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Sample records for evaluate cell-mediated immunity

  1. Skin Tests for Evaluation of Cell Mediated Immunity in Leprosy

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    P S Mallya

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mesate,d immune (CMI response to lepromin and dinitrochloro benzene (DNCB was evaluatt-d in 60 freshly detected leprosy cases. It was observed that 70%, ( 28 of 40 of the pa across tie leprosy spectrum except LL cases revealed delayed hypersensitivity to DNCB as -against 42.5% (1-7 of 40 to lepromin. DNCB test was found superior to lepromin test to measure CMI because of its simplicity and easy interpretation of skin reactivity. It detected CMI in 40% of BL cases who were lepromin negative. Grading of skin reactivity showed a program decrease in delayed hypersensitivity across the spectrum of leprosy from TT to LL. It can be concluded that there is no gross impairment of non-specific CMI in leprosy patients other than LL cases and this non-specific CMI depression correlates well with Ridley-Jopling clinical scale of leprosy.

  2. 2. Cell-mediatedImmunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    causing multiple sclerosis (see Box 2 in Part 1). Keywords. Immunity ..... polymorphic, this aspect causes problems for recipients during tissue transplantation. T cells from the recipient will 'attack and ... In fact, some MH alleles are associated with resistance or susceptibility to different infectious diseases, such as malaria and.

  3. Ex vivo evaluation of pidotimod activity on cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, G P; Fugazza, L; Stramba Badiale, M; Montalto, F; Bombelli, G; La Vecchia, G; Illeni, M T; Uslenghi, C

    1994-12-01

    The activity of pidotimod ((R)-3-[(S)-(5-oxo2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, PGT/1A, CAS 121808-62-6) on immunological parameters was evaluated in a double-blind trial, involving two Research Centres. 16 patients with a primary or metastatic neoplasm, 16 elderly patients under immunodeficiency conditions and 11 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the present study. The patients, randomized within each centre, were assigned to one of the following treatments lasting 15 days: one vial i.m. of pidotimod 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg twice a day, respectively; one vial i.m. of physiological saline twice a day. The lymphocyte PHA-stimulation test evidenced a significant variability due to the different treatment groups (p = 0.004). The analysis of the stimulation index (SI), computed from the mean c.p.m. before and after PHA-stimulation, showed a significant difference, dose-independent, between saline and active treatment (p = 0.002). The SI analysis, on the basis of the data of the allogenic stimulation test (mixed lymphocyte culture), confirmed the difference between saline and active treatment (p = 0.05) with a significant linear component in the time-effect curve (p = 0.001) but not in the dose-effect curve. A 12% increase in CD 3 lymphocytes compartment was observed with pidotimod 400 mg/day. The drug was well tolerated by all the patients included in the study.

  4. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity-Cell-mediated Immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 6. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity - Cell-mediated Immunity. Asma Ahmed Banishree Saha Anand Patwardhan Shwetha Shivaprasad Dipankar Nandi. General Article Volume 14 Issue 6 June 2009 pp 610-621 ...

  5. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

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    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  6. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  7. Augmented primary humoral immune response and decreased cell-mediated immunity by Murraya koenigii in rats.

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    Kaur, Inderjit; Bhatia, Sneh; Bhati, Yogendra; Sharma, Vinay; Mediratta, Pramod K; Bhattacharya, Swapan K

    2014-05-01

    Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae) (curry patta: Hindi) of the family Rutaceae is used in the traditional Indian system of medicine for its immunomodulatory properties. The essential oil of the leaves of M. koenigii possesses antimicrobial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities and is used for the treatment of amebiasis, diabetes, and hepatitis. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of M. koenigii on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats. Aqueous extract of M. koenigii leaves was administered orally in a dose of 350 mg/kg. Cell-mediated immunity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness following sensitization by injection of keyhole limpet hemocyanin and subsequent challenge by the same. Humoral immunity was assessed by measurement of hemagglutination titer to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). In the humoral immune response, the administration of M. koenigii [350 mg/kg per os (p.o.)] from day 1 to day 7 after sensitization with SRBC on day 0 caused a significant increase in the primary anti-SRBC titer. However, the secondary immune response was decreased significantly (pkoenigii (350 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered for 14 days, produced a significant (pkoenigii augments primary humoral immune response and decreases cell-mediated immunity.

  8. Augmentation of humoral and cell mediated immune responses by Thujone.

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    Siveen, K S; Kuttan, Girija

    2011-12-01

    Thujone, a naturally occurring monoterpene, was found to enhance the total WBC count, bone marrow cellularity, number of α-esterase positive cells, number of plaque forming cells in spleen and circulating antibody titer in Balb/c mice (1mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally for 5 days). Thujone treatment enhanced proliferation of splenocytes and thymocytes, both in the presence and absence of specific mitogens. Administration of Thujone was found to stimulate the cell-mediated immunological response in normal and tumor bearing Balb/c mice. A significant enhancement in natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent complement mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) in both normal as well as tumor-bearing animals was observed after the administration of Thujone. Production of cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-γ was significantly enhanced by the administration of Thujone. The stimulatory effect of Thujone on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) generation was determined by Winn's neutralization assay using CTL sensitive EL4 thymoma cells. Thujone treatment showed a significant increase in CTL production in both the in vivo and in vitro models, as indicated by a significant increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals. All these results indicate that administration of Thujone could enhance the immune response of mice. There was a significant reduction in solid tumor development, mediated by the presence of alert immune responses during Thujone administration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  10. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  11. Evaluation of cell-mediated immune responses and bacterial clearance in 6-10 months old water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) experimentally vaccinated with four dosages of commercial Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diptee, M D; Adesiyun, A A; Asgarali, Z; Campbell, M; Fosgate, G T

    2005-07-15

    Thirty water buffalo, obtained from a brucellosis-free farm, were used to evaluate cell-mediated immune responses and bacterial clearance in response to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) in a dose-response study. The animals were randomly divided into five treatment groups. Groups I--V received the recommended dose (RD) of RB51 vaccine once, RD twice 4 weeks apart, double RD once, double RD twice 4 weeks apart and saline once, respectively. Cell-mediated immune response to RB51 was assessed by the histological examination of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections of lymph nodes draining the sites of inoculation and by comparison of stimulation indices (SI) derived from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) assay. A mixture of cytoplasmic proteins from B. melitensis B115 (brucellergene) was used as a specific antigenic stimulus to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and lymph node mononuclear cells (LNMC) up to 22 post-initial-inoculation week (PIW). Supernatants harvested at 18-24h after the in vitro antigenic stimulus were assayed for their IFN-gamma content by using a commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Clearance of RB51 was assessed by the sequential immunohistochemical examination of sections of draining lymph nodes post-inoculation. There was no observable expansion of the deep cortex of lymph nodes on H&E sections indicating poor T-cell stimulation. All group V (control) water buffalo PBMC ELISA values were negative (SIRB51 occurred between 4 and 6 PIW in treatment groups I and III and between 6 and 12 PIW in groups II and IV. RB51 was not detected in any of the control animals at sampling intervals post-inoculation.

  12. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

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    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  13. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells...... significant differences between the two strains. Expression of VLA-1 was also found to be redundant regarding the ability of effector T cells to eliminate virus from internal organs of i.v. infected mice. Using delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assays to evaluate subdermal CD8(+) T......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection....

  14. Human cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens.

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    Hanna, L; Schmidt, L; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Jawetz, E

    1979-02-01

    A reproducible method was developed to determine the ability of chlamydial antigens to stimulate lymphocytes from volunteers. In tests repeated 4 to 14 times, the cells from a given volunteer gave a relatively narrow range of responses, but there were great differences in the mean response of different volunteers. In the entire group of 52 volunteers, lymphocyte stimulation was significantly associated with the presence of antibody, but in a given individual results of one test did not aid in predicting the results of the other. A majority of persons with either antichlamydial antibody or elevated lymphocyte stimulation, or both, did not have a history of signs or symptoms within a spectrum of chlamydial diseases. This may reflect the great frequency of asymptomatic infection with these organisms. The lymphocytes of some individuals were stimulated to a significantly greater degree by antigens of one chlamydial species (Chlamydia trachomatis or C. psittaci) than by the other. These and other cell-mediated reactions in human chlamydial infections, and their possible medical significance, are under continued study.

  15. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...... are important regulators of the antigen-specific cell-mediated responses during active C trachomatis infection. We conclude that impaired cell-mediated response to C trachomatis is associated with IL-10 genotype in subjects with high IL-10 producing capacity. A comparison of immune markers between subjects...

  16. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response to crude antigens of Dermatophilus congolensis during experimental infection of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A; Wilkie, B N

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits were infected with Dermatophilus congolensis and tested for humoral immune response by indirect haemagglutination and for cell-mediated immune response to crude antigens of D. congolensis. Lymphocyte transformation and macrophage migration inhibition assays were used as in vitro correlates of cell-mediated immune response while cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity was used in vivo. Endo-antigen and whole cell antigen were found to significantly induce cell-mediated immune response. In contrast, humoral responses were found to be more significantly induced by exo-antigen. A biphasic immune response was revealed by the lymphocyte transformation test.

  17. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    is still a problem worldwide. The broad host range of CDV creates a constant viral reservoir among wildlife animals. Our results demonstrated early humoral and cell-mediated immune responses (IFN-gamma) in DNA vaccinated mink compared to mock-vaccinated mink after challenge with a Danish wild-type CDV...

