WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluating healthcare research

  1. Systematic review of methods for evaluating healthcare research economic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdzadeh Reza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic benefits of healthcare research require study so that appropriate resources can be allocated to this research, particularly in developing countries. As a first step, we performed a systematic review to identify the methods used to assess the economic impact of healthcare research, and the outcomes. Method An electronic search was conducted in relevant databases using a combination of specific keywords. In addition, 21 relevant Web sites were identified. Results The initial search yielded 8,416 articles. After studying titles, abstracts, and full texts, 18 articles were included in the analysis. Eleven other reports were found on Web sites. We found that the outcomes assessed as healthcare research payback included direct cost-savings, cost reductions in healthcare delivery systems, benefits from commercial advancement, and outcomes associated with improved health status. Two methods were used to study healthcare research payback: macro-economic studies, which examine the relationship between research studies and economic outcome at the aggregated level, and case studies, which examine specific research projects to assess economic impact. Conclusions Our study shows that different methods and outcomes can be used to assess the economic impacts of healthcare research. There is no unique methodological approach for the economic evaluation of such research. In our systematic search we found no research that had evaluated the economic return of research in low and middle income countries. We therefore recommend a consensus on practical guidelines at international level on the basis of more comprehensive methodologies (such as Canadian Academic of Health Science and payback frameworks in order to build capacity, arrange for necessary informative infrastructures and promote necessary skills for economic evaluation studies.

  2. Requirements for an evaluation infrastructure for reliable pervasive healthcare research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2012-01-01

    The need for a non-intrusive evaluation infrastructure platform to support research on reliable pervasive healthcare in the unsupervised setting is analyzed and challenges and possibilities are identified. A list of requirements is presented and a solution is suggested that would allow researchers...

  3. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    29 juin 2016 ... ... and development programmes in Africa. Eulalia Kokuangisa Kahwa teaches at the UWI School of Nursing, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica. She is a nurse and nutritionist with over 30 years' experience in healthcare and nursing education, particularly in the fields of HIV/AIDS and asthma.

  4. Learning Evaluation: blending quality improvement and implementation research methods to study healthcare innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Cohen, Deborah J; Davis, Melinda M; Gunn, Rose; Dickinson, L Miriam; Miller, William L; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Stange, Kurt C

    2015-03-10

    In healthcare change interventions, on-the-ground learning about the implementation process is often lost because of a primary focus on outcome improvements. This paper describes the Learning Evaluation, a methodological approach that blends quality improvement and implementation research methods to study healthcare innovations. Learning Evaluation is an approach to multi-organization assessment. Qualitative and quantitative data are collected to conduct real-time assessment of implementation processes while also assessing changes in context, facilitating quality improvement using run charts and audit and feedback, and generating transportable lessons. Five principles are the foundation of this approach: (1) gather data to describe changes made by healthcare organizations and how changes are implemented; (2) collect process and outcome data relevant to healthcare organizations and to the research team; (3) assess multi-level contextual factors that affect implementation, process, outcome, and transportability; (4) assist healthcare organizations in using data for continuous quality improvement; and (5) operationalize common measurement strategies to generate transportable results. Learning Evaluation principles are applied across organizations by the following: (1) establishing a detailed understanding of the baseline implementation plan; (2) identifying target populations and tracking relevant process measures; (3) collecting and analyzing real-time quantitative and qualitative data on important contextual factors; (4) synthesizing data and emerging findings and sharing with stakeholders on an ongoing basis; and (5) harmonizing and fostering learning from process and outcome data. Application to a multi-site program focused on primary care and behavioral health integration shows the feasibility and utility of Learning Evaluation for generating real-time insights into evolving implementation processes. Learning Evaluation generates systematic and rigorous cross

  5. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-08-11

    29 juin 2016 ... Nancy Edwards est une infirmière épidémiologiste et professeure à la School of Nursing and Community Medicine, de l'Université d'Ottawa, au Canada. ... Researchers and practitioners gathered in Montreal on August 11, 2017 to discuss the potential of child care to benefit women through improved ...

  6. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Chapter 2 Research Capacity Building: A Literature Review and the Theoretical Framework — Eulalia Kahwa, Nancy Edwards & Natasha Mortley ...... A further complication was that although broad representation from parish hospitals and health centres was the aim, in the Kingston-St Andrew hub, for example, the majority ...

  7. Enhancing research capacity across healthcare and higher education sectors: development and evaluation of an integrated model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitworth Anne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With current policy in healthcare research, in the United Kingdom and internationally, focused on development of research excellence in individuals and teams, building capacity for implementation and translation of research is paramount among the professionals who use that research in daily practice. The judicious use of research outcomes and evaluation of best evidence and practice in healthcare is integrally linked to the research capacity and capabilities of the workforce. In addition to promoting high quality research, mechanisms for actively enhancing research capacity more generally must be in place to address the complexities that both undermine and facilitate this activity. Methods A comprehensive collaborative model for building research capacity in one health professional group, speech and language therapy, was developed in a region within the UK and is presented here. The North East of England and the strong research ethos of this profession in addressing complex interventions offered a fertile context for developing and implementing a model which integrated the healthcare and university sectors. Two key frameworks underpin this model. The first addresses the individual participants’ potential trajectory from research consciousness to research participative to research active. The second embeds a model developed for general practitioners into a broader framework of practice-academic partnership and knowledge and skills exchange, and considers external drivers and impacts on practice and patient outcomes as key elements. Results and discussion The integration of practice and academia has been successful in building a culture of research activity within one healthcare profession in a region in the UK and has resulted, to date, in a series of research related outcomes. Understanding the key components of this partnership and the explicit strategies used has driven the implementation of the model and are discussed

  8. Evaluating Healthcare Information Technology Outside of Academia: Observations from the National Resource Center for Healthcare Information Technology at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric G.; Cusack, Caitlin M.; McGowan, Julie J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Resource Center for Health Information Technology (NRC) was formed in the fall of 2004 as part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) health IT portfolio to support its grantees. One of the core functions of the NRC was to assist grantees in their evaluation efforts of Health IT. This manuscript highlights some common challenges experienced by health IT project teams at nonacademic institutions, including inappropriately scoped and resourced evaluation efforts, inappropriate choice of metrics, inadequate planning for data collection and analysis, and lack of consideration of qualitative methodologies. Many of these challenges can be avoided or overcome. The strategies adopted by various AHRQ grantees and the lessons learned from their projects should become part of the toolset for current and future implementers of health IT as the nation moves rapidly towards its widespread adoption. PMID:19567800

  9. Evaluating a community-based participatory research project for elderly mental healthcare in rural America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Blevins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dean Blevins1,2,3, Bridget Morton4, Rene McGovern5,61South Central Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (SC-MIRECC, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System; 2University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; 3University of Phoenix, Little Rock Campus, Little Rock, AR; 4Northeast Missouri Health Network, Kirksville, MO; 5A.T. Still University/Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, MO; 6Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OHAbstract: The purpose of this evaluation was to explore the collaborative nature of partners in a rural mental health program for the elderly, and to test an adapted method of assessing the collaborative process. Sixteen collaborative partners were interviewed to explore ratings of collaboration across 6 domains identified as critical to participatory research. Results indicate that the context of rural Missouri and uniqueness of the program necessitated an approach to collaboration that began with a top-down approach, but greater community responsibility developed over time. Partners recognized the efforts of the program’s directors to seek input. Most were satisfied with their roles and the degree of success achieved by the program, although several wanted to have more input in the future in some domains, but not in others. Interviews revealed numerous barriers to achieving sustainability. Methods to improve the assessment of collaboration are discussed and areas for improvement are offered.Keywords: community-based participatory research, elderly, mental health, older adults, rural

  10. Evaluating a community-based program to improve healthcare quality: research design for the Aligning Forces for Quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Beich, Jeff; Christianson, Jon B; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; McHugh, Megan C; Mittler, Jessica N; Shi, Yunfeng; Bodenschatz, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    The Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) initiative is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's (RWJF's) signature effort to increase the overall quality of healthcare in targeted communities throughout the country. In addition to sponsoring this 16-site, complex program, the RWJF funds an independent scientific evaluation to support objective research on the initiative's effectiveness and contributions to basic knowledge in 5 core programmatic areas. The research design, data, and challenges faced in the evaluation of this 10-year initiative are discussed. A descriptive overview of the evaluation research design for a multi-site, community based, healthcare quality improvement initiative is provided. The multiphase research design employed by the evaluation team is discussed. Evaluation provides formative feedback to the RWJF, participants, and other interested audiences in real time; develops approaches to assess innovative and under-studied interventions; furthers the analysis and understanding of effective community-based collaborative work in healthcare; and helps to differentiate the various facilitators, barriers, and contextual dimensions that affect the implementation and outcomes of community-based health interventions. The AF4Q initiative is arguably the largest community-level healthcare improvement demonstration in the United States to date; it is being implemented at a time of rapid change in national healthcare policy. The implementation of large-scale, multi-site initiatives is becoming an increasingly common approach for addressing problems in healthcare. The evaluation research design for the AF4Q initiative, and the lessons learned from its approach, may be valuable to others tasked with evaluating similar community-based initiatives.

  11. Applying the Analytic Hierarchy Process in healthcare research: A systematic literature review and evaluation of reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katharina; Aumann, Ines; Hollander, Ines; Damm, Kathrin; von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf

    2015-12-24

    The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), developed by Saaty in the late 1970s, is one of the methods for multi-criteria decision making. The AHP disaggregates a complex decision problem into different hierarchical levels. The weight for each criterion and alternative are judged in pairwise comparisons and priorities are calculated by the Eigenvector method. The slowly increasing application of the AHP was the motivation for this study to explore the current state of its methodology in the healthcare context. A systematic literature review was conducted by searching the Pubmed and Web of Science databases for articles with the following keywords in their titles or abstracts: "Analytic Hierarchy Process," "Analytical Hierarchy Process," "multi-criteria decision analysis," "multiple criteria decision," "stated preference," and "pairwise comparison." In addition, we developed reporting criteria to indicate whether the authors reported important aspects and evaluated the resulting studies' reporting. The systematic review resulted in 121 articles. The number of studies applying AHP has increased since 2005. Most studies were from Asia (almost 30%), followed by the US (25.6%). On average, the studies used 19.64 criteria throughout their hierarchical levels. Furthermore, we restricted a detailed analysis to those articles published within the last 5 years (n = 69). The mean of participants in these studies were 109, whereas we identified major differences in how the surveys were conducted. The evaluation of reporting showed that the mean of reported elements was about 6.75 out of 10. Thus, 12 out of 69 studies reported less than half of the criteria. The AHP has been applied inconsistently in healthcare research. A minority of studies described all the relevant aspects. Thus, the statements in this review may be biased, as they are restricted to the information available in the papers. Hence, further research is required to discover who should be interviewed and how, how

  12. Evaluating a community-based participatory research project for elderly mental healthcare in rural America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean; Morton, Bridget; McGovern, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to explore the collaborative nature of partners in a rural mental health program for the elderly, and to test an adapted method of assessing the collaborative process. Sixteen collaborative partners were interviewed to explore ratings of collaboration across 6 domains identified as critical to participatory research. Results indicate that the context of rural Missouri and uniqueness of the program necessitated an approach to collaboration that began with a top-down approach, but greater community responsibility developed over time. Partners recognized the efforts of the program's directors to seek input. Most were satisfied with their roles and the degree of success achieved by the program, although several wanted to have more input in the future in some domains, but not in others. Interviews revealed numerous barriers to achieving sustainability. Methods to improve the assessment of collaboration are discussed and areas for improvement are offered.

  13. Evaluation of ICT investment in healthcare : Insights and agenda for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arviansyah, A.; Berghout, Egon; Tan, Chee-Wee; Castelnovo, W; Ferrari, E

    2011-01-01

    The recent downturn in global economy exerts mounting pressure on the justification of ICT budgets within organizations. Effective evaluation of ICT investments is therefore deterministic of organizations' ability to maximize the business value to be extracted from such investments. The same can be

  14. Evaluating in a Healthcare Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Jul

    2007-01-01

    The think-aloud protocol, also known as concurrent verbalisation protocol, is widely used in the field of HCI today, but as the technology and applications have evolved the protocol has had to cope with this. Therefore new variations of the protocol have seen the light of day. One example...... is retrospective verbalisation. To compare concurrent and retrospective verbalisation an experiment was conducted. A home healthcare application was evaluated with 15 participants using both protocols. The results of the experiment show that the two protocols have each their strengths and weaknesses...

  15. 76 FR 18765 - National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality: Request for Nominations for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... information concerning their financial interests, consultant positions and research grants and contracts, to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflict of interest. Please note that Federally registered... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality National Advisory Council for Healthcare...

  16. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bienestar Condiciones y enfermedades Atención médica Medicamentos La seguridad del paciente Calidad de atención médica Healthcare Delivery ... Research Trust Fund News Newsroom Press Releases AHRQ Social Media AHRQ Stats Data Visualizations Blog AHRQ Views ...

  17. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  18. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  19. Dragons' Den: promoting healthcare research and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhindu, Deborah; Gregory, Siobhan

    2015-07-01

    The changing health and social care landscape, and, in particular, the financial challenges affecting the NHS, can present difficulties for staff looking for funding to support innovation and new ways of working. One method of competitive tendering that is becoming more accepted as a way of allocating funds, encouraging staff engagement and developing innovation for research is a format based the BBC television series, Dragons' Den. This article describes how Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust, London, has developed a 'Dragons' Den initiative' of annual competitive research funding allocation to ensure that some of the most dynamic practice in the trust is captured.

  20. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology: Survey and Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Nasia; Abbo, Lilian M; Knobloch, Mary Jo; Seo, Susan K

    2016-11-01

    Surveys are one of the most frequently employed study designs in healthcare epidemiology research. Generally easier to undertake and less costly than many other study designs, surveys can be invaluable to gain insights into opinions and practices in large samples and may be descriptive and/or be used to test associations. In this context, qualitative research methods may complement this study design either at the survey development phase and/or at the interpretation/extension of results stage. This methods article focuses on key considerations for designing and deploying surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antibiotic stewardship, including identification of whether or not de novo survey development is necessary, ways to optimally lay out and display a survey, denominator measurement, discussion of biases to keep in mind particularly in research using surveys, and the role of qualitative research methods to complement surveys. We review examples of surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship and review the pros and cons of methods used. A checklist is provided to help aid design and deployment of surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-6.

  1. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  2. 78 FR 26638 - National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality: Request for Nominations for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... information concerning their financial interests, consultant positions and research grants and contracts, to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflict of interest. Please note that once you are nominated... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality National Advisory Council for Healthcare...

  3. 77 FR 26281 - National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality: Request for Nominations for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... information concerning their financial interests, consultant positions and research grants and contracts, to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflict of interest. Please note that once you are nominated... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality National Advisory Council for Healthcare...

  4. Leadership research in healthcare: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Federico; Prenestini, Anna; Rosso, Matilde

    2017-05-01

    Being largely considered a human right, healthcare needs leaders who are able to make choices and to set directions. Following the recommendations expressed by Gilmartin and D'Aunno's review and roadmap compiled in 2008, today, it is important to acknowledge researchers' contributions to outline this landscape. The realist review of 77 publications answered questions such as "what works, for whom, and in which circumstances" highlighting: the effectiveness and acceptance of transformational and collaborative approaches; professionalism, expertise, and good task delegation within operational teams; distributed leadership, relationships, and social responsibility at a systemic level. The relevancy and need of leadership development programs, framed within a wider strategy, emerged. Nonetheless, gaps still exist and require further investigation: particular needs in public vs. private contexts; professionals' and women's differentiating characters; generational gaps; associations between leadership and recruitment HR practices research; how (and if) leaders (should) influence the organizational culture and values; and developing countries specific challenges. Also, a greater proportion of relevant findings should be drawn by empirical and more rigorous studies. Finally, a major attention could be paid to interactions happening at the team, organizational, and systemic level among different leaders and among leaders, followers and external actors.

  5. Evaluating Complex Healthcare Systems: A Critique of Four Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Boon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to bring clarity to the emerging conceptual and methodological literature that focuses on understanding and evaluating complex or ‘whole’ systems of healthcare. An international working group reviewed literature from interdisciplinary or interprofessional groups describing approaches to the evaluation of complex systems of healthcare. The following four key approaches were identified: a framework from the MRC (UK, whole systems research, whole medical systems research described by NCCAM (USA and a model from NAFKAM (Norway. Main areas of congruence include acknowledgment of the inherent complexity of many healthcare interventions and the need to find new ways to evaluate these; the need to describe and understand the components of complex interventions in context (as they are actually practiced; the necessity of using mixed methods including randomized clinical trials (RCTs (explanatory and pragmatic and qualitative approaches; the perceived benefits of a multidisciplinary team approach to research; and the understanding that methodological developments in this field can be applied to both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as well as conventional therapies. In contrast, the approaches differ in the following ways: terminology used, the extent to which the approach attempts to be applicable to both CAM and conventional medical interventions; the prioritization of research questions (in order of what should be done first especially with respect to how the ‘definitive’ RCT fits into the process of assessing complex healthcare systems; and the need for a staged approach. There appears to be a growing international understanding of the need for a new perspective on assessing complex healthcare systems.

  6. Research information systems are path to high-quality healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenfuss, J T

    1987-10-01

    Research is the key to dealing with the major issues facing the healthcare industry. And an information system for organization and management research is a necessary component in healthcare organizations. Research information systems should support action, not theory. Their purpose is to educate information users about their system of services; provide data for planning, developing, directing, and evaluating both technical and management work; and provide a basis for "steering" the program. Four key subjects for a research information system are service activities, patient characteristics, costs and budget, and outcomes. The goal in developing a research information system is to integrate the various types of information into a format that provides the information for management use at a given time. Development of a research information system requires concentrating on the design and the process of developing and using the data for action research. Each design step requires an analysis of existing and future research requirements, of what clinical and managerial leaders would like to know. Identifying users is important, since they will ultimately judge the adequacy of the system. Each user has to make decisions based on the data. Such decisions include setting goals, forming policy, organizing activities, and budgeting.

  7. Development and Evaluation of an Evaluation Tool for Healthcare Smartphone Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meiling; Kim, Jeongeun

    2015-10-01

    Various types of healthcare smartphone applications (apps) have been released in recent years, making it possible for people to manage their health anytime and anywhere. As a healthcare provider, who has the responsibility to provide guidance as to which apps can be used? The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an evaluation tool for the various aspects of healthcare smartphone apps. In the first phase, a provisional version of an evaluation tool for healthcare smartphone apps was developed from a review of previous studies. In the second phase, the provisional tool was modified and edited after verification by five experts with regard to its content validity. In the third phase, from September 25 to October 4, 2013, 200 responses were collected to verify the construct validity and reliability of the tool. The edited tool had 23 evaluating items with three evaluating factors along with seven subevaluating factors as a result of confirmatory factor analysis. The reliability was found to be high (0.905). This study is meaningful because it demonstrates a healthcare smartphone app evaluation tool that is proven in terms of its validity and reliability. The evaluation tool developed and tested in this study is an appropriate and widely applicable tool with which to evaluate healthcare smartphone apps to determine if they are reliable and useful. However, this evaluation tool represents the beginning of the research in this area.

  8. Burnout and Quality of Life among Healthcare Research Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Felicity; West, Colin P.; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is increasingly recognized as a problem in the workplace--30% to 50% of physicians experience burnout, but no assessment of burnout has been done among healthcare research faculty. A cross-sectional survey of burnout, quality of life, and related factors was sent to all doctoral-level faculty in a large department of healthcare research.…

  9. Evaluating Burnout among Administrative and Healthcare Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khorshidian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Burnout is an occupational hazard which is known as one of the major factors affecting employees’ psychological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate occupational burnout among administrative and healthcare staffs of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional study, 300 employees (150 administrative staff and 150 health care staff were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean of burnout was 2.33±0.60. The results showed no significant difference between men and women employees in terms of occupational burnout and its three dimensions. Moreover, a significant difference between administrative and medical staffs  were found only in the dimension of emotional exhaustion. The mean score of emotional exhaustion in the administrative staff was significantly lower than that of their peers in the healthcare sector (2.03±0.84vs. 2.36±1.00 (p=0.03. Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of employees reported an average level of burnout .Such finding was in agreement with the results reported in previous studies. The obtained results can pave the way for further study on the identifying determinants of burnout.

  10. Design research and the globalization of healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Song, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Global healthcare practice has expanded in the past 20 years. At the same time the incorporation of research into the design process has gained prominence as a best practice among architects. The authors of this study investigated the status of design research in a variety of international settings. We intended to answer the question, "how pervasive is healthcare design research outside of the United States?" The authors reviewed the international literature on the design of healthcare facilities. More than 500 international studies and conference proceedings were incorporated in this literature review. A team of five research assistants searched multiple databases comparing approximately 16 keywords to geographic location. Some of those keywords included: evidence-based design, salutogenic design, design research, and healthcare environment. Additional articles were gathered by contacting prominent researchers and asking for their personal assessment of local health design research studies. While there are design researchers in most parts of the world, the majority of studies focus on the needs of populations in developed countries and generate guidelines that have significant cost and cultural implications that prohibit their implementation in developing countries. Additionally, the body of literature discussing the role of culture in healthcare environments is extremely limited. Design researchers must address the cultural implications of their studies. Additionally, we need to expand our research objectives to address healthcare design in countries that have not been previous considered. © 2014 Vendome Group, LLC.

  11. Enhancing skills for evidence-based healthcare leadership: the Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklin, Wendy; Stipich, Nina

    2005-01-01

    The Executive Training for Research Application (EXTRA) is a new training program that aims to increase the skills of health services executives and their organizations to use research evidence in healthcare management and decision-making. This paper describes the goals and rationale of the EXTRA program and its learning objectives and curriculum, and reports on some early baseline evaluative research. In particular, the authors address the opportunities that EXTRA offers to leaders in the nursing profession to transform the practice of nursing and patient care, and the unique opportunities that the program offers for collaboration across the healthcare professions and disciplines. While the EXTRA training program requires substantive investment of time and commitment by healthcare leaders and their organizations, it offers great potential for increasing research application in healthcare leadership decision-making. It is therefore a potential long-term lever of cultural decision-making change within healthcare organizations.

  12. Leadership behaviours and healthcare research performance: prospective correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vanash M; Ashrafian, Hutan; Uzoho, Chukwudi; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Panzarasa, Pietro; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-05-16

    The aims of the study were to determine whether differences in leadership self-perception/behaviour in healthcare researchers may influence research performance and to evaluate whether certain leadership characteristics are associated with enhanced leadership efficiency in terms of motivation, effectiveness and satisfaction. All Faculty of Medicine Professors at Imperial College London (n=215) were sent the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Self form as a means of evaluating self-perception of leadership behaviours. For each professor, we extracted objective research performance measures (total number of publications, total number of citations and h index) from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009. The MLQ measured three leadership outcomes, which included motivation, effectiveness and satisfaction. Regression analysis was used to determine associations. A total number of 90 responses were received, which equated to a 42% response rate. There were no significant correlations between transformational, transactional or passive/avoidant leadership behaviours and any of the research performance measures. The five transformational leadership behaviours (ie, idealised attributes (IA), idealised behaviours (IB), inspirational motivation (IM), intellectual stimulation (IS), individual consideration (IC)) were highly significant predictors of leadership outcomes, extra effort (all B>0.404, SE=0.093-0.146, p0.359, SE=0.093-0.146, p0.483, SE=0.086-0.139, pleadership and contingent reward positively influence leadership efficiency in healthcare researchers. Although we did not show an association between leadership behaviours and research performance metrics, further studies using contextual performance measures at team and organisational levels are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. [Healthcare services research on pain in Germany. A survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, W; Neugebauer, E; Petzke, F

    2015-10-01

    Within the last ten years healthcare services research has developed into an independent interdisciplinary field of research. A selective search of the literature was conducted in the database Google Scholar and the database on healthcare services research in Germany (http://versorgungsforschung-deutschland.de) for healthcare services research projects on pain in Germany. Healthcare services research projects were conducted by pharmaceutical companies, patient self-help organizations, scientific societies, statutory health insurance companies and university departments on acute and chronic pain. Valid data on the epidemiology, grading and treatment of chronic pain are available. There was an overuse of opioids and invasive procedures in patients with chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia syndrome and somatoform pain disorders. Databases for patients with chronic pain are currently constructed by pain societies. The fragmentation of data from health insurance companies, old age pension insurances, clinical institutions and population surveys and inconsistencies in diagnosing or encoding chronic pain impede the carrying out of significant longitudinal studies. Based on the data available, the needs of care for patients with chronic pain and the necessary care services cannot be derived. Important topics of future healthcare services research on pain are longitudinal studies on the cost efficacy and risks of inpatient and outpatient pain therapy based on routine data of health insurance companies, old age pension insurances and pain registries, longitudinal studies on "patient careers" (i.e. sequences of healthcare) and the identification of potential starting points for control of healthcare.

  14. Space syntax in healthcare facilities research: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Saif; Luo, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Space Syntax is a theory and method that has been developing for the last 40 years. Originally conceived as a theory of "society and space," it has expanded to other areas. An important aspect of this is technical; it allows the quantification of layouts, and unit spaces within a layout, so that the environment itself can produce independent variables in quantitative research. Increasingly, it is being used to study healthcare facilities. Space Syntax has thereby become relevant to healthcare facilities researchers and designers. This paper attempts to explain Space Syntax to a new audience of healthcare designers, administrators, and researchers; it provides a literature review on the use of Space Syntax in healthcare facility research and suggests some possibilities for future application.

  15. 77 FR 60997 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the intention of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  16. Healthcare students as innovative partners in the development of future healthcare services: An action research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbye, Bente

    2016-11-01

    Health care systems in Norway and the western world have experienced extensive changes due to patients living longer with complex conditions that require coordinated care. A Norwegian healthcare reform has led to significant restructuring in service delivery as a devolution of services to municipalities. Partners from three rural healthcare services, students from four professional programmes, and one lecturer from each of the professional programmes used a collaborative approach to obtain new knowledge through interprofessional practice. Using an action research design, the research group facilitated democratic processes through dialogues with healthcare services and students. The design is visualised as a cyclical process in which each cycle contributes to improvements, innovations, and increased understanding. A total of 32 students and 3 supervisors were interviewed before and after the clinical practice experiences. Fieldwork was conducted during three clinical periods. Interprofessional student groups formed small healthcare teams and assessed patients with chronic and long-term conditions. Students prepared and negotiated patient follow-up. The teams' responsibilities led to reflective practices that enhanced their professional knowledge. The teams achieved a new understanding of patient situations, which influenced "second opinions" for patients with complex conditions and led to innovative practices. The change in perception of patient needs led to a changed professional approach. The students' perceptions changed as they learned from and about each other and in collaboration with the health service; this led to more coordinated care of patients with complex conditions. Interprofessional learning in community settings provided a platform to improve both healthcare education and rural healthcare services. This research contributes to knowledge of how students' placement in interprofessional teams can enhance students learning from, with and about each other

  17. Qualitative methods in research on healthcare quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, C; van Royen, P; Baker, R

    2002-01-01

    There are no easy solutions to the problem of improving the quality of care. Research has shown how difficult it can be, but has failed to provide reliable and effective ways to change services and professional performance for the better...

  18. 78 FR 61362 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... applications are to be reviewed and discussed at these meetings. Each subcommittee meeting will commence in... remainder of the meeting) 4. Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research (HSQR) Date: October 23-24... Extramural Research Education and Priority Populations, AHRQ, 540 Gaither Road, Suite 2000, Rockville...

  19. Traditions of research into interruptions in healthcare: A conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdie, Tara; Sanderson, Penelope; Aitken, Leanne M

    2017-01-01

    Researchers from diverse theoretical backgrounds have studied workplace interruptions in healthcare, leading to a complex and conflicting body of literature. Understanding pre-existing viewpoints may advance the field more effectively than attempts to remove bias from investigations. To identify research traditions that have motivated and guided interruptions research, and to note research questions posed, gaps in approach, and possible avenues for future research. A critical review was conducted of research on interruptions in healthcare. Two researchers identified core research communities based on the community's motivations, philosophical outlook, and methods. Among the characteristics used to categorise papers into research communities were the predominant motivation for studying interruptions, the research questions posed, and key contributions to the body of knowledge on interruptions in healthcare. In cases where a paper approached an equal number of characteristics from two traditions, it was placed in a blended research community. A total of 141 papers were identified and categorised; all papers identified were published from 1994 onwards. Four principal research communities emerged: epidemiology, quality improvement, cognitive systems engineering (CSE), and applied cognitive psychology. Blends and areas of mutual influence between the research communities were identified that combine the benefits of individual traditions, but there was a notable lack of blends incorporating quality improvement initiatives. The question most commonly posed by researchers across multiple communities was: what is the impact of interruptions? Impact was measured as a function of task time or risk in the epidemiology tradition, situation awareness in the CSE tradition, or resumption lag (time to resume an interrupted task) in the applied cognitive psychology tradition. No single question about interruptions in healthcare was shared by all four of the core communities. Much

  20. Quality research in healthcare: are researchers getting enough statistical support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambler Gareth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reviews of peer-reviewed health studies have highlighted problems with their methodological quality. As published health studies form the basis of many clinical decisions including evaluation and provisions of health services, this has scientific and ethical implications. The lack of involvement of methodologists (defined as statisticians or quantitative epidemiologists has been suggested as one key reason for this problem and this has been linked to the lack of access to methodologists. This issue was highlighted several years ago and it was suggested that more investments were needed from health care organisations and Universities to alleviate this problem. Methods To assess the current level of methodological support available for health researchers in England, we surveyed the 25 National Health Services Trusts in England, that are the major recipients of the Department of Health's research and development (R&D support funding. Results and discussion The survey shows that the earmarking of resources to provide appropriate methodological support to health researchers in these organisations is not widespread. Neither the level of R&D support funding received nor the volume of research undertaken by these organisations showed any association with the amount they spent in providing a central resource for methodological support for their researchers. Conclusion The promotion and delivery of high quality health research requires that organisations hosting health research and their academic partners put in place funding and systems to provide appropriate methodological support to ensure valid research findings. If resources are limited, health researchers may have to rely on short courses and/or a limited number of advisory sessions which may not always produce satisfactory results.

  1. 78 FR 12319 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... ] Healthcare Research and Quality. This Executive Session will be closed to the public in accordance with 5 U.S... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION...

  2. Determining research knowledge infrastructure for healthcare systems: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavis John N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines research knowledge infrastructures (RKIs found in health systems. An RKI is defined as any instrument (i.e., programs, interventions, tools implemented in order to facilitate access, dissemination, exchange, and/or use of evidence in healthcare organisations. Based on an environmental scan (17 key informant interviews and scoping review (26 studies, we found support for a framework that we developed that outlines components that a health system can have in its RKI. The broad domains are climate for research use, research production, activities used to link research to action, and evaluation. The objective of the current study is to profile the RKI of three types of health system organisations--regional health authorities, primary care practices, and hospitals--in two Canadian provinces to determine the current mix of components these organisations have in their RKI, their experience with these components, and their views about future RKI initiatives. Methods This study will include semistructured telephone interviews with a purposive sample region of a senior management team member, library/resource centre manager, and a 'knowledge broker' in three regional health authorities, five or six purposively sampled hospitals, and five or six primary care practices in Ontario and Quebec, for a maximum of 71 interviewees. The interviews will explore (a which RKI components have proven helpful, (b barriers and facilitators in implementing RKI components, and (c views about next steps in further development of RKIs. Discussion This is the first qualitative examination of potential RKI efforts that can increase the use of research evidence in health system decision making. We anticipate being able to identify broadly applicable insights about important next steps in building effective RKIs. Some of the identified RKI components may increase the use of research evidence by decision makers, which may then lead to more

  3. Logistics research report : Framework in the healthcare industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.; Hajdasinski, A.K.; Willems, J.

    2009-01-01

    The research report takes the perspective of Information Logistics and investigates relating concepts like Knowledge Management, Information Systems and Context Awareness in the context of the healthcare industry. The aim of Information Logistics is to deliver the right information product, in the

  4. From Data to Improved Decisions: Operations Research in Healthcare Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capan, Muge; Khojandi, Anahita; Denton, Brian T; Williams, Kimberly D; Ayer, Turgay; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Kurt, Murat; Lobo, Jennifer Mason; Roberts, Mark S; Zaric, Greg; Zhang, Shengfan; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2017-11-01

    The Operations Research Interest Group (ORIG) within the Society of Medical Decision Making (SMDM) is a multidisciplinary interest group of professionals that specializes in taking an analytical approach to medical decision making and healthcare delivery. ORIG is interested in leveraging mathematical methods associated with the field of Operations Research (OR) to obtain data-driven solutions to complex healthcare problems and encourage collaborations across disciplines. This paper introduces OR for the non-expert and draws attention to opportunities where OR can be utilized to facilitate solutions to healthcare problems. Decision making is the process of choosing between possible solutions to a problem with respect to certain metrics. OR concepts can help systematically improve decision making through efficient modeling techniques while accounting for relevant constraints. Depending on the problem, methods that are part of OR (e.g., linear programming, Markov Decision Processes) or methods that are derived from related fields (e.g., regression from statistics) can be incorporated into the solution approach. This paper highlights the characteristics of different OR methods that have been applied to healthcare decision making and provides examples of emerging research opportunities. We illustrate OR applications in healthcare using previous studies, including diagnosis and treatment of diseases, organ transplants, and patient flow decisions. Further, we provide a selection of emerging areas for utilizing OR. There is a timely need to inform practitioners and policy makers of the benefits of using OR techniques in solving healthcare problems. OR methods can support the development of sustainable long-term solutions across disease management, service delivery, and health policies by optimizing the performance of system elements and analyzing their interaction while considering relevant constraints.

  5. [Realist evaluation for implementation research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Cécile Marie

    2017-04-01

    The realist approach to evaluation can be useful faced with the complexity of health interventions in populations. Implementation is the process by which these interventions are put into practice. Scientific realism can provide an important contribution to the development of programme theories through implementation research, and help to reveal the distal and proximal mechanisms of programmes aimed at combatting social inequalities in healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. 77 FR 47847 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council on Healthcare Research and Quality Subcommittee on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council on Healthcare Research and Quality Subcommittee on Quality Measures for Children's Healthcare AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section...

  7. Directions in healthcare research: pointers from retailing and services marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Thomas L J; Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of the environment in relation to healing processes has been well established, empirical evidence for environmental effects on patient well-being and behavior is sparse. In addition, few attempts have been made to integrate insights from related fields of research such as retailing and services marketing with findings from healthcare studies. In this paper, relevant findings and insights from these domains are discussed. What insights and findings from retailing and services marketing are (potentially) of interest to the healthcare context, and how should one interpret and follow up on these results in healthcare environments? Research in retailing and services marketing indicates that physical environmental factors (i.e., music and scent) and social environmental factors (i.e., crowded conditions) may affect consumer satisfaction and well-being. In addition, environmental effects have been shown to vary with contextual factors (e.g., the type of environment) and consumer needs (e.g., the extent to which consumers value social contact or stimulation in a specific setting). Although the evidence base for environmental factors in health environments is steadily growing, few attempts have been made to integrate findings from both domains. The findings presented indicate that environmental variables such as music and scent can contribute to patient well-being and overall satisfaction. In addition, findings suggest that these variables may be used to counteract the negative effects resulting from crowded conditions in different healthcare units. Taking into account recent developments in the healthcare industry, the importance of creating memorable and pleasant patient experiences is likely to grow in the years to come. Hence, the finding that subtle and relatively inexpensive manipulations may affect patient well-being in profound ways should inspire follow-up research aimed at unraveling the specifics of environmental influences in health

  8. Translational educational research: a necessity for effective health-care improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Issenberg, S Barry; Cohen, Elaine R; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-11-01

    Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research.

  9. A Mixed-Methods Research Framework for Healthcare Process Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Nathaniel D; Munoz, David; Ventura, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The healthcare system in the United States is spiraling out of control due to ever-increasing costs without significant improvements in quality, access to care, satisfaction, and efficiency. Efficient workflow is paramount to improving healthcare value while maintaining the utmost standards of patient care and provider satisfaction in high stress environments. This article provides healthcare managers and quality engineers with a practical healthcare process improvement framework to assess, measure and improve clinical workflow processes. The proposed mixed-methods research framework integrates qualitative and quantitative tools to foster the improvement of processes and workflow in a systematic way. The framework consists of three distinct phases: 1) stakeholder analysis, 2a) survey design, 2b) time-motion study, and 3) process improvement. The proposed framework is applied to the pediatric intensive care unit of the Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital. The implementation of this methodology led to identification and categorization of different workflow tasks and activities into both value-added and non-value added in an effort to provide more valuable and higher quality patient care. Based upon the lessons learned from the case study, the three-phase methodology provides a better, broader, leaner, and holistic assessment of clinical workflow. The proposed framework can be implemented in various healthcare settings to support continuous improvement efforts in which complexity is a daily element that impacts workflow. We proffer a general methodology for process improvement in a healthcare setting, providing decision makers and stakeholders with a useful framework to help their organizations improve efficiency. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evidence-based healthcare management competency evaluation: alumni perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Clement, Dolores G; Nayar, Preethy

    2006-01-01

    An ongoing concern of healthcare educators is how well students are prepared for practice after they are graduated. Curriculum design and pedagogical methods are central components for developing healthcare management and leadership competencies. Various stakeholders have identified competency domains and typologies that outline the requisite skills and expertise to manage and lead healthcare organizations. This study analyzes survey data over a ten-year period from alumni one-year post graduation to compare self-reported assessment of competency development. Trends across two graduate professional programs tailored to different students of healthcare administration are compared. A total of 302 alumni responded to the survey. A factor analysis is performed to evaluate how the skills, knowledge, and abilities of graduates fit into identified competency domains. Fourteen competencies on the survey load into four factor domains: leadership, communication, business skills, and technology.

  11. Emerging technologies in healthcare: navigating risks, evaluating rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Elizabeth; Conger, Sue; Blanke, Sandra; Landry, Brett J L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this prescriptive research is to help decision makers become better informed about three technologies emerging in the healthcare arena by providing a basic description of the technology and describing their current applications, future healthcare deployment, potential risks, and related managerial issues. Two of the technologies, radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning systems (GPS), are currently available to healthcare organizations and appear capable of decreasing cost but may require significant initial investment and have disruptive potential. The third technology, nanotechnology, has limited current use but may revolutionize both the delivery of medicine and hospital infrastructure management. With cautious attention to managerial issues and meticulous attention to implementation details, healthcare organizations that can successfully navigate the coming technologically driven paradigm shifts will emerge more resilient organizations.

  12. Toolkit for healthcare facility design evaluation - some case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available "? This is notoriously difficult to evaluate but, this paper argues, there would be much to be gained from a systematic, reliable and replicable framework for doing so. Internationally, some design evaluation toolkits specifically for healthcare facilities have been...

  13. Toolkit for healthcare facility design evaluation - some case studies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available "? This is notoriously difficult to evaluate but, this paper argues, there would be much to be gained from a systematic, reliable and replicable framework for doing so. Internationally, some design evaluation toolkits specifically for healthcare facilities have been...

  14. Undue industry influences that distort healthcare research, strategy, expenditure and practice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Weiler, Richard; Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-05-01

    Expenditure on industry products (mostly drugs and devices) has spiraled over the last 15 years and accounts for substantial part of healthcare expenditure. The enormous financial interests involved in the development and marketing of drugs and devices may have given excessive power to these industries to influence medical research, policy, and practice. Review of the literature and analysis of the multiple pathways through which the industry has directly or indirectly infiltrated the broader healthcare systems. We present the analysis of the industry influences at the following levels: (i) evidence base production, (ii) evidence synthesis, (iii) understanding of safety and harms issues, (iv) cost-effectiveness evaluation, (v) clinical practice guidelines formation, (vi) healthcare professional education, (vii) healthcare practice, (viii) healthcare consumer's decisions. We located abundance of consistent evidence demonstrating that the industry has created means to intervene in all steps of the processes that determine healthcare research, strategy, expenditure, practice and education. As a result of these interferences, the benefits of drugs and other products are often exaggerated and their potential harms are downplayed, and clinical guidelines, medical practice, and healthcare expenditure decisions are biased. To serve its interests, the industry masterfully influences evidence base production, evidence synthesis, understanding of harms issues, cost-effectiveness evaluations, clinical practice guidelines and healthcare professional education and also exerts direct influences on professional decisions and health consumers. There is an urgent need for regulation and other action towards redefining the mission of medicine towards a more objective and patient-, population- and society-benefit direction that is free from conflict of interests. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined. PMID:20482843

  16. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Shannon L; Gibson, Jennifer L; Singer, Peter A; Upshur, Ross; Martin, Douglas K

    2010-05-19

    In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined.

  17. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework. Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined.

  18. Evaluating a healthcare data warehouse for cancer diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Dr. Osama E.; Eldeen, Ahmed Nour

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the architecture of healthcare data warehouse specific to cancer diseases. This data warehouse containing relevant cancer medical information and patient data. The data warehouse provides the source for all current and historical health data to help executive manager and doctors to improve the decision making process for cancer patients. The evaluation model based on Bill Inmon's definition of data warehouse is proposed to evaluate the Cancer data warehouse.

  19. Pathways to research impact in primary healthcare: What do Australian primary healthcare researchers believe works best to facilitate the use of their research findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Richard L; McIntyre, Ellen; Jackson-Bowers, Eleanor; Kalucy, Libby

    2017-03-02

    Primary healthcare researchers are under increasing pressure to demonstrate measurable and lasting improvement in clinical practice and healthcare policy as a result of their work. It is therefore important to understand the effectiveness of the research dissemination strategies used. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathways for research impact that have been achieved across several government-funded primary healthcare projects, and the effectiveness of these methods as perceived by their Chief Investigators. The project used an online survey to collect information about government-funded primary healthcare research projects. Chief Investigators were asked how they disseminated their findings and how this achieved impact in policy and practice. They were also asked to express their beliefs regarding the most effective means of achieving research impact and describe how this occurred. Chief Investigators of 17 projects indicated that a number of dissemination strategies were used but that professional networks were the most effective means of promoting uptake of their research findings. Utilisation of research findings for clinical practice was most likely to occur in organisations or among individual practitioners who were most closely associated with the research team, or when research findings were included in educational programmes involving clinical practice. Uptake of both policy- and practice-related research was deemed most successful if intermediary organisations such as formal professional networks were engaged in the research. Successful primary healthcare researchers had developed critical relationships with intermediary organisations within primary healthcare before the initiation of the research and had also involved them in the design. The scale of research impact was influenced by the current policy environment, the type and significance of the results, and the endorsement (or lack thereof) of professional bodies. Chief Investigators

  20. 76 FR 62068 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  1. 78 FR 65321 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  2. 75 FR 13293 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C...

  3. 76 FR 40733 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  4. 77 FR 38633 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  5. 75 FR 63497 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  6. 75 FR 38110 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  7. 76 FR 14668 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  8. 77 FR 61000 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  9. 77 FR 13607 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C...

  10. Incorporating translational research with clinical research to increase effectiveness in healthcare for better health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estape, Estela S; Mays, Mary Helen; Harrigan, Rosanne; Mayberry, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of new scientific discoveries into healthcare interventions requires that basic and clinical researchers work together with health care providers to generate team science. These innovative models require translational teams, and need to extend beyond the academic environment. The future of translational science requires partnerships with the healthcare community as well as the broader, general community. This new integrated model of effective translational teams holds promise for addressing thorny and persistent health disparities, is consistent with the nation's strategic priority of eliminating health disparities, and bodes well for increasing healthcare effectiveness aimed at better health for all. As part of the 13th Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) International Symposium on Health Disparities, several senior academic leaders joined efforts to hold a workshop to discuss a model that considers the incorporation of two translational research strategies in research career development programs: Comparative effectiveness research (CER) and community-based participatory research (CBPR) for increasing healthcare effectiveness and eliminating healthcare disparities. Discussion included what issues may be most germane to the concept of a unified model for research workforce development through formal training and career development leading to increased effectiveness in healthcare for better health. We believe that there is a gap in knowledge and skills in formal research career development programs that will enable physicians, other clinicians, and basic scientists to actively participate in these two translational research strategies. The purpose of this paper is to share the outcomes of these discussions, and encourage further discussion and possible innovation in the formulation of a new model for translational research workforce development.

  11. Interpreting ethnic inequalities in healthcare consumption: a conceptual framework for research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Lamkaddem, Majda; Jellema, Petra; Nielsen, Signe Smith; Stronks, Karien

    2013-01-01

    The increasing diversity of the Western-European population demands identification of potential ethnic healthcare inequities. We developed a framework that helps researchers in interpreting ethnic inequalities in healthcare consumption in equity terms. From this framework, we develop recommendations

  12. Introducing research initiatives into healthcare: what do doctors think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyld, Lucy; Smith, Sian; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Long, Janet; Ward, Robyn L

    2014-04-01

    Current national and international policies emphasize the need to develop research initiatives within our health care system. Institutional biobanking represents a modern, large-scale research initiative that is reliant upon the support of several aspects of the health care organization. This research project aims to explore doctors' views on the concept of institutional biobanking and to gain insight into the factors which impact the development of research initiatives within healthcare systems. Qualitative research study using semi-structured interviews. The research was conducted across two public teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia where institutional biobanking was being introduced. Twenty-five participants were interviewed, of whom 21 were medical practitioners at the specialist trainee level or above in a specialty directly related to biobanking; four were key stakeholders responsible for the design and implementation of the biobanking initiative. All participants strongly supported the concept of institutional biobanking. Participants highlighted the discordance between the doctors who work to establish the biobank (the contributors) and the researchers who use it (the consumers). Participants identified several barriers that limit the success of research initiatives in the hospital setting including: the 'resistance to change' culture; the difficulties in engaging health professionals in research initiatives; and the lack of incentives offered to doctors for their contribution. Doctors positively valued the opportunity to advise the implementation team, and felt that the initiative could benefit from their knowledge and expertise. Successful integration of research initiatives into hospitals requires early collaboration between the implementing team and the health care professionals to produce a plan that is sensitive to the needs of the health professionals and tailored to the hospital setting. Research initiatives must consider incentives that

  13. Pediatric eMental healthcare technologies: a systematic review of implementation foci in research studies, and government and organizational documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Nicole D; McGrath, Patrick; Wozney, Lori; Soleimani, Amir; Bennett, Kathryn; Hartling, Lisa; Huguet, Anna; Dyson, Michele P; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-06-21

    Researchers, healthcare planners, and policymakers convey a sense of urgency in using eMental healthcare technologies to improve pediatric mental healthcare availability and access. Yet, different stakeholders may focus on different aspects of implementation. We conducted a systematic review to identify implementation foci in research studies and government/organizational documents for eMental healthcare technologies for pediatric mental healthcare. A search of eleven electronic databases and grey literature was conducted. We included research studies and documents from organization and government websites if the focus included eMental healthcare technology for children/adolescents (0-18 years), and implementation was studied and reported (research studies) or goals/recommendations regarding implementation were made (documents). We assessed study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and document quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II. Implementation information was grouped according to Proctor and colleagues' implementation outcomes-acceptability, adoption, appropriateness, cost, feasibility, fidelity, penetration, and sustainability-and grouped separately for studies and documents. Twenty research studies and nine government/organizational documents met eligibility criteria. These articles represented implementation of eMental healthcare technologies in the USA (14 studies), United Kingdom (2 documents, 3 studies), Canada (2 documents, 1 study), Australia (4 documents, 1 study), New Zealand (1 study), and the Netherlands (1 document). The quality of research studies was excellent (n = 11), good (n = 6), and poor (n = 1). These eMental health studies focused on the acceptability (70%, n = 14) and appropriateness (50%, n = 10) of eMental healthcare technologies to users and mental healthcare professionals. The quality of government and organizational documents was high (n = 2), medium (n = 6

  14. Introduction special issue on IT adoption and evaluation in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; Trimmer, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This special issue’s coverage truly reflects the spectrum of research areas within Ken Trimmer’s domain. The development of these papers from initial submission also reflects Dr. Trimmer’s ability to aptly match submitted paper to a review team that could insightfully mature the work. This web of scientists coming together in this special issue and in other efforts co-collaborated on elaborated into a collegial force in collectively extending knowledge in the healthcare adoption domain. Healt...

  15. Insight: Semantic Provenance and Analysis Platform for Multi-center Neurology Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Priya; Wei, Annan; Welter, Elisabeth; Bamps, Yvan; Stoll, Shelley; Bukach, Ashley; Sajatovic, Martha; Sahoo, Satya S

    2015-11-01

    Insight is a Semantic Web technology-based platform to support large-scale secondary analysis of healthcare data for neurology clinical research. Insight features the novel use of: (1) provenance metadata, which describes the history or origin of patient data, in clinical research analysis, and (2) support for patient cohort queries across multiple institutions conducting research in epilepsy, which is the one of the most common neurological disorders affecting 50 million persons worldwide. Insight is being developed as a healthcare informatics infrastructure to support a national network of eight epilepsy research centers across the U.S. funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This paper describes the use of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) PROV recommendation for provenance metadata that allows researchers to create patient cohorts based on the provenance of the research studies. In addition, the paper describes the use of descriptive logic-based OWL2 epilepsy ontology for cohort queries with "expansion of query expression" using ontology reasoning. Finally, the evaluation results for the data integration and query performance are described using data from three research studies with 180 epilepsy patients. The experiment results demonstrate that Insight is a scalable approach to use Semantic provenance metadata for context-based data analysis in healthcare informatics.

  16. Supporting primary healthcare professionals to care for people with intellectual disability: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Nicholas; Van Driel, Mieke L; van Dooren, Kate

    2015-01-01

    The vast health inequities experienced by people with intellectual disability remain indisputable. Persistent and contemporary challenges exist for primary healthcare providers and researchers working to contribute to improvements to the health and well-being of people with intellectual disability. Over two decades after the only review of supports for primary healthcare providers was published, this paper contributes to an evolving research agenda that aims to make meaningful gains in health-related outcomes for this group. The present authors updated the existing review by searching the international literature for developments and evaluations of multinational models of care. Based on our review, we present three strategies to support primary healthcare providers: (i) effectively using what we know, (ii) considering other strategies that offer support to primary healthcare professionals and (iii) researching primary health care at the system level. Strengthening primary care by supporting equitable provision of health-related care for people with intellectual disability is a much needed step towards improving health outcomes among people with intellectual disability. More descriptive quantitative and qualitative research, as well as intervention-based research underpinned by rigorous mixed-methods evaluating these strategies at the primary care level, which is sensitive to the needs of people with intellectual disability will assist primary care providers to provide better care and achieve better health outcomes. Many people with intellectual disability have poor health. The authors reviewed what has been written by other researchers about how to improve the health of people with intellectual disability. In the future, people who support adults with intellectual disability should continue doing what they do well, think of other ways to improve health, and do more research about health. At all times, the needs of people with intellectual disability should be the

  17. Interdisciplinary Research in Operations Management: Applications in Healthcare, Retailing and On-demand Service Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Jiaru

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on applications of interdisciplinary research in operations management. The first essay addresses issues in healthcare. Our goal is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab compared to the baseline treatment with only chemotherapy in recurrent/persistent and metastatic cervical cancer using recently reported updated survival and toxicology data. We developed a Markov model with 5 patient health states for both treatments. With data based on ...

