to time, place and cost. To study the stability and capability of the process of RBRC. Methods: Analysis of secondary data of external quality assessment of Solapur district since January 2006 is supplemented by direct implementation of the programme since April 2011 till date. Data analysis is done using statistical software Minitab version 16.Results: Since January 2006 to May 2012;42191 slides were re-checked in 77 RBRC sessions at District Tuberculosis Center, Solapur.Different types of 69 errors were detected. Onsite evaluation and panel testing did not show any discordance. Barshi and Mangalwedha Tuberculosis Units (TU showed significantly higher number of errors as compared to Karmala TU. (P<0.002 Weighted Pareto Chart revealed that the costliest form of errors is high false negatives and low false negatives. Conclusion:Detection of errors in RBRC sessions follows Poisson distribution. The process of RBRC is found to be in control and capable of achieving the desired target of detection of errors.

  6. Validation of CsNaIF data evaluation software. Final report on task FIN A940 on the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaartinen, J.

    1996-07-01

    A new computer programme, called CsNaIF, which calculates the area of 137 Cs peak in spent fuel spectra has been developed for IAEA. This programme has been tested and evaluated in this report. Evaluation has been made by calculating different types of SFAT spectra (NaI- and CdTe-SFAT) with the validated software and with a research grade gamma spectroscopy software, SAMPO 90. Obtained results, mainly 137 Cs peak areas and their errors, have been compared and perceived differences have been reported. Also some recommendations of the usability of CsNaIF programme have been made for IAEA. (orig.) (4 refs.)

  7. Review and evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's RDandD Programme 2010. Statement to the Government and summary of the review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-03-15

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD programme 2010, in terms of planned research and development activity, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and intended measures (Section 26 of the Nuclear Activities Ordinance). This report presents the results of the review and the evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations.

  8. Review and evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's RDandD Programme 2010. Statement to the Government and summary of the review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    SSM has reviewed and evaluated the RDandD programme 2010, in terms of planned research and development activity, reported research results, alternative handling and storage methods, and intended measures (Section 26 of the Nuclear Activities Ordinance). This report presents the results of the review and the evaluation. The RDandD programme 2010 has been circulated for national consultation by SSM to approximately 70 organisations

  9. An evaluation of a morphine public health programme for cancer and AIDS pain relief in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harding Richard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite growing HIV and cancer prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa, and WHO advocacy for a public health approach to palliative care provision, opioid availability is severely limited. Uganda has achieved a morphine roll-out programme in partnership with the Ministry of Health. This study aimed to evaluate that programme by identifying challenges to implementation that may inform replication. Methods A multi-methods protocol appraised morphine regulation, storage, prescribing, and consumption in three phases: key informant interviews throughout the opioid supply chain, and direct observation and audit of clinical practice. Results Regulation had achieved its goal of preventing misuse and leakage from the supply chain. However, the Government felt that relaxation of regulation was now appropriate. Confusion and complexity in storage and authorisation rules led to discontinuation of opioid pain management at the patient level and also wasted service time in trying to obtain supplies to which they were entitled. Continued neglect to prescribe among clinicians and public fear of opioids led to under prescribing, and clinical skills showed some evidence of need for improvement with respect to physical assessment and follow-up. Conclusion The Ugandan programme offers a successful model for both advocacy and Governmental support in achieving opioid roll-out across health districts. Despite initial concerns, abuse of opioids has not been evident. Further work is required to ensure that available supplies of opioids are prescribed to those in need, and that clinical standards are met. However, the programme for roll-out has proved a useful model to expand opioid availability as the first step in improving patient care, and may prove a useful template for other Sub-Saharan African countries.

  10. Pain management: evaluating the effectiveness of an educational programme for surgical nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Chiang, Hsiao-Wen; Chiang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Chyang-Shiong

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a pain management education programme in improving the nurses' knowledge about, attitude towards and application of relaxation therapy. Pain of surgical patients has long been an existing problem of health care. Nursing staff need to be educated continuously to develop the professional ability of pain management. A quasi-study design with pre- and posttest and post- and posttest was used. Subjects were chosen from a medical centre in Taipei by convenience sampling. The total sample size of 81 was segregated into a study group of 42 and control group of 39 participants. The study group attended a seven-session pain management programme totalling 15 hours. The control group received no pain management training. Scaled measurements were taken on pain management knowledge and attitude and relaxation therapy practice. (1) Scores for pain management knowledge differed significantly between the two groups (F = 40.636, p = 0.001). (2) Attitudes towards pain management differed between the two groups (F = 8.328, p = 0.005) and remained stable over time (F = 1.603, p = 0.205). (3) Relaxation therapy practice differed significantly between the two groups, with the study group better than the control group (F = 4.006, p = 0.049). (4) Relaxation therapy was applied to nearly all (97.5%) of the patients cared for by study group nurses. All of the instructed patients performed this technique one to three times per day postsurgery. Continuing education can improve nurses' knowledge about, attitude towards and behaviour of pain management. Results of this study could be used to guide the development and implementation of continuing education programmes for nursing staff to enhance patients' care knowledge and skills.

  11. Evaluating fundamentals of care: The development of a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jenny M; Bell, Jeanette; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2018-06-01

    The project aimed to develop a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme using evidence-based fundamentals of care. Feedback from patients, families, whānau, staff and audit data in 2014 indicated variability in the delivery of fundamental aspects of care such as monitoring, nutrition, pain management and environmental cleanliness at a New Zealand District Health Board. A general inductive approach was used to explore the fundamentals of care and design a measurement and improvement programme, the Patient and Whānau Centred Care Standards (PWCCS), focused on fundamental care. Five phases were used to explore the evidence, and design and test a measurement and improvement framework. Nine identified fundamental elements of care were used to define expected standards of care and develop and test a measurement and improvement framework. Four six-monthly peer reviews have been undertaken since June 2015. Charge Nurse Managers used results to identify quality improvements. Significant improvement was demonstrated overall, in six of the 27 units, in seven of the nine standards and three of the four measures. In all, 89% (n = 24) of units improved their overall result. The PWCCS measurement and improvement framework make visible nursing fundamentals of care in line with continuous quality improvement to increase quality of care. Delivering fundamentals of care is described by nurses as getting ?back to basics'. Patient and family feedback supports the centrality of fundamentals of care to their hospital experience. Implementing a unit-level fundamentals of care quality measurement and improvement programme clarifies expected standards of care, highlights the contribution of fundamentals of care to quality and provides a mechanism for ongoing improvements. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The IDA-80 measurement evaluation programme on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis of uranium and plutonium. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Golly, W.; Spannagel, G.

    1985-04-01

    The evaluation data derived from the measurement results of the laboratories participating in the IDA-80 programme have been compiled in tables and graphs. They concern a total of more than 2000 determinations of isotope ratios, isotope abundances and concentrations for uranium and plutonium obtained on test materials of industrial origin which contained fission products, and on fission product free synthetic reference solutions. Comparisons are made with data certified by CBNM and NBS, and estimates are given which were calculated by variance analyses for within- and between laboratory variations. (orig.) [de

  13. Evaluating impact of a multi-dimensional education programme on perceived performance of primary care professionals in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sanjoti; Bush, Robert; Cook, Susan; Grant, Phillipa

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate an educational programme, 'Diabetes Connect: Connecting Professions', which was developed to enhance communication across primary care networks, to support best practice in clinical interventions and progress multidisciplinary team work to benefit patients in diabetes care. A total of 26 workshops were successfully delivered for 309 primary care professionals across the state of Queensland in Australia from November 2011. It consists of two separate, but complementary training elements: a series of online clinical education training modules and state-wide interprofessional learning workshops developed to enhance professional competencies. The evaluation design included completion of online surveys by the participants at two time points: first upon registering for the online modules or workshops; second, one week after attending a workshop. The survey included questions to evaluate the change in role performance measures. Overall, significant increases in participants' current knowledge, perceived ability to adopt this knowledge at work and willingness to change professional behaviour in the short term were observed. The study suggests that for maximum benefit both, workshop and online training, should be combined and made available widely. Future programmes should use a randomised trial design to test the delivery model.

  14. The SKB spent fuel corrosion programme. An evaluation of results from the experimental programme performed in the Studsvik Hot Cell Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R. [Forsyth Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    During the last few years, many of the specimens in the SKB programme on the corrosion of spent fuel have been analysed by the ICP-MS technique, shortly after conclusion of the corrosion tests, or by the analysis of archive samples. Together with the previous results, this has made available a much more extended analytical data base than that available before, and this has been used in a new evaluation which complements those published earlier. Some of the new analytical data is for tests performed on fuel specimens (from two reference fuel rods, one BWR and one PWR) which have been corrosion tested for over ten years. Most of the data refers to 16 fuel/clad specimens from a short BWR fuel rod, which had burnups over a range of 27.0 to 48.8 MWd/kg U. Detailed examination and characterisation of three other fuel specimens from the rod had shown that the specimens with the higher burnups in this series would have a fuel microstructure and alpha activity content and distribution which, theoretically, may promote enhanced corrosion. These specimens had been exposed to over 5 years of corrosion during nine water contact periods. The corrodants used were a simulated bicarbonate groundwater and de-ionised water, and both oxic and nominally anoxic conditions were included in the test matrix. Most of the emphasis in the evaluation has, therefore, been on the possible effects on corrosion behaviour of the linear heat rating and burnup of the fuels. However, examination of the variation with water contact time of the fractional release rates of selected fission products and their total release over the five years of corrosion, have shown that the corrosion rates during the first few weeks of corrosion of the specimens with the higher burnups were lower than those for specimens with slightly lower burnup. Later, the corrosion rates converged for all specimens. This has been interpreted to be due to burnup-related differences in the fuel microstructure, particularly in the

  15. Evaluation of the Leon3 soft-core processor within a Xilinx radiation-hardened field-programmable gate array.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Learn, Mark Walter

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the work done to evaluate the performance of the Leon3 soft-core processor in a radiation environment while instantiated in a radiation-hardened static random-access memory based field-programmable gate array. This evaluation will look at the differences between two soft-core processors: the open-source Leon3 core and the fault-tolerant Leon3 core. Radiation testing of these two cores was conducted at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron facility and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The results of these tests are included within the report along with designs intended to improve the mitigation of the open-source Leon3. The test setup used for evaluating both versions of the Leon3 is also included within this document.

  16. Evaluation of a Trauma-Focused CBT Training Programme for IAPT services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Hannah

    2017-09-01

    Therapists in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services are often expected to treat complex presentations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as individuals with multiple, prolonged or early life trauma histories and significant co-morbidity, for which they have received minimal training. Although high recovery rates for PTSD have been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, these are not always replicated in routine practice, suggesting that training interventions are required to fill the research-practice gap. This study investigated the outcomes of a therapist training programme on treating PTSD with trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT). Twenty therapists from ten IAPT services participated in the training, which consisted of workshops, webinars and consultation sessions over a 6-month period. Feedback indicated that participants found the training highly acceptable. PTSD knowledge and self- and supervisor-rated competence on TF-CBT measures improved following the training and improvements were maintained a year later. Client outcomes on a PTSD measure improved following the training. Participants reported attempts to disseminate learning from the course back to their teams. The findings indicate that the training programme was successful in improving TF-CBT knowledge, skills and outcomes for IAPT therapists. Tentative support for training 'trauma experts' within IAPT services was found, although institutional constraints and staff turnover may limit the sustainability of the model.

  17. Independent evaluation of a canine Echinococcosis Control Programme in Hobukesar County, Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Freya; Qi, Xinwei; Tao, Jiang; Feng, Xiaohui; Mastin, Alexander; Craig, Philip S; Vuitton, Dominique A; Duan, Xinyu; Chu, Xiangdong; Zhu, Jinlong; Wen, Hao

    2015-05-01

    The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China is one of the world's most important foci for cystic echinococcosis. Domestic dogs are the main source for human infection, and previous studies in Xinjiang have found a canine Echinococcus spp. coproELISA prevalence of between 36% and 41%. In 2010 the Chinese National Echinococcosis Control Programme was implemented in Xinjiang, and includes regular dosing of domestic dogs with praziquantel. Six communities in Hobukesar County, northwest Xinjiang were assessed in relation to the impact of this control programme through dog necropsies, dog Echinococcus spp. coproantigen surveys based on Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) and dog owner questionnaires. We found that 42.1% of necropsied dogs were infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and coproELISA prevalences were between 15% and 70% in the communities. Although approximately half of all dog owners reported dosing their dogs within the 12 months prior to sampling, coproELISA prevalence remained high. Regular praziquantel dosing of owned dogs in remote and semi-nomadic communities such as those in Hobukesar County is logistically very difficult and additional measures should be considered to reduce canine echinococcosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility of the Participatory Experience Survey and the Setting Affordances Survey for use in evaluation of programmes serving youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenquist, K; Coster, W; Kramer, J; Rossetti, Z

    2017-07-01

    Participation by youth with disabilities in recreational activities has been shown to promote the development of important skills needed for transition to adulthood. The Participatory Experience Survey (PES) and the Setting Affordances Survey (SAS) were developed for use by recreational programmes serving youth with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (SIDD) to assess participant experiences and ensure that participants are afforded optimal opportunities to develop these skills. This paper presents a feasibility evaluation to determine the appropriateness of the PES and the SAS for use in a programme evaluation context. The PES and the SAS were used to evaluate a programme serving youth with SIDD in the greater northwest region of the United States. Three recreational activities were evaluated: an art project, trip to a zoo and a track practice. Programme volunteers used the SAS to assess opportunities and affordances offered within each activity. The PES was then given to 10 young people in each activity to capture their experiences. It was hypothesized that each setting would afford different experiences and developmental opportunities because of the differing nature of the activities. The PES and SAS were found to be feasible for conducting a programme evaluation. All three settings offered varying types of experiences and affordances. Notably, as measured by the SAS, opportunity for skill development was greater in more structured activities; the zoo had the fewest opportunities for skill development and the art project had the most skill development opportunities. Youth answered 'no' most often to 'asking for help' and 'helping a kid', suggesting changes to offer more opportunities to develop these skills would be beneficial in all three activities. These new instruments offer programmes a means to more fully include young people with disabilities during programme evaluations, leading to better-structured, more supportive programmes.

  19. Development and evaluation of a dietary self-management programme for older adults with low literacy and heart disease: pilot study of feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jung-Hua; Chen, Su-Hui

    2016-12-01

    To develop a dietary self-management programme for salt-, fluid-, fat- and cholesterol-intake behaviours for older adults with low literacy and heart disease and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the programme. Eating behaviours such as fluid, salt, fat and cholesterol intake are an important factor related to heart disease outcomes. People with low literacy have difficulty following recommended health behaviours, but limited research has investigated intervention programmes for this population. Programme development and pilot testing its feasibility and acceptability. Recommendations were also collected from participants and the research assistant for future large-scale interventions. The study had two phases. Phase I consisted of programme development based on previous qualitative findings, a systematic review of the literature, clinical practice experience and expert opinion. In Phase II, we pilot tested the programme from January - June 2014 in a convenience sample of 10 older adults with low literacy, heart disease and recruited from a medical centre in northern Taiwan. Pilot testing showed that our programme was feasible and acceptable to older adults with low literacy and heart disease. Moreover, the final version of the programme was revised based on participants' and the research assistant's recommendations. Our study results suggest that with guidance and assistance, older adults with low literacy and heart disease can be motivated to take action for their health and are empowered by learning how to self-manage their heart-healthy eating behaviours. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Marathon Kids UK: study design and protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of a school-based running programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routen, Ash C; Harris, Jo P; Cale, Lorraine A; Gorely, Trish; Sherar, Lauren B

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Schools are promising settings for physical activity promotion; however, they are complex and adaptive systems that can influence the quality of programme implementation. This paper presents an evaluation of a school-based running programme (Marathon Kids). The aims of this study are (1) to identify the processes by which schools implement the programme, (2) identify and explain the contextual factors affecting implementation and explications of effectiveness and (3) examine the relationship between the level of implementation and perceived outcomes. Methods Using a realist evaluation framework, a mixed method single-group before-and-after design, strengthened by multiple interim measurements, will be used. Year 5 (9–10 years old) pupils and their teachers will be recruited from six state-funded primary schools in Leicestershire, UK. Data will be collected once prior to implementation, at five discrete time points during implementation and twice following implementation. A weekly implementation log will also be used. At time point 1 (TP1) (September 2016), data on school environment, teacher and pupil characteristics will be collected. At TP1 and TP6 (July 2017), accelerometry, pupil self-reported physical activity and psychosocial data (eg, social support and intention to be active) will be collected. At TP2, TP3 and TP5 (January, March and June 2017), observations will be conducted. At TP2 and TP5, there will be teacher interviews and pupil focus groups. Follow-up teacher interviews will be conducted at TP7 and TP8 (October 2017 and March 2018) and pupil focus group at TP8. In addition, synthesised member checking will be conducted (June 2018) with a mixed sample of schools. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this study was obtained through Loughborough University Human Participants Ethics Subcommittee (R16-P032 & R16-P116). Findings will be disseminated via print, online media and dissemination events as well as practitioner and

  1. Performance indicators evaluation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme in Northern Portugal using the European Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Maria José; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Aguiar, Ana; Castro, Clara; Veloso, Vitor; Rodrigues, Vítor

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the first 10 years of operation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme implemented in the Northern Region of Portugal, using selected recommended standard performance indicators. Data from women aged 50-69 screened with two-view mammography, biennially, in the period 2000-2009, were included. Main performance indicators were compared with the recommended levels of the European Guidelines. A total of 202,039 screening examinations were performed, 71,731 (35.5%) in the initial screening and 130,308 (64.5%) in the subsequent screening. Coverage rate by examination reached 74.3% of the target population, in the last period evaluated. Recall rates were 8.1% and 2.4% and cancer detection rates were 4.4/1000 and 2.9/1000 respectively, for initial and subsequent screenings. The breast cancer detection rate, expressed as a multiple of the background expected incidence was 3.1 in initial screen and 2.2 in subsequent screen. The incidence of invasive interval cancers met the desirable recommended levels both the first and second years since last screening examination, in the initial and subsequent screenings. Invasive tumours cancers detected in initial and subsequent screenings. Less favourable size, grading and biomarkers expression were found in interval cancers compared to screen-detected cancers. Breast cancer screening programme in the Northern Region of Portugal was well accepted by the population. Most of the performance indicators were consistent with the desirable levels of the European Guidelines, which indicate an effective screening programme. Future research should verify the consistency of some of these results by using updated information from a larger population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Quality Aspects in Vocational Training Programmes. Synthesis Report. CEDEFOP Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Erwin