  18. T cell mediated cerebral hemorrhages and microhemorrhages during passive Aβ immunization in APPPS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Calignon Alix

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ, the peptide that accumulates in the form of senile plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes a dramatic immune response that prevents plaque formation and clears accumulated Aβ in transgenic mice. In a clinical trial of Aβ immunization, some patients developed meningoencephalitis and hemorrhages. Neuropathological investigations of patients who died after the trial showed clearance of amyloid pathology, but also a powerful immune response involving activated T cells probably underlying the negative effects of the immunization. Results To define the impact of T cells on this inflammatory response we used passive immunization and adoptive transfer to separate the effect of IgG and T cell mediated effects on microhemorrhage in APPPS1 transgenic mice. Neither anti Aβ IgG nor adoptively transferred T cells, alone, led to increased cerebrovascular damage. However, the combination of adoptively transferred T cells and passive immunization led to massive cerebrovascular bleeding that ranged from multiple microhemorrhages in the parenchyma to large hematomas. Conclusions Our results indicate that vaccination can lead to Aβ and T cell induced cerebral micro-hemorrhages and acute hematomas, which are greatly exacerbated by T cell mediated activity.

  19. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses against Schistosoma spindale in BALB/c mice.

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    Prechatangkit, B; Dhaliwal, J S; Ambu, S

    1994-03-01

    (BALB/c mice were infected with cercariae of Schistosoma spindale by tail immersion technique and by dropping some cercariae from a pipet onto the outer surface of the pinna of the ears. Groups of mice were removed on Days 10, 20 and 30 and tested for humoral and cell mediated immune responses using either adult worm or cercarial antigen. On Day 50 the mice were sacrificed and the worm burden was determined for each mouse. This method resulted in an infectivity rate of 89.7%. There was a significant increase in antibody titer to the adult worm antigen while no significant increase was observed for cercarial antigen over the period of the study. Results obtained for cell mediated immunity were more dramatic. There was a significant increase in foot pad swelling for adult worm antigen compared to a significant decrease for cercarial antigen during the course of the infection.

  20. In-vitro monitoring of cell-mediated immunity to dinitrochlorobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D N; Ledger, V; Diamandopoulos, A

    1976-11-27

    A dinitrochlorobenzene (D.N.C.B.)/red-blood-cell conjugate inhibited migration of leucocytes which came from D.N.C.B. sensitised patients. This effect provided the basis for a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative in-vitro measure of D.N.C.B. sensitivity. Frequent serial measurement of cell-mediated immunity was possible with the test, provided D.N.C.B. sensitivity was maintained by occasional skin patch tests.

  1. Defining T-Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Rotavirus-Infected Juvenile Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Sestak, K.; McNeal, M M; Choi, A.; Cole, M. J.; Ramesh, G.; Alvarez, X.; Aye, P. P.; Bohm, R P; Mohamadzadeh, M.; Ward, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    The appearance of virus-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of captive juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) was observed following rotavirus infection. These cell-mediated immune responses were measured following experimental or natural infection after rotavirus was isolated from stool specimens of asymptomatic animals. The virus isolated was a new strain of simian rotavirus that we named TUCH (for Tulane University and Cincinnati Children's Hospital). Restimulati...

  2. Cell-mediated immune response in rotavirus-infected calves: leucocyte migration inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R S; Singh, N P

    1992-07-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was determined in rotavirus-infected calves by leucocyte migration inhibition assay with blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph node and intestinal lymphocytes. The inhibition of migration was more prominent in intestinal and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes than in spleen and blood. In rotavirus-infected calves, the assay indicated the presence of CMI response which was more prominent at the local site of infection.

  3. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  6. Cell mediated immune response of Bufo arenarum and Leptodactylus ocellatus (Amphibia, Anura) to mycobacterial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, E L; Salibian, A

    1984-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test was applied to the study of cell mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro to mycobacterial antigens in Bufo arenarum and Leptodactylus ocellatus previously inoculated with a suspension of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The stimulated samples of blood both in B. arenarum and L. ocellatus showed a significant increase in the percent of blastic dedifferentiation (almost 100% with respect to controls) suggesting the presence of a positive CMI response to PPD. The differences were observed on the fifth day of incubation and lasted until the seventh day.

  7. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of vitamin E levels on the cell-mediated immunity of broilers vaccinated against coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ICM da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the relationships between animal nutrition and immunity have sought reliable methodologies to measure responses. Cell-mediated immune response is similarly studied in humans. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity test (CBH is one of the methods to measure that response and consists in the infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly of lymphocytes and basophils, as result of the application of substances capable of inducing cell proliferation in determined sites, such as wings, wattle, and interdigital space in birds. CBH is considered a simple and fast method and can be applied in birds of different ages. In immunocompetence studies with poultry, phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P is a commonly used substance, despite the variability of the response related to the method of application (intradermal injection and the antigens used. In the present experiment, PHA-P was used to observe the cell-mediated immune response of 216 chicks fed three dietary levels of vitamin E from 1 to 36 days of age. All birds were immunologically challenged by vaccination against coccidiosis at three days of age and against Newcastle Disease (NCD at 14 and 30 days of age. At 36 days of age, birds were submitted to the CBH test according to the methodology of Corrier & DeLoach (1990. Birds fed 65mg/kg of vitamin E presented lasting cell reaction (p<0.08, which indicates that this vitamin E level improved cell immune response of birds due to its antioxidant and immunomodulating properties. The use of this vitamin E level can be considered by nutritionists under practical conditions, aiming to improve broiler immunity.

  9. Tetherin promotes the innate and adaptive cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sam X; Barrett, Bradley S; Heilman, Karl J; Messer, Ronald J; Liberatore, Rachel A; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Santiago, Mario L

    2014-07-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that could directly inhibit retroviral particle release by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, the immunological impact of Tetherin during retrovirus infection remains unknown. We now show that Tetherin influences antiretroviral cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast to the direct antiviral effects of Tetherin, which are dependent on cell surface expression, the immunomodulatory effects are linked to the endocytosis of the molecule. Mice encoding endocytosis-competent C57BL/6 Tetherin exhibited lower viremia and pathology at 7 d postinfection with Friend retrovirus (FV) compared with mice encoding endocytosis-defective NZW/LacJ Tetherin. Notably, antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. In addition, Friend retrovirus infection levels were significantly lower in wild-type C57BL/6 mice than in Tetherin knockout mice at 2 wk postinfection, and antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The results demonstrate that Tetherin acts as a modulator of the cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo.

  10. Defining T-cell-mediated immune responses in rotavirus-infected juvenile rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, K; McNeal, M M; Choi, A; Cole, M J; Ramesh, G; Alvarez, X; Aye, P P; Bohm, R P; Mohamadzadeh, M; Ward, R L

    2004-10-01

    The appearance of virus-specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of captive juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) was observed following rotavirus infection. These cell-mediated immune responses were measured following experimental or natural infection after rotavirus was isolated from stool specimens of asymptomatic animals. The virus isolated was a new strain of simian rotavirus that we named TUCH (for Tulane University and Cincinnati Children's Hospital). Restimulation of peripheral T lymphocytes by inactivated double- or triple-layered TUCH rotavirus particles containing either VP6 or VP4 and VP7 on their respective surfaces resulted in increased quantities of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-12 in cell culture supernatants. Recall responses to rotavirus by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were associated with accumulation of intracellular IL-6 and gamma interferon. Antigen presentation of TUCH rotavirus to lymphocytes was mediated via differentiated cultures of monocyte-derived dendritic (HLA-DR(+)) cells. This is the first report demonstrating cell-mediated immune responses to rotavirus in nonhuman primates. Further exploration of rhesus macaques in vaccine trials with human rotavirus vaccine candidates is the major objective of future studies.

  11. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  12. Cell-Mediated Immunity to AAV Vectors, Evolving Concepts and Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Mingozzi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most efficient in vivo gene delivery platforms. Over the past decade, clinical trials of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer led to some of the most exciting results in the field of gene therapy and, recently, to the market approval of an AAV-based drug in Europe. With clinical development, however, it became obvious that the host immune system represents an important obstacle to successful gene transfer with AAV vectors. In this review article, we will discuss the issue of cytotoxic T cell responses directed against the AAV capsid encountered on human studies. While over the past several years the field has acquired a tremendous amount of information on the interactions of AAV vectors with the immune system, a lot of questions are still unanswered. Novel concepts are emerging, such as the relationship between the total capsid dose and the T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells, the potential role of innate immunity in vector immunogenicity highlighted in preclinical studies, and the cross talk between regulatory and effector T cells in the determination of the outcome of gene transfer. There is still a lot to learn about immune responses in AAV gene transfer, for example, it is not well understood what are the determinants of the kinetics of activation of T cells in response to vector administration, why not all subjects develop detrimental T cell responses following gene transfer, and whether the intervention strategies currently in use to block T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells will be safe and effective for all gene therapy indications. Results from novel preclinical models and clinical studies will help to address these points and to reach the important goal of developing safe and effective gene therapy protocols to treat human diseases.

  13. The impact of long-term haemofiltration (continuous veno-venous haemofiltration) on cell-mediated immunity during endotoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Nilsen, B U; Bollen, P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased survival with high-volume continuous veno-venous haemofiltration (CVVH) has been demonstrated in critically ill patients. This may be the result of intensified blood purification or an effect on the immune system. We hypothesized that CVVH modifies the cell-mediated immunity...

  14. Effect of response to backtest and housing condition on cell-mediated and humoral immunity in adult pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geverink, N.A.; Parmentier, H.K.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Schouten, W.G.P.; Gort, G.; Wiegant, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Several recent studies in juvenile pigs demonstrated a relationship between the degree of resistance displayed early in life in a so-called "backtest" and parameters of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Some of the immune characteristics were reported to depend on the interaction between backtest

  15. Cell-mediated immune responses in rainbow trout after DNA immunization against the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utke, Katrin; Kock, Holger; Schuetze, Heike

    2008-01-01

    To identify viral proteins that induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) against viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-infected cells, rainbow trout were immunized with DNA vectors encoding the glycoprotein G or the nucleocapsid protein N of VHSV. The G protein was a more potent trigger...... of cytotoxic cells than the N protein. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from trout immunized against the G protein killed both VHSV-infected MHC class I matched (RTG-2) and VHSV-infected xenogeneic (EPC) target cells, suggesting the involvement of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells...... against the VHSV G protein significantly killed VHSV-infected but not infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)-infected targets indicating antigen specificity. Thus, this is the first report on cytotoxic immune responses after DNA vaccination in fish. Furthermore, cells isolated from the inflamed...