  18. Preventive Maintenance Optimization in Healthcare Domain: Status of Research and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mahfoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although medical equipment maintenance has been carefully managed for years, very few in-depth studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of these implemented preventive maintenance strategies, especially after the debate about the credibility of manufacturer’s recommendations has increased in the clinical engineering community. Facing the dilemma of merely following manufactures maintenance manual or establishing an evidence-based maintenance, medical equipment maintenance could have exploited an advanced area in operations research which is maintenance optimization research. In this paper, we review and examine carefully the status of application oriented research on preventive maintenance optimization of medical devices. This study addresses preventive healthcare maintenance with a focus on factors influencing the maintenance decision making. The analysis is structured by defining different aspects necessary to construct a maintenance optimization model. We conclusively propose directions to develop suitable tools for better healthcare maintenance management.

  19. Healthcare waste management research: A structured analysis and review (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Ramesh, A

    2015-10-01

    The importance of healthcare waste management in preserving the environment and protecting the public cannot be denied. Past research has dealt with various issues in healthcare waste management and disposal, which spreads over various journals, pipeline research disciplines and research communities. Hence, this article analyses this scattered knowledge in a systematic manner, considering the period between January 2005 and July 2014. The purpose of this study is to: (i) identify the trends in healthcare waste management literature regarding journals published; (ii) main topics of research in healthcare waste management; (iii) methodologies used in healthcare waste management research; (iv) areas most frequently researched by researchers; and (v) determine the scope of future research in healthcare waste management. To this end, the authors conducted a systematic review of 176 articles on healthcare waste management taken from the following eight esteemed journals: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, International Journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance, Journal of Environmental Management, Journal of Hazardous Material, Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, Resources, Conservations and Recycling, Waste Management, and Waste Management & Research. The authors have applied both quantitative and qualitative approaches for analysis, and results will be useful in the following ways: (i) results will show importance of healthcare waste management in healthcare operations; (ii) findings will give a comparative view of the various publications; (c) study will shed light on future research areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Moving research into practice: lessons from the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's IDSRN program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Erin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ Integrated Delivery Systems Research Network (IDSRN program was established to foster public-private collaboration between health services researchers and health care delivery systems. Its broad goal was to link researchers and delivery systems to encourage implementation of research into practice. We evaluated the program to address two primary questions: 1 How successful was IDSRN in generating research findings that could be applied in practice? and 2 What factors facilitate or impede such success? Methods We conducted in-person and telephone interviews with AHRQ staff and nine IDSRN partner organizations and their collaborators, reviewed program documents, analyzed projects funded through the program, and developed case studies of four IDSRN projects judged promising in supporting research implementation. Results Participants reported that the IDSRN structure was valuable in creating closer ties between researchers and participating health systems. Of the 50 completed projects studied, 30 had an operational effect or use. Some kinds of projects were more successful than others in influencing operations. If certain conditions were met, a variety of partnership models successfully supported implementation. An internal champion was necessary for partnerships involving researchers based outside the delivery system. Case studies identified several factors important to success: responsiveness of project work to delivery system needs, ongoing funding to support multiple project phases, and development of applied products or tools that helped users see their operational relevance. Factors limiting success included limited project funding, competing demands on potential research users, and failure to reach the appropriate audience. Conclusion Forging stronger partnerships between researchers and delivery systems has the potential to make research more relevant to users

  1. The Development and Evaluation of an Online Healthcare Toolkit for Autistic Adults and their Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Raymaker, Dora; McDonald, Katherine; Kapp, Steven; Weiner, Michael; Ashkenazy, Elesia; Gerrity, Martha; Kripke, Clarissa; Platt, Laura; Baggs, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    The healthcare system is ill-equipped to meet the needs of adults on the autism spectrum. Our goal was to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop and evaluate tools to facilitate the primary healthcare of autistic adults. Toolkit development included cognitive interviewing and test-retest reliability studies. Evaluation consisted of a mixed-methods, single-arm pre/post-intervention comparison. A total of 259 autistic adults and 51 primary care providers (PCPs) residing in the United States. The AASPIRE Healthcare toolkit includes the Autism Healthcare Accommodations Tool (AHAT)-a tool that allows patients to create a personalized accommodations report for their PCP-and general healthcare- and autism-related information, worksheets, checklists, and resources for patients and healthcare providers. Satisfaction with patient-provider communication, healthcare self-efficacy, barriers to healthcare, and satisfaction with the toolkit's usability and utility; responses to open-ended questions. Preliminary testing of the AHAT demonstrated strong content validity and adequate test-retest stability. Almost all patient participants (>94 %) felt that the AHAT and the toolkit were easy to use, important, and useful. In pre/post-intervention comparisons, the mean number of barriers decreased (from 4.07 to 2.82, p communication improved (from 30.9 to 32.6, p = 0.03). Patients stated that the toolkit helped clarify their needs, enabled them to self-advocate and prepare for visits more effectively, and positively influenced provider behavior. Most of the PCPs surveyed read the AHAT (97 %), rated it as moderately or very useful (82 %), and would recommend it to other patients (87 %). The CBPR process resulted in a reliable healthcare accommodation tool and a highly accessible healthcare toolkit. Patients and providers indicated that the tools positively impacted healthcare interactions. The toolkit has the potential to reduce barriers to

  2. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.J.; Grimshaw, J.M.; Eccles, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse,

  3. Comparing interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration in healthcare: A systematic review of the qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Marlène; Brault, Isabelle; Van Durme, Thérèse; Macq, Jean

    2017-11-11

    Interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration have become important components of a well-functioning healthcare system, all the more so given limited financial resources, aging populations, and comorbid chronic diseases. The nursing role in working alongside other healthcare professionals is critical. By their leadership, nurses can create a culture that encourages values and role models that favour collaborative work within a team context. To clarify the specific features of conceptual frameworks of interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration in the healthcare field. This review, accordingly, offers insights into the key challenges facing policymakers, managers, healthcare professionals, and nurse leaders in planning, implementing, or evaluating interprofessional collaboration. This systematic review of qualitative research is based on the Joanna Briggs Institute's methodology for conducting synthesis. Cochrane, JBI, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Sociological Abstract, PsycInfo, and ProQuest were searched, using terms such as professionals, organizations, collaboration, and frameworks. Qualitative studies of all research design types describing a conceptual framework of interprofessional or interorganizational collaboration in the healthcare field were included. They had to be written in French or English and published in the ten years between 2004 and 2014. Sixteen qualitative articles were included in the synthesis. Several concepts were found to be common to interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration, such as communication, trust, respect, mutual acquaintanceship, power, patient-centredness, task characteristics, and environment. Other concepts are of particular importance either to interorganizational collaboration, such as the need for formalization and the need for professional role clarification, or to interprofessional collaboration, such as the role of individuals and team identity. Promoting

  4. Assessing the impact of healthcare research: A systematic review of methodological frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Rivera, Samantha; Kyte, Derek G; Aiyegbusi, Olalekan Lee; Keeley, Thomas J; Calvert, Melanie J

    2017-08-01

    Increasingly, researchers need to demonstrate the impact of their research to their sponsors, funders, and fellow academics. However, the most appropriate way of measuring the impact of healthcare research is subject to debate. We aimed to identify the existing methodological frameworks used to measure healthcare research impact and to summarise the common themes and metrics in an impact matrix. Two independent investigators systematically searched the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL+), the Health Management Information Consortium, and the Journal of Research Evaluation from inception until May 2017 for publications that presented a methodological framework for research impact. We then summarised the common concepts and themes across methodological frameworks and identified the metrics used to evaluate differing forms of impact. Twenty-four unique methodological frameworks were identified, addressing 5 broad categories of impact: (1) 'primary research-related impact', (2) 'influence on policy making', (3) 'health and health systems impact', (4) 'health-related and societal impact', and (5) 'broader economic impact'. These categories were subdivided into 16 common impact subgroups. Authors of the included publications proposed 80 different metrics aimed at measuring impact in these areas. The main limitation of the study was the potential exclusion of relevant articles, as a consequence of the poor indexing of the databases searched. The measurement of research impact is an essential exercise to help direct the allocation of limited research resources, to maximise research benefit, and to help minimise research waste. This review provides a collective summary of existing methodological frameworks for research impact, which funders may use to inform the measurement of research impact and researchers may use to inform study

  5. Assessing the impact of healthcare research: A systematic review of methodological frameworks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Cruz Rivera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, researchers need to demonstrate the impact of their research to their sponsors, funders, and fellow academics. However, the most appropriate way of measuring the impact of healthcare research is subject to debate. We aimed to identify the existing methodological frameworks used to measure healthcare research impact and to summarise the common themes and metrics in an impact matrix.Two independent investigators systematically searched the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL+, the Health Management Information Consortium, and the Journal of Research Evaluation from inception until May 2017 for publications that presented a methodological framework for research impact. We then summarised the common concepts and themes across methodological frameworks and identified the metrics used to evaluate differing forms of impact. Twenty-four unique methodological frameworks were identified, addressing 5 broad categories of impact: (1 'primary research-related impact', (2 'influence on policy making', (3 'health and health systems impact', (4 'health-related and societal impact', and (5 'broader economic impact'. These categories were subdivided into 16 common impact subgroups. Authors of the included publications proposed 80 different metrics aimed at measuring impact in these areas. The main limitation of the study was the potential exclusion of relevant articles, as a consequence of the poor indexing of the databases searched.The measurement of research impact is an essential exercise to help direct the allocation of limited research resources, to maximise research benefit, and to help minimise research waste. This review provides a collective summary of existing methodological frameworks for research impact, which funders may use to inform the measurement of research impact and researchers may use to inform

  6. Assessing the impact of healthcare research: A systematic review of methodological frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Thomas J.; Calvert, Melanie J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasingly, researchers need to demonstrate the impact of their research to their sponsors, funders, and fellow academics. However, the most appropriate way of measuring the impact of healthcare research is subject to debate. We aimed to identify the existing methodological frameworks used to measure healthcare research impact and to summarise the common themes and metrics in an impact matrix. Methods and findings Two independent investigators systematically searched the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL+), the Health Management Information Consortium, and the Journal of Research Evaluation from inception until May 2017 for publications that presented a methodological framework for research impact. We then summarised the common concepts and themes across methodological frameworks and identified the metrics used to evaluate differing forms of impact. Twenty-four unique methodological frameworks were identified, addressing 5 broad categories of impact: (1) ‘primary research-related impact’, (2) ‘influence on policy making’, (3) ‘health and health systems impact’, (4) ‘health-related and societal impact’, and (5) ‘broader economic impact’. These categories were subdivided into 16 common impact subgroups. Authors of the included publications proposed 80 different metrics aimed at measuring impact in these areas. The main limitation of the study was the potential exclusion of relevant articles, as a consequence of the poor indexing of the databases searched. Conclusions The measurement of research impact is an essential exercise to help direct the allocation of limited research resources, to maximise research benefit, and to help minimise research waste. This review provides a collective summary of existing methodological frameworks for research impact, which funders may use to inform the

  7. Hierarchy of evidence: a framework for ranking evidence evaluating healthcare interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David

    2003-01-01

    A number of hierarchies of evidence have been developed to enable different research methods to be ranked according to the validity of their findings. However, most have focused on evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions. When the evaluation of healthcare addresses its appropriateness or feasibility, then existing hierarchies are inadequate. This paper reports the development of a hierarchy for ranking of evidence evaluating healthcare interventions. The aims of this hierarchy are twofold. Firstly, it is to provide a means by which the evidence from a range of methodologically different types of research can be graded. Secondly, it is to provide a logical framework that can be used during the development of systematic review protocols to help determine the study designs which can contribute valid evidence when the evaluation extends beyond effectiveness. The proposed hierarchy was developed based on a review of literature, investigation of existing hierarchies and examination of the strengths and limitations of different research methods. The proposed hierarchy of evidence focuses on three dimensions of the evaluation: effectiveness, appropriateness and feasibility. Research that can contribute valid evidence to each is suggested. To address the varying strengths of different research designs, four levels of evidence are proposed: excellent, good, fair and poor. The strength of the proposed hierarchy is that it acknowledges the valid contribution of evidence generated by a range of different types of research. However, hierarchies only provide a guide to the strength of the available evidence and other issues such as the quality of research also have an important influence.

  8. Emerging perspectives on transforming the healthcare system: redesign strategies and a call for needed research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Flanagan, Mindy E

    2011-12-01

    U.S. healthcare requires major redesign of its delivery systems, finances, and incentives. Healthcare operations, leadership, and payors are increasingly recognizing the need for community-business-research partnerships to transform healthcare. New models of continuous learning, research, and development should help focus and sustain redesign efforts. This study summarizes suggested strategies for transformational change in healthcare and identifies needed areas for research to inform, spread, and sustain transformational change. We developed these recommendations based on a series of review papers, invited expert discussion, and a subsequent review in the context of a health system transformation research conference (The Regenstrief Biennial Research Conference). The multidisciplinary audience included health systems researchers, clinicians, informaticians, social and engineering scientists, and operational and business leaders. Conference participants and literature reviews identified key strategies for system redesign with the following themes: using the framework of complex adaptive systems; fostering organizational redesign; developing appropriate performance measures and incentives; creating continuous learning organizations; and integrating health information, technology, and communication into practice. Sustained investment in research and development in these areas is crucial. Multiple issues influence the likelihood that healthcare leaders will make transformational changes in their healthcare systems. Healthcare leaders, clinicians, researchers, journals, and academic institutions, in partnership with payors, government and multiple other stakeholders, should apply the recommendations relevant to their own setting to redesign healthcare delivery, improve cognitive support, and sustain transformation. Fostering further research investments in these areas will increase the impact of transformation on the health and healthcare of the public.

  9. Decision-analytical modelling in health-care economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Faunce, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Decision-analytical modelling is widely used in health-care economic evaluations, especially in situations where evaluators lack clinical trial data, and in circumstances where such evaluations factor into reimbursement pricing decisions. This paper aims to improve the understanding and use of modelling techniques in this context, with particular emphasis on Markov modelling. We provide an overview, in this paper, of the principles and methodological details of decision-analytical modelling. We propose a common route for practicing modelling that accommodates any type of decision-analytical modelling techniques. We use the treatment of chronic hepatitis B as an example to indicate the process of development, presentation and analysis of the Markov model, and discuss the strengths, weaknesses and pitfalls of different approaches. Good practice of modelling requires careful planning, conduct and analysis of the model, and needs input from modellers and users.

  10. Service user engagement in healthcare education as a mechanism for value based recruitment: An evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet; Mills, Anne; Spriggs, Ashley; Addis, Andrea; Bond, Mandy; Latchford, Carolyn; Warren, Angela; Borwell, Juliet; Tee, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Within the United Kingdom (UK) there is an increasing focus on Values Based Recruitment (VBR) of staff working in the National Health Service (NHS) in response to public inquiries criticising the lack of person-centred care. All NHS employees are recruited on the basis of a prescribed set of values. This is extended to the recruitment of student healthcare professionals, yet there is little research of how to implement this. Involving Service Users in healthcare educational practice is gaining momentum internationally, yet involvement of service users in VBR of 'would be' healthcare professionals remains at an embryonic phase. Adult nurses represent the largest healthcare workforce in the UK, yet involvement of service users in their recruitment has received scant attention. This paper is an evaluation of the inclusion of service users in a VBR of 640 adult student nurses. This study used a participatory mixed methods approach, with service users as co-researchers in the study. The study consisted of mixed methods design. Quantitative data via an online questionnaire to ascertain candidates' perspectives (n=269 response rate of 42%), and academic/clinical nurses (n=35 response rate 34.65%). Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups and one to one interviews with service users (n=9). Data analysis included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. 4 overarching themes were identified; increasing sense of humanness, substantiating care values; impact of involvement; working together and making it work, a work in progress. The findings from the study highlight that involving service users in VBR of student healthcare professionals has benefits to candidates, service users and local health services. Appreciating the perceptions of healthcare professionals is fundamental in the UK and internationally to implementing service users' engagement in service enhancement and delivery. Findings from this study identify there may be a dissonance between the policy

  11. Evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrenti, Eloá; Mira, Vera Lúcia; Bucchi, Sarah Marília; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the scientific literature on the evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals. Integrative literature review in which were reviewed the following databases: VHL, Pubmed and Cochrane. The final sample was composed of 19 articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish published from 2000 to July 2010. The subject of study was the evaluation of formal educational processes for health professionals, which had at least the abstract available online. There is no use of a systematic methodology to evaluate the formal educational processes in this study group. The evaluation focus mainly on the learning of participants, with little attention to the teaching process. There are no evaluations on the impact caused by this type of training in institutions and users of the health system, which can incur the risk of reducing the value of formal education processes. A full evaluation of the formal educational processes for professionals during a longer time is important to assess the impact of these processes and provide information about the necessities of continuing education of this population.

  12. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science: Bridging healthcare research and delivery to build a learning healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Jose; Adams, Nadia; Boustani, Malaz

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that 75,000 deaths every year could be averted if the healthcare system implemented high quality care more effectively and efficiently. Patient harm in the hospital occurs as a consequence of inadequate procedures, medications and other therapies, nosocomial infections, diagnostic evaluations and patient falls. Implementation science, a new emerging field in healthcare, is the development and study of methods and tools aimed at enhancing the implementation of new discoveries and evidence into daily healthcare delivery. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science (IU-CHIIS) was launched in September 2013 with the mission to use implementation science and innovation to produce great-quality, patient-centered and cost-efficient healthcare delivery solutions for the United States of America. Within the first 24 months of its initiation, the IU-CHIIS successfully scaled up an evidence-based collaborative care model for people with dementia and/or depression, successfully expanded the Accountable Care Unit model positively impacting the efficiency and quality of care, created the first Certificate in Innovation and Implementation Science in the US and secured funding from National Institutes of Health to investigate innovations in dementia care. This article summarizes the establishment of the IU-CHIIS, its impact and outcomes and the lessons learned during the journey. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. 75 FR 38819 - National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality: Request for Nominations for Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...Section 921 (now Section 941 of the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act)), 42 U.S.C. 299c, established a National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality (the Council). The Council is to advise the Secretary of HHS (Secretary) and the Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on activities proposed or undertaken to carry out the agency mission including providing guidance on (A) Priorities for health care research, (B) the field of health care research including training needs and information dissemination on health care quality and (C) the role of the Agency in light of private sector activity and opportunities for public private partnerships. Seven current members' terms will expire in November 2010. To fill these positions in accordance with the legislative mandate establishing the Council, we are seeking individuals who are distinguished: (1) In the conduct of research, demonstration projects, and evaluations with respect to health care; (2) in the fields of health care quality research or health care improvement; (3) in the practice of medicine; (4) in other health professions; (5) in the fields of health care economics, information systems, law, ethics, business, or public policy; and (6) individuals who could represent the interests of patients and consumers of health care; and (7) the private health care sector (including health plans, providers, and purchasers) possibly including distinguished administrators of health care delivery systems., Individuals are particularly sought with experience and success in activities specified in the summary above.

  14. Data Safe Havens in health research and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Paul R; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Boyd, Andy; Williams, James B; Dove, Edward S; Wallace, Susan E; Tassé, Anne-Marie; Little, Julian; Chisholm, Rex L; Gaye, Amadou; Hveem, Kristian; Brookes, Anthony J; Goodwin, Pat; Fistein, Jon; Bobrow, Martin; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-10-15

    The data that put the 'evidence' into 'evidence-based medicine' are central to developments in public health, primary and hospital care. A fundamental challenge is to site such data in repositories that can easily be accessed under appropriate technical and governance controls which are effectively audited and are viewed as trustworthy by diverse stakeholders. This demands socio-technical solutions that may easily become enmeshed in protracted debate and controversy as they encounter the norms, values, expectations and concerns of diverse stakeholders. In this context, the development of what are called 'Data Safe Havens' has been crucial. Unfortunately, the origins and evolution of the term have led to a range of different definitions being assumed by different groups. There is, however, an intuitively meaningful interpretation that is often assumed by those who have not previously encountered the term: a repository in which useful but potentially sensitive data may be kept securely under governance and informatics systems that are fit-for-purpose and appropriately tailored to the nature of the data being maintained, and may be accessed and utilized by legitimate users undertaking work and research contributing to biomedicine, health and/or to ongoing development of healthcare systems. This review explores a fundamental question: 'what are the specific criteria that ought reasonably to be met by a data repository if it is to be seen as consistent with this interpretation and viewed as worthy of being accorded the status of 'Data Safe Haven' by key stakeholders'? We propose 12 such criteria. paul.burton@bristol.ac.uk. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) : a qualitative methodology of choice in healthcare research

    OpenAIRE

    Biggerstaff, Deborah; Thompson, Andrew R

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the teaching of the qualitative method, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), to healthcare professionals (HCPs). It introduces briefly the philosophical background of IPA and how it has been used within healthcare research, and then discusses the teaching of IPA to HCPs within received educational theory. Lastly, the paper describes how IPA has been taught to students/trainees in some specific healthcare professions (clinical psychology, medicine, nursing and ...

  16. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life of Employees in the Healthcare Sector: An Issue in Health Services Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasczik, Matthias; Ahnert, Jutta; Ströbl, Veronika; Vogel, Heiner; Donath, Carolin; Enger, Ilka; Gräßel, Elmar; Heyelmann, Lena; Lux, Heidemarie; Maurer, Jochen; Özbe, Dominik; Spieckenbaum, Stefanie; Voigtländer, Elzbieta; Wildner, Manfred; Zapf, Andreas; Zellner, Angela; Hollederer, Alfons

    2017-05-18

    Background Healthcare professionals are confronted with specific work-related demands that influence work-family relations and might indirectly affect the quality of healthcare. This paper seeks to provide an overview of the current state of research on this topic of relevance to health services research. The overview may serve as a starting point for modifying structures in the healthcare system (especially in rural regions) with the aim of improving work-family compatibility. Methods A systematic national and international literature search was conducted in terms of a scoping review. The following criteria/contents to be covered in publications were defined: work-family compatibility; work-family interface and work-family conflict in employees working in healthcare; healthcare professions in rural areas and links with work-family issues; interventions to improve work-family compatibility. 145 publications were included in the overview. Results The available literature focuses on physicians and nursing staff while publications on other professions are largely lacking. The methodological quality of existing studies is mostly low, including a lack of meta-analyses. Several studies document dissatisfaction in physicians and nursing staff regarding reconciliation of work and family life. Only few intervention studies were found that seek to improve work-life compatibility; few of them focus on employees in healthcare. There are also deficits with respect to linking work-family issues with aspects of healthcare in rural areas. Conclusions There is a shortage of systematic national and international research regarding work-family compatibility, especially when it comes to the evaluation of interventions. The overview provides starting points for improving work-family compatibility in healthcare. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Politics and partnerships: challenges and rewards of partnerships in workplace health research in the healthcare sector of British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Annalee; Tomlin, Katrina; Sidebottom, Claire; Rideout, Karen; De Boer, Henrietre

    2004-01-01

    In British Columbia (BC), Canada, a partnership of researchers, healthcare employers, and healthcare unions reduced high injury rates through examining determinants of healthy workplaces and designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions. Over 51 million dollars (Canadian) was saved from the BC healthcare budget over two years, largely attributable to the collaborative effort. Challenges and rewards of the process were determined from interviews and workshops with researchers and community stakeholders, and by obtaining direct input to this report. Challenges included maintaining communication and trust between partners, preserving partnerships during restructuring and labor disputes, and maintaining involvement and support of front-line workers and senior management. As all partners recognized the importance of the research agenda, the stakeholders remained committed to working through the challenges, and have consequently achieved considerable success.

  18. Setting the stage for a business case for leadership diversity in healthcare: history, research, and leverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Ebbin; Nuru-Jeter, Amani

    2012-01-01

    Leveraging diversity to successfully influence business operations is a business imperative for many healthcare organizations as they look to leadership to help manage a new era of culturally competent, patient-centered care that reduces health and healthcare disparities. This article presents the foundation for a business case in leadership diversity within healthcare organizations and describes the need for research on managerial solutions to health and healthcare disparities. It provides a discussion of clinical, policy, and management implications that will help support a business case for improving the diversity of leadership in healthcare organizations as a way to reduce health and healthcare disparities. Historical contexts introduce aspects of the business case for leveraging leadership diversity based on a desire for a culturally competent care organization. Little research exists on the impact that the role of leadership plays in addressing health disparities from a healthcare management perspective. This article provides practitioners and researchers with a rationale to invest in leadership diversity. It discusses three strategies that will help set the stage for a business case. First, provide empirical evidence of the link between diversity and performance. Second, link investments in diversity to financial outcomes and organizational metrics of success. Third, make organizational leadership responsible for cultural competence as a performance measure. In order to address health and healthcare disparities, collaborations between researchers and practitioners are necessary to effectively implement these strategies.

  19. Evaluation of Collection and Disposal of Hospital Waste in Hospitals and Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the environmental issues is waste of hospitals and healthcare facilities which due to hazardous, toxic, and disease-causing agents such as pharmaceutical, chemical and infectious disease, is of particular sensitivity. According to a 2002 survey by WHO, it was determined that 22 million people worldwide suffer from infectious diseases annually, because of contacting hospital wastes. Also based on a research conducted in 22 countries, 18 to 64 percent of hospitals wastes are not disposed properly [1]. The purpose f the study is to appraise collection and disposal of hospital wastes in hospitals and healthcare centers of Shahroud.In this sectional study, 3 university hospitals (580 beds and 10 healthcare facilities were investigated for six months (mehr-azar 89 at Shahroud. In order to determine the amount of waste, produced waste of an entire day was weighted in hospitals and health centers. In this research, proposed questionnaires of WHO for developing countries was used to evaluate collection and disposal system of hospitals waste. Collected data was coded and analyzed by SPSS ver.15.

  20. International publication trends and collaboration performance of China in healthcare science and services research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Yao, Qiang; Sun, Ju; He, Zhi-Fei; Yao, Lan; Liu, Zhi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, China's healthcare reforms and related studies have drawn particular global attention. The main objective of this study is to evaluate quantitatively the publication trends and collaboration performance of China in healthcare science and services (HSS) research. Scientometric methods and visualization technology were used to survey the growth and development trends of HSS research based on the Web of Science publications during the past 15 years. China's international publications on HSS research increased rapidly compared to those of the global HSS and Chinese scientific studies. Growth trends indicate that collaboration among countries, institutions and authors has also increased. China's leading partners were all developed countries, such as the US, the UK, Australia and Canada, which have contributed to the majority of the joint publications. The academic impact of publications involving partners from European and American countries was relatively higher than those involving partners from Asian countries. Prominent institutions were universities that could be primarily classified into two groups, namely, Mainland China on the one hand and Hong Kong universities and foreign universities on the other. The most prominent actors were elite institutions, such as Peking University, Fudan University, Chinese University of Hong Kong, University of Hong Kong. The papers published by the Chinese Ministry of Health had relatively high academic impact, whereas those published by Mainland China universities alone had a lower academic impact compared to foreign cooperation papers. Issues related to the Chinese healthcare reform, priority diseases (e.g., breast cancer, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, etc.), health systems performance, quality of life and measurement tools, aging problems and research methods have been the most popular HSS topics in China in recent years. Despite the extensive achievement of the Chinese HSS reforms and research, gaps and challenges

  1. The Politicization of Evaluation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carol H.

    1970-01-01

    Researchers who undertake the evaluation of social action programs face several hazards, among which is the politicization of evaluation. Several alternatives in research methodology are suggested, as well as implications from the evaluations themselves. (DM)

  2. 75 FR 62550 - Meeting of a Subcommittee of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Meeting of a Subcommittee of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal...

  3. Perceived service quality in healthcare organizations and a research in Ankara by hospital type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim H. Kayral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of healthcare services is to protect and improve individuals’ physical, mental and social health and ensure its continuity to increase the level of welfare and happiness in the society. As in all service organizations, service quality has an important place in healthcare organizations. Therefore, measuring the impacts of the efforts made by enterprises for service quality and the clients’ perceptions of the services provided, assessing how their perceptions differ in different dimensions of quality, and taking new measures according to the results are the key to continuous improvement. In this study, with respect to the abovementioned issues, perception of the quality of services provided in the field of health by those who receive them is compared according to different types of hospitals providing such service, and evaluations are made accordingly. Thus, whether patients’ perceptions of service quality differ according to hospital types, in what dimensions of quality these differences occur and perceived quality by different patient profiles like age, sex, incomes etc. are assessed. In the measurement of service quality, a set of 34 questions with six dimensions was used, which was used by Kara, Tarım and Zaim (2003 in several hospitals and then used in several research studies in Turkey on service quality in healthcare enterprises (Çaha, 2007; Kara, 2006. Based on the findings of the research, it can be said that public general branch hospitals are perceived as quality at the same level with private hospitals and even they reach higher levels of patient satisfaction. On the other hand, when the sub-dimensions of quality are examined, it is seen that public hospitals are still behind private hospitals in terms of physical quality.

  4. MRM Evaluation Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James C.

    1998-01-01

    This is an interim report on the current output of the MRM evaluation research program. During 1998 this research program has used new and existing data to create an important tool for the development and improvement of "maintenance resource management" (MRM). Thousands of surveys completed by participants in airline MRM training and/or behavior change programs have, for the first time, been consolidated into a panel of "MRM Attitudes and Opinion Profiles." These profiles can be used to compare the attitudes about decision making and communication in any given company at any stage in its MRM program with attitudes of a large sample of like employees during a similar period in their MRM involvement. This panel of comparison profiles for attitudes and opinions is a tool to help audit the effectiveness of a maintenance human factors program. The profile panel is the first of several tools envisioned for applying the information accumulating in MRM databases produced as one of the program's long range objectives.

  5. Extension of the primary care research object model (PCROM) as clinical research information model (CRIM) for the "learning healthcare system".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Karakoyun, Töresin; Ohmann, Christian; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C; Speedie, Stuart M

    2014-12-18

    Patient data from general practices is already used for many types of epidemiological research and increasingly, primary care systems to facilitate randomized clinical trials. The EU funded project TRANSFoRm aims to create a "Learning Healthcare System" at a European level that is able to support all types of research using primary care data, to recruit patients and follow patients in clinical studies and to improve diagnosis and therapy. The implementation of such a Learning Healthcare System needs an information model for clinical research (CRIM), as an informational backbone to integrate aspects of primary care with clinical trials and database searches. Workflow descriptions and corresponding data objects of two clinical use cases (Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease and Type 2 Diabetes) were described in UML activity diagrams. The components of activity diagrams were mapped to information objects of PCROM (Primary Care Research Object Model) and BRIDG (Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group) and evaluated. The class diagram of PCROM was adapted to comply with workflow descriptions. The suitability of PCROM, a primary care information model already used for clinical trials, to act as an information model for TRANSFoRm was evaluated and resulted in its extension with 14 new information object types, two extensions of existing objects and the introduction of two new high-ranking concepts (CARE area and ENTRY area). No PCROM component was redundant. Our result illustrates that in primary care based research an important but underestimated portion of research activity takes place in the area of care (e.g. patient consultation, screening, recruitment and response to adverse events). The newly introduced CARE area for care-related research activities accounts for this shift and includes Episode of Care and Encounter as two new basic elements. In the ENTRY area different aspects of data collection were combined, including data semantics for observations, assessment

  6. Value for money of changing healthcare services? Economic evaluation of quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severens, J

    2003-01-01

    

 There are many instances of perceived or real inefficiencies in health service delivery. Both healthcare providers and policy makers need to know the impact and cost of applying strategies to change the behaviour of individuals or organisations. Quality improvement or implementation research is concerned with evaluating the methods of behavioural change. Addressing inefficiencies in healthcare services raises a series of issues, beginning with how inefficiency itself should be defined. The basic concepts of cost analysis and economic evaluations are explained and a model for working through the economic issues of quality improvement is discussed. This model combines the costs and benefits of corrected inefficiency with the costs and degree of behavioural change achieved by a quality improvement method in the policy maker's locality. It shows why it may not always be cost effective for policy makers to address suboptimal behaviour. Both the interpretation of quality improvement research findings and their local application need careful consideration. The limited availability of applicable quality improvement research may make it difficult to provide robust advice on the value for money of many behavioural quality improvement strategies. PMID:14532369

  7. [Health-care research from the German Medical Association's perspective on small-area analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, U

    2014-02-01

    As early as 2003, the German medical profession realized the necessity of not only forwarding medical research, but also analyzing the process of health care itself. Approved by a decision of the 108th German Medical Assembly in 2005, an initiative on health-care research paid by contributions of the medical profession was launched. Since then several projects have been supported with the results being published continuously. From the perspective of the German Medical Association, the success of the initiative also proves the effective approach of the scientific and medical communities' self-administration. Although the current results from health-care research can be used to support health-care politics and decision making at a macro level, a focus on small-area analysis tends to be an intrinsic attribute of health-care research, keeping a local approach toward changes so as to obtain real effects. Without local settings and without data reflecting the local situation, the"last mile" of a health-care system, which is the core subject of health-care research, will not be comprehensible.

  8. Visualizing the knowledge structure and evolution of big data research in healthcare informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongxiao; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xingguo; Liang, Changyong

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the literature associated with healthcare big data has grown rapidly, but few studies have used bibliometrics and a visualization approach to conduct deep mining and reveal a panorama of the healthcare big data field. To explore the foundational knowledge and research hotspots of big data research in the field of healthcare informatics, this study conducted a series of bibliometric analyses on the related literature, including papers' production trends in the field and the trend of each paper's co-author number, the distribution of core institutions and countries, the core literature distribution, the related information of prolific authors and innovation paths in the field, a keyword co-occurrence analysis, and research hotspots and trends for the future. By conducting a literature content analysis and structure analysis, we found the following: (a) In the early stage, researchers from the United States, the People's Republic of China, the United Kingdom, and Germany made the most contributions to the literature associated with healthcare big data research and the innovation path in this field. (b) The innovation path in healthcare big data consists of three stages: the disease early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis phase, the life and health promotion phase, and the nursing phase. (c) Research hotspots are mainly concentrated in three dimensions: the disease dimension (e.g., epidemiology, breast cancer, obesity, and diabetes), the technical dimension (e.g., data mining and machine learning), and the health service dimension (e.g., customized service and elderly nursing). This study will provide scholars in the healthcare informatics community with panoramic knowledge of healthcare big data research, as well as research hotspots and future research directions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. VA/DoD Collaboration Guidebook for Healthcare Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Interdisciplinary Affective Science Laboratory Department of Psychology, Northeastern University Boston, MA Research Physiologist, Center for Health Quality...is essential and may become an issue in collaborative research when sharing intellectual property (IP), particularly in the proposal development...misconduct. Research misconduct includes the fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research or in reporting

  10. Innovative use of the integrative review to evaluate evidence of technology transformation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2015-12-01

    Healthcare is in a period significant transformational activity through the accelerated adoption of healthcare technologies, new reimbursement systems that emphasize shared savings and care coordination, and the common place use of mobile technologies by patients, providers, and others. The complexity of healthcare creates barriers to transformational activity and has the potential to inhibit the desired paths toward change envisioned by policymakers. Methods for understanding how change is occurring within this complex environment are important to the evaluation of delivery system reform and the role of technology in healthcare transformation. This study examines the use on an integrative review methodology to evaluate the healthcare literature for evidence of technology transformation in healthcare. The methodology integrates the evaluation of a broad set of literature with an established evaluative framework to develop a more complete understanding of a particular topic. We applied this methodology and the framework of punctuated equilibrium (PEq) to the analysis of the healthcare literature from 2004 to 2012 for evidence of technology transformation, a time during which technology was at the forefront of healthcare policy. The analysis demonstrated that the established PEq framework applied to the literature showed considerable potential for evaluating the progress of policies that encourage healthcare transformation. Significant inhibitors to change were identified through the integrative review and categorized into ten themes that describe the resistant structure of healthcare delivery: variations in the environment; market complexity; regulations; flawed risks and rewards; change theories; barriers; ethical considerations; competition and sustainability; environmental elements, and internal elements. We hypothesize that the resistant nature of the healthcare system described by this study creates barriers to the direct consumer involvement and engagement

  11. Trends and Challenges in Smart Healthcare Research: A Journey from Data to Wisdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solanas, Agusti; Fran, Casino; Batista, Edgar; Rallo Moya, Roberto J.

    2017-10-12

    Smart Healthcare is a relatively new context-aware healthcare paradigm influenced by several fields of knowledge, namely medical informatics, communications and electronics, bioengineering, ethics and so on. Thus, many challenging problems are related to smart healthcare but in many cases they are explored individually in their respective fields and, as a result, they are not always known by the smart healthcare research community working in more specific domains. The aim of this article is to identify some of the most relevant trends and research lines that are going to affect the smart healthcare field in the years to come. To do so, the article considers a systematic approach that classifies the identified research trends and problems according to their appearance within the data life cycle, this is, from the data gathering in the physical layer (lowest level) until their final use in the application layer (highest level). By identifying and classifying those research trends and challenges, we help to pose questions that the smart healthcare community will need to address. Consequently, we set a common ground to explore important problems in the field, which will have significant impact in the years to come.

  12. Clinical research ethics in Irish healthcare: diversity, dynamism and medicalization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Condell, Sarah L

    2012-11-01

    Gaining ethical clearance to conduct a study is an important aspect of all research involving humans but can be time-consuming and daunting for novice researchers. This article stems from a larger ethnographic study that examined research capacity building in Irish nursing and midwifery. Data were collected over a 28-month time frame from a purposive sample of 16 nurse or midwife research fellows who were funded to undertake full-time PhDs. Gaining ethical clearance for their studies was reported as an early \\'rite of passage\\' in the category of \\'labouring the doctorate\\'. This article penetrates the complexities in Irish clinical research ethics by describing the practices these nurse and midwife researchers encountered and the experiences they had. The key issue of representation that occurred in the context of \\'medicalized\\' research ethics is further explored including its meaning for nursing or midwifery research.

  13. The importance of research in healthcare | Young | South Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In June 1913 the Medical Research Committee held its first meeting. The objective was to implement a national scheme for health insurance which would provide hospital treatment for tuberculosis (TB) and to initiate research comparing TB in animals and humans. The committee is now known as the Medical Research ...

  14. Using and misusing marketing research in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keckley, P H

    1985-12-01

    As competition grows in health care, marketing research, especially consumer attitude research, is becoming increasingly important to the hospital's success and even survival. However, in the research process, mistakes are often made that invalidate the usefulness of the research. Those involved in marketing research, therefore, must be aware of the possible techniques to be used, potential audiences to be surveyed, the limitations of computer analysis, and the difference between consumer attitudes and intentions, if the information to be collected is to be reliable and useful to the organization.

  15. Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Firth, Kimberly; Smeeding, Sandra; Wolever, Ruth; Kaufman, Joanna; Delgado, Roxana; Bellanti, Dawn; Xenakis, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the development of mind-body skills can improve individual and family resilience, particularly related to the stresses of illness, trauma, and caregiving. To operationalize the research evidence that mind-body skills help with health and recovery, Samueli Institute, in partnership with experts in mind-body programming, created a set of guidelines for developing and evaluating mind-body programs for service members, veterans, and their families. The Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting outline key strategies and issues to consider when developing, implementing, and evaluating a mind-body focused family empowerment approach in a military healthcare setting. Although these guidelines were developed specifically for a military setting, most of the same principles can be applied to the development of programs in the civilian setting as well. The guidelines particularly address issues unique to mind-body programs, such as choosing evidence-based modalities, licensure and credentialing, safety and contraindications, and choosing evaluation measures that capture the holistic nature of these types of programs. The guidelines are practical, practice-based guidelines, developed by experts in the fields of program development and evaluation, mind-body therapies, patient- and family-centered care, as well as, experts in military and veteran's health systems. They provide a flexible framework to create mind-body family empowerment programs and describe important issues that program developers and evaluators are encouraged to address to ensure the development of the most impactful, successful, evidence-supported programs possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating integrated healthcare for refugees and hosts in an African context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuepker, Anais; Chi, Chunhuei

    2009-04-01

    This paper argues on ethical and practical grounds for more widespread use of an integrated approach to refugee healthcare, and proposes a basic model of assessment for integrated systems. A defining element of an integrated approach is an equal ability by refugee and host nationals to access the same healthcare resources from the same providers. This differs fundamentally from parallel care, currently the predominant practice in Africa. The authors put forward a general model for evaluation of integrated healthcare with four criteria: (1) improved health outcomes for both hosts and refugees, (2) increased social integration, (3) increased equitable use of healthcare resources, and (4) no undermining of protection. Historical examples of integrated care in Ethiopia and Uganda are examined in light of these criteria to illustrate how this evaluative model would generate evidence currently lacking in debates on the merit of integrated healthcare.

  17. Research activity and capacity in primary healthcare: The REACH study: A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias Alberto A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite increased investment in primary care research and development (R&D, the level of engagement of primary healthcare professionals with research remains poor. The aim of this study is to assess the level of research activity and capacity for research among primary healthcare professionals in a health authority of over one million people in a mixed urban/rural setting in the West of Ireland. Methods A questionnaire, incorporating the R+D Culture Index, was sent to primary healthcare professionals in the HSE Western Region. Baseline characteristics were analysed with the use of one-way ANOVA and Chi-square test and the dependence of R&D Culture Index score on all sixteen available covariates was examined using multiple regression and regression tree modelling. Results There was a 54% response rate to the questionnaire. Primary healthcare professionals appeared to have an interest in and awareness of the importance of research in primary care but just 15% were found to be research active in this study. A more positive attitude towards an R&D culture was associated with having had previous research training, being currently involved in research and with not being a general practitioner (GP (p Conclusion Despite awareness of the importance of R&D in primary care and investment therein, primary healthcare professionals remain largely unengaged with the R&D process. This study highlights the issues that need to be addressed in order to encourage a shift towards a culture of R&D in primary care: lack of research training particularly in basic research skills and increased opportunities for research involvement. The use of the R&D Culture Index may enable groups to be identified that may be more research interested and can therefore be targeted in any future R&D strategy.

  18. Research activity and capacity in primary healthcare: the REACH study: a survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Liam G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increased investment in primary care research and development (R&D), the level of engagement of primary healthcare professionals with research remains poor. The aim of this study is to assess the level of research activity and capacity for research among primary healthcare professionals in a health authority of over one million people in a mixed urban\\/rural setting in the West of Ireland. METHODS: A questionnaire, incorporating the R+D Culture Index, was sent to primary healthcare professionals in the HSE Western Region. Baseline characteristics were analysed with the use of one-way ANOVA and Chi-square test and the dependence of R&D Culture Index score on all sixteen available covariates was examined using multiple regression and regression tree modelling. RESULTS: There was a 54% response rate to the questionnaire. Primary healthcare professionals appeared to have an interest in and awareness of the importance of research in primary care but just 15% were found to be research active in this study. A more positive attitude towards an R&D culture was associated with having had previous research training, being currently involved in research and with not being a general practitioner (GP) (p < 0.001), but much variability in the R&D culture index score remained unexplained. CONCLUSION: Despite awareness of the importance of R&D in primary care and investment therein, primary healthcare professionals remain largely unengaged with the R&D process. This study highlights the issues that need to be addressed in order to encourage a shift towards a culture of R&D in primary care: lack of research training particularly in basic research skills and increased opportunities for research involvement. The use of the R&D Culture Index may enable groups to be identified that may be more research interested and can therefore be targeted in any future R&D strategy.

  19. Healthcare market research examined. Relevant, rigorous and highly regulated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Douglas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available [The abstract of this article is not available. Here are the first sentences of the article. The full text is freely available upon registration]Market research is invariably confused with marketing – but, in fact, the two disciplines are very different. Put in its simplest terms, marketing is about promotion whilst market research is about understanding. Accordingly, data collected for market research purposes are used in a completely different way to that gathered for marketing, with research practices heavily regulated to ensure high ethical standards.Let’s begin with a definition of what, exactly, market research is. According to the ICC/ESOMAR International Code 2007 (a definition also adopted by the European Pharmaceutical Market Research Association, it is: «the systematic gathering and interpretation of information about individuals or organisations using the statistical and analytical methods and techniques of the applied social sciences to gain insight or support decision-making. The identity of respondents will not be revealed to the user of the information without explicit consent and no sales approach will be made to them as a direct result of their having provided information».

  20. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Pedersen, Reidar; Norvoll, Reidun; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-06-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five studies were included. The ethics support activities described were moral case deliberations and ethics rounds. Different qualitative and quantitative research methods were utilized. The results show that (a) participants felt that they gained an increased insight into moral issues through systematic reflection; (b) there was improved cooperation among multidisciplinary team members; (c) it was uncertain whether clinical ethics support services led to better patient care; (d) the issue of patient and client participation is complex; and (e) the implementation process is challenging. Clinical ethics support services have mainly been studied through the experiences of the participating facilitators and healthcare professionals. Hence, there is limited knowledge of whether and how various types of clinical ethics support services influence the quality of care and how patients and relatives may evaluate clinical ethics support services. Based on the six excluded 'grey zone articles', in which there was an implicit focus on ethics reflection, other ways of working with ethical reflection in practice are discussed. Implementing and evaluating clinical ethics support services as approaches to clinical ethics support that are more integrated into the development of good practice are in focus. In order to meet some of the shortcomings of the field of clinical ethics support services, a research project that aims to strengthen ethics support in the mental health services, including patients' and caregivers' views on ethical challenges, is presented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Biomedical Informatics Research for Individualized Life - Long Shared Healthcare

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana; Hanzlíček, Petr; Nagy, Miroslav; Přečková, Petra; Zvára, K.; Seidl, L.; Bureš, V.; Šubrt, D.; Dostálová, T.; Seydlová, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2009), s. 31-41 ISSN 0208-5216 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : electronic health record * semantic interoperability * dentistry * cardiology Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  2. Directions in healthcare research: Pointers from retailing and services marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rompay, Thomas Johannes Lucas; Dijkstra, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although the importance of the environment in relation to healing processes has been well established, empirical evidence for environmental effects on patient well-being and behavior is sparse. In addition, few attempts have been made to integrate insights from related fields of research

  3. Directions in healthcare research : Pointers from retailing and services marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rompay, Thomas J L; Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin

    Purpose: Although the importance of the environment in relation to healing processes has been well established, empirical evidence for environmental effects on patient well-being and behavior is sparse. In addition, few attempts have been made to integrate insights from related fields of research

  4. Field Research and Evaluation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francis A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the utility of field research techniques for the evaluation of educational programs in general and the Minneapolis South East Alternatives Program in particular. Examines relationships between theory, field research, and evaluation in education and describes a pattern of relationships that has evaluative utility and provides responsible…

  5. Evaluating research communications | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... To do so, that research has to be effectively communicated and reach the right people. The Evaluation Unit has worked on two aspects of evaluating research communications. Part 1: Data visualization A first focus has been on the importance of communicating research findings through data visualization.

  6. Recruitment of general practices: Is a standardised approach helpful in the involvement of healthcare professionals in research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Riis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health service research often involves the active participation of healthcare professionals. However, their ability and commitment to research varies. This can cause recruitment difficulties and thereby prolong the study period and inflate budgets. Solberg has identified seven R-factors as determinants for successfully recruiting healthcare professionals: relationships, reputation, requirements, rewards, reciprocity, resolution, and respect. Method: This is a process evaluation of the seven R-factors. We applied these factors to guide the design of our recruitment strategy as well as to make adjustments when recruiting general practices in a guideline implementation study. In the guideline implementation study, we studied the effect of outreach visits, quality reports, and new patient stratification tools for low back pain patients. Results: During a period of 15 months, we recruited 60 practices, which was fewer than planned (100 practices. In this evaluation, five of Solberg’s seven R-factors were successfully addressed and two factors were not. The need to involve (reciprocity end users in the development of new software and the amount of time needed to conduct recruitment (resolution were underestimated. Conclusion: The framework of the seven R-factors was a feasible tool in our recruitment process. However, we suggest further investigation in developing systematic approaches to support the recruitment of healthcare professionals to research.

  7. Smart Homes for Elderly Healthcare-Recent Advances and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Sumit; Aghayi, Emad; Noferesti, Moein; Memarzadeh-Tehran, Hamidreza; Mondal, Tapas; Pang, Zhibo; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-10-31

    Advancements in medical science and technology, medicine and public health coupled with increased consciousness about nutrition and environmental and personal hygiene have paved the way for the dramatic increase in life expectancy globally in the past several decades. However, increased life expectancy has given rise to an increasing aging population, thus jeopardizing the socio-economic structure of many countries in terms of costs associated with elderly healthcare and wellbeing. In order to cope with the growing need for elderly healthcare services, it is essential to develop affordable, unobtrusive and easy-to-use healthcare solutions. Smart homes, which incorporate environmental and wearable medical sensors, actuators, and modern communication and information technologies, can enable continuous and remote monitoring of elderly health and wellbeing at a low cost. Smart homes may allow the elderly to stay in their comfortable home environments instead of expensive and limited healthcare facilities. Healthcare personnel can also keep track of the overall health condition of the elderly in real-time and provide feedback and support from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art research and development in smart home based remote healthcare technologies.

  8. Discourse analysis: A useful methodology for health-care system researches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Yousefy, Alireza; Mohammadi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Discourse analysis (DA) is an interdisciplinary field of inquiry and becoming an increasingly popular research strategy for researchers in various disciplines which has been little employed by health-care researchers. The methodology involves a focus on the sociocultural and political context in which text and talk occur. DA adds a linguistic approach to an understanding of the relationship between language and ideology, exploring the way in which theories of reality and relations of power are encoded in such aspects as the syntax, style, and rhetorical devices used in texts. DA is a useful and productive qualitative methodology but has been underutilized within health-care system research. Without a clear understanding of discourse theory and DA it is difficult to comprehend important research findings and impossible to use DA as a research strategy. To redress this deficiency, in this article, represents an introduction to concepts of discourse and DA, DA history, Philosophical background, DA types and analysis strategy. Finally, we discuss how affect to the ideological dimension of such phenomena discourse in health-care system, health beliefs and intra-disciplinary relationship in health-care system.

  9. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse, the work of allied health professions, and preventive healthcare. The society would be open to researchers from all traditions. Thus, we take an inclusive approach to what constitutes scientific research, as long as it uses rigorous methods, is focused on improving healthcare, and aims at knowledge that can be transferred across settings. The society would primarily target scientific researchers but would invite others with an interest in this area of research, regardless of their discipline, position, field of application, or group affiliation (e.g., improvement science, behavioral medicine, knowledge translation. A society would need fruitful collaboration with related societies and organizations, which may include having combined meetings. Special links may be developed with one or more journals. A website to provide information on relevant resources, events, and training opportunities is another key activity. It would also provide a voice for the field at funding agencies, political arenas, and similar institutions. An organizational structure and financial resources are required to develop and run these activities. Our aim is to start an international debate, to discover if we can establish a shared vision across academics and stakeholders engaged with creating scientific knowledge on how to improve healthcare. We invite readers to express their views in the online questionnaire accessed by following the URL link provided at the end of the editorial.