    National evaluations of quality aspects of vocational training programs (VTPs) in five European countries--Belgium, Germany, France, Greece, and Portugal--were reviewed to determine how VTP quality is currently being evaluated and identify a more coherent approach to evaluating VTPs. Special attention was paid to how existing evaluation studies…

  3. Evaluation of a group based cognitive behavioural therapy programme for menstrual pain management in young women with intellectual disabilities: protocol for a mixed methods controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Menstrual pain which is severe enough to impact on daily activities is very common amongst menstruating females. Research suggests that menstrual pain which impacts on daily functioning may be even more prevalent amongst those with intellectual disabilities. Despite this, little research attention has focused on pain management programmes for those with intellectual disabilities. The aims of this pilot study were to develop and evaluate a theory-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for menstrual pain management in young women with intellectual disabilities. Methods/Design The study utilised a mixed methods controlled clinical trial to evaluate elements from a CBT programme called Feeling Better (McGuire & McManus, 2010). The Feeling Better programme is a modular, manualised intervention designed for people with an intellectual disability and their carers. The programme was delivered to 36 young women aged 12 – 30 years who have a Mild - Moderate Intellectual Disability, split between two conditions. The treatment group received the Feeling Better intervention and the control group received treatment as usual. To evaluate the effectiveness of the programme, measures were taken of key pain variables including impact, knowledge, self-efficacy and coping. Process evaluation was conducted to examine which elements of the programme were most successful in promoting change. Discussion Participants in the intervention group were expected to report the use of a greater number of coping strategies and have greater knowledge of pain management strategies following participation in the intervention and at three month follow-up, when compared to control group participants. A significant advantage of the study was the use of mixed methods and inclusion of process evaluation to determine which elements of a cognitive behavioural therapy programme work best for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  4. The impact of consumer involvement in research: an evaluation of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Katrina; Carter, Mary; Mahtani, Vinita; Barnard, Angela; Hawton, Annie; Britten, Nicky

    2008-06-01

    The value of consumer involvement in health services research is widely recognized. While there is a growing body of evidence about the principles of good consumer involvement, there is little research about the effect that involvement can have on the research. This evaluation assessed the level and impact of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme (LPCSP), all of whose individual projects had to demonstrate substantial involvement as a condition of funding. To evaluate consumer involvement in the LPSCP and understand what impact consumers had on the research process and outcomes. A multi-method case study approach was undertaken, using survey techniques, interviews, focus groups, observation and scrutiny of written documents. The overall data set comprised 61 questionnaires, 44 semi-structured interviews, 2 focus groups and 15 hours of observation of meetings. Eleven primary care-based research projects which together made up the LPCSP. An in-depth description of consumer involvement in the Programme was produced. Nine projects had consumers as co-applicants, four projects had been completed before the evaluation began and one was still ongoing at the time of the evaluation. Of the eight projects which have produced final reports, all met their aims and objectives. Consumers had had an additional impact in the research, in the initial design of the study, in recruitment of the research subjects, in developing data collection tools, in collecting the data, in analysis and disseminating the findings. Consumer involvement in National Health Service research is a relatively recent policy development and while there is an increasing amount of literature about how and why consumers should be involved in research, there is less evidence about the impact of such involvement. This evaluation provides evidence about the impact that consumers have not only on the research process but also on the outcomes of the research.

  5. Evaluation of a programme to support foundation-phase teachers to facilitate literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Wium

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learners who do not develop adequate listening and language skills during their early years are at risk of academic failure and early drop-out. Future learning problems may be prevented by supporting these children in the foundation phase to overcome their developmental delays. A continued professional development (CPD programme was developed to support foundation-phase teachers to facilitate literacy. The theoretical basis for the workshop material was the articulation between an auditory processing model, a language processing model, and literacy. The focus of this article is on the qualitative findings obtained from the literacy component of a more comprehensive CPD programme that covered several topics. The research was conducted as action research cycles across two contexts (a semi-rural and an urban-township context and included 96 participants. This article explores how the teachers implemented the strategies to facilitate literacy in their classrooms and the benefits obtained from it. Data were collected by means of questionnaires, self-reflections and focus groups, as well as a research diary and field notes. The results revealed that the strategies trained were implemented in the classrooms and were valued by the participants. Those who participated in critical reflection felt that they had developed competence and professional growth. Challenges identified included the language used in the support provided, which had an impact on phonological awareness training, and the use of terminology. The importance of collaboration was emphasised. The participants gained in the sense that they learnt how to implement the assessment standards in the curriculum, and learners benefited from the new strategies as they could all participate in the activities. The research confirmed the value of teacher support in the facilitation of literacy, which highlights the role of speech-language therapists working in school contexts.

  6. Evaluating a training programme at Viet Duc University Hospital in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung, Phan Thi; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Hanh, Bui My; Notter, Joy

    2016-06-23

    Vietnam's nursing competency standards (VNCS) were issued in 2012 as the legal framework on which the continuous nursing training programme are designed and developed. The study aimed to assess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as the confidence of nurses regarding wound care at Viet Duc University Hospital before and after a new educational intervention. A comparative descriptive study was carried out in 2014 at Viet Duc University Hospital. The study reviewed knowledge, skills, attitude and confidence among nurses working in seven clinical departments. The data collection tools included a 48-knowledge-item self-administered questionnaire, a sixteen-item skills set, and attitude-item observation sheet and a thirteen confidence level-item observation sheet, adapted for the field of wound care. Data were loaded into Epidata version 3.1 and analysed with SPSS version 16.0. The mean pre-training knowledge, skill, attitude and confidence scores were (117.78±24.94), (53.61±10.26), (54.39±8.02) and (1.18-3.59), respectively, while the corresponding post-training scores were (148.68±16.54), (62.33±8.40), (60.80±8.75) and (1.50-4.15) p<0.0001. This was the first cohort to undergo the new training programme and has shown promising initial results; however, it also demonstrates that the training content, while leading to positive changes, does in some areas need to be further developed and then disseminated across the hospital to all nurses who provide direct wound care for patients.

  7. Evaluation of a standard provision versus an autonomy promotive exercise referral programme: rationale and study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Kate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Clinical Excellence in the UK has recommended that the effectiveness of ongoing exercise referral schemes to promote physical activity should be examined in research trials. Recent empirical evidence in health care and physical activity promotion contexts provides a foundation for testing the utility of a Self Determination Theory (SDT-based exercise referral consultation. Methods/Design Design: An exploratory cluster randomised controlled trial comparing standard provision exercise on prescription with a Self Determination Theory-based (SDT exercise on prescription intervention. Participants: 347 people referred to the Birmingham Exercise on Prescription scheme between November 2007 and July 2008. The 13 exercise on prescription sites in Birmingham were randomised to current practice (n = 7 or to the SDT-based intervention (n = 6. Outcomes measured at 3 and 6-months: Minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week assessed using the 7-day Physical Activity Recall; physical health: blood pressure and weight; health status measured using the Dartmouth CO-OP charts; anxiety and depression measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and vitality measured by the subjective vitality score; motivation and processes of change: perceptions of autonomy support from the advisor, satisfaction of the needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness via physical activity, and motivational regulations for exercise. Discussion This trial will determine whether an exercise referral programme based on Self Determination Theory increases physical activity and other health outcomes compared to a standard programme and will test the underlying SDT-based process model (perceived autonomy support, need satisfaction, motivation regulations, outcomes via structural equation modelling. Trial registration The trial is registered as Current Controlled trials ISRCTN07682833.

  8. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme for elderly patients with hip fracture: A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Hoi Cheung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and cost of an 18-month multi-disciplinary Comprehensive Fragility Fracture Management Program (CFFMP for fragility hip fracture patients. Design: Prospective cohort study. Patients: Elderly patients with hip fracture were recruited at their first postoperative follow-up in 2 district hospitals. The intervention group comprised patients from the hospital undergoing CFFMP, and the control group comprised patients from another hospital undergoing conventional care. CFFMP provided geri-orthopaedic co-management, physician consultations, group-exercise and vibration-therapy. Timed-up-and-go test (TUG, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS, Berg Balance Scale (BBS and fall risk screening (FS were used to assess functional performance. Incidences of falls and secondary fractures, the cost of the programme and related healthcare resources were recorded. Results: A total of 76 patients were included in the intervention group (mean age 77.9 years ((standard deviation; SD 6.1 and 77 in the control group (79.9 (SD 7.2, respectively. The re-fracture rate in the control group (10.39% was significantly higher than in the intervention group (1.32% (p = 0.034. The intervention group improved significantly in TUG, EMS and FS after a 1-year programme. The overall healthcare costs per patient in the intervention and control groups were US$22,450 and US$25,313, respectively. Conclusion: Multi-disciplinary CFFMP is effective, with reduced overall cost, reduced length of hospital stay and reduced secondary fracture rate. The rehabilitation community service favours rehabilitation and improved quality of life of hip fracture patients.

  9. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  10. [Groups of statutory bodies and evaluation of health recovery programmes for mothers and their child(ren) - An application of a time-based break-even analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönig, W

    2002-01-01

    Public and private expenditure in health recovery programmes for mothers and their children is stagnating. A focal point to turn around this trend is to convince the responsible statury bodies by proving both effectiveness and efficiency of these programmes. The paper suggests the application of the break-even analysis on a time-based principle. A primary calculation with the data of a major German evaluation shows significant savings if the success of the health recovery programmes holds for at least 1.19 years. Available data does not cover such a long period.

  11. Research Protocol: Development, implementation and evaluation of a cognitive behavioural therapy-based intervention programme for the management of anxiety symptoms in South African children with visual impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Visagie

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: The main aim of this study is to develop, implement and evaluate a specifically tailored anxiety intervention programme for use with South African children with visual impairments. Method: A specifically tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy-based anxiety intervention, for 9–13 year old South African children with visual impairments, will be evaluated in two special schools. The study will employ a randomised wait-list control group design with pre- postand follow-up intervention measures, with two groups each receiving a 10 session anxiety intervention programme. The main outcome measure relates to the participants’ symptoms of anxiety as indicated on the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale. Conclusion: If the anxiety intervention programme is found to be effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety, this universal intervention will lay down the foundation upon which future contextually sensitive (South African anxiety intervention programmes can be built.

  12. The IDA-80 measurement evaluation programme on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis of uranium and plutonium. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bievre, P. de; Gallet, M.; Hendrickx, F.; Lycke, E.; Wolters, W.H.; Mainka, E.; Wertenbach, H.

    1984-12-01

    A description is given of the test samples for the IDA-80 interlaboratory measurement evaluation programme. The preparation is described from the delivery of authentic reprocessing plant input samples (WAK Karlsruhe), their treatment at the IRCh-KfK and their further preparation and bottling at CBNM-Geel. All test samples have been characterized with best methods and instrumentation available at CBNM Geel and NBS Washington. Joint certified values for U/Pu element and isotopes content of a real-life and of a synthetic input test material were established, to serve the evaluation of participant's results. Full details of packaging, transport requirements and transport formalities in order to dispatch the samples world wide are also given. (orig.) [de

  13. Evaluation of common cleaning and disinfection programmes in battery cage and on-floor layer houses in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau-Salaün, A; Michel, V; Balaine, L; Petetin, I; Eono, F; Ecobichon, F; Bouquin, S Le

    2010-04-01

    1. The aim in this study was to evaluate cleaning and disinfection programmes in battery cage and on-floor layer houses in France. 2. Cleaning and disinfection efficiency was assessed by a visual evaluation of cleaning and a bacteriological monitoring of surface contamination from counts of thermotolerant streptococci on contact agar plates. 3. In battery cage houses, dropping belts, manure conveyors, and house floors remained highly contaminated due to poor cleaning in half of the buildings examined. 4. In on-floor houses, a high standard of cleaning was achieved but errors in the planning of cleaning and disinfection operations sometimes led to a high residual contamination of nest boxes and egg sorting tables.

  14. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Karin M M; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Cramm, Jane M; Huijsman, Robbert; Bal, Roland A; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-01-10

    Disease management programmes (DMPs) have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost)-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. The study will lead to a better understanding of (1) the mechanisms of disease management, (2) the feasibility, and cost-effectiveness of a disease management

  15. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes (DMPs) have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. Methods To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost)-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. Discussion The study will lead to a better understanding of (1) the mechanisms of disease management, (2) the feasibility, and cost

  16. Evaluation of a large scale implementation of disease management programmes in various Dutch regions: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Roland A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease management programmes (DMPs have been developed to improve effectiveness and economic efficiency within chronic care delivery by combining patient-related, professional-directed, and organisational interventions. The benefits of DMPs within different settings, patient groups, and versions remain unclear. In this article we propose a protocol to evaluate a range of current DMPs by capturing them in a single conceptual framework, employing comparable structure, process, and outcome measures, and combining qualitative and quantitative research methods. Methods To assess DMP effectiveness a practical clinical trial will be conducted. Twenty-two disease management experiments will be studied in various Dutch regions consisting of a variety of collaborations between organisations and/or professionals. Patient cohorts include those with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, stroke, depression, psychotic diseases, and eating disorders. Our methodological approach combines qualitative and quantitative research methods to enable a comprehensive evaluation of complex programmes. Process indicators will be collected from health care providers' data registries and measured via physician and staff questionnaires. Patient questionnaires include health care experiences, health care utilisation, and quality of life. Qualitative data will be gathered by means of interviews and document analysis for an in depth description of project interventions and the contexts in which DMPs are embedded, and an ethnographic process evaluation in five DMPs. Such a design will provide insight into ongoing DMPs and demonstrate which elements of the intervention are potentially (cost-effective for which patient populations. It will also enable sound comparison of the results of the different programmes. Discussion The study will lead to a better understanding of (1 the mechanisms of disease management, (2 the

  17. An evaluation of the parents under pressure programme: a study protocol for an RCT into its clinical and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jane; Sembi, Sukhdev; Gardner, Frances; Macdonald, Geraldine; Petrou, Stavros; Parsons, Helen; Harnett, Paul; Dawe, Sharon

    2013-07-11

    Many babies in the UK are born to drug-dependent parents, and dependence on psychoactive drugs during the postnatal period is associated with high rates of child maltreatment, with around a quarter of these children being subject to a child protection plan. Parents who are dependent on psychoactive drugs are at risk of a wide range of parenting problems, and studies have found reduced sensitivity and responsiveness to both the infant's physical and emotional needs. The poor outcomes that are associated with such drug dependency appear to be linked to the multiple difficulties experienced by such parents.An increase in understanding about the crucial importance of early relationships for infant well-being has led to a focus on the development and delivery of services that are aimed at supporting parenting and parent-infant interactions. The Parents under Pressure (PuP) programme is aimed at supporting parents who are dependent on psychoactive drugs or alcohol by providing them with methods of managing their emotional regulation, and of supporting their new baby's development. An evaluation of the PuP programme in Australia with parents on methadone maintenance of children aged 3 to 8 years found significant reductions in child abuse potential, rigid parenting attitudes and child behaviour problems. The study comprises a multicentre randomised controlled trial using a mixed-methods approach to data collection and analysis in order to identify which families are most able to benefit from this intervention.The study is being conducted in six family centres across the UK, and targets primary caregivers of children less than 2.5 years of age who are substance dependent. Consenting participants are randomly allocated to either the 20-week PuP programme or to standard care.The primary outcome is child abuse potential, and secondary outcomes include substance use, parental mental health and emotional regulation, parenting stress, and infant/toddler socio

  18. Dohsa Treatment to Improve Balance in Elderly People: An Evaluation of a Family-Based Rehabilitation Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Dadkhah

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this research we evaluate an individually family-based Dohsa exercise programme of balance in the aged people and its effect on self confidence for performing common daily tasks with less falling could be influenced by training. Methods: From a residential care center, five aged person were participated in this study. They were trained by Dohsa method for six weeks. Two types of Dohsa-hou were used: Relaxation and Tate-kei. Tate-kei was the task which required them to control their body vertically against gravity. Results: The results indicated that most of them had improved their balance and their confidence for doing their daily activities without falling in a better way. Discussion: The Dohsa family based rehabilitation program could improve their balance and increase their activity by not falling down. The family based programme can be a useful program for rehabilitation therapists in their therapy with aged people to improve their life skills and well beings.

  19. Equine infectious anaemia in equids of Southern Pantanal, Brazil: seroprevalence and evaluation of the adoption of a control programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia F. Nogueira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The working equid population in Corumbá, Southern Pantanal, is very large and has a crucial role in the main economic activity of the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, the beef cattle industry. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of equine infectious anaemia (EIA in working equids of ranches in the municipality of Corumbá, by the official agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID test, and evaluate the adoption of the Programme for the Prevention and Control of Equine Infectious Anaemia proposed by Embrapa Pantanal and official entities in the 1990s. From September to November 2009, forty ranches distributed through the area of the municipality were visited, and serum samples were obtained from 721 equines and 232 mules. According to previous publications and the present data, it was concluded that the prevalence of EIA in this population has increased from 18.17% to 38.60%, which represents at this time approximately 13,000 infected animals. There was no significant difference between the apparent prevalence of equines and mules. It was also verified that the control programme was not known by the greater part of the interviewed ranch owners, managers and foremen and, in their perception, EIA is not a primary threat to address. Among the studied variables, the serologic testing practice significantly reduced the risk for the presence of EIA seropositivity, as well as the separation of riding equipment and segregation of seropositives.

  20. An evaluation of the impact of introducing compassion focused therapy to a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Corinne; Gilbert, Paul; Read, Natalie; Goss, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the outcome of introducing Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) into a standard treatment programme for people with eating disorders. In particular, the aim was to evaluate the principle that CFT can be used with people with eating disorders and improve eating disorder symptomatology. Routinely collected questionnaire data were used to assess cognitive and behavioural aspects of eating disorders and social functioning/well being (n = 99). There were significant improvements on all questionnaire measures during the programme. An analysis by diagnosis found that people with bulimia nervosa improved significantly more than people with anorexia nervosa on most of the subscales. Also, in terms of clinical significance, 73% of those with bulimia nervosa were considered to have made clinically reliable and significant improvements at the end of treatment (compared with 21% of people with anorexia nervosa and 30% of people with atypical eating disorders). This study demonstrates the potential benefits of using CFT with people with eating disorders and highlights the need for further research on this new approach. CFT offers new ways to conceptualize and formulate some of the self-critical and shame-based difficulties associated with eating disorders. CFT offers a framework that can enable people with eating disorders to conceptualize their difficulties in different ways. CFT can be combined with standard therapies especially cognitive behavioural therapy. CFT can be especially useful in a group context where the relationships between members can become increasingly compassionate, validating, supportive and encouraging. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of a self-management programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ap; Anderson, Jk; Wallace, Lm; Kennedy-Williams, P

    2014-06-30

    Self-management is becoming an important part of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a longitudinal survey of patients with COPD who attended a 7-week group-based lay and clinician co-delivered COPD self-management programme (SMP)to see whether they became more activated, enjoyed better health status, and quality of life, were less psychologically distressed and improved their self-management abilities. The main analysis was a per-protocol analysis (N = 131), which included only patients who attended ≥5 SMP sessions and who returned a 6-month follow-up questionnaires. Changes in the mean values of the patient outcomes were compared over time using paired t tests and general linear model for repeated measures. Patient activation significantly improved 6 months after the SMP (p management abilities (self-monitoring and insight p = 0.03), constructive attitude shift (p = 0.04), skills and technique acquisition, (p management abilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Evaluation tests on controbloc, a programmable automaton for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pralus, B.; Bourassin, J.L.; Varaldi, G.