  16. Cell-mediated immunity in Chagas' disease: Alterations induced by treatment with a trypanocidal drug (nifurtimox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelchuk, R; Cardoni, R L; Fuks, A S

    1977-01-01

    Peripheral leucocyte migration inhibition (LMI) with Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antigens, measured as a migration index (MI), was studied in chronic Chagas' disease patients. The MI of untreated patients with polymerized antigens from culture forms (epimastigotes) of T. cruzi was significantly lower than that of controls. In contrast, when chronic Chagas' patients were treated with nifurtimox, 10 mg/kg/day for 2 months, the MI was not different from control values. Treated and untreated patients had normal T- and B-lymphocyte markers, measured by the ability to form rosettes either with sheep erythrocytes (E-RFC) or with sheep erythrocytes--antibody--complement (EAC-RFC). In addition, the number of lymphocytes bearing surface membrane Ig (SMIg) was the same as that of controls. Non-specific functional assays, such as PHA-induced blastogenesis and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to sensitized chicken erythrocytes were also normal, both in treated and untreated patients. Thus, nifurtimox produced a particularly effect on cell-mediated immunity, specially detectable using LMI. PMID:414867

  17. Effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on weight, hematology and cell-mediated immune response of newborn goat kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhan Shokrollahi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effects of different levels of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract on growth rate, hematology and cell-mediated immune response in Markhoz newborn goat kids. Twenty four goat kids (aged 7±3 days were randomly allotted to four groups with six replicates. The groups included: control, T1, T2 and T3 groups which received supplemented-milk with 0, 100, 200 and 400mg aqueous rosemary extract per kg of live body weight per day for 42 days. Body weights of kids were measured weekly until the end of the experiment. On day 42, 10 ml blood samples were collected from each kid through the jugular vein. Cell-mediated immune response was assessed through the double skin thickness after intradermal injection of phyto-hematoglutinin (PHA at day 21 and 42. No significant differences were seen in initial body weight, average daily gain (ADG and total gain. However, significant differences in globulin (P<0.05, and white blood cells (WBC (P<0.001 were observed. There were no significant differences in haemoglobin (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, red blood cells (RBC, lymphocytes and neutrophils between the treatments. Skin thickness in response to intra dermal injection of PHA significantly increased in the treated groups as compared to the control group at day 42 (P<0.01 with the T3 group showing the highest response to PHA injection. In conclusion, the results indicated that aqueous rosemary extract supplemented-milk had a positive effect on immunity and skin thickness of newborn goat kids.

  18. Development of a simplified and convenient assay for cell-mediated immunity to the mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naruhito; Shima, Masayuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Okuno, Toshiomi

    2014-09-01

    Because methods for measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the mumps virus are expensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding, the role of CMI in mumps virus infection remains unclear. To address this issue, we report here the development of a simplified method for measuring mumps virus-specific CMI that is suitable for use in diverse laboratory and clinical settings. A mumps vaccine was cultured with whole blood, and interferon (IFN)-γ released into the culture supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IFN-γ production in blood from vaccinated subjects markedly increased in response to the vaccine and decreased before the antibody titer decreased in some cases, suggesting that this assay may be used as a simple surrogate method for measuring CMI specific for the mumps virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Endogenous cell-mediated immunity, blood transfusion, and outcome of renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M A; Briggs, J D; Diamandopoulos, A A; Hamilton, D N; Dick, H M

    The cell-mediated immunity (CMI) of a group of patients on regular dialysis was measured by a quantitative dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) skin test, the reaction being graded 0--15. The score in these patients varied widely, although the mean was much lower than that occurring in a group of 15 healthy subjects. 55 cadaveric renal allografts were subsequently done in 51 of these patients, and graft survival was assessed at 6 months. The 39 patients with weak DNCB skin reactions had a much higher graft survival (71%) than did the 12 with strong reaction (15%) (p less than 0.01). The weak DNCB reactors also had more pre-transplant blood transfusions. The findings suggest that the CMI of the recipient as measured by the DNCB test has an important influence on subsequent graft survival. This influence may partly be related to pre-transplant blood transfusion.

  20. [Change in cell-mediated immunity to Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium marinum in Hansen's disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliess, E L; Ortiz, M C; Corn, J

    1983-06-01

    The cell mediated immunity (CMI) to protein purified derivates of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium marinum was studied. Leukocyte Migration Inhibition (LMI) and Delayed Hypersensitivity skin reactions to these antigens were examined in 44 hanseniasis patients (20 quiescent Virchowians, 13 reactional Virchowians and 11 tuberculoid patients) and 15 healthy subjects. An impairment in LMI and Delayed Hypersensitivity tests to M. leprae and M. marinum was observed in Virchowians patients both quiescent and reactional. The CMI response to all mycobacterial antigens was increased in tuberculoid patients and was observed a poor response to M. leprae and M. marinum in healthy controls. Our results show a high correlation between the CMI response to M. leprae and to M. marinum (r = + 0,8). This close relationship between both antigens may express cross-reactivity.

  1. THE STATE OF CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY AMONG HEPATITIS B SURFACE ,ANTGENI CARRIERS IN IRAN,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MASSOUD

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune (CMI s t a t us and sub- popul at i ons o f pe r ipheral b l ood lymphocytes were investigated in one hundre d volunt a ry blood donors who were car r ier s of Ag • HE S A signi f i c ant decr e ase of t otal T-cells observed in HB Ag carri e rs as compared t o normal controls. The percenS t age o f active T-cells a nd B-lymphocytes did not d i f f e r signi f icant ly between the t wo groups ."nAddi t ion of aut ologous serum from HE Ag c a r r iers t o s t heir l ymphocyt e s reduced the numbe r of detectabl e cells in HE Ag carriers . This reduction coul d be due to the s presence of a r osette i nhi bitory f actor in their serum. Our studies demonstrated a failur e o f CMI among HB Ags car r i ers detected by the l e ukocyte migr ation i nhibition (LMI test. This failure cannot be attributed to the presence of HE Ag-AB complexes in their serum. It is s possible that specific failure of CMI allows the hepatitis B virus to remain harmless in carriers a Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HE Ag; Hepatitis Bs coreantigen (HE Ag and Hepatitis Be-antigen (HE Ag, c e have been established as indicating ineffectivity in viral hepatitis B ({I, 6 , 20, 28."nA number of infected individuals also developed clini cal evidence of disease and HE Ag may s the serum of some subjects for a long rema•ln present I•n time (18. It has been suggested that to a defect in CMI, the persistence of HB Ag s whether liver disease is is related present or not, and impairment of the lymphocyte response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA in this group is presented in evide•"nnee (8, •9 , 13, 24, 25 .In contrast, other workers report a normal respons e t o PHA in healthy carriers of HE Ag and s they concludE that the defective T-cell response is relat ed to the live!' disease rather than the immune system (31. Dudley et al (8 have suggested that liver damage occurring after hepatitis B infection, may be an effect of thymus-dependent lymphocytes (12."n

  2. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  3. Induction of cell-mediated immunity during early stages of infection with intracellular protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazzinelli R.T.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii and Trypanosoma cruzi are intracellular parasites which, as part of their life cycle, induce a potent cell-mediated immunity (CMI maintained by Th1 lymphocytes and IFN-g. In both cases, induction of a strong CMI is thought to protect the host against rapid parasite multiplication and consequent pathology and lethality during the acute phase of infection. However, the parasitic infection is not eliminated by the immune system and the vertebrate host serves as a parasite reservoir. In contrast, Leishmania sp, which is a slow growing parasite, appears to evade induction of CMI during early stages of infection as a strategy for surviving in a hostile environment (i.e., inside the macrophages which are their obligatory niche in the vertebrate host. Recent reports show that the initiation of IL-12 synthesis by macrophages during these parasitic infections is a key event in regulating CMI and disease outcome. The studies reviewed here indicate that activation/inhibition of distinct signaling pathways and certain macrophage functions by intracellular protozoa are important events in inducing/modulating the immune response of their vertebrate hosts, allowing parasite and host survival and therefore maintaining parasite life cycles.

  4. Induction of cell-mediated immunity to Mycobacterium leprae in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.J.; Lefford, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The immune response of mice to armadillo-derived, irradiation-killed Mycobacterium leprae (I-ML) was investigated. Following injection of 100 microgram of I-ML into the left hind footpads of mice, a state of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was engendered to antigens of M. leprae. The evidence for CMI was as follows: (1) development of delayed-type hypersensitivity to both human tuberculin purified protein derivative and soluble M. leprae antigens; (2) T-lymphocyte-dependent macrophage activation at the inoculation site; (3) specific systemaic resistance to the cross-reactive species M. tuberculosis; and (4) immunopotentiation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to an unrelated antigen. The CMI induced by I-ML in aqueous suspension was greater than that obtained with the same antigen in water-in-oil emulsion, even though the latter generated a more severe reaction at the site of immunization. I-ML also induced a stronger CMI response than the corresponding dose of heat-killed BCG.