  10. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensing, Michel; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Eccles, Martin P

    2012-02-29

    In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse, the work of allied health professions, and preventive healthcare. The society would be open to researchers from all traditions. Thus, we take an inclusive approach to what constitutes scientific research, as long as it uses rigorous methods, is focused on improving healthcare, and aims at knowledge that can be transferred across settings. The society would primarily target scientific researchers but would invite others with an interest in this area of research, regardless of their discipline, position, field of application, or group affiliation (e.g., improvement science, behavioral medicine, knowledge translation). A society would need fruitful collaboration with related societies and organizations, which may include having combined meetings. Special links may be developed with one or more journals. A website to provide information on relevant resources, events, and training opportunities is another key activity. It would also provide a voice for the field at funding agencies, political arenas, and similar institutions. An organizational structure and financial resources are required to develop and run these activities. Our aim is to start an international debate, to discover if we can establish a shared vision across academics and stakeholders engaged with creating scientific knowledge on how to improve healthcare. We invite readers to express their views in the online questionnaire accessed by following the URL link provided at the end of the editorial.

  11. A realist evaluation of the role of communities of practice in changing healthcare practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Johanna I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare organisations seeking to manage knowledge and improve organisational performance are increasingly investing in communities of practice (CoPs. Such investments are being made in the absence of empirical evidence demonstrating the impact of CoPs in improving the delivery of healthcare. A realist evaluation is proposed to address this knowledge gap. Underpinned by the principle that outcomes are determined by the context in which an intervention is implemented, a realist evaluation is well suited to understand the role of CoPs in improving healthcare practice. By applying a realist approach, this study will explore the following questions: What outcomes do CoPs achieve in healthcare? Do these outcomes translate into improved practice in healthcare? What are the contexts and mechanisms by which CoPs improve healthcare? Methods The realist evaluation will be conducted by developing, testing, and refining theories on how, why, and when CoPs improve healthcare practice. When collecting data, context will be defined as the setting in which the CoP operates; mechanisms will be the factors and resources that the community offers to influence a change in behaviour or action; and outcomes will be defined as a change in behaviour or work practice that occurs as a result of accessing resources provided by the CoP. Discussion Realist evaluation is being used increasingly to study social interventions where context plays an important role in determining outcomes. This study further enhances the value of realist evaluations by incorporating a social network analysis component to quantify the structural context associated with CoPs. By identifying key mechanisms and contexts that optimise the effectiveness of CoPs, this study will contribute to creating a framework that will guide future establishment and evaluation of CoPs in healthcare.

  12. How healthcare systems evaluate their advance care planning initiatives: Results from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Patricia D; Lee, Lydia D; Davison, Sara N; Simon, Jessica E

    2016-09-01

    Advance care planning initiatives are being implemented across healthcare systems around the world, but how best to evaluate their implementation is unknown. To identify gaps and/or redundancies in current evaluative strategies to help healthcare systems develop future evaluative frameworks for ACP. Systematic review. Peer-reviewed and gray literature searches were conducted till February 2015 to answer: "What methods have healthcare systems used to evaluate implementation of advance care planning initiatives?" A PICOS framework was developed to identify articles describing the implementation and evaluation of a health system-level advance care planning initiative. Outcome measures were mapped onto a conceptual quality indicator framework based on the Institute of Medicine and Donabedian models of healthcare quality. A total of 46 studies met inclusion criteria for analysis. Most articles reported on single parts of a healthcare system (e.g. continuing care). The most common outcome measures pertained to document completion, followed by healthcare resource use. Patient-, family-, or healthcare provider-reported outcomes were less commonly measured. Concordance measures (e.g. dying in place of choice) were reported by only 26% of studies. The conceptual quality indicator framework identified gaps and redundancies in measurement and is presented as a potential foundation from which to develop a comprehensive advance care planning evaluation framework. Document completion is frequently used to evaluate advance care planning program implementation; capturing the quality of care appears to be more difficult. This systematic review provides health system administrators with a comprehensive summary of measures used to evaluate advance care planning and may identify gaps in evaluation within their local context. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Post-Occupancy Evaluation of a Mental Healthcare Facility Based on Staff Perceptions of Design Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Saleh; Snell, Robin

    2017-07-01

    This study was a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) to examine the effectiveness of three specific design innovations in a mental healthcare facility. In addition to collecting data about the impact of these specific designs, the study provides a model for the broader implementation of POE approaches in the mental healthcare context. POEs in general healthcare settings have been shown to lead to better work environments and better outcomes for patients. Despite growing evidence of the value provided by POE studies, the industry has been somewhat slow to adopt their regular use, in part due to unfamiliarity with the POE process. This is particularly true in mental healthcare contexts, where POE studies remain virtually nonexistent. In-depth interviews and a widely distributed, anonymous survey were used to collect hospital staff perceptions and feedback regarding the impact of specific design features. The hospital staff were quite enthusiastic about two of the design innovations studied here (a new wayfinding strategy and the use of vibrant colors in specific areas of the facility). The third innovation, open-style communication centers, elicited more mixed evaluations. The results include extensive hypothesis testing about the effects of each innovation as well as narrative discussions of their pros and cons. The study generated new knowledge about three specific mental healthcare design innovations and provides a model for the practical implementation of a POE approach in mental healthcare contexts. The results are particularly relevant for designers who are considering innovative strategies in future mental healthcare facilities.

  14. Thinking beyond Measurement, Description and Judgment: Fourth Generation Evaluation in Family-Centered Pediatric Healthcare Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although pediatric healthcare organizations have widely implemented the philosophy of family-centered care (FCC), evaluators and health professionals have not explored how to preserve the philosophy of FCC in evaluation processes. Purpose: To illustrate how fourth generation evaluation, in theory, could facilitate collaboration between…

  15. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  16. Measuring, evaluating and improving hospital quality parameters/dimensions--an integrated healthcare quality approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zineldin, Mosad; Camgöz-Akdağ, Hatice; Vasicheva, Valiantsina

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the major factors affecting cumulative summation, to empirically examine the major factors affecting satisfaction and to address the question whether patients in Kazakhstan evaluate healthcare similarly or differently from patients in Egypt and Jordan. A questionnaire, adapted from previous research, was distributed to Kazakhstan inpatients. The questionnaire contained 39 attributes about five newly-developed quality dimensions (5Qs), which were identified to be the most relevant attributes for hospitals. The questionnaire was translated into Russian to increase the response rate and improve data quality. Almost 200 usable questionnaires were returned. Frequency distribution, factor analysis and reliability checks were used to analyze the data. The three biggest concerns for Kazakhstan patients are: infrastructure; atmosphere; and interaction. Hospital staffs concern for patients' needs, parking facilities for visitors, waiting time and food temperature were all common specific attributes, which were perceived as concerns. These were shortcomings in all three countries. Improving health service quality by applying total relationship management and the 5Qs model together with a customer-orientation strategy is recommended. Results can be used by hospital staff to reengineer and redesign creatively their quality management processes and help move towards more effective healthcare quality strategies. Patients in three countries have similar concerns and quality perceptions. The paper describes a new instrument and method. The study assures relevance, validity and reliability, while being explicitly change-oriented. The authors argue that patient satisfaction is a cumulative construct, summing satisfaction as five different qualities (5Qs): object; processes; infrastructure; interaction and atmosphere.

  17. How to Do Research on IT Design and Applications in Healthcare Science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    How to Do Research on IT Design and Applications in Healthcare Science? Background It is of pivotal importance for an increasing number of scientists in the healthcare research community to retrieve knowledge about which IT design and applications empower the end-user to master their own life......’s ”knowledge in practice”, Boltes' concepts and requirements for the design of and application of IT and Latour’s ideas about a new scheme for research and inquiry into a number of modes to retrieve knowledge about the world. Like the realistic paradigm the points of departure of all the three scientists...... scientists in the field find that the dominant research paradigm (referred to as “the paradigm of evidence”) says very little about whether designs and applications fulfil the purpose. Objective Therefore, they seek new principles for research (often referred to as “the paradigm of realism”) able to find...

  18. Technical evaluation of methods for identifying chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in healthcare claims databases

    OpenAIRE

    Weycker, Derek; Sofrygin, Oleg; Seefeld, Kim; Deeter, Robert G; Legg, Jason; Edelsberg, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare claims databases have been used in several studies to characterize the risk and burden of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) and effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors against FN. The accuracy of methods previously used to identify FN in such databases has not been formally evaluated. Methods Data comprised linked electronic medical records from Geisinger Health System and healthcare claims data from Geisinger Health Plan. Subjects were classifie...

  19. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients \\'at risk\\' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored.

  20. Improving healthcare delivery with lean thinking: Action research in an emergency department.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmulder, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The healthcare sector faces a challenge to deliver more and better patient care with less manpower and less financial resources. This action research (AR) thesis deals with the question if industrial engineers can contribute to this by applying process improvement concepts that were successful in

  1. A critique of the regulation of data science in healthcare research in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, John M M; Pierscionek, Barbara K

    2017-04-08

    The EU offers a suitable milieu for the comparison and harmonisation of healthcare across different languages, cultures, and jurisdictions (albeit with a supranational legal framework), which could provide improvements in healthcare standards across the bloc. There are specific ethico-legal issues with the use of data in healthcare research that mandate a different approach from other forms of research. The use of healthcare data over a long period of time is similar to the use of tissue in biobanks. There is a low risk to subjects but it is impossible to gain specific informed consent given the future possibilities for research. Large amounts of data on a subject present a finite risk of re-identification. Consequently, there is a balancing act between this risk and retaining sufficient utility of the data. Anonymising methods need to take into account the circumstances of data sharing to enable an appropriate balance in all cases. There are ethical and policy advantages to exceeding the legal requirements and thereby securing the social licence for research. This process would require the examination and comparison of data protection laws across the trading bloc to produce an ethico-legal framework compatible with the requirements of all member states. Seven EU jurisdictions are given consideration in this critique.

  2. Ethics Leadership in Research, Healthcare and Organizational Systems: Commentary and Critical Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades there has arisen a greater awareness of the ever present need for critical academic reflection on the nature of ethics leadership and committees in research, healthcare, and organizational systems. Yet what is meant by ethics itself? How is ethics understood as a historical phenomenon? What challenges must ethics leaders face…

  3. Denkbeeldige Wereld: The New Dutch Guidelines for Economic Evaluations in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2016 the Dutch National Health Care Institute (Zorginstituut Nederland published a new guidance for economic evaluations in healthcare to support reimbursement decisions. These Guidelines update and replace three previously published guidelines covering pharmacoeconomic evaluation, outcomes research and costing. The purpose of this commentary is to consider the merits of these new Guidelines from the perspective of modeled claims which meet the standards of normal science: credibility, evaluation and replication in the treatment of target patient populations. In evaluating the merits of the Guidelines the focus will be on the requirement for submissions to follow reference case standards where lifetime-cost-per-QALY claims are the preferred outcome measure. The assessment points out that in adhering to a reference case standard, the Dutch Guidelines, in common with those in the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, fail to address the fundamental question of claims assessment. Rather, in relying upon the reference case imaginary world (denkbeeldige wereld to inform decision makers, the possibility of evaluating claims and generating feedback to decision makers on comparative effectiveness is put to one side. We have no idea as to whether the claims are right or even if they are wrong. Hopefully, future versions of the guidelines will address this issue and focus on a rigorous program of claims assessment.   Type: Commentary

  4. Healthcare students' evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Salla; Kääriäinen, Maria; Oikarainen, Ashlee; Tuomikoski, Anna-Maria; Elo, Satu; Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kärsämänoja, Taina; Mikkonen, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of clinical placements and supervision is to promote the development of healthcare students´ professional skills. High-quality clinical learning environments and supervision were shown to have significant influence on healthcare students´ professional development. This study aimed to describe healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision, and to identify the factors that affect these. The study was performed as a cross-sectional study. The data (n = 1973) were gathered through an online survey using the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale during the academic year 2015-2016 from all healthcare students (N = 2500) who completed their clinical placement at a certain university hospital in Finland. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression analysis. More than half of the healthcare students had a named supervisor and supervision was completed as planned. The students evaluated the clinical learning environment and supervision as 'good'. The students´ readiness to recommend the unit to other students and the frequency of separate private unscheduled sessions with the supervisor were the main factors that affect healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision. Individualized and goal-oriented supervision in which the student had a named supervisor and where supervision was completed as planned in a positive environment that supported learning had a significant impact on student's learning. The clinical learning environment and supervision support the development of future healthcare professionals' clinical competence. The supervisory relationship was shown to have a significant effect on the outcomes of students' experiences. We recommend the planning of educational programmes for supervisors of healthcare students for the enhancement of supervisors' pedagogical competencies in supervising students in

  5. Citation analysis in research evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Moed, Henk F

    2005-01-01

    This book is written for members of the scholarly research community, and for persons involved in research evaluation and research policy. More specifically, it is directed towards the following four main groups of readers: - All scientists and scholars who have been or will be subjected to a quantitative assessment of research performance using citation analysis. - Research policy makers and managers who wish to become conversant with the basic features of citation analysis, and about its potentialities and limitations. - Members of peer review committees and other evaluators, who consider th

  6. Conjoint analysis: using a market-based research model for healthcare decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Nancy L

    2008-01-01

    Conjoint analysis is a market-based research model that has been used by businesses for more than 35 years to predict consumer preferences in product design and purchasing. Researchers in medicine, healthcare economics, and health policy have discovered the value of this methodology in determining treatment preferences, resource allocation, and willingness to pay. To describe the conjoint analysis methodology and explore value-added applications in nursing research. Conjoint analysis methodology is described, using examples from the healthcare and business literature, and personal experience with the method. Nurses are called upon to increase interdisciplinary research, provide an evidence base for nursing practice, create patient-centered treatments, and revise nursing education. Other disciplines have met challenges like these using conjoint analysis and discrete choice modeling.

  7. Enhancing the h index for the objective assessment of healthcare researcher performance and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vanash M; Ashrafian, Hutan; Bornmann, Lutz; Mutz, Rüdiger; Makanjuola, Jonathan; Skapinakis, Petros; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the h index (a bibliometric tool which is increasingly used to assess and appraise an individual's research performance) could be improved to better measure the academic performance and citation profile for individual healthcare researchers. Design Cohort study. Setting Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK. Participants Publication lists from 1 January 2000 until 31 December 2009 for 501 academic healthcare researchers from the Faculty of Medicine. Main outcome measures The h index for each researcher was calculated over a nine-year period. The citation count for each researcher was differentiated into high (h2 upper), core (h2 centre) and low (h2 lower) visibility areas. Segmented regression model (sRM) was used to statistically estimate number of high visibility publications (sRM value). Validity of the h index and other proposed adjuncts were analysed against academic rank and conventional bibliometric indicators. Results Construct validity was demonstrated for h index, h2 upper, h2 centre, h2 lower and sRM value (all P < 0.05). Convergent validity of the h index and sRM value was shown by significant correlations with total number of publications (r = 0.89 and 0.86 respectively, P < 0.05) and total number of citations (r = 0.96 and 0.65, respectively, P < 0.05). Significant differences in h index and sRM value existed between non-physician and physician researchers (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study supports the construct validity of the h index as a measure of healthcare researcher academic rank. It also identifies the assessment value of our developed indices of h2 upper, h2 centre, h2 lower and sRM. These can be applied in combination with the h index to provide additional objective evidence to appraise the performance and impact of an academic healthcare researcher. PMID:23358276

  8. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hem, M.H.; Pedersen, R.; Norvoll, R.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five

  9. A critical review of published research literature reviews on nursing and healthcare ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna M; Nam, Mavis A; Murphy, Jill; Victorino, João P; Gondim, Ellen C; Low, Gail

    2017-12-01

    To establish how common and impactful nursing and healthcare ageism is and whether proven interventions or prevention methods exist. Ageism has been a concern since 1969 when it was first introduced as a concept for social reform. As ageism has been linked to lower quality health services and reduced health care access, it is imperative that healthcare and nursing ageism is prevented or identified and reduced or eliminated. A qualitative narrative review of published research literature reviews using a scoping design to map all published reviews was undertaken. The EBSCO Discovery Service (providing access to articles in 271 databases, including MEDLINE and CINAHL) and Directory of Open Access Journals (providing access to over 9,000 open access journals) were used to find review articles. Using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, and limited by English language and peer-review publications, 12 eligible reviews were identified and information from them was systematically identified, assessed and synthesised. The 12 reviews did not provide clear and convincing information to determine how common and impactful nursing or healthcare ageism is, nor what can best be done to prevent or address it. Although each review had value since research literature was collected and discussed on nursing or healthcare ageism, the array of literature search and analysis methods, and diversity in conclusions reached about the evidence is highly problematic. Research literature reviews offering a more balanced perspective and demonstrating greater care in finding and using quality evidence are needed. At this point in time, there is no clear understanding of how widespread and impactful nursing or healthcare ageism is, and what can best be done to prevent or address it. Nurses need to be aware that ageism may be common and impactful, and guard against it. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of a collaborative project to develop sustainable healthcare education in eight UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S C; Mortimer, F

    2017-09-01

    Environmental change poses pressing challenges to public health and calls for profound and far-reaching changes to policy and practice across communities and health systems. Medical schools can act as a seedbed where knowledge, skills and innovation to address environmental challenges can be developed through innovative and collaborative approaches. The objectives of this study were to (1) explore drivers and challenges of collaboration for educational development between and within medical schools; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of a range of pedagogies for sustainable healthcare education; and (3) identify effective strategies to facilitate the renewal of medical curricula to address evolving health challenges. Participatory action research. Medical school teams participated in a nine-month collaborative project, including a one-day seminar to learn about sustainable healthcare education and develop a project plan. After the seminar, teams were supported to develop, deliver and evaluate new teaching at their medical school. New teaching was introduced at seven medical schools. A variety of pedagogies were represented. Collaboration between schools motivated and informed participants. The main challenges faced related to time pressures. Educators and students commented that new teaching was enjoyable and effective at improving knowledge and skills. Collaborative working supported educators to develop and implement new teaching sessions rapidly and effectively. Collaboration can help to build educators' confidence and capacity in a new area of education development. Different forms of collaboration may be appropriate for different circumstances and at different stages of education development. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influenza vaccination uptake among Victorian healthcare workers: evaluating the success of a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra A; Bennett, Noleen; Bull, Ann L; Richards, Michael J; Worth, Leon J

    2016-06-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all Australian healthcare workers (HCWs). In 2014, a target vaccination uptake of 75% was set for Victorian healthcare facilities. This study aimed to determine the 2014 uptake, describe trends over time and propose an enhanced reporting framework. Annual data submitted to the Victorian Healthcare Associated Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS) regarding HCW influenza were evaluated for 2005-2014. Faculty uptake - the number of vaccinations administered divided by total number of staff employed - was reported as a statewide aggregate and stratified by facility size (number of staff employed). In 2014, 78,885 HCWs were vaccinated across 93 healthcare facilities, corresponding to an overall uptake of 72.2%. During 2005-2014, small facilities (healthcare facility size categories, the highest uptake was observed in 2014. Influenza vaccination uptake in HCWs has successfully been introduced as a performance indicator in Victorian healthcare facilities and a peak uptake was reported in 2014. Varied trends are evident when uptake is stratified by number of employed HCWs, providing a feasible and meaningful method for benchmarking. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. Norwegian climate research. An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    From the executive summary; Based on our evaluation, we make six major recommendations and provide suggestions for how these might be implemented. 1. Establish a clear and coherent national strategy for climate research and its funding. 2. The Research Council of Norway should develop a new integrated long-term climate research programme. 3. Build on strengths and develop capacities in areas where Norway currently lacks sufficient scientific expertise. 4. Ensure societal relevance as well as inter- and transdisciplinarity in research. 5. Emphasise collaboration and cooperation as a basis for successful climate research. 6. Prioritise outreach and stakeholder interaction.(Author)

  13. Human Microbiome and Learning Healthcare Systems: Integrating Research and Precision Medicine for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Kim H; Mack, David R; Stintzi, Alain; O'Doherty, Kieran C

    2018-02-01

    Healthcare institutions face widespread challenges of delivering high-quality and cost-effective care, while keeping up with rapid advances in biomedical knowledge and technologies. Moreover, there is increased emphasis on developing personalized or precision medicine targeted to individuals or groups of patients who share a certain biomarker signature. Learning healthcare systems (LHS) have been proposed for integration of research and clinical practice to fill major knowledge gaps, improve care, reduce healthcare costs, and provide precision care. To date, much discussion in this context has focused on the potential of human genomic data, and not yet on human microbiome data. Rapid advances in human microbiome research suggest that profiling of, and interventions on, the human microbiome can provide substantial opportunity for improved diagnosis, therapeutics, risk management, and risk stratification. In this study, we discuss a potential role for microbiome science in LHSs. We first review the key elements of LHSs, and discuss possibilities of Big Data and patient engagement. We then consider potentials and challenges of integrating human microbiome research into clinical practice as part of an LHS. With rapid growth in human microbiome research, patient-specific microbial data will begin to contribute in important ways to precision medicine. Hence, we discuss how patient-specific microbial data can help guide therapeutic decisions and identify novel effective approaches for precision care of inflammatory bowel disease. To the best of our knowledge, this expert analysis makes an original contribution with new insights poised at the emerging intersection of LHSs, microbiome science, and postgenomics medicine.

  14. The search for the criteria in reforming health care: evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciūra, Rimantas; Jankauskiene, Danguole; Gurevicius, Romualdas

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services, i.e. the population's possibilities to receive healthcare services within an acceptable period of time in healthcare institutions situated in a certain territorial-administrative unit--the municipality. The aim of the study was to develop the technique for the quantitative evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services in different territories. The object of the study was the network of primary healthcare institutions and their subdivisions in the municipalities of Klaipeda, Taurage, and Vilnius districts. The methods of the study were geometrical modeling and applied graphics used for the quantitative determination of the ratios between the total zone area of the accessible primary healthcare institutions and the area of the respective municipal territory. The result of the study was the developed and proposed technique allowing for the evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare institutions. The proposed technique of the evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services may be valuable in solving the problems of the development of primary healthcare institutions primarily in the rural regions of Lithuania. The quantitative expression of the evaluation could be used in decision-making related to investments into the development of the primary healthcare institution network in different administrational units of the country. The method of geometrical modeling involving the application of digital graphics may create preconditions for the creation of the geographical information system of the primary healthcare institution network in Lithuania.

  15. Evaluating building performance in healthcare facilities: an organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Claudia; Webster, Lynn; Fontaine, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Using the environment as a strategic tool is one of the most cost-effective and enduring approaches for improving public health; however, it is one that requires multiple perspectives. The purpose of this article is to highlight an innovative methodology that has been developed for conducting comprehensive performance evaluations in public sector health facilities in Canada. The building performance evaluation methodology described in this paper is a government initiative. The project team developed a comprehensive building evaluation process for all new capital health projects that would respond to the aforementioned need for stakeholders to be more accountable and to better integrate the larger organizational strategy of facilities. The Balanced Scorecard, which is a multiparadigmatic, performance-based business framework, serves as the underlying theoretical framework for this initiative. It was applied in the development of the conceptual model entitled the Building Performance Evaluation Scorecard, which provides the following benefits: (1) It illustrates a process to link facilities more effectively to the overall mission and goals of an organization; (2) It is both a measurement and a management system that has the ability to link regional facilities to measures of success and larger business goals; (3) It provides a standardized methodology that ensures consistency in assessing building performance; and (4) It is more comprehensive than traditional building evaluations. The methodology presented in this paper is both a measurement and management system that integrates the principles of evidence-based design with the practices of pre- and post-occupancy evaluation. It promotes accountability and continues throughout the life cycle of a project. The advantage of applying this framework is that it engages health organizations in clarifying a vision and strategy for their facilities and helps translate those strategies into action and measurable performance

  16. Cross-border care and healthcare quality improvement in Europe: the MARQuIS research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, R; Garel, P; Jacquerye, A

    2009-02-01

    Citizens are increasingly crossing borders within the European Union (EU). Europeans have always been free to travel to receive care abroad, but if they wished to benefit from their statutory social protection scheme, they were subject to their local or national legislation on social protection. This changed in 1991 with the European Court of Justice defining healthcare as a service, starting a debate on the right balance between different principles in European treaties: movement of persons, goods and services, versus the responsibility of member states to organise their healthcare systems. Simultaneously, cross-border cooperation has developed between member states. In this context, patient mobility has become a relevant issue on the EU's agenda. The EU funded a number of Scientific Support to Policies (SSP) activities within the Sixth Framework Programme, to provide the evidence needed by EU policy makers to deal with issues that European citizens face due to enhanced mobility in Europe. One SSP project "Methods of Assessing Response to Quality Improvement Strategies" (MARQuIS), focused on cross-border care. It aimed to assess the value of different quality strategies, and to provide information needed when: (1) countries contract care for patients moving across borders; and (2) individual hospitals review the design of their quality strategies. This article describes the European context related to healthcare, and its implications for cross-border healthcare in Europe. The background information demonstrates a need for further research and development in this area.

  17. Implementation of new clinical programs in the VHA healthcare system: the importance of early collaboration between clinical leadership and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R Ryanne; Kinsinger, Linda S; Provenzale, Dawn; King, Heather A; Akerly, Patricia; Barnes, Lottie K; Datta, Santanu K; Grubber, Janet M; Katich, Nicholas; McNeil, Rebecca B; Monte, Robert; Sperber, Nina R; Atkins, David; Jackson, George L

    2014-12-01

    Collaboration between policy, research, and clinical partners is crucial to achieving proven quality care. The Veterans Health Administration has expended great efforts towards fostering such collaborations. Through this, we have learned that an ideal collaboration involves partnership from the very beginning of a new clinical program, so that the program is designed in a way that ensures quality, validity, and puts into place the infrastructure necessary for a reliable evaluation. This paper will give an example of one such project, the Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project (LCSDP). We will outline the ways that clinical, policy, and research partners collaborated in design, planning, and implementation in order to create a sustainable model that could be rigorously evaluated for efficacy and fidelity. We will describe the use of the Donabedian quality matrix to determine the necessary characteristics of a quality program and the importance of the linkage with engineering, information technology, and clinical paradigms to connect the development of an on-the-ground clinical program with the evaluation goal of a learning healthcare organization. While the LCSDP is the example given here, these partnerships and suggestions are salient to any healthcare organization seeking to implement new scientifically proven care in a useful and reliable way.

  18. Introduction special issue on IT adoption and evaluation in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; Trimmer, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This special issue’s coverage truly reflects the spectrum of research areas within Ken Trimmer’s domain. The development of these papers from initial submission also reflects Dr. Trimmer’s ability to aptly match submitted paper to a review team that could insightfully mature the work. This web of

  19. Program evaluation of remote heart failure monitoring: healthcare utilization analysis in a rural regional medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems.

  20. Research on evaluation techniques for immersive multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Aslinda M.; Romli, Fakaruddin Fahmi; Zainal Osman, Zosipha

    2013-03-01

    Nowadays Immersive Multimedia covers most usage in tremendous ways, such as healthcare/surgery, military, architecture, art, entertainment, education, business, media, sport, rehabilitation/treatment and training areas. Moreover, the significant of Immersive Multimedia to directly meet the end-users, clients and customers needs for a diversity of feature and purpose is the assembly of multiple elements that drive effective Immersive Multimedia system design, so evaluation techniques is crucial for Immersive Multimedia environments. A brief general idea of virtual environment (VE) context and `realism' concept that formulate the Immersive Multimedia environments is then provided. This is followed by a concise summary of the elements of VE assessment technique that is applied in Immersive Multimedia system design, which outlines the classification space for Immersive Multimedia environments evaluation techniques and gives an overview of the types of results reported. A particular focus is placed on the implications of the Immersive Multimedia environments evaluation techniques in relation to the elements of VE assessment technique, which is the primary purpose of producing this research. The paper will then conclude with an extensive overview of the recommendations emanating from the research.

  1. Development and User Research of a Smart Bedside Station System toward Patient-Centered Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Baek, Hyunyoung; Ryu, Borim; Chung, Eunja; Kim, Kidong; Yi, Jay Chaeyong; Park, Soo Beom; Hwang, Hee

    2015-09-01

    User experience design that reflects real-world application and aims to support suitable service solutions has arisen as one of the current issues in the medical informatics research domain. The Smart Bedside Station (SBS) is a screen that is installed on the bedside for the personal use and provides a variety of convenient services for the patients. Recently, bedside terminal systems have been increasingly adopted in hospitals due to the rapid growth of advanced technology in healthcare at the point of care. We designed user experience (UX) research to derive users' unmet needs and major functions that are frequently used in the field. To develop the SBS service, a service design methodology, the Double Diamond Design Process Model, was undertaken. The problems or directions of the complex clinical workflow of the hospital, the requirements of stakeholders, and environmental factors were identified through the study. The SBS system services provided to patients were linked to the hospital's main services or to related electronic medical record (EMR) data. Seven key services were derived from the results of the study. The primary services were as follows: Bedside Check In and Out, Bedside Room Service, Bedside Scheduler, Ready for Rounds, My Medical Chart, Featured Healthcare Content, and Bedside Community. This research developed a patient-centered SBS system with improved UX using service design methodology applied to complex and technical medical services, providing insights to improve the current healthcare system.

  2. Healthcare Databases in Thailand and Japan: Potential Sources for Health Technology Assessment Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saokaew, Surasak; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kamae, Isao; Pratoomsoot, Chayanin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2015-01-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) has been continuously used for value-based healthcare decisions over the last decade. Healthcare databases represent an important source of information for HTA, which has seen a surge in use in Western countries. Although HTA agencies have been established in Asia-Pacific region, application and understanding of healthcare databases for HTA is rather limited. Thus, we reviewed existing databases to assess their potential for HTA in Thailand where HTA has been used officially and Japan where HTA is going to be officially introduced. Existing healthcare databases in Thailand and Japan were compiled and reviewed. Databases' characteristics e.g. name of database, host, scope/objective, time/sample size, design, data collection method, population/sample, and variables were described. Databases were assessed for its potential HTA use in terms of safety/efficacy/effectiveness, social/ethical, organization/professional, economic, and epidemiological domains. Request route for each database was also provided. Forty databases- 20 from Thailand and 20 from Japan-were included. These comprised of national censuses, surveys, registries, administrative data, and claimed databases. All databases were potentially used for epidemiological studies. In addition, data on mortality, morbidity, disability, adverse events, quality of life, service/technology utilization, length of stay, and economics were also found in some databases. However, access to patient-level data was limited since information about the databases was not available on public sources. Our findings have shown that existing databases provided valuable information for HTA research with limitation on accessibility. Mutual dialogue on healthcare database development and usage for HTA among Asia-Pacific region is needed.

  3. Evaluation of an Assistive Telepresence Robot for Elderly Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koceski, Saso; Koceska, Natasa

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we described the telepresence robot system designed to improve the well-being of elderly by supporting them to do daily activities independently, to facilitate social interaction in order to overcome a sense of social isolation and loneliness as well as to support the professional caregivers in everyday care. In order to investigate the acceptance of the developed robot system, evaluation study involved elderly people and professional caregivers, as two potential user groups was conducted. The results of this study are also presented and discussed.

  4. Healthcare planning for the Olympics in London: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Black

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass gatherings, such as the Olympic and Paralympic Games, represent an enormous logistical challenge for the host city. Health service planners must deliver routine and emergency services and, in recent Games, health legacy initiatives, for the local and visiting population. However there is little evidence to support their planning decisions. We therefore evaluated the strategic health planning programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games to identify generalisable information for future Games. METHODS: We thematically analysed data from stakeholder interviews and documents. The data were prospectively collected in three phases, before, during and after the Games. FINDINGS: We identified five key themes: (1 Systemic Improvement for example in communications, (2 Effective relationships led to efficiencies and permanent gains, such as new relationships with the private sector (3 Difficult relationships led to inefficiencies, for instance, duplication in testing and exercising emergency scenarios, (4 Tendency to over-estimate demand for care, particularly emergency medicine, and (5 Difficulties establishing a health legacy due to its deprioritisation and lack of vision by the programme team. INTERPRETATION: Enduring improvements which are sustained after the Games are possible, such as the establishment of new and productive partnerships. Relationships must be established early on to avoid duplication, delay and unnecessary expense. There should be greater critical evaluation of the likely demand for health services to reduce the wasting of resources. Finally, if a health legacy is planned, then clear definitions and commitment to its measurement is essential.

  5. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  6. An overview of methods and applications to value informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmanschap, M.A.; van Exel, J.N.; van den Berg, B.; Brouwer, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares several applied valuation methods for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes: the proxy good method; the opportunity cost method; the contingent valuation method (CVM); conjoint measurement (CM); and valuation of health effects in terms of

  7. Process and outcome evaluation of a diabetes prevention education program for community healthcare workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M; Sirichakwal, Prapaisri P; Chittchang, Uraiporn

    2009-12-01

    To describe the development, process and outcome evaluation of a culturally tailored diabetes prevention education program for community healthcare workers (CHCWs) in Thailand. A tailored diabetes prevention education program was designed based on formative research and implemented with 35 CHCWs in semi-urban areas in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Modules were delivered over eight group classes and eight self-directed E-learning sessions (www.FitThai.org). The program incorporated problem-based learning, discussion, reflection, community-based application, self-evaluation and on-line support. The frequency that students accessed on-line materials, including videotaped lectures, readings, monthly newsletters and community resources, was documented. Participant satisfaction was assessed through three questionnaires. Knowledge was assessed through pre-post testing. Three-quarters of participants attended all eight classes and no participant attended fewer than six. On-line support and materials were accessed 3 to 38 times (median 13). Participants reported that program information and activities were fun, useful, culturally-relevant and applicable to diabetes prevention in their specific communities. Participants also appreciated the innovative technology support for their work. Comfort with E-learning varied among participants. Scores on pre-post knowledge test increased from a mean (sd) of 56.5% (6.26) to 75.5% (6.01) (p E-learning were generally well-received and supported better knowledge scores. Ongoing access to web-based materials and expert support may help sustain learning.

  8. The necessary distinction between methodology and philosophical assumptions in healthcare research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesel, Terje

    2013-09-01

    Methodological discussions within healthcare research have traditionally described a methodological dichotomy between qualitative and quantitative methods. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that such a dichotomy presents unnecessary obstacles for good research design and is methodologically and philosophically unsustainable. The issue of incommensurability is not a question of method but rather a question of the philosophical premises underpinning a given method. Thus, transparency on the philosophical level is important for validity and consistency as well as for attempts to integrate or establish an interface to other research. I argue that it is necessary to make a distinction between methodology and philosophical assumptions and to ensure consistency in these correlations. Furthermore, I argue that the question of incommensurability is best answered at this basic philosophical level. The complexity of health care calls for methodological pluralism and creativity that utilises the strength of both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Transparency and consistency on the philosophical level can facilitate new mixed methods research designs that may be promising methodological assets for healthcare research. I believe we are ill served by fortified positions that continue to uphold old battle lines. Empirical research begins in the field of practice and requires a certain amount of pragmatism. However, this pragmatism must be philosophically informed. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. A research model of health-care competition and customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoh, Derek A; Rivers, Patrick A

    2007-11-01

    In all industries, competition among businesses has long been encouraged as a mechanism to increase value for customers. In other words, competition ensures the provision of better products and services to satisfy the needs of customers. Various perspectives of competition, the nature of service quality, health-care system costs and customer satisfaction in health care are examined. A model of the relationship among these variables is developed. The model depicts customer satisfaction as an outcome measure directly dependent on competition. Quality of care and health-care system costs, while also directly dependent on competition, are considered as determinants of customer satisfaction as well. The model is discussed in the light of propositions for empirical research.

  10. Reconsidering 'ethics' and 'quality' in healthcare research: the case for an iterative ethical paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Fiona A; Gibson, William; Pelletier, Caroline; Chrysikou, Vasiliki; Park, Sophie

    2015-05-08

    UK-based research conducted within a healthcare setting generally requires approval from the National Research Ethics Service. Research ethics committees are required to assess a vast range of proposals, differing in both their topic and methodology. We argue the methodological benchmarks with which research ethics committees are generally familiar and which form the basis of assessments of quality do not fit with the aims and objectives of many forms of qualitative inquiry and their more iterative goals of describing social processes/mechanisms and making visible the complexities of social practices. We review current debates in the literature related to ethical review and social research, and illustrate the importance of re-visiting the notion of ethics in healthcare research. We present an analysis of two contrasting paradigms of ethics. We argue that the first of these is characteristic of the ways that NHS ethics boards currently tend to operate, and the second is an alternative paradigm, that we have labelled the 'iterative' paradigm, which draws explicitly on methodological issues in qualitative research to produce an alternative vision of ethics. We suggest that there is an urgent need to re-think the ways that ethical issues are conceptualised in NHS ethical procedures. In particular, we argue that embedded in the current paradigm is a restricted notion of 'quality', which frames how ethics are developed and worked through. Specific, pre-defined outcome measures are generally seen as the traditional marker of quality, which means that research questions that focus on processes rather than on 'outcomes' may be regarded as problematic. We show that the alternative 'iterative' paradigm offers a useful starting point for moving beyond these limited views. We conclude that a 'one size fits all' standardisation of ethical procedures and approach to ethical review acts against the production of knowledge about healthcare and dramatically restricts what can be

  11. Norwegian climate research. An evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    [English] In early 2011, the Norwegian Research Council (RCN) appointed a committee to review Norwegian climate research. The aim of the evaluation was to provide a critical review of Norwegian climate research in an international perspective and to recommend measures to enhance the quality, efficiency and relevance of future climate research. The Evaluation Committee met three times: in August and December 2011, and March 2012. RCN sent an invitation to 140 research organisations to participate by delivering background information on their climate research. Based on the initial response, 48 research units were invited to submit self-assessments and 37 research units responded. These were invited to hearings during the second meeting of the Evaluation Committee in December. In our judgement, a great majority of the most active research units are covered by this evaluation report. It should be emphasised that the evaluation concerned the Norwegian landscape of climate research rather than individual scientists or research units. Bibliometric analyses and social network analyses provided additional information. We are aware of problems in making comparisons across disciplinary publishing traditions, especially with regard to the differences between the natural and social sciences and the humanities. The Evaluation Committee also reviewed a number of governmental and RCN policy documents and conducted interviews with the chairs of the NORKLIMA Programme Steering Board and the Norwegian IPY Committee, as well as with staff members of RCN. Additional information was received from hearings organised by RCN with the science communities and various stakeholders in January 2012. For the purpose of this evaluation, climate research was divided into three broad thematic areas: 1. The climate system and climate change: research on climate variability and change in order to improve our capability of understanding climate and of projecting climate change for different time

  12. Benchmarking statewide trauma mortality using Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Darwin; McKenney, Mark; Norwood, Scott; Kurek, Stanley; Kimbrell, Brian; Liu, Huazhi; Ziglar, Michele; Hurst, James

    2015-09-01

    Improving clinical outcomes of trauma patients is a challenging problem at a statewide level, particularly if data from the state's registry are not publicly available. Promotion of optimal care throughout the state is not possible unless clinical benchmarks are available for comparison. Using publicly available administrative data from the State Department of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) patient safety indicators (PSIs), we sought to create a statewide method for benchmarking trauma mortality and at the same time also identifying a pattern of unique complications that have an independent influence on mortality. Data for this study were obtained from State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. Adult trauma patients were identified as having International Classification of Disease ninth edition codes defined by the state. Multivariate logistic regression was used to create a predictive inpatient expected mortality model. The expected value of PSIs was created using the multivariate model and their beta coefficients provided by the AHRQ. Case-mix adjusted mortality results were reported as observed to expected (O/E) ratios to examine mortality, PSIs, failure to prevent complications, and failure to rescue from death. There were 50,596 trauma patients evaluated during the study period. The overall fit of the expected mortality model was very strong at a c-statistic of 0.93. Twelve of 25 trauma centers had O/E ratios benchmarking method that screens at risk trauma centers in the state for higher than expected mortality. Stratifying mortality based on failure to prevent PSIs may identify areas of needed improvement at a statewide level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... Nancy Edwards is a nurse epidemiologist and a professor in the School of Nursing and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada. She has nearly 40 years of experience in the field of public health. Dan C. Owino Kaseje, professor at Great Lakes University of Kisumu, Kenya, has over 30 years of ...

  14. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    29 juin 2016 ... Eulalia Kokuangisa Kahwa enseigne à la School of Nursing, de la University of the West Indies, à Kingston, en Jamaïque. Elle est infirmière et nutritionniste et possède plus de 30 ans d'expérience en enseignement des soins de santé et des soins infirmiers, particulièrement dans les domaines du VIH/sida ...

  15. Research evaluation and organizational learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    The paper will address the role of the recent implementation of systems of research evaluation in universities. The role of classic quality control system, the peer review, is to produce the most trustworthy knowledge and at the same time function as a learning system in a peer-to-peer learning p...

  16. Qualitative research in healthcare: an introduction to grounded theory using thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A L; Hadfield, M; Chapman, C J

    2015-01-01

    In today's NHS, qualitative research is increasingly important as a method of assessing and improving quality of care. Grounded theory has developed as an analytical approach to qualitative data over the last 40 years. It is primarily an inductive process whereby theoretical insights are generated from data, in contrast to deductive research where theoretical hypotheses are tested via data collection. Grounded theory has been one of the main contributors to the acceptance of qualitative methods in a wide range of applied social sciences. The influence of grounded theory as an approach is, in part, based on its provision of an explicit framework for analysis and theory generation. Furthermore the stress upon grounding research in the reality of participants has also given it credence in healthcare research. As with all analytical approaches, grounded theory has drawbacks and limitations. It is important to have an understanding of these in order to assess the applicability of this approach to healthcare research. In this review we outline the principles of grounded theory, and focus on thematic analysis as the analytical approach used most frequently in grounded theory studies, with the aim of providing clinicians with the skills to critically review studies using this methodology.

  17. The standard of healthcare accreditation standards: a review of empirical research underpinning their development and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenfield David

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare accreditation standards are advocated as an important means of improving clinical practice and organisational performance. Standard development agencies have documented methodologies to promote open, transparent, inclusive development processes where standards are developed by members. They assert that their methodologies are effective and efficient at producing standards appropriate for the health industry. However, the evidence to support these claims requires scrutiny. The study’s purpose was to examine the empirical research that grounds the development methods and application of healthcare accreditation standards. Methods A multi-method strategy was employed over the period March 2010 to August 2011. Five academic health research databases (Medline, Psych INFO, Embase, Social work abstracts, and CINAHL were interrogated, the websites of 36 agencies associated with the study topic were investigated, and a snowball search was undertaken. Search criteria included accreditation research studies, in English, addressing standards and their impact. Searching in stage 1 initially selected 9386 abstracts. In stage 2, this selection was refined against the inclusion criteria; empirical studies (n = 2111 were identified and refined to a selection of 140 papers with the exclusion of clinical or biomedical and commentary pieces. These were independently reviewed by two researchers and reduced to 13 articles that met the study criteria. Results The 13 articles were analysed according to four categories: overall findings; standards development; implementation issues; and impact of standards. Studies have only occurred in the acute care setting, predominately in 2003 (n = 5 and 2009 (n = 4, and in the United States (n = 8. A multidisciplinary focus (n = 9 and mixed method approach (n = 11 are common characteristics. Three interventional studies were identified, with the remaining 10 studies having

  18. An Action Research Study of a Healthcare Enterprise information System at the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Svejvig, Per; Andersen, Povl Erik Rostgaard

    2015-01-01

    concerning getting value from their IT investment. In order to fulfill this objective an action research project was started in the fall of 2010 consisting of two cycles: (1) setting the stage for benefit realization and; (2) benefit realization in a pilot area. The first cycle has revealed...... of Style Composition in action research we suggest a method to identify and realize emergent IT public value in an HIS action research project. The method is presented and discussed, and issues and concerns for further research are presented....... that it is not possible to distinguish between working processes and HIS, that benefit realization in healthcare (a public organization) has a much broader perspective than just financial value and that the reaping of benefits is quite difficult. This paper reports on the first two action cycles. Framed by the theory...

  19. Economic Evaluation in Ethiopian Healthcare Sector Decision Making: Perception, Practice and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Elias Asfaw; Mbonigaba, Josue; Kaye, Sylvia Blanche; Wilkinson, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Globally, economic evaluation (EE) is increasingly being considered as a critical tool for allocating scarce healthcare resources. However, such considerations are less documented in low-income countries, such as in Ethiopia. In particular, to date there has been no assessment conducted to evaluate the perception and practice of and barriers to health EE. This paper assesses the use and perceptions of EE in healthcare decision-making processes in Ethiopia. In-depth interview sessions with decision makers/healthcare managers and program coordinators across six regional health bureaus were conducted. A qualitative analysis approach was conducted on three thematic areas. A total of 57 decision makers/healthcare managers were interviewed from all tiers of the health sector in Ethiopia, ranging from the Federal Ministry of Health down to the lower levels of the health facility pyramid. At the high-level healthcare decision-making tier, only 56 % of those interviewed showed a good understanding of EE when explaining in terms of cost and consequences of alternative courses of action and value for money. From the specific program perspective, 50 % of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS program coordinators indicated the relevance of EE to program planning and decision making. These respondents reported a limited application of costing studies on the HIV/AIDS prevention and control program, which were most commonly used during annual planning and budgeting. The study uncovered three important barriers to growth of EE in Ethiopia: a lack of awareness, a lack of expertise and skill, and the traditional decision-making culture.

  20. Design and development of a computer program for the evaluation of the healthcare executive - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Daniel; Bava, Michele; Delendi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    According to the Italian law which regulates executive healthcare contracts, the professional evaluation is mandatory. The goal of the periodic evaluation is to enhance and motivate the professional involved. In addition this process should 1. increase the sense of duty towards the patients, 2. become aware of ones own professional growth and aspirations and 3. enhance the awareness of the healthcare executive regarding the companys strategies. To satisfy these requirements a data sheet has been modeled for every evaluated subject, divided in two sections. In the first part, the chief executive officer (CEO) scores: 1. behavioral characteristics, 2. multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement, 3. organizational skills, 4. professional quality and training, 5. relationships with the citizens. The scores for these fields are decided by the CEO. In the second part the CEO evaluates: 1. quantitative job dimension, 2.technology innovation, 3. scientific and educational activities. The value scores of these fields are decided by the CEO together with the professional under evaluation. A previously established correction coefficient can be used for all the scores. This evaluation system model has been constructed according to the enhancement quality approaches (Deming cycle) and a web-based software has been developed on a Linux platform using LAMP technology and php programming techniques. The program replicates all the evaluation process creating different profiles of authentications and authorizations which can then give to the evaluator the possibility to make lists of the professionals to evaluate, to upload documents regarding their activities and goals, to receive individual documents in automatically generated folders, to change the correction coefficients, to obtain year by year the individual scores. The advantages of using this web-based software include easy data consultation and update, the implementation of IT security issues, the easy portability and

  1. Identifying inequitable healthcare in older people: systematic review of current research practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salway, Sarah M; Payne, Nick; Rimmer, Melanie; Buckner, Stefanie; Jordan, Hannah; Adams, Jean; Walters, Kate; Sowden, Sarah L; Forrest, Lynne; Sharp, Linda; Hidajat, Mira; White, Martin; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2017-07-11

    There is growing consensus on the importance of identifying age-related inequities in the receipt of public health and healthcare interventions, but concerns regarding conceptual and methodological rigour in this area of research. Establishing age inequity in receipt requires evidence of a difference that is not an artefact of poor measurement of need or receipt; is not warranted on the grounds of patient preference or clinical safety; and is judged to be unfair. A systematic, thematic literature review was undertaken with the objective of characterising recent research approaches. Studies were eligible if the population was in a country within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and analyses included an explicit focus on age-related patterns of healthcare receipt including those 60 years or older. A structured extraction template was applied. Extracted material was synthesised in thematic memos. A set of categorical codes were then defined and applied to produce summary counts across key dimensions. This process was iterative to allow reconciliation of discrepancies and ensure reliability. Forty nine studies met the eligibility criteria. A wide variety of concepts, terms and methodologies were used across these studies. Thirty five studies employed multivariable techniques to produce adjusted receipt-need ratios, though few clearly articulated their rationale, indicating the need for great conceptual clarity. Eighteen studies made reference to patient preference as a relevant consideration, but just one incorporated any kind of adjustment for this factor. Twenty five studies discussed effectiveness among older adults, with fourteen raising the possibility of differential effectiveness, and one differential cost-effectiveness, by age. Just three studies made explicit reference to the ethical nature of healthcare resource allocation by age. While many authors presented suitably cautious conclusions, some appeared to over-stretch their

  2. A novel trust evaluation method for Ubiquitous Healthcare based on cloud computational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Georgia; Fengou, Maria-Anna; Beis, Antonios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    The notion of trust is considered to be the cornerstone on patient-psychiatrist relationship. Thus, a trustfully background is fundamental requirement for provision of effective Ubiquitous Healthcare (UH) service. In this paper, the issue of Trust Evaluation of UH Providers when register UH environment is addressed. For that purpose a novel trust evaluation method is proposed, based on cloud theory, exploiting User Profile attributes. This theory mimics human thinking, regarding trust evaluation and captures fuzziness and randomness of this uncertain reasoning. Two case studies are investigated through simulation in MATLAB software, in order to verify the effectiveness of this novel method.

  3. Extracting Sentiment from Healthcare Survey Data: An Evaluation of Sentiment Analysis Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, D.; MacFarlane, A.; Russell-Rose, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sentiment analysis is an emerging discipline with many analytical tools available. This project aimed to examine a number of tools regarding their suitability for healthcare data. A comparison between commercial and non-commercial tools was made using responses from an online survey which evaluated design changes made to a clinical information service. The commercial tools were Semantria and TheySay and the non-commercial tools were WEKA and Google Prediction API. Different approaches were fo...

  4. Take the Money and Run: The Challenges of Designing and Evaluating Financial Incentives in Healthcare; Comment on “Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Mannion

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  5. Take the money and run: the challenges of designing and evaluating financial incentives in healthcare; Comment on "Paying for performance in healthcare organisations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell

    2014-02-01

    Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  6. Take the Money and Run: The Challenges of Designing and Evaluating Financial Incentives in Healthcare; Comment on “Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations”

    OpenAIRE

    Russell Mannion

    2014-01-01

    Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  7. Sustainability of evidence-based healthcare: research agenda, methodological advances, and infrastructure support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Enola; Luke, Douglas; Calhoun, Annaliese; McMillen, Curtis; Brownson, Ross; McCrary, Stacey; Padek, Margaret

    2015-06-11

    Little is known about how well or under what conditions health innovations are sustained and their gains maintained once they are put into practice. Implementation science typically focuses on uptake by early adopters of one healthcare innovation at a time. The later-stage challenges of scaling up and sustaining evidence-supported interventions receive too little attention. This project identifies the challenges associated with sustainability research and generates recommendations for accelerating and strengthening this work. A multi-method, multi-stage approach, was used: (1) identifying and recruiting experts in sustainability as participants, (2) conducting research on sustainability using concept mapping, (3) action planning during an intensive working conference of sustainability experts to expand the concept mapping quantitative results, and (4) consolidating results into a set of recommendations for research, methodological advances, and infrastructure building to advance understanding of sustainability. Participants comprised researchers, funders, and leaders in health, mental health, and public health with shared interest in the sustainability of evidence-based health care. Prompted to identify important issues for sustainability research, participants generated 91 distinct statements, for which a concept mapping process produced 11 conceptually distinct clusters. During the conference, participants built upon the concept mapping clusters to generate recommendations for sustainability research. The recommendations fell into three domains: (1) pursue high priority research questions as a unified agenda on sustainability; (2) advance methods for sustainability research; (3) advance infrastructure to support sustainability research. Implementation science needs to pursue later-stage translation research questions required for population impact. Priorities include conceptual consistency and operational clarity for measuring sustainability, developing evidence

  8. Knowledge engineering for health: A new discipline required to bridge the “ICT gap” between research and healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Tim; Gollapudi, Sirisha; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Despite vast amount of money and research being channeled toward biomedical research, relatively little impact has been made on routine clinical practice. At the heart of this failure is the information and communication technology “chasm” that exists between research and healthcare. A new focus ...