    1983-01-01

    Controbloc is the programmable automaton used by Electricite de France (EDF) to equip its 1300 MW range of power plants. EDF and the designer CGEE Alsthom have conducted a large number of tests on prototype series equipment to determine whether it matches its specifications. These tests were performed in various laboratories in the Paris area and were concerned with: (1) verifying performance (acquisition, processing and retrieval cycle times - multiplexed exchange performance); (2) the robustness of equipment and its behaviour in industrial conditions (climatic tests in line with IEC regulations - earthquake resistance in particularly severe conditions - resistance to industrial interference); (3) behaviour when internal faults occur, an aspect of particular importance in view of the role played by Controbloc in nuclear power plants; in the event of a failure, safety (incorrect commands must not be given) and availability (resumption of operation) must be guaranteed. A large number of checks have been carried out both by the designer and EDF, the latter having put into operation an original method which is described in the paper. Controbloc has been thoroughly tested and its modular construction has facilitated the performance of these tests. Some shortcomings have been revealed which the designer or EDF has remedied. (author)

  3. Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment: Aetiological Evaluation of Infants identified through the Irish Newborn Hearing Screening Programme

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2017-11-01

    The Newborn Hearing Screening Programme (NHSP) was established in Cork University Maternity Hospital (CUMH) in April 2011. Between April 2011 and July 2014, 42 infants were identified with a Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment (PCHI). Following this diagnosis, infants underwent a paediatric assessment according to recognised guidelines with the intention of identifying the underlying aetiology of the PCHI. The aim of this study was to assess the findings of this aetiological workup via retrospective chart review. PCHI data was obtained from the eSP database. This is a web based information system (eSP) used to track each baby through the screening and referral process A retrospective chart review of these patients was performed. Sixteen (38%) infants were diagnosed with a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Two infants had congenital CMV infection. A Connexin 26 gene mutation was detected in one infant. Two infants were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome, One with Pendred syndrome and one with Pfeiffer syndrome. Five babies underwent cochlear implantation. Through adherence to the recommended protocol a possible cause of PCHI may be determined. This study has identified areas of future improvement for this service in Ireland.

  4. Current state of a dosimetric evaluation programme in diagnostic radiology installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Calzado, A.; Delgado, V.; Moran, P.; Sanchez, B.; Murias, F.

    1988-01-01

    The Medical Physics Group at the School of Medicine of the Complutense University of Madrid, started a programme on the study of radiation doses in relation to Diagnostic Radiology in the area of Madrid in 1986, in cooperation with the Department of Health and Consumer Affairs, and several Madrid area hospitals as well as some Outpatient Centers. In Spain, the National Health Service (NHS) (through the National Institute of Health, INSALUD), potentially cares for the health of approximately 94% of the population. This figure reaches 99% at the Community of Madrid. Radiological examinations are performed mainly in Hospitals and Outpatient Centers (the latter making up a first link in the patient's radiological diagnosis). Private Diagnostic Radiology is used by the remaining 6% of the population (not taking into account the population attended in military hospitals), and by patients who in spite of having access to NHS Diagnostic Radiology Services, prefer to choose the private sector for different reasons. Besides the data we obtained during the first year of study from four large Madrid-area hospitals (and a few outpatient centers); we have used data furnished by the Department of Health and Consumer Affairs, the INSALUD and other sources

  5. A Scotland-wide pilot programme of smoking cessation services for young people: process and outcome evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnich, Wendy; Sheehy, Christine; Amos, Amanda; Bitel, Mark; Platt, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    To conduct an independent, external evaluation of a Scotland-wide youth cessation pilot programme, focusing upon service uptake and effectiveness. National Health Service (NHS) Health Scotland and Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Scotland funded a 3-year (2002-2005) national pilot programme comprising eight projects which aimed to engage with and support young smokers (aged 12-25 years) to quit. Process evaluation was undertaken via detailed case studies comprising qualitative interviews, observation and documentary analysis. Outcomes were assessed by following project participants (n=470 at baseline) at 3 and 12 months and measuring changes in smoking behaviour, including carbon monoxide (CO)-validated quit status. Recruitment proved difficult. Considerable time and effort were needed to attract young smokers. Advertising and recruitment had to be tailored to project settings and educational activities proved essential to raise the profile of smoking as an issue. Thirty-nine participants [8.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.0-11.2%] were CO-validated quitters at 3 months and 11 of these (2.4%, 95% CI 1.90-3.8%) were also validated quitters at 12 months. Older participants were more likely to be abstinent at 3 months. The overall quit rate was disappointing. As a result of low participant numbers, it was impossible to draw conclusions about the relative effectiveness of different project approaches. These findings give little support to the case for developing dedicated youth cessation services in Scotland. They also highlight the difficulties of undertaking 'real-world' evaluations of pilot youth cessation projects. More action is needed to develop environments which enhance young smokers' motivation to quit and their ability to sustain quit attempts.

  6. Evaluating the impact of agricultural extension programmes in sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Hailemichael Taye

    2013-01-01

    Background: In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), impact evaluation has been used to assess whether agricultural extension interventions have brought the intended result or to establish causal linkages between interventions and outcomes. However, there is some scepticism about the validity and reliability of the results of the impact evaluation reports due to some contradictory and exaggerated results. Objectives: This article analyses some impact evaluation studies conducted in SSA as to why cont...

  7. Evaluation in the teaching / learning process of foreign languages: the case of higher education business programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armăsar Ioana Paula

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An essential element of the teaching practice, student assessment has individualizing features in the lan guage teaching / learning progress. This article aims at optimizing the evaluation process, by analyzing both its positive and undesirable effects. Integrating the theoretical background of the documents developed by the Council of Europe into language teaching practice can have a formative, evaluative and self-evaluative benefit. The switch of the assessment actors (teachers evaluated by the students aims at adapting the didactic strategies to real situations while preserving the principles and the values system.

  8. Management of remanent lifetime. Short-term benefits of the maintenance evaluation and improvement programme; Gestion de la vida remanente de instalaciones industriales. Extension de vida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainero Garcia, J [Empresarios Agrupados, Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-15

    Remanent Lifetime Management, which is scientifically based on knowing the degradatory phenomena associated with aging, today allows us to optimize plant life through a long-term maintenance strategy combining preventive maintenance and condition monitoring programmes. Within a project for Remanent Lifetime Management (RLM), the determination of methods of control and mitigation of degradations due to aging depends on the programme of Maintenance Evaluation and Improvement (MEI). This programme, underpinned by the analysis of degradatory phenomena to which plant components are subjected, evaluates current maintenance practices and defines the complementary actions which would facilitate establishment of a long-term strategy to control aging. Together with this main objective of the RLM project, the MEI programme achieves short-term benefits since, right from the beginning, it offers solutions to mitigate and guard against degradations in crucial plant components, and generally sets out a programme to control aging. The MEI programme further serves as a tool to reach the final objectives of the new 10CFR50.65 rule, 'Requirements for Maintenance Programs for NPPs'. The MEI always offers the option should the Utility Owner decide to extend plant life. (author)

  9. The impact of urban regeneration programmes on health and health-related behaviour: Evaluation of the Dutch District Approach 6.5 years from the start.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Ruijsbroek

    Full Text Available Large-scale regeneration programmes to improve the personal conditions and living circumstances in deprived areas may affect health and the lifestyle of the residents. Previous evaluations concluded that a large-scale urban regeneration programme in the Netherlands had some positive effects within 3.5 years. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects at the longer run.With a quasi-experimental research design we assessed changes in the prevalence of general health, mental health, physical activity, overweight, obesity, and smoking between the pre-intervention (2003-04 -mid 2008 and intervention period (mid 2008-2013-14 in 40 deprived target districts and comparably deprived control districts. We used the Difference-in-Difference (DiD to assess programme impact. Additionally, we stratified analyses by sex and by the intensity of the regeneration programme.Changes in health and health related behaviours from pre-intervention to the intervention period were about equally large in the target districts as in control districts. DiD impact estimates were inconsistent and not statistically significant. Sex differences in DiD estimates were not consistent or significant. Furthermore, DiD impact estimates were not consistently larger in target districts with more intensive intervention programmes.We found no evidence that this Dutch urban regeneration programme had an impact in the longer run on self-reported health and related behaviour at the area level.

  10. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Felix; Pappas, Yannis; Bardsley, Martin; Harris, Matthew; Curry, Natasha; Holder, Holly; Blunt, Ian; Soljak, Michael; Gunn, Laura; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Background Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect. Study design We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context. Theory and discussion This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them. Conclusions We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important. PMID:23687478

  11. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Greaves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect. Study design: We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context. Theory and discussion: This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them. Conclusions: We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important

  12. Evaluation of complex integrated care programmes: the approach in North West London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Greaves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several local attempts to introduce integrated care in the English National Health Service have been tried, with limited success. The Northwest London Integrated Care Pilot attempts to improve the quality of care of the elderly and people with diabetes by providing a novel integration process across primary, secondary and social care organisations. It involves predictive risk modelling, care planning, multidisciplinary management of complex cases and an information technology tool to support information sharing. This paper sets out the evaluation approach adopted to measure its effect.Study design: We present a mixed methods evaluation methodology. It includes a quantitative approach measuring changes in service utilization, costs, clinical outcomes and quality of care using routine primary and secondary data sources. It also contains a qualitative component, involving observations, interviews and focus groups with patients and professionals, to understand participant experiences and to understand the pilot within the national policy context.Theory and discussion: This study considers the complexity of evaluating a large, multi-organisational intervention in a changing healthcare economy. We locate the evaluation within the theory of evaluation of complex interventions. We present the specific challenges faced by evaluating an intervention of this sort, and the responses made to mitigate against them.Conclusions: We hope this broad, dynamic and responsive evaluation will allow us to clarify the contribution of the pilot, and provide a potential model for evaluation of other similar interventions. Because of the priority given to the integrated agenda by governments internationally, the need to develop and improve strong evaluation methodologies remains strikingly important

  13. An Evaluation of Talent 4 . . . : A Programme to Identify Talent and Skills for Prisoners, Disadvantaged, Unemployed, and Vulnerable Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire-Snieckus, Rebecca; Caulfield, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Previous research suggests that the relationship between employment and recidivism is complex, with more support needed to facilitate employability motivation for sustained change. An arts-based programme designed to facilitate vocational self-determinism among prisoners with evidence of impact across three prisons in the United Kingdom was replicated and delivered to 234 prisoners and long-term unemployed participants from six European countries, to explore whether the findings from the previous evaluation would be replicated on a much larger scale. The research presented in this article found that supporting prisoners and the long-term unemployed to articulate employability goals had a positive effect on personal growth as well as understanding of individual strengths and weaknesses with respect to work, employment, problem solving, and thinking styles. Future research might explore the longer term impact on employment and recidivism.

  14. The positive impact of interprofessional education: a controlled trial to evaluate a programme for health professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Ben; Coleman, Karen; McKinlay, Eileen; Donovan, Sarah; Beckingsale, Louise; Gray, Ben; Neser, Hazel; Perry, Meredith; Stanley, James; Pullon, Sue

    2015-06-04

    Collaborative interprofessional practice is an important means of providing effective care to people with complex health problems. Interprofessional education (IPE) is assumed to enhance interprofessional practice despite challenges to demonstrate its efficacy. This study evaluated whether an IPE programme changed students' attitudes to interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning, students' self-reported effectiveness as a team member, and students' perceived ability to manage long-term conditions. A prospective controlled trial evaluated an eleven-hour IPE programme focused on long-term conditions' management. Pre-registration students from the disciplines of dietetics (n = 9), medicine (n = 36), physiotherapy (n = 12), and radiation therapy (n = 26) were allocated to either an intervention group (n = 41) who received the IPE program or a control group (n = 42) who continued with their usual discipline specific curriculum. Outcome measures were the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (ATHCTS), Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS), the Team Skills Scale (TSS), and the Long-Term Condition Management Scale (LTCMS). Analysis of covariance compared mean post-intervention scale scores adjusted for baseline scores. Mean post-intervention attitude scores (all on a five-point scale) were significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group for all scales. The mean difference for the ATHCTS was 0.17 (95 %CI 0.05 to 0.30; p = 0.006), for the RIPLS was 0.30 (95 %CI 0.16 to 0.43; p < 0.001), for the TSS was 0.71 (95 %CI 0.49 to 0.92; p < 0.001), and for the LTCMS was 0.75 (95 %CI 0.56 to 0.94; p < 0.001). The mean effect of the intervention was similar for students from the two larger disciplinary sub-groups of medicine and radiation therapy. An eleven-hour IPE programme resulted in improved attitudes towards interprofessional teams and interprofessional learning, as well as self

  15. Rational drug use--evaluation of a training programme for interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natu, M V; Zachariah, P; Zachariah, A; Chand, S; Singh, T; Choudhry, K

    1995-09-01

    A workshop covering various aspects of rational drug use was conducted for interns of Christian Medical College, Ludhiana. Evaluation of the workshop revealed that it was able to bring about an attitudinal change regarding rational drug use. The methodology and evaluation procedures have been described. It is suggested that similar attempts should be made at all medical colleges so that every graduate enters medical practice with a positive attitude towards rational drug use.

  16. Regulatory evaluation of nuclear power plant on-the-job training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.

    1996-01-01

    It is now well recognized internationally in the nuclear industry that a Systematic Approach to Training (SAT), as described in IAEA-TECDOC-525, represents the currently most effective method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. For this reason the Canadian regulator, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), has made SAT a requirement for the training of NPP personnel whose job activities could affect plant or public safety. In this respect the AECB recognizes that the SAT process will dictate on-the-job-training (OJT) and the prudent use of Job Performance Measures (JPMs) as the most effective method of providing parts of the required training to some work groups. The AECB has adopted a process of training program evaluation for NPP operations personnel which comprises methods to evaluate all types of training including OJT. This paper describes some variations which have been identified in the conduct of OJT at Canadian utilities. It then presents the three step process established by the AECB to effectively evaluate training programs expertise is required. The concept of utility self-evaluations is introduced. Finally, the importance of consistency on the part of the regulator in following a systematic approach to evaluation through the application of a viable standard is addressed. (author). 2 figs

  17. [Muenster Parental Programme--Feedback from Parents: How do parents evaluate an early intervention programme for improving the communication with their baby or toddler with hearing impairment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanemann, R; Reichmuth, K; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, A

    2016-02-01

    With the implementation of the UNHS, early educational services' existing concepts of early intervention have to be adapted to the situation and needs of families with a preverbal child who is deaf or hard of hearing. The Muenster Parental Programme (MPP), a module in early family-centered intervention, fulfils this requirement. We report feedback from participating parents regarding processes and outcomes of the MPP. The self-developed questionnaire was checked for its suitability as feedback instrument for measuring parental satisfaction with the MPP. 29 parents who participated in the MPP assessed the programme by using the standardised FBB and the self-developed questionnaire FB-MEP, which is specific to the MPP. Using the FBB, 96% of parents judged the MPP to be good or very good. With the FB-MEP, parents rated setting, contents and didactics as highly as they did using the FBB (r = 0.7, p parents judged both the contact and exchange with other affected parents, and the specific individual support for communicating with their child (including video feedback) as especially helpful. The results reflect parents' high level of satisfaction with the setting, content, didactics and individual benefit gained by their child and themselves from the MPP. The parents are aware of the efficacy of the MPP, which was shown in the controlled intervention study. The self-developed questionnaire FB-MEP was shown to be a suitable instrument for quality assurance measurements of the MPP.

  18. Evaluating different dimensions of programme effectiveness for private medicine retailer malaria control interventions in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy O Abuya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Private medicine retailers (PMRs are key partners in the home management of fevers in many settings. Current evidence on effectiveness for PMR interventions at scale is limited. This study presents evaluation findings of two different programs implemented at moderate scale targeting PMRs for malaria control in the Kisii and Kwale districts of Kenya. Key components of this evaluation were measurement of program performance, including coverage, PMR knowledge, practices, and utilization based on spatial analysis.The study utilized mixed quantitative methods including retail audits and surrogate client surveys based on post-intervention cross-sectional surveys in intervention and control areas and mapping of intervention outlets. There was a large and significant impact on PMR knowledge and practices of the program in Kisii, with 60.5% of trained PMRs selling amodiaquine medicines in adequate doses compared to 2.8% of untrained ones (OR; 53.5: 95% CI 6.7, 428.3, a program coverage of 69.7% targeted outlets, and a potential utilization of about 30,000 children under five. The evaluation in Kwale also indicates a significant impact with 18.8% and 2.3% intervention and control PMRs selling amodiaquine with correct advice, respectively (OR; 9.4: 95% CI 1.1, 83.7, a program coverage of 25.3% targeted outlets, and a potential utilization of about 48,000 children under five. A provisional benchmark of 7.5 km was a reasonable threshold distance for households to access PMR services.This evaluation show that PMR interventions operationalized in the district level settings are likely to impact PMR knowledge and practices and lead to increased coverage of appropriate treatment to target populations. There is value of evaluating different dimensions of public health programs, including quality, spatial access, and implementation practice. This approach strengthens the potential contribution of pragmatic study designs to evaluating public health programs in the

  19. Nonlinear regression analysis for evaluating tracer binding parameters using the programmable K1003 desk computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrach, D.; Strohner, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Gauss-Newton algorithm has been used to evaluate tracer binding parameters of RIA by nonlinear regression analysis. The calculations were carried out on the K1003 desk computer. Equations for simple binding models and its derivatives are presented. The advantages of nonlinear regression analysis over linear regression are demonstrated

  20. Programme evaluation – Case work with families and children in Riga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipova M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the quality of the case work system in providing social assistance. The research involved the unity of all the activities undertaken by a social worker when focusing on case work. Quality assessment criteria were defined for the sake of carrying out the research.