  5. Dynamics of an HIV-1 infection model with cell mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Huang, Jianing; Jiang, Jiao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of an improved mathematical model on HIV-1 virus with cell mediated immunity. This new 5-dimensional model is based on the combination of a basic 3-dimensional HIV-1 model and a 4-dimensional immunity response model, which more realistically describes dynamics between the uninfected cells, infected cells, virus, the CTL response cells and CTL effector cells. Our 5-dimensional model may be reduced to the 4-dimensional model by applying a quasi-steady state assumption on the variable of virus. However, it is shown in this paper that virus is necessary to be involved in the modeling, and that a quasi-steady state assumption should be applied carefully, which may miss some important dynamical behavior of the system. Detailed bifurcation analysis is given to show that the system has three equilibrium solutions, namely the infection-free equilibrium, the infectious equilibrium without CTL, and the infectious equilibrium with CTL, and a series of bifurcations including two transcritical bifurcations and one or two possible Hopf bifurcations occur from these three equilibria as the basic reproduction number is varied. The mathematical methods applied in this paper include characteristic equations, Routh-Hurwitz condition, fluctuation lemma, Lyapunov function and computation of normal forms. Numerical simulation is also presented to demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical predictions.

  6. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  7. Cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs injected with inactivated chlamydiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyk, G; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1980-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to chlamydial antigens was readily induced in guinea pigs by a single injection of Betaprone-inactivated chlamydiae in complete Freund adjuvant. The CMI was measured in vivo by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, and in vitro by inhibition of migration of peritoneal exudate cells and by proliferation of lymph node lymphocytes. There was an overall correlation between in vivo and in vitro responses. Of the in vitro assays, migration inhibition reflected the state of sensitization, as judged by skin tests, more uniformly than lymphocyte stimulation. Extensive inter- and intra-species cross-reactivity was noted between LB-1, a strain of C. trachomatis, and three strains of C. psittaci, 6BC, GPIC, and 562F. Cross-reactivity between LB-1 and 6BC was one-way only, by all three parameters: LB-1 elicited strong cross-reactions in 6BC-immunized animals but not vice versa. Antichlamydial antibodies could not be demonstrated in any of the animals by microimmunofluorescence.

  8. Therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical cancer : induction of cell-mediated immunity in murine models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bungener, Laura Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis is the development of a therapeutic immunization strategy against cervical cancer and pre-malignant precursor lesions of cervical cancer (CIN lesions). Cervical cancer is caused by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Two of the early proteins of high

  9. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D J; Ostler, H B; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1981-04-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infection even without the re-inoculation of the infectious agent. Extensive cross-reactions among the three chlamydial antigens during the cell-mediated immune response appeared to be due to shared species-specific and group-reactive antigens. Serum antibody response was pronounced and uniform to GPIC; it was less marked to 6BC and LB-1, with fewer cross-reactions than seen in tests for cell-mediated immunity.

  10. Nifurtimox-induced alterations in the cell-mediated immune response to PPD tin guinea-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelchuk, R; Cardoni, R L; Levis, S

    1977-01-01

    Positive skin reactions to PPD in guinea-pigs immunized with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) were reversed after treatment with 10 mg/kg/day nifurtimox for 12 days. The in vitro migration of peripheral blood leucocytes from FCA-immunized guinea-pigs was inhibited with PPD, but it returned to normal values after nifurtimox treatment. Furthermore, the cell-free supernatant from PPD-stimulated lymphocytes from FCA-immunized nifurtimox-treated guinea-pigs did not inhibit the migration of normal cells. Thus the administration of nifurtimox impaired the specific cell-mediated immune response to PPD both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:414870

  11. LEI0258 microsatellite variability and its association with humoral and cell mediated immune responses in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailnejad, Atefeh; Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Badavam, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has a profound influence on disease resistance or susceptibility, productivity and important economic traits in chicken. Association of the MHC with a wide range of immune responses makes it a valuable predictive factor for the disease pathogenesis and outcome. The tandem repeat LEI0258 is a genetic marker which is located within the B locus of chicken MHC and strongly associated with serologically defined haplotypes. LEI0258 microsatellite marker was applied to investigate the MHC polymorphism in Ross 308 broiler chicken (N=104). Association of LEI0258 alleles with humoral and cell mediated immune responses to Newcastle disease (ND), Infectious bursal disease (IBD) and Avian influenza (AI) vaccines were also examined. LEI0258 polymorphism was determined by PCR-based fragment analysis, and association of LEI0258 alleles with immune responses were evaluated using multivariate regression analysis and GLM procedures. A total of seven alleles ranging from 195 to 448bp were found, including two novel alleles (263 and 362bp) that were unique in Ross 308 broiler population. Association study revealed a significant influence of MHC alleles on humoral and cellular immune responses in Ross population (Pimmune responses to Infectious bursal disease vaccine, and allele 263bp was significantly correlated with elevated antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine. Results obtained from this study confirmed the important role of MHC as a candidate gene marker for immune responses that could be used in genetic improvement of disease-resistant traits and resource conservation in broiler population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro-induced cell-mediated immune deviation to encephalitogenic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Ashour, Hossam M

    2014-01-01

    The injection of antigens into the Anterior Chamber (AC) of the eye induces Anterior Chamber Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID), which is a potent form of immune deviation that is largely attributed to the effect of TGFβ2 in the aqueous humor on ocular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). ACAID antigen presentation via APCs and B cells leads to the generation of antigen-specific T regulatory cells. The encephalitogenic antigens Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and Myelin basic protein (MBP) have an obvious clinical relevance. We hypothesized that the intravenous injection of in vitro-generated ACAID APCs or in vitro-generated ACAID B cells specific to the encephalitogenic antigens MOG35-55/MBP induces specific peripheral tolerance in recipient BALB/c mice. We examined the suppression of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific inflammatory responses using delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assays and Local Adoptive Transfer (LAT) assays. Results indicated that MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific tolerance was generated after the intravenous injections of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID APCs, MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID B cells, and MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID T regulatory cells. The specific immune deviation was in vitro-induced, cell-mediated, and specific to the encephalitogenic antigens MOG35-55/MBP. This in vitro-mediated approach for the generation of MOG35-55/MBP-specific tolerance opens up avenues for the application of ACAID as a tool for the therapy of Multiple Sclerosis, Schizophrenia, and other diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  14. Au@Pt nanoparticles as catalase mimics to attenuate tumor hypoxia and enhance immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Wu, Ying; Ou, Xiang-Yu; Li, Jing-Ying; Li, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to tumor progression, heterogeneity and immune suppression. Therefore, the development of effective methods to overcome hypoxia and substantially enhance the immunotherapy efficacy remains a desirable goal. Herein, we engineered a biocompatible Au core/Pt shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) to reoxygenate the TME by reacting with endogenous H2O2. Treatment with Au@Pt NPs appeared to improve oxygen in intracellular environments and decrease hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. Furthermore, the integration of high catalytic efficiency of Au@Pt NPs with cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell immunotherapy, could lead to significantly improve the effect of CIK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest great potential of Au@Pt NPs for regulation of the hypoxic TME and enhance immune cell mediated anti-tumor immunity.

  15. Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Could It Be Related to Cell-Mediated Immunity Defect in Response to Candida Antigen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Talaei

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC is a common cause of morbidity affecting millions of women worldwide. Patients with RVVC are thought to have an underlying immunologic defect. This study has been established to evaluate cell-mediated immunity defect in response to candida antigen in RVVC cases. Materials and Methods Our cross-sectional study was performed in 3 groups of RVVC patients (cases, healthy individuals (control I and known cases of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC (control II. Patients who met the inclusion criteria of RVVC were selected consecutively and were allocated in the case group. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and labeled with CFSE and proliferation rate was measured in exposure to candida antigen via flow cytometry. Results T lymphocyte proliferation in response to candida was significantly lower in RVVC cases (n=24 and CMC patients (n=7 compared to healthy individuals (n=20, P0.05. Family history of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID differed significantly among groups (P=0.01, RVVC patients has family history of PID more than control I (29.2 vs. 0%, P=0.008 but not statistically different from CMC patients (29.2 vs. 42.9%, P>0.05. Prevalence of atopy was greater in RVVC cases compared to healthy individuals (41.3 vs. 15%, P=0.054. Lymphoproliferative activity and vaginal symptoms were significantly different among RVVC cases with and without allergy (P=0.01, P=0.02. Conclusion Our findings revealed that T cells do not actively proliferate in response to Candida antigen in some RVVC cases. So it is concluded that patients with cell-mediated immunity defect are more susceptible to recurrent fungal infections of vulva and vagina. Nonetheless, some other cases of RVVC showed normal function of T cells. Further evaluations showed that these patients suffer from atopy. It is hypothesized that higher frequency of VVC in patients with history of atopy might be due to allergic response

  16. Effect of Zinc on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity of Broilers Vaccinated Against Coccidiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Moazeni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was the comparison of humoral and cell-mediated immunity in ‎broilers fed with different levels of zinc during a coccidiosis challenge.‎Methods: One hundred and forty-‎four one-day-old broiler chicks were used with three ‎dietary zinc ‎(40, 120 and 200 mg/kg. At 14 d of age, all birds were inoculated orally with 5×103 sporulated oocysts of E. Tenella. ‎At ‎2, 22, 32, 42 ‎days of age, the blood serums were tested for ‎antibody titer against‎ Newcas­tle disease vaccine, using ‎the standard HI test. On day 42 the sum of nitrite ‎and nitrate based on the reduction of nitrate ‎to nitrite by cadmium ‎and white blood cell count (WBC using a hemocytometer were measured.Results: At 42 d, levels of ‎120 and 200 mg significantly (P< 0.05 increased the antibody titer in compare with the control. The peak response of CBH was observed at the level of 200 mg Zn/kg diet. Also both level of 120 and 200 mg Zn/kg diet increased WBC count and sum of nitrite and nitrate‎ in serum compared with the control.Conclusion: The levels of 120 and 200 mg Zn/kg diet could be considered as a non-pharmacologic booster of immunity in broilers chicks infected with E. Tenella.

  17. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( Plymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are probably not affected by microwave radiation. It is clear from our experiments that although chronic microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2 leads to suppression of peripheral T lymphocyte numbers, there is no concomitant functional impairment of these cells as evidenced by functional assays.