  9. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research......, to broaden the scope of topics investigated, and to highlight the importance of simulation-related research....

  10. [Critical research issues in nursing policy and management: a healthcare system perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jwo-Leun; Chen, Wen-Yi; Hung, Chin-Tun; Hsu, Ming-Yi

    2011-06-01

    This study explores critical research issues in nursing policy and management in Taiwan from a healthcare system perspective that considers resources, programmes and organisations, service delivery, policy and management, and economic support. Findings suggest the following: In terms of resources, priority issues include quantity planning, active surveillance, planning methodology, and estimation of work life expectancies for nursing manpower. In terms of programmes ÷ organisations and delivery, priority issues include skill mix, task shifting, nationwide nursing work surveys, and nursing manpower structure and utilization. In terms of policy/management and economic support, priority issues included minimum nursing manpower requirements by law or medical institution standards and the relationship between the social insurance payment system and development of the nursing profession. The last section of this paper makes suggestions on practical ways to improve nursing policy and management research in Taiwan.

  11. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Stewardship: Use of Administrative and Surveillance Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Marci; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Morgan, Daniel J; Lee, Grace M

    2016-11-01

    Administrative and surveillance data are used frequently in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship (HE&AS) research because of their wide availability and efficiency. However, data quality issues exist, requiring careful consideration and potential validation of data. This methods paper presents key considerations for using administrative and surveillance data in HE&AS, including types of data available and potential use, data limitations, and the importance of validation. After discussing these issues, we review examples of HE&AS research using administrative data with a focus on scenarios when their use may be advantageous. A checklist is provided to help aid study development in HE&AS using administrative data. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-10.

  12. Converging blockchain and next-generation artificial intelligence technologies to decentralize and accelerate biomedical research and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoshina, Polina; Ojomoko, Lucy; Yanovich, Yury; Ostrovski, Alex; Botezatu, Alex; Prikhodko, Pavel; Izumchenko, Eugene; Aliper, Alexander; Romantsov, Konstantin; Zhebrak, Alexander; Ogu, Iraneus Obioma; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2018-01-19

    The increased availability of data and recent advancements in artificial intelligence present the unprecedented opportunities in healthcare and major challenges for the patients, developers, providers and regulators. The novel deep learning and transfer learning techniques are turning any data about the person into medical data transforming simple facial pictures and videos into powerful sources of data for predictive analytics. Presently, the patients do not have control over the access privileges to their medical records and remain unaware of the true value of the data they have. In this paper, we provide an overview of the next-generation artificial intelligence and blockchain technologies and present innovative solutions that may be used to accelerate the biomedical research and enable patients with new tools to control and profit from their personal data as well with the incentives to undergo constant health monitoring. We introduce new concepts to appraise and evaluate personal records, including the combination-, time- and relationship-value of the data. We also present a roadmap for a blockchain-enabled decentralized personal health data ecosystem to enable novel approaches for drug discovery, biomarker development, and preventative healthcare. A secure and transparent distributed personal data marketplace utilizing blockchain and deep learning technologies may be able to resolve the challenges faced by the regulators and return the control over personal data including medical records back to the individuals.

  13. Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH): A Streamlined, Systematic, Phased Approach for Determining "What Works" in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Wayne B; Crawford, Cindy; Hilton, Lara; Elfenbaum, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Answering the question of "what works" in healthcare can be complex and requires the careful design and sequential application of systematic methodologies. Over the last decade, the Samueli Institute has, along with multiple partners, developed a streamlined, systematic, phased approach to this process called the Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH™). The SEaRCH process provides an approach for rigorously, efficiently, and transparently making evidence-based decisions about healthcare claims in research and practice with minimal bias. SEaRCH uses three methods combined in a coordinated fashion to help determine what works in healthcare. The first, the Claims Assessment Profile (CAP), seeks to clarify the healthcare claim and question, and its ability to be evaluated in the context of its delivery. The second method, the Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL(©)), is a streamlined, systematic review process conducted to determine the quantity, quality, and strength of evidence and risk/benefit for the treatment. The third method involves the structured use of expert panels (EPs). There are several types of EPs, depending on the purpose and need. Together, these three methods-CAP, REAL, and EP-can be integrated into a strategic approach to help answer the question "what works in healthcare?" and what it means in a comprehensive way. SEaRCH is a systematic, rigorous approach for evaluating healthcare claims of therapies, practices, programs, or products in an efficient and stepwise fashion. It provides an iterative, protocol-driven process that is customized to the intervention, consumer, and context. Multiple communities, including those involved in health service and policy, can benefit from this organized framework, assuring that evidence-based principles determine which healthcare practices with the greatest promise are used for improving the public's health and wellness.

  14. The Development of a Quality Management Framework for Evaluating Medical Device Reprocessing Practice in Healthcare Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Bailey; Horodyski, Robin; Welton, Cynthia; Vail, John; Simonetto, Luca; Jokanovic, Danilo; Sharma, Richa; Mahoney, Angela Rea; Savoy-Bird, Shay; Bains, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of medical device reprocessing (MDR) for the provision of safe patient care. Although industry service standards are available to guide MDR practices, there remains a lack of published key performance indicators (KPIs) and targets that are necessary to evaluate MDR quality for feedback and improvement. This article outlines the development of an initial framework that builds on established guidelines and includes service standards, KPIs and targets for evaluating MDR operations. This framework can support healthcare facilities in strengthening existing practices and enables a platform for collaboration towards better MDR performance management.

  15. Interpersonal Communication from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A.

    2011-01-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is “the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired.” Objective: To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Results: Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. Conclusion: The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient

  16. Interpersonal communication from the patient perspective: comparison of primary healthcare evaluation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A

    2011-12-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is "the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired." To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient-centred care.

  17. Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-focused primary healthcare social and emotional wellbeing research: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnbach, Sara; Eades, Anne-Marie; Hackett, Maree Lisa

    2015-12-30

    Research with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian's (hereafter referred to as Indigenous(1)) needs is crucial to ensure culturally appropriate evidence-based strategies are developed to improve health. However, concerns surrounding this research exist, arising from some previous research lacking community consultation, resulting in little community benefit or infringing on important cultural values. Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research (hereafter referred to as Values and Ethics), developed by The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia in 2003, is the ethical standard for Indigenous-focused health research. Researchers must address its Values in research design and conduct. However, its impact on research processes is unclear. Local Protocols should also be considered. This review aims to systematically examine practices related to Values and Ethics, Local Protocols and the processes of conducting Indigenous-focused primary healthcare research in collaboration with external researchers. The following electronic databases and grey literature will be searched (2003 to current): MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Informit and HealthInfoNet--an Indigenous-specific research and program website. Indigenous-focused research will be included. Research must be conducted in one or more primary healthcare services, in collaboration with external researchers and with a focus on social and emotional well being. One reviewer will review titles and abstracts to remove obviously irrelevant research articles. Full-text research articles will be retrieved and independently examined by two reviewers. Data and quality assessment will be completed by one reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Quality will be assessed using modified versions of established quality assessment tools. This review will provide information on research processes and the impact of Values and Ethics on

  18. An evaluation of approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lorraine; Shepherd, Ashley; Harris, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    Improving the quality of healthcare remains central to UK and international policy, practice and research. In 2003, The Institute of Medicine's 'Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality', advocated quality improvement as a core competency for all healthcare professionals. As a result, developing capacity and capability of those applying improvement methodologies in the pre-registration population has risen, yet, little is known about the teaching approaches employed for this purpose. To describe and analyse educational approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals and identify enabling and impeding factors. Integrative review. CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC, ASSIA, SCOPUS and Google Scholar were accessed for papers published between 2000 and 2016. Publications where quality improvement education was delivered to pre-registration healthcare professionals were eligible. One author independently screened papers, extracted data using a modified version of the Reporting of Primary Studies in Education Guideline and evaluated methodological quality using the Weight of Evidence Framework. The Kirkpatrick Education Evaluation Model was used to explore the impact of teaching approaches. Enabling and impeding factors were thematically analysed. A narrative synthesis of findings is presented. Ten papers were included, representing nursing, pharmacy and medicine from UK, Norway and USA. Studies comprised four quantitative, four mixed method, one qualitative and one cluster randomised trial, all allocated medium Weight of Evidence. Teaching approaches included experiential learning cited in all studies, didactics in seven, group work in four, seminars in three, self-directed learning in three and simulation in one. Most studies measured Level 1 of the Kirkpatrick Model (reaction), all but one measured Level 2 (skills, knowledge or attitudes), none measured Level 3 (behaviour) and one measured Level 4 (patient outcomes

  19. EVALUATION OF THE METERED-DOSE INHALER TECHNIQUE AMONG HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nadi F. Zeraati

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Poor inhaler technique is a common problem both in asthmatic patients and healthcare providers, which contributes to poor asthma control. This study was performed to evaluate the adequacy of metered-dose inhaler (MDI technique in a sample of physicians and nurses practicing in hospitals of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. A total of 173 healthcare providers voluntary participated in this study. After the participants answered a questionnaire aimed at identifying their involvement in MDI prescribing and counseling, a trained observer assessed their MDI technique using a checklist of nine steps. Of the 173 participants, 35 (20.2% were physicians and 138 (79.8% were nurses. Only 12 participants (6.93% performed all steps correctly. Physicians performed essential steps significantly better than nurses (85.7% vs. 63.8%, P < 0.05. The majority of healthcare providers responsible for instructing patients on the correct MDI technique were unable to perform this technique correctly, indicating the need for regular formal training programs on inhaler techniques.

  20. Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Padraig; Davey Smith, George; von Hinke, Stephanie; Davies, Neil M; Hollingworth, William

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the marginal healthcare costs associated with different diseases and health conditions is important, especially for increasingly prevalent conditions such as obesity. However, existing observational study designs cannot identify the causal impact of disease on healthcare costs. This paper explores the possibilities for causal inference offered by Mendelian randomization, a form of instrumental variable analysis that uses genetic variation as a proxy for modifiable risk exposures, to estimate the effect of health conditions on cost. Well-conducted genome-wide association studies provide robust evidence of the associations of genetic variants with health conditions or disease risk factors. The subsequent causal effects of these health conditions on cost can be estimated using genetic variants as instruments for the health conditions. This is because the approximately random allocation of genotypes at conception means that many genetic variants are orthogonal to observable and unobservable confounders. Datasets with linked genotypic and resource use information obtained from electronic medical records or from routinely collected administrative data are now becoming available and will facilitate this form of analysis. We describe some of the methodological issues that arise in this type of analysis, which we illustrate by considering how Mendelian randomization could be used to estimate the causal impact of obesity, a complex trait, on healthcare costs. We describe some of the data sources that could be used for this type of analysis. We conclude by considering the challenges and opportunities offered by Mendelian randomization for economic evaluation.

  1. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Rughoobur, G F; Slattery, C G; Sugrue, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored. An education programme, incorporating 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST)' training, was implemented in eight of 10 eligible primary care practices (14 general practitioners and nine practice nurses attended), in seven private nursing homes (20 staff nurses attended) and two health centres (53 community nurses attended) in conjunction with a community dietetics service for patients at risk of malnutrition. Nutritional knowledge was assessed before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention using self-administered, multiple-choice questionnaires. Reported changes in practice and the acceptability of the education programme were considered using self-administered questionnaires 6 months after the intervention. A significant increase in nutritional knowledge 6 months after the intervention was observed (P dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition increased the nutritional knowledge and improved the reported management of malnourished patients in the community by healthcare professionals. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. [Quality development within interdisciplinary transgender healthcare : Results and implications of a participatory research project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Timo O; Köhler, Andreas; Eyssel, Jana; Briken, Peer

    2017-09-01

    Both internationally and nationally, the objective has been set to offer specialized, coordinated, and interdisciplinary treatment to individuals with rare clinical needs, such as trans individuals (e. g., transsexual, transgender). The Interdisciplinary Transgender Health Care Center Hamburg (ITHCCH) is the first and only center in Germany to integrate all disciplines relevant to trans healthcare (THC).The research project seeks to generate valid information to support quality development and assure high-quality treatment at the ITHCCH. This was done by (a) investigating needs and concerns of trans individuals regarding interdisciplinary THC, and (b) analyzing attitudes and interests of key stakeholders.Using a participatory approach involving a work group (representatives of trans support groups and local THC professionals), researchers developed an online survey focusing on trans individuals' needs and concerns. Data from N = 415 trans-identified participants were analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. In addition, a short survey was used to record key stakeholders' attitudes and interests towards the ITHCCH.Healthcare offers accessed by trans individuals as part of transition related treatment vary in focus and number. For example, take-up numbers of genital surgery differ between binary and non-binary trans individuals. Crucial aspects impacting on THC quality are structural characteristics, communication/social aspects, individuality, and professionalism/quality.To ensure successful, high-quality interdisciplinary THC, feedback from (potential) patients and stakeholders is crucial. In addition, both structural development and optimizing individuality and flexibility throughout the treatment process are key. This poses a considerable challenge to the sector of THC provision.

  3. Optimizing healthcare research data warehouse design through past COSTAR query analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S N; Morgan, M M; Barnett, G O; Chueh, H C

    1999-01-01

    Over the past two years we have reviewed and implemented the specifications for a large relational database (a data warehouse) to find research cohorts from data similar to that contained within the clinical COSTAR database at the Massachusetts General Hospital. A review of 16 years of COSTAR research queries was conducted to determine the most common search strategies. These search strategies are relevant to the general research community, because they use the Medical Query Language (MQL) developed for the COSTAR M database which is extremely flexible (much more so than SQL) and allows searches by coded fields, text reports, and laboratory values in a completely ad hoc fashion. By reviewing these search strategies, we were able to obtain user specifications for a research oriented healthcare data warehouse that could support 90% of the queries. The data warehouse was implemented in a relational database using the star schema, allowing for highly optimized analytical processing. This allowed queries that performed slowly in the M database to be performed very rapidly in the relational database. It also allowed the data warehouse to scale effectively.

  4. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research...

  5. Addressing holistic healthcare needs of oncology patients: Implementation and evaluation of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) course within an elective module designed for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Homberg, Angelika; Glassen, Katharina; Mahler, Cornelia

    2016-12-01

    Patients, and especially oncology patients, increasingly demand information and application of complementary therapies to supplement their conventional medical treatment and follow-up care. Due to the widespread interest in holistic treatment opportunities in oncology populations, healthcare professionals need to be prepared in differentiating evidence-based methods of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) spectrum and how to consult with patients about it. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of a newly designed module "Complementary and Alternative Medicine in oncological healthcare" in the bachelor degree program Interprofessional Health Care (B.Sc.). The study applied a developed evaluation questionnaire to capture students' perspectives on the CAM contents. This assessment instrument was administered pre and post the CAM teaching unit. Interprofessional medical education, University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany. The integration of the CAM elective module was possible and was met by positive response. Students' interest was reflected in an increase of their self-reported knowledge gain and positive CAM attitude. Comparison of pre and post evaluation data demonstrate that, particularly, students' expectations on developing their own opinion about CAM, and getting an overview of the evidence-base of different CAM methods have been met. Evaluation results indicate that the module content was in line with the students' expectations and may have positively impacted on their general CAM attitude. The results support us in continuing to offer this CAM course within the elective module to prepare today's healthcare professionals for patient-oriented healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Setting Healthcare Priorities at the Macro and Meso Levels: A Framework for Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwine W. Barasa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Priority setting in healthcare is a key determinant of health system performance. However, there is no widely accepted priority setting evaluation framework. We reviewed literature with the aim of developing and proposing a framework for the evaluation of macro and meso level healthcare priority setting practices. Methods We systematically searched Econlit, PubMed, CINAHL, and EBSCOhost databases and supplemented this with searches in Google Scholar, relevant websites and reference lists of relevant papers. A total of 31 papers on evaluation of priority setting were identified. These were supplemented by broader theoretical literature related to evaluation of priority setting. A conceptual review of selected papers was undertaken. Results Based on a synthesis of the selected literature, we propose an evaluative framework that requires that priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels of the health system meet the following conditions: (1 Priority setting decisions should incorporate both efficiency and equity considerations as well as the following outcomes; (a Stakeholder satisfaction, (b Stakeholder understanding, (c Shifted priorities (reallocation of resources, and (d Implementation of decisions. (2 Priority setting processes should also meet the procedural conditions of (a Stakeholder engagement, (b Stakeholder empowerment, (c Transparency, (d Use of evidence, (e Revisions, (f Enforcement, and (g Being grounded on community values. Conclusion Available frameworks for the evaluation of priority setting are mostly grounded on procedural requirements, while few have included outcome requirements. There is, however, increasing recognition of the need to incorporate both consequential and procedural considerations in priority setting practices. In this review, we adapt an integrative approach to develop and propose a framework for the evaluation of priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels that draws from

  7. Developing a research agenda on ethical issues related to using social media in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Samantha A; Van Veghel, Dennis; Dekker, Lukas

    2015-07-01

    The consequences of using publicly available social media applications specifically for healthcare purposes are largely unaddressed in current research. Where they are addressed, the focus is primarily on issues of privacy and data protection. We therefore use a case study of the first live Twitter heart operation in the Netherlands, in combination with recent literature on social media from other academic fields, to identify a wide range of ethical issues related to using social media for health-related purposes. Although this case reflects an innovative approach to public education and patient centeredness, it also illustrates the need for institutions to weigh the various aspects of use and to develop a plan to deal with these on a per case basis. Given the continual development of technologies, researchers may not yet be able to oversee and anticipate all of the potential implications. Further development of a research agenda on this topic, the promotion of guidelines and policies, and the publication of case studies that reveal the granularity of individual situations will therefore help raise awareness and assist physicians and institutions in using social media to support existing care services.

  8. Bereaved Parents and Siblings Offer Advice to Healthcare Providers and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amii Corbisiero; Kaal, Julia; Thompson, Amanda L.; Barrera, Maru; Compas, Bruce E.; Davies, Betty; Fairclough, Diane L.; Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Hogan, Nancy; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how to improve care for families by obtaining their advice to healthcare providers and researchers after a child’s death from cancer. Design Families with a surviving sibling (ages 8-17) were recruited from cancer registries at three hospitals in the United States and Canada 3-12 months (M = 10.4, SD = 3.5) after the child’s death. Setting Data were collected in the home. Participants Participants (N = 99) included 36 mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings from 40 families. Outcome Measures Each participant completed a qualitative interview that was audio recorded, transcribed, and coded for thematic content. Findings Five major themes included the need for: (a) improved communication with the medical team, (b) more compassionate care, (c) increased access to resources, (d) ongoing research, as well as (e) offering praise. Interwoven within the five themes was a subtheme of continuity of care. Conclusions Many participants were pleased with the care the child with cancer received, but others noted areas in need of improvement, particularly medical communication and continuity of care. Additional research is needed to inform interventions to improve services for families of children with life-limiting conditions. PMID:23612375

  9. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  10. Technical evaluation of methods for identifying chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in healthcare claims databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weycker Derek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare claims databases have been used in several studies to characterize the risk and burden of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN and effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors against FN. The accuracy of methods previously used to identify FN in such databases has not been formally evaluated. Methods Data comprised linked electronic medical records from Geisinger Health System and healthcare claims data from Geisinger Health Plan. Subjects were classified into subgroups based on whether or not they were hospitalized for FN per the presumptive “gold standard” (ANC 9/L, and body temperature ≥38.3°C or receipt of antibiotics and claims-based definition (diagnosis codes for neutropenia, fever, and/or infection. Accuracy was evaluated principally based on positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity. Results Among 357 study subjects, 82 (23% met the gold standard for hospitalized FN. For the claims-based definition including diagnosis codes for neutropenia plus fever in any position (n=28, PPV was 100% and sensitivity was 34% (95% CI: 24–45. For the definition including neutropenia in the primary position (n=54, PPV was 87% (78–95 and sensitivity was 57% (46–68. For the definition including neutropenia in any position (n=71, PPV was 77% (68–87 and sensitivity was 67% (56–77. Conclusions Patients hospitalized for chemotherapy-induced FN can be identified in healthcare claims databases--with an acceptable level of mis-classification--using diagnosis codes for neutropenia, or neutropenia plus fever.

  11. Estimation and Evaluation of Future Demand and Supply of Healthcare Services Based on a Patient Access Area Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Doi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accessibility to healthcare service providers, the quantity, and the quality of them are important for national health. In this study, we focused on geographic accessibility to estimate and evaluate future demand and supply of healthcare services. We constructed a simulation model called the patient access area model (PAAM, which simulates patients’ access time to healthcare service institutions using a geographic information system (GIS. Using this model, to evaluate the balance of future healthcare services demand and supply in small areas, we estimated the number of inpatients every five years in each area and compared it with the number of hospital beds within a one-hour drive from each area. In an experiment with the Tokyo metropolitan area as a target area, when we assumed hospital bed availability to be 80%, it was predicted that over 78,000 inpatients would not receive inpatient care in 2030. However, this number would decrease if we lowered the rate of inpatient care by 10% and the average length of the hospital stay. Using this model, recommendations can be made regarding what action should be undertaken and by when to prevent a dramatic increase in healthcare demand. This method can help plan the geographical resource allocation in healthcare services for healthcare policy.

  12. The contribution of qualitative research in designing a complex intervention for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in two different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrrigan, Mairead

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Developing complex interventions for testing in randomised controlled trials is of increasing importance in healthcare planning. There is a need for careful design of interventions for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). It has been suggested that integrating qualitative research in the development of a complex intervention may contribute to optimising its design but there is limited evidence of this in practice. This study aims to examine the contribution of qualitative research in developing a complex intervention to improve the provision and uptake of secondary prevention of CHD within primary care in two different healthcare systems. METHODS: In four general practices, one rural and one urban, in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, patients with CHD were purposively selected. Four focus groups with patients (N = 23) and four with staff (N = 29) informed the development of the intervention by exploring how it could be tailored and integrated with current secondary prevention activities for CHD in the two healthcare settings. Following an exploratory trial the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention were discussed in four focus groups (17 patients) and 10 interviews (staff). The data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Integrating qualitative research into the development of the intervention provided depth of information about the varying impact, between the two healthcare systems, of different funding and administrative arrangements, on their provision of secondary prevention and identified similar barriers of time constraints, training needs and poor patient motivation. The findings also highlighted the importance to patients of stress management, the need for which had been underestimated by the researchers. The qualitative evaluation provided depth of detail not found in evaluation questionnaires. It highlighted how the intervention needed to be more practical by minimising administration

  13. Impact of a quality improvement program on primary healthcare in Canada: a mixed-method evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael E; Brown, Judith Belle; Roberts, Sharon; Russell, Grant; Fournie, Meghan; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Kotecha, Jyoti; Han, Han; Thind, Amardeep; Stewart, Moira; Reichert, Sonja; Tompkins, Jordan W; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous comprehensive evaluations of primary healthcare (PHC) quality improvement (QI) initiatives are lacking. This article describes the evaluation of the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership Learning Collaborative (QIIP-LC), an Ontario-wide PHC QI program targeting type 2 diabetes management, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, access to care, and team functioning. This article highlights the primary outcome results of an external retrospective, multi-measure, mixed-method evaluation of the QIIP-LC, including: (1) matched-control pre-post chart audit of diabetes management (A1c/foot exams) and rate of CRC screening; (2) post-only advanced access survey (third-next available appointment); and (3) post-only semi-structured interviews (team functioning). Chart audit data was collected from 34 consenting physicians per group (of which 88% provided access data). Between-group differences were not statistically significant (A1c [p=0.10]; foot exams [p=0.45]; CRC screening [p=0.77]; advanced access [p=0.22]). Qualitative interview (n=42) themes highlighted the success of the program in helping build interdisciplinary team functioning and capacity. The rigorous design and methodology of the QIIP-LC evaluation utilizing a control group is one of the most significant efforts thus far to demonstrate the impact of a QI program in PHC, with improvements over time in both QIIP and control groups offering a likely explanation for the lack of statistically significant primary outcomes. Team functioning was a key success, with team-based chronic care highlighted as pivotal for improved health outcomes. Policy makers should strive to endorse QI programs with proven success through rigorous evaluation to ensure evidence-based healthcare policy and funding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Visibility of healthcare research institutes through the Web of Science database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Albo, B; Moreno-Solano, L; Aparicio, J; Bordons, M

    2017-12-01

    The strategic importance of healthcare research institutes (HRIs) in health sciences research in Spain has motivated this analysis of the feasibility of studing their contribution to the Spanish scientific output through their presence as a signatory institution in the publications. We identified the output of the HRIs in the Web of Science database, comparing their observed output (the institutes are explicitly listed in the authors' workplace) and potential output (estimated based on the linked hospitals). The studies based on scientific publications do not help us reliably identify the contribution of the HRIs because their observed production is much lower than the potential output, although their visibility tends to increase over time. This article highlights the importance of HRI members including the institute among their work addresses to increase the visibility of these organisations and to facilitate studies aimed at assessing their activity in the national and international context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Healthcare for migrants, participatory health research and implementation science--better health policy and practice through inclusion. The RESTORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Anne; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brún, Tomas; Dowrick, Christopher; O'Donnell, Catherine; Mair, Frances; Spiegel, Wolfgang; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria; van Weel Baumgarten, Evelyn; Lionis, Christos; Clissmann, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    This is a time of unprecedented mobility across the globe. Healthcare systems need to adapt to ensure that primary care is culturally and linguistically appropriate for migrants. Evidence-based guidelines and training interventions for cultural competence and the use of professional interpreters are available across European healthcare settings. However, in real-world practice migrants and their healthcare providers 'get by' with a range of informal and inadequate strategies. RESTORE is an EU FP7 funded project, which is designed to address this translational gap. The objective of RESTORE is to investigate and support the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives to support communication in cross-cultural consultations in selected European primary care settings. RESTORE is a qualitative, participatory health project running from 2011-2015. It uses a novel combination of normalization process theory and participatory learning and action research to follow and shape the implementation journeys of relevant guidelines and training initiatives. Research teams in Ireland, England, the Netherlands, Austria and Greece are conducting similar parallel qualitative case study fieldwork, with a complementary health policy analysis led by Scotland. In each setting, key stakeholders, including migrants, are involved in participatory data generation and analysis. RESTORE will provide knowledge about the levers and barriers to the implementation of guidelines and training initiatives in European healthcare settings and about successful, transferrable strategies to overcome identified barriers. RESTORE will elucidate the role of policy in shaping these implementation journeys; generate recommendations for European policy driving the development of culturally and linguistically appropriate healthcare systems.

  16. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Davey; Santosh Kumar Raghav; Jai Vir Singh; Anuradha Davey; Nirankar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and...

  17. Evaluating Research Excellence : Main Debates

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    (2011). Maximizing the impacts of your research: A Handbook for Social Scien- tists. London: LSE Public Policy Group. Nutley, S., Percy-Smith, J., & Solesbury, W. (2003). Models of research impact: a cross-sector review of literature and practice. London: Learning and Skills Research Centre. O'Gorman, L. (2008, January ).

  18. Validation of instruments to evaluate primary healthcare from the patient perspective: overview of the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Jeannie L; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Christine; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A; Gass, David; Lawson, Beverley

    2011-12-01

    Patient evaluations are an important part of monitoring primary healthcare reforms, but there is little comparative information available to guide evaluators in the choice of instruments or to determine their relevance for Canada. To compare values and the psychometric performances of validated instruments thought to be most pertinent to the Canadian context for evaluating core attributes of primary healthcare. AMONG VALIDATED INSTRUMENTS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN, WE SELECTED SIX: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS); the Primary Care Assessment Tool - Short Form (PCAT-S); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II); and part of the Veterans Affairs National Outpatient Customer Satisfaction Survey (VANOCSS). We mapped subscales to operational definitions of attributes. All were administered to a sample of adult service users balanced by English/French language (in Nova Scotia and Quebec, respectively), urban/rural residency, high/low education and overall care experience. The sample was recruited from previous survey respondents, newspaper advertisements and community posters. We used common factor analysis to compare our factor resolution for each instrument to that of the developers. Our sample of 645 respondents was approximately balanced by design variables, but considerable effort was required to recruit low-education and poor-experience respondents. Subscale scores are statistically different by excellent, average and poor overall experience, but interpersonal communication and respectfulness scores were the most discriminating of overall experience. We found fewer factors than did the developers, but when constrained to the number of expected factors, our item loadings were largely similar to those found by developers. Subscale reliability was equivalent to or higher than that reported by developers. These instruments perform similarly in the

  19. The effectiveness of research implementation strategies for promoting evidence-informed policy and management decisions in healthcare: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Mitchell N; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Haas, Romi; Lane, Haylee; Haines, Terry P

    2017-11-14

    It is widely acknowledged that health policy and management decisions rarely reflect research evidence. Therefore, it is important to determine how to improve evidence-informed decision-making. The primary aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of research implementation strategies for promoting evidence-informed policy and management decisions in healthcare. The secondary aim of the review was to describe factors perceived to be associated with effective strategies and the inter-relationship between these factors. An electronic search was developed to identify studies published between January 01, 2000, and February 02, 2016. This was supplemented by checking the reference list of included articles, systematic reviews, and hand-searching publication lists from prominent authors. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. After duplicate removal, the search strategy identified 3830 titles. Following title and abstract screening, 96 full-text articles were reviewed, of which 19 studies (21 articles) met all inclusion criteria. Three studies were included in the narrative synthesis, finding policy briefs including expert opinion might affect intended actions, and intentions persisting to actions for public health policy in developing nations. Workshops, ongoing technical assistance, and distribution of instructional digital materials may improve knowledge and skills around evidence-informed decision-making in US public health departments. Tailored, targeted messages were more effective in increasing public health policies and programs in Canadian public health departments compared to messages and a knowledge broker. Sixteen studies (18 articles) were included in the thematic synthesis, leading to a conceptualisation of inter-relating factors perceived to be associated with effective research implementation strategies. A unidirectional, hierarchal flow was described from (1

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: summary of the 2016 agency of healthcare research and quality evidence review

    Science.gov (United States)

    We summarize the 2016 update of the 2004 Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality's evidence review of omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The overall findings for the effects of marine oil supplements on intermediate CVD outcomes remain largely unchanged. There is high strength o...

  1. Control and mitigation of healthcare-acquired infections: designing clinical trials to evaluate new materials and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Peter A; Schmidt, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals clean environmental surfaces to lower microbial contamination and reduce the likelihood of transmitting infections. Despite current cleaning and hand hygiene protocols, hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) continue to result in a significant loss of life and cost the U.S. healthcare system an estimated $45 billion annually. Stainless steel and chrome are often selected for hospital touch surfaces for their "clean appearance," comparatively smooth finish, resistance to standard cleaners, and relative effectiveness for removing visible dirt during normal cleaning. Designers use wood surfaces for aesthetics; plastic surfaces have become increasingly endemic for their relative lower initial cost; and "antimicrobial agents" are being incorporated into a variety of surface finishes.This paper concentrates on environmental surface materials with a history of bactericidal control of infectious agents and focuses on the methods necessary to validate their effectiveness in healthcare situations. Research shows copper-based metals to have innate abilities to kill bacteria in laboratory settings, but their effectiveness in patient care environments has not been adequately investigated. This article presents a research methodology to expand the evidence base from the laboratory to the built environment. For such research to have a meaningful impact on the design/specifying community, it should assess typical levels of environmental pathogens (i.e., surface "cleanliness") as measured by microbial burden (MB); evaluate the extent to which an intervention with copper-based materials in a randomized clinical trial affects the level of contamination; and correlate how the levels of MB affect the incidence of infections acquired during hospital stays.

  2. Research Award: Policy and Evaluation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    These awards may be part of an academic requirement. • Your proposed research must focus on one or more developing countries and/or. Canada. Candidates ... Strong research, analytical, and writing skills;. • Strong communication and interpersonal skills; and. • Good judgement, initiative, and ability to set priorities and ...

  3. Using realist evaluation to assess primary healthcare teams' responses to intimate partner violence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Few evaluations have assessed the factors triggering an adequate health care response to intimate partner violence. This article aimed to: 1) describe a realist evaluation carried out in Spain to ascertain why, how and under what circumstances primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence, and 2) discuss the strengths and challenges of its application. We carried out a series of case studies in four steps. First, we developed an initial programme theory (PT1), based on interviews with managers. Second, we refined PT1 into PT2 by testing it in a primary healthcare team that was actively responding to violence. Third, we tested the refined PT2 by incorporating three other cases located in the same region. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and thick descriptions were produced and analysed using a retroduction approach. Fourth, we analysed a total of 15 cases, and identified combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that triggered an adequate response to violence by using qualitative comparative analysis. There were several key mechanisms -the teams' self-efficacy, perceived preparation, women-centred care-, and contextual factors -an enabling team environment and managerial style, the presence of motivated professionals, the use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care- that should be considered to develop adequate primary health-care responses to violence. The full application of this realist evaluation was demanding, but also well suited to explore a complex intervention reflecting the situation in natural settings. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Workplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the

  5. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWorkplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the internal

  6. Quality and Research Evaluation in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    A central issue in science policy today is the changing role and function ofresearch evaluation. How is quality selected, has local organizational traditionsand managerial practices influence on the research evaluation? Who isperceived as peers or evaluators by the researchers and by managers......? Recentorganizational theory has focused on organizational and social dimensions inprivate knowledge-based companies, but left out research organizations. Howimportant is the organizational context for the research evaluation processes?The paper will present results from an interview-based study of four privateand...... public research organizations and discuss the importance of theorganizational context on the production of new knowledge....

  7. Innovation in healthcare services: notes on the limits of field research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Silveira Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract: The contemporary context of population aging, itsthe population's different health and disease characteristics, and the growing incorporation of technologies by healthcare systems have highlighted the need to adjust the healthcare structure as a whole. The defense of a democratic and sustainable system reveals the importance of understanding how changes in healthcare take place. The current article aims to contribute to the understanding of innovation in healthcare services. The study's results indicate that the existence of certain knowledge gaps means that public policies tend to overlook a whole rangeseries of innovations normally associated with social changes, with a consequentwith an impact on human development, social cohesion, equality, and equity, allcentral issues that are central toin the field of collective public healthcare field. The article concludes that the lack of a mature theoretical framework negatively impacts the formulation of such policies, further aggravated in Brazil by growing differences in quality and access between population segments that depend on the public and private healthcare systems.

  8. Sarcopenia and cachexia evaluation in different healthcare settings: a questionnaire survey of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Saori; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Maeda, Keisuke; Nishioka, Shinta; Kokura, Yoji

    2018-01-01

    The rates of sarcopenia and cachexia evaluations by different occupational groups at different settings are unclear. The objectives are to evaluate and compare the relative use of sarcopenia and cachexia evaluations among dietitians and associated healthcare professionals in a diverse range of settings. Participants were 4,621 members from the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Nutrition. Settings included acute general wards, convalescent rehabilitation wards, long-term care wards, homecare service, and other settings. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate assessments for sarcopenia and cachexia among dietitians and other professionals. Multiple comparisons based on Bonferroni method and logistic regression analysis were used. 718 (15.5%) answered the questionnaire. Data from 683 valid questionnaires were analyzed. Muscle strength, muscle mass, physical function, and cachexia were assessed by 53.4%, 51.1%, 53.4%, and 17.4% of dietitians. At convalescent rehabilitation wards, these rates were 81.8%, 62.0%, 82.5%, and 14.0%. The use of muscle strength and physical function evaluations was significantly lower among dietitians than among physical therapists and occupational therapists. The use of muscle mass and cachexia evaluations was not significantly different among the occupations. The use of muscle mass and strength evaluations was significantly higher in convalescent rehabilitation wards than in acute general wards, long-term care wards and facilities, and other settings, but not in homecare services. Cachexia evaluations were not significantly different between all settings. Raising the awareness of cachexia and sarcopenia among dietitians is a key issue, which should be addressed.

  9. Knowledge sharing in infection prevention in routine and outbreak situations: a survey of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerstein, Rami; Geser, Sonja; Atkinson, Andrew; Tschan, Franziska; Morgan, Daniel J; Marschall, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-sectional Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Research Network survey on knowledge sharing in infection prevention we identified a rudimentary understanding of how to communicate and share knowledge within healthcare institutions. Our data support the need of further research in this important field.

  10. Evaluating societal relevance of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbertz, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Scientific research is performed to elucidate how the world around us is functioning. One dimension of the acquired knowledge is that it can be used to develop various sectors of society such as industry, education, governmental practices, the health system or social cohesion. A main characteristic

  11. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the iterative evaluation of an artifact developed through the application of Design Science Research (DSR) methodology in a resource constrained environment. In the DSR process the aspect of evaluation is often done...

  12. A 6-year comparative economic evaluation of healthcare costs and mortality rates of Dutch patients from conventional and CAM GPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Erik W; Kooreman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare healthcare costs and mortality rates of Dutch patients with a conventional (CON) general practitioner (GP) and patients with a GP who has additionally completed training in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design Comparative economic evaluation. Setting Database from the Dutch insurance company Agis. Participants 1 521 773 patients (98.8%) from a CON practice and 18 862 patients (1.2%) from a CAM practice. Main outcome measures Annual information on five types of healthcare costs for the years 2006–2011: care by GP, hospital care, pharmaceutical care, paramedic care and care covered by supplementary insurance. Healthcare costs in the last year of life. Mortality rates. Results The mean annual compulsory and supplementary healthcare costs of CON patients are respectively €1821 (95% CI 1813 to 1828) and €75.3 (95% CI 75.1 to 75.5). Compulsory healthcare costs of CAM patients are €225 (95% CI 169 to 281; pcompulsory and supplementary healthcare costs and do not live longer or shorter than CON patients. PMID:25164536

  13. Beyond Effectiveness: A Pragmatic Evaluation Framework for Learning and Continuous Quality Improvement of e-Learning Interventions in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafalla, Tarig Dafalla Mohamed; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatic evaluation framework for evaluating the usability and usefulness of an e-learning intervention for a patient clinical information scheduling system is presented in this paper. The framework was conceptualized based on two different but related concepts (usability and usefulness) and selection of appropriate and valid methods of data collection and analysis that included: (1) Low-Cost Rapid Usability Engineering (LCRUE), (2) Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA), (3) Heuristic Evaluation (HE) criteria for web-based learning, and (4) Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). The results of the analysis showed some areas where usability that were related to General Interface Usability (GIU), instructional design and content was problematic; some of which might account for the poorly rated aspects of usability when subjectively measured. This paper shows that using a pragmatic framework can be a useful way, not only for measuring the usability and usefulness, but also for providing a practical objective evidences for learning and continuous quality improvement of e-learning systems. The findings should be of interest to educators, developers, designers, researchers, and usability practitioners involved in the development of e-learning systems in healthcare. This framework could be an appropriate method for assessing the usability, usefulness and safety of health information systems both in the laboratory and in the clinical context.

  14. Scaling Research Results: Design and Evaluation | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Scaling Research Results: Design and Evaluation. Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) supports research to seek scalable solutions to improve the lives of people in the developing world. While there is general understanding of the meaning of "scaling up/ within the domain of research for ...

  15. Integration of rural and urban healthcare insurance schemes in China: an empirical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Ang; He, Xin; Jiang, Hanghang

    2014-03-29

    Despite the broad coverage of the healthcare insurance system in China, the imbalances in fairness, accessibility and affordability of healthcare services have hindered the universal healthcare progress. To provide better financial protection for the Chinese population, China's new medical reform was proposed to link up urban employee basic medical insurance scheme (UEBMI), urban resident basic medical insurance scheme (URBMI), new rural cooperative medical system (NRCMS) and urban and rural medical assistance programs. In this paper, we focused on people's expected healthcare insurance model and their willingness towards healthcare insurance integration, and we made a couple of relative policy suggestions. A questionnaire survey was conducted in four cities in China. A total of 1178 effective questionnaires were retrieved. Statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS and Excel. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were applied. The payment intention and reimbursement expectation of the three groups varied with NRCMS participants the lowest and UEBMI participants the highest. In economic developed areas, rural residents had equal or even stronger payment ability than urban residents, and the overall payment intention showed a scattered trend; while in less developed areas, urban residents had a stronger payment ability than rural residents and a more concentrated payment intention was observed. The majority of participants favored the integration, with NRCMS enrollees up to 80.5%. In the logistic regression model, we found that participants from less developed areas were more likely to oppose the integration, which we conceived was mainly due to their dissatisfaction with their local healthcare insurance schemes. Also the participants with better education background tended to oppose the integration, which might be due to their fear of benefit impairment and their concern about the challenges ahead. Even though there are many challenges for healthcare

  16. Respectfulness from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Gass, David; Santor, Darcy A.; Beaulieu, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Respectfulness is one measurable and core element of healthcare responsiveness. The operational definition of respectfulness is “the extent to which health professionals and support staff meet users' expectations about interpersonal treatment, demonstrate respect for the dignity of patients and provide adequate privacy.” Objective: To examine how well respectfulness is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective, whether or not their developers had envisaged these as representing respectfulness. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact with their own regular doctor or clinic in the previous 12 months responded to six instruments, two subscales that mapped to respectfulness: the Interpersonal Processes of Care, version II (IPC-II, two subscales) and the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS). Additionally, there were individual respectfulness items in subscales measuring other attributes in the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI) and the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation modelling) factor analyses examined fit to operational definition. Results: Respectfulness scales correlate highly with one another and with interpersonal communication. All items load adequately on a single factor, presumed to be respectfulness, but the best model has three underlying factors corresponding to (1) physician's interpersonal treatment (eigenvalue=13.99), (2) interpersonal treatment by office staff (eigenvalue=2.13) and (3) respect for the dignity of the person (eigenvalue=1.16). Most items capture physician's interpersonal treatment (IPC-II Compassionate, Respectful Interpersonal Style, IPC-II Hurried Communication and PCAS Interpersonal Treatment). The IPC-II Interpersonal Style (Disrespectful Office Staff) captures treatment by staff, but only three items capture dignity. Conclusion: Various items or

  17. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention.

  18. Measurement of integrated healthcare delivery: a systematic review of methods and future research directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Strandberg-Larsen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated healthcare delivery is a policy goal of healthcare systems. There is no consensus on how to measure the concept, which makes it difficult to monitor progress. Purpose: To identify the different types of methods used to measure integrated healthcare delivery with emphasis on structural, cultural and process aspects. Methods: Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, WHOLIS, and conventional internet search engines were systematically searched for methods to measure integrated healthcare delivery (published – April 2008. Results: Twenty-four published scientific papers and documents met the inclusion criteria. In the 24 references we identified 24 different measurement methods; however, 5 methods shared theoretical framework. The methods can be categorized according to type of data source: a questionnaire survey data, b automated register data, or c mixed data sources. The variety of concepts measured reflects the significant conceptual diversity within the field, and most methods lack information regarding validity and reliability. Conclusion: Several methods have been developed to measure integrated healthcare delivery; 24 methods are available and some are highly developed. The objective governs the method best used. Criteria for sound measures are suggested and further developments should be based on an explicit conceptual framework and focus on simplifying and validating existing methods.

  19. Burden of disease and economic evaluation of healthcare interventions: are we investigating what really matters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gènova-Maleras Ricard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of limited available healthcare resources demands an agreed rational allocation principle and the consequent priority setting. We assessed the association between economic evaluations of healthcare interventions published in Spain (1983-2008 and the disease burden in the population. Methods Electronic databases (e.g., PubMed/MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Knowledge, CRD, IME, IBECS and reports from health technology assessment agencies were systematically reviewed. For each article, multiple variables were recorded such as: year and journal of publication, type of study, health intervention targetted, perspective of analysis, type of costs and sources of information, first author's affiliation, explicit recommendations aimed at decision-making, and the main disease cause to which the intervention was addressed. The following disease burden measures were calculated: years of life lost (YLLs, years lived with disability (YLDs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and mortality by cause. Correlation and linear regression models were fitted. Results Four hundred and seventy-seven economic evaluations were identified. Cardiovascular diseases (15.7%, infectious diseases (15.3%, malignant neoplasms (13.2%, and neuropsychiatric diseases (9.6% were the conditions most commonly addressed. Accidents and injuries, congenital anomalies, oral conditions, nutritional deficiencies and other neoplasms were the categories with a lowest number of studies (0.6% for each of them. For the main disease categories (n = 20, a correlation was seen with: mortality 0.67 (p = 0.001, DALYs 0.63 (p = 0.003, YLLs 0.54 (p = 0.014, and YLDs 0.51 (p = 0.018. By disease sub-categories (n = 51, the correlations were generally low and non statistically significant. Conclusions Examining discrepancies between economic evaluations in particular diseases and the overall burden of disease helps shed light on whether there are potentially over- and under

  20. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1(st) Jan 2014 to 1(st) July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  1. Helping fluid teams work: A research agenda for effective team adaptation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Wendy L; Ramsay, P Scott; Salas, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Although membership changes within teams are a common practice, research into this phenomenon is relatively nascent (Summers et al.; Acad Manag J 55:314-338, 2012). The small literature base, however, does provide insight into skills required for effective adaptation. The purpose of this effort is to provide a brief research synopsis, leading to research hypotheses about medical team training. By generalizing previous scientific findings regarding skills required for effective membership adaptation in different kinds of teams, we posit mechanisms whereby teamwork training might also support adaptation among medical teams (Burke et al.; Qual & Saf Health Care 13:i96-i104, 2004 and Salas et al.; Theor Issues Ergon Sci 8:381-394, 2007). We provide an overview of the membership change literature. Drawing upon literature from both within and outside of the medical domain, we suggest a framework and research propositions to aid in research efforts designed to determine the best content for helping to create adaptable medical teams through team training efforts. For effective adaptation, we suggest ad hoc teams should be trained on generalizable teamwork skills, to share just "enough" and the "right" information, to engage in shared leadership, and to shift from explicit to implicit coordination. Our overarching goal was to present what is known from the general research literature on successful team adaptation to membership changes, and to propose a research agenda to evaluate whether findings generalize to member changes in medical teams.

  2. Evaluation of shared EHR services in primary healthcare centers and their rural community offices: the twister story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronaki, Ce; Kontoyiannis, V; Mytaras, M; Aggourakis, N; Kostomanolakis, S; Roumeliotaki, T; Kavlentakis, G; Chiarugi, F; Tsiknakis, M

    2007-01-01

    Ten years after primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare facilities in Crete were connected in HYGEIAnet, one of the first regional health information networks worldwide, the Twister project addressed the practical challenge of delivering integrated eHealth services to remote healthcare facilities in Crete and the south Aegean. A hybrid network infrastructure comprising terrestrial broadband, wireless, and satellite segments provided connectivity among distributed healthcare organizations. A fast-track methodology of continuous training and evaluation was used to encourage the wide adoption of EHR services in primary healthcare centers and their remote community offices, eTraining in prehospital emergency management, and medical collaboration. For the evaluation of Twister, health professionals using EHRs and citizens visiting the healthcare facilities provided their attitudes and perceptions on eHealth. Although eHealth is viewed differently by citizens and health professionals, both groups consider the EHR as an important part of the daily medical practice. However, continuous training, practical incentives, and awareness initiatives are necessary to increase the use of EHRs and the social embedding of eHealth in rural areas.

  3. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Stewardship-Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sean L; Kasaie, Parastu; Anderson, Deverick J; Rubin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Mathematical modeling is a valuable methodology used to study healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship, particularly when more traditional study approaches are infeasible, unethical, costly, or time consuming. We focus on 2 of the most common types of mathematical modeling, namely compartmental modeling and agent-based modeling, which provide important advantages-such as shorter developmental timelines and opportunities for extensive experimentation-over observational and experimental approaches. We summarize these advantages and disadvantages via specific examples and highlight recent advances in the methodology. A checklist is provided to serve as a guideline in the development of mathematical models in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-7.

  4. Making Good Decisions in Healthcare with Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: The Use, Current Research and Future Development of MCDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Kaczynski, Anika

    2016-02-01

    Healthcare decision making is usually characterized by a low degree of transparency. The demand for transparent decision processes can be fulfilled only when assessment, appraisal and decisions about health technologies are performed under a systematic construct of benefit assessment. The benefit of an intervention is often multidimensional and, thus, must be represented by several decision criteria. Complex decision problems require an assessment and appraisal of various criteria; therefore, a decision process that systematically identifies the best available alternative and enables an optimal and transparent decision is needed. For that reason, decision criteria must be weighted and goal achievement must be scored for all alternatives. Methods of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) are available to analyse and appraise multiple clinical endpoints and structure complex decision problems in healthcare decision making. By means of MCDA, value judgments, priorities and preferences of patients, insurees and experts can be integrated systematically and transparently into the decision-making process. This article describes the MCDA framework and identifies potential areas where MCDA can be of use (e.g. approval, guidelines and reimbursement/pricing of health technologies). A literature search was performed to identify current research in healthcare. The results showed that healthcare decision making is addressing the problem of multiple decision criteria and is focusing on the future development and use of techniques to weight and score different decision criteria. This article emphasizes the use and future benefit of MCDA.

  5. A prospective observational study of machine translation software to overcome the challenge of including ethnic diversity in healthcare research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Crichton, Nicola; Moult, Beki; Gibson, Faith

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates whether machine translation could help with the challenge of enabling the inclusion of ethnic diversity in healthcare research. A two phase, prospective observational study. Two machine translators, Google Translate and Babylon 9, were tested. Translation of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) from 24 languages into English and translation of an English information sheet into Spanish and Chinese were quality scored. Quality was assessed using the Translation Assessment Quality Tool. Only six of the 48 translations of the SDQ were rated as acceptable, all from Google Translate. The mean number of acceptably translated sentences was higher ( P  = 0·001) for Google Translate 17·1 (sd 7·2) than for Babylon 9 11 (sd 7·9). Translation by Google Translate was better for Spanish and Chinese, although no score was in the acceptable range. Machine translation is not currently sufficiently accurate without editing to provide translation of materials for use in healthcare research.

  6. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile): Research Design

    OpenAIRE

    Arianne MJ Elissen; Dorijn FL Hertroijs; Shaper, Nicolaas C; Hubertus JM Vrijhoef; Dirk Ruwaard

    2016-01-01

    Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (bio)medical and non-(bio)medical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. Th...