  1. Performance Evaluation of the United Nations Environment Programme Air Quality Monitoring Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    A request for technical collaboration between the UNEP and the US EPA resulted in the establishment of a MCRADA. The purpose of this agreement was to evaluate an air quality monitoring system (referred to as the UNEP pod) developed by the UNEP for use in environmental situations ...

  2. Evaluation of an Action Learning Programme for Leadership Development of SME Leaders in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jean-Anne

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from an evaluation research project undertaken by Henley Management College in 2006. This project followed an earlier research study that focused on identifying the leadership development needs for leaders of small and medium sized-enterprises (SMEs) in the UK, developed a leadership development model and made…

  3. Positive Youth Development through an Outdoor Physical Activity Programme: Evidence from a Four-Year Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kathleen; Sandford, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Sandford, Armour and Warmington undertook a comprehensive review of the literature on the role of physical activity/sport and physical education in promoting positive development for disaffected youth. This paper revisits the findings of the literature review in light of data from a four-year evaluation of one corporate-sponsored physical…

  4. Evaluating the Impact of the Erasmus Programme: Skills and European Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobone, Vittoria; Moro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study lies in the evaluation of what students acquire from studies abroad in the context of credit mobility, in terms of competence development and personal growth, compared with that gained by students completing their study or internship in their home country. A pre-post test design, with both an experimental group…

  5. Process evaluation of a participatory ergonomics programme to prevent low back pain and neck pain among workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Maurice T

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both low back pain (LBP and neck pain (NP are major occupational health problems. In the workplace, participatory ergonomics (PE is frequently used on musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence on the effectiveness of PE to prevent LBP and NP obtained from randomised controlled trials (RCTs is scarce. This study evaluates the process of the Stay@Work participatory ergonomics programme, including the perceived implementation of the prioritised ergonomic measures. Methods This cluster-RCT was conducted at the departments of four Dutch companies (a railway transportation company, an airline company, a steel company, and a university including its university medical hospital. Directly after the randomisation outcome, intervention departments formed a working group that followed the steps of PE during a six-hour working group meeting. Guided by an ergonomist, working groups identified and prioritised risk factors for LBP and NP, and composed and prioritised ergonomic measures. Within three months after the meeting, working groups had to implement the prioritised ergonomic measures at their department. Data on various process components (recruitment, reach, fidelity, satisfaction, and implementation components, i.e., dose delivered and dose received were collected and analysed on two levels: department (i.e., working group members from intervention departments and participant (i.e., workers from intervention departments. Results A total of 19 intervention departments (n = 10 with mental workloads, n = 1 with a light physical workload, n = 4 departments with physical and mental workloads, and n = 4 with heavy physical workloads were recruited for participation, and the reach among working group members who participated was high (87%. Fidelity and satisfaction towards the PE programme rated by the working group members was good (7.3 or higher. The same was found for the Stay@Work ergocoach training (7.5 or higher. In total, 66

  6. Evaluation of the “Eat Better Feel Better” Cooking Programme to Tackle Barriers to Healthy Eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada L. Garcia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated a 6-week community-based cooking programme, “Eat Better Feel Better”, aimed at tackling barriers to cooking and healthy eating using a single-group repeated measures design. 117 participants enrolled, 62 completed baseline and post-intervention questionnaires, and 17 completed these and a 3–4 months follow-up questionnaire. Most participants were female, >45 years, and socioeconomically deprived. Confidence constructs changed positively from baseline to post-intervention (medians, scale 1 “not confident” to 7 “very confident”: “cooking using raw ingredients” (4, 6 p < 0.003, “following simple recipe” (5, 6 p = 0.003, “planning meals before shopping” (4, 5 p = <0.001, “shopping on a budget (4, 5 p = 0.044, “shopping healthier food” (4, 5 p = 0.007, “cooking new foods” (3, 5 p < 0.001, “cooking healthier foods” (4, 5 p = 0.001, “storing foods safely” (5, 6 p = 0.002; “using leftovers” (4, 5 p = 0.002, “cooking raw chicken” (5, 6 p = 0.021, and “reading food labels” (4, 5 p < 0.001. “Microwaving ready-meals” decreased 46% to 39% (p = 0.132. “Preparing meals from scratch” increased 48% to 59% (p = 0.071. Knowledge about correct portion sizes increased 47% to 74% (p = 0.002. Spending on ready-meals/week decreased. Follow-up telephone interviewees (n = 42 reported developing healthier eating patterns, spending less money/wasting less food, and preparing more meals/snacks from raw ingredients. The programme had positive effects on participants’ cooking skills confidence, helped manage time, and reduced barriers of cost, waste, and knowledge.

  7. [Dynamics of interdisciplinary around a health care network: simultaneous programme design and evaluation planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, H; Mantovani, J; Raffy, C; Cayla, F; Clément, S

    2005-12-01

    This article reports on the evaluation experience of a multiple sclerosis care network in the Midi-Pyrénées region (MIPSEP). It shows how an evaluation team composed of public health doctors and sociologists progressively and naturally evolved from having a purely external observation role towards having a collaborative role actively working with the network's members and partners. A qualitative method was chosen for the data collection through interviews with the network's actors, and the frameworks for reference were constituted from official texts which defined the networks and their missions. Coming from a curative and healing culture, the network's actors were concerned primarily about how to organise themselves in order to better respond to the needs expressed by the patients. The various professional backgrounds and cultures, faced with different perspectives from innovation and confronted with the related difficulties, participated in a collective expertise exercise and collaborated in the construction process. This example supports an open, qualitative, evolutionary evaluation approach which is done in close proximity to the field and work on the ground. The study is timely given the current explosion of debate on evaluation methods. With a great deal of exchange and reflection on suitable tools and indicators as well as the respective roles of researchers, care givers and decision-makers, the results of this study advocate to favour multidisciplinary approaches, including opening up this process to funders and planning authorities rather than over-theorising about it, which only serves to enclose and paralyse a process that, on the contrary, should aim to be more inclusive. This could be a useful way to decompartmentalise and break down existing barriers within the health system.

  8. Clinical Leaders for the Future: Evaluation of the Early Clinical Careers Fellowship Pilot Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Pauline; Machin, Alison; Rae, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate key features (contexts), activities (mechanisms) and outcomes of the Early Clinical Career Fellowships Pilot. In Scotland and across the United Kingdom (UK) the number of nurses likely to retire is set to double between 2005 and 2015 - equivalent to a quarter of all nurses. There is a need to build leadership capacity within the existing workforce in order to maintain the quality of service provision.

  9. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: breeding programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Rydhmer, L; Gourdine, Jean-Luc; de Greef, K; Bonneau, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The sustainability of breeding activities in 15 pig farming systems in five European countries was evaluated. One conventional and two differentiated systems per country were studied. The Conventional systems were the standard systems in their countries. The differentiated systems were of three categories: Adapted Conventional with focus on animal welfare, meat quality or environment (five systems); Traditional with local breeds in small-scale production (three systems) and Organic (two syste...

  10. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RD and D Programme 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    According to the Act on Nuclear Activities, the holder of a licence to operate a nuclear reactor must adopt all necessary measures to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Act stipulates requirements on a research programme which is to be submitted to the competent regulatory authority once every three years. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is the competent authority that evaluates and reviews the programme. SKI distributes the programme to a wide circle of reviewing bodies for comment, including authorities, municipalities, universities and NGOs. The Swedish programme for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel started about 25 years ago. According to the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Co. (SKB), the planned repository will not be closed until sometime in the 2050's. A series of decisions must be made before this goal is attained. The decision process can therefore be described as a multi-stage process. During each stages, safety will be evaluated and there is a possibility of taking additional time for development work or of selecting improved solutions. SKI's task is to ensure safety compliance throughout all of these stages. In its decision in January 2000, the Government explained that the Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration for the Treatment and Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste (RD and D Programme 98) complied with legislative requirements but that certain supplementary reporting should be conducted by SKB and submitted no later than when the next programme, in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act on Nuclear Activities, was prepared (September 2001). The supplementary reporting requested by the Government, and which was submitted by SKB to SKI in December 2000, dealt with issues relating to method selection, site selection and the site investigation programme. SKI submitted its review of the supplement to the Government in June 2001 and the Government made a decision on the matter on November 1, 2001

  11. Preventing alcohol misuse in young people aged 9-11 years through promoting family communication: an exploratory evaluation of the Kids, Adults Together (KAT Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segrott Jeremy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol misuse by young people is an important public health issue, and has led to the development of a range of prevention interventions. Evidence concerning the most effective approaches to intervention design and implementation is limited. Parental involvement in school-based interventions is important, but many programmes fail to recruit large numbers of parents. This paper reports findings from an exploratory evaluation of a new alcohol misuse prevention programme - Kids, Adults Together (KAT, which comprised a classroom component, engagement with parents through a fun evening for families with children aged 9-11 years, and a DVD. The evaluation aimed to establish the programme's theoretical basis, explore implementation processes and acceptability, and identify plausible precursors of the intended long-term outcomes. Methods Documentary analysis and interviews with key personnel examined the programme's development. Classroom preparation and KAT family events in two schools were observed. Focus groups with children, and interviews with parents who attended KAT family events were held immediately after programme delivery, and again after three months. Interviews with head teachers and with teachers who delivered the classroom preparation were conducted. Follow-up interviews with programme personnel were undertaken. Questionnaires were sent to parents of all children involved in classroom preparation. Results KAT achieved high levels of acceptability and involvement among both children and parents. Main perceived impacts of the programme were increased pro-social communication within families (including discussions about harmful parental alcohol consumption, heightened knowledge and awareness of the effects of alcohol consumption and key legal and health issues, and changes in parental drinking behaviours. Conclusions KAT demonstrated promise as a prevention intervention, primarily through its impact on knowledge and

  12. SKI's Evaluation of SKB's RD and D Programme 95. Summary and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    In SKI's opinion, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) has presented a research and development program which fulfills the basic requirements stipulated in the Act on Nuclear Activities. On the whole, the program is appropriate with regard to the development and evaluation of a method for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste in the Swedish bedrock. The quality of the supporting research program is high. However, in SKI's view, the General Siting Study should be supplemented with regard to certain points and the siting factors should be further specified

  13. (ARV) treatment training programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    Keywords:ARV, training, evaluation, HIV, health care provider. RÉSUMÉ .... workers, adequate laboratory facilities for measuring viral load and .... questionnaire guide, the head of unit of the ART ...... begins its scale-up programme. Some of ...

  14. How to develop a theory-driven evaluation design? Lessons learned from an adolescent sexual and reproductive health programme in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Sara B; Marchal, Bruno; Dubourg, Dominique; Kegels, Guy

    2010-11-30

    This paper presents the development of a study design built on the principles of theory-driven evaluation. The theory-driven evaluation approach was used to evaluate an adolescent sexual and reproductive health intervention in Mali, Burkina Faso and Cameroon to improve continuity of care through the creation of networks of social and health care providers. Based on our experience and the existing literature, we developed a six-step framework for the design of theory-driven evaluations, which we applied in the ex-post evaluation of the networking component of the intervention. The protocol was drafted with the input of the intervention designer. The programme theory, the central element of theory-driven evaluation, was constructed on the basis of semi-structured interviews with designers, implementers and beneficiaries and an analysis of the intervention's logical framework. The six-step framework proved useful as it allowed for a systematic development of the protocol. We describe the challenges at each step. We found that there is little practical guidance in the existing literature, and also a mix up of terminology of theory-driven evaluation approaches. There is a need for empirical methodological development in order to refine the tools to be used in theory driven evaluation. We conclude that ex-post evaluations of programmes can be based on such an approach if the required information on context and mechanisms is collected during the programme.

  15. R and D programmes in Germany. Selection and evaluation of projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In Germany, budgets for research and development rest on three pillars, which are the federal government, the 16 states, and the civil sector. The total expenditure for 1997 amounted to 83.7 times 1 billion Deutsche marks, and this occupied 2.3 of Germany's GNP (gross national product). National research projects constitute the main stream even today. As for federal government-financed projects, they are managed mainly by BMBF (Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research, and Technology). There are project carriers as the managerial organizations. Requests for proposals for research and development projects are published in official gazettes and technical journals. Such a project has to contain detailed descriptions regarding the setting of targets, levels of technology, cost accounting, development schedule, history of discovery and development involved, etc. Analyses are conducted into technology, economic risk, market, and environmental impact. Support by the German government for government-related projects is given in compliance with predetermined guidelines. The evaluation and selection of submitted proposals are performed by professionals of the project carrier level. In this paper, explanations are also given about contracts, management of progress, and evaluation. (NEDO)

  16. Process Evaluation of Communitisation Programme in Public Sector Health Facilities, Mokokchung District, Nagaland, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushi, Aonungdok; Kaur, Prabhdeep

    2017-01-01

    Public sector health facilities were poorly managed due to a history of conflict in Nagaland, India. Government of Nagaland introduced "Nagaland Communitisation of Public Institutions and Services Act" in 2002. Main objectives of the evaluation were to review the functioning of Health Center Managing Committees (HCMCs), deliver health services in the institutions managed by HCMC, identify strengths as well as challenges perceived by HCMC members in the rural areas of Mokokchung district, Nagaland. The evaluation was made using input, process and output indicators. A doctor, the HCMC Chairman and one member from each of the three community health centers (CHC) and four primary health centers (PHC) were surveyed using a semi-structured questionnaire and an in-depth interview guide. Proportions for quantitative data were computed and key themes from the same were identified. Overall; the infrastructure, equipment and outpatient/inpatient service availability was satisfactory. There was a lack of funds and shortage of doctors, drugs as well as laboratory facilities. HCMCs were in place and carried out administrative activities. HCMCs felt ownership, mobilized community contributions and managed human resources. HCMC members had inadequate funds for their transport and training. They faced challenges in service delivery due to political interference and lack of adequate human, material, financial resources. Communitisation program was operational in the district. HCMC members felt the ownership of health facilities. Administrative, political support and adequate funds from the government are needed for effective functioning of HCMCs and optimal service delivery in public sector facilities.

  17. Quality assurance and the need to evaluate interventions and audit programme outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Kotseva, Kornelia; Jennings, Catriona; Grobbee, Diederick E; Graham, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based clinical guidelines provide standards for the provision of healthcare. However, these guidelines have been poorly implemented in daily practice. Clinical audit is a quality improvement tool to promote quality of care in daily practice and to improve outcomes through the systematic review of care delivery and implementation of changes. A major priority in the management of subjects with cardiovascular disease (CVD) management is secondary prevention by controlling cardiovascular risk factors and providing appropriate medical treatment. Clinical audits can be applied to monitor modifiable risk factors and evaluate quality improvements of CVD management in daily practice. Existing clinical audits have provided an overview of the burden of risk factors in subjects with CVD and reflect real-world risk factor recording and management. However, consistent and representative data from clinic audits are still insufficient to fully monitor quality improvement of CVD management. Data are lacking in particular from low- and middle-income countries, limiting the evaluation of CVD management quality by clinical audit projects in many settings. To support the development of clinical standards, monitor daily practice performance, and improve quality of care in CVD management at national and international levels, more widespread clinical audits are warranted.

  18. Evaluation of Market Design Programme - Phase IV; Utvaerdering av Market Designprogrammet - etapp IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Tomas

    2013-08-15

    The Market Design program was established in year 2000 to study issues related to markets, regulations and policy instruments related to the deregulation of the Swedish electricity market. Through the years, the focus has widened to include not only Sweden but also international cooperation on these issues. The fourth phase of the program is now underway between the years 2010 and 2013. The overall project objective of this fourth phase is to increase knowledge about the Nordic and North European electricity market. Specific objective is to create new knowledge that affects market design of the single market area (Nordic, EU) and to contribute to constructive meetings between researchers, energy companies and government agencies on Market Design Issues. The purpose of the evaluation of the Market Design Program phase IV has been to investigate the results and benefits of the program in relation to the program's original objectives and to examine the need for and areas of further research and possible ways for the research in Market Design. The evaluation has been carried through in four phases during spring and summer 2013. The work has included reading, interviews with program stakeholders, analysis and reporting.

  19. Evaluation of the AccessIT Project and the Distance LearningProgramme on Digitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Yılmaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AccessIT is an EU-funded project under EU’s Education and Culture Program aiming to digitize a certain amount of sources that are part of the cultural heritage, to transfer them to Europeana, and to sustain the education infrastructure to achieve this goal in the partner countries of Greece, Poland, Serbia, Turkey and UK. In this study, in addition to the general evaluation of the AccessIT Project, it is aimed to investigate the awareness of participants in thefield on digitization and digital content management, their self-efficiency perceptions, and to evaluate the education program based on the data acquired from the survey of544participants who were enrolled in the distance education program offered within the scope of the project.It was found out in the study that the AccessIT Project has had an important function in Turkey and the distance education program significantly contributed to participants ’ self-efficiency perceptions about digitization.

  20. Evaluation of an Adaptive Learning Technology in a First-year Extended Curriculum Programme Physics course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Mushe Basitere

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalised, adaptive online learning platforms that form part of web-based proficiency tests play a major role in the improvement of the quality of learning in physics and assist learners in building proficiency, preparing for tests and using their time more effectively. In this study, the effectiveness of an adaptive learning platform, Wiley Plus ORION, was evaluated using proficiency test scores compared to paper-based test scores in a first-year introductory engineering physics course. Learners’ performance activities on the adaptive learning platform as well as their performance on the proficiency tests and their impact on the paper-based midterm averaged test were investigated using both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection. A comparison between learners’ performance on the proficiency tests and a paper-based midterm test was done to evaluate whether there was a correlation between their performance on the proficiency tests and the midterm test. Focus group interviews were carried out with three categories of learners to elicit their experiences. Results showed that there was a positive relationship between high-performing learners’ proficiency score in the midterm averaged test and that the proficiency test enhanced learners’ performance in the paper-based midterm averaged test.

  1. Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES). Users and programmers manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes how to use the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) computer program. The primary function of the code is to calculate the fast fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings, such as those found in heat engine applications. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effect of multiaxial stress states on material strength. The principle of independent action (PIA) and the Weibull normal stress averaging models are also included. Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities are estimated from four-point bend bar or unifrom uniaxial tensile specimen fracture strength data. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-square analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests, ninety percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters, and Kanofsky-Srinivasan ninety percent confidence band values are also provided. The probabilistic fast-fracture theories used in CARES, along with the input and output for CARES, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various feature of the program are also included. This manual describes the MSC/NASTRAN version of the CARES program.