  18. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D.J.; Ostler, H. B.; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E.

    1981-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infe...

  19. Varicella-zoster virus-specific cell-mediated immunity in Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haginomori, Shin-ichi; Ichihara, Takahiro; Mori, Atsuko; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Kawata, Ryo; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (Hunt syndrome) is reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve, leading to neuritis. Although the mechanism of the VZV reactivation is unclear, one possibility is that the reactivation involves a low level of VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristics of the VZV-specific CMI in Hunt syndrome compared to that in Bell's palsy, and to obtain clues to its role in the development of Hunt syndrome. Prospective study. We determined the median spot numbers and examined VZV-specific CMI in patients with Hunt syndrome and with Bell's palsy using interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. We analyzed the relationship between the value of VZV-specific CMI and days from disease onset. The median spot number in Hunt syndrome (87.3 spot-forming cells [SFCs]/4 × 10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs]) was higher than that in Bell's palsy (62.3 SFCs/4 × 10(5) PBMCs). Hunt syndrome showed a strong relationship between the ELISPOT count and days from onset (r = 0.65). Within the first 5 days from onset, no ELISPOT counts higher than 80 SFCs/4 × 10(5) PBMCs were observed. On the other hand, no correlation was observed between the ELISPOT count and days from onset in patients with Bell's palsy (r = -0.19). These results suggest that VZV-specific CMI in Hunt syndrome is low at disease onset and increases rapidly thereafter. Consequently, reduced VZV-specific CMI may play an important role in the reactivation of VZV in the facial nerve, leading to Hunt syndrome. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi adjuvants potentiate T cell-mediated immunity induced by a NY-ESO-1 based antitumor vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Junqueira

    Full Text Available Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, lipopeptide (Pam3Cys, and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128 derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ production by CD4(+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8(+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception. The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi Adjuvants Potentiate T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by a NY-ESO-1 Based Antitumor Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant. PMID:22567144

  2. Novel protein and poxvirus-based vaccine combinations for simultaneous induction of humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Claire L; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hill, Adrian V S; Moore, Anne C

    2005-07-01

    The presence of both cell-mediated and humoral immunity is important in protection from and clearance of a number of infectious pathogens. We describe novel vaccine regimens using combinations of plasmid DNA, poxvirus and protein to induce strong Ag-specific T cell and Ab responses simultaneously in a murine model. Intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the middle Ag of hepatitis B (DNA) concurrently with a commercial hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine (Engerix-B) followed by boosting immunizations with both modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) encoding the middle Ag of HBV and Engerix-B induced high levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and high titer Ab responses to hepatitis B surface Ag (HbsAg). Substitution of Engerix-B with adjuvant-free rHBsAg induced similar T cell responses and greatly enhanced Ab levels. Repeated immunizations with recombinant or nonrecombinant MVA mixed with Ag induced higher titers of Abs compared with immunization with either Ag or Engerix-B further demonstrating this novel adjuvant effect of MVA. The poxviruses NYVAC, fowlpox (FP9) and ALVAC, and to a lesser extent, adenovirus, also displayed similar adjuvant properties when used in combination with rHBsAg. The use of poxviruses as an adjuvant for protein to concurrently induce Ag-specific T cells and Abs could be applied to the development of vaccines for many diseases, including HIV and malaria, where both cell mediated and humoral immunity may be important for protection.

  3. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne Toft

    2011-01-01

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evalu......The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in-vitro assay for a direct read out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult...

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF Bioactivity at the Site of an Acute Cell-Mediated Immune Response Is Preserved in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Responding to Anti-TNF Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Byng-Maddick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapies on inducible TNF-dependent activity in humans has never been evaluated in vivo. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients responding to anti-TNF treatments exhibit attenuated TNF-dependent immune responses at the site of an immune challenge. We developed and validated four context-specific TNF-inducible transcriptional signatures to quantify TNF bioactivity in transcriptomic data. In anti-TNF treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, we measured the expression of these biosignatures in blood, and in skin biopsies from the site of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs as a human experimental model of multivariate cell-mediated immune responses. In blood, anti-TNF therapies attenuated TNF bioactivity following ex vivo stimulation. However, at the site of the TST, TNF-inducible gene expression and genome-wide transcriptional changes associated with cell-mediated immune responses were comparable to that of RA patients receiving methotrexate only. These data demonstrate that anti-TNF agents in RA patients do not inhibit inducible TNF activity at the site of an acute inflammatory challenge in vivo, as modeled by the TST. We hypothesize instead that their therapeutic effects are limited to regulating TNF activity in chronic inflammation or by alternative non-canonical pathways.

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Bioactivity at the Site of an Acute Cell-Mediated Immune Response Is Preserved in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Responding to Anti-TNF Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byng-Maddick, Rachel; Turner, Carolin T; Pollara, Gabriele; Ellis, Matthew; Guppy, Naomi J; Bell, Lucy C K; Ehrenstein, Michael R; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapies on inducible TNF-dependent activity in humans has never been evaluated in vivo. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients responding to anti-TNF treatments exhibit attenuated TNF-dependent immune responses at the site of an immune challenge. We developed and validated four context-specific TNF-inducible transcriptional signatures to quantify TNF bioactivity in transcriptomic data. In anti-TNF treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we measured the expression of these biosignatures in blood, and in skin biopsies from the site of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) as a human experimental model of multivariate cell-mediated immune responses. In blood, anti-TNF therapies attenuated TNF bioactivity following ex vivo stimulation. However, at the site of the TST, TNF-inducible gene expression and genome-wide transcriptional changes associated with cell-mediated immune responses were comparable to that of RA patients receiving methotrexate only. These data demonstrate that anti-TNF agents in RA patients do not inhibit inducible TNF activity at the site of an acute inflammatory challenge in vivo, as modeled by the TST. We hypothesize instead that their therapeutic effects are limited to regulating TNF activity in chronic inflammation or by alternative non-canonical pathways.

  6. Specificity of two tests for the early diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis based on cell-mediated immunity : the Johnin skin test and the gamma interferon assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, CHJ; Collins, MT; Hesselink, JW; Barkema, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    Paratuberculosis in cattle is a chronic debilitating infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. Control of paratuberculosis is based on tests that principally detect advanced stages of infections: faecal culture and serology. Tests measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) could

  7. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1 -/- recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1 -/- recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved.

  8. The effect of arginine dietary supplementation in broiler breeder hens on offspring humoral and cell-mediated immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AE Murakami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of supplementing the diet of broiler breeder hens with arginine (Arg on their offspring's humoral and cell-mediated immune response was evaluated in two experiments. In experiments I and II, breeder hens were fed diets containing graded levels of Arg (0.943, 1.093, 1.243, 1.393 and 1.543% digestible Arg. In experiment I, the offspring was randomly grouped according to the treatment received by the breeder hens, with five levels of Arg in the maternal diet and six replicates, giving a total 30 experimental units. In experiment II, the offspring were grouped in accordance with the treatment received by the breeder hens; however, Arg was added to the starter diet (1.300, 1.450, 1.600, 1.750 and 1.900% digestible Arg and also the growing diet (1.150, 1.300, 1.450, 1.600 and 1.750% digestible Arg. Supplementation of the broiler breeder hen diet did not influence (p > 0.05 the development of the lymphoid organs (cloacal bursa, thymus and spleen of the offspring, whether their diet were supplemented or not. Nevertheless, greater weight and dimensions cloacal bursa were found in the supplemented offspring in comparison with the nonsupplemented offspring. Macrophage phagocytic activity was found to be unaffected (p > 0.05, independently of the Arg supplementation. The offspring fed with supplemented diets showed a linear reduction in the antibody titer against Newcastle Disease (p 0.05 by the breeder hen diet. This study concluded that supplementing the breeder hen diet with arginine is insufficient to improve the humoral and cellular immune response, requiring supplementation of the offspring diet.

  9. Cell mediated immune responses following revaccination with an influenza A/H5N1 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbawuike, Innocent N; Atmar, Robert L; Patel, Shital M; Corry, David B; Winokur, Patricia L; Brady, Rebecca C; Chen, Wilbur H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Creech, C Buddy; Walter, Emmanuel B; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Goll, Johannes B; Hill, Heather; Keitel, Wendy A

    2016-01-20

    The study aims were to determine whether inactivated influenza A/H5N1 vaccine administration elicited cell mediated immune (CMI) responses and the impact of adjuvant, vaccine dose and subject age on these responses. Adults who were previously primed with either adjuvanted or unadjuvanted, inactivated, A/H5N1/Vietnam/1203/2004 (Clade 1) vaccine or unprimed (received placebo) in previous vaccine studies were randomized to receive one (primed) or two (unprimed) 15- or 90-mcg doses of inactivated, A/H5N1/Indonesia/05/05 (Clade 2) vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected and analyzed from a subset of vaccinees to assess CMI responses using IFN-γ and granzyme B ELISPOT assays. Cytokine measurements were performed on PBMC supernatants after stimulation with H5N1 virus. PBMCs were available from 177 participants; 88 and 89 received 15-mcg and 90-mcg of unadjuvanted clade 2 vaccine, respectively. Following H5N1 clade 1 stimulation, IFN-γ but not granzyme B normalized spot-forming cell numbers had statistically significant increased numbers at each of the post-vaccination timepoints compared to baseline in pooled analyses of all vaccine doses and age groups. Clade 2 stimulation resulted in statistically significant increased numbers of IFN-γ cells only 180 days following the last vaccination. Responses were similar among younger and older study participants, as were responses among those primed with alum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted clade 1 H5N1 vaccines. The dosage of clade 2 vaccine did not impact CMI responses among primed subjects, but responses were statistically significantly greater in unprimed recipients of the 90-mcg dosage compared to unprimed recipients of the 15-mcg dosage. IFN-γ levels in the supernatants of stimulated PBMC were strongly correlated with IFN-γ ELISPOT results. CMI responses occur in adults administered influenza A/H5N1 inactivated influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, T. S.; Norup, L. R.; Pedersen, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection....... Furthermore, peripheral lymphocytes from L133 exhibited a significantly higher expression of CD44 and CD45 throughout the experiment. Interestingly, also vaccine-induced differences were observed in L133 as immune chickens had a significantly higher CD45 expression on their lymphocytes than the naïve controls....... Immune chickens from both lines had a significantly higher frequency of circulating γδ T cells than the naïve controls both after vaccination and challenge. Finally, the proliferative capacity of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ cells specific for NDV was addressed 3 weeks after vaccination and 1 week after...