  7. Evaluation of factors affecting plate waste of inpatients in different healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero Díaz, Antonio; Caracuel García, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Satisfaction of inpatients with served food within a hospital care system still constitutes one of the main attempts to modernize food services. The impact of type of menu, food category, hospital centre and timetable on the meals wastage produced in different Spanish healthcare settings, was evaluated. Meal wastage was measured through a semiquantitative 5-point scale ("nothing on plate"; "¼ on plate"; "half on plate"; "¾ on plate" and "all on plate"). The study was carried out in two periods of three months each in 2010 and 2011. A trained person took charge of measuring plate waste classified into 726 servings belonging to 11 menus. In total 31,392 plates were served to 7,868 inpatients. A Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (p food categories, 26.78% of the plates corresponded to soups and purées, while pasta and rice, and prepared foods were only distributed in 4-5% of the servings. Desserts were mostly consumed, while cooked vegetables were less accepted by the inpatients evaluated. Other factors such as hospital centre influenced plate waste (p 0.05). Visual inspections of plate waste might be useful to optimize type and quality of menus served. The type of menu served and the food category could have a great influence on food acceptability by the inpatients studied. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Case study evaluation of health-care solid waste and pollution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... recommendations ranging from daily monitoring of generated wastes to its environmental-friendly disposal, in order to guarantee safe management of health-care wastes in the city. Keywords: health-care waste, characterization, quantification, Ibadan, Nigeria Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol.

  9. Transforming Healthcare Delivery: Integrating Dynamic Simulation Modelling and Big Data in Health Economics and Outcomes Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Padula, William V.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Wong, Peter K.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Engbers, Jordan; Wiebe, Samuel; Crown, William; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2016-01-01

    In the era of the Information Age and personalized medicine, healthcare delivery systems need to be efficient and patient-centred. The health system must be responsive to individual patient choices and preferences about their care, while considering the system consequences. While dynamic simulation

  10. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data.

  11. Transforming Healthcare Delivery: Integrating Dynamic Simulation Modelling and Big Data in Health Economics and Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Padula, William V; IJzerman, Maarten J; Wong, Peter K; Higashi, Mitchell K; Engbers, Jordan; Wiebe, Samuel; Crown, William; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2016-02-01

    In the era of the Information Age and personalized medicine, healthcare delivery systems need to be efficient and patient-centred. The health system must be responsive to individual patient choices and preferences about their care, while considering the system consequences. While dynamic simulation modelling (DSM) and big data share characteristics, they present distinct and complementary value in healthcare. Big data and DSM are synergistic-big data offer support to enhance the application of dynamic models, but DSM also can greatly enhance the value conferred by big data. Big data can inform patient-centred care with its high velocity, volume, and variety (the three Vs) over traditional data analytics; however, big data are not sufficient to extract meaningful insights to inform approaches to improve healthcare delivery. DSM can serve as a natural bridge between the wealth of evidence offered by big data and informed decision making as a means of faster, deeper, more consistent learning from that evidence. We discuss the synergies between big data and DSM, practical considerations and challenges, and how integrating big data and DSM can be useful to decision makers to address complex, systemic health economics and outcomes questions and to transform healthcare delivery.

  12. Research into person-centred healthcare technology: a plea for considering humanization dimensions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, G.; Zijpp, T. van der; Lieshout, F. van; Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Changes in demographics, financial and time constraints and the on‐going shift towards greater responsibility for health and illness for the patient, have increased the speed of development of innovative, information and communications technology‐guided solutions and tools within healthcare

  13. Guidance on Performing Focused Ethnographies with an Emphasis on Healthcare Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, Gina M. A.; Pillay, Jennifer J.; Boadu, Nana Y.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ethnographies can have meaningful and useful application in primary care, community, or hospital healthcare practice, and are often used to determine ways to improve care and care processes. They can be pragmatic and efficient ways to capture data on a specific topic of importance to individual clinicians or clinical specialties. While…

  14. Research Issues on Educational Aid Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, Masafumi

    1999-01-01

    This paper represents an attempt to elaborate research issues on aid evaluation in the field of education. It does so on the basis of a review of existing research, coupled with the consideration of practical issues involved in the administration of aid evaluation by the government aid agencies in Japan. Evaluation of educational aid is made difficult owing to particular characteristics of educational programs and projects, such as long lead time needed for educational investments and inc...

  15. 'The way things are around here': organisational culture is a concept missing from New Zealand healthcare policy, development, implementation, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane L

    2012-01-20

    Internationally, healthcare sectors are coming under increasing pressure to perform and to be accountable for the use of public funds. In order to deliver on stakeholder expectation, transformation will need to occur across all levels of the health system. Outside of health care it has been recognised for some time that organisational culture (OC) can have a significant influence on performance and that it is a mediator for change. The health sector has been slow to adopt organisational theory and specifically the benefits of understanding OC and impacts on performance. During a visit to health research units in the United Kingdom (UK) I realised the stark differences in the practice of health reform and its evaluation. OC is a firmly established concept within policy development, implementation and research in the UK. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for New Zealand. There has been unrelenting reform and structural redesign, particularly of the primary healthcare sector under multiple governments over the past 20 to 30 years. However, there has been an underwhelming focus on the human aspects of organisational change. This seems set to continue and the aim of this viewpoint is to introduce the concept of OC and outline why New Zealand policy reformists and health services researchers should be thinking explicitly about OC. Culture is not solely the domain of the organisational scientist and current understandings of the influence of OC on performance are outlined in this commentary. Potential benefits of thinking about culture are argued and a proposed research agenda is presented.

  16. Speaking up behaviours (safety voices) of healthcare workers: A metasynthesis of qualitative research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kelly J; Gustavson, Allison M; Jones, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    A critical characteristic of effective teams in any setting is when each member is willing to speak up to share thoughts and ideas to improve processes. In spite of attempts by healthcare systems to encourage employees to speak up, employee silence remains a common cause of communication breakdowns, contributing to errors and suboptimal care delivery. Nurses in particular have reported low confidence in their communication abilities, and cite the belief that speaking up will not make a difference. To develop an understanding of how nurses and other healthcare workers relate to safety voice behaviors and how this might influence clinical practice. A search of the PubMed, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premier databases was conducted using keywords employee, nurse, qualitative, speak up, silence, safety, voice, and safety voice identified 372 articles with 11 retained after a review of the abstracts. Studies took place in Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Hong Kong, East Africa, Ireland, Korea, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States representing 504 healthcare workers including 354 nurses. This interpretive meta-synthesis of 11 qualitative articles published from 2005 to 2015 was conducted using a social constructivist approach with thematic analysis. The four themes identified are: 1) hierarchies and power dynamics negatively affect safety voice, 2) open communication is unsafe and ineffective, 3) embedded expectations of nurse behavior affect safety voice, and 4) nurse managers have a powerful positive or negative affect on safety voice. Healthcare workers worldwide report multiple social and hierarchy related fears surrounding the utilization of safety voice behaviors. Hesitance to speak up is pervasive among nurses, as is low self-efficacy related to safety voice. The presence of caring leaders, peer support, and an organizational commitment to safe, open cultures, may improve safety voice utilization among nurses and other healthcare workers. Copyright

  17. Medical education for equity in health: a participatory action research involving persons living in poverty and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Loignon, Christine; Grabovschi, Cristina; Bush, Paula; Lambert, Mireille; Goulet, Émilie; Boyer, Sophie; De Laat, Marianne; Fournier, Nathalie

    2016-04-12

    Improving the knowledge and competencies of healthcare professionals is crucial to better address the specific needs of persons living in poverty and avoid stigmatization. This study aimed to explore the needs and expectations of persons living in poverty and healthcare professionals in terms of medical training regarding poverty and its effects on health and healthcare. We conducted a participatory action research study using photovoice, a method using photography, together with merging of knowledge and practice, an approach promoting dialogue between different sources of knowledge. Nineteen healthcare professionals and persons from an international community organization against poverty participated in the study. The first phase included 60 meetings and group sessions to identify the perceived barriers between persons living in poverty and healthcare teams. In the second phase, sub-committees deployed action plans in academic teaching units to overcome barriers identified in the first phase. Data were analysed through thematic analysis, using NVivo, in collaboration with five non-academic co-researchers. Four themes in regard to medical training were highlighted: improving medical students' and residents' knowledge on poverty and the living conditions of persons living in poverty; improving their understanding of the reality of those people; improving their relational skills pertaining to communication and interaction with persons living in poverty; improving their awareness and capacity for self-reflection. At the end of the second phase, actions were undertaken such as improving knowledge of the living conditions of persons living in poverty by posting social assistance rates, and tailoring interventions to patients' reality by including sociodemographic information in electronic medical records. Our findings also led to a participatory research project aiming to improve the skills and competency of residents and health professionals in regard to the quality of

  18. Commentary: Writing and evaluating qualitative research reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of qualitative methods is provided, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals ...

  19. Innovative technology transfer of nondestructive evaluation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Technology transfer is often an afterthought for many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) researchers. Effective technology transfer should be considered during the planning and execution of research projects. This paper outlines strategies for using technology transfer in NDE research and presents a wide variety of technology transfer methods used by a cooperative...

  20. Integrating clinical research with the Healthcare Enterprise: from the RE-USE project to the EHR4CR platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fadly, AbdenNaji; Rance, Bastien; Lucas, Noël; Mead, Charles; Chatellier, Gilles; Lastic, Pierre-Yves; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Daniel, Christel

    2011-12-01

    There are different approaches for repurposing clinical data collected in the Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) for use in clinical research. Semantic integration of "siloed" applications across domain boundaries is the raison d'être of the standards-based profiles developed by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative - an initiative by healthcare professionals and industry promoting the coordinated use of established standards such as DICOM and HL7 to address specific clinical needs in support of optimal patient care. In particular, the combination of two IHE profiles - the integration profile "Retrieve Form for Data Capture" (RFD), and the IHE content profile "Clinical Research Document" (CRD) - offers a straightforward approach to repurposing EHR data by enabling the pre-population of the case report forms (eCRF) used for clinical research data capture by Clinical Data Management Systems (CDMS) with previously collected EHR data. Implement an alternative solution of the RFD-CRD integration profile centered around two approaches: (i) Use of the EHR as the single-source data-entry and persistence point in order to ensure that all the clinical data for a given patient could be found in a single source irrespective of the data collection context, i.e. patient care or clinical research; and (ii) Maximize the automatic pre-population process through the use of a semantic interoperability services that identify duplicate or semantically-equivalent eCRF/EHR data elements as they were collected in the EHR context. The RE-USE architecture and associated profiles are focused on defining a set of scalable, standards-based, IHE-compliant profiles that can enable single-source data collection/entry and cross-system data reuse through semantic integration. Specifically, data reuse is realized through the semantic mapping of data collection fields in electronic Case Report Forms (eCRFs) to data elements previously defined as part of patient care

  1. Evaluation of healthcare waste treatment/disposal alternatives by using multi-criteria decision-making techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Aysun

    2013-02-01

    Healthcare waste should be managed carefully because of infected, pathological, etc. content especially in developing countries. Applied management systems must be the most appropriate solution from a technical, environmental, economic and social point of view. The main objective of this study was to analyse the current status of healthcare waste management in Turkey, and to investigate the most appropriate treatment/disposal option by using different decision-making techniques. For this purpose, five different healthcare waste treatment/disposal alternatives including incineration, microwaving, on-site sterilization, off-site sterilization and landfill were evaluated according to two multi-criteria decision-making techniques: analytic network process (ANP) and ELECTRE. In this context, benefits, costs and risks for the alternatives were taken into consideration. Furthermore, the prioritization and ranking of the alternatives were determined and compared for both methods. According to the comparisons, the off-site sterilization technique was found to be the most appropriate solution in both cases.

  2. Research evaluation support services in biomedical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzman, Karen Elizabeth; Bales, Michael E; Belter, Christopher W; Chambers, Thane; Chan, Liza; Holmes, Kristi L; Lu, Ya-Ling; Palmer, Lisa A; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca C; Sarli, Cathy C; Suiter, Amy M; Wheeler, Terrie R

    2018-01-01

    The paper provides a review of current practices related to evaluation support services reported by seven biomedical and research libraries. A group of seven libraries from the United States and Canada described their experiences with establishing evaluation support services at their libraries. A questionnaire was distributed among the libraries to elicit information as to program development, service and staffing models, campus partnerships, training, products such as tools and reports, and resources used for evaluation support services. The libraries also reported interesting projects, lessons learned, and future plans. The seven libraries profiled in this paper report a variety of service models in providing evaluation support services to meet the needs of campus stakeholders. The service models range from research center cores, partnerships with research groups, and library programs with staff dedicated to evaluation support services. A variety of products and services were described such as an automated tool to develop rank-based metrics, consultation on appropriate metrics to use for evaluation, customized publication and citation reports, resource guides, classes and training, and others. Implementing these services has allowed the libraries to expand their roles on campus and to contribute more directly to the research missions of their institutions. Libraries can leverage a variety of evaluation support services as an opportunity to successfully meet an array of challenges confronting the biomedical research community, including robust efforts to report and demonstrate tangible and meaningful outcomes of biomedical research and clinical care. These services represent a transformative direction that can be emulated by other biomedical and research libraries.

  3. Innovation in healthcare services: notes on the limits of field research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Laís Silveira

    2016-11-03

    The contemporary context of population aging, itsthe population's different health and disease characteristics, and the growing incorporation of technologies by healthcare systems have highlighted the need to adjust the healthcare structure as a whole. The defense of a democratic and sustainable system reveals the importance of understanding how changes in healthcare take place. The current article aims to contribute to the understanding of innovation in healthcare services. The study's results indicate that the existence of certain knowledge gaps means that public policies tend to overlook a whole rangeseries of innovations normally associated with social changes, with a consequentwith an impact on human development, social cohesion, equality, and equity, allcentral issues that are central toin the field of collective public healthcare field. The article concludes that the lack of a mature theoretical framework negatively impacts the formulation of such policies, further aggravated in Brazil by growing differences in quality and access between population segments that depend on the public and private healthcare systems. Resumo: O contexto contemporâneo de envelhecimento e as características de saúde e doença da população, aliados à crescente incorporação tecnológica nos sistemas de saúde têm pontuado a necessidade de adequação da estrutura de atenção. A defesa de um sistema democrático e sustentável evidencia a importância de entender como são estabelecidos os processos relacionados às mudanças na saúde. Neste cenário, o presente artigo visa aprofundar o entendimento sobre inovação nos serviços de saúde. Os resultados da pesquisa indicaram que lacunas no conhecimento levam políticas públicas a negligenciarem uma série de inovações normalmente associadas a mudanças sociais com impacto no desenvolvimento humano, coesão social, igualdade e equidade, temas centrais ao campo da saúde coletiva. E conclui que a falta de um referencial

  4. Healthcare and Research Priorities of Adolescents and Young Adults with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Mixed-methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, David J; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Craig, Jonathan C; Howell, Martin; Tugwell, Peter; Mackie, Fiona; Lin, Ming-Wei; O'Neill, Sean G; Ralph, Angelique F; Tong, Allison

    2017-04-01

    Managing juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is particularly challenging. The disease may be severe, adolescent patients have complex medical and psychosocial needs, and patients must navigate the transition to adult services. To inform patient-centered care, we aimed to identify the healthcare and research priorities of young patients with SLE and describe the reasons underpinning their priorities. Face-to-face, semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted with patients with SLE, aged from 14 to 26 years, from 5 centers in Australia. For each of the 5 allocation exercises, participants allocated 10 votes to (1) research topics; research questions on (2) medical management, (3) prevention and diagnosis, (4) lifestyle and psychosocial; and (5) healthcare specialties, and discussed the reasons for their choices. Descriptive statistics were calculated for votes and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. The 26 participants prioritized research that alleviated the psychological burden of SLE. They allocated their votes toward medical and mental health specialties in the management of SLE, while fewer votes were given to physiotherapy/occupational therapy and dietetics. The following 7 themes underpinned the participants' priorities: improving service shortfalls, strengthening well-being, ensuring cost efficiency, minimizing family/community burden, severity of comorbidity or complications, reducing lifestyle disruption, and fulfilling future goals. Young patients with SLE value comprehensive care with greater coordination among specialties. They prioritized research focused on alleviating poor psychological outcomes. The healthcare and research agenda for patients with SLE should include everyone involved, to ensure that the agenda aligns with patient priorities, needs, and values.

  5. An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Smith, John

    2014-01-14

    Health information, provided through the Internet, has recently received attention from consumers and healthcare providers as an efficient method of motivating people to get screened for colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, the primary purpose was to investigate the extent to which consumers were better educated about CRC screening information because of the information available on the Internet. Another purpose was to identify how better-informed consumers, with reliable and trustworthy health information, were enabled to make sound decisions regarding CRC screening. The data used in this study was taken from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. People aged 55 and older were classified based on their compliance with recommended CRC screening. The study applied the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to evaluate the effects of health information taken from the Internet regarding CRC screening. The credibility and reliance of cancer related information on the Internet was significantly associated with patient compliance to be screened for CRC. Experience and knowledge of Internet use had a significant impact on the utilization of CRC screening. This analysis suggests that the design and publishing websites concerning CRC should emphasize credibility and reliance. Websites providing information about CRC must also contain the most current information so that people are able to make educated decisions about CRC screening.

  6. An Evaluation of Healthcare Information on the Internet: The Case of Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ching Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Health information, provided through the Internet, has recently received attention from consumers and healthcare providers as an efficient method of motivating people to get screened for colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, the primary purpose was to investigate the extent to which consumers were better educated about CRC screening information because of the information available on the Internet. Another purpose was to identify how better-informed consumers, with reliable and trustworthy health information, were enabled to make sound decisions regarding CRC screening. The data used in this study was taken from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. People aged 55 and older were classified based on their compliance with recommended CRC screening. The study applied the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to evaluate the effects of health information taken from the Internet regarding CRC screening. The credibility and reliance of cancer related information on the Internet was significantly associated with patient compliance to be screened for CRC. Experience and knowledge of Internet use had a significant impact on the utilization of CRC screening. This analysis suggests that the design and publishing websites concerning CRC should emphasize credibility and reliance. Websites providing information about CRC must also contain the most current information so that people are able to make educated decisions about CRC screening.

  7. The Pharmacogenomics Research Network Translational Pharmacogenetics Program: Outcomes and Metrics of Pharmacogenetic Implementations Across Diverse Healthcare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzum, J A; Pakyz, R E; Elsey, A R; Haidar, C E; Peterson, J F; Whirl-Carrillo, M; Handelman, S K; Palmer, K; Pulley, J M; Beller, M; Schildcrout, J S; Field, J R; Weitzel, K W; Cooper-DeHoff, R M; Cavallari, L H; O'Donnell, P H; Altman, R B; Pereira, N; Ratain, M J; Roden, D M; Embi, P J; Sadee, W; Klein, T E; Johnson, J A; Relling, M V; Wang, L; Weinshilboum, R M; Shuldiner, A R; Freimuth, R R

    2017-09-01

    Numerous pharmacogenetic clinical guidelines and recommendations have been published, but barriers have hindered the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. The Translational Pharmacogenetics Program (TPP) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pharmacogenomics Research Network was established in 2011 to catalog and contribute to the development of pharmacogenetic implementations at eight US healthcare systems, with the goal to disseminate real-world solutions for the barriers to clinical pharmacogenetic implementation. The TPP collected and normalized pharmacogenetic implementation metrics through June 2015, including gene-drug pairs implemented, interpretations of alleles and diplotypes, numbers of tests performed and actionable results, and workflow diagrams. TPP participant institutions developed diverse solutions to overcome many barriers, but the use of Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines provided some consistency among the institutions. The TPP also collected some pharmacogenetic implementation outcomes (scientific, educational, financial, and informatics), which may inform healthcare systems seeking to implement their own pharmacogenetic testing programs. © 2017, The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. Implementing solutions to improve and expand telehealth adoption: participatory action research in four community healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Johanna; Coates, Elizabeth; Wessels, Bridgette; Mountain, Gail; Hawley, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Adoption of telehealth has been slower than anticipated, and little is known about the service improvements that help to embed telehealth into routine practice or the role of frontline staff in improving adoption. This paper reports on participatory action research carried out in four community health settings using telehealth for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Chronic Heart Failure. To inform the action research, in-depth case studies of each telehealth service were conducted (May 2012-June 2013). Each service was then supported by researchers through two cycles of action research to implement changes to increase adoption of telehealth, completed over a seven month period (July 2013-April 2014). The action research was studied via observation of multi-stakeholder workshops, analysis of implementation plans, and focus groups. Action research participants included 57 staff and one patient, with between eight and 20 participants per site. The case study findings were identified as a key source of information for planning change, with sites addressing common challenges identified through this work. For example, refining referral criteria; standardizing how and when patients are monitored; improving data sharing; and establishing evaluation processes. Sites also focused on raising awareness of telehealth to increase adoption in other clinical teams and to help secure future financial investment for telehealth, which was required because of short-term funding arrangements. Specific solutions varied due to local infrastructures, resources, and opinion, as well as previous service developments. Local telehealth champions played an important role in engaging multiple stakeholders in the study. Action research enabled services to make planned changes to telehealth and share learning across multiple stakeholders about how and when to use telehealth. However, adoption was impeded by continual changes affecting telehealth and wider service provision

  9. Integration of research and practice to improve public health and healthcare delivery through a collaborative 'Health Integration Team' model - a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Sabi; Brangan, Emer; Leach, Verity; Horwood, Jeremy; Donovan, Jenny L

    2016-06-22

    healthcare delivery at a time of considerable organisational turmoil and financial constraints. The concept gained momentum and will likely be of interest to those involved in setting up similar arrangements, and researchers in the social and implementation sciences with an interest in their evaluation.

  10. Validation of the conceptual research utilization scale: an application of the standards for educational and psychological testing in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Janet E; Estabrooks, Carole A; Newburn-Cook, Christine V; Gierl, Mark

    2011-05-19

    There is a lack of acceptable, reliable, and valid survey instruments to measure conceptual research utilization (CRU). In this study, we investigated the psychometric properties of a newly developed scale (the CRU Scale). We used the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing as a validation framework to assess four sources of validity evidence: content, response processes, internal structure, and relations to other variables. A panel of nine international research utilization experts performed a formal content validity assessment. To determine response process validity, we conducted a series of one-on-one scale administration sessions with 10 healthcare aides. Internal structure and relations to other variables validity was examined using CRU Scale response data from a sample of 707 healthcare aides working in 30 urban Canadian nursing homes. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to determine internal structure. Relations to other variables were examined using: (1) bivariate correlations; (2) change in mean values of CRU with increasing levels of other kinds of research utilization; and (3) multivariate linear regression. Content validity index scores for the five items ranged from 0.55 to 1.00. The principal components analysis predicted a 5-item 1-factor model. This was inconsistent with the findings from the confirmatory factor analysis, which showed best fit for a 4-item 1-factor model. Bivariate associations between CRU and other kinds of research utilization were statistically significant (p < 0.01) for the latent CRU scale score and all five CRU items. The CRU scale score was also shown to be significant predictor of overall research utilization in multivariate linear regression. The CRU scale showed acceptable initial psychometric properties with respect to responses from healthcare aides in nursing homes. Based on our validity, reliability, and acceptability analyses, we recommend using a reduced (four

  11. The fourth mission of hospitals and the role of researchers as innovation drivers in the public healthcare sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rey-Rocha, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role of researchers as innovation drivers in the public healthcare sector. The Triple Helix model is proposed for the analysis of the role of public hospitals in innovation processes. We discuss the role of public hospitals in innovation and in economic and social development, and identify this role as a ‘fourth mission’ of hospitals in addition to their widely recognized threefold function of healthcare provision, education and research. We discuss the evolution of hospital administration from healthcare towards the ‘entrepreneurial hospital’ model. More specifically, we investigate the extent to which the incorporation of full-time researchers can help to foster innovation at research and healthcare centres affiliated with the Spanish National Health System. Data were obtained through a survey of researchers, research group leaders and heads of departments and centres where these researchers worked, as well as through content analysis of researchers’ annual reports.Se estudia el papel de los investigadores como promotores de la innovación en el sector sanitario público. Se propone el modelo de la Triple Hélice para el estudio del papel de los hospitales en los procesos de innovación. Se identifica la innovación y la contribución al desarrollo económico y social como la ‘cuarta misión’ de los hospitales públicos, adicional a su triple misión asistencial, docente e investigadora. Este enfoque aboga por una evolución desde el modelo asistencial tradicional hacia el modelo del ‘hospital emprendedor’. A través del Programa FIS/Miguel Servet, se investiga en qué medida la incorporación de investigadores contribuye a fomentar la innovación en los centros del Sistema Nacional de Salud español. Los datos proceden de sendas encuestas a los investigadores y a los responsables de los grupos y de los distintos departamentos y centros a los que éstos se incorporaron, así como del análisis de

  12. Evaluating the organisational climate in Italian public healthcare institutions by means of a questionnaire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wienand, Ulrich; Cinotti, Renata; Nicoli, Augusta; Bisagni, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    ...) to assess the differences among employees with different contractual positions. The anonymous questionnaire containing 50 items, each with a scale from 1 to 10, was offered to the healthcare organisations, to be compiled during ad hoc meetings...

  13. Healthcare access: A sequence-sensitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco J. Haenssgen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that healthcare-seeking behaviour is neither limited to nor terminated by access to one single healthcare provider. Yet the sequential conceptualisation of healthcare-seeking processes has not diffused into quantitative research, which continues to analyse healthcare access as a “one-off” event. The ensuing lack of understanding healthcare behaviour is problematic in light of the immense burden of premature death especially in low- and middle-income countries. This paper presents an alternative approach. Based on a novel survey instrument, we analyse original survey data from rural India and China that contain 119 unique healthcare pathways among 637 respondents. We offer three applications of how such sequential data can be analysed to enhance our understanding of people's health behaviour. First, descriptive analysis of sequential data enables more a comprehensive representation of people's health behaviours, for example the time spent in various healthcare activities, common healthcare pathways across different groups, or shifts in healthcare provider access during a typical illness. Second, by analysing the effect of mobile technology on healthcare-seeking process characteristics, we demonstrate that conventional, sequence-insensitive indicators are potentially inconsistent and misleading approximations when compared to a more precise, sequence-sensitive measure. Third, we describe how sequential data enable transparent and flexible evaluations of people's healthcare behaviour. The example of a sequence-insensitive evaluation suggests that household wealth has no statistical link to an illustrative “ideal” form of public healthcare utilisation. In contrast, sequence-sensitive evaluations demonstrate that household wealth is associated with an increased likelihood of bypassing referral processes and approaching unregulated and costly informal and private practitioners before accessing a public clinic. Sequential

  14. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research(CDER) performs an essential public health task by making sure that safe and effective drugs are available to improve the...

  15. The Role of the Evaluation Research Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Pamela

    1982-01-01

    In its role as a broker between the scientific community and the Congress, the Office of Technology Assessment evaluates the soundness of scientific conclusions for policy makers and ensures that research findings are included in formative policy analysis. (Author)

  16. Bibliometrics and research evaluation uses and abuses

    CERN Document Server

    Gingras, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The research evaluation market is booming. "Ranking," "metrics," "h-index," and "impact factors" are reigning buzzwords. Government and research administrators want to evaluate everything -- teachers, professors, training programs, universities -- using quantitative indicators. Among the tools used to measure "research excellence," bibliometrics -- aggregate data on publications and citations -- has become dominant. Bibliometrics is hailed as an "objective" measure of research quality, a quantitative measure more useful than "subjective" and intuitive evaluation methods such as peer review that have been used since scientific papers were first published in the seventeenth century. In this book, Yves Gingras offers a spirited argument against an unquestioning reliance on bibliometrics as an indicator of research quality. Gingras shows that bibliometric rankings have no real scientific validity, rarely measuring what they pretend to. Although the study of publication and citation patterns, at the proper scales...

  17. Paediatric palliative care improves patient outcomes and reduces healthcare costs: evaluation of a home-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, P H; De Castro Molina, J A; Teo, K; Tan, W S

    2018-01-03

    Around the world, different models of paediatric palliative care have responded to the unique needs of children with life shortening conditions. However, research confirming their utility and impact is still lacking. This study compared patient-related outcomes and healthcare expenditures between those who received home-based paediatric palliative care and standard care. The quality of life and caregiver burden for patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care were also tracked over the first year of enrolment to evaluate the service's longitudinal impact. A structured impact and cost evaluation of Singapore-based HCA Hospice Care's Star PALS (Paediatric Advance Life Support) programme was conducted over a three-year period, employing both retrospective and prospective designs with two patient groups. Compared to the control group (n = 67), patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care (n = 71) spent more time at home than in hospital in the last year of life by 52 days (OR = 52.30, 95% CI: 25.44-79.17) with at least two fewer hospital admissions (OR = 2.46, 95% CI: 0.43-4.48); and were five times more likely to have an advance care plan formulated (OR = 5.51, 95% CI: 1.55-19.67). Medical costs incurred by this group were also considerably lower (by up to 87%). Moreover, both patients' quality of life (in terms of pain and emotion), and caregiver burden showed improvement within the first year of enrolment into the programme. Our findings suggest that home-based paediatric palliative care brings improved resource utilization and cost-savings for both patients and healthcare providers. More importantly, the lives of patients and their caregivers have improved, with terminally ill children and their caregivers being able to spend more quality time at home at the final stretch of the disease. The benefits of a community paediatric palliative care programme have been validated. Study findings can become key drivers when

  18. Conceptualizing Indicator Domains for Evaluating Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen; Rowe, Wendy; Ferkins, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to share thinking about meta-level evaluation of action research (AR), and to introduce indicator domains for assessing and measuring inputs, outputs and outcomes. Meta-level and multi-site evaluation has been rare in AR beyond project implementation and participant satisfaction. The paper is the first of several…

  19. Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD): Evaluation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (CORD) project evaluation will determine the extent to which the CORD model of linking primary care (PC) interventions to public health (PH) interventions in multiple community sectors affects BMI and behavior in children (2 to 12 years). The evaluation c...

  20. Evaluation of research in biomedical ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2013-11-01

    Ontologies are now pervasive in biomedicine, where they serve as a means to standardize terminology, to enable access to domain knowledge, to verify data consistency and to facilitate integrative analyses over heterogeneous biomedical data. For this purpose, research on biomedical ontologies applies theories and methods from diverse disciplines such as information management, knowledge representation, cognitive science, linguistics and philosophy. Depending on the desired applications in which ontologies are being applied, the evaluation of research in biomedical ontologies must follow different strategies. Here, we provide a classification of research problems in which ontologies are being applied, focusing on the use of ontologies in basic and translational research, and we demonstrate how research results in biomedical ontologies can be evaluated. The evaluation strategies depend on the desired application and measure the success of using an ontology for a particular biomedical problem. For many applications, the success can be quantified, thereby facilitating the objective evaluation and comparison of research in biomedical ontology. The objective, quantifiable comparison of research results based on scientific applications opens up the possibility for systematically improving the utility of ontologies in biomedical research.

  1. A comparative evaluation of public health centers with private health training centers on primary healthcare parameters in India: a study by data envelopment analysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Davey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government; for 6 months duration from 1 st Jan 2014 to 1 st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30% and presence of health staff (100 vs 92% were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  2. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry; Kardong-Edgren, Suzie; Ostergaard, Doris; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-08-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research, to broaden the scope of topics investigated, and to highlight the importance of simulation-related research. An international Core Group (the authors of this article) worked with the SSH Research Committee to identify 10 topic areas relevant for future research that would be examined by the 10 Topic Groups composed of Topic Chairs and Topic Group Members. Each Topic Group prepared a monograph and slide presentation on their topic which was presented at the 2-day Summit. The audience provided feedback on each presentation. Based on this feedback, the Topic Groups revised their presentations and monographs for publication in this supplement to Simulation in Healthcare. The Core Group has synthesized an overview of the key Summit themes in this article. In some groups, the agreement was that there is currently no consensus about the state of the science in certain topic aspects. Some key themes emerged from the Topic Groups. The conceptual and theoretical bases of simulation-related research, as well as the methods used and their methodological foundations, need to be more explicitly described in future publications. Although no single method is inherently better, the mix of research methods chosen should match the goal of each study. The impact of simulation, whether direct or indirect, needs to be assessed across different levels of training, and larger, more complex contexts need to be taken into account. When interpreting simulation-related research, the ecological validity of the results needs to be taken into consideration. The scope of simulation-related research can be widened from having simulation as the focus of research (research about simulation), to using simulation

  3. Protocole of a controlled before-after evaluation of a national health information technology-based program to improve healthcare coordination and access to information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, Florence; Duhamel, Sylvie; Fourneyron, Emmanuelle; Huiart, Laetitia; Joseph, Jean Philippe; Langlois, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Stephane; Ramel, Viviane; Renaud, Thomas; Roberts, Tamara; Sibé, Matthieu; Thiessard, Frantz; Wittwer, Jerome; Salmi, Louis Rachid

    2017-04-21

    Improvement of coordination of all health and social care actors in the patient pathways is an important issue in many countries. Health Information (HI) technology has been considered as a potentially effective answer to this issue. The French Health Ministry first funded the development of five TSN ("Territoire de Soins Numérique"/Digital health territories) projects, aiming at improving healthcare coordination and access to information for healthcare providers, patients and the population, and at improving healthcare professionals work organization. The French Health Ministry then launched a call for grant to fund one research project consisting in evaluating the TSN projects implementation and impact and in developing a model for HI technology evaluation. EvaTSN is mainly based on a controlled before-after study design. Data collection covers three periods: before TSN program implementation, during early TSN program implementation and at late TSN program implementation, in the five TSN projects' territories and in five comparison territories. Three populations will be considered: "TSN-targeted people" (healthcare system users and people having characteristics targeted by the TSN projects), "TSN patient users" (people included in TSN experimentations or using particular services) and "TSN professional users" (healthcare professionals involved in TSN projects). Several samples will be made in each population depending on the objective, axis and stage of the study. Four types of data sources are considered: 1) extractions from the French National Heath Insurance Database (SNIIRAM) and the French Autonomy Personalized Allowance database, 2) Ad hoc surveys collecting information on knowledge of TSN projects, TSN program use, ease of use, satisfaction and understanding, TSN pathway experience and appropriateness of hospital admissions, 3) qualitative analyses using semi-directive interviews and focus groups and document analyses and 4) extractions of TSN

  4. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, T [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  5. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Montagna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare facilities (HF represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis®μ and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis®μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4% by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis®μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis®μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  6. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis(®)μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis(®)μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis(®)μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis(®)μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  7. Research evaluation support services in biomedical libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzman, Karen Elizabeth; Bales, Michael E.; Belter, Christopher W.; Chambers, Thane; Chan, Liza; Holmes, Kristi L.; Lu, Ya-Ling; Palmer, Lisa A.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca C.; Sarli, Cathy C.; Suiter, Amy M.; Wheeler, Terrie R.

    2018-01-01

    Objective The paper provides a review of current practices related to evaluation support services reported by seven biomedical and research libraries. Methods A group of seven libraries from the United States and Canada described their experiences with establishing evaluation support services at their libraries. A questionnaire was distributed among the libraries to elicit information as to program development, service and staffing models, campus partnerships, training, products such as tools and reports, and resources used for evaluation support services. The libraries also reported interesting projects, lessons learned, and future plans. Results The seven libraries profiled in this paper report a variety of service models in providing evaluation support services to meet the needs of campus stakeholders. The service models range from research center cores, partnerships with research groups, and library programs with staff dedicated to evaluation support services. A variety of products and services were described such as an automated tool to develop rank-based metrics, consultation on appropriate metrics to use for evaluation, customized publication and citation reports, resource guides, classes and training, and others. Implementing these services has allowed the libraries to expand their roles on campus and to contribute more directly to the research missions of their institutions. Conclusions Libraries can leverage a variety of evaluation support services as an opportunity to successfully meet an array of challenges confronting the biomedical research community, including robust efforts to report and demonstrate tangible and meaningful outcomes of biomedical research and clinical care. These services represent a transformative direction that can be emulated by other biomedical and research libraries. PMID:29339930

  8. MEMS sensor technologies for human centred applications in healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing: a review on research activities in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-03-17

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users' health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users' physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson's disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy.

  9. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson’s disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy. PMID:25808763

  10. [Questionnaire evaluation of hand hygiene by the healthcare staff of Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdani, Mabrouka; Ennigrou, Samir; Soltani, Hend; Ben Redjeb, Saïda

    2010-10-01

    Known to be reservoir of bacteria, hands are implicated in bacteria cross-transmission which enhances nosocomial-acquired infection rates (NI) and outbreaks. Hand washing is then considered the first mean with authentic efficiency to prevent NI. To describe the situation of the hand hygiene at Charles Nicolle hospital of Tunis in order to identify problems that can oppose to the good execution of this practice. A descriptive transverse study performed in October 2006 where 600 questionnaires were distributed to healthcare staff of the hospital. Only 434 questionnaires were responded (158 doctors and 276 nurses). Analysis of data obtained showed that hand washing was essentially practiced after each contact presumed to be contaminant for the healthcare person himself (80%) and was principally done with water and soap (82%). Hydro-alcoholic solutions were rarely mentioned (17.1%). The main reasons evoked for the non observance were unavailability of the necessary means (84.8%) and default of awareness (61.3%). So, these results show a poor perception of the healthcare staff on the importance of hand hygiene which they share the responsibility with healthcare managers. Thus, implication of all healthcare actors is necessary to ensure the good practice and mainly the observance of hand hygiene.

  11. Vignette Research on Messy and Confusing Problems in Primary Mental Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. (Dineke Smit

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The average primary care psychologist feels an ever-widening gap between objective, measurable reality as described and the complex and dynamic reality they experience. To obtain a better understanding of this complex dynamic reality, we conducted an exploratory mixed-method study of primary care psychologists. We asked our participants to write vignettes about messy and confusing problems in the complex context of mental healthcare. We then examined the data in portions, exposed the patterns in the data, and subsequently analysed all in conjunction. The 113 vignettes showed experiences of psychologists dealing not only with the patient, but also with the family of the patient and/or employers, working together with other healthcare professionals, struggling with dilemmas and having mixed feelings. However, using the Cynafin Framework, 36% of the vignettes were still rated as simple. Was it because those vignettes contained fewer words (p = .006? Or because it is difficult to grasp complexity when cause and effect are intertwined with emotions, norms and values? In the discussion, we suggest examining a complex dynamic system in terms of both the consistency of its various elements and the dynamics of the system. We also discuss how to optimize the system’s adaptive self-organizing ability and how to challenge ourselves to invent negative feedback loops that can keep the complex system in equilibrium.

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 AJHPE. Research. The Ugandan Ministry of Health (MOH) identified lack of leadership and management skills, rather than lack of resources, as the main reason for poor healthcare delivery in the country.[1] Healthcare professionals, as an integral component of Uganda's healthcare system, receive a high level of training ...

  13. Managing multiple projects: a literature review of setting priorities and a pilot survey of healthcare researchers in an academic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robert Borden; Campbell, Kaitryn; O'Reilly, Daria; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Bowen, Jim; Blackhouse, Gord; Goerre, Ron

    2007-05-16

    To summarize and then assess with a pilot study the use of published best practice recommendations for priority setting during management of multiple healthcare research projects, in a resource-constrained environment. Medical, economic, business, and operations literature was reviewed to summarize and develop a survey to assess best practices for managing multiple projects. Fifteen senior healthcare research project managers, directors, and faculty at an urban academic institution were surveyed to determine most commonly used priority rules, ranking of rules, characteristics of their projects, and availability of resources. Survey results were compared to literature recommendations to determine use of best practices. Seven priority-setting rules were identified for managing multiple projects. Recommendations on assigning priorities by project characteristics are presented. In the pilot study, a large majority of survey respondents follow best practice recommendations identified in the research literature. However, priority rules such as Most Total Successors (MTS) and Resource Scheduling Method (RSM) were used "very often" by half of the respondents when better performing priority rules were available. Through experience, project managers learn to manage multiple projects under resource constraints. Best practice literature can assist project managers in priority setting by recommending the most appropriate priority given resource constraints and project characteristics. There is room for improvement in managing multiple projects.

  14. Evaluating Translational Research: A Process Marker Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochim, William; Kane, Cathleen; Graham, Mark J.; Pincus, Harold A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We examine the concept of translational research from the perspective of evaluators charged with assessing translational efforts. One of the major tasks for evaluators involved in translational research is to help assess efforts that aim to reduce the time it takes to move research to practice and health impacts. Another is to assess efforts that are intended to increase the rate and volume of translation. Methods: We offer an alternative to the dominant contemporary tendency to define translational research in terms of a series of discrete “phases.”Results: We contend that this phased approach has been confusing and that it is insufficient as a basis for evaluation. Instead, we argue for the identification of key operational and measurable markers along a generalized process pathway from research to practice. Conclusions: This model provides a foundation for the evaluation of interventions designed to improve translational research and the integration of these findings into a field of translational studies. Clin Trans Sci 2011; Volume 4: 153–162 PMID:21707944

  15. Recent research and development in titanium alloys for biomedical applications and healthcare goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Niinomi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nb, Ta and Zr are the favorable non-toxic alloying elements for titanium alloys for biomedical applications. Low rigidity titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements are getting much attention. The advantage of low rigidity titanium alloy for the healing of bone fracture and the remodeling of bone is successfully proved by fracture model made in tibia of rabbit. Ni-free super elastic and shape memory titanium alloys for biomedical applications are energetically developed. Titanium alloys for not only implants, but also dental products like crowns, dentures, etc. are also getting much attention in dentistry. Development of investment materials suitable for titanium alloys with high melting point is desired in dental precision castings. Bioactive surface modifications of titanium alloys for biomedical applications are very important for achieving further developed biocompatibility. Low cost titanium alloys for healthcare goods, like general wheel chairs, etc. has been recently proposed.

  16. Factors Associated with Research Productivity among Oral Healthcare Educators in an Asian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Bernardo E., Jr.; Clerigo, Maria Eloisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Research writing confidence and organizational support toward research activities are two essential factors that may affect research productivity among higher educational institutions. This study investigated the possible relationships of these two factors to research productivity among faculty members of the College of Dentistry at Lyceum of the…

  17. Back to the future of IT adoption and evaluation in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; LeRouge, Cynthia; Trimmer, Ken; Wiggins, Carla

    2011-01-01

    This is a time of expansion, hope and change in the area of Health Information Technology (HIT). In this study, we provide an in-depth perspective into the adoption and diffusion of IT in healthcare based on a review of the current literature and upon expert panel assessments of adoption and

  18. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, M.; Molewijk, A.C.; de Bree, M.; Moraal, M.; Verkerk, M.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  19. Improving Women's Sexual Health: A Quantitative Evaluation of an Educational Intervention for Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Britney; Arnow, B. A.; Haas, Amie; Millheiser, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three per cent of women in the USA report some type of sexual complaint and these complaints have been shown to negatively impact quality of life and overall well-being. With proper training and experience, healthcare professionals are in a unique position to help their patients improve their sexual health. The present study was designed to…

  20. Design and implementation of monitoring and evaluation of healthcare organization management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampos, Platis; Emmanouil, Zoulias; Dimitrios, Iracleous; Lappa, Evaggelia

    2017-09-01

    The management of a healthcare organization is monitored using a suitably designed questionnaire to 271 nurses operating in Greek hospital. The data are fed to an automatic data mining system to obtain a suitable series of models to analyse, visualise and study the obtained information. Hidden patterns, correlations and interdependencies are investigated and the results are analytically presented.

  1. Evidence-Based and Value-Based Decision Making About Healthcare Design: An Economic Evaluation of the Safety and Quality Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Rana; Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Xue, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a vision and framework that can facilitate the implementation of evidence-based design (EBD), scientific knowledge base into the process of the design, construction, and operation of healthcare facilities and clarify the related safety and quality outcomes for the stakeholders. The proposed framework pairs EBD with value-driven decision making and aims to improve communication among stakeholders by providing a common analytical language. Recent EBD research indicates that the design and operation of healthcare facilities contribute to an organization's operational success by improving safety, quality, and efficiency. However, because little information is available about the financial returns of evidence-based investments, such investments are readily eliminated during the capital-investment decision-making process. To model the proposed framework, we used engineering economy tools to evaluate the return on investments in six successful cases, identified by a literature review, in which facility design and operation interventions resulted in reductions in hospital-acquired infections, patient falls, staff injuries, and patient anxiety. In the evidence-based cases, calculated net present values, internal rates of return, and payback periods indicated that the long-term benefits of interventions substantially outweighed the intervention costs. This article explained a framework to develop a research-based and value-based communication language on specific interventions along the planning, design and construction, operation, and evaluation stages. Evidence-based and value-based design frameworks can be applied to communicate the life-cycle costs and savings of EBD interventions to stakeholders, thereby contributing to more informed decision makings and the optimization of healthcare infrastructures. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile: Research Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne MJ Elissen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (biomedical and non-(biomedical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. The project focuses on patients with type 2 diabetes. During the first study phase, patient profiles are drafted based on a systematic literature research, latent class growth modeling, and expert collaboration. In phase 2, the profiles are validated from a clinical, patient-related and statistical perspective. Phase 3 involves a discrete choice experiment to gain insight into the patient preferences that exist per profile. In phase 4, the results from all analyses are integrated and recommendations formulated on which patient characteristics should guide tailored chronic care. Discussion: PROFILe is an innovative study which uses a uniquely holistic approach to assess the healthcare needs and preferences of chronically ill. The patient profiles resulting from this project must be tested in practice to investigate the effects of tailored management on patient experience, population health and costs.

  3. Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) 7: supporting staff in evidence-based decision-making, implementation and evaluation in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Allen, Kelly; Waller, Cara; Dyer, Tim; Brooke, Vanessa; Garrubba, Marie; Melder, Angela; Voutier, Catherine; Gust, Anthony; Farjou, Dina

    2017-06-21

    This is the seventh in a series of papers reporting Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) in a local healthcare setting. The SHARE Program was a systematic, integrated, evidence-based program for resource allocation within a large Australian health service. It aimed to facilitate proactive use of evidence from research and local data; evidence-based decision-making for resource allocation including disinvestment; and development, implementation and evaluation of disinvestment projects. From the literature and responses of local stakeholders it was clear that provision of expertise and education, training and support of health service staff would be required to achieve these aims. Four support services were proposed. This paper is a detailed case report of the development, implementation and evaluation of a Data Service, Capacity Building Service and Project Support Service. An Evidence Service is reported separately. Literature reviews, surveys, interviews, consultation and workshops were used to capture and process the relevant information. Existing theoretical frameworks were adapted for evaluation and explication of processes and outcomes. Surveys and interviews identified current practice in use of evidence in decision-making, implementation and evaluation; staff needs for evidence-based practice; nature, type and availability of local health service data; and preferred formats for education and training. The Capacity Building and Project Support Services were successful in achieving short term objectives; but long term outcomes were not evaluated due to reduced funding. The Data Service was not implemented at all. Factors influencing the processes and outcomes are discussed. Health service staff need access to education, training, expertise and support to enable evidence-based decision-making and to implement and evaluate the changes arising from those decisions. Three support services were proposed based on research

  4. Potential pros and cons of external healthcare performance evaluation systems: real-life perspectives on Iranian hospital evaluation and accreditation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafaripooyan, Ebrahim

    2014-09-01

    Performance evaluation is essential to quality improvement in healthcare. The current study has identified the potential pros and cons of external healthcare evaluation programs, utilizing them subsequently to look into the merits of a similar case in a developing country. A mixed method study employing both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques was adopted to achieve the study end. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) and professionals were approached for two-stage process of data collection. Potential advantages included greater attractiveness of high accreditation rank healthcare organizations to their customers/purchasers and boosted morale of their personnel. Downsides, as such, comprised the programs' over-reliance on value judgment of surveyors, routinization and incurring undue cost on the organizations. In addition, the improved, standardized care processes as well as the judgmental nature of program survey were associated, as pros and cons, to the program investigated by the professionals. Besides rendering a tentative assessment of Iranian hospital evaluation program, the study provides those running external performance evaluations with a lens to scrutinize the virtues of their own evaluation systems through identifying the potential advantages and drawbacks of such programs. Moreover, the approach followed could be utilized for performance assessment of similar evaluation programs.

  5. Potential Benefits and Downsides of External Healthcare Performance Evaluation Systems: Real-Life Perspectives on Iranian Hospital Evaluation and Accreditation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Jaafaripooyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Performance evaluation is essential to quality improvement in healthcare. The current study has identified the potential pros and cons of external healthcare evaluation programs, utilizing them subsequently to look into the merits of a similar case in a developing country. Methods A mixed method study employing both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques was adopted to achieve the study end. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs and professionals were approached for two-stage process of data collection. Results Potential advantages included greater attractiveness of high accreditation rank healthcare organizations to their customers/purchasers and boosted morale of their personnel. Downsides, as such, comprised the programs’ over-reliance on value judgment of surveyors, routinization and incurring undue cost on the organizations. In addition, the improved, standardized care processes as well as the judgmental nature of program survey were associated, as pros and cons, to the program investigated by the professionals. Conclusion Besides rendering a tentative assessment of Iranian hospital evaluation program, the study provides those running external performance evaluations with a lens to scrutinize the virtues of their own evaluation systems through identifying the potential advantages and drawbacks of such programs. Moreover, the approach followed could be utilized for performance assessment of similar evaluation programs.

  6. Challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertshaw, Luke; Dhesi, Surindar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies that explore challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries. Design Systematic review and qualitative thematic synthesis. Methods Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. Search terms were combined for qualitative research, primary healthcare professionals, refugees and asylum seekers, and were supplemented by searches of reference lists and citations. Study selection was conducted by two researchers using prespecified selection criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool was conducted by the first author. A thematic synthesis was undertaken to develop descriptive themes and analytical constructs. Results Twenty-six articles reporting on 21 studies and involving 357 participants were included. Eleven descriptive themes were interpreted, embedded within three analytical constructs: healthcare encounter (trusting relationship, communication, cultural understanding, health and social conditions, time); healthcare system (training and guidance, professional support, connecting with other services, organisation, resources and capacity); asylum and resettlement. Challenges and facilitators were described within these themes. Conclusions A range of challenges and facilitators have been identified for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers that are experienced in the dimensions of the healthcare encounter, the healthcare system and wider asylum and resettlement situation. Comprehensive understanding of these challenges and facilitators is important to shape policy, improve the quality of services and provide more equitable health services for this vulnerable group. PMID:28780549

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease in Nigeria: An Evaluation of the Spatial Accessibility to Healthcare for Diagnosed Cases in Edo State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviasu, Osaretin; Rigby, Janette E; Ballas, Dimitris

    2015-03-31

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation's health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate.

  8. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: an evaluation of the spatial accessibility to healthcare for diagnosed cases in Edo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaretin Oviasu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation’s health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate.

  9. Commentary: Writing and Evaluating Qualitative Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Thompson, Deborah; Aroian, Karen J; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Deatrick, Janet A

    2016-06-01

    To provide an overview of qualitative methods, particularly for reviewers and authors who may be less familiar with qualitative research. A question and answer format is used to address considerations for writing and evaluating qualitative research. When producing qualitative research, individuals are encouraged to address the qualitative research considerations raised and to explicitly identify the systematic strategies used to ensure rigor in study design and methods, analysis, and presentation of findings. Increasing capacity for review and publication of qualitative research within pediatric psychology will advance the field's ability to gain a better understanding of the specific needs of pediatric populations, tailor interventions more effectively, and promote optimal health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Robustness of judgments in evaluation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Zwarts, Michel A.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that judgments in evaluative research are ultimately subjective, but that good criteria are available to assess their quality. One of these criteria is the robustness of the judgments against incompleteness or uncertainty in the data used to describe the educational system. The use of

  11. Health-care decision-making processes in Latin America: problems and prospects for the use of economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Cynthia P; Drummond, Michael F; Rovira, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The use of economic evaluation studies (EE) in the decision-making process within the health-care system of nine Latin American (LA) and three European countries was investigated. The aim was to identify the opportunities, obstacles, and changes needed to facilitate the introduction of EE as a formal tool in health-care decision-making processes in LA. A comparative study was conducted based on existing literature and information provided through a questionnaire applied to decision makers in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Portugal Spain, United Kingdom, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Systematic electronic searches of HEED, NHS EED, and LILACS were conducted to identify published economic evaluation studies in LA from 1982 onward. There is relatively little evidence of the conduct and use of EE within the health care systems in LA. Electronic searches retrieved 554 records; however, only 93 were EE. In the nine LA participating countries, broad allocation of health-care resources is primarily based on political criteria, historical records, geographical areas, and specific groups of patients and diseases. Public-health provision and inclusion of services in health-insurance package are responsibilities of the Ministry of Health. Decisions regarding the purchase of medicines are primarily made through public tenders, and mainly based on differences in clinical efficacy and the price of health technologies of interest. To expedite the process of incorporating EE as a formal tool to inform decision-making processes within the health-care systems in LA countries, two main conditions need to be fulfilled. First, adequate resources and skills need to be available to conduct EE of good quality. Second, decision-making procedures need to be modified to accommodate "evidence-based" approaches such as EE.