  2. Shared decision-making for psychiatric medication: A mixed-methods evaluation of a UK training programme for service users and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Shulamit; Morant, Nicola; Stead, Ute; Perry, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is recognised as a promising strategy to enhance good collaboration between clinicians and service users, yet it is not practised regularly in mental health. Develop and evaluate a novel training programme to enhance SDM in psychiatric medication management for service users, psychiatrists and care co-ordinators. The training programme design was informed by existing literature and local stakeholders consultations. Parallel group-based training programmes on SDM process were delivered to community mental health service users and providers. Evaluation consisted of quantitative measures at baseline and 12-month follow-up, post-programme participant feedback and qualitative interviews. Training was provided to 47 service users, 35 care-coordinators and 12 psychiatrists. Participant feedback was generally positive. Statistically significant changes in service users' decisional conflict and perceptions of practitioners' interactional style in promoting SDM occurred at the follow-up. Qualitative data suggested positive impacts on service users' and care co-ordinators confidence to explore medication experience, and group-based training was valued. The programme was generally acceptable to service users and practitioners. This indicates the value of conducting a larger study and exploring application for non-medical decisions.

  3. The Gold Standard Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Tim; Rasmussen, Mette; Ghith, Nermin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates.......To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates....

  4. Evaluating a complex system-wide intervention using the difference in differences method: the Delivering Choice Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, Jeff; Drake, Robyn; Kendall, Edward; Addicott, Rachael; Agelopoulos, Nicky; Jones, Louise

    2015-03-01

    We report the use of difference in differences (DiD) methodology to evaluate a complex, system-wide healthcare intervention. We use the worked example of evaluating the Marie Curie Delivering Choice Programme (DCP) for advanced illness in a large urban healthcare economy. DiD was selected because a randomised controlled trial was not feasible. The method allows for before and after comparison of changes that occur in an intervention site with a matched control site. This enables analysts to control for the effect of the intervention in the absence of a local control. Any policy, seasonal or other confounding effects over the test period are assumed to have occurred in a balanced way at both sites. Data were obtained from primary care trusts. Outcomes were place of death, inpatient admissions, length of stay and costs. Small changes were identified between pre- and post-DCP outputs in the intervention site. The proportion of home deaths and median cost increased slightly, while the number of admissions per patient and the average length of stay per admission decreased slightly. None of these changes was statistically significant. Effects estimates were limited by small numbers accessing new services and selection bias in sample population and comparator site. In evaluating the effect of a complex healthcare intervention, the choice of analysis method and output measures is crucial. Alternatives to randomised controlled trials may be required for evaluating large scale complex interventions and the DiD approach is suitable, subject to careful selection of measured outputs and control population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Evaluation of a community-based drowning prevention programme in northern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, A; Mohammadi, R; Yousefzade-Chabok, S; Jansson, B

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a drowning intervention package in northern Islamic Republic of Iran. A quasi-experimental design used pre- and post-observations among residents and tourists in water-recreation beach areas of intervention and control regions by the Caspian Sea and in residents near the Caspian Sea coastline. The fatal drowning rate in the studied resident population in the provinces fell from 4.24 per 100 000 residents at baseline to 3.04 per 100,000 residents at endline. The risk of death from drowning in the intervention areas in the water-recreation area was greater during the pre-intervention (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 0.66-2.01) than the implementation period (OR = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.15-0.37). The risk of drowning can be reduced by implementing increased supervision and raising community awareness.

  6. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Teacher Preparation Programmes in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    The trainee teachers were able to communicate easily and clearly in classroom situations. The prospective teachers could make lessons plans and implement it successfully. The teacher preparation program has developed classroom management skills of the prospective teachers. The teachers could use different strategies in their classrooms for student’s learning evaluations. The teachers were more confident to share their experiences with other teachers. However, a unique finding of the study is that the teacher preparation program has failed to develop research skills of the teachers. It was found that the trained teachers did not know how to conduct research in their contexts on various issues of teaching and learning. Therefore on the basis of this study it is recommended that a strong component of research project should be incorporated in the curriculum of the teacher preparation program of RITEs to enable the prospective teachers to conduct research on different issues of teaching and learning.

  7. Breast cancer screening programmes: the development of a monitoring and evaluation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, N E; Williams, D R; Khaw, K T

    1989-06-01

    It is important that the introduction of breast screening is closely monitored. The anticipated effect on breast cancer mortality will take 10 years or more fully to emerge, and will only occur if a succession of more short-term end points are met. Data from the Swedish two-county randomised trial provide targets that should be achieved, following a logical progression of compliance with the initial invitation, prevalence and stage distribution at the prevalence screen, the rate of interval cancers after the initial screen, the pick-up rate and stage distribution at later screening tests, the rate of interval cancers after later tests, the absolute rate of advanced cancer and finally the breast cancer mortality rate. For evaluation purposes, historical data on stage at diagnosis is desirable; it is suggested that tumour size is probably the most relevant variable available in most cases.

  8. Evaluation of fire hazard analyses for nuclear power plants. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The present publication has been developed with the help of experts from regulatory, operating and engineering organizations, all with practical experience in the field of fire safety of nuclear power plants. The publication supplements the broad concepts of Safety Series No. 50-SG-D2 (Rev.1), Fire Protection in Nuclear Power Plants, by providing a detailed list of the issues, and some of the limitations, to be considered when evaluating the adequacy and effectiveness of the fire hazard analysis of a nuclear power plant. The publication is intended for assessors of fire hazard analyses, including regulators, independent assessors or plant assessors, and gives a broad description of the methodology to be used by operators in preparing a fire hazard analysis for their own plant. 1 fig

  9. Process evaluation of communitisation programme in public sector health facilities, Mokokchung district, Nagaland, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aonungdok Tushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Public sector health facilities were poorly managed due to a history of conflict in Nagaland, India. Government of Nagaland introduced “Nagaland Communitisation of Public Institutions and Services Act” in 2002. Main objectives of the evaluation were to review the functioning of Health Center Managing Committees (HCMCs, deliver health services in the institutions managed by HCMC, identify strengths as well as challenges perceived by HCMC members in the rural areas of Mokokchung district, Nagaland. Materials and Methods: The evaluation was made using input, process and output indicators. A doctor, the HCMC Chairman and one member from each of the three community health centers (CHC and four primary health centers (PHC were surveyed using a semi-structured questionnaire and an in-depth interview guide. Proportions for quantitative data were computed and key themes from the same were identified. Results: Overall; the infrastructure, equipment and outpatient/inpatient service availability was satisfactory. There was a lack of funds and shortage of doctors, drugs as well as laboratory facilities. HCMCs were in place and carried out administrative activities. HCMCs felt ownership, mobilized community contributions and managed human resources. HCMC members had inadequate funds for their transport and training. They faced challenges in service delivery due to political interference and lack of adequate human, material, financial resources. Conclusions: Communitisation program was operational in the district. HCMC members felt the ownership of health facilities. Administrative, political support and adequate funds from the government are needed for effective functioning of HCMCs and optimal service delivery in public sector facilities.

  10. An economic evaluation of the national schistosomiasis control programme in China from 1992 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Wang, Li-Ying; Chen, Ming-Gang; Wang, Tian-Ping; Guo, Jia-Gang; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Jiang, Qing-Wu; Zheng, Jiang; Chen, Xian-Yi

    2005-01-01

    The World Bank Loan Project, by far the largest effort in China for schistosomiasis control since control activities were initiated in the mid 1950s, was carried out for a 9-year period commencing in 1992 in the 8 provinces where Schistosoma japonicum remained endemic when the project started. To evaluate its impact, a retrospective economic evaluation was done in 2001. Six representative counties, i.e. Huarong in Hunan province, Qianjiang in Hubei province, Yugan in Jiangxi province, Tongling in Anhui province, Xichang in Sichuan province and Dali in Yunnan province, were selected for the study. The total financial input in these counties from 1992 to 2000 was RMB Yuan 90.334 million with the World Bank loan accounting for 40.9%. Control efforts resulted in reduction of human prevalence rates in the six counties from 0.7-9.0% in 1992 to 0.1-2.7% in 2000. With regard to S. japonicum infection in bovines, a high reduction was observed in Qianjiang, and smaller decreases were noted in four counties, while there was an increase in Dali. In general, the areas infested by the intermediate host snail fluctuated around the initial level. The net benefit-cost ratio was 6.20, which means that this project gained US$ 6.20 for every dollar spent. The correlation coefficients of the net benefit-cost ratio to the human and bovine infection rates at the beginning of the project were 0.55 and 0.66, respectively. It is conceivable that further progress in schistosomiasis control is an important feature for sustained growth of the local economy, particularly in areas where control of the disease has been most challenging.

  11. Evaluation of a Core Team Centred Professional Development Programme for Building a Whole-School Cooperative Problem Solving Approach to Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew Jonathan; Wertheim, Eleanor H.; Freeman, Elizabeth; Trinder, Margot

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a professional learning approach using a core team (CT) model to assist primary (elementary) schools to develop whole-school collaborative conflict resolution processes. Thirteen schools were matched and randomly assigned to the enhancing relationships in school communities programme ("n"?=?10) or a non-programme…

  12. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a First Aid Health Volunteers' Training Programme Using Kirkpatrick's Model: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizeshfar, Fatemeh; Momennasab, Marzieh; Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Iman, Mohamad Taghi

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a health volunteers' complementary training programme on first aid. Design: Quasi-experimental study. Setting: A comprehensive health centre in the southwest of Iran. Method: The study was conducted in the second half of 2015 with all 25 health volunteers in the Qamar Bani Hashem…

  13. LEGO[R] Therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme: An Evaluation of Two Social Skills Interventions for Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Gina; Granader, Yael; Humphrey, Ayla; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    LEGO[R] therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme (SULP) were evaluated as social skills interventions for 6-11 year olds with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome. Children were matched on CA, IQ, and autistic symptoms before being randomly assigned to LEGO or SULP. Therapy occurred for 1 h/week over 18 weeks. A no-intervention…

  14. 'I am stronger, I'm no longer afraid...', an evaluation of a home-visiting mentor mother support programme for abused women in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosman, G.J.; Wong, S.H.; Romkens, R.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate which factors make a mentor mother support programme for abused women successful. METHOD: We used semi-structured interviews with abused women and focus group discussions with the mentor mothers to evaluate their experiences and needs within a mentor support

  15. VIP in construction: systematic development and evaluation of a multifaceted health programme aiming to improve physical activity levels and dietary patterns among construction workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viester Laura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of both overweight and musculoskeletal disorders (MSD in the construction industry is high. Many interventions in the occupational setting aim at the prevention and reduction of these health problems, but it is still unclear how these programmes should be designed. To determine the effectiveness of interventions on these health outcomes randomised controlled trials (RCTs are needed. The aim of this study is to systematically develop a tailored intervention for prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD among construction workers and to describe the evaluation study regarding its (cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design The Intervention Mapping (IM protocol was applied to develop and implement a tailored programme aimed at the prevention and reduction of overweight and MSD. The (cost- effectiveness of the intervention programme will be evaluated using an RCT. Furthermore, a process evaluation will be conducted. The research population will consist of blue collar workers of a large construction company in the Netherlands. Intervention The intervention programme will be aimed at improving (vigorous physical activity levels and healthy dietary behaviour and will consist of tailored information, face-to-face and telephone counselling, training instruction (a fitness "card" to be used for exercises, and materials designed for the intervention (overview of the company health promoting facilities, waist circumference measuring tape, pedometer, BMI card, calorie guide, recipes, and knowledge test. Main study parameters/endpoints The intervention effect on body weight and waist circumference (primary outcome measures, as well as on lifestyle behaviour, MSD, fitness, CVD risk indicators, and work-related outcomes (i.e. productivity, sick leave (secondary outcome measures will be assessed. Discussion The development of the VIP in construction intervention led to a health programme tailored to the needs of construction

  16. Evaluation of long-term geological and climatic changes in the Spanish programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, T.; Ortiz, J.E.; Cortes, A.; Delgado, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Bio-molecular Stratigraphy Laboratory of the Madrid School of Mines has been largely involved in the analysis of long-term paleo-environmental changes in the Iberian Peninsula during the Quaternary. Some of the research projects were UE funded: Paleo-climatological Revision of Climate Evolution in Western Mediterranean Region. Evaluation of Altered Scenarios, Evidence from Quaternary Infill Paleo-hydrogeology, Sequential Biosphere modelling function of Climate evolution models; Paleo-hydrogeological Data Analysis and Model Testing. Other projects were funded by the National Company for Radioactive Waste Management (ENRESA) and the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN): 'Paleo-climate reconstruction from Middle Pleistocene times through dating and isotopic analysis of tufa deposits'; 'Paleo-environmental evolution of the southern part of the Iberian Peninsula'; 'Paleo-climate'. On a minor scale the laboratory was also involved in the study of some argillaceous media: 'Organic Geochemistry of some deep Spanish argillaceous formations' and 'Effects of climatic change on the argillaceous series of the Duero and Ebro basins'. Here we will present some of the results obtained from tufa deposits analysis and paleo-environmental information from the Guadix-Baza Basin composite-stratigraphical-type-section study. (authors)

  17. A programme evaluation of pre-primary education reform, and policy, in Plateau State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaye Fadimatu Hamza

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Contextualisation This paper presents a brief overview of the educational system in Nigeria with an emphasis on the pre-primary education level. It addresses the international literature on early childhood pedagogy and assesses to what extent pre-primary education policy in Nigeria is inspired by this literature. The paper will pay special attention to the shortcomings and obstacles encountered in trying to implement the pre-primary education policy of Plateau State in Nigeria Abstract: The current study is an evaluation of the pre-primary education policy in Plateau State in Nigeria. It was inspired by my own experience as a school teacher/principal who has seen the effects on primary schools and the results of a lack of government investment in the sector, itself leading to a proliferation of ‘private owners’. Because of these circumstances the implementation of central policy is highly dependent on the varying understanding of these owners. The study will employ both qualitative and quantitative techniques in data collection through the use of questionnaire, interviews, classroom observation and use of documents. The data will be analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results will hopefully be used, not only to add to existing literature, but also to improve the system serving as a basis for further research in the area.

  18. Development and evaluation of a computer-based medical work assessment programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spallek Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several ways to conduct a job task analysis in medical work environments including pencil-paper observations, interviews and questionnaires. However these methods implicate bias problems such as high inter-individual deviations and risks of misjudgement. Computer-based observation helps to reduce these problems. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the development process of a computer-based job task analysis instrument for real-time observations to quantify the job tasks performed by physicians working in different medical settings. In addition reliability and validity data of this instrument will be demonstrated. Methods This instrument was developed in consequential steps. First, lists comprising tasks performed by physicians in different care settings were classified. Afterwards content validity of task lists was proved. After establishing the final task categories, computer software was programmed and implemented in a mobile personal computer. At least inter-observer reliability was evaluated. Two trained observers recorded simultaneously tasks of the same physician. Results Content validity of the task lists was confirmed by observations and experienced specialists of each medical area. Development process of the job task analysis instrument was completed successfully. Simultaneous records showed adequate interrater reliability. Conclusion Initial results of this analysis supported the validity and reliability of this developed method for assessing physicians' working routines as well as organizational context factors. Based on results using this method, possible improvements for health professionals' work organisation can be identified.

  19. Evaluation of changes in prescription medication use after a residential treatment programme for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbear, Jillian H; Nesci, Julian; Thomas, Rosemary; Thompson, Katherine; Beatson, Josephine; Rao, Sathya

    2016-12-01

    Residential patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder were evaluated to determine whether borderline personality disorder-focused psychotherapy reduced prescribing, personality disorder and co-morbid symptom severity. Psychotropic prescriptions were measured at admission, discharge and 1 year later in 74 female participants with one or more personality disorder diagnosis and co-morbid mood disorders. Changes in pharmacotherapy were examined in the context of improvements in borderline personality disorder and/or co-morbid disorder symptom severity. Residential treatment included individual and group psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used to confirm the borderline personality disorder diagnosis and associated co-morbid conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory was completed at each time point. A significant reduction in the incidence and severity of self-rated depression as well as clinician assessed personality disorder, including borderline personality disorder, was accompanied by a reduction in prescription of psychoactive medications. Three to six months of intensive borderline personality disorder-specific psychotherapy showed lasting benefit with regard to symptom severity of personality disorders (borderline personality disorder in particular) as well as depressive symptoms. This improvement corresponded with a reduction in prescriptions for psychoactive medications, which is consistent with current thinking regarding treatment for borderline personality disorder. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  20. The Dutch 'Focus on Strength' intervention study protocol: programme design and production, implementation and evaluation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoor, G A; Kok, G; Rutten, G M; Ruiter, R A C; Kremers, S P J; Schols, A M J W; Plasqui, G

    2016-06-10

    Overweight youngsters are better in absolute strength exercises than their normal-weight counterparts; a physiological phenomenon with promising psychological impact. In this paper we describe the study protocol of the Dutch, school-based program 'Focus on Strength' that aims to improve body composition of 11-13 year old students, and with that to ultimately improve their quality of life. The development of this intervention is based on the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol, which starts from a needs assessment, uses theory and empirical research to develop a detailed intervention plan, and anticipates program implementation and evaluation. This novel intervention targets first year students in preparatory secondary vocational education (11-13 years of age). Teachers are the program implementers. One part of the intervention involves a 30 % increase of strength exercises in the physical education lessons. The other part is based on Motivational Interviewing, promoting autonomous motivation of students to become more physically active outside school. Performance and change objectives are described for both teachers and students. The effectiveness of the intervention will be tested in a Randomized Controlled Trial in 9 Dutch high schools. Intervention Mapping is a useful framework for program planning a school-based program to improve body composition and motivation to exercise in 11-13 year old adolescents by a "Focus on Strength". NTR5676 , registered 8 February 2016 (retrospectively registered).