  11. Prolonged tomato juice consumption has no effect on cell-mediated immunity of well-nourished elderly men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzl, B; Bub, A; Blockhaus, M; Herbert, B M; Lührmann, P M; Neuhäuser-Berthold, M; Rechkemmer, G

    2000-07-01

    The immunomodulatory potential of carotenoids has been investigated thoroughly only for beta-carotene. Data on the immunomodulatory activity of other carotenoids such as lycopene are scarce. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged tomato juice consumption on cell-mediated immunity of well-nourished healthy elderly persons. In an intervention study, 33 female and 20 male subjects (aged 63-86 y) consumed 330 mL/d tomato juice (47.1 mg/d lycopene) or mineral water for 8 wk. Immune status was assessed by measuring number and lytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells, secretion of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)] by activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), lymphocyte proliferation, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin responses. Tomato juice consumption resulted in significantly increased plasma lycopene and beta-carotene concentrations over time. In both treatment groups, TNF-alpha and IL-4 secretion were increased at the end of the intervention period, whereas IL-2 secretion was decreased. Tomato juice consumption had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation, DTH or the number of NK cells. Lytic activity of NK cells was increased in both groups at the end of the intervention period. In conclusion, these results show that prolonged tomato juice consumption increased plasma lycopene concentrations without significantly affecting cell-mediated immunity in well-nourished elderly subjects.

  12. Effect of response to backtest and housing condition on cell-mediated and humoral immunity in adult pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geverink, N A; Parmentier, H K; de Vries Reilingh, G; Schouten, W G P; Gort, G; Wiegant, V M

    2004-01-01

    Several recent studies in juvenile pigs demonstrated a relationship between the degree of resistance displayed early in life in a so-called "backtest" and parameters of cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Some of the immune characteristics were reported to depend on the interaction between backtest classification and housing system. In the present study, the effects of backtest classification and housing condition on immune reactivity in adult gilts were examined. At 10 and 17 days of age, female piglets were subjected to the backtest. In this test, each piglet is restrained on its back for 1 min and the number of escape attempts is scored. Pigs classified as high resisting (HR) or low resisting (LR) were selected and housed in groups of six gilts. At 7 months of age, half of the gilts were housed in individual stalls. At 12 months of age, gilts were challenged by immunization with DNP-KLH. Control gilts were treated similarly with a placebo. Blood samples were drawn prior to immunization (Day 0) and weekly thereafter until Day 28. No significant effects of backtest type on cellular and humoral responses against KLH were found. Furthermore, being housed in stalls as compared to groups had no consequences for the immune response and did not induce differences between HR and LR gilts. Differences in behavior and physiology found previously between HR and LR gilts, particularly in gilts in stall housing, may thus be of relatively little importance for immune-related health.

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses differentiate infections with Brucella suis from Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O : 9 in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Jungersen, Gregers

    2007-01-01

    Due to almost identical lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigens, infections with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9 (YeO:9) cause false positive serological reactions (FPSR) in tests for Brucella and thus cause problems in National Brucella surveillance programs. As LPS are strong inducers...... of antibody responses it was hypothesized that cell-mediated immune responses to non-LPS antigens of the two bacteria can be used to separate immune responses to these two biologically very different infections. Following subclinical experimental infections with Brucella suis biovar 2, high interferon......-gamma (IFN-gamma) assay responses with a commercial Brucella melitensis antigen preparation (Brucellergene OCB) preceded the development of antibodies. High IFN-gamma responses in the seven B. suis inoculated pigs with serological evidence of infection were consistent throughout a 20-week postinoculation...

  14. Simultaneous presence of endogenous retrovirus and herpes virus antigens has profound effect on cell-mediated immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Christensen, Tove; Hansen, Hans Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Retroviruses have been suggested as possible pathogenic factors in multiple sclerosis (MS), supported by the observation that endogenous retroviruses are activated in MS patients. Different members of the herpes family of which several are neurotropic have also been suggested as factors in MS...... pathogenesis. Further, interactions between retroviruses and herpes viruses have been implied in the development of MS. The objective of the study was investigation of cell-mediated immune responses of MS patients to retrovirus and herpes virus antigens, particularly antigen combinations, with analyses...... retrovirus HERV-H and herpes virus antigens resulted in highly increased cellular immune responses among both the MS patients and healthy subjects. The increase was synergistic in character in most samples. Very pronounced effects were obtained using HHV-6A and HSV-1 antigens. Blast transformation assays...

  15. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  16. Killers and beyond: NK-cell-mediated control of immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoniou, Christopher E; Coudert, Jérôme D; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A

    2008-11-01

    Effective immunity requires coordinated activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. NK cells are principal mediators of innate immunity, able to respond to challenge quickly and generally without prior activation. The most acknowledged functions of NK cells are their cytotoxic potential and their ability to release large amounts of cytokines, especially IFN-gamma. Recently, it has become clear that NK cells are more than assassins. Indeed, NK cells play critical roles in shaping adaptive immunity.

  17. Regulation of stem-cell mediated host immunity by the sphingolipid ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Changes in the functioning of the human immune system are the main cause for many diseases, including auto-immunity, infections, and cancer. Research suggests that the sphingolipid pathway plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell functions and, as a consequence, in the generation of mature immune cells ...

  18. Evasion from NK cell-mediated immune responses by HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Stephanie; Altfeld, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mostly owes its success to its ability to evade host immune responses. Understanding viral immune escape mechanisms is prerequisite to improve future HIV-1 vaccine design. This review focuses on the strategies that HIV-1 has evolved to evade recognition by natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:22626930

  19. CHARACTERISATION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN PIGS IN A CLINICAL CHALLENGE EXPERIMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST MYCOPLASMA HYOSYNOVIAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Josephine Skovgaard; Riber, Ulla; Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøll

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae (Mhs) is an extracellular parasitizing bacterium that causes arthritis in swine. The infection is widespread in modern pig production. An effective immunoprophylaxis is not available. In an experimental infection study (Lauritsen, K. T., et al., 2009. 3rd EVIW Poster, Berlin...... (Germany) September 10-13, 2009), testing a new vaccine (formalin inactivated Mhs and EMULSIGEN-BCL® (MVP Laboratories)), cell-mediated immune response was measured in the vaccine group (n=13) and not in the placebo group (n=13). In an IFN-γ assay, where whole-blood was co-cultured with Mhs......-antigen and recombinant IL-18, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was produced in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group one day before challenge with Mhs. In contrast, significantly higher level of IFN-γ was measured in the placebo group compared to the vaccine group at day 6 after challenge. The latter could...

  20. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndongala Michel Lubaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m, VP35 (EBOV/VP35m or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from cytomegalovirus (CMV-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as

  1. Immunoregulatory mechanisms in Chagas disease: modulation of apoptosis in T-cell mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Ana Thereza; de Assis Silva Gomes Estanislau, Juliana; Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Guimarães, Pedro Henrique Gazzinelli; de Souza Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Morato, Maria José; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2016-04-30

    Chronic Chagas disease presents different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic (namely indeterminate) to severe cardiac and/or digestive. Previous results have shown that the immune response plays an important role, although no all mechanisms are understood. Immunoregulatory mechanisms such as apoptosis are important for the control of Chagas disease, possibly affecting the morbidity in chronic clinical forms. Apoptosis has been suggested to be an important mechanism of cellular response during T. cruzi infection. We aimed to further understand the putative role of apoptosis in Chagas disease and its relation to the clinical forms of the disease. Apoptosis of lymphocytes, under antigenic stimuli (soluble T. cruzi antigens - TcAg) where compared to that of non-stimulated cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using the expression of annexin and caspase 3(+) by T cells and the percentage of cells positive evaluated by flow cytometry. In addition activation and T cell markers were used for the identification of TCD4(+) and TCD8(+) subpopulations. The presence of intracellular and plasma cytokines were also evaluated. Analysis of the activation status of the peripheral blood cells showed that patients with Chagas disease presented higher levels of activation determined by the expression of activation markers, after TcAg stimulation. PCR array were used to evaluate the contribution of this mechanism in specific cell populations from patients with different clinical forms of human Chagas disease. Our results showed a reduced proliferative response associated a high expression of T CD4(+)CD62L(-) cells in CARD patients when compared with IND group and NI individuals. We also observed that both groups of patients presented a significant increase of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets in undergoing apoptosis after in vitro stimulation with T. cruzi antigens. In CARD patients, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing TNF-α were highly susceptible to undergo apoptosis

  2. Efficiency of recombinant bacille Calmette-Guérin in inducing humoral and cell mediated immunities against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 third variable domain in immunized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jae

    2011-01-01

    The third variable (V3) loop of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein has been intensively studied for AIDS vaccine development. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used to immunize against tuberculosis and has many advantages as a vaccine vehicle, such as low toxicity, adjuvant potential, low cost, and long-lasting immune-inducing capacity. This work was initiated to investigate the immunogenicity of recombinant BCG (rBCG-mV3) designed to express trimeric HIV-1 V3 loop (mV3) in rBCG-mV3-immunized animals. HIV-1 V3-concatamer was cloned into pMV261, a BCG-expression vector, and then rBCG-mV3 was constructed by introducing the recombinant plasmid (pMV-V3). The recombinant BCG was examined with regard to its expression of V3-concatamer and the genetic stability in vivo and in vitro. The immune responses induced by recombinant BCG were tested in immunized mice and guinea pigs. The rBCG-mV3 expressed detectable amounts of V3-concatamer when induced by single heat-shock. The recombinant BCG was genetically stable and maintained the introduced mV3 gene for several weeks. V3-specific antibodies were clearly detected 6 weeks after inoculation. The antibody titer rapidly increased after immunization up to 10 weeks, and then maintained for over 4 weeks. IgG2a was prevalent in the V3-specific antiserum. The recombinant BCG was also effective in inducing delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in the immunized guinea pigs. rBCG-immunized mice retained substantial amounts of V3-specific T cells in the spleen, even 5 months after the first immunization. Recombinant BCG-mV3 is very efficient in inducing humoral and long-lasting cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 V3 in the immunized animals.