  12. 76 FR 61707 - Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... will provide the grantees with technical assistance regarding research design, data collection, data... attitudes related to research activities and grant requirements, changes in their research itself (design... designed to capture a combination of quantitative and qualitative data. No claim is made that the results...

  13. Becoming a health literate organization: Formative research results from healthcare organizations providing care for undeserved communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, Prajakta; Wray, Ricardo; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri; Weaver, Nancy; Wilson, Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Background Integrating health literacy into primary care institutional policy and practice is critical to effective, patient centered health care. While attributes of health literate organizations have been proposed, approaches for strengthening them in healthcare systems with limited resources have not been fully detailed. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with individuals from 11 low resourced health care organizations serving uninsured, underinsured, and government-insured patients across Missouri. The qualitative inquiry explored concepts of impetus to transform, leadership commitment, engaging staff, alignment to organization wide goals, and integration of health literacy with current practices. Findings Several health care organizations reported carrying out health literacy related activities including implementing patient portals, selecting easy to read patient materials, offering community education and outreach programs, and improving discharge and medication distribution processes. The need for change presented itself through data or anecdotal staff experience. For any change to be undertaken, administrators and medical directors had to be supportive; most often a champion facilitated these changes in the organization. Staff and providers were often resistant to change and worried they would be saddled with additional work. Lack of time and funding were the most common barriers reported for integration and sustainability. To overcome these barriers, managers supported changes by working one on one with staff, seeking external funding, utilizing existing resources, planning for stepwise implementation, including members from all staff levels and clear communication. Conclusion Even though barriers exist, resource scarce clinical settings can successfully plan, implement, and sustain organizational changes to support health literacy.

  14. [Research progress on quality evaluation of saffron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang-di; Ouyang, Zhen; Yang, Bin

    2017-02-01

    Saffron, a precious spice and a traditional medicinal herb in the international trade market, has attracted much attention about its quality evaluation.Saffron has been successfully cultivated in some areas in China,such as Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, but few studies were focused on the quality difference between saffron cultivated in China and in foreign countries, which obstructed the entrance of saffron cultivated in China into international trade market. The paper is to review the current research progress on quality evaluation of saffron from the following respects: the chemical composition, the identification of authenticity and adulterants, the detection of artificial colorants, the indexes and methods of quality evaluation,the quality evaluation of different specifications in the international trade market, and the parameters which affected the quality of saffron. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context...

  16. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garefalakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcare organizations improves their functionality, simplifies their business processes, assure the quality of care services and helps their management accounting and controlling. This study presents also the stages required for the implementation of ERP system in healthcare organizations. This study utilizes a literature review in order to reach the research conclusions. Specifically, through related case studies and research, it examines how ERP systems are used to evaluate the better functionality of the healthcare organizations, addressing in parallel important problems, and possible malfunctions. The implementation of ERP systems in healthcare organizations promises to evolve and align strictly to the organizations’ corporate objectives and high-levels of healthcare quality. In order to accomplish this goal, the right decisions should be made by the managers of the healthcare organization regarding the choice of the appropriate ERP system following its installation and its application. Limited research exists on the significance ERP systems implementation in healthcare organizations, while possible dysfunctions and challenges during its installation and implementation are recorded. Therefore, new evidence in the significance of ERP systems in healthcare organization is provided.

  17. Optimizing healthcare research data warehouse design through past COSTAR query analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, S. N.; Morgan, M. M.; Barnett, G.O.; Chueh, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past two years we have reviewed and implemented the specifications for a large relational database (a data warehouse) to find research cohorts from data similar to that contained within the clinical COSTAR database at the Massachusetts General Hospital. A review of 16 years of COSTAR research queries was conducted to determine the most common search strategies. These search strategies are relevant to the general research community, because they use the Medical Query Language (MQL) de...

  18. Access to linked administrative healthcare utilization data for pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics research in Canada: anti-viral drugs as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Nigel S B

    2009-11-01

    Administrative healthcare utilization data from Canadian provinces have been used for pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics research, but limited transparency exists about opportunities for data access, who can access them, and processes to obtain data. An attempt was made to obtain data from all 10 provinces to evaluate access and its complexity. An initial enquiry about the process and requirements to obtain data on individual, anonymized patients dispensed any of four anti-viral drugs in the ambulatory setting, linked with data from hospital and physician service claims, was sent to each province. Where a response was encouraging, a technical description of the data of interest was submitted. Data were unavailable from the provinces of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island, and inaccessible from British Columbia, Manitoba and Ontario due to policies that prohibit collaborative work with pharmaceutical industry researchers. In Nova Scotia, patient-level data were available but only on site. Data were accessible in Alberta, Quebec and Saskatchewan, although variation exists in the currency of the data, time to obtain data, approval requirements and insurance coverage eligibility. As Canada moves towards a life-cycle management approach to drug regulation, more post-marketing studies will be required, potentially using administrative data. Linked patient-level drug and healthcare data are presently accessible to pharmaceutical industry researchers in four provinces, although only logistically realistic in three and limited to seniors and low-income individuals in two. Collaborative endeavours to improve access to provincial data and to create other data resources should be encouraged. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Clinically led performance management in secondary healthcare: evaluating the attitudes of medical and non-clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebble, Timothy M; Paul, Maureen; Hockey, Peter M; Heyworth, Nicola; Humphrey, Rachael; Powell, Timothy; Clarke, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Improving the quality and activity of clinicians' practice improves patient care. Performance-related human resource management (HRM) is an established approach to improving individual practice but with limited use among clinicians. A framework for performance-related HRM was developed from successful practice in non-healthcare organisations centred on distributive leadership and locally provided, validated and interpreted performance measurement. This study evaluated the response of medical and non-clinical managers to its implementation into a large secondary healthcare organisation. A semistructured qualitative questionnaire was developed from themes identified during framework implementation and included attitudes to previous approaches to measuring doctors' performance, and the structure and response to implementation of the performance-related HRM framework. Responses were analysed through a process of data summarising and categorising. A total of 29, from an invited cohort of 31, medical and non-clinical managers from departmental to executive level were interviewed. Three themes were identified: (1) previous systems of managing clinical performance were considered to be ineffective due to insufficient empowerment of medical managers and poor quality of available performance data; (2) the implemented framework was considered to address these needs and was positively received by medical and non-clinical managers; (3) introduction of performance-related HRM required the involvement of the whole organisation to executive level and inclusion within organisational strategy, structure and training. This study suggests that a performance-related HRM framework may facilitate the management of clinical performance in secondary healthcare, but is dependent on the design and methods of application used. Such approaches contrast with those currently proposed for clinicians in secondary healthcare in the UK and suggest that alternative strategies should be considered

  20. The intersection of disability and healthcare disparities: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Michelle A; Mahmoudi, Elham; Lee, Shoou-Yih

    2015-01-01

    healthcare among individuals with disabilities. The Model of Healthcare Disparities and Disability (MHDD) provides a framework for conceptualizing how healthcare disparities impact disability and specifically, how a mismatch between personal and environmental factors may result in reduced healthcare access and quality, which in turn may lead to reduced functioning, activity and participation among individuals with impairments and chronic health conditions. Researchers, health providers, policy makers and community advocate groups who are engaged in devising interventions aimed at reducing healthcare disparities would benefit from the discussions. Implications for Rehabilitation Evaluates the main models of healthcare disparity and disability to create an integrated framework. Provides a comprehensive conceptual model of healthcare disparity that specifically targets issues related to individuals with disabilities. Conceptualizes how personal and environmental factors interact to produce disparities in access to healthcare and healthcare quality. Recognizes and targets modifiable factors to reduce disparities between and within individuals with disabilities.

  1. Visual soil evaluation and soil compaction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M.L. Guimarães, Rachel; Keller, Thomas; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Following on from discussions that took place during the 19th International Conference of the International Soil Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO) in Montevideo, Uruguay, in 2012, the ISTRO working groups “Visual Soil Examination and Evaluation” (VSEE) and “Subsoil Compaction” decided...... to organize a joint workshop. The present special issue is an outcome from the workshop on “Soil structural quality of tropical soils: Visual evaluation methods and soil compaction prevention strategies” that was held 26–29 May 2014 in Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. There has been a long-lasting interest in Visual...... and climatic conditions, as well as in utilizing VSE methods together with qualitative methods to evaluate the impact of soil management (Munkholm et al., 2013). Soil compaction due to agricultural operations is a serious threat to soil productivity and soil ecological functions and has been a key research...

  2. Evaluation of short research experiences in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legardeur, B; Lopez, A; Johnson, W D

    1993-01-01

    For the past 5 years, the Cancer Education Committee of Louisiana State University Medical School (LSUMS) has selected premedical and medical students to participate in cancer research during the summer months. The students' participation is funded through a NCI R-25 training grant. Each year, LSUMS faculty from both the clinical and basic science departments provide opportunities for the students to participate in cancer research. The students also attend weekly seminars on cancer-related topics and biweekly multi-disciplinary Tumor Conferences. At the end of the summer, the students are required to submit and present a summary of their research project and to complete an evaluation form of the program. The overall evaluation of this experience has been favorable. Seventy-nine percent of the students agreed that the experience exceeded their expectations, and 83% responded that they would be willing to repeat the program. However, when asked if they planned to pursue a career in cancer research or medical oncology, 84 and 62%, respectively, were undecided. These findings raise the following questions: (1) When is the most appropriate time period in the student's education for this experience to take place? and (2) How can students' future career decisions be influenced?

  3. Systems thinking perspectives applied to healthcare transition for youth with disabilities: a paradigm shift for practice, policy and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Y; Jetha, A; Norman, C

    2011-11-01

    Healthcare transition (HCT) for youth with disabilities is a complex phenomenon influenced by multiple interacting factors, including health, personal and environmental factors. Current research on the transition to adulthood for disabled youth has primarily focused on identifying these multilevel factors to guide the development of interventions to improve the HCT process. However, little is known about how this complex array of factors interacts and contributes to successful HCT. Systems thinking provides a theoretically informed perspective that accounts for complexity and can contribute to enhanced understanding of the interactions among HCT factors. The objective of this paper is to introduce general concepts of systems thinking as applied to HCT practice and research. Several systems thinking concepts and principles are introduced and a discussion of HCT as a complex system is provided. Systems dynamics methodology is described as one systems method for conceptualizing HCT. A preliminary systems dynamics model is presented to facilitate discourse on the application of systems thinking principles to HCT practice, policy and research. An understanding of the complex interactions and patterns of relationships in HCT can assist health policy makers and practitioners in determining key areas of intervention, the impact of these interventions on the system and the potential intended and unintended consequences of change. This paper provides initial examination of applying systems thinking to inform future research and practice on HCT. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Patented Drug Extension Strategies on Healthcare Spending: A Cost-Evaluation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaz, Nathalie; Haller, Guy; Girardin, François; Huttner, Benedikt; Combescure, Christophe; Dayer, Pierre; Muscionico, Daniel; Salomon, Jean-Luc; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug manufacturers have developed “evergreening” strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs) on the healthcare system as a whole (“spillover effect”). Methods and Findings We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. “Extra costs” were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1) all brand (i.e., initially patented) drugs, (2) all follow-on drugs, or (3) brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated “extra costs” over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2) million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7) million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8) million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover “extra cost” of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800), whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100). Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in “extra costs” of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100). Conclusions Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to

  5. IMPLEMENTATION OF BIG DATA TECHNOLOGIES IN THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM: EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGICAL AND COMMERCIAL PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Tsvetkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the trajectory of scientific-technological development and commercial perspectives of Big Data technologies in healthcare inRussiaand the world and a patent-conjuncture analysis of areas of Big Data in medicine. There has been shown a high potential of new markets and market niches for services in this field. There are identified the main trends in the evolution of technological solutions in Big Data in in the field of health care. There has been an assessment done of the global competitiveness of Russian Big Data inventions in the field of medicine. 

  6. Patented drug extension strategies on healthcare spending: a cost-evaluation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vernaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug manufacturers have developed "evergreening" strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs on the healthcare system as a whole ("spillover effect". METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. "Extra costs" were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1 all brand (i.e., initially patented drugs, (2 all follow-on drugs, or (3 brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated "extra costs" over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2 million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7 million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8 million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover "extra cost" of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800, whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100. Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in "extra costs" of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100. CONCLUSIONS: Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to increased

  7. Secondary use of clinical data in healthcare providers - an overview on research, regulatory and ethical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenauer, Matthias; Johner, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hospital providers, physicians and researchers are interested in a cross-institutional use of their data for clinical research. This interest has led to the question whether the scientific potential of the data stored in so many different systems can be unfolded by the establishment of a cross-institutional medical data warehouse. The aim of this paper is to describe the ethical and regulatory requirements and to develop a solution architecture considering technical and organisational aspects. The present paper uses a structured approach to collect user requirements. The requirements are discussed with legal experts. The work was complemented by extended literature research. An essential requirement is the cross-institutional merging of the data. Here, aspects of data protection as the informed consent, or transparency must be considered. In addition it is essential to protect the researchers through transparency from accusations on publication bias. Technical and organisational solutions in combination of data protection, and data security enable an operation of a central medical data warehouse in compliance with the law. The usage of this infrastructure for research can contribute to an improvement of the treatment quality, and patient safety if there is an appropriate transparency. This contributes to innovation and added value of a hospital group.

  8. Successful partnerships with third sector organisations to enhance the healthcare student experience: a partnership evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katie; Tanner, Judith; Rutty, Jane; Astley-Pepper, Maxine; Hall, Richard

    2015-03-01

    There is limited research surrounding academic partnerships and more research is needed to educate universities, and the private, public and third sectors about the benefits and limitations of such partnerships. The aim of this study was to outline the unique partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support and De Montfort University and to evaluate the progress of this partnership. A qualitative approach was employed which involved interviews with nine members of the partnership's steering group. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that a partnership between a university and a third sector charity can have mutual benefits for all those involved, particularly for students and those affected by cancer. Furthermore, the module to develop volunteering among families affected cancer, created through this partnership is now being considered by other universities as a way of providing holistic and non-traditional lecture based learning experiences. Recommendations are made for future partnerships between third sector charities and universities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 78 FR 41799 - Meeting of the National Advisory Council for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... needed, please contact the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Office of Equal Employment Opportunity and... includes presentations on AHRQ's Centers for Education and Research in Therapeutics (CERTS), the National Quality Strategy and Patient and Family Engagement. The final agenda will be available on the AHRQ Web...

  10. Managing security and privacy concerns over data storage in healthcare research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Mantay, Brian J; McDonnell, Patrick G; Wei, Li; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    Issues surrounding data security and privacy are of great importance when handling sensitive health-related data for research. The emphasis in the past has been on balancing the risks to individuals with the benefit to society of the use of databases for research. However, a new way of looking at such issues is that by optimising procedures and policies regarding security and privacy of data to the extent that there is no appreciable risk to the privacy of individuals, we can create a 'win-win' situation in which everyone benefits, and pharmacoepidemiological research can flourish with public support. We discuss holistic measures, involving both information technology and people, taken to improve the security and privacy of data storage. After an internal review, we commissioned an external audit by an independent consultant with a view to optimising our data storage and handling procedures. Improvements to our policies and procedures were implemented as a result of the audit. By optimising our storage of data, we hope to inspire public confidence and hence cooperation with the use of health care data in research. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Research Collaboration between a Catholic University School of Nursing and Healthcare System: Process and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jane M.; Gonzales, Lucia; Aube, Patti; Connelly, Cynthia D.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborations between diverse Catholic organizations will be important in fulfilling the goals contained in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2010 document, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health." This article describes a qualitative research study examining the partnership between a graduate-level school of nursing in…

  12. Capturing sexual assault data: An information system designed by forensic clinicians and healthcare researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S Aqif; Smith, Debbie A; Phillips, Maureen A; Kelly, Maire C; Zilkens, Renate R; Semmens, James B

    2018-01-01

    The Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC) in Perth, Western Australia provides free 24-hour medical, forensic, and counseling services to persons aged over 13 years following sexual assault. The aim of this research was to design a data management system that maintains accurate quality information on all sexual assault cases referred to SARC, facilitating audit and peer-reviewed research. The work to develop SARC Medical Services Clinical Information System (SARC-MSCIS) took place during 2007-2009 as a collaboration between SARC and Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia. Patient demographics, assault details, including injury documentation, and counseling sessions were identified as core data sections. A user authentication system was set up for data security. Data quality checks were incorporated to ensure high-quality data. An SARC-MSCIS was developed containing three core data sections having 427 data elements to capture patient's data. Development of the SARC-MSCIS has resulted in comprehensive capacity to support sexual assault research. Four additional projects are underway to explore both the public health and criminal justice considerations in responding to sexual violence. The data showed that 1,933 sexual assault episodes had occurred among 1881 patients between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2015. Sexual assault patients knew the assailant as a friend, carer, acquaintance, relative, partner, or ex-partner in 70% of cases, with 16% assailants being a stranger to the patient. This project has resulted in the development of a high-quality data management system to maintain information for medical and forensic services offered by SARC. This system has also proven to be a reliable resource enabling research in the area of sexual violence.

  13. Researching Haptics in Higher Education: The Complexity of Developing Haptics Virtual Learning Systems and Evaluating Its Impact on Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Diego, Jonathan P.; Cox, Margaret J.; Quinn, Barry F. A.; Newton, Jonathan Tim; Banerjee, Avijit; Woolford, Mark

    2012-01-01

    hapTEL, an interdisciplinary project funded by two UK research councils from 2007 to 2011, involves a large interdisciplinary team (with undergraduate and post-graduate student participants) which has been developing and evaluating a virtual learning system within an HE healthcare education setting, working on three overlapping strands. Strand 1…

  14. Visual soil evaluation - future research requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Ball, Bruce; Holden, Nick

    2017-04-01

    A review of Visual Soil Evaluation (VSE) techniques (Emmet-Booth et al., 2016) highlighted their established utility for soil quality assessment, though some limitations were identified; (1) The examination of aggregate size, visible intra-porosity and shape forms a key assessment criterion in almost all methods, thus limiting evaluation to structural form. The addition of criteria that holistically examine structure may be desirable. For example, structural stability can be indicated using dispersion tests or examining soil surface crusting, while the assessment of soil colour may indirectly indicate soil organic matter content, a contributor to stability. Organic matter assessment may also indicate structural resilience, along with rooting, earthworm numbers or shrinkage cracking. (2) Soil texture may influence results or impeded method deployment. Modification of procedures to account for extreme texture variation is desirable. For example, evidence of compaction in sandy or single grain soils greatly differs to that in clayey soils. Some procedures incorporate separate classification systems or adjust deployment based on texture. (3) Research into impacts of soil moisture content on VSE evaluation criteria is required. Criteria such as rupture resistance and shape may be affected by moisture content. It is generally recommended that methods are deployed on moist soils and quantification of influences of moisture variation on results is necessary. (4) Robust sampling strategies for method deployment are required. Dealing with spatial variation differs between methods, but where methods can be deployed over large areas, clear instruction on sampling is required. Additionally, as emphasis has been placed on the agricultural production of soil, so the ability of VSE for exploring structural quality in terms of carbon storage, water purification and biodiversity support also requires research. References Emmet-Booth, J.P., Forristal. P.D., Fenton, O., Ball, B

  15. The Swedish personal identity number: possibilities and pitfalls in healthcare and medical research

    OpenAIRE

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Otterblad-Olausson, Petra; Pettersson, Birgitta U.; Ekbom, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Swedish health care and national health registers are dependent on the presence of a unique identifier. This paper describes the Swedish personal identity number (PIN) and explores ethical issues of its use in medical research. A ten-digit-PIN is maintained by the National Tax Board for all individuals that have resided in Sweden since 1947. Until January 2008, an estimated 75,638 individuals have changed PIN. The most common reasons for change of PIN are incorrect recording of date of birth ...

  16. How 'healthy' are healthcare organizations? Exploring employee healthcare utilization rates among Dutch healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronkhorst, Babette

    2017-08-01

    Occupational health and safety research rarely makes use of data on employee healthcare utilization to gain insight into the physical and mental health of healthcare staff. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the prevalence of two relevant types of healthcare utilization among staff working in healthcare organizations: physical therapy and mental healthcare utilization. The paper furthermore explores what role employee and organizational characteristics play in explaining differences in healthcare utilization between organizations. A Dutch healthcare insurance company provided healthcare utilization records for a sample of 417 organizations employing 136,804 healthcare workers in the Netherlands. The results showed that there are large differences between and within healthcare industries when it comes to employee healthcare utilization. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that employee characteristics such as age and gender distributions, and healthcare industry, explain some of the variance between healthcare organizations. Nevertheless, the results of the analyses showed that for all healthcare utilization indicators there is still a large amount of unexplained variance. Further research into the subject of organizational differences in employee healthcare utilization is needed, as finding possibilities to influence employee health and subsequent healthcare utilization is beneficial to employees, employers and society as a whole.

  17. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Bernhard

    Full Text Available Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1 identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2 to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3 to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument.The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP, were derived from an expert survey (n = 23, interviews with HCPs (n = 12, and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP.Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups.The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has

  18. CDC guidance for evaluating health-care personnel for hepatitis B virus protection and for administering postexposure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillie, Sarah; Murphy, Trudy V; Sawyer, Mark; Ly, Kathleen; Hughes, Elizabeth; Jiles, Ruth; de Perio, Marie A; Reilly, Meredith; Byrd, Kathy; Ward, John W

    2013-12-20

    This report contains CDC guidance that augments the 2011 recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for evaluating hepatitis B protection among health-care personnel (HCP) and administering post-exposure prophylaxis. Explicit guidance is provided for persons working, training, or volunteering in health-care settings who have documented hepatitis B (HepB) vaccination years before hire or matriculation (e.g., when HepB vaccination was received as part of routine infant [recommended since 1991] or catch-up adolescent [recommended since 1995] vaccination). In the United States, 2,890 cases of acute hepatitis B were reported to CDC in 2011, and an estimated 18,800 new cases of hepatitis B occurred after accounting for underreporting of cases and asymptomatic infection. Although the rate of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections have declined approximately 89% during 1990-2011, from 8.5 to 0.9 cases per 100,000 population in the United States, the risk for occupationally acquired HBV among HCP persists, largely from exposures to patients with chronic HBV infection. ACIP recommends HepB vaccination for unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated HCP with reasonably anticipated risk for blood or body fluid exposure. ACIP also recommends that vaccinated HCP receive postvaccination serologic testing (antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen [anti-HBs]) 1-2 months after the final dose of vaccine is administered (CDC. Immunization of health-care personnel: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2011;60 [No. RR-7]). Increasing numbers of HCP have received routine HepB vaccination either as infants (recommended since 1991) or as catch-up vaccination (recommended since 1995) in adolescence. HepB vaccination results in protective anti-HBs responses among approximately 95% of healthy-term infants. Certain institutions test vaccinated HCP by measuring anti-HBs upon hire or matriculation, even when anti

  19. Numerical and experimental evaluation of a compact sensor antenna for healthcare devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomainy, A; Yang Hao; Pasveer, F

    2007-12-01

    The paper presents a compact planar antenna designed for wireless sensors intended for healthcare applications. Antenna performance is investigated with regards to various parameters governing the overall sensor operation. The study illustrates the importance of including full sensor details in determining and analysing the antenna performance. A globally optimized sensor antenna shows an increase in antenna gain by 2.8 dB and 29% higher radiation efficiency in comparison to a conventional printed strip antenna. The wearable sensor performance is demonstrated and effects on antenna radiated power, efficiency and front to back ratio of radiated energy are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Propagation characteristics of the body-worn sensor to on-body and off-body base units are also studied. It is demonstrated that the improved sensor antenna has an increase in transmitted and received power, consequently sensor coverage range is extended by approximately 25%.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of care integration strategies in different healthcare systems in Latin America: the EQUITY-LA II quasi-experimental study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, María-Luisa; Vargas, Ingrid; Unger, Jean-Pierre; De Paepe, Pierre; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Samico, Isabella; Albuquerque, Paulette; Eguiguren, Pamela; Cisneros, Angelica Ivonne; Rovere, Mario; Bertolotto, Fernando

    2015-07-31

    Although fragmentation in the provision of healthcare is considered an important obstacle to effective care, there is scant evidence on best practices in care coordination in Latin America. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a participatory shared care strategy in improving coordination across care levels and related care quality, in health services networks in six different healthcare systems of Latin America. A controlled before and after quasi-experimental study taking a participatory action research approach. In each country, two comparable healthcare networks were selected--intervention and control. The study contains four phases: (1) A baseline study to establish network performance in care coordination and continuity across care levels, using (A) qualitative methods: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with a criterion sample of health managers, professionals and users; and (B) quantitative methods: two questionnaire surveys with samples of 174 primary and secondary care physicians and 392 users with chronic conditions per network. Sample size was calculated to detect a proportion difference of 15% and 10%, before and after intervention (α=0.05; β=0.2 in a two-sided test); (2) a bottom-up participatory design and implementation of shared care strategies involving micro-level care coordination interventions to improve the adequacy of patient referral and information transfer. Strategies are selected through a participatory process by the local steering committee (local policymakers, health care network professionals, managers, users and researchers), supported by appropriate training; (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions by measuring changes in levels of care coordination and continuity 18 months after implementation, applying the same design as in the baseline study; (4) Cross-country comparative analysis. This study complies with international and national legal stipulations on ethics. Conditions of the study procedure

  1. The Swedish personal identity number: possibilities and pitfalls in healthcare and medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Otterblad-Olausson, Petra; Pettersson, Birgitta U; Ekbom, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Swedish health care and national health registers are dependent on the presence of a unique identifier. This paper describes the Swedish personal identity number (PIN) and explores ethical issues of its use in medical research. A ten-digit-PIN is maintained by the National Tax Board for all individuals that have resided in Sweden since 1947. Until January 2008, an estimated 75,638 individuals have changed PIN. The most common reasons for change of PIN are incorrect recording of date of birth or sex among immigrants or newborns. Although uncommon, change of sex always leads to change of PIN since the PIN is sex-specific. The most common reasons for re-use of PIN (n = 15,887), is when immigrants are assigned a PIN that has previously been assigned to someone else. This is sometimes necessary since there is a shortage of certain PIN combinations referring to dates of birth in the 1950s and 1960s. Several ethical issues can be raised pro and con the use of PIN in medical research. The Swedish PIN is a useful tool for linkages between medical registers and allows for virtually 100% coverage of the Swedish health care system. We suggest that matching of registers through PIN and matching of national health registers without the explicit approval of the individual patient is to the benefit for both the individual patient and for society.

  2. What guidance is available for researchers conducting overviews of reviews of healthcare interventions? A scoping review and qualitative metasummary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Michelle; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Becker, Lorne A; Featherstone, Robin; Hartling, Lisa

    2016-11-14

    Overviews of reviews (overviews) compile data from multiple systematic reviews to provide a single synthesis of relevant evidence for decision-making. Despite their increasing popularity, there is limited methodological guidance available for researchers wishing to conduct overviews. The objective of this scoping review is to identify and collate all published and unpublished documents containing guidance for conducting overviews examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and/or safety of healthcare interventions. Our aims were to provide a map of existing guidance documents; identify similarities, differences, and gaps in the guidance contained within these documents; and identify common challenges involved in conducting overviews. We conducted an iterative and extensive search to ensure breadth and comprehensiveness of coverage. The search involved reference tracking, database and web searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, Scopus, Cochrane Methods Studies Database, Google Scholar), handsearching of websites and conference proceedings, and contacting overview producers. Relevant guidance statements and challenges encountered were extracted, edited, grouped, abstracted, and presented using a qualitative metasummary approach. We identified 52 guidance documents produced by 19 research groups. Relatively consistent guidance was available for the first stages of the overview process (deciding when and why to conduct an overview, specifying the scope, and searching for and including systematic reviews). In contrast, there was limited or conflicting guidance for the latter stages of the overview process (quality assessment of systematic reviews and their primary studies, collecting and analyzing data, and assessing quality of evidence), and many of the challenges identified were also related to these stages. An additional, overarching challenge identified was that overviews are limited by the methods, reporting, and coverage of their included systematic reviews. This compilation

  3. What guidance is available for researchers conducting overviews of reviews of healthcare interventions? A scoping review and qualitative metasummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Pollock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overviews of reviews (overviews compile data from multiple systematic reviews to provide a single synthesis of relevant evidence for decision-making. Despite their increasing popularity, there is limited methodological guidance available for researchers wishing to conduct overviews. The objective of this scoping review is to identify and collate all published and unpublished documents containing guidance for conducting overviews examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and/or safety of healthcare interventions. Our aims were to provide a map of existing guidance documents; identify similarities, differences, and gaps in the guidance contained within these documents; and identify common challenges involved in conducting overviews. Methods We conducted an iterative and extensive search to ensure breadth and comprehensiveness of coverage. The search involved reference tracking, database and web searches (MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, Scopus, Cochrane Methods Studies Database, Google Scholar, handsearching of websites and conference proceedings, and contacting overview producers. Relevant guidance statements and challenges encountered were extracted, edited, grouped, abstracted, and presented using a qualitative metasummary approach. Results We identified 52 guidance documents produced by 19 research groups. Relatively consistent guidance was available for the first stages of the overview process (deciding when and why to conduct an overview, specifying the scope, and searching for and including systematic reviews. In contrast, there was limited or conflicting guidance for the latter stages of the overview process (quality assessment of systematic reviews and their primary studies, collecting and analyzing data, and assessing quality of evidence, and many of the challenges identified were also related to these stages. An additional, overarching challenge identified was that overviews are limited by the methods, reporting, and coverage of

  4. Learning from doing: the case for combining normalisation process theory and participatory learning and action research methodology for primary healthcare implementation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brún, Tomas; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; O'Donnell, Catherine A; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-08-03

    The implementation of research findings is not a straightforward matter. There are substantive and recognised gaps in the process of translating research findings into practice and policy. In order to overcome some of these translational difficulties, a number of strategies have been proposed for researchers. These include greater use of theoretical approaches in research focused on implementation, and use of a wider range of research methods appropriate to policy questions and the wider social context in which they are placed. However, questions remain about how to combine theory and method in implementation research. In this paper, we respond to these proposals. Focussing on a contemporary social theory, Normalisation Process Theory, and a participatory research methodology, Participatory Learning and Action, we discuss the potential of their combined use for implementation research. We note ways in which Normalisation Process Theory and Participatory Learning and Action are congruent and may therefore be used as heuristic devices to explore, better understand and support implementation. We also provide examples of their use in our own research programme about community involvement in primary healthcare. Normalisation Process Theory alone has, to date, offered useful explanations for the success or otherwise of implementation projects post-implementation. We argue that Normalisation Process Theory can also be used to prospectively support implementation journeys. Furthermore, Normalisation Process Theory and Participatory Learning and Action can be used together so that interventions to support implementation work are devised and enacted with the expertise of key stakeholders. We propose that the specific combination of this theory and methodology possesses the potential, because of their combined heuristic force, to offer a more effective means of supporting implementation projects than either one might do on its own, and of providing deeper understandings of

  5. Challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertshaw, Luke; Dhesi, Surindar; Jones, Laura L

    2017-08-04

    To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies that explore challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries. Systematic review and qualitative thematic synthesis. Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. Search terms were combined for qualitative research, primary healthcare professionals, refugees and asylum seekers, and were supplemented by searches of reference lists and citations. Study selection was conducted by two researchers using prespecified selection criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool was conducted by the first author. A thematic synthesis was undertaken to develop descriptive themes and analytical constructs. Twenty-six articles reporting on 21 studies and involving 357 participants were included. Eleven descriptive themes were interpreted, embedded within three analytical constructs: healthcare encounter (trusting relationship, communication, cultural understanding, health and social conditions, time); healthcare system (training and guidance, professional support, connecting with other services, organisation, resources and capacity); asylum and resettlement. Challenges and facilitators were described within these themes. A range of challenges and facilitators have been identified for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers that are experienced in the dimensions of the healthcare encounter, the healthcare system and wider asylum and resettlement situation. Comprehensive understanding of these challenges and facilitators is important to shape policy, improve the quality of services and provide more equitable health services for this vulnerable group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  6. Improving healthcare empowerment through breast cancer patient navigation: a mixed methods evaluation in a safety-net setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitova, Guzyal; Burke, Nancy J

    2014-09-19

    Breast cancer mortality rates in the U.S. remain relatively high, particularly among ethnic minorities and low-income populations. Unequal access to quality care, lower follow up rates, and poor treatment adherence contribute to rising disparities among these groups. Healthcare empowerment (HCE) is theorized to improve patient outcomes through collaboration with providers and improving understanding of and compliance with treatment. Patient navigation is a health care organizational intervention that essentially improves healthcare empowerment by providing informational, emotional, and psychosocial support. Patient navigators address barriers to care through multilingual coordination of treatment and incorporation of access to community services, support, and education into the continuum of cancer care. Utilizing survey and qualitative methods, we evaluated the patient navigation program in a Northern California safety-net hospital Breast Clinic by assessing its impact on patients' experiences with cancer care and providers' perspectives on the program. We conducted qualitative interviews with 16 patients and 4 service providers, conducted approximately 66 hours of clinic observations, and received feedback through the self-administered survey from 66 patients. The role of the patient navigator at the Breast Clinic included providing administrative assistance, psychosocial support, improved knowledge, better understanding of treatment process, and ensuring better communication between patients and providers. As such, patient navigators facilitated improved collaboration between patients and providers and understanding of interdisciplinary care processes. The survey results suggested that the majority of patients across all ethnic backgrounds and age groups were highly satisfied with the program and had a positive perception of their navigator. Interviews with patients and providers highlighted the roles of a navigator in ensuring continuity of care, improving

  7. What's in a name generator? Choosing the right name generators for social network surveys in healthcare quality and safety research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Ronald S; Meltzer, David O; Seid, Michael; Borgert, Amy; Chung, Jeanette W; Colletti, Richard B; Dellal, George; Kahn, Stacy A; Kaplan, Heather C; Peterson, Laura E; Margolis, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Interest in the use of social network analysis (SNA) in healthcare research has increased, but there has been little methodological research on how to choose the name generators that are often used to collect primary data on the social connection between individuals for SNA. We sought to determine a minimum set of name generators sufficient to distinguish the social networks of a target population of physicians active in quality improvement (QI). We conducted a pilot survey including 8 name generators in a convenience sample of 25 physicians active in QI to characterize their social networks. We used multidimensional scaling to determine what subset of these name generators was needed to distinguish these social networks. We found that some physicians maintain a social network organized around a specific colleague who performed multiple roles while others maintained highly differentiated networks. We found that a set of 5 of the 8 name generators we used was needed to distinguish the networks of these physicians. Beyond methodology for selecting name generators, our findings suggest that QI networks may require 5 or more generators to elicit valid sets of relevant actors and relations in this target population.

  8. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods for systematically reviewing complex multicomponent health care interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Chang, Christine; Viswanathan, Meera; Glick, Susan; Treadwell, Jonathan; Umscheid, Craig A; Whitlock, Evelyn; Fu, Rongwei; Berliner, Elise; Paynter, Robin; Anderson, Johanna; Motu'apuaka, Pua; Trikalinos, Tom

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence-based Practice Center methods white paper was to outline approaches to conducting systematic reviews of complex multicomponent health care interventions. We performed a literature scan and conducted semistructured interviews with international experts who conduct research or systematic reviews of complex multicomponent interventions (CMCIs) or organizational leaders who implement CMCIs in health care. Challenges identified include lack of consistent terminology for such interventions (eg, complex, multicomponent, multidimensional, multifactorial); a wide range of approaches used to frame the review, from grouping interventions by common features to using more theoretical approaches; decisions regarding whether and how to quantitatively analyze the interventions, from holistic to individual component analytic approaches; and incomplete and inconsistent reporting of elements critical to understanding the success and impact of multicomponent interventions, such as methods used for implementation the context in which interventions are implemented. We provide a framework for the spectrum of conceptual and analytic approaches to synthesizing studies of multicomponent interventions and an initial list of critical reporting elements for such studies. This information is intended to help systematic reviewers understand the options and tradeoffs available for such reviews. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dietary-induced cancer prevention: An expanding research arena of emerging diet related to healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilipkumar Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet plays a vital role in the management of cancer because they are the source of important physiologically functional components. Scientific observations support the idea that dietary supplement can prevent breast cancer recurrences. Strong correlations are established between the high intake of saturated fat and the incidence of different types of cancer. It is found that chronic alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of cancers of oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, and larynx. Again, some evidences are also found regarding phosphorous, glutamate level in the body, and incidence of cancer. Different physiologically functional components are found in the dietary materials. Fibers, the major dietary components, have long been recognized for the unique properties in the treatment of cancer, which are related to its antineoplastic functions. Antioxidant rich diet has been added to the list of cancer-preventing dietary components. Also, recently published research has shown that natural carotenoids in the diet leads to a normalization of body epithelial cells and protects against the risk of stomach and esophagus cancer, and improves the immune system′s response. Again, fruit juices, processed vegetable juices, orange peel, green tea, vitamins, flavonoids, and trace materials have cancer inhibitory properties. Clearly, there has been increasing recognition of chemoprotective functions. Now, it can be recognized for another kind of functionality for the improvement of the health of mankind.

  10. Alternative approaches to forestry research evaluation: an assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Jakes; Earl C. Leatherberry

    1986-01-01

    Reviews research evaluation techniques in a variety of fields an assesses the usefulness of various approaches or combinations of approaches for forestry research evaluation. Presents an evaluation framework that will help users develop an approach suitable for their specific problem.

  11. Development and evaluation of a web-based breast cancer cultural competency course for primary healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantis Maria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop and evaluate a continuing medical education (CME course aimed at improving healthcare provider knowledge about breast cancer health disparities and the importance of cross-cultural communication in provider-patient interactions about breast cancer screening. Methods An interactive web-based CME course was developed and contained information about breast cancer disparities, the role of culture in healthcare decision making, and demonstrated a model of cross-cultural communication. A single group pre-/post-test design was used to assess knowledge changes. Data on user satisfaction was also collected. Results In all, 132 participants registered for the CME with 103 completing both assessments. Differences between pre-/post-test show a significant increase in knowledge (70% vs. 94%; p Conclusion There was an overall high level of satisfaction among all users. Users felt that learning objectives were met and the web-based format was appropriate and easy to use and suggests that web-based CME formats are an appropriate tool to teach cultural competency skills. However, more information is needed to understand how the CME impacted practice behaviors.

  12. Developing a research agenda on ethical issues related to using social media in healthcare : Lessons from the first Dutch Twitter heart operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, S.A.; van Veghel, Dennis; Dekker, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of using publicly available social media applications specifically for healthcare purposes are largely unaddressed in current research. Where they are addressed, the focus is primarily on issues of privacy and data protection. We therefore use a case study of the first live Twitter

  13. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5-7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269224742; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their

  14. The impact on healthcare, policy and practice from 36 multi-project research programmes: findings from two reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Steve; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Blatch-Jones, Amanda; Glover, Matthew; Raftery, James

    2017-03-28

    We sought to analyse the impacts found, and the methods used, in a series of assessments of programmes and portfolios of health research consisting of multiple projects. We analysed a sample of 36 impact studies of multi-project research programmes, selected from a wider sample of impact studies included in two narrative systematic reviews published in 2007 and 2016. We included impact studies in which the individual projects in a programme had been assessed for wider impact, especially on policy or practice, and where findings had been described in such a way that allowed them to be collated and compared. Included programmes were highly diverse in terms of location (11 different countries plus two multi-country ones), number of component projects (8 to 178), nature of the programme, research field, mode of funding, time between completion and impact assessment, methods used to assess impact, and level of impact identified. Thirty-one studies reported on policy impact, 17 on clinician behaviour or informing clinical practice, three on a combined category such as policy and clinician impact, and 12 on wider elements of impact (health gain, patient benefit, improved care or other benefits to the healthcare system). In those multi-programme projects that assessed the respective categories, the percentage of projects that reported some impact was policy 35% (range 5-100%), practice 32% (10-69%), combined category 64% (60-67%), and health gain/health services 27% (6-48%). Variations in levels of impact achieved partly reflected differences in the types of programme, levels of collaboration with users, and methods and timing of impact assessment. Most commonly, principal investigators were surveyed; some studies involved desk research and some interviews with investigators and/or stakeholders. Most studies used a conceptual framework such as the Payback Framework. One study attempted to assess the monetary value of a research programme's health gain. The widespread

  15. Patient-centered communication between adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and their healthcare providers: Identifying research gaps with a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jessica R; Standridge, Daniel; Lyons, Karen S; Elliot, Diane L; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Julian, Anne K; Weprin, Jennifer; Storksdieck, Martin; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2017-09-01

    To conduct a scoping literature review to identify practices or programs that promote AYA patient-centered communication. Between January and May of 2016, we applied standard scoping review methodology to systematically review articles. We considered peer-reviewed, English language articles written at any phase of intervention research. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were eligible, and no additional search restrictions were applied. We retained articles that included explicit or implicit outcomes for one of the six functions of patient-centered communication in cancer care. At least two independent reviewers assessed the articles. We screened a total of 4072 titles and abstracts, retaining 27 for full-text review. Ultimately, eight titles met the review's inclusion criteria. We categorized each publication by the action or setting used to improve patient-centered communication, resulting in five categories. Most studies were not included because they did not include a patient-centered communication outcome. This area of research is still emerging, as indicated by the small number of eligible studies and predominance of qualitative, descriptive, pilot, and feasibility studies with small sample sizes. Our results suggest a clear need to develop and evaluate interventions focused on improving patient-centered communication between AYA survivors and their healthcare providers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric Dentistry in Primary Healthcare: Creation, Development, and Evaluation of a Distance Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavaresco, Caren Serra; Bragança, Silvana Gonçalves; D'Avila, Otávio Pereira; Umpierre, Roberto; Harzheim, Erno; Rodrigues, Jonas Almeida

    2018-01-02

    Oral health in childhood is a major problem for global public health. In Brazil, the prevalence of childhood tooth decay varies from 12% to 46%. Dental care treatment in Brazil is almost the exclusive responsibility of primary healthcare (PHC). Therefore, it is essential these professionals are prepared to conduct restorative, endodontic, and exodontic treatments and preventive care in children. Children make up a large proportion of the population in territories requiring advanced dental care provided by PHC in Brazil. To care for these patients, it is necessary to have both manual dexterity and technical knowledge of pediatric dentistry. Accordingly, this study aimed to develop a distance course on pediatric dentistry. A pretest questionnaire consisting of 15 questions was used to assess initial dental knowledge of participants. After completion of a five-module course, participants retook the same initial dental knowledge questionnaire (post-test). Descriptive statistic and paired t test, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman correlation were used, and a significance level of 5% was set. The majority of participants completing the five-module course were women who earned specialty degrees beyond undergraduate studies and currently worked in PHC (>5 years). Participant performance on the dental knowledge questionnaire after completion of the five-module course improved pre- to post-test. These data suggest that completion of a distance course on pediatric dentistry can be an effective tool for improving knowledge of pediatric dentistry in PHC professionals.

  17. Performance Evaluation of an Enhanced Uplink 3.5G System for Mobile Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnakos, Dimitris; Vouyioukas, Demosthenes; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Constantinou, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The present paper studies the prospective and the performance of a forthcoming high-speed third generation (3.5G) networking technology, called enhanced uplink, for delivering mobile health (m-health) applications. The performance of 3.5G networks is a critical factor for successful development of m-health services perceived by end users. In this paper, we propose a methodology for performance assessment based on the joint uplink transmission of voice, real-time video, biological data (such as electrocardiogram, vital signals, and heart sounds), and healthcare records file transfer. Various scenarios were concerned in terms of real-time, nonreal-time, and emergency applications in random locations, where no other system but 3.5G is available. The accomplishment of quality of service (QoS) was explored through a step-by-step improvement of enhanced uplink system's parameters, attributing the network system for the best performance in the context of the desired m-health services.

  18. Evaluation and implementation of QR Code Identity Tag system for Healthcare in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Vassilya; Bilgin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we designed a QR Code Identity Tag system to integrate into the Turkish healthcare system. This system provides QR code-based medical identification alerts and an in-hospital patient identification system. Every member of the medical system is assigned a unique QR Code Tag; to facilitate medical identification alerts, the QR Code Identity Tag can be worn as a bracelet or necklace or carried as an ID card. Patients must always possess the QR Code Identity bracelets within hospital grounds. These QR code bracelets link to the QR Code Identity website, where detailed information is stored; a smartphone or standalone QR code scanner can be used to scan the code. The design of this system allows authorized personnel (e.g., paramedics, firefighters, or police) to access more detailed patient information than the average smartphone user: emergency service professionals are authorized to access patient medical histories to improve the accuracy of medical treatment. In Istanbul, we tested the self-designed system with 174 participants. To analyze the QR Code Identity Tag system's usability, the participants completed the System Usability Scale questionnaire after using the system.

  19. Performance Evaluation of an Enhanced Uplink 3.5G System for Mobile Healthcare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Komnakos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studies the prospective and the performance of a forthcoming high-speed third generation (3.5G networking technology, called enhanced uplink, for delivering mobile health (m-health applications. The performance of 3.5G networks is a critical factor for successful development of m-health services perceived by end users. In this paper, we propose a methodology for performance assessment based on the joint uplink transmission of voice, real-time video, biological data (such as electrocardiogram, vital signals, and heart sounds, and healthcare records file transfer. Various scenarios were concerned in terms of real-time, nonreal-time, and emergency applications in random locations, where no other system but 3.5G is available. The accomplishment of quality of service (QoS was explored through a step-by-step improvement of enhanced uplink system's parameters, attributing the network system for the best performance in the context of the desired m-health services.

  20. Sustainable healthcare: how to assess and improve healthcare structures' sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, M; Capolongo, S; Bottero, M; Cavagliato, E; Speranza, S; Volpatti, L

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is a broad and debated subject, often difficult to be defined and applied into real projects, especially when dealing with a complex scenario as the one of healthcare. Many research studies and evaluation systems have handled this topic from different perspectives, but many limits and criticalities still have to be overcome to properly cope with actual needs. The Sustainable Healthcare project has been developed through three main phases: a deep study of the state of the art, unraveling pros and cons of available sustainability scoring systems; an accurate analysis of the stakeholders network and their needs; the realization of an objective evaluation framework, through scientific methods, as the ANP. The newly developed evaluation system takes into consideration all the three pillars of sustainability, analyzing social, environmental and economic sustainability through a set of criteria, specified by measurable indicators. So the system identifies both global sustainability and specific critical areas, pointing out possible strategic solutions to improve sustainability. The evaluation is achieved through technical analyses and qualitative surveys, which eventually allow to quantitatively assess sustainability, through a sound scoring method. This study proposes an innovative evaluation method to determine the sustainability of a hospital, already existing or in the design phase, within the European context. The Sustainable Healthcare system overcomes some of the current evaluation systems' limits by establishing a multidisciplinary approach and being an easy-to-use tool. This protocol is intended to be of support in the identification of the main hospital's weaknesses and in setting priorities for implementation of the solutions.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Summary of the 2016 Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Ethan M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2017-08-11

    We summarize the 2016 update of the 2004 Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality's evidence review of omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The overall findings for the effects of marine oil supplements on intermediate CVD outcomes remain largely unchanged. There is high strength of evidence, based on numerous trials, of no significant effects of marine oils on systolic or diastolic blood pressures, but there are small, yet statistically significant increases in high density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. The clinical significance of these small changes, particularly in combination, is unclear. The strongest effect of marine oils is on triglyceride concentrations. Across studies, this effect was dose-dependent and related to studies' mean baseline triglyceride concentration. In observational studies, there is low strength of evidence that increased marine oil intake lowers ischemic stroke risk. Among randomized controlled trials and observational studies, there is evidence of variable strength of no association with increased marine oil intake and lower CVD event risk. Evidence regarding alpha-linolenic acid intake is sparser. There is moderate strength of evidence of no effect on blood pressure or lipoprotein concentrations and low strength of evidence of no association with coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure.

  2. Evaluating the quality of colorectal cancer care across the interface of healthcare sectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ludt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC has a high prevalence in western countries. Diagnosis and treatment of CRC is complex and requires multidisciplinary collaboration across the interface of health care sectors. In Germany, a new nationwide established program aims to provide quality information of healthcare delivery across different sectors. Within this context, this study describes the development of a set of quality indicators charting the whole pathway of CRC-care including data specifications that are necessary to operationalize these indicators before practice testing. METHODS: Indicators were developed following a systematic 10 step modified 'RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method' which involved a multidisciplinary panel of thirteen participants. For each indicator in the final set, data specifications relating to sources of quality information, data collection procedures, analysis and feedback were described. RESULTS: The final indicator set included 52 indicators covering diagnostic procedures (11 indicators, therapeutic management (28 indicators and follow-up (6 indicators. In addition, 7 indicators represented patient perspectives. Primary surgical tumor resection and pre-operative radiation (rectum carcinoma only were perceived as most useful tracer procedures initiating quality data collection. To assess the quality of CRC care across sectors, various data sources were identified: medical records, administrative inpatient and outpatient data, sickness-funds billing code systems and patient survey. CONCLUSION: In Germany, a set of 52 quality indicators, covering necessary aspects across the interfaces and pathways relevant to CRC-care has been developed. Combining different sectors and sources of health care in quality assessment is an innovative and challenging approach but reflects better the reality of the patient pathway and experience of CRC-care.

  3. Evaluation of national health-care related infection criteria for epidemiological surveillance in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janita Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the use of the Brazilian criteria for reporting of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs in the neonatal unit and compare them with the criteria proposed by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN. METHODS: this was a cross-sectional study conducted from 2009 to 2011. It included neonates with HAI reporting by at least one of the criteria. Statistical analysis included calculation of incidence density of HAIs, distribution by weight, and by reporting criterion. Analysis of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV for the national criteria was performed considering the NHSN as the gold standard, with agreement assessed by kappa. RESULTS: a total of 882 newborns were followed, and 330 had at least one infection notified by at least one of the criteria. A total of 522 HAIs were reported, regardless of the criteria. An incidence density of 27.28 infections per 1,000 patient-days was observed, and the main topographies were sepsis (58.3%, candidiasis (15.1%, and conjunctivitis (6.5%. A total of 489 (93.7% were notified by both criteria, eight infections were notified only by the national criteria (six cases of necrotizing enterocolitis and two cases of conjunctivitis, and 25 cases of clinical sepsis were reported by NHSN criteria only. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 95.1%, 98.6%, 98.4%, and 95.7%, respectively, for all topographies, and were 91.8%, 100%, 100%, and 96.3% for the analysis of sepsis. Kappa analysis showed an agreement of 96.9%. CONCLUSION: there was a high rate of agreement between the criteria. The use of the national criteria facilitates the reporting of sepsis in newborns, and can help to improve the specificity and PPV.