  1. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: breeding programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydhmer, L; Gourdine, J L; de Greef, K; Bonneau, M

    2014-12-01

    The sustainability of breeding activities in 15 pig farming systems in five European countries was evaluated. One conventional and two differentiated systems per country were studied. The Conventional systems were the standard systems in their countries. The differentiated systems were of three categories: Adapted Conventional with focus on animal welfare, meat quality or environment (five systems); Traditional with local breeds in small-scale production (three systems) and Organic (two systems). Data were collected with a questionnaire from nine breeding organisations providing animals and semen to the studied farming systems and from, on average, five farmers per farming system. The sustainability assessment of breeding activities was performed in four dimensions. The first dimension described whether the market for the product was well defined, and whether the breeding goal reflected the farming system and the farmers' demands. The second dimension described recording and selection procedures, together with genetic change in traits that were important in the system. The third dimension described genetic variation, both within and between pig breeds. The fourth dimension described the management of the breeding organisation, including communication, transparency, and technical and human resources. The results show substantial differences in the sustainability of breeding activities, both between farming systems within the same category and between different categories of farming systems. The breeding activities are assessed to be more sustainable for conventional systems than for differentiated systems in three of the four dimensions. In most differentiated farming systems, breeding goals are not related to the system, as these systems use the same genetic material as conventional systems. The breeds used in Traditional farming systems are important for genetic biodiversity, but the small scale of these systems renders them vulnerable. It is hoped that, by

  2. Evaluation of a parent-designed programme to support tooth brushing of infants and young children*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, CE; Milgrom, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study developed and tested an intervention to help parents establish a routine of brushing their young children’s teeth twice a day. Methods Community-based participatory research methods were used to engage parents in the design of the intervention to maximize its relevance and acceptability to others. Input was obtained by interviews and focus groups. The resulting intervention was four 90-min small-group sessions that provided educational information, direct instruction, practice and peer-to-peer problem-solving. A pre- to post-non-randomized design was used to evaluate the intervention’s effect to increase or maintain parents’ twice daily brushing. Results Intervention participants were 67 primary caregivers of children under six years of age. Of the 67 initial participants, 50 completed a post-intervention questionnaire administered 4 to 8 weeks following the intervention. The proportion of parents who reported brushing their young children’s teeth twice a day increased significantly from 59 per cent prior to the intervention to 89 per cent post-intervention (McNemar’s X2 = 10.71, P = 0.002). There were concomitant and statistically significant increases over the study period in parents’ confidence for brushing twice a day, attitudes about the importance of brushing and their self-efficacy for tooth brushing. Parents’ knowledge of children’s oral health, assessed by a 15-item scale developed for this study (‘Things to Know About Baby Teeth’), also increased significantly. Conclusions Twice daily tooth brushing is a low-cost, effective strategy to reduce the risk of childhood caries. As demonstrated here, community-based efforts can help parents achieve this important health behaviour. PMID:25070036

  3. Evaluation of a parent-designed programme to support tooth brushing of infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, C E; Milgrom, P

    2015-02-01

    This study developed and tested an intervention to help parents establish a routine of brushing their young children's teeth twice a day. Community-based participatory research methods were used to engage parents in the design of the intervention to maximize its relevance and acceptability to others. Input was obtained by interviews and focus groups. The resulting intervention was four 90-min small-group sessions that provided educational information, direct instruction, practice and peer-to-peer problem-solving. A pre- to post-non-randomized design was used to evaluate the intervention's effect to increase or maintain parents' twice daily brushing. Intervention participants were 67 primary caregivers of children under six years of age. Of the 67 initial participants, 50 completed a post-intervention questionnaire administered 4 to 8 weeks following the intervention. The proportion of parents who reported brushing their young children's teeth twice a day increased significantly from 59 per cent prior to the intervention to 89 per cent post-intervention (McNemar's X(2)  = 10.71, P = 0.002). There were concomitant and statistically significant increases over the study period in parents' confidence for brushing twice a day, attitudes about the importance of brushing and their self-efficacy for tooth brushing. Parents' knowledge of children's oral health, assessed by a 15-item scale developed for this study ('Things to Know About Baby Teeth'), also increased significantly. Twice daily tooth brushing is a low-cost, effective strategy to reduce the risk of childhood caries. As demonstrated here, community-based efforts can help parents achieve this important health behaviour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk-lowering health benefits accruing from laboratory-based, community-based and exercise-referral exercise programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R; Thompson, J E S; Ruffino, J-S; Davies, N A; Watkeys, L; Hooper, S; Jones, P M; Walters, G; Clayton, D; Thomas, A W; Morris, K; Llewellyn, D H; Ward, M; Wyatt-Williams, J; McDonnell, B J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of community-based exercise programmes to facilitate public participation in exercise and hence improved cardiovascular health, we assessed the respective impacts of: a continuously monitored exercise programme based within our university (study 1); a Valleys Regional Park-facilitated community-based outdoor exercise programme (study 2); a Wales National Exercise Referral Scheme-delivered exercise-referral programme (study 3). Biomolecular (monocytic PPARγ target gene expression), vascular haemodynamic (central/peripheral blood pressure, arterial stiffness), clinical (insulin sensitivity, blood lipids) and anthropometric (body mass index, waist circumference, heart rate) parameters were investigated using RT-PCR, applanation tonometry, chemical analysis and standard anthropometric techniques. In studies 1-3, 22/28, 32/65 and 11/14 participants adhered to their respective exercise programmes, and underwent significant increases in physical activity levels. Importantly, beneficial effects similar to those seen in our previous studies (eg, modulations in expression of monocytic PPARγ target genes, decreases in blood pressure/arterial stiffness, improvements in blood lipids/insulin sensitivity) were observed (albeit to slightly differing extents) only in participants who adhered to their respective exercise programmes. While study 1 achieved more intense exercise and more pronounced beneficial effects, significant cardiovascular risk-lowering health benefits related to biomolecular markers, blood pressure, arterial stiffness and blood lipids were achieved via community/referral-based delivery modes in studies 2 and 3. Because cardiovascular health benefits were observed in all 3 studies, we conclude that the majority of benefits previously reported in laboratory-based studies can also be achieved in community-based/exercise-referral settings. These findings may be of use in guiding policymakers with regard to introduction and/or continued

  5. Piloting a programme tool to evaluate malaria case investigation and reactive case detection activities: results from 3 settings in the Asia Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Chris; Sudathip, Prayuth; Herdiana, Herdiana; Cao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yaobao; Luo, Alex; Ranasinghe, Neil; Bennett, Adam; Cao, Jun; Gosling, Roly D

    2017-08-22

    Case investigation and reactive case detection (RACD) activities are widely-used in low transmission settings to determine the suspected origin of infection and identify and treat malaria infections nearby to the index patient household. Case investigation and RACD activities are time and resource intensive, include methodologies that vary across eliminating settings, and have no standardized metrics or tools available to monitor and evaluate them. In response to this gap, a simple programme tool was developed for monitoring and evaluating (M&E) RACD activities and piloted by national malaria programmes. During the development phase, four modules of the RACD M&E tool were created to assess and evaluate key case investigation and RACD activities and costs. A pilot phase was then carried out by programme implementers between 2013 and 2015, during which malaria surveillance teams in three different settings (China, Indonesia, Thailand) piloted the tool over a period of 3 months each. This study describes summary results of the pilots and feasibility and impact of the tool on programmes. All three study areas implemented the RACD M&E tool modules, and pilot users reported the tool and evaluation process were helpful to identify gaps in RACD programme activities. In the 45 health facilities evaluated, 71.8% (97/135; min 35.3-max 100.0%) of the proper notification and reporting forms and 20.0% (27/135; min 0.0-max 100.0%) of standard operating procedures (SOPs) were available to support malaria elimination activities. The tool highlighted gaps in reporting key data indicators on the completeness for malaria case reporting (98.8%; min 93.3-max 100.0%), case investigations (65.6%; min 61.8-max 78.4%) and RACD activities (70.0%; min 64.7-max 100.0%). Evaluation of the SOPs showed that knowledge and practices of malaria personnel varied within and between study areas. Average monthly costs for conducting case investigation and RACD activities showed variation between study

  6. A controlled clinical evaluation of the Parents Plus Children's Programme for parents of children aged 6-12 with mild intellectual disability in a school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Ailish; Raghallaigh, Ciara Ní; Cuppage, Jennifer; Coyle, Sadhbh; Sharry, John

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the parent training, Parents Plus Children's Programme (PPCP) as an intervention for parents of children with mild intellectual disabilities. Participants were parents of children, aged six to 12, attending a special school for children with mild general learning disability (n = 29). Minor programme adaptations were made. Pre and post-assessment included the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, the Parenting Stress Index, the Kansas Parent Satisfaction Scale and parent identified personal and child-related goals. A significant reduction in clinical range scores for treatment group participants (n = 16) was observed. Conversely, clinical range scores for control group participants (n = 13) increased, or remained elevated. These preliminary results suggest that PPCP may be successfully delivered as a routine community-based intervention and aid to prevent and reduce behavioural problems, reduce parent stress and increase parent confidence and satisfaction. Further investigation of programme effectiveness for parents of children with developmental disability is warranted.

  7. Evaluation of the Norwegian Programme for Development, Research and Education (NUFU) and of Norad´s Programme for Master Studies (NOMA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Henrik Secher; Mikkelsen, Britha; Thulstrup, Erik W.

    Evaluering af de norske statslige støtteprogrammer for forsknings- og udviklingssamarbejde mellem norske universiteter og universiteter i Syd-samarbejdslande......Evaluering af de norske statslige støtteprogrammer for forsknings- og udviklingssamarbejde mellem norske universiteter og universiteter i Syd-samarbejdslande...

  8. Development of a health promotion programme to improve awareness of factors that affect fertility, and evaluation of its reach in the first 5 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hammarberg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Awareness among people of reproductive age about the factors that influence fertility and reproductive outcomes, including medically assisted reproduction outcomes, is generally low. To improve awareness about the potentially modifiable factors that affect fertility and reproductive outcomes, ‘Your Fertility’, a fertility health promotion programme funded by the Australian Government, was established in 2011. This paper describes the development and evaluation of the reach of the Your Fertility programme from its inception in 2011 to June 2016. Systematically recorded outcomes for the programme’s key focus areas and Google Analytics data were collated. Key achievements include developing and maintaining an internationally renowned website that experiences high growth and demand for fertility-related information; by 2016, over 5 million users had viewed more than 10 million webpages, and over 96,000 users had engaged in programme messages across social media. Programme messages have reached more than 4 million Australian social media users, and a potential audience of 150 million through media coverage across more than 320 media features. More than 4200 education and health professionals have completed online learning modules, and external partnerships have been established with 14 separate organizations. Data collected over 5 years indicate that the Your Fertility programme meets a need for targeted, evidence-based, accessible fertility-related information.

  9. Clinical leadership and pre-registration nursing programmes: A model for clinical leadership and a prospective curriculum implementation and evaluation research strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela; Dewing, Jan; Crookes, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    To present for wider debate a conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a proposed implementation plan. Globally, leadership in nursing has become a significant issue. Whilst there is continued support for leadership preparation in pre-registration nursing programmes, there have been very few published accounts of curriculum content and/or pedagogical approaches that foster clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing. A doctoral research study has resulted in the creation of an overarching model for clinical leadership. A multi-method research study using theoretical and empirical literature 1974-2015, a focus group, expert opinion and a national on-line survey. A conceptual model of clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programme is presented, including the infinity loop of clinical leadership, an integral curriculum thread and a conceptual model: a curriculum-pedagogy nexus for clinical leadership. In order to test out usability and evaluate effectiveness, a multi method programme of research in one school of nursing in Australia is outlined. Implementation of the proposed conceptual model for clinical leadership development in pre-registration nursing programmes and a programme of (post-doctoral) research will contribute to what is known about curriculum content and pedagogy for nurse academics. Importantly, for nursing students and the profession as a whole, there is a clearer expectation of what clinical leadership might look like in the novice registered nurse. For nurse academics a model is offered for consideration in curriculum design and implementation with an evaluation strategy that could be replicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Maternal Health Component of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH II Programme in Beed District, Maharashtra, India 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dnyaneshwar Nipte,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Situation analysis of Reproductive and Child Health programme of Government of India in Beed district of Maharashtra state in India indicated lack of achievement of targeted maternal health indicators. Evaluation of the utilization of maternal health services component of Reproductive and Child Health (RCH II programme in Beed district of Maharashtra state in India was undertaken. Material and Methods: A cross sectional survey in the rural area of Beed district using cluster sampling method was conducted. The information about the utilization of maternal health services was collected from mothers who delivered between 1st April and 30th June 2013. A facility survey using pre tested check list was undertaken. Analysis of the data using Epi Info Version 3.5.3 and proportion for selected maternal health care indicators were calculated. Results: Out of the 374 mothers included in the study, 122 (33.0% had registered within first trimester of pregnancy; nearly 50% had received more than three antenatal care (ANC visits and 90% had institutional delivery. Of the 70 mothers, who made phone call for ambulance service, 56 (80% utilized ambulance from their residence to the hospitals. Of the 183 mothers who delivered in Government hospitals, 103 (56.3% utilized it to reach home from hospitals after delivery. Of the eligible women, 96 (76.2% were registered for Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY scheme of the Government and 67 (69.8% received the benefit. In all 46 (16.4% Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs were trained as Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA. Of the 22 facilities, 14 (63.6% had delivery kits and in 6 (27.3% facilities maternal health services were monitored by medical officers. Conclusion: The utilization of maternal health care services and knowledge and implementation regarding JSY Scheme and ambulance service utilization among mothers was less than desirable. The coverage of training of ANMs as SBA was low. Provision of antenatal services in

  11. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  12. Understanding the motivation and performance of community health volunteers involved in the delivery of health programmes in Kampala, Uganda: a realist evaluation protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareilles, Gaëlle; Pommier, Jeanine; Kane, Sumit; Pictet, Gabriel; Marchal, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The recruitment of community health volunteers to support the delivery of health programmes is a well-established approach in many countries, particularly where health services are not readily available. However, studies on management of volunteers are scarce and current research on human resource management of volunteers faces methodological challenges. This paper presents the protocol of a realist evaluation that aims at identifying the factors influencing the performance of community health volunteers involved in the delivery of a Red Cross immunisation programme in Kampala (Uganda) with a specific focus on motivation. Methods and analysis The realist evaluation cycle structures the protocol. To develop the theoretical basis for the evaluation, the authors conducted interviews and reviewed the literature on community health volunteers’ performance, management and organisational behaviour. This led to the formulation of the initial programme theory, which links the intervention inputs (capacity-building strategies) to the expected outcomes (positive work behaviour) with mechanisms that point in the direction of drivers of motivation. The contextual elements include components such as organisational culture, resource availability, etc. A case study design will be adopted. We define a case as a Red Cross branch, run by a programme manager, and will select two cases at the district level in Kampala. Mixed methods will be used in data collection, including individual interviews of volunteers, participant observation and document review. The thematic analysis will be based on the initial programme theory and will seek for context-mechanism-outcome configurations. Findings from the two cases will be compared. Discussion We discuss the scope for applying realist evaluation and the methodological challenges we encountered in developing this protocol. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethical Committee at Rennes University Hospital

  13. Process evaluation of two environmental nutrition programmes and an educational nutrition programme conducted at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.M. Steenhuis; P. van Assema (Patricia); A. Reubsaet; G.J. Kok (Gerjo)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis article describes the process evaluation of two environmental programs and a educational nutrition program, implemented at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias. Studies conducted earlier, indicated that the programs had no effect on consumers’ eating behavior. Consequently, the more

  14. Interdisciplinary research and education in the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems: a framework for evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloeschl, G.; Carr, G.; Loucks, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Greater understanding of how interdisciplinary research and education evolves is critical for identifying and implementing appropriate programme management strategies. We propose a program evaluation framework that is based on social learning processes (individual learning, interdisciplinary research practices, and interaction between researchers with different backgrounds); social capital outcomes (ability to interact, interpersonal connectivity, and shared understanding); and knowledge and human capital outcomes (new knowledge that integrates multiple research fields). The framework is tested on established case study doctoral program: the Vienna Doctoral Program on Water Resource Systems. Data are collected via mixed qualitative/quantitative methods that include semi-structured interviews, publication co-author analysis, analysis of research proposals, categorisation of the interdisciplinarity of publications and graduate analysis. Through the evaluation and analysis, several interesting findings about how interdisciplinary research evolves and can be supported are identified. Firstly, different aspects of individual learning seem to contribute to a researcher's ability to interact with researchers from other research fields and work collaboratively. These include learning new material from different research fields, learning how to learn new material and learning how to integrate different material. Secondly, shared interdisciplinary research practices can be identified that may be common to other programs and support interaction and shared understanding between different researchers. They include clarification and questioning, harnessing differences and setting defensible research boundaries. Thirdly, intensive interaction between researchers from different backgrounds support connectivity between the researchers, further enabling cross-disciplinary collaborative work. The case study data suggest that social learning processes and social capital outcomes

  15. Social participation of people with cognitive problems and their caregivers: a feasibility evaluation of the Social Fitness Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, H.W.; Veen, D.J. van der; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Sanden, M.W. van der; Graff, M.J.L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We developed a tailor-made intervention aimed at improving social participation of people with cognitive problems and their caregivers. This programme consists of an integration of healthcare and welfare interventions: occupational therapy, physiotherapy and guidance by a welfare

  16. Development and evaluation of two root caries controlling programmes for home-based frail people older than 75 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Kim; Martignon, Stefania; Holm-Pedersen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    (i) Initially, to devise and examine the validity of a system for determining lesion activity on root surfaces, and (ii) compare the effectiveness of two preventive programmes in controlling root caries in elderly people using the devised system....

  17. General conclusions arising from a field evaluation of the Agency's RAPAT and WAMAP programmes in the Asia and Pacific region 1984-1993. Special evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.; Fitch, J.; Cooley, C.; Saire, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Palacios, E.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the assistance provided to the developing Member States of IAEA in the areas of radiation protection and radioactive waste management, two advisory programmes were established by IAEA. The radiation Protection Advisory Teams (RAPATs) in 1984, and the Radioactive Waste Management Programme (WAMAP) in 1987. This report summarizes general achievements, finding, conclusions and recommendations regarding these two programmes in Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, and Philippines

  18. Evaluation of a Regional Retrofit Programme to Upgrade Existing Housing Stock to Reduce Carbon Emissions, Fuel Poverty and Support the Local Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Louise Patterson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first-ever legally binding global climate deal that will be adopted by 195 countries was introduced in Paris in 2015, highlighting that climate change is being recognised as a real and urgent global problem. Legislative interventions need to be accompanied by significant action across all sectors of the built environment through reducing energy demand, providing energy supply from low carbon sources and combining with this with energy storage to enable necessary targets to be met. Retrofitting existing buildings is critical to making these cuts as 80% of buildings currently in existence will still be present in 2050. These retrofits need to be undertaken rapidly using replicable and affordable solutions that benefit both the householder whilst significantly reducing emissions. This paper will present an evaluation of a £9.6 million regional scale retrofit programme funded under the Welsh Governments Arbed 1 Programme which aimed to reduce fuel poverty, reduce carbon emissions and support the energy efficiency and renewable supply chain and encourage recruitment and training in the sector. Results have been obtained from desk top data collection and energy modelling calculations. The evaluation work presents the technical, environmental and economic impacts of the programme and demonstrates lessons learnt to help improve the implementation of the other regional retrofit projects providing evidence of the impacts of a large scale retrofit programme that are necessary for the deep carbon reductions required in the near future.