  3. Genetic adjuvantation of recombinant MVA with CD40L potentiates CD8 T cell mediated immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning eLauterbach

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70 early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated CTLs also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases.

  4. Cell-mediated immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection: evidence against the involvement of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Andersen, B J; Pedersen, B K

    1988-01-01

    by either SPag or PPD in the presence of immune serum. Studies on subpopulations of PBMC indicated that the inhibitory cells resided among the adherent cell fraction. Furthermore we tested PBMC for cytotoxic activity against P. falciparum-infected autologous or heterologous erythrocytes. Experiments were...... done both in the absence and the presence of immune serum. Neither fresh PBMC nor PBMC activated by SPag or PPD for 7 days prior to assay were cytotoxic, indicating that cytotoxic T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and K cells did not possess cytotoxic activity directed against parasitized...

  5. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. © 2015 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  6. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael J Borg

    Full Text Available Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells - a critical cell that links the innate and adaptive immune systems. We find that plasmin generated on the surface of necrotic cells enhances their phagocytic removal by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Plasmin also promoted phagocytosis of protease-resistant microparticles by diverse mouse dendritic cell sub-types both in vitro and in vivo. Together with an increased phagocytic capacity, plasmin-treated dendritic cells maintain an immature phenotype, exhibit reduced migration to lymph nodes, increase their expression/release of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β, and lose their capacity to mount an allogeneic response. Collectively, our findings support a novel role for plasmin formed on dead cells and other phagocytic targets in maintaining tissue homeostasis by increasing the phagocytic function of dendritic cells while simultaneously decreasing their immunostimulatory capacity consistent with producing an immunosuppressive state.

  7. Orally administered heat-killed Lactobacillus gasseri TMC0356 can upregulate cell-mediated immunity in senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Manabu; He, Fang; Miyazawa, Kenji; Kubota, Akira; Yoda, Kazutoyo; Hiramatsu, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to test the ability of probiotic lactobacilli to alter age-related immunosenescence in host animals. Senescence-accelerated mouse prone 1 mice were orally fed heat-killed Lactobacillus gasseri TMC0356 (TMC0356) for 4 and 8 weeks at dosages of 10 mg day(-1) after a 16-week period of prefeeding with a standard diet. After 4 and 8 weeks of TMC0356 intervention, splenic activation of natural killer (NK) cells and mRNA expression of cytokines and other immune molecules in the lungs were analysed. After 4 and 8 weeks, splenic NK cell activities were significantly higher in the TMC0356-fed mice compared with control mice (P < 0.05). After 4 weeks, mRNA expression of interleukin-2 and interferon-(α and β) receptor 1 in lung cells isolated from the TMC0356-fed mice also increased significantly compared with that in lung cells from the control mice (P < 0.05). These results suggest that lactobacilli, especially certain selected strains, might enhance cell-mediated immunity in host animals and thereby alter age-related immunosenescence. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A longitudinal study of cell-mediated immunity in pigs infected with porcine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    -mediated immune response, a longitudinal infection experiment was performed, using swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I characterized growing pigs (haplotype H7/H7). Pigs were intranasally inoculated with PPV at 0, 80, and 136 days. At predetermined time points, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were......-cell subset of PBMC proliferated in response to virus antigen, in keeping with the assumed role for these cells in immunological memory. This is, to our knowledge, the first indication of a cellular immune response following PPV infection. A weak CTL activity, which peaked on days 80 and 87, was observed...... in PPV-infected pigs. In vitro restimulation of PBMC with live PPV did not induce further CTL activity. A pronounced NK cell activity was detected in both virus-infected and control pigs throughout the experiment, and may have negatively affected the sensitivity of the CTL assay. In conclusion...

  9. Nutritional imbalances and infections affect the thymus: consequences on T-cell-mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Wilson; Dardenne, Mireille

    2010-11-01

    The thymus gland, where T lymphocyte development occurs, is targeted in malnutrition secondary to protein energy deficiency. There is a severe thymic atrophy, resulting from massive thymocyte apoptosis (particularly affecting the immature CD4+CD8+ cell subset) and decrease in cell proliferation. The thymic microenvironment (the non-lymphoid compartment that drives intrathymic T-cell development) is also affected in malnutrition: morphological changes in thymic epithelial cells were found, together with a decrease of thymic hormone production, as well as an increase of intrathymic contents of extracellular proteins. Profound changes in the thymus can also be seen in deficiencies of vitamins and trace elements. Taking Zn deficiency as an example, there is a substantial thymic atrophy. Importantly, marginal Zn deficiency in AIDS subjects, children with diarrhoea and elderly persons, significantly impairs the host's immunity, resulting in an increased risk of opportunistic infections and mortality; effects that are reversed by Zn supplementation. Thymic changes also occur in acute infectious diseases, including a severe thymic atrophy, mainly due to the depletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, decrease in thymocyte proliferation, in parallel to densification of the epithelial network and increase in the extracellular matrix contents, with consequent disturbances in thymocyte migration and export. In conclusion, the thymus is targeted in several conditions of malnutrition as well as in acute infections. These changes are related to the impaired peripheral immune response seen in malnourished and infected individuals. Thus, strategies inducing thymus replenishment should be considered as adjuvant therapeutics to improve immunity in malnutrition and/or acute infectious diseases.

  10. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando dos Santos Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  11. Gene Therapy for Modulation of T Cell Mediated Immune Response Provoked by Corneal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastak, Marko; Kleff, Veronika; Saban, Daniel Raphael; Czugala, Marta; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Ergün, Süleyman; Singer, Bernhard; Fuchsluger, Thomas Armin

    2017-10-07

    Corneal transplantation (=keratoplasty) is the most common type of tissue replacement in the world. The increased rate of graft rejection after keratoplasty is a central problem for repeated transplantations and in inflamed host corneas. It has been shown that apoptosis of grafted epithelium has a role in corneal allograft rejection. Our study focused on the T cell response triggered in BALB/c mice after allogeneic corneal transplantation with and without anti-apoptotic p35-transduced epithelium. To restrict p35 expression to the epithelial cells we created modified allogeneic composite grafts. As a result we found that the proportion of alloreactive CD4+ T cells in postoperatively removed cervical lymph nodes was reduced in the p35-transduced group compared to the allogeneic control group. Diminished priming of the CD4+ T cells was supported by significantly decreased proliferation and lower interferon gamma secretion when compared to allogeneic engraftments. The reduced priming of CD4+ lymphocytes is the first confirmation of the functionality of p35 in the epithelium of corneal grafts to alter the development of the recipient's immune response. Thus, modification of allosensibilization seems to be a promising tool for reducing graft-mediated immune response following corneal transplantation.

  12. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura De Simone

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in

  13. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens.

  14. Role of the immune cells, mediators and cytokines in pathogenesis of asthma: a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Bahrami Mahne

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, associated with airway re-modeling and hyperresponsiveness. It is expressed that asthma influences about 300 million people around the world, which is estimated to increase to about 400 million by 2025. The prevalence rate is 15 to 20 percent in children and 5 to 10 percent in adults, while its trend is still increasing. Inflammation plays an important role in the patho-physiology of asthma, which involves an interaction of different types of the immune cells and mediators. It leads to a number of pathophysiology changes, including bron-chial inflammation, airway obstruction, and clinical episodes such as cough, wheeze and shortness of breath. Asthma is now greatly being introduced as a heterogeneous disorder and it is pointed out to the role of T cells, including Th1, Th2, Th17, and regu-latory T cells. Other immune cells, especially neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells, as well structural cells such as epithelial and airway smooth muscle cells also pro-duce disease-associated cytokines in asthma. Increased levels of these immune cells and cytokines have been recognized in clinical samples and mouse models of asthma. Different cytokines, including pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNFα, IL-1, and IL-6, T helper 2 cytokines (such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and growth factors (such as GM-CSF, PDGF play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Indeed chemokines (such as MPC-1, RANTES , MIP-1 and the chemokine receptors (such as CCR3, CCR4, CCL11, CCL24, and CCL26 play an important role in the recruitment of circu-lating inflammatory cells into the airways in asthmatic patients and also is related with increased T helper 2 cytokines after inhaled allergens. Among new approaches, treat-ment of asthma with anti-cytokine drugs such as antibodies blocking IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 could reduce recruitment inflammatory cells into the airways and remodeling. The final perspective of asthma

  15. Effect of renal and non-renal ischemia/reperfusion on cell-mediated immunity in organs and plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common morbidity factor among patients in the intensive care unit, reaching an incidence from 3% to 30% depending on the definition of ARF and the population. Although the majority of the patients with ARF are treated with continuous renal replacement therapy......, the mortality rate still remains above 50%. The causes of death are primarily extra-renal and include infection, shock, septicemia, and respiratory failure. We wanted to evaluate the cell-mediated inflammatory response of renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and non-renal I/R, in blood and in distant organs. In our...... study, 80 mice were divided into four groups. The following surgeries were performed on the groups compared: bilateral renal I/R by clamping, unilateral renal ischemia, anesthesia only, and unilateral hind leg I/R. Half of the animals were killed after 2 h and the other half after 24 h. To assess...