  4. Problematisations of Complexity: On the Notion and Production of Diverse Complexities in Healthcare Interventions and Evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Broer (Tineke); R.A. Bal (Roland); Pickersgill, M. (Martyn)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWithin the literature on the evaluation of health (policy) interventions, complexity is a much-debated issue. In particular, many claim that so-called ‘complex interventions’ pose different challenges to evaluation studies than apparently ‘simple interventions’ do. Distinct ways of doing

  5. A multifaceted quality improvement intervention for CVD risk management in Australian primary healthcare: a protocol for a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bindu; Patel, Anushka; Jan, Stephen; Usherwood, Tim; Harris, Mark; Panaretto, Katie; Zwar, Nicholas; Redfern, Julie; Jansen, Jesse; Doust, Jenny; Peiris, David

    2014-12-17

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Despite the widespread availability of evidence-based clinical guidelines and validated risk predication equations for prevention and management of CVD, their translation into routine practice is limited. We developed a multifaceted quality improvement intervention for CVD risk management which incorporates electronic decision support, patient risk communication tools, computerised audit and feedback tools, and monthly, peer-ranked performance feedback via a web portal. The intervention was implemented in a cluster randomised controlled trial in 60 primary healthcare services in Australia. Overall, there were improvements in risk factor recording and in prescribing of recommended treatments among under-treated individuals, but it is unclear how this intervention was used in practice and what factors promoted or hindered its use. This information is necessary to optimise intervention impact and maximally implement it in a post-trial context. In this study protocol, we outline our methods to conduct a theory-based, process evaluation of the intervention. Our aims are to understand how, why, and for whom the intervention produced the observed outcomes and to develop effective strategies for translation and dissemination. We will conduct four discrete but inter-related studies taking a mixed methods approach. Our quantitative studies will examine (1) the longer term effectiveness of the intervention post-trial, (2) patient and health service level correlates with trial outcomes, and (3) the health economic impact of implementing the intervention at scale. The qualitative studies will (1) identify healthcare provider perspectives on implementation barriers and enablers and (2) use video ethnography and patient semi-structured interviews to understand how cardiovascular risk is communicated in the doctor/patient interaction both with and without the use of intervention. We will also

  6. Pervasive mobile healthcare systems for chronic disease monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzooree, Geshwaree; Kumar Khedo, Kavi; Joonas, Noorjehan

    2017-05-01

    Pervasive mobile healthcare system has the potential to improve healthcare and the quality of life of chronic disease patients through continuous monitoring. Recently, many articles related to pervasive mobile healthcare system focusing on health monitoring using wireless technologies have been published. The main aim of this review is to evaluate the state-of-the-art pervasive mobile healthcare systems to identify major technical requirements and design challenges associated with the realization of a pervasive mobile healthcare system. A systematic literature review was conducted over IEEE Xplore Digital Library to evaluate 20 pervasive mobile healthcare systems out of 683 articles from 2011 to 2016. The classification of the pervasive mobile healthcare systems and other important factors are discussed. Potential opportunities and challenges are pointed out for the further deployment of effective pervasive mobile healthcare systems. This article helps researchers in health informatics to have a holistic view toward understanding pervasive mobile healthcare systems and points out new technological trends and design challenges that researchers have to consider when designing such systems for better adoption, usability, and seamless integration.

  7. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2008-04-01

    vaccination coverage required is modest and may be achieved simply by removing the cost burden to vaccination. Conclusion We recommend that provincial healthcare programs should pay for voluntary adult vaccination for women aged 14–26. However, it should be noted that our model results are preliminary, in that we have made a number of simplifying assumptions, including a lack of age-dependency in sexual partner rates, a lack of sexual activity outside of the vaccine age-range among females and a uniform age of sexual debut; thus, further work is desired to enhance the external generalisability of our results.

  8. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  9. A nationwide postal survey on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists' (PERMFAMS) clinical performance, professional attitudes and research visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon-How; Yasin, Mazapuspavina Md; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan A; Hamzah, Zuhra; Ismail, Mastura; Ali, Norsiah; Bashah, Baizury; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah

    2015-01-01

    Perception of healthcare providers who worked with family medicine specialists (FMSs) could translate into the effectiveness of primary healthcare delivery in daily practices. This study examined perceptions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) on FMSs at public health clinics throughout Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in 2012-2013 using postal method targeting PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely health clinics, health offices and hospitals. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess PHCP's perception of FMS's clinical competency, safety practice, ethical and professional values, and research involvement. It consists of 37 items with Likert scale of strongly disagree (a score of 1) to strongly agree (a score of 5). Interaction and independent effect of the independent variables were tested and adjusted means score were reported. The participants' response rate was 58.0% (780/1345) with almost equal proportion from each of the three public healthcare facilities. There were more positive perceptions than negative among the PHCPs. FMSs were perceived to provide effective and safe treatment to their patients equally disregards of patient's social background. However, there were some concerns of FMSs not doing home visits, not seeing walk-in patients, had long appointment time, not active in scientific research, writing and publication. There were significant differences in perception based on a respondent's health care facility (p publication.

  10. Development and evaluation of a common data model enabling active drug safety surveillance using disparate healthcare databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Stephanie J; Ryan, Patrick B; O'Hara, Donald J; Powell, Gregory E; Painter, Jeffery L; Pattishall, Edward N; Morris, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    Active drug safety surveillance may be enhanced by analysis of multiple observational healthcare databases, including administrative claims and electronic health records. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a common data model (CDM) enabling rapid, comparable, systematic analyses across disparate observational data sources to identify and evaluate the effects of medicines. The CDM uses a person-centric design, with attributes for demographics, drug exposures, and condition occurrence. Drug eras, constructed to represent periods of persistent drug use, are derived from available elements from pharmacy dispensings, prescriptions written, and other medication history. Condition eras aggregate diagnoses that occur within a single episode of care. Drugs and conditions from source data are mapped to biomedical ontologies to standardize terminologies and enable analyses of higher-order effects. The CDM was applied to two source types: an administrative claims and an electronic medical record database. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate transformation rules. Two case studies demonstrate the ability of the CDM to enable standard analyses across disparate sources: analyses of persons exposed to rofecoxib and persons with an acute myocardial infarction. Over 43 million persons, with nearly 1 billion drug exposures and 3.7 billion condition occurrences from both databases were successfully transformed into the CDM. An analysis routine applied to transformed data from each database produced consistent, comparable results. A CDM can normalize the structure and content of disparate observational data, enabling standardized analyses that are meaningfully comparable when assessing the effects of medicines.

  11. Older people's exclusion from healthcare services in Nepal: an analysis of the political economy of development aid, domestic policy and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Lok P Sharma

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this review was to contribute to the discussion on older people's access to healthcare in developing countries. Relevant research findings, survey reports, policy papers and planning documents were critically reviewed, placing a particular focus on their relevance in understanding issues of access, equity and justice. A number of factors are identified for their roles on the issue; that is, place of residence, economic factors/poverty, cultural stigma, situation and impact of research, and the prevalent policy framework in health and the approach of development assistance adopted by donor communities. In order to make healthcare facilities equitable for older people, the identified factors need to be addressed at different levels - at local policy work, in the allocation of funding for health service research and in designing overseas development work. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. 78 FR 29159 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... issuing an endorsement letter of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report, ``Seismic Evaluation...

  13. Management-By-Objectives in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Andreas

    Concurrent to the hasty development within the medical, technological and organizational areas of healthcare, new initiatives are continuously implemented to improve quality of delivered care. To evaluate the effect of these initiatives, the application of performance measurement has become common...... practice for modern healthcare organizations. During the last decade, vast amounts of quality indicators, accreditation audits, satisfaction surveys etc. have become an integrated part of healthcare professionals' daily work. Most of these measurement structures are well documented and well executed...... the overview and transparency for healthcare decision makers; as a result, well-documented initiatives fail to become integrated support in operational decision-making processes. This research work has thus striven to design a holistic Management-By-Objectives framework that can enable managers and operational...

  14. Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in Allergic Rhinitis: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or Anchor-Based Thresholds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Eli O; Wallace, Dana; Dykewicz, Mark; Shneyer, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recommended that allergic rhinitis (AR) studies calculate a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) based on an estimated threshold equal to 30% of the maximum total nasal symptom score. Applying this threshold, their data showed no differences between well-established treatments, and a subsequent analysis using prescribing information found no differences between active treatments and placebo controls. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the application of an evidence-based model to determine MCIDs for AR studies, with an absolute value for an anchor-based threshold and validated methods for calculating distribution-based thresholds. Using the same studies as the AHRQ report, anchor- and distribution-based MCID thresholds were determined for 3 clinical comparisons identified by the AHRQ: (1) oral antihistamine+intranasal corticosteroid (INCS) versus INCS, (2) montelukast versus INCS, and (3) intranasal antihistamine+INCS in a single device versus the monotherapies. The outcomes were compared with those reported using the AHRQ threshold. No treatment comparison met the AHRQ-defined MCID threshold; all treatments were determined to be equivalent for all 3 queries. In contrast, the evidence-based model revealed some differences between treatments: INCS > montelukast; intranasal antihistamine+INCS > either monotherapy. No clinically relevant benefit was observed for adding an oral antihistamine to INCS, but some studies were not optimal choices for quantitative determination of MCIDs. Updating the literature search revealed no additional studies that met the AHRQ inclusion criteria. The evidence-based threshold for MCID determination for AR studies should supersede the threshold recommended in the AHRQ report. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Partnered research in healthcare delivery redesign for high-need, high-cost patients: development and feasibility of an Intensive Management Patient-Aligned Care Team (ImPACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulman, Donna M; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Shaw, Jonathan G; Hummel, Debra L; Holloway, Katie S; Smither, Sasha F; Breland, Jessica Y; Chardos, John F; Kirsh, Susan; Kahn, James S; Asch, Steven M

    2014-12-01

    We employed a partnered research healthcare delivery redesign process to improve care for high-need, high-cost (HNHC) patients within the Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system. Health services researchers partnered with VA national and Palo Alto facility leadership and clinicians to: 1) analyze characteristics and utilization patterns of HNHC patients, 2) synthesize evidence about intensive management programs for HNHC patients, 3) conduct needs-assessment interviews with HNHC patients (n = 17) across medical, access, social, and mental health domains, 4) survey providers (n = 8) about care challenges for HNHC patients, and 5) design, implement, and evaluate a pilot Intensive Management Patient-Aligned Care Team (ImPACT) for a random sample of 150 patients. HNHC patients accounted for over half (52 %) of VA facility patient costs. Most (94 %) had three or more chronic conditions, and 60 % had a mental health diagnosis. Formative data analyses and qualitative assessments revealed a need for intensive case management, care coordination, transitions navigation, and social support and services. The ImPACT multidisciplinary team developed care processes to meet these needs, including direct access to team members (including after-hours), chronic disease management protocols, case management, and rapid interventions in response to health changes or acute service use. Two-thirds of invited patients (n = 101) enrolled in ImPACT, 87 % of whom remained actively engaged at 9 months. ImPACT is now serving as a model for a national VA intensive management demonstration project. Partnered research that incorporated population data analysis, evidence synthesis, and stakeholder needs assessments led to the successful redesign and implementation of services for HNHC patients. The rigorous design process and evaluation facilitated dissemination of the intervention within the VA healthcare system. Employing partnered research to redesign care for high-need, high

  16. Disability Evaluation System Analysis and Research Annual Report 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-20

    Annual Report 2017 Disability Evaluation Systems Analysis and Research Prepared by Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity...Disabi l i ty Evaluation Systems Analysis and Research Annual Report 2017 Contributors Jan I. Maby, DO, MPH Paul O. Kwon, DO, MPH LTC...Disability Evaluation System ........................................................................... 3 Figure 1: Key Variables Collected at Each Stage

  17. Action research in palliative care: defining an evaluation methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Katherine; Hockley, Jo

    2011-12-01

    Action research is beginning to be utilized within palliative care research to address questions concerned with practice and organizational change. An understanding of appropriate evaluation practices is required in order to ensure that high-quality action research is conducted. The aim of this paper is to present an account of participatory action research and illustrate the way in which evaluation approaches are integrated within this methodology. Participatory action research will be described identifying its origins, principles and its relationship with evaluation frameworks. The key features of the evaluation process in regard to participatory research are outlined. Two studies are presented which illustrate the integration of evaluation within a participatory action research framework. The first approach uses a before-after summative evaluation approach in a study undertaken to develop palliative care practice within a UK nursing home context. The evaluation focused upon the impact of the intervention. The second study utilized similar methods and addressed the process of the action research using the Äldreväst Sjuhärad (ÄVS) model to evaluate participation in a peer education programme for advance care planning amongst older adults. These examples of evaluation within action research illustrate how diverse methods can be used. The use of a specific participatory evaluation model ensures the process reflects the underlying participatory principle of action research. Evaluation processes are integral to action research approaches. The specific evaluative methods adopted will reflect the nature and focus of the evaluation being undertaken.

  18. Judging surgical research: how should we evaluate performance and measure value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souba, W W; Wilmore, D W

    2000-07-01

    To establish criteria to evaluate performance in surgical research, and to suggest strategies to optimize research in the future. Research is an integral component of the academic mission, focusing on important clinical problems, accounting for surgical advances, and providing training and mentoring for young surgeons. With constraints on healthcare resources, there is increasing pressure to generate clinical revenues at the expense of the time and effort devoted to surgical research. An approach that would assess the value of research would allow prioritization of projects. Further, alignment of high-priority research projects with clinical goals would optimize research gains and maximize the clinical enterprise. The authors reviewed performance criteria applied to industrial research and modified these criteria to apply to surgical research. They reviewed several programs that align research objectives with clinical goals. Performance criteria were categorized along several dimensions: internal measures (quality, productivity, innovation, learning, and development), customer satisfaction, market share, and financial indices (cost and profitability). A "report card" was proposed to allow the assessment of research in an individual department or division. The department's business strategy can no longer be divorced from its research strategy. Alignment between research and clinical goals will maximize the department's objectives but will create the need to modify existing hierarchical structures and reward systems. Such alignment appears to be the best way to ensure the success of surgical research in the future.

  19. Evaluation | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    When a program is co-funded, we design the evaluation approach to ensure donor organizations meet their accountability and learning needs too. We conduct external program reviews toward the end of each program ... with your Global Evaluation Community. Living in the Global South? Access free evaluation journals.

  20. A Holistic Approach to Evaluating Research

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Assessing the quality of research is hardly a new or novel idea. Researchers have long debated the best criteria and means for determining the scientific rigor and significance of empirical studies in the natural, social, and behavioral sciences. What is different is that the concern with research quality has taken on renewed ...

  1. Evaluation of Research in Engineering Science in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Brussel, Hendrik Van Brussel; Lindberg, Bengt; Cederwall, Klas

    This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway .......This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway ....

  2. Application of interval 2-tuple linguistic MULTIMOORA method for health-care waste treatment technology evaluation and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; You, Jian-Xin; Lu, Chao; Shan, Meng-Meng

    2014-11-01

    The management of health-care waste (HCW) is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing countries. Selection of the best treatment technology for HCW can be viewed as a complicated multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem which requires consideration of a number of alternatives and conflicting evaluation criteria. Additionally, decision makers often use different linguistic term sets to express their assessments because of their different backgrounds and preferences, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. In response, this paper proposes a modified MULTIMOORA method based on interval 2-tuple linguistic variables (named ITL-MULTIMOORA) for evaluating and selecting HCW treatment technologies. In particular, both subjective and objective importance coefficients of criteria are taken into consideration in the developed approach in order to conduct a more effective analysis. Finally, an empirical case study in Shanghai, the most crowded metropolis of China, is presented to demonstrate the proposed method, and results show that the proposed ITL-MULTIMOORA can solve the HCW treatment technology selection problem effectively under uncertain and incomplete information environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of computer usage in healthcare among private practitioners of NCT Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshkumar, P; Arun Kumar, Sharma; Rajoura, O P

    2011-01-01

    1. To evaluate the usage and the knowledge of computers and Information and Communication Technology in health care delivery by private practitioners. 2. To understand the determinants of computer usage by them. A cross sectional study was conducted among the private practitioners practising in three districts of NCT of Delhi between November 2007 and December 2008 by stratified random sampling method, where knowledge and usage of computers in health care and determinants of usage of computer was evaluated in them by a pre-coded semi open ended questionnaire. About 77% of the practitioners reported to have a computer and had the accessibility to internet. Computer availability and internet accessibility was highest among super speciality practitioners. Practitioners who attended a computer course were 13.8 times [OR: 13.8 (7.3 - 25.8)] more likely to have installed an EHR in the clinic. Technical related issues were the major perceived barrier in installing a computer in the clinic. Practice speciality, previous attendance of a computer course, age of started using a computer influenced the knowledge about computers. Speciality of the practice, presence of a computer professional and gender were the determinants of usage of computer.

  4. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, E.W. van der; Dongen, J.M. van; Boot, C.R.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  5. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, J.M.; Boot, C.R.; van der Gulden, J.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  6. Improving healthcare systems' disclosures of large-scale adverse events: a Department of Veterans Affairs leadership, policymaker, research and stakeholder partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwy, A Rani; Bokhour, Barbara G; Maguire, Elizabeth M; Wagner, Todd H; Asch, Steven M; Gifford, Allen L; Gallagher, Thomas H; Durfee, Janet M; Martinello, Richard A; Schiffner, Susan; Jesse, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) mandates disclosure of large-scale adverse events to patients, even if risk of harm is not clearly present. Concerns about past disclosures warranted further examination of the impact of this policy. Through a collaborative partnership between VA leaders, policymakers, researchers and stakeholders, the objective was to empirically identify critical aspects of disclosure processes as a first step towards improving future disclosures. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants at nine VA facilities where recent disclosures took place. Ninety-seven stakeholders participated in the interviews: 38 employees, 28 leaders (from facilities, regions and national offices), 27 Veteran patients and family members, and four congressional staff members. Facility and regional leaders were interviewed by telephone, followed by a two-day site visit where employees, patients and family members were interviewed face-to-face. National leaders and congressional staff also completed telephone interviews. Interviews were analyzed using rapid qualitative assessment processes. Themes were mapped to the stages of the Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication model: pre-crisis, initial event, maintenance, resolution and evaluation. Many areas for improvement during disclosure were identified, such as preparing facilities better (pre-crisis), creating rapid communications, modifying disclosure language, addressing perceptions of harm, reducing complexity, and seeking assistance from others (initial event), managing communication with other stakeholders (maintenance), minimizing effects on staff and improving trust (resolution), and addressing facilities' needs (evaluation). Through the partnership, five recommendations to improve disclosures during each stage of communication have been widely disseminated throughout the VA using non-academic strategies. Some improvements have been made; other recommendations will be addressed through

  7. Rethinking evaluation | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-06

    Oct 6, 2010 ... Development programs are routinely evaluated based on their usefulness and effectiveness. But in a rapidly changing world, how should evaluation methods themselves be judged? This was the topic of a recent panel discussion at Carleton University hosted by the International Program for Development ...

  8. Evaluating Access. Research Brief. Edition 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton Trust, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews national and international research on widening participation and access programmes to find out which methods are most likely to help disadvantaged pupils get into higher education. Analysis of existing research in the United States and United Kingdom suggests that summer schools, tutoring, and mentoring are among five methods…

  9. Research Award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh ...

  10. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-14

    Jan 14, 2018 ... Deadline: January 14, 2018 IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, ...

  11. Evaluating Excellence in International Development Research

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    kferguson

    ble academic journal or has been cited by other researchers in other journals. This approach is increasingly being criticized for being conserva- tive, arbitrary, and political – and of stifling in- novation and risk-taking in research. Even as universities wrestle with these measures of ex- cellence, IDRC grantees and staff ask ...

  12. An evaluation of attitude toward vaccines among healthcare workers of a University Hospital in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeri, R; Genovese, C; Trimarchi, G; Palamara, M A R; La Fauci, V

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective and safe health technology. Despite this vaccine coverage falls short of national and international targets. Study design. The aim of the study was to evaluate the views of medical staff at Messina University Hospital regarding vaccinations, their current and future vaccination status and whether they recommend it to their patients. The study was conducted from April 2016 to March 2017 by an anonymous face-to-face questionnaire submitted to HCWs. A general lack of confidence and insecurity about vaccination was shown by a substantial proportion of physicians analyzed while pediatricians showed a positive attitude to vaccines. However, many physicians had not been immunized with the recommended vaccines for HCWs and therefore represent a potential source of infection for both patients and the general population. Despite the evidence of the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, compliance by HCWs remains very low for a variety of reasons. A range of measures are therefore needed to ensure their use, not only by the general population, but also by doctors who should be their major promoters.

  13. Apps for hearing healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella; Pinciroli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The hearing healthcare scenario is rapidly evolving due to the pervasive use of m-Health solutions, in particular mobile apps. This brings along significant advantages and opportunities (e.g., accessibility, affordability, personalized healthcare, patient empowerment) as well as significant potential risks and threats (e.g., safety, misuse, quality issues, privacy). Our research aims at the identification and assessment of apps in the hearing healthcare domain. In this article we present an overview of the current availability, variety, and penetration of hearing-related apps.

  14. Evaluation of FRA trespass prevention research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The United States Department of Transportations (US DOT) John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), under the direction of the US DOT Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D), conduct...

  15. Assessing healthcare quality using routine data: evaluating the performance of the national tuberculosis programme in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Zoë M; Sharp, Alana R; Zhou, Jifang; Wasserman, Sean; Nanoo, Ananta

    2017-02-01

    To assess the performance of healthcare facilities by means of indicators based on guidelines for clinical care of TB, which is likely a good measure of overall facility quality. We assessed quality of care in all public health facilities in South Africa using graphical, correlation and locally weighted kernel regression analysis of routine TB test data. Facility performance falls short of national standards of care. Only 74% of patients with TB provided a second specimen for testing, 18% received follow-up testing and 14% received drug resistance testing. Only resistance testing rates improved over time, tripling between 2004 and 2011. National awareness campaigns and changes in clinical guidelines had only a transient impact on testing rates. The poorest performing facilities remained at the bottom of the rankings over the period of study. The optimal policy strategy requires both broad-based policies and targeted resources to poor performers. This approach to assessing facility quality of care can be adapted to other contexts and also provides a low-cost method for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed interventions. Devising targeted policies based on routine data is a cost-effective way to improve the quality of public health care provided. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. FEDS : A Framework for Evaluation in Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venable, John; Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of design artefacts and design theories is a key activity in Design Science Research (DSR), as it provides feedback for further development and (if done correctly) assures the rigour of the research. However, the extant DSR literature provides insufficient guidance on evaluation...... to enable Design Science Researchers to effectively design and incorporate evaluation activities into a DSR project that can achieve DSR goals and objectives. To address this research gap, this research paper develops, explicates, and provides evidence for the utility of a Framework for Evaluation in Design...... Science (FEDS) together with a process to guide design science researchers in developing a strategy for evaluating the artefacts they develop within a DSR project. A FEDS strategy considers why, when, how, and what to evaluate. FEDS includes a two-dimensional characterisation of DSR evaluation episodes...

  17. Design and evaluation of a ubiquitous chest-worn cardiopulmonary monitoring system for healthcare application: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiewen; Ha, Congying; Zhang, Zhengbo

    2017-02-01

    Ambulatory recording of physiological data will provide us deep insight into the physical condition of patients and athletes, and assessing treatment effects and training performances. This study presents a miniature wearable cardiopulmonary monitoring system called "Smart Chest Strap," which consists of an elastic band worn around the user's chest with integrated sensors, a physiological signals acquisition unit, and a mobile phone. The physiological signals including electrocardiogram, respiratory inductance plethysmograph, and accelerations (ACC) are sampled, digitalized, stored, and simultaneously transmitted to a mobile phone via Bluetooth. A medical validation test with participants performing discontinuous incremental treadmill (0-12 km/h) exercise was conducted. The results indicate nearly perfect correlations (0.999, 0.996, 0.994), small mean bias (0.60 BPM, 0.51 BPM, 0.05 g), and narrow limits of agreement (±2.90 BPM, ±1.81 BPM, ±0.09 g) for heart rate (HR), breathing rate (BR), and ACC represented as vector magnitude units (VMUs). There is a general trend of decrease in accuracy, precision, and correlation for HR, BR, and VMU as velocity increases, but these validity statistics are all within acceptable error limits and clinically accepted. The findings demonstrate that the Smart Chest Strap is valid and will have wider applications in healthcare, sports, and scientific research areas.

  18. New evaluation tool now available to assess research quality | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... IDRC supports Strategic Evaluation on Research Excellence, a three-phase project that aims to define and articulate what research excellence means ... An innovative IDRC initiative is improving evaluation capacities of researchers studying Information and Communication Technologies for Development.

  19. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Eccles, Martin P; Shepperd, Sasha; Scott, Anthony; Parmelli, Elena; Beyer, Fiona R

    2014-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals’ behaviour and patient outcomes. Objectives To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each

  20. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Eccles, Martin P; Shepperd, Sasha; Scott, Anthony; Parmelli, Elena; Beyer, Fiona R

    2011-07-06

    There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals' behaviour and patient outcomes. To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each review according to the AMSTAR

  1. The evaluation of research by scientometric indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Vinkler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Aimed at academics, academic managers and administrators, professionals in scientometrics, information scientists and science policy makers at all levels. This book reviews the principles, methods and indicators of scientometric evaluation of information processes in science and assessment of the publication activity of individuals, teams, institutes and countries. It provides scientists, science officers, librarians and students with basic and advanced knowledge on evaluative scientometrics. Especially great stress is laid on the methods applicable in practice and on the clarification of quantitative aspects of impact of scientific publications measured by citation indicators.

  2. Open source clinical portals: a model for healthcare information systems to support care processes and feed clinical research. An Italian case of design, development, reuse, and exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Paolo; Baj, Emanuele; Restifo, Nicola; Origgi, Gianni; Bragagia, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Open source is a still unexploited chance for healthcare organizations and technology providers to answer to a growing demand for innovation and to join economical benefits with a new way of managing hospital information systems. This chapter will present the case of the web enterprise clinical portal developed in Italy by Niguarda Hospital in Milan with the support of Fondazione Politecnico di Milano, to enable a paperless environment for clinical and administrative activities in the ward. This represents also one rare case of open source technology and reuse in the healthcare sector, as the system's porting is now taking place at Besta Neurological Institute in Milan. This institute is customizing the portal to feed researchers with structured clinical data collected in its portal's patient records, so that they can be analyzed, e.g., through business intelligence tools. Both organizational and clinical advantages are investigated, from process monitoring, to semantic data structuring, to recognition of common patterns in care processes.

  3. The effectiveness of tools used to evaluate successful critical decision making skills for applicants to healthcare graduate educational programs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Brian; Hawley, Diane

    2015-05-15

    Students leave healthcare academic programs for a variety of reasons. When they attrite, it is disappointing for the student as well as their faculty. Advanced practice nursing and other healthcare professions require not only extensive academic preparation, but also the ability to critically evaluate patient care situations. The ability to critically evaluate a situation is not innate. Critical decision making skills are high level skills that are difficult to assess. For the purpose of this review, critical decision making and critical thinking skills refer to the same constructs and will be referred to globally as critical decision making skills. The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of tools used to evaluate critical decision making skills for applicants to healthcare graduate educational programs. Adult (18 years of age or older) applicants, students enrolled and/or recent graduates (within one year from completion) of healthcare graduate educational programs. Types of interventions: This review considered studies that evaluated the utilization of unique tools as well as standard tools, such as the Graduate Record Exam or grade point average, to evaluate critical decision making skills in graduate healthcare program applicants. Types of studies: Experimental and non-experimental studies were considered for inclusion. Types of outcomes: Successful quantitative evaluations based on specific field of study standards. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. Studies published in English after 1969 were considered for inclusion in this review. Databases that included both published and unpublished (grey) literature were searched. Additionally, reference lists from all articles retrieved were examined for articles for inclusion. Selected papers were assessed by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from Joanna Briggs Institute. Any disagreement between reviewers was

  4. Public relations metrics: research and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruler, B.; Tkalac Verčič, A.; Verčič, D.

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the increasing need in academia and the public relations profession, this volume presents the current state of knowledge in public relations measurement and evaluation. The book brings together ideas and methods that can be used throughout the world, and scholars and practitioners from

  5. Behavioral Response Research Evaluation Workshop (BRREW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    future research directions, focusing on controlled exposure experiments ( captive and free-ranging animals ) and observational studies. OBJECTIVES...in key areas including controlled exposure experiments ( captive and free-ranging animals ) and observational studies on real Navy exercises; 2...include response to simulated sources of Navy sonar (BRS and captive studies), response to real Navy sources (BRS studies, M3R), incidental response

  6. Methods, measures and indicators for evaluating benefits of transportation research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, Louw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available drawn from within and outside transportation research. The article discusses the sources driving the need for evaluating benefits and describes the challenges confronting the evaluation process. It reviews and compares qualitative and quantitative...

  7. 78 FR 13097 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... issuing an endorsement letter with clarifications of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-1025287...

  8. Mid-term evaluation of ten National Research schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Göran; Dahl, Hanne Marlene; Gustafsson, Christina

    grant applications, monitoring the progress of the FORSKERSKOLER scheme and serving as the evaluation panel for the mid-term evaluation in 2013 and in 2016/2017. The task of the evaluation panel has been to: 1) evaluate the quality of and progress achieved by the ten research schools which were awarded...

  9. Research Steps Towards Human Sequence Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzàlez, Jordi; Roca, F. Xavier; Villanueva, Juan J.

    Human Sequence Evaluation (HSE) concentrates on how to extract descriptions of human behaviour from videos in a restricted discourse domain, such as (i) pedestrians crossing inner-city roads where pedestrians appear approaching or waiting at stops of busses or trams, and (ii) humans in indoor worlds like an airport hall, a train station, or a lobby. These discourse domains allow exploring a coherent evaluation of human movements and facial expressions across a wide variation of scale. This general approach lends itself to various cognitive surveillance scenarios at varying degrees of resolution: from wide-field-of-view multiple-agent scenes, through to more specific inferences of emotional state that could be elicited from high resolution imagery of faces. The true challenge of HSE will consist of the development of a system facility which starts with basic knowledge about pedestrian behaviour in the chosen discourse domain, but could cluster evaluation results into semantically meaningful subsets of behaviours. The envisaged system will comprise an internal logic-based representation which enables it to comment each individual subset, giving natural language explanations of why the system has created the subset in question.

  10. Concluding Thoughts: Observing, Promoting, Evaluating, and Reviewing Research Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1986-01-01

    When institutional personnel assess faculty research performance, they should consider the extent to which the institution rewards research, ways to encourage faculty to be productive, criteria for evaluating research performance, and the specific steps useful in reviewing research performance within academic units. (Author/MSE)

  11. Strategic Evaluation on Communicating Research for Influence: Part I

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC endeavours to do this is by engaging potential research users in the research process, and training research partners in communication skills (writing, publishing, presentation, etc.). IDRC is supporting an evaluation of experiences of research uptake in order to understand to what extent, where and why some ...

  12. A Comprehensive Framework for Evaluation in Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard; Venable, John

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation is a central and essential activity in conducting rigorous Design Science Research (DSR), yet there is surprisingly little guidance about designing the DSR evaluation activity beyond suggesting possible methods that could be used for evaluation. This paper extends the notable exception...... of the existing framework of Pries-Heje et al [11] to address this problem. The paper proposes an extended DSR evaluation framework together with a DSR evaluation design method that can guide DSR researchers in choosing an appropriate strategy for evaluation of the design artifacts and design theories that form...... the output from DSR. The extended DSR evaluation framework asks the DSR researcher to consider (as input to the choice of the DSR evaluation strategy) contextual factors of goals, conditions, and constraints on the DSR evaluation, e.g. the type and level of desired rigor, the type of artifact, the need...

  13. Using prediction markets to forecast research evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafo, Marcus R; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Altmejd, Adam; Heikensten, Emma; Almenberg, Johan; Bird, Alexander; Chen, Yiling; Wilson, Brad; Johannesson, Magnus; Dreber, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) was conducted to assess the quality of research carried out at higher education institutions in the UK over a 6 year period. However, the process was criticized for being expensive and bureaucratic, and it was argued that similar information could be obtained more simply from various existing metrics. We were interested in whether a prediction market on the outcome of REF2014 for 33 chemistry departments in the UK would provide information similar to that obtained during the REF2014 process. Prediction markets have become increasingly popular as a means of capturing what is colloquially known as the 'wisdom of crowds', and enable individuals to trade 'bets' on whether a specific outcome will occur or not. These have been shown to be successful at predicting various outcomes in a number of domains (e.g. sport, entertainment and politics), but have rarely been tested against outcomes based on expert judgements such as those that formed the basis of REF2014.

  14. Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jim Benney

    2009-11-30

    The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be

  15. Promoting and evaluating scientific rigour in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lesley

    2015-07-15

    This article explores perspectives on qualitative research and the variety of views concerning rigour in the research process. Evaluating and ensuring the quality of research are essential considerations for practitioners who are appraising evidence to inform their practice or research. Several criteria and principles for evaluating quality in qualitative research are presented, recognising that their application in practice is influenced by the qualitative methodology used. The article examines a range of techniques that a qualitative researcher can use to promote rigour and apply it to practice.

  16. The Utility of Rural and Underserved Designations in Geospatial Assessments of Distance Traveled to Healthcare Services: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Wendel, Monica L.; Ahn, SangNam; Pulczinski, Jairus C.; Drake, Kelly N.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities research in rural populations is based on several common taxonomies identified by geography and population density. However, little is known about the implications of different rurality definitions on public health outcomes. To help illuminate the meaning of different rural designations often used in research, service delivery, or policy reports, this study will (1) review the different definitions of rurality and their purposes; (2) identify the overlap of various rural designations in an eight-county Brazos Valley region in Central Texas; (3) describe participant characteristic profiles based on distances traveled to obtain healthcare services; and (4) examine common profile characteristics associated with each designation. Data were analyzed from a random sample from 1,958 Texas adults participating in a community assessment. K-means cluster analysis was used to identify natural groupings of individuals based on distance traveled to obtain three healthcare services: medical care, dental care, and prescription medication pick-up. Significant variation in cluster representation and resident characteristics was observed by rural designation. Given widely used taxonomies for designating areas as rural (or provider shortage) in health-related research, this study highlights differences that could influence research results and subsequent program and policy development based on rural designation. PMID:23843803

  17. Strategies for providing healthcare services to street-dwellers in Dhaka city: Evidence from an operations research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddin Jasim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In almost every major urban city, thousands of people live in overcrowded slums, streets, or other public places without any health services. Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest rates of urban population growth in the last three decades compared to the national population growth rate. The numbers of the urban poor and street-dwellers are likely to increase at least in proportion to the overall population growth of the country. The street-dwellers in Bangladesh are extremely vulnerable in terms of their health needs and healthcare-seeking behaviours. In Bangladesh, there is no health service-delivery mechanism targeting this marginalized group of people. This study, therefore, assessed the effectiveness of two models to provide primary healthcare (PHC services to street-dwellers. Methods This study of experimental pre-post design tested two models, such as static clinic and satellite clinics, for providing PHC services to street-dwellers in the evening through paramedics in Dhaka city during May 2009-April 2010. Both quantitative and qualitative techniques were used for collecting data. Data were analyzed comparing before and after the implementation of the clinics for the assessment of selected health and family-planning indicators using the statistical t-test. Services received from the model l and model 2 clinics were also compared by calculating the absolute difference to determine the relative effectiveness of one model over another. Results The use of healthcare services by the street-dwellers increased at endline compared to baseline in both the model clinic areas, and the difference was highly significant (p p  Conclusions As the findings of the study showed the promise of this approach, the strategies could be implemented in all other cities of Bangladesh and in other countries which encounter similar problems.

  18. The CRADLE vital signs alert: qualitative evaluation of a novel device designed for use in pregnancy by healthcare workers in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Hannah L; Boene, Helena; Munguambe, Khatia; Sevene, Esperança; Akeju, David; Adetoro, Olalekan O; Charanthimath, Umesh; Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B; de Greeff, Annemarie; Anthony, John; Hall, David R; Steyn, Wilhelm; Vidler, Marianne; von Dadelszen, Peter; Chappell, Lucy C; Sandall, Jane; Shennan, Andrew H

    2018-01-05

    Vital signs measurement can identify pregnant and postpartum women who require urgent treatment or referral. In low-resource settings, healthcare workers have limited access to accurate vital signs measuring devices suitable for their environment and training. The CRADLE Vital Signs Alert (VSA) is a novel device measuring blood pressure and pulse that is accurate in pregnancy and designed for low-resource settings. Its traffic light early warning system alerts healthcare workers to the need for escalation of care for women with hypertension, haemorrhage or sepsis. This study evaluated the usability and acceptability of the CRADLE VSA device. Evaluation was conducted in community and primary care settings in India, Mozambique and Nigeria and tertiary hospitals in South Africa. Purposeful sampling was used to convene 155 interviews and six focus groups with healthcare workers using the device (n = 205) and pregnant women and their family members (n = 41). Interviews and focus groups were conducted in the local language and audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English for analysis. Thematic analysis was undertaken using an a priori thematic framework, as well as an inductive approach. Most healthcare workers perceived the CRADLE device to be easy to use and accurate. The traffic lights early warning system was unanimously reported positively, giving healthcare workers confidence with decision-making and a sense of professionalism. However, a minority in South Africa described manual inflation as tiring, particularly when measuring vital signs in obese and hypertensive women (n = 4) and a few South African healthcare workers distrusted the device's accuracy (n = 7). Unanimously, pregnant women liked the CRADLE device. The traffic light early warning system gave women and their families a better understanding of the importance of vital signs in pregnancy and during the postpartum period. The CRADLE device was well accepted by healthcare workers

  19. Evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare for ansatte i Odense Kommune, der sygemeldes med lidelser i bevægeapparatet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Didde Cramer; Sørensen, Jan

    CAST har afsluttet en evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare for ansatte i Odense Kommune, der sygemeldes med lidelser i bevægeapparatet. Målet med projektet var at belyse om der blev opnået en hurtigere udredning af kommunens ansatte gennem køb af en 'diagnostisk pakke' ved det...... private firma Falck Healtcare end ved standardforløbet i offentligt regi ved langtidssygemeldinger.   Evalueringen var oprindelig planlagt som et åbent, randomiseret kontrolleret interventionsstudie, hvor ca. 100 deltagere, som pr. lodtrækning skulle fordeles i henholdsvis en kontrol- eller...... projektet skulle udarbejdes en evalueringsrapport. Rapporten: Evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare , beskriver forløbet, og målsætningerne bag projektet samt om mulige årsager og barrierer for rekruttering af deltagere....

  20. Improving correctional healthcare providers' ability to care for transgender patients: Development and evaluation of a theory-driven cultural and clinical competence intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Clark, Kirsty A; Altice, Frederick L; Reisner, Sari L; Kershaw, Trace S; Pachankis, John E

    2017-12-01

    Correctional healthcare providers' limited cultural and clinical competence to care for transgender patients represents a barrier to care for incarcerated transgender individuals. The present study aimed to adapt, deliver, and evaluate a transgender cultural and clinical competence intervention for correctional healthcare providers. In the summer of 2016, a theoretically-informed, group-based intervention to improve transgender cultural and clinical competence was delivered to 34 correctional healthcare providers in New England. A confidential survey assessed providers' cultural and clinical competence to care for transgender patients, self-efficacy to provide hormone therapy, subjective norms related to transgender care, and willingness to provide gender-affirming care to transgender patients before and after (immediately and 3-months) the intervention. Linear mixed effects regression models were fit to assess change in study outcomes over time. Qualitative exit interviews assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. Providers' willingness to provide gender-affirming care improved immediately post-intervention (β = 0.38; SE = 0.41, p cultural competence (χ2 = 22.49; p cultural and clinical competence, self-efficacy, subjective norms, and willingness to provide gender-affirming care to transgender patients. Continued efforts should be made to train correctional healthcare providers in culturally and clinically competent gender-affirming care in order to improve the health of incarcerated transgender people. Future efficacy testing of this intervention is warranted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Substance abuse patterns and psychiatric symptomatology among three healthcare provider groups evaluated in an out-patient program for impaired healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Julio I; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Brand, Michael; Koos, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Three impaired health care provider groups (N = 84) (nurses, pharmacists, and providers with prescriptive authority) referred for a substance abuse evaluation at an outpatient-based program were compared on demographic and family factors, substance abuse patterns, and psychiatric symptomology as assessed by the Personality Assessment Inventory. Nurses had the highest rates of family history of addiction, problems with benzodiazepines, and psychiatric comorbidity. Overall, health care professionals endorsed opioids twice as often as alcohol as a preferred substance. Family history of addiction, sex, and psychiatric comorbidity emerged as salient factors among these health care professionals. Clinical implications are examined in light of the current findings.

  2. 9 CFR 104.4 - Products for research and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PERMITS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 104.4 Products for research and evaluation. (a) An application for a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product Permit to import a biological product for research and evaluation shall be accompanied by...

  3. Cluster randomized trials in comparative effectiveness research: randomizing hospitals to test methods for prevention of healthcare-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Richard; Takvorian, Samuel U; Septimus, Edward; Hickok, Jason; Moody, Julia; Perlin, Jonathan; Jernigan, John A; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S

    2010-06-01

    The need for evidence about the effectiveness of therapeutics and other medical practices has triggered new interest in methods for comparative effectiveness research. Describe an approach to comparative effectiveness research involving cluster randomized trials in networks of hospitals, health plans, or medical practices with centralized administrative and informatics capabilities. We discuss the example of an ongoing cluster randomized trial to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in intensive care units (ICUs). The trial randomizes 45 hospitals to: (a) screening cultures of ICU admissions, followed by Contact Precautions if MRSA-positive, (b) screening cultures of ICU admissions followed by decolonization if MRSA-positive, or (c) universal decolonization of ICU admissions without screening. All admissions to adult ICUs. The primary outcome is MRSA-positive clinical cultures occurring >or=2 days following ICU admission. Secondary outcomes include blood and urine infection caused by MRSA (and, separately, all pathogens), as well as the development of resistance to decolonizing agents. Recruitment of hospitals is complete. Data collection will end in Summer 2011. This trial takes advantage of existing personnel, procedures, infrastructure, and information systems in a large integrated hospital network to conduct a low-cost evaluation of prevention strategies under usual practice conditions. This approach is applicable to many comparative effectiveness topics in both inpatient and ambulatory settings.

  4. Mixed methods evaluation research for a mental health screening and referral clinical pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Annells, Merilyn; Clark, Eileen; Lang, Lyn; Nunn, Russell; Petrie, Eileen; Robins, Alan

    2012-08-01

    This study is an exemplar of mixed method evaluation research for development of a clinical pathway. To develop and evaluate an evidence-based, feasible mental health screening and referral clinical pathway for Department of Veterans' Affairs-funded community nursing care of war veterans and war widows in the Australian context. Mixed methods were applied to formulate and clinically evaluate an appropriate pathway. The pathway was applied at urban and rural sites for the nursing care of 97 war veteran and war widow clients. Evaluative data were collected from clients, their informal carers, community nurses, and general practitioners. Chart auditing and pre-post measures were undertaken. Collaboration occurred with an interdisciplinary design team. The final modified six-page pathway includes use of validated screening tools (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale [K10]) and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, appropriate referral information, directions for support and health-promoting education, and evidence-based guidelines. The clinical pathway is a useful, tested, evidence-based guide for generalist community nurses to identify and suitably respond to common mental healthcare needs of war veterans and war widows. The pathway provides outcomes acceptable to clients and their carers, nurses and doctors. This study provides an evaluated clinical pathway for generalist community nurses to screen for mental health difficulties, make appropriate referrals as required and to support war veteran and war widow clients. However, the study also shows how research can be used to develop and evaluate practical, evidence-based clinical pathways. ©2011 Commonwealth of Australia.

  5. TQM implementation for the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarini, Andrea; Vagnoni, Emidia

    2017-07-03

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to enlarge the debate on total quality management (TQM) implementation in the healthcare sector and to evaluate how and whether leadership can affect TQM implementation. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on findings from a literature review of TQM and leadership. The authors analysed these findings to categorise causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementations. Findings The authors propose three categories of causes of a lack of leadership in TQM programme implementation. The first cause is well-known: a lack of senior managers' involvement and commitment. The second category is the "combined leadership" that occurs in large healthcare organisations; and the third category is the influence of an external "political leadership" on public healthcare. Research limitations/implications This paper presents researchers with three categories of causes of failure of leadership in TQM implementation that can be investigated. It also encourages reflections from practitioners concerning TQM leadership in the healthcare sector. Practical implications The authors request that practitioners reflect on ways to create or sustain a "monolithic" leadership, especially in large organisations, to ensure a common vision, values and attitude for unitary TQM governance. Originality/value In an original way, this paper analyses and proposes three categories of causes linked to a lack of TQM leadership in the healthcare sector.

  6. Improving opioid safety practices in primary care: protocol for the development and evaluation of a multifaceted, theory-informed pilot intervention for healthcare providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leece, Pamela; Buchman, Daniel Z; Hamilton, Michael; Timmings, Caitlyn; Shantharam, Yalnee; Moore, Julia; Furlan, Andrea D

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In North America, drug overdose deaths are reaching unprecedented levels, largely driven by increasing prescription opioid-related deaths. Despite the development of several opioid guidelines, prescribing behaviours still contribute to poor patient outcomes and societal harm. Factors at the provider and system level may hinder or facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines; interventions designed to address such factors are needed. Methods and analysis Using implementation science and behaviour change theory, we have planned the development and evaluation of a comprehensive Opioid Self-Assessment Package, designed to increase adherence to the Canadian Opioid Guideline among family physicians. The intervention uses practical educational and self-assessment tools to provide prescribers with feedback on their current knowledge and practices, and resources to improve their practice. The evaluation approach uses a pretest and post-test design and includes both quantitative and qualitative methods at baseline and 6 months. We will recruit a purposive sample of approximately 10 family physicians in Ontario from diverse practice settings, who currently treat patients with long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain. Quantitative data will be analysed using basic descriptive statistics, and qualitative data will be analysed using the Framework Method. Ethics and dissemination The University Health Network Research Ethics Board approved this study. Dissemination plan includes publications, conference presentations and brief stakeholder reports. This evidence-informed, theory-driven intervention has implications for national application of opioid quality improvement tools in primary care settings. We are engaging experts and end users in advisory and stakeholder roles throughout our project to increase its national relevance, application and sustainability. The performance measures could be used as the basis for health system quality improvement

  7. Effect on maternal and child health services in Rwanda of payment to primary health-care providers for performance: an impact evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinga, Paulin; Gertler, Paul J; Binagwaho, Agnes; Soucat, Agnes L B; Sturdy, Jennifer; Vermeersch, Christel M J

    2011-04-23

    the greatest effect on those services that had the highest payment rates and needed the least effort from the service provider. P4P financial performance incentives can improve both the use and quality of maternal and child health services, and could be a useful intervention to accelerate progress towards Millennium Development Goals for maternal and child health. World Bank's Bank-Netherlands Partnership Program and Spanish Impact Evaluation Fund, the British Economic and Social Research Council, Government of Rwanda, and Global Development Network. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementation of a disability management policy in a large healthcare employer: a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, Cameron A; Skivington, Kathryn; Lay, Morgan; Lifshen, Marni; Etches, Jacob; Chambers, Andrea

    2017-06-17

    This study describes the process and outcomes of the implementation of a strengthened disability management policy in a large Canadian healthcare employer. Key elements of the strengthened policy included an emphasis on early contact, the training of supervisors and the integration of union representatives in return-to-work (RTW) planning. The study applied mixed methods, combining a process evaluation within the employer and a quasi-experimental outcome evaluation between employers for a 3-year period prior to and following policy implementation in January 2012. Staff in the implementation organisation (n=4000) and staff in a peer group of 29 large hospitals (n=1 19 000). Work disability episode incidence and duration. Both qualitative and quantitative measures of the implementation process were predominantly positive. Over the 6-year observation period, there were 624 work disability episodes in the organisation and 8604 in the comparison group of 29 large hospitals. The annual per cent change in episode incidence in the organisation was -5.6 (95% CI -9.9 to -1.1) comparable to the annual per cent change in the comparison group: -6.2 (-7.2 to -5.3). Disability episode durations also declined in the organisation, from a mean of 19.4 days (16.5, 22.3) in the preintervention period to 10.9 days (8.7, 13.2) in the postintervention period. Reductions in disability durations were also observed in the comparison group: from a mean of 13.5 days (12.9, 14.1) in the 2009-2011 period to 10.5 days (9.9, 11.1) in the 2012-2014 period. The incidence of work disability episodes and the durations of work disability declined strongly in this hospital sector over the 6-year observation period. The implementation of the organisation's RTW policy was associated with larger reductions in disability durations than observed in the comparison group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial

  9. Making Research Delicious: An Evaluation of Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Using the Great American Cookie Experiment With Mobile Device Gaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes Lane, Susan; Serafica, Reimund; Huffman, Carolyn; Cuddy, Alyssa

    2016-01-01

    In the current healthcare environment, nurses must have a basic understanding of research to lead change and implement evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention formulated on the framework of the Great American Cookie Experiment measuring nurses' research knowledge, attitudes, and practice using mobile device gaming. This multisite quantitative study provides insight into promotion of research and information about best practices on innovative teaching strategies for nurses.

  10. Eye Tracking: A Novel Approach for Evaluating and Improving the Safety of Healthcare Processes in the Simulated Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Marquard, Jenna L; Fisher, Donald L; Gawlinski, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Eye tracking, used to evaluate a clinician's eye movements, is an example of an existing technology being used in novel ways by patient safety researchers in the simulated setting. The use of eye-tracking technology has the potential to augment current teaching, evaluation, and research methods in simulated settings by using this quantitative, objective data to better understand why an individual performed as he or she did on a simulated or naturalistic task. Selected literature was reviewed with the purpose of explicating how eye tracking can be used by researchers and educators to evaluate error-prone processes. The literature reviewed was obtained by querying the databases PubMed, CINHAL, and Google Scholar using the key words eye tracking, patient safety, and medical errors from 2005 through 2015.An introduction to the use of eye tracking, including both theoretical underpinnings and technological considerations, is presented. In addition, examples of how eye tracking has been used in research studies conducted in both simulated and naturalistic settings are provided. The use of eye-tracking technology to capture the eye movements of novice and expert clinicians has provided new insight into behaviors associated with the identification of medical errors. The study of novices' and experts' eye movements provides data about clinician performance not possible with existing evaluation methods such as direct observation, verbal reports, and thinking out loud. The use of eye tracking to capture the behaviors of experts can lead to the development of training protocols to guide the education of students and novice practitioners. Eye-tracking technology clearly has the potential to transform the way clinical simulation is used to improve patient safety practices.