  19. Better health at work? An evaluation of the effects and cost-benefits of a structured workplace health improvement programme in reducing sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, T; Bambra, C; Booth, M; Adetayo, K; Milne, E

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Better Health at Work Award-a structured regional workplace health programme which combined changes to the work environment with lifestyle interventions. Baseline and follow-up data on sickness-absence rates and programme costs were collected retrospectively via a web survey of all participating organizations. Changes over time were calculated using 95% confidence intervals of the mean, supplemented by hypothesis testing using a t-test. The indicative cost-benefits of the intervention were also calculated. Participation was associated with a mean reduction in sickness absence of 0.26-1.6 days per employee per year depending on the length and level of participation in the programme. The estimated cost for the programme was £3 per sickness-absence day saved. These results suggest that the Better Health at Work Award could be a cost-effective way of improving health and reducing sickness absence particularly in the public sector. However, controlled evaluations of future interventions are needed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Exogenous factors matter when interpreting the results of an impact evaluation: a case study of rainfall and child health programme intervention in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukabutera, Assumpta; Thomson, Dana R; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Atwood, Sidney; Basinga, Paulin; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Savage, Kevin P; Habimana, Marcellin; Murray, Megan

    2017-12-01

    Public health interventions are often implemented at large scale, and their evaluation seems to be difficult because they are usually multiple and their pathways to effect are complex and subject to modification by contextual factors. We assessed whether controlling for rainfall-related variables altered estimates of the efficacy of a health programme in rural Rwanda and have a quantifiable effect on an intervention evaluation outcomes. We conducted a retrospective quasi-experimental study using previously collected cross-sectional data from the 2005 and 2010 Rwanda Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), 2010 DHS oversampled data, monthly rainfall data collected from meteorological stations over the same period, and modelled output of long-term rainfall averages, soil moisture, and rain water run-off. Difference-in-difference models were used. Rainfall factors confounded the PIH intervention impact evaluation. When we adjusted our estimates of programme effect by controlling for a variety of rainfall variables, several effectiveness estimates changed by 10% or more. The analyses that did not adjust for rainfall-related variables underestimated the intervention effect on the prevalence of ARI by 14.3%, fever by 52.4% and stunting by 10.2%. Conversely, the unadjusted analysis overestimated the intervention's effect on diarrhoea by 56.5% and wasting by 80%. Rainfall-related patterns have a quantifiable effect on programme evaluation results and highlighted the importance and complexity of controlling for contextual factors in quasi-experimental design evaluations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Can workers with chronic back pain shift from pain elimination to function restore at work? Qualitative evaluation of an innovative work related multidisciplinary programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Peter C; Lambeek, Ludeke C; Koppenrade, Vera; Hooftman, Wendela E; Anema, Johannes R

    2009-01-01

    Workers with chronic low back pain (LBP) mean a heavy human and social-economic burden. Their medical histories often include different treatments without attention to work-relatedness or communication with occupational health providers, leaving them passive and medicalized in (outpatient) health care. So we developed and implemented an innovative, patient-activating alternative: the multidisciplinary outpatient care (MOC) programme, including work(place) intervention and graded activity. It aims at function restore (instead of pain elimination), return to work (RTW) and coordinated communication. To qualitatively explore how patients and health care providers perceive the programme effectiveness and which factors influence its implementation. In-depth, semi structured interview with patients and focus groups of health care providers are used, all recorded, transformed into verbatim transcript and analysed. This qualitative study shows that although patients' expectations were low at the start of the program, and despite long LBP histories, including many different therapies, (primarily) directed at pain reduction, the MOC programme was successful in changing patients' goal setting from pain oriented towards function restore and RTW. The programme was therefore perceived as applicable and effective. Patient compliance was influenced by barriers - despair, supervisory and subordinate resistance at work, waiting period, medicalisation in health care - and facilitators: disciplinary motivation, protocolled communication, information supply, tailor-made exercises. For some patients the barriers were too high. Several improvement suggestions were given. This qualitative study shows that generally, patients and professionals perceived the multidisciplinary outpatient care programme as applicable and effective. After incorporating improvement suggestions this program seems promising for further, broader application and hypothesis testing. For those, negatively evaluating

  2. Randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of the 'Families for Health' programme to reduce obesity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wendy; Fleming, Joanna; Kamal, Atiya; Hamborg, Thomas; Khan, Kamran A; Griffiths, Frances; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Petrou, Stavros; Simkiss, Douglas; Harrison, Elizabeth; Kim, Sung Wook; Thorogood, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 'Families for Health V2' (FFH) compared with usual care (UC). Multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) (investigators blinded, families unblinded) and economic evaluation. Stratified randomisation by family; target of 120 families. Three National Health Service Primary Care Trusts in West Midlands, England. Overweight or obese (≥91st or ≥98th centile body mass index (BMI)) children aged 6-11 years and their parents/carers, recruited March 2012-February 2014. FFH; a 10-week community-based family programme addressing parenting, lifestyle change and social and emotional development. UC; usual support for childhood obesity at each site. Primary outcomes were 12-months change in children's BMI z-score and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained (QALY). Secondary outcomes included changes in children's physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption and quality of life, parents' BMI and mental well-being, family eating/activity, parent-child relationships and parenting style. 115 families (128 children) were randomised to FFH (n=56) or UC (n=59). There was no significant difference in BMI z-score 12-months change (0.114, 95% CI -0.001 to 0.229, p=0.053; p=0.026 in favour of UC with missing value multiple imputation). One secondary outcome, change in children's waist z-score, was significantly different between groups in favour of UC (0.15, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.29). Economic evaluation showed that mean costs were significantly higher for FFH than UC (£998 vs £548, p<0.001). Mean incremental cost-effectiveness of FFH was estimated at £552 175 per QALY. FFH was neither effective nor cost-effective for the management of obesity compared with UC. ISRCTN45032201. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Designing evaluation studies to optimally inform policy: what factors do policy-makers in China consider when making resource allocation decisions on healthcare worker training programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shishi; Legido-Quigley, Helena; Spencer, Julia; Coker, Richard James; Khan, Mishal Sameer

    2018-02-23

    In light of the gap in evidence to inform future resource allocation decisions about healthcare provider (HCP) training in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and the considerable donor investments being made towards training interventions, evaluation studies that are optimally designed to inform local policy-makers are needed. The aim of our study is to understand what features of HCP training evaluation studies are important for decision-making by policy-makers in LMICs. We investigate the extent to which evaluations based on the widely used Kirkpatrick model - focusing on direct outcomes of training, namely reaction of trainees, learning, behaviour change and improvements in programmatic health indicators - align with policy-makers' evidence needs for resource allocation decisions. We use China as a case study where resource allocation decisions about potential scale-up (using domestic funding) are being made about an externally funded pilot HCP training programme. Qualitative data were collected from high-level officials involved in resource allocation at the national and provincial level in China through ten face-to-face, in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions consisting of ten participants each. Data were analysed manually using an interpretive thematic analysis approach. Our study indicates that Chinese officials not only consider information about the direct outcomes of a training programme, as captured in the Kirkpatrick model, but also need information on the resources required to implement the training, the wider or indirect impacts of training, and the sustainability and scalability to other settings within the country. In addition to considering findings presented in evaluation studies, we found that Chinese policy-makers pay close attention to whether the evaluations were robust and to the composition of the evaluation team. Our qualitative study indicates that training programme evaluations that focus narrowly on direct training

  4. Evaluation of nurses’ changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J; Zuidema, Sytse U; Dees, Marianne K; Hermsen, Pieter G J M; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Graff, Maud J L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To gain insights into the process of nurses’ changing perceptions when trained to implement a self-management programme for dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care, and into the factors that contributed to these changes in their perceptions. Design Qualitative study alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 17 long-term care homes spread across the Netherlands. Participants 34 licensed practical nurses supporting 54 dual sensory impaired older adults. Intervention A 5-month training programme designed to enable nurses to support the self-management of dual sensory impaired older adults in long-term care. Primary outcomes Nurses’ perceptions on relevance and feasibility of the self-management programme collected from nurses’ semistructured coaching diaries over the 5-month training and intervention period, as well as from trainers’ reports. Results Nurses’ initial negative perceptions on relevance and feasibility of the intervention changed to positive as nurses better understood the concept of autonomy. Through interactions with older adults and by self-evaluations of the effect of their behaviour, nurses discovered that their usual care conflicted with client autonomy. From that moment, nurses felt encouraged to adapt their behaviour to the older adults’ autonomy needs. However, nurses’ initial unfamiliarity with conversation techniques required a longer exploration period than planned. Once client autonomy was understood, nurses recommended expanding the intervention as a generic approach to all their clients, whether dual sensory impaired or not. Conclusions Longitudinal data collection enabled exploration of nurses’ changes in perceptions when moving towards self-management support. The training programme stimulated nurses to go beyond ‘protocol thinking’, discovering client autonomy and exploring the need for their own behavioural adaptations. Educational programmes for practical nurses should offer

  5. Current status of nuclear decay data and report on the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium isotope nuclear decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, C.W.; Vaninbroukx, R.

    1984-01-01

    In 1977, the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Programme to address the needs for highly accurate actinide-nuclide decay data identified at the first Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in Karlsruhe in 1975. During the years of its existence, this CRP has made significant strides towards achieving the goals outlined at Karlsruhe and subsequently refined at a second Advisory Group Meeting, held in Cadarache in 1979. In this paper, the make-up of the CRP and its work in the areas of decay-data measurement and evaluation are presented and its significant accomplishments summarized. We also discuss the contents and philosophy of the final report, containing the results of the measurements and evaluations carried out by the CRP participants, to be published following the planned termination of this Programme in November, 1984. 82 references

  6. The acceptability, feasibility and impact of a lay health counsellor delivered health promoting schools programme in India: a case study evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaraman Divya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in resource-limited settings have shown that there are constraints to the use of teachers, peers or health professionals to deliver school health promotion interventions. School health programmes delivered by trained lay health counsellors could offer a cost-effective alternative. This paper presents a case study of a multi-component school health promotion intervention in India that was delivered by lay school health counsellors, who possessed neither formal educational nor health provider qualifications. Methods The intervention was based on the WHO’s Health Promoting Schools framework, and included health screening camps; an anonymous letter box for student questions and complaints; classroom-based life skills training; and, individual psycho-social and academic counselling for students. The intervention was delivered by a lay school health counsellor who had attained a minimum of a high school education. The counsellor was trained over four weeks and received structured supervision from health professionals working for the implementing NGO. The evaluation design was a mixed methods case study. Quantitative process indicators were collected to assess the extent to which the programme was delivered as planned (feasibility, the uptake of services (acceptability, and the number of students who received corrective health treatment (evidence of impact. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over two years with 108 stakeholders, and were analysed to identify barriers and facilitators for the programme (feasibility, evaluate acceptability, and gather evidence of positive or negative effects of the programme. Results Feasibility was established by the high reported coverage of all the targeted activities by the school health counsellor. Acceptability was indicated by a growing number of submissions to the students’ anonymous letter-box; more students self-referring for counselling services over time; and, the

  7. The acceptability, feasibility and impact of a lay health counsellor delivered health promoting schools programme in India: a case study evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Divya; Travasso, Sandra; Chatterjee, Achira; Bhat, Bhargav; Andrew, Gracy; Parab, Suraj; Patel, Vikram

    2012-05-25

    Studies in resource-limited settings have shown that there are constraints to the use of teachers, peers or health professionals to deliver school health promotion interventions. School health programmes delivered by trained lay health counsellors could offer a cost-effective alternative. This paper presents a case study of a multi-component school health promotion intervention in India that was delivered by lay school health counsellors, who possessed neither formal educational nor health provider qualifications. The intervention was based on the WHO's Health Promoting Schools framework, and included health screening camps; an anonymous letter box for student questions and complaints; classroom-based life skills training; and, individual psycho-social and academic counselling for students. The intervention was delivered by a lay school health counsellor who had attained a minimum of a high school education. The counsellor was trained over four weeks and received structured supervision from health professionals working for the implementing NGO. The evaluation design was a mixed methods case study. Quantitative process indicators were collected to assess the extent to which the programme was delivered as planned (feasibility), the uptake of services (acceptability), and the number of students who received corrective health treatment (evidence of impact). Semi-structured interviews were conducted over two years with 108 stakeholders, and were analysed to identify barriers and facilitators for the programme (feasibility), evaluate acceptability, and gather evidence of positive or negative effects of the programme. Feasibility was established by the high reported coverage of all the targeted activities by the school health counsellor. Acceptability was indicated by a growing number of submissions to the students' anonymous letter-box; more students self-referring for counselling services over time; and, the perceived need for the programme, as expressed by principals

  8. From root to fruit – flourishing in change. Evaluation of a development programme for practice development facilitators in end-of-life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Dickson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper outlines the structure, processes and outcomes of a 12-month development programme for nurses who were transitioning from a practice-based training role to a practice development role. The programme was part of organisational commitment to develop a person-centred culture. A new team of practice development facilitators across the UK was formed at Marie Curie, a UK-based charity supporting persons with palliative and end-of-life care needs. Aim: The overall aim of the programme was to enable practice development facilitators to engage with the theory and practice of practice development, and to develop as enablers in the delivery of person-centred practice. Method: A co-designed, multimethod evaluation of the programme, which adopted emancipatory practice development and active learning methodologies. Data collection included fourth-generation evaluation, reflective writing, participant stories and examples of practice change. Findings: The programme supported a change in focus of participants’ role from technical to emancipatory. The team identified new ways of engaging together that enabled them to embody person-centredness. By experiencing active learning, they came to a better understanding of themselves and their practice. Throughout the programme, the team experienced a range of organisational challenges that impacted on their progress. Development of facilitation skills and a strong community of practice will enhance the embeddedness and sustainability of the new role. Conclusions: Facilitators of practice development can be catalysts in the development of person-centred cultures, which are indicative of flourishing organisations. To be sustainable, initiatives such as this one need to be included in organisational strategy. A sense of wellbeing and renewed commitment to develop practice in ways that keep person-centred care at its heart can be experienced through experiencing human flourishing. Key messages:

  9. Art, music, story: The evaluation of a person-centred arts in health programme in an acute care older persons' unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Karen; Tesch, Leigh; Dawborn, Jacqueline; Courtney-Pratt, Helen

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of an arts in health programme delivered by a specialised artist within an acute older person's unit. Acute hospitals must meet the increasingly complex needs of older people who experience multiple comorbidities, often including cognitive impairment, either directly related to their admission or longer term conditions, including dementia. A focus on physical illness, efficiency and tasks within an acute care environment can all divert attention from the psychosocial well-being of patients. This focus also decreases capacity for person-centred approaches that acknowledge and value the older person, their life story, relationships and the care context. The importance of arts for health and wellness, including responsiveness to individual need, is well established: however, there is little evidence about its effectiveness for older people in acute hospital settings. We report on a collaborative arts in health programme on an acute medical ward for older people. The qualitative study used collaborative enquiry underpinned by a constructivist approach to evaluate an arts programme that involved participatory art-making activities, customised music, song and illustration work, and enlivening the unit environment. Data sources included observation of art activities, semi-structured interviews with patients and family members, and focus groups with staff. Data were transcribed and thematically analysed using a line by line approach. The programme had positive impacts for the environment, patients, families and staff. The environment exhibited changes as a result of programme outputs; patients and families were engaged and enjoyed activities that aided recovery from illness; and staff also enjoyed activities and importantly learnt new ways of working with patients. An acute care arts in health programme is a carefully nuanced programme where the skills of the arts health worker are critical to success. Utilising such skill, continued focus on person

  10. Self-imposed evaluation of the Helmholtz Research School MICMoR as a tool for quality assurance and advancement of a structured graduate programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elija Bleher, Bärbel; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scholz, Beate

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz Research School MICMoR (Mechanisms and Interactions of Climate Change in Mountain Regions) offers a structured graduate programme for doctoral students in the field of climate change research. It is hosted by the Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (KIT/IMK-IFU) in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, in collaboration with 7 Bavarian partner universities and research institutions. Hence, MICMoR brings together a considerably large network with currently 20 doctoral students and 55 scientists. MICMoR offers scientific and professional skills training, provides a state-of-the-art supervision concept, and fosters international exchange and interdisciplinary collaboration. In order to develop and advance its programme, MICMoR has committed itself to a self-imposed mid-term review in its third year, to monitor to which extent its original objectives have been reached, and to explore and identify where MICMoR has room for improvement. The evaluation especially focused on recruitment, supervision, training, networking and cooperation. Carried out by an external expert (Beate Scholz from scholz ctc), the evaluation was based on a mixed methods approach, i.e. combining a quantitative survey involving all doctoral candidates as well as their supervisors and focus groups with different MICMoR stakeholders. The evaluation has brought forward some highly interesting results, pinpointing challenges and opportunities of setting up a structured doctoral programme. Overall, the evaluation proved to be a useful tool for evidence-based programme and policy planning, and demonstrated a high level of satisfaction of supervisors and fellows. Supervision, with facets ranging from disciplinary feedback to career advice, is demanding and requires strong commitment and adequate human resources development by all parties involved. Thus, MICMoR plans to offer mentor coaching and calls on supervisors and mentors to form a community of learners with their doctoral students. To

  11. Crispv programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovicj, N.

    CRISPV (Criticality and Spectrum code) is a multigroup neutron spectrum code for homogeneous reactor cores and is actually a somewhat modified version of the original CRISP programme. It is a combination of DATAPREP-II and BIGG-II programmes. It is assumed that the reactor cell is a cylindrical fuel rod in the light or heavy water moderator. DATEPREP-II CODE forms the multigroup data for homogeneous reactor and prepares the input parameters for the BIGG-II code. It has its own nuclear data library on a separate tape in binary mode. BIGG-II code is a multigroup neutron spectrum and criticality code for a homogenized medium. It has as well its own separate data library. In the CRISPV programme the overlay structure enables automatic handling of data calculated in the DATAPREP-II programme and needed in the BIGG-II core. Both programmes are written in FORTRAN for CDC 3600. Using the programme is very efficient and simple

  12. Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Realizing the potential of labelled monoclonal antibodies for in vivo diagnosis and therapy and the interest in many developing Member States for acquiring expertise in this field the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme in 1991 focusing on {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of antibodies, their quality control and scintigraphic evaluation. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Latin America, Europe and North America participated in this programme which was concluded in 1996. During this programme the participants investigated the {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of a murine anti-CEA antibody using the method of chelating {sup 99}Tc{sup m} with the free sulfhydryl groups generated by reaction with reducing agents such as mercapto ethanol. During the later part of the programme this method was also extended to {sup 99}Tc{sup m} labelling of hIgG. All the participating laboratories could gain valuable experience in {sup 99}Tc{sup m} antibody labelling techniques and formulation of kits. Many of them have been use in patients by collaborating nuclear medicine specialists with satisfactory results. This report is a compilation of the detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories and includes a summary and assessment of the achievement of the CRP. Refs, figs, tabs.

  13. Labelling, quality control and clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    Realizing the potential of labelled monoclonal antibodies for in vivo diagnosis and therapy and the interest in many developing Member States for acquiring expertise in this field the IAEA initiated a co-ordinated research programme in 1991 focusing on 99 Tc m labelling of antibodies, their quality control and scintigraphic evaluation. Twelve laboratories from Asia, Latin America, Europe and North America participated in this programme which was concluded in 1996. During this programme the participants investigated the 99 Tc m labelling of a murine anti-CEA antibody using the method of chelating 99 Tc m with the free sulfhydryl groups generated by reaction with reducing agents such as mercapto ethanol. During the later part of the programme this method was also extended to 99 Tc m labelling of hIgG. All the participating laboratories could gain valuable experience in 99 Tc m antibody labelling techniques and formulation of kits. Many of them have been use in patients by collaborating nuclear medicine specialists with satisfactory results. This report is a compilation of the detailed results obtained by the participating laboratories and includes a summary and assessment of the achievement of the CRP

  14. Food sustainability education as a route to healthier eating: evaluation of a multi-component school programme in English primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Dailami, N; Weitkamp, E; Salmon, D; Kimberlee, R; Morley, A; Orme, J

    2012-06-01

    Promising approaches to the promotion of healthier eating among children in primary school settings include the opportunity to practise practical cooking and growing, promoting the take up of healthier school meals and nutritional education. However, less is known about the potential for strategies that integrate approaches through a focus on food sustainability issues--such as the promotion of awareness about local, seasonal, organic, fair trade and higher animal welfare foods. This paper presents an evaluation of the Food for Life Partnership, a multi-component programme that sought to address both the health and sustainability aspects of food. The study consisted of a two-stage cross-sectional survey of Years 5 and 6 students (ages 9-11) in 30 primary schools at enrolment and after 18-24 months, combined with an analysis of programme delivery. Higher self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption in the second stage survey was associated with a range of indicators of school participation in the programme. These included the reform of school meal procurement and preparation; experiential food growing, cooking and farm-based education and improved opportunities for stakeholder engagement. The study therefore develops a case for multilevel programmes that incorporate sustainability issues alongside experiential food education in primary school settings.

  15. Evaluation of a Staff Training Programme using Positive Psychology coaching with film and theatre elements in care homes: views and attitudes of residents, staff and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Ledgerd, Ritchard; Orrell, Martin

    2017-03-01

    There is a recognised need to improve staff training in care homes. The aim of this study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP), a staff training programme aimed at enhancing staff-resident communication. Focus groups were conducted with residents able to provide consent; staff and relatives and managers were interviewed in two care homes. A theoretical framework was developed to interpret the impact of CCSEP using Framework Analysis. Residents noted that the programme appeared to result in staff interacting more with them, as well as enjoying working together as a team. Staff reported an improved sense of teamwork, developing more positive attitudes towards residents, as well as their concerns about using theatrical techniques in the care setting. Relatives identified care home organisational aspects as being barriers to implementation, and some regarded CCSEP simply as 'entertainment' rather than 'creative care'. This study provides an insight into the potential of this staff training programme to improve staff-resident interactions. However, participants' varying views of CCSEP highlight the need to brief staff, residents and relatives before implementation so as to enable full understanding of the aim. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Patent extension policy for paediatric indications: an evaluation of the impact within three drug classes in a state Medicaid programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard E; McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Evans, Megan L; Ward, Robert; Campbell, Benjamin; Brixner, Diana; Lafleur, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) of 1997, Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) of 2002 and Pediatric Research Equity Act of 2007 provide an extended period of 6 months of marketing exclusivity (i.e. patent extension) to prescription drug manufacturers that conduct paediatric studies. Branded drugs in the statin, ACE inhibitor and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) classes were three of many classes with drugs granted patent extensions. We estimated the cost impact of the 6-month exclusivity extension policy on the Utah Medicaid drug programme by comparing actual costs to projected costs had the 6-month exclusivity extension not been granted for these drugs and thus less expensive generic alternatives been available sooner. Using these results, we then projected the cost impact of this policy on Medicaid programmes in the US during the 18 months following patent expiration. The Utah Medicaid prescription claims obtained for statins, ACE inhibitors and SSRIs included reimbursement amount, number of units dispensed, days supplied, date of service and drug strength. Actual expenditures for each drug were calculated for the 6 months before and 12 months after generic availability. The percentage difference between the brand name prescription reimbursement amount to Medicaid in the last 2 months of the 6-month extension and the generic prescription reimbursement amount to Medicaid in the first 2 months following exclusivity expiration was then calculated for each drug. This was done using data from the 5 months surrounding the exclusivity expiration by regressing the log-transformed Utah Medicaid reimbursement amount on an indicator for patent expiration, controlling for number of units, volume of sales, month filled and strength. This was used to estimate what the initial generic prescription price would have been without the 6-month patent extension and what costs would have been in the 18 months following the original

  17. Resolving a double standard for risk management of thalidomide: an evaluation of two different risk management programmes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugumichi; Watanabe, Hikaru; Kubota, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Thalidomide, once withdrawn because of its teratogenicity, has now been re-launched worldwide. In Japan, thalidomide has been imported by individual doctors since around the year 2000. In October 2008, it was approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) on the condition that the manufacturer implemented a risk management programme termed the Thalidomide Education and Risk Management System (TERMS). It is likely that the imports of thalidomide will be used off-label to treat diseases other than MM. Thus, the MHLW is also planning to introduce a web-based registration system, referred to as the Safety Management System for Unapproved Drugs (SMUD), for thalidomide imported by individual doctors. To evaluate the difference between TERMS and SMUD and establish a way to resolve the 'double standard' for risk management of thalidomide treatment in Japan. The fraction of patients with disorders other than MM was estimated by the volume of annual imports obtained from the MHLW and records of the imports for patients with MM, other oncological diseases (ODs) and non-ODs in 2007 through a major supplier covering 63% of the total imported thalidomide. The information for TERMS was obtained from web pages of the manufacturer and the MHLW. The components of TERMS were compared with those in SMUD. Provided that the distribution of the indication for thalidomide (MM) in 2007, estimated from the records of imports through the major supplier, is representative of the entire nation, it is estimated that on average 866 patients, including 851 (98.3%) with MM, are using thalidomide on any one day. However, if the major supplier's imports, which account for 63% of the total imports, are not representative of the nation as a whole, possibly only half of the patients treated with thalidomide in Japan have MM. This would be the case in a scenario where the remaining 37% of imports are exclusively used to treat disorders other than

  18. Scaling up nurse education: An evaluation of a national PhD capacity development programme in South Africa, in the context of the global shortage of nursing graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiskey, Catherine M; Matthews, Anne; Williamson, Charmaine; Bruce, Judith; Mulaudzi, Mavis; Klopper, Hester

    2015-05-01

    The global shortage of nursing professionals educated at baccalaureate level and beyond has been highlighted. Within America, services are preparing to treat an additional 32 million individuals under the Health Reform Bill. Within South Africa nursing education outputs do not meet demands. Countries are addressing these shortages by developing advanced nurse roles which require research degrees. To evaluate a national PhD programme within the context of a nurse education strategy and a national health insurance plan. A comparative effectiveness research design was employed. The setting was in South Africa between 2011 and 2013, a county with 51.7 million inhabitants. Participants included PhD candidates, programme facilitators, supervisors and key stakeholders. Data from a one day workshop was analysed using an inductive thematic analysis. Three years of evaluation reports were analysed. A mapping of the alignment of the PhD topics with healthcare priorities, and a comparison of the development of nurse education, of the national and international funder were conducted. The evaluation reports rated the programme highly. Three themes were identified from the workshop. These were, "support" with the sub-themes of burden, leveraging and a physical supportive place; "planning" with the sub-themes of the national context and practice, and "quality" with the sub-themes of processes and monitoring and evaluation. The mapping of PhD topics revealed that research was in line with development priorities. However, further investment and infrastructural changes were necessary to sustain the programme and its impact. To address sustainability and capacity in nations scaling up nurse education and healthcare insurance, it was recommended that top-up degrees for diploma educated nurses be developed along with, the implementation of a national nursing strategy for PhD and post-doctoral training encompassing clinical practice implementation and collaboration. Copyright © 2015

  19. [The methods within the evaluation of disease management programmes in control-group designs using the example of diabetes mellitus - a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, A; Sawicki, P T; Müller, D; Passon, A; Stock, S

    2012-08-01

    Disease management programmes (DMPs) were implemented in Germany in 2002. Their evaluation is required by law. Beyond the mandatory evaluation, a growing number of published studies evaluate the DMP for diabetes mellitus type 2 in a control-group design. As patients opt into the programme on a voluntary basis it is necessary to adjust the inherent selection bias between groups. The aim of this study is to review published studies which evaluate the diabetes DMP using a control-group design with respect to the methods used. A systematic literature review of electronic databases (PUBMED, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDPILOT) and a hand search of reference lists of the relevant publications was conducted to identify studies evaluating the DMP diabetes mellitus in a control-group design. 8 studies were included in the systematic literature review. 4 studies gathered retrospective claims data from sickness funds, one from physician's records, one study used prospective data from ambulatory care, and 2 studies were based on one patient survey. Methods used for adjustment of selection bias included exact matching, matching using propensity score methods, age-adjusted and sex-separated analysis, and adjustment in a regression model/analysis of covariance. One study did not apply adjustment methods. The intervention period ranged from 1 day to 4 years. Considered outcomes of studies (surrogate parameter, diabetes complications, mortality, quality of life, and claim data) depended on the database. In the evaluation of the DMP diabetes mellitus based on a control-group design neither the database nor the methods used for selection bias adjustment were consistent in the available studies. Effectiveness of DMPs cannot be judged based on this review due to heterogeneity of study designs. To allow for a comprehensive programme evaluation standardised minimum requirements for the evaluation of DMPs in the control group design are required. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New

  20. Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RDandD Programme 2004. Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration of Methods for the Management and Disposal of Nuclear Waste, including Social Science Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    SKB has submitted RDandD Programme 2004 to SKI for review in accordance with the Act (1984:3) on Nuclear Activities. Based on SKI's review and the review statements received, SKI considers that: - SKB, and thereby the reactor owners, have fulfilled their obligations in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act (1984:3) on Nuclear Activities, - Disposal in accordance with the KBS-3 concept seems to still be the most suitable way of disposing of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme. SKI would like to draw the Government's attention to the following evaluations and comments: - The question of who is responsible after the closure of a repository for spent nuclear fuel needs to be clarified. - SKB's plan of action is incomplete and its structure needs to be improved. The revised plan of action needs a more detailed account of the content of the basis for decision-making that SKB intends to present on different decision-making occasions. - As soon as possible, SKB should develop design premises for the canister and verify these premises in the next safety assessment which is planned for 2006. A clear and logical link between the detailed design premises for the canister and the requirements on long-term safety of the repository is still lacking. - SKB should specify the limits for different parameters that are of importance for the canister function. The account must be based on an identification of defects that can occur and their consequences for canister integrity and repository function. - SKB should clarify how the work on KBS-3H (horizontal deposition of the canisters) is to be developed. An estimate of how much time and resources will be required is needed in order to prepare a body of material corresponding to that for KBS-3V (vertical deposition which is, so far, the most studied concept). - SKB should continue to participate in and contribute to the development of methodology for safeguards in connection with the disposal process. The area

  1. Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RDandD Programme 2004. Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration of Methods for the Management and Disposal of Nuclear Waste, including Social Science Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    SKB has submitted RDandD Programme 2004 to SKI for review in accordance with the Act (1984:3) on Nuclear Activities. Based on SKI's review and the review statements received, SKI considers that: - SKB, and thereby the reactor owners, have fulfilled their obligations in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act (1984:3) on Nuclear Activities, - Disposal in accordance with the KBS-3 concept seems to still be the most suitable way of disposing of spent nuclear fuel from the Swedish nuclear power programme. SKI would like to draw the Government's attention to the following evaluations and comments: - The question of who is responsible after the closure of a repository for spent nuclear fuel needs to be clarified. - SKB's plan of action is incomplete and its structure needs to be improved. The revised plan of action needs a more detailed account of the content of the basis for decision-making that SKB intends to present on different decision-making occasions. - As soon as possible, SKB should develop design premises for the canister and verify these premises in the next safety assessment which is planned for 2006. A clear and logical link between the detailed design premises for the canister and the requirements on long-term safety of the repository is still lacking. - SKB should specify the limits for different parameters that are of importance for the canister function. The account must be based on an identification of defects that can occur and their consequences for canister integrity and repository function. - SKB should clarify how the work on KBS-3H (horizontal deposition of the canisters) is to be developed. An estimate of how much time and resources will be required is needed in order to prepare a body of material corresponding to that for KBS-3V (vertical deposition which is, so far, the most studied concept). - SKB should continue to participate in and contribute to the development of methodology for safeguards in connection with the disposal process. The area

  2. A Pre-Post Evaluation of OpenMinds: a Sustainable, Peer-Led Mental Health Literacy Programme in Universities and Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Praveetha; Annis, Jennifer; Sharpe, Helen; Newman, Robbie; Main, Dominic; Ragunathan, Thivvia; Parkes, Mary; Clarke, Kelly

    2017-11-01

    Engaging young people in the design and delivery of mental health education could lead to more effective interventions; however, few of these interventions have been evaluated. This study aimed to gain preliminary evidence with regards to the efficacy and acceptability of OpenMinds: a peer-designed and facilitated mental health literacy programme for university and secondary school students. The programme involves a structured programme of education and training for university medical students, who then deliver workshops in secondary schools. Pre- and post-surveys were completed by 234 school students who received two workshops and 40 university medical students who completed the OpenMinds programme and delivered the workshops. The main outcomes in both groups were components of mental health literacy (non-stigmatising attitudes, knowledge, social distance and helping attitudes). Perceived teaching efficacy and interest in mental health careers (university medical students) and workshop acceptability (school students) were also examined. University and school student participation in OpenMinds was associated with significant improvements in three of four mental health literacy elements in both samples. Knowledge and attitudes improved in both samples, social distance improved only in the university sample and knowledge of helping behaviours increased in the school sample. University students' perceived teaching efficacy improved but there was no change in their reported interest in pursuing psychiatry in their career. Acceptability was high; over 70% of the school students agreed that they enjoyed the workshops and liked being taught by a university student. This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability and efficacy of OpenMinds as a sustainable peer-led model of mental health education for young people. The OpenMinds programme is ready for efficacy testing in a randomised trial.

  3. Sex and Relationships Education in Schools--Evaluation of a Pilot Programme for the Certification of Community Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Helen; Tyrer, Paul; Aggleton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In support of the UK Government's teenage pregnancy and sexual health strategies, a certificated programme of professional development for school nurses and other community nurses was developed to provide support for personal, social and health education (PSHE) work, including sex and relationships education (SRE), for young people.…

  4. Lifestyle Knowledge and Preferences in Preschool Children: Evaluation of the "Get up and Grow" Healthy Lifestyle Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Nicola; Harris, Neil; Lee, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early childhood is considered a window of opportunity for lifestyle interventions, as this is a critical life-stage at which children accumulate knowledge and skills around behaviours such as eating and physical activity. This study examined how exposure to a settings-based healthy lifestyle programme influences knowledge and preference…

  5. Evaluating the effect of policies and interventions to address inequalities in health: lessons from a Dutch programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, Karien; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many initiatives have been taken in European countries that are designed to reduce inequalities in health. However, the effects of only a very few of these initiatives have been assessed. The main aim of a Dutch research and development programme was to systematically investigate and

  6. The Implementation and Evaluation of a Project-Oriented Problem-Based Learning Module in a First Year Engineering Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoone, Seamus C.; Lawlor, Bob J.; Meehan, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how a circuits-based project-oriented problem-based learning educational model was integrated into the first year of a Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering programme at Maynooth University, Ireland. While many variations of problem based learning exist, the presented model is closely aligned with the model used in…

  7. Qualitative Evaluation of a Physical Activity Health Promotion Programme for People with Intellectual Disabilities in a Group Home Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Ibarra, A.; Driver, S.; Nery-Hurwit, M.; VanVolkenburg, H.

    2018-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of health promotion programming designed to change the physical activity environment of the group home setting. The Menu-Choice programme assists staff in creating physical activity goals alongside residents with intellectual disabilities and provides strategies to incorporate activity into the group home schedule. The…

  8. Joint recovery programme versus usual care - An economic evaluation of a clinical pathway for joint replacement surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunenberg, DE; van Steyn, MJ; Sluimer, JC; Bekebrede, LL; Bulstra, SK; Joore, MA

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of a clinical pathway for patients undergoing joint replacement, the Joint Recovery Programme (JRP), as compared with usual care. The existing care process was revised to contain costs and shorten

  9. Evaluation of cooling water treatment programme at RAPS-3 and 4 with reference to chlorination and microbial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rao, T.S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Water from Rana Pratap Sagar Lake is used in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) units 3 and 4 for cooling the condenser system. As the lake water is rich in nutrients and microflora, investigations were carried out on the nutrient quality, microflora distribution and chlorine decay to evaluate the cooling water treatment programme. Algal growth in emergency storage makeup water pools, weed growth on the cooling tower decks and biofilm growth on various materials (carbon steel, stainless steel, admiralty brass and cupronickel) were studied with an objective to understand the reasons for corrosion and failure of fire water pipeline. Visual examination showed that the emergency makeup water pools were infested with green algae and cyano-bacterial mats. Some algal growth was observed on induced draft cooling tower-3 structures. The bacterial counts in various water samples were low, except in emergency makeup water pool. Sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present in makeup and demineralised waters. Chlorophyll pigment analysis showed that the makeup and emergency storage water pool had abundant algal growth. To prevent biofouling, chlorine is dosed at the rate of 7 kg/hr for 10 minutes; free residual oxidant (FRO) and chlorine decay were monitored at regular intervals. After 24 hrs, biofilm thickness on different materials ranged from 27-45 μm. However, the thickness was reduced by 50 % after exposure to 2 ppm of chlorine for 15 minutes. In further investigations, it was found that the anion resin beads of demineraliser plant were infested with filamentous microbes. Hence, It is recommended to treat the feed water of DM plant. Tubercles were observed inside the failed fire water carbon steel pipeline and on removing the tubercles concentric ring patterns, typical signatures of SRB corrosion were observed. For controlling the biofouling problem in the cooling water system, it is recommended to maintain a chlorine dose of 2.3 ppm (which gives 0.8 ppm FRO) for two

  10. Evaluation of a pilot 'peer support' training programme for volunteers in a hospital-based cancer information and support centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnane, Nicole Anne; Waters, Trish; Aranda, Sanchia

    2