  11. A critical review of the research literature on Six Sigma, Lean and StuderGroup's Hardwiring Excellence in the United States: the need to demonstrate and communicate the effectiveness of transformation strategies in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamm Larry D

    2009-07-01

    ensure the validity of the conclusions, demonstrate sustainability, investigate changes in organizational culture, or even how one strategy interfaced with other concurrent and subsequent transformation efforts. While informative results can be gleaned from less rigorous studies, improved design and analysis can more effectively guide healthcare leaders who are motivated to transform their organizations and convince others of the need to employ such strategies. Demanding more exacting evaluation of projects consultants, or partnerships with health management researchers in academic settings, can support such efforts.

  12. A critical review of the research literature on Six Sigma, Lean and StuderGroup's Hardwiring Excellence in the United States: the need to demonstrate and communicate the effectiveness of transformation strategies in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R; Gamm, Larry D

    2009-07-01

    sustainability, investigate changes in organizational culture, or even how one strategy interfaced with other concurrent and subsequent transformation efforts. While informative results can be gleaned from less rigorous studies, improved design and analysis can more effectively guide healthcare leaders who are motivated to transform their organizations and convince others of the need to employ such strategies. Demanding more exacting evaluation of projects consultants, or partnerships with health management researchers in academic settings, can support such efforts.

  13. Evaluation Criteria for Participatory Research: Insights from Coastal Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Micaela; Lázaro, Marila

    2014-07-01

    Participatory research in which experts and non-experts are co-researchers in addressing local concerns (also known as participatory action research or community-based research) can be a valuable approach for dealing with the uncertainty of social-ecological systems because it fosters learning among stakeholders and co-production of knowledge. Despite its increased application in the context of natural resources and environmental management, evaluation of participatory research has received little attention. The objectives of this research were to define criteria to evaluate participatory research processes and outcomes, from the literature on participation evaluation, and to apply them in a case study in an artisanal fishery in coastal Uruguay. Process evaluation criteria (e.g., problem to be addressed of key interest to local and additional stakeholders; involvement of interested stakeholder groups in every research stage; collective decision making through deliberation; and adaptability through iterative cycles) should be considered as conditions to promote empowering participatory research. Our research contributes to knowledge on evaluation of participatory research, while also providing evidence of the positive outcomes of this approach, such as co-production of knowledge, learning, strengthened social networks, and conflict resolution.

  14. Evaluation of health information systems research in information systems research: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haried, Peter; Claybaugh, Craig; Dai, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of the health-care industry and the promise of health information systems, researchers are encouraged to build on the shoulders of giants as the saying goes. The health information systems field has a unique opportunity to learn from and extend the work that has already been done by the highly correlated information systems field. As a result, this research article presents a past, present and future meta-analysis of health information systems research in information systems journals over the 2000-2015 time period. Our analysis reviewed 126 articles on a variety of topics related to health information systems research published in the "Senior Scholars" list of the top eight ranked information systems academic journals. Across the selected information systems academic journals, our findings compare research methodologies applied, health information systems topic areas investigated and research trends. Interesting results emerge in the range and evolution of health information systems research and opportunities for health information systems researchers and practitioners to consider moving forward.

  15. A Guide to Evaluation Research in Terminal Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Robert W., III; Foley, Susan H.

    1978-01-01

    Pressure for greater accountability is being exerted on programs for care of terminally ill and increasing demand for evaluation research. Components, implications, and limitations of evaluation systems are discussed, and their application in the terminal care setting addressed. Buckingham evaluation of hospice home care service is cited as a…

  16. Research Evaluation and the Assessment of Public Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molas-Gallart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Funding organisations are increasingly asking academics to show evidence of the economic and social value generated by their research. These requests have often been associated with the emergence of a so-called "new social contract for research" and are related to the implementation of new research evaluation systems. Although the…

  17. Strategic Evaluation on Communicating Research for Influence: Part I

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strategic Evaluation on Communicating Research for Influence: Part I. IDRC aims to support research that is not just about development, or relevant to development, but that will actually influence development. In order to do so, that research has to be effectively communicated and strategically positioned. IDRC endeavours ...

  18. The Policy and Evaluation Division is seeking a 2018 Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-12-22

    Dec 22, 2017 ... Applications must be submitted via email directly to the Policy and Evaluation Division at poev@idrc.ca and may consist only of a resume and cover letter, including an explanation of the proposed research (title, research questions, and initial ideas for the research design). For general information regarding ...

  19. Usability Evaluation of a Research Repository and Collaboration Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Maron, Deborah J.; Charles, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports results from an empirical usability evaluation of Human-Animal Bond Research Initiative Central as part of the effort to develop an open access research repository and collaboration platform for human-animal bond researchers. By repurposing and altering key features of the original HUBzero system, Human-Animal Bond Research…

  20. Situated Research Design and Methodological Choices in Formative Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Design-based implementation research offers the opportunity to rethink the relationships between intervention, research, and situation to better attune research and evaluation to the program development process. Using a heuristic called the intervention development curve, I describe the rough trajectory that programs typically follow as they…

  1. Research Award: Evaluations Deadline: 12 September 2012 Please ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Research Award: Evaluations. Deadline: 12 September 2012. Please note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC's Research Awards provide a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid, in-house program of training and ...

  2. Approach for conducting the longitudinal program evaluation of the US Department of Health and Human Services National Action Plan to prevent healthcare-associated infections: roadmap to elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Katherine L; Mendel, Peter; Weinberg, Daniel A; Leuschner, Kristin J; Gall, Elizabeth M; Siegel, Sari

    2014-02-01

    In response to mounting evidence about skyrocketing morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), in 2009, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued the HHS HAI Action Plan to enhance collaboration and coordination and to strengthen the impact of national efforts to address HAIs. To optimize timely understanding of the Action Plan's approach and outcomes, as well as improve the likely success of this effort, HHS requested an independent longitudinal and formative program evaluation. This article describes the evaluation approach to assessing HHS's progress and the challenges encountered as HHS attempted to transform the national strategy to HAI elimination. The Context-Input-Process-Product (CIPP) model, a structured-yet-flexible formative and summative evaluation tool, supported the assessment of: (1) the Context in which the Action Plan developed, (2) the Inputs and decisions made about selecting activities for implementation, (3) Processes or implementation of selected activities, and (4) Products and outcomes. A system framework consisting of 4 system functions and 5 system properties. The CIPP evaluation model provides a structure for tracking the components of the program, the relationship between components, and the way in which components change with time. The system framework allows the evaluation team to understand what the Action Plan is doing and how it aims to facilitate change in the healthcare system to address the problem of HAIs. With coordination and alignment becoming increasingly important among large programs within healthcare and other fields, program evaluations like this can inform the policy community about what works and why, and how future complex large-scale programs should be evaluated.

  3. Neuroscience-related research in Ghana: a systematic evaluation of direction and capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quansah, Emmanuel; Karikari, Thomas K

    2016-02-01

    Neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases account for considerable healthcare, economic and social burdens in Ghana. In order to effectively address these burdens, appropriately-trained scientists who conduct high-impact neuroscience research will be needed. Additionally, research directions should be aligned with national research priorities. However, to provide information about current neuroscience research productivity and direction, the existing capacity and focus need to be identified. This would allow opportunities for collaborative research and training to be properly explored and developmental interventions to be better targeted. In this study, we sought to evaluate the existing capacity and direction of neuroscience-related research in Ghana. To do this, we examined publications reporting research investigations authored by scientists affiliated with Ghanaian institutions in specific areas of neuroscience over the last two decades (1995-2015). 127 articles that met our inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated in terms of research foci, annual publication trends and author affiliations. The most actively-researched areas identified include neurocognitive impairments in non-nervous system disorders, depression and suicide, epilepsy and seizures, neurological impact of substance misuse, and neurological disorders. These studies were mostly hospital and community-based surveys. About 60% of these articles were published in the last seven years, suggesting a recent increase in research productivity. However, data on experimental and clinical research outcomes were particularly lacking. We suggest that future investigations should focus on the following specific areas where information was lacking: large-scale disease epidemiology, effectiveness of diagnostic platforms and therapeutic treatments, and the genetic, genomic and molecular bases of diseases.

  4. Strategies for providing healthcare services to street-dwellers in Dhaka city: evidence from an operations research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Jasim; Koehlmoos, Tracey P; Saha, Nirod C; Islam, Ziaul; Khan, Iqbal A; Quaiyum, M A

    2012-06-13

    In almost every major urban city, thousands of people live in overcrowded slums, streets, or other public places without any health services. Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest rates of urban population growth in the last three decades compared to the national population growth rate. The numbers of the urban poor and street-dwellers are likely to increase at least in proportion to the overall population growth of the country. The street-dwellers in Bangladesh are extremely vulnerable in terms of their health needs and healthcare-seeking behaviours. In Bangladesh, there is no health service-delivery mechanism targeting this marginalized group of people. This study, therefore, assessed the effectiveness of two models to provide primary healthcare (PHC) services to street-dwellers. This study of experimental pre-post design tested two models, such as static clinic and satellite clinics, for providing PHC services to street-dwellers in the evening through paramedics in Dhaka city during May 2009-April 2010. Both quantitative and qualitative techniques were used for collecting data. Data were analyzed comparing before and after the implementation of the clinics for the assessment of selected health and family-planning indicators using the statistical t-test. Services received from the model l and model 2 clinics were also compared by calculating the absolute difference to determine the relative effectiveness of one model over another. The use of healthcare services by the street-dwellers increased at endline compared to baseline in both the model clinic areas, and the difference was highly significant (p < 0.001). Institutional delivery among the female street-dwellers increased at endline compared to baseline in both the clinic areas. The use of family-planning methods among females also significantly (p < 0.001) increased at endline compared to baseline in both the areas. As the findings of the study showed the promise of this approach, the strategies could

  5. Reviewing Teacher Evaluation of Rewards and Punishments: The Overview of Chinese Teacher Evaluation Research

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Jiayi; Cheng Ling

    2012-01-01

    The authors chose the teacher evaluation pieces literature of Chinese academic studies as the research object, analyzed the domestic dynamic and the views of some experts in this field, and summarized and compiled the research approaches and research methods of the UK and USA. The study found that whether at China or abroad, the study route is basically along the reward and punishment evaluation, from developmental evaluation to the performance evaluation, and compared to the foreign study, t...

  6. Evaluation of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals : Effects on mental health consumer outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilrycx, G.K.M.L.; Croon, M.A.; van den Broek, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals on mental health consumer outcomes. Methods: The Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) and the Recovery-Promoting Relationship Scale (RPRS) were administered to a sample of 142

  7. Applying a community-based participatory research approach to improve access to healthcare for Eritrean asylum-seekers in Israel: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Nora; Weinstein, Tomer; Mink, Jonah; Ghebrezghiabher, Habtom M; Sultan, Zebib; Reichlin, Rachel

    2017-11-15

    Israel hosts approximately 50,000 asylum seekers, most of them from Eritrea. Exclusive policies restrict their access to healthcare. In 2013, local activists partnered with Eritrean asylum seekers to assess health needs as well as willingness to pay for health insurance among the Eritrean communities. This initiative was meant as a step towards jointly advocating access to Israel's public healthcare system and towards strengthening collective efficacy among the asylum-seeking communities, as well as a first attempt to apply a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to migrant health research in Israel. Applying a CBPR approach, a 22-item survey was developed by a team of activists, academics and community members. It was administered by community members in four different cities. Cell weighting was applied to align sample estimates with the population distribution. The results were analyzed by means of a Generalized Linear Model. Six follow-up interviews and two focus group discussions helped interpret the quantitative findings and provided additional information. The results from 445 questionnaires show that most (95%) asylum seekers are interested in purchasing health insurance. To this end, more than half of the respondents are willing to invest up to 300 NIS monthly, which represents a significant part (5-7.5%) of their median monthly income. Willingness to pay for health coverage was independent from employment and income; it was significantly associated with city of residence - which translates into current healthcare options - understanding of health insurance, and health seeking motives. The study further highlights the role of labor policies in shaping not only asylum seekers' access to care but also psychosocial wellbeing. The study provides initial evidence for asylum seekers' willingness to pay monthly contributions into a public health insurance scheme, in spite of economic hardship, and it points to understanding of and trust in the

  8. [Management of malaria in Benin: evaluation of the practices of healthcare professionals following the introduction of artemisinin derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogouyemi-Hounto, A; Kinde-Gazard, D; Nahum, A; Abdillahi, A; Massougbodji, A

    2009-12-01

    In 2004 the policy for malaria management in Benin changed when the National Malaria Coordination Program (NMCP) introduced artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Up to that time, chloroquine had been used for first-line therapy against uncomplicated malaria and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine had been used in case of failure. Artemisinin derivatives have been used for monotherapy in Benin since 2002. The purpose of this transverse study carried out among public and private centers in Cotonou from March 16 to May 17, 2005 was to determine the impact of the switch to ACT on the practices of healthcare professionals. Medical centers were randomly selected from each stratum after identification and stratification of all facilities in the healthcare pyramid. A survey questionnaire was sent to healthcare workers. A total of 690 health workers responded to the questionnaire. Most responders (95.5%) were familiar with artemisinin but a lower percentage (89.6%) prescribed them. Responders were less knowledgable about ACT drugs and Coartem was the best known combination in the minds of prescribers. Biological diagnosis was available for 50% of patients. Artemisinine (derivates) were mainly prescribed as a second choice treatment and as monotherapy whether for severe or uncomplicated malaria. They were prescribed to pregnant women in 34.6% of the cases. Dosage was incorrect in 26.1% of cases in adults and 20.9% of cases in children. These findings indicate that more effort is needed to inform healthcare workers. This is especially urgent since the country is now considering revising its malaria management policy to make ACT available at all levels of the healthcare system. An effective information campaign must be set up to ensure that health workers and drug retailers throughout the country are duly informed of the new malaria treatment policy.

  9. Race to the Top: evaluation of a novel performance-based financing initiative to promote healthcare delivery in rural Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrard Nahimana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performance-based financing (PBF has demonstrated a range of successes and failures in improving health outcomes across low- and middle-income countries. Evidence indicates that the success of PBF depends, in large part, on the model selected, in relation to a variety of contextual factors. Objective: Partners In Health∣Inshuti Mu Buzima aimed to evaluate health outcomes associated with a novel capacity-building model of PBF at health centers throughout Kirehe district, Rwanda. Design: Thirteen health centers in Kirehe district, which provide healthcare to a population of over 300,000 people, agreed to participate in a PBF initiative scheme that integrated data feedback, quality improvement coaching, peer-to-peer learning, and district-level priority setting. Health centers’ progress toward collectively agreed upon site-specific health targets was assessed every 6 months for 18 months. Incentives were awarded only when health centers met goals on all three priorities health centers had collectively agreed upon: 90% coverage of community-based health insurance, 70% contraceptive prevalence rate, and zero acute severe malnutrition cases. Improvement across all four time points and facilities was measured using mixed-effects linear regression. Findings: At 6-month follow-up, 4 of 13 health centers had met 1 target. At 12-month follow-up, 7 centers had met 1 target, and by 18-month follow-up, 6 centers had met 2 targets and 2 centers had met all 3. Average health center performance had improved significantly across the district for all three targets: mean insurance coverage increased from 68% at baseline to 93% (p<0.001; mean number of acute malnutrition cases in the previous 6 months declined from 24 to 5 per facility (p<0.001; and contraceptive prevalence increased from 42 to 59% (p<0.001. A number of innovative improvement initiatives were identified. Conclusion: The combining of PBF, district engagement/support, and peer

  10. Transdisciplinary Research and Evaluation for Community Health Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W.; Neubauer, Leah C.; Bangi, Audrey K.; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2010-01-01

    Transdisciplinary research and evaluation projects provide valuable opportunities to collaborate on interventions to improve the health and well-being of individuals and communities. Given team members’ diverse backgrounds and roles or responsibilities in such projects, members’ perspectives are significant in strengthening a project’s infrastructure and improving its organizational functioning. This article presents an evaluation mechanism that allows team members to express the successes and challenges incurred throughout their involvement in a multisite transdisciplinary research project. Furthermore, their feedback is used to promote future sustainability and growth. Guided by a framework known as organizational development, the evaluative process was conducted by a neutral entity, the Quality Assurance Team. A mixed-methods approach was utilized to garner feedback and clarify how the research project goals could be achieved more effectively and efficiently. The multiple benefits gained by those involved in this evaluation and implications for utilizing transdisciplinary research and evaluation teams for health initiatives are detailed. PMID:18936267

  11. A Decade of Research on Evaluation: A Systematic Review of Research on Evaluation Published between 2005 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coryn, Chris L. S.; Wilson, Lyssa N.; Westine, Carl D.; Hobson, Kristin A.; Ozeki, Satoshi; Fiekowsky, Erica L.; Greenman, Gregory D., II; Schröter, Daniela C.

    2017-01-01

    Although investigations into evaluation theories, methods, and practices have been occurring since the late 1970s, research on evaluation (RoE) has seemingly increased in the past decade. In this review, 257 studies published in 14 evaluation-focused journals over a 10-year period (between 2005 and 2014) were identified as RoE and then classified…

  12. The role of economic evaluation in agricultural research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Krasowicz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the role of economic evaluation in agricultural research on the case of the Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation – State Research Institute in Puławy. The issues such as production technology, crop rotation, farming systems, the level of farm production sustainability and the possibilities of producing biomass for energetic purposes need to be evaluated and economically analysed. It was concluded that economic evaluation can provide an objective assessment of the results of agricultural research and seems to be useful in selecting an appropriate management system and the best trends and directions for production technology.

  13. Research on Livable Community Evaluation Based on GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhangcai; Wu, Yang; Jin, Zhanghaonan; Zhang, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Community is the basic unit of the city. Research on livable community could provide a bottom-up research path for the realization of livable city. Livability is the total factor affecting the quality of community life. In this paper, livable community evaluation indexes are evaluated based on GIS and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method. Then the sum-index and sub-index of community livability are both calculated. And community livable evaluation index system is constructed based on the platform of GIS. This study provides theoretical support for the construction and management of livable communities, so as to guide the development and optimization of city.

  14. Managing Tensions between Evaluation and Research: Illustrative Cases of Developmental Evaluation in the Context of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Lynda; Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Brousselle, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Developmental evaluation (DE), essentially conceptualized by Patton over the past 30 years, is a promising evaluative approach intended to support social innovation and the deployment of complex interventions. Its use is often justified by the complex nature of the interventions being evaluated and the need to produce useful results in real time.…

  15. Functional Capacity Evaluation Research: Report from the Third International Functional Capacity Evaluation Research Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelaar, M J A; Gross, D P; James, C L; Reneman, M F

    2018-03-01

    Purpose Based on the success of the first two conferences the Third International FCE Research Conference was held in The Netherlands on September 29, 2016. The aim was to provide ongoing opportunity to share and recent FCE research and discuss its implications. Methods Invitations and call for abstracts were sent to previous attendees, researchers, practicing FCE clinicians and professionals. Fifteen abstracts were selected for presentation. The FCE research conference contained two keynote lectures. Results 54 participants from 12 countries attended the conference where 15 research projects and 2 keynote lectures were presented. The conference provided an opportunity to present and discuss recent FCE research, and provided a forum for discourse related to FCE use. Conference presentations covered aspects of practical issues in administration and interpretation; protocol reliability and validity; consideration of specific injury populations; and a focused discussion on proposed inclusion of work physiology principles in FCE testing with the Heart Rate Reserve Method. Details of this Third International FCE Research Conference are available from http://repro.rcnheliomare.nl/FCE.pdf . Conclusions Researchers, clinicians, and other professionals in the FCE area have a common desire to further improve the content and quality of FCE research and to collaborate to further develop research across systems, cultures and countries. A fourth, 2-day, International FCE research conference will be held in Valens, Switzerland in August or September 2018. A 'FCE research Society' will be developed.

  16. Improving healthcare consumer effectiveness: An Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research Tool (ANSWER for people with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Susan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA should use DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs within the first three months of symptoms in order to prevent irreversible joint damage. However, recent studies report the delay in DMARD use ranges from 6.5 months to 11.5 months in Canada. While most health service delivery interventions are designed to improve the family physician's ability to refer to a rheumatologist and prescribe treatments, relatively little has been done to improve the delivery of credible, relevant, and user-friendly information for individuals to make treatment decisions. To address this care gap, the Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research Tool (ANSWER will be developed and evaluated to assist people in making decisions about the use of methotrexate, a type of DMARD. The objectives of this project are: 1 to develop ANSWER for people with early RA; and 2 to assess the extent to which ANSWER reduces people's decisional conflict about the use of methotrexate, improves their knowledge about RA, and improves their skills of being 'effective healthcare consumers'. Methods/design Consistent with the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, the development process of ANSWER will involve: 1. creating a storyline and scripts based on the best evidence on the use of methotrexate and other management options in RA, and the contextual factors that affect a patient's decision to use a treatment as found in ERAHSE; 2. using an interactive design methodology to create, test, analyze and refine the ANSWER prototype; 3. testing the content and user interface with health professionals and patients; and 4. conducting a pilot study with 51 patients, who are diagnosed with RA in the past 12 months, to assess the extent to which ANSWER improves the quality of their decisions, knowledge and skills in being effective consumers. Discussion We envision that the ANSWER will help accelerate the dissemination of knowledge and

  17. Efficient healthcare logistics with a human touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vrugt, Noëlle Maria

    2016-01-01

    Despite the long experienced urgency of rapidly increasing healthcare expenditures, there is still a large potential to improve hospitals' logistical efficiency. Operations Research (OR) methodologies may support healthcare professionals in making better decisions concerning planning and capacity

  18. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  19. Making sense of evidence in management decisions: the role of research-based knowledge on innovation adoption and implementation in healthcare. study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyratsis Yiannis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We know that patient care can be improved by implementing evidence-based innovations and applying research findings linked to good practice. Successfully implementing innovations in complex organisations, such as the UK's National Health Service (NHS, is often challenging as multiple contextual dynamics mediate the process. Research studies have explored the challenges of introducing innovations into healthcare settings and have contributed to a better understanding of why potentially useful innovations are not always implemented in practice, even if backed by strong evidence. Mediating factors include health policy and health system influences, organisational factors, and individual and professional attitudes, including decision makers' perceptions of innovation evidence. There has been limited research on how different forms of evidence are accessed and utilised by organisational decision makers during innovation adoption. We also know little about how diverse healthcare professionals (clinicians, administrators make sense of evidence and how this collective sensemaking mediates the uptake of innovations. Methods The study will involve nine comparative case study sites of acute care organisations grouped into three regional clusters across England. Each of the purposefully selected sites represents a variety of trust types and organisational contexts. We will use qualitative methods, in-depth interviews, observation of key meetings, and systematic analysis of relevant secondary data to understand the rationale and challenges involved in sourcing and utilising innovation evidence in the empirical setting of infection prevention and control. We will use theories of innovation adoption and sensemaking in organisations to interpret the data. The research will provide lessons for the uptake and continuous use of innovations in the English and international health systems. Discussion Unlike most innovation studies, which involve

  20. Better antiretroviral therapy outcomes at primary healthcare facilities: an evaluation of three tiers of ART services in four South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Grimwood, Ashraf; Bock, Peter

    2010-09-21

    There are conflicting reports of antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness comparisons between primary healthcare (PHC) facilities and hospitals in low-income settings. This comparison has not been evaluated on a broad scale in South Africa. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including ART-naïve adults from 59 facilities in four provinces in South Africa, enrolled between 2004 and 2007. Kaplan-Meier estimates, competing-risks Cox regression, generalised estimating equation population-averaged models and logistic regression were used to compare death, loss to follow-up (LTFU) and virological suppression (VS) between PHC, district and regional hospitals. 29 203 adults from 47 PHC facilities, nine district hospitals and three regional hospitals were included. Patients at PHC facilities had more advanced WHO stage disease when starting ART. Retention in care was 80.1% (95% CI: 79.3%-80.8%), 71.5% (95% CI: 69.1%-73.8%) and 68.7% (95% CI: 67.0%-69.7%) at PHC, district and regional hospitals respectively, after 24 months of treatment (PART. District and regional hospital patients had independently reduced probabilities of VS, aOR 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59-0.97) and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.56-0.75) respectively compared to PHC facilities over 24 months of treatment. ART outcomes were superior at PHC facilities, despite PHC patients having more advanced clinical stage disease when starting ART, suggesting that ART can be adequately provided at this level and supporting the South African government's call for rapid up-scaling of ART at the primary level of care. Further prospective research is required to determine the degree to which outcome differences are attributable to either facility level characteristics or patient co-morbidity at hospital level.

  1. Literature review: instructional design and pedagogy science in healthcare simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, John J; Vanderbilt, Allison A; Cason, Carolyn L; Bauman, Eric B; Glavin, Ronnie J; Lee, Frances W; Navedo, Deborah D

    2011-08-01

    This article is a review of the literature focused on simulation as an educational intervention in healthcare. The authors examined the literature based on four key levels: (1) the validity and reliability of the simulator, (2) the validity and reliability of the performance evaluation tool, (3) the study design, and (4) the translational impact. The authors found that the majority of research literature in healthcare simulation does not address the validity and reliability of the simulator or the performance evaluation tool. However, there are well-designed research studies that address the translation into clinical settings and have positive patient safety outcomes.

  2. Prototype-Technology Evaluator and Research Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Area-I team has developed and flight tested the unmanned Prototype-Technology Evaluation and Research Aircraft or PTERA ("ptera" being Greek for wing, or...

  3. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  4. Gas research programme in Sweden 1994-1996. Evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustad, J.E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Jahkola, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland); Norhammar, U. [STOSEB (Sweden)

    1997-05-01

    This evaluation report is written by an international committee at the request of the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK). The committee was invited to look into the quality of a research programme funded jointly by Svenskt Gastekniskt Center SGC (Swedish Gas Technical Centre) and NUTEK. Criteria`s considered in the evaluation have in short been as follows: scientific value of the projects and of the results obtained; merits of the methods; capability of research groups and adequacy of resources; quality of research in the view of problem oriented applied research; necessity of future financial support. Although the projects are the main elements to be evaluated, the evaluators have paid attention to structural and other problems wherever such a need has been seen.

  5. Kikiskawâwasow - prenatal healthcare provider perceptions of effective care for First Nations women: an ethnographic community-based participatory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Richard T; Bruno, Grant; Montour, Margaret; Roasting, Matilda; Lightning, Rick; Rain, Patricia; Graham, Bonny; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-08-11

    Pregnant Indigenous women suffer a disproportionate burden of risk and adverse outcomes relative to non-Indigenous women. Although there has been a call for improved prenatal care, examples are scarce. Therefore, we explored the characteristics of effective care with First Nations women from the perspective of prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs). We conducted an ethnographic community-based participatory research study in collaboration with a large Cree First Nations community in Alberta, Canada. We carried out semi-structured interviews with 12 prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs) that were recorded, transcribed, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. According to the participants, relationships and trust, cultural understanding, and context-specific care were key features of effective prenatal care and challenge the typical healthcare model. HCPs that are able to foster sincere, non-judgmental, and enjoyable interactions with patients may be more effective in treating pregnant First Nations women, and better able to express empathy and understanding. Ongoing HCP cultural understanding specific to the community served is crucial to trusting relationships, and arises from real experiences and learning from patients over and above relying only on formal cultural sensitivity training. Consequently, HCPs report being better able to adapt a more flexible, all-inclusive, and accessible approach that meets specific needs of patients. Aligned with the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, improving prenatal care for First Nations women needs to allow for genuine relationship building with patients, with enhanced and authentic cultural understanding by HCPs, and care approaches tailored to women's needs, culture, and context.

  6. QuaDoSta - a freely configurable system which facilitates multi-centric data collection for healthcare and medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht, Ulrike

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes QuaDoSta (quality assurance, documentation and statistics, a flexible documentation system as well as a data collection and networking platform for medical facilities. The user can freely define the required documentation masks which are easily expandable and can be adapted to individual requirements without the need for additional programming. To avoid duplication, data transfer interfaces can be configured flexibly to external sources such as patient management systems used in surgeries or hospital information systems. The projects EvaMed (Evaluation Anthroposophical Medicine and the Network Oncology are two scientific research projects which have been successfully established as nationally active networks on the basis of QuaDoSta. The EvaMed-Network serves as a modern pharmacovigilance project for the documentation of adverse drug events. All prescription data are electronically recorded to assess the relative risk of drugs. The Network Oncology was set up as a documentation system in four hospitals and seven specialist oncology practices where a complete record of all oncological therapies is being carried out to uniform standards on the basis of the ‘basic documentation for tumour patients’ (BDT developed by the German Cancer Society. The QuaDoSta solution system made it possible to cater for the specific requirements of the presented projects. The following features of the system proved to be highly advantageous: flexible setup of catalogues and user friendly customisation and extensions, complete dissociation of system setup and documentation content, multi-centre networkability, and configurable data transfer interfaces.

  7. Orchestration in learning technology research: evaluation of a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Prieto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘orchestrating learning’ is being used increasingly often, referring to the coordination activities performed while applying learning technologies to authentic settings. However, there is little consensus about how this notion should be conceptualised, and what aspects it entails. In this paper, a conceptual framework for orchestration-related research is evaluated by an international panel of learning technology experts. The results of this evaluation show that the framework is complete and understandable, and it is particularly useful as an integrative list of aspects to consider when designing and evaluating learning technologies. To illustrate a way in which the framework can be used to help researchers structure their classroom innovation evaluations, an example is presented that follows the adoption of the framework by a group of researchers in Singapore. Finally, a new evolved version of the framework is presented, taking into account the evaluation feedback.

  8. Evaluating Effectiveness of evidence Based Decision-making Educational Course on Healthcare Domain Managers based Krick-Patrick Model

    OpenAIRE

    Behrouz soltany; Abol Hassan afkar; Seyedeh Hoda Mousavi; Tahereh Khazaei; Somaieh Roohani_Majd; Mohsen Nouri; Mohsen Mohammadi; Nasim Hatefi Moadab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Now a day, Increasing growth of information and increase in complexity of jobs has lead to an increasing importance of educating employees. Toffler believes that education is the most important action and way to face great changes in future life and accepting changes.present study aims to study the effect of evidence based decision making workshop on healthcare managers by means of Krick-Patrick model. Methods and Material:present study was executed among 60 of health...

  9. Web indicators for research evaluation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Thelwall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand for research evaluation within universities and other research-based organisations. In parallel, there has been an increasing recognition that traditional citation-based indicators are not able to reflect the societal impacts of research and are slow to appear. This has led to the creation of new indicators for different types of research impact as well as timelier indicators, mainly derived from the Web. These indicators have been called altmetrics, webometrics or just web metrics. This book describes and evaluates a range of web indicators for aspects of societal or scholarly impact, discusses the theory and practice of using and evaluating web indicators for research assessment and outlines practical strategies for obtaining many web indicators. In addition to describing impact indicators for traditional scholarly outputs, such as journal articles and monographs, it also covers indicators for videos, datasets, software and other non-standard scholarly out...

  10. Evaluating Research Impact: The Development of a Research for Impact Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsey, Komla; Lawson, Kenny; Kinchin, Irina; Bainbridge, Roxanne; McCalman, Janya; Watkin, Felecia; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Rossetto, Allison

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the process of developing a Research for Impact Tool in the contexts of general fiscal constraint, increased competition for funding, perennial concerns about the over-researching of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander issues without demonstrable benefits as well as conceptual and methodological difficulties of evaluating research impact. The aim is to highlight the challenges and opportunities involved in evaluating research impact to serve as resource for potential users of the research for impact tool and others interested in assessing the impact of research. A combination of literature reviews, workshops with researchers, and reflections by project team members and partners using participatory snowball techniques. Assessing research impact is perceived to be difficult, akin to the so-called "wicked problem," but not impossible. Heuristic and collaborative approach to research that takes the expectations of research users, research participants and the funders of research offers a pragmatic solution to evaluating research impact. The logic of the proposed Research for Impact Tool is based on the understanding that the value of research is to create evidence and/or products to support smarter decisions so as to improve the human condition. Research is, therefore, of limited value unless the evidence created is used to make smarter decisions for the betterment of society. A practical way of approaching research impact is, therefore, to start with the decisions confronting decision makers whether they are government policymakers, industry, professional practitioners, or households and the extent to which the research supports them to make smarter policy and practice decisions and the knock-on consequences of doing so. Embedded at each step in the impact planning and tracking process is the need for appropriate mix of expertise, capacity enhancement, and collaborative participatory learning-by-doing approaches. The tool was developed in the

  11. National Evaluation of the Primary Leadership Programme : Research Brief

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Pauline; McCrone, Tami; Rudd, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This research brief presents the key findings from a national evaluation of the Primary Leadership Programme (PLP) carried out by a team at the National Foundation for Educational Research (NEFER) between 2004 and 2006. The evaluation was commissioned by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) and included the use of case-study interviews with key personnel, surveys of school leaders and analysis of pupil examination results. KEY FINDINGS • Pupil achievement – With regard to pupil atta...

  12. Evaluation of a 'virtual' approach to commissioning health research

    OpenAIRE

    McCourt, Christine A; Morgan, Philip A; Youll, Penny

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a 'virtual' (computer-mediated) approach to health research commissioning. This had been introduced experimentally in a DOH programme – the 'Health of Londoners Programme' – in order to assess whether is could enhance the accessibility, transparency and effectiveness of commissioning health research. The study described here was commissioned to evaluate this novel approach, addressing these key questions. Me...

  13. Bridging the gaps among research, policy and practice in ten low- and middle-income countries: Development and testing of questionnaire for health-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boupha Boungnong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reliability and validity of instruments used to survey health-care providers' views about and experiences with research evidence have seldom been examined. Methods Country teams from ten low- and middle-income countries (China, Ghana, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Laos, Mexico, Pakistan, Senegal and Tanzania participated in the development, translation, pilot-testing and administration of a questionnaire designed to measure health-care providers' views and activities related to improving their clinical practice and their awareness of, access to and use of research evidence, as well as changes in their clinical practice that they attribute to particular sources of research evidence that they have used. We use internal consistency as a measure of the questionnaire's reliability and, whenever possible, we use explanatory factor analyses to assess the degree to which questions that pertain to a single domain actually address common themes. We assess the questionnaire's face validity and content validity and, to a lesser extent, we also explore its criterion validity. Results The questionnaire has high internal consistency, with Cronbach's alphas between 0.7 and 0.9 for 16 of 20 domains and sub-domains (identified by factor analyses. Cronbach's alphas are greater than 0.9 for two domains, suggesting some item redundancy. Pre- and post-field work assessments indicate the questionnaire has good face validity and content validity. Our limited assessment of criterion validity shows weak but statistically significant associations between the general influence of research evidence among providers and more specific measures of providers' change in approach to preventing or treating a clinical condition. Conclusion Our analysis points to a number of strengths of the questionnaire - high internal consistency (reliability and good face and content validity - but also to areas where it can be shortened without losing important conceptual

  14. Evaluating an interdisciplinary research project: Lessons learned for organisation, researchers and funders

    OpenAIRE

    Bark, RH; Kragt, M; B. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research is often essential to develop the integrated systems understanding needed to manage complex environmental issues that are faced by decision-makers world-wide. The scientific, institutional and funding challenges to interdisciplinary research have been the subject of considerable discussion. Funders remain willing to support such research and to evaluate its impact. In this paper, we develop and apply a set of review concepts to systematically evaluate a large interd...

  15. Integrated decision-making in response to weapons of mass destruction incidents: development and initial evaluation of a course for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Erica; Heck, Emily; Norman, Linda; Weiner, Betsy; Mathews, Rick; Black, James; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Standardized, validated training programs for teaching administrative decision-making to healthcare professionals responding to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) incidents have not been available. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team designed, developed, and offered a four-day, functional exercise, competency-based course at a national training center. This report provides a description of the development and initial evaluation of the course in changing participants' perceptions of their capabilities to respond to WMD events. Course participants were healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, emergency medical services administrators, hospital administrators, and public health officials. Each course included three modified tabletop and/or real-time functional exercises. A total of 441 participants attended one of the eight course offerings between March and August 2003. An intervention group only, pre-post design was used to evaluate change in perceived capabilities related to administrative decision-making for WMD incidents. Paired evaluation data were available on 339 participants (81.9%). Self-ratings for each of 21 capability statements were compared before and after the course. A 19-item total scale score for each participant was calculated from the pre-course and post-course evaluations. Paired t-tests on pre- and post-course total scores were conducted separately for each course. There was consistent improvement in self-rated capabilities after course completion for all 21 capability statements. Paired t-tests of pre- and post-course total scale scores indicated a significant increase in mean ratings for each course (all p < 0.001). The tabletop/real-time-exercise format was effective in increasing healthcare administrators' self-rated capabilities related to WMD disaster management and response. Integrating the competencies into training interventions designed for a specific target audience and deploying them into an interactive learning

  16. The evaluation of the individual impact factor of researchers and research centers using the RC algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Villafáfila, Amelia; Ramos-Brieva, Jesus A

    2015-01-01

    The RC algorithm quantitatively evaluates the personal impact factor of the scientific production of isolated researchers. The authors propose an adaptation of RC to evaluate the personal impact factor of research centers, hospitals and other research groups. Thus, these could be classified according to the accredited impact of the results of their scientific work between researchers of the same scientific area. This could be useful for channelling budgets and grants for research. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating a collaborative IT based research and development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zaheer; Ludlow, David; Caceres, Santiago

    2013-10-01

    In common with all projects, evaluating an Information Technology (IT) based research and development project is necessary in order to discover whether or not the outcomes of the project are successful. However, evaluating large-scale collaborative projects is especially difficult as: (i) stakeholders from different countries are involved who, almost inevitably, have diverse technological and/or application domain backgrounds and objectives; (ii) multiple and sometimes conflicting application specific and user-defined requirements exist; and (iii) multiple and often conflicting technological research and development objectives are apparent. In this paper, we share our experiences based on the large-scale integrated research project - The HUMBOLDT project - with project duration of 54 months, involving contributions from 27 partner organisations, plus 4 sub-contractors from 14 different European countries. In the HUMBOLDT project, a specific evaluation methodology was defined and utilised for the user evaluation of the project outcomes. The user evaluation performed on the HUMBOLDT Framework and its associated nine application scenarios from various application domains, resulted in not only an evaluation of the integrated project, but also revealed the benefits and disadvantages of the evaluation methodology. This paper presents the evaluation methodology, discusses in detail the process of applying it to the HUMBOLDT project and provides an in-depth analysis of the results, which can be usefully applied to other collaborative research projects in a variety of domains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Research Issues in Evaluating Learning Pattern Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This article concludes the special issue of "Studies in Educational Evaluation" concerned with "Evaluating learning pattern development in higher education" by discussing research issues that have emerged from the previous contributions. The article considers in turn: stability versus variability in learning patterns; old versus new analytic…

  19. Evaluation in the Extreme : Research, Impact and Politics in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Evaluation in the Extreme : Research, Impact and Politics in Violently Divided Societies. Couverture du livre Evaluation in the Extreme. Directeur(s) : Kenneth Bush et Colleen Duggan. Maison(s) d'édition : SAGE Publications, CRDI. 17 septembre 2015. ISBN : 9789351503941. 348 pages. e-ISBN : 9781552505847.

  20. Measurement of Teacher Competence. Research and Evaluation in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, George E.; Wiersma, William

    This monograph contains a description of continued research efforts in measuring and evaluating preservice teacher competencies and effectiveness in the competency-based teacher education (CBTE) program at the University of Toledo (Ohio). Chapter 1 introduces the assessment rationale, and chapter 2 provides an overview of research literature on…

  1. Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Nancy L.; Dellinger, Amy B.; Brannagan, Kim B.; Tanaka, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are…

  2. The next Stages in Researching Water Fluoridation: Evaluation and Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Martin C.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: (1) to provide a commentary on a conference held at the University of Manchester entitled Researching Water Fluoridation: Evaluation and Surveillance; (2) to synthesize from the proceedings of the meeting suggestions for future research and public health surveillance. Method: The main points and problematic issues raised by the speakers…

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the standard of future practice. Therefore, it is imperative for healthcare educators to understand the issues students face in their everyday fieldwork practice and equip them to deal with these ethical issues. Objectives. The objective of this research was to determine the issues that students face in their fieldwork practice and ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This model involves the allocation of nursing students to a qualified professional nurse who, in the course of ... who qualified in general nursing and midwifery at a rural hospital in. Lesotho. Eight professional .... research that explored the experiences and perceptions of healthcare workers in clinical environments about the ...

  5. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper.

  6. Fundamental research on the evaluation of muscle activity state

    OpenAIRE

    遠藤, 厚志

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamental research results obtained by adding the sensory information to the activity state evaluation of muscle movement. The purpose of this study is to show the engineering evaluation results of the activity state of the muscle by sEMG(surface ElectroMyoGraphy) using the visual information that biofeedback is made. No evaluation method has the visual information, from being affected by the auxiliary cooperative muscles, not efficient. How to sEMG and biofeedback ...

  7. Healthcare Applications of Smart Watches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tsung-Chien; Fu, Chia-Ming; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Fang, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize research studies involving the use of smart watch devices for healthcare. Materials and Methods The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was chosen as the systematic review methodology. We searched PubMed, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, ACM, and IEEE Xplore. In order to include ongoing clinical trials, we also searched ClinicalTrials.gov. Two investigators evaluated the retrieved articles for inclusion. Discrepancies between investigators regarding article inclusion and extracted data were resolved through team discussion. Results 356 articles were screened and 24 were selected for review. The most common publication venue was in conference proceedings (13, 54%). The majority of studies were published or presented in 2015 (19, 79%). We identified two registered clinical trials underway. A large proportion of the identified studies focused on applications involving health monitoring for the elderly (6, 25%). Five studies focused on patients with Parkinson’s disease and one on cardiac arrest. There were no studies which reported use of usability testing before implementation. Discussion Most of the reviewed studies focused on the chronically ill elderly. There was a lack of detailed description of user-centered design or usability testing before implementation. Based on our review, the most commonly used platform in healthcare research was that of the Android Wear. The clinical application of smart watches as assistive devices deserves further attention. Conclusion Smart watches are unobtrusive and easy to wear. While smart watch technology supplied with biosensors has potential to be useful in a variety of healthcare applications, rigorous research with their use in clinical settings is needed. PMID:27623763

  8. Robustness of the healthcare utilization results from the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST evaluating the human-bovine (WC3 reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Damme Pierre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial was a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of a three-dose pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5 including its effect on healthcare utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE. The per-protocol (PP analyses, which counted events occurring 14 days after dose 3 among infants without protocol violations, have already been published. This paper evaluates the consistency of the healthcare utilization results based on the modified intention to treat (MITT analyses with the PP analyses. The MITT analyses include all infants receiving at least one dose of vaccine or placebo and follow-up begins after dose 1. The paper also explores the consistency of the results for different subgroups of the study population with different types of surveillance. Methods Data on healthcare utilization for acute gastroenteritis were collected via telephone interviews after administration of the first dose. Parents were either contacted every 6 weeks or every 2 weeks depending on the substudy in which they were enrolled. Those contacted every 2 weeks were also asked to complete symptom diaries. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of RV5 on the rates of RVGE-associated healthcare encounters in all of the analyses. Results In the first 2 years after vaccination, RV5 reduced the combined rate of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED visits 88.9% (95% CI: 84.9, 91.9 for all RVGE regardless of serotype in the MITT analysis compared with a 94.5% (95% CI: 91.2, 96.6 reduction based on the G1-G4 PP analysis. By type of surveillance, the rate reductions for the G1-G4 PP analysis were 91.0% (95% CI: 81.7, 95.5 and 95.9% (95% CI: 92.2, 97.8 among parents contacted every 2 weeks (number evaluable = 4,451 and every 6 weeks (number evaluable = 52,683 respectively. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrated that the effect of RV5 on reducing the rate of hospitalizations

  9. On multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, G.; Molas-Gallart, J.; De Rijcke, S.; Meijer, I.; Van der Weijden, I.; Wouters, P.

    2016-07-01

    This special session forms part of a larger program aimed at the multiplication and integration of methodological approaches in the research evaluation and innovation policy field. The session builds on previous initiatives by Gemma Derrick and colleagues at CWTS, INGENIO, the Rathenau Instituut and SPRU, exploring the advantages of qualitative methodological tools at the STI/ENID conference in Lugano, and an international workshop in London in October 2015. The program is highly topical: the research evaluation field is currently reconsidering its methodological foundations in light of new research questions arising from policy initiatives regarding a) the move toward open science; b) a reconceptualization of research excellence to include societal relevance; c) diversification of academic careers, and d) the search for indicators showcasing responsible research behavior and innovation. This new special session at STI2016 will advance and broaden the scope of previous initiatives by building bridges between cutting edge research involving quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodological research designs. Bringing together leading experts and promising researchers with distinctive methodological skill-sets, the session will demonstrate the advantages of cross-fertilization between ‘core’ and ‘peripheral’ methodological approaches for the research evaluation and science indicators field. (Author)

  10. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5–7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their association with static magnetic field exposure. Methods We performed an observational study among 361 employees of 14 clinical and research MRI facilities in The Netherlands. Each participant completed a diary during one or more work shifts inside and/or outside the MRI facility, reporting work activities and symptoms (from a list of potentially MRI-related symptoms, complemented with unrelated symptoms) experienced during a working day. We analysed 633 diaries. Exposure categories were defined by strength and type of MRI scanner, using non-MRI shifts as the reference category for statistical analysis. Non-MRI shifts originated from MRI staff who also participated on MRI days, as well as CT radiographers who never worked with MRI. Results Varying per exposure category, symptoms were reported during 16–39% of the MRI work shifts. We observed a positive association between scanner strength and reported symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with closed-bore MRI scanners of 1.5 Tesla (T) and higher (1.5 T OR=1.88; 3.0 T OR=2.14; 7.0 T OR=4.17). This finding was mainly driven by reporting of vertigo and metallic taste. Conclusions The results suggest an exposure-response association between exposure to strong static magnetic fields (and associated motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields) and reporting of transient symptoms on the same day of exposure. Trial registration number 11-032/C PMID:24714654

  11. The Osservasalute Health Report 2010: the contribution of a wide and independent Italian research network to decision making in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Giulio de Belvis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Italian Observatory Healthcare Report (IOHR - 8th edition [1] aims to help policy makers in the process of decision making through a set of validated indicators resulting from the multidisciplinary activity of several public health experts. Its main task is to gather comparable data on the health status and the quality of health care services throughout the Italian regions. Methods: The report adopts a European approach in order to build a benchmarking activity and the selection criteria of indicators include: meaning, feasibility and quality, comparability and reliability. Each indicator is analyzed by experts in terms of meaning, pattern, validity and limits, graphic representation; recommendations are included for decision makers. A peer reviewing is performed for quality assessment. Results: The IOHR 2010 included 96 indicators, analysed by 203 authors. Through comparable regional data coming from different sources, an overview of the Italian Health System, and a gauging of the impact that different regional organizational and institutional arrangements have on the quality of health services, have been provided. Though data analysis showed a North-South gradient in the quality and the organization of health care services, nevertheless, the overall health status of Italian population is good. Risk factors, lifestyles and prevention together with geographical and social differences in health status and service access are the main priorities. Conclusions: The IOHR helps monitoring the health status in the Italian regions through specific indicators characterized by scientific strictness. It contributes to identifying the situations of excellence and disseminating public health care control tools in order to facilitate the decision making process.

  12. Evaluation of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie T

    2008-08-01

    Interdisciplinarity has become a widespread mantra for research, accompanied by a growing body of publications. Evaluation, however, remains one of the least-understood aspects. This review of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research evaluation categorizes lessons from the emergent international literature on the topic reviewed in 2007. It defines parallels between research performance and evaluation, presents seven generic principles for evaluation, and reflects in the conclusion on changing connotations of the underlying concepts of discipline, peer, and measurement. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research performance and evaluation are both generative processes of harvesting, capitalizing, and leveraging multiple expertise. Individual standards must be calibrated, and tensions among different disciplinary, professional, and interdisciplinary approaches carefully managed in balancing acts that require negotiation and compromise. Readiness levels are strengthened by antecedent conditions that are flexible enough to allow multiple pathways of integration and collaboration. In both cases, as well, new epistemic communities must be constructed and new cultures of evidence produced. The multidisciplinary-interdisciplinary-transdisciplinary research environment spans a wide range of contexts. Yet seven generic principles provide a coherent framework for thinking about evaluation: (1) variability of goals; (2) variability of criteria and indicators; (3) leveraging of integration; (4) interaction of social and cognitive factors in collaboration; (5) management, leadership, and coaching; (6) iteration in a comprehensive and transparent system; and (7) effectiveness and impact.

  13. Instrument Adaptation in Cross-Cultural Studies of Students' Mathematics-Related Beliefs: Learning from Healthcare Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Paul; Diego-Mantecón, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Much comparative research into education-related beliefs has exploited questionnaires developed in one culture for use in another. This has been particularly the case in mathematics education, the focus of this paper. In so doing, researchers have tended to assume that translation alone is sufficient to warrant a reliable and valid instrument for…

  14. Healthcare plans and consumer perceptions of healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda-Arango, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of healthcare insurance plans on consumer perception of trust in a healthcare institution, and the mediating effect of trust on consumer loyalty towards an institution. The study was conducted at a healthcare institution in Colombia where a total of 841 patients responded to a questionnaire. A structural equation model shows that individuals who have a pre-paid healthcare plan have a stronger evaluation of trust compared to those who hold a regulated healthcare plan (i.e., subsidized and contributory plans). In turn, trust positively predicts consumers' loyalty towards an institution. The relationship between the patients' healthcare plans and their degree of loyalty towards healthcare institutions is completely mediated by their perception of trust towards the institution. A greater perception of trust is explained by having a medical plan that provides consumers with more flexibility, allowing them to select their health provider at a premium price. Although health institutions do not control healthcare regimes, these affect consumers' trust in their service. Institutions cannot modify characteristics of the regime, but they can promote a trustworthy environment to strengthen consumers' loyalty to the institution.

  15. [Requirements for the provision of healthcare to socially disadvantaged population groups: evaluation of 10 years of medical care provided to the homeless in Hanover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidl, Jana; Wenzlaff, Paul; Sens, Brigitte; Goesmann, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the German Federal Government introduced a general health insurance obligation, but there are still vulnerable groups such as poor and homeless people without access to medical care. Especially for social fringe groups, a visit to the doctor involves many obstacles. Ten years ago the project "Outreach medical care for homeless people and people threatened by homelessness in Hanover" was established in order to reduce those gaps in healthcare provision. A continuously conducted evaluation of the project shows that low-threshold consulting hours are accepted and the transition to medical specialists is becoming increasingly easy. So the evaluation plays an important part in the development of the project. Since the healthcare reform in 2004, however, the number of cases has increased by 30 % while the actual homeless target group has remained the same. In order to guarantee access to the healthcare system for patients who cannot afford additional payments, the abolition of the quarterly practice fee and other additional payments for people on a low income is an important step. The growing requirements, resulting from a changing clientele and changes in the general conditions, are raising questions as to the nature of such projects and its future funding. In the long run it isn't the aim of this non-profit project to take on central tasks of a mutually supportive community. Ther