  16. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu...... (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months...

  17. Inflammation in lung after acute myocardial infarction is induced by dendritic cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L J; Ren, W Y; Shen, Q J; Ji, H Y; Zhu, L

    2017-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the changes of lung tissues in mice with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and also explain the cell mechanism involved in inflammation in lung. AMI was established by left coronary ligation in mice. Then mice were divided into three groups: control group, MW1 group (sampling after surgery for one week) and MW2 group (sampling after surgery for two weeks). Afterwards, measurement of lung weight and lung histology, cell sorting in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and detection of several adhesive molecules, inflammatory molecules as well as enzyme associated with inflammation were performed. Moreover, dendritic cells (DCs) were isolated from bone marrow of C57B/L6 mice. After incubating with necrotic myocardium, the expression of antigen presenting molecules, co-stimulatory molecules and inflammatory molecules were detected by flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry in DCs. We also detected T-cell proliferation after incubating with necrotic myocardium-treated DCs. AMI induced pathological changes of lung tissue and increased inflammatory cell amount in BAL fluid. AMI also increased the expression of several inflammatory factors, adhesive molecules and enzymes associated with inflammation. CD11c and TLR9, which are DC surface markers, showed a significantly increased expression in mice with AMI. Additionally, necrotic myocardium significantly increased the expression of co-stimulatory factors including CD83 and CD80, inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ and NF-κB in DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with necrotic myocardium also significantly promoted T-cell proliferation. AMI induced inflammation in lung and these pathological changes were mediated by DC-associated immune response.

  18. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  19. Cell-mediated immune response to Leishmania chagasi experimental infection of BALB/c immunosuppressed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis, a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, presents a significant impact on immunosupressed patients. This study aimed to evaluate Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. Spleen cells stimulated or not with L. chagasi were cultured for cytokine quantification (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 by sandwich ELISA. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were determined by means of culture microtitration. Immunosuppressed groups showed statistically lower spleen weight and CD4-cell percentage in blood on the day of infection and produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines on other days of the study. The other infected groups, weather immunosupressed or not, also produced Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Parasite loads in the spleen and liver were not statistically different among the groups. It was concluded that L. chagasi infection was not affected by dexamethasone-induced immunosuppression, probably due the reversible effect of the treatment.

  20. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S; Norup, Liselotte R; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Vadekær, Dorte F; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Poul; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2014-01-09

    Potent vaccine efficiency is crucial for disease control in both human and livestock vaccination programmes. Free range chickens and chickens with access to outdoor areas have a high risk of infection with parasites including Ascaridia galli, a gastrointestinal nematode with a potential influence on the immunological response to vaccination against other infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether A. galli infection influences vaccine-induced immunity to Newcastle Disease (ND) in chickens from an MHC-characterized inbred line. Chickens were experimentally infected with A. galli at 4 weeks of age or left as non-parasitized controls. At 10 and 13 weeks of age half of the chickens were ND-vaccinated and at 16 weeks of age, all chickens were challenged with a lentogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). A. galli infection influenced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses after ND vaccination. Thus, significantly lower NDV serum titres were found in the A. galli-infected group as compared to the non-parasitized group early after vaccination. In addition, the A. galli-infected chickens showed significantly lower frequencies of NDV-specific T cells in peripheral blood three weeks after the first ND vaccination as compared to non-parasitized chickens. Finally, A. galli significantly increased local mRNA expression of IL-4 and IL-13 and significantly decreased TGF-ß4 expression in the jejunum two weeks after infection with A. galli. At the time of vaccination (six and nine weeks after A. galli infection) the local expression in the jejunum of both IFN-? and IL-10 was significantly decreased in A. galli-infected chickens. Upon challenge with the NDV LaSota strain, viral genomes persisted in the oral cavity for a slightly longer period of time in A. galli-infected vaccinees as compared to non-parasitized vaccinees. However, more work is needed in order to determine if vaccine-induced protective immunity is impaired in A. galli

  1. Rubella specific cell-mediated and humoral immunity following vaccination in college students with low antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kihei; Itoh, Yuri; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Teranishi, Hideto; Akaike, Hiroto; Ogita, Satoko; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-11-09

    This study measured cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and antibodies to clarify the basis of rubella reinfection after vaccination. In a pool of 65 college students, 39 who exhibited hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody titers against rubella of ≤ 1:16 were vaccinated with a rubella vaccine. The CMI was assessed with interferon-gamma release assay. There was low correlation (r = 0.24) between the antibody titers and interferon-gamma levels at pre-vaccination status. Preexisting interferon-gamma levels were low in some subjects with low HI antibody titers of 1:8 and 1:16. Fifty-seven percent (4/7) of the subjects who were antibody-negative with past history of rubella vaccination at entry onto the study exhibited CMI. And 57% (4/7) of the subjects remained antibody-negative following a second vaccination, despite exhibiting CMI. HI antibody titers increased significantly after vaccination, whereas post-vaccination interferon-gamma levels did not exhibit significant increases. When subjects were divided (based on their past history of vaccination and antibody values) into natural infection and vaccination groups, HI antibody titers (mean ± SD) increased to 1:2(4.4 ± 1.4) from 1: 2(3.2 ± 0.4) (p = 0.065) in the natural infection group and to 1:2(4.4 ± 1.0) from 1:2(3.0 ± 0.8) (p rubella reinfection can occur in vaccinated seropositive individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Validation of T-Track® CMV to assess the functionality of cytomegalovirus-reactive cell-mediated immunity in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Bernhard; Böger, Carsten A; Lückhoff, Gerhard; Krüger, Bernd; Barabas, Sascha; Batzilla, Julia; Schemmerer, Mathias; Köstler, Josef; Bendfeldt, Hanna; Rascle, Anne; Wagner, Ralf; Deml, Ludwig; Leicht, Joachim; Krämer, Bernhard K

    2017-03-07

    Uncontrolled cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication in immunocompromised solid-organ transplant recipients is a clinically relevant issue and an indication of impaired CMV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Primary aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the immune monitoring tool T-Track® CMV to determine CMV-reactive CMI in a cohort of hemodialysis patients representative of patients eligible for renal transplantation. Positive and negative agreement of T-Track® CMV with CMV serology was examined in 124 hemodialysis patients, of whom 67 (54%) revealed a positive CMV serostatus. Secondary aim of the study was to evaluate T-Track® CMV performance against two unrelated CMV-specific CMI monitoring assays, QuantiFERON®-CMV and a cocktail of six class I iTAg™ MHC Tetramers. Positive T-Track® CMV results were obtained in 90% (60/67) of CMV-seropositive hemodialysis patients. In comparison, 73% (45/62) and 77% (40/52) positive agreement with CMV serology was achieved using QuantiFERON®-CMV and iTAg™ MHC Tetramer. Positive T-Track® CMV responses in CMV-seropositive patients were dominated by pp65-reactive cells (58/67 [87%]), while IE-1-responsive cells contributed to an improved (87% to 90%) positive agreement of T-Track® CMV with CMV serology. Interestingly, T-Track® CMV, QuantiFERON®-CMV and iTAg™ MHC Tetramers showed 79% (45/57), 87% (48/55) and 93% (42/45) negative agreement with serology, respectively, and a strong inter-assay variability. Notably, T-Track® CMV was able to detect IE-1-reactive cells in blood samples of patients with a negative CMV serology, suggesting either a previous exposure to CMV that yielded a cellular but no humoral immune response, or TCR cross-reactivity with foreign antigens, both suggesting a possible protective immunity against CMV in these patients. T-Track® CMV is a highly sensitive assay, enabling the functional assessment of CMV-responsive cells in hemodialysis patients prior to renal transplantation. T

  3. Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses in Children During a Vaccine Mismatch Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hyang; Mishina, Margarita; Chung, Jessie R; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Martin, Judith M; Spencer, Sarah; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2016-10-01

    Emergence of antigenically drifted influenza A(H3N2) viruses resulted in reduced vaccine effectiveness in all age groups during the 2014-2015 influenza season. In children, inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) elicited neutralizing antibodies (Abs) against drifted strains at significantly lower levels than against the vaccine strain. Little is known about the cross-reactivity of cell-mediated immunity against drifted strains in children. Children aged 3-17 years (n = 48) received IIV during the 2014-2015 influenza season. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected before (on day 0) and after (on days 7 and 21) vaccination were evaluated for induction of cross-reactive plasmablasts, memory B cells, and cytokine-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against the vaccine and drifted A(H3N2) viruses by an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and flow cytometry. IIV increased frequencies of plasmablasts and memory B cells. The overall induction of the T-cell response was not significant. Both B-cell and T-cell responses showed significant cross-reactivity against A(H3N2) viruses. Age and preexisting immunity affected virus-specific plasmablast responses and fold-change of T-cell responses, respectively. The proportion of T-helper type 1-prone (ie, interferon γ- or tumor necrosis factor α-secreting) CD4(+) T cell responses also increased with age. In children aged 3-17 years, B- and T-cell responses following IIV receipt showed significant cross-reactivity against A(H3N2) viruses during a vaccine mismatch season. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Immune tolerance induced by platelet-targeted factor VIII gene therapy in hemophilia A mice is CD4 T cell mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Luo, X; Schroeder, J A; Chen, J; Baumgartner, C K; Hu, J; Shi, Q

    2017-10-01

    Essentials The immune response is a significant concern in gene therapy. Platelet-targeted gene therapy can restore hemostasis and induce immune tolerance. CD4 T cell compartment is tolerized after platelet gene therapy. Preconditioning regimen affects immune tolerance induction in platelet gene therapy. Background Immune responses are a major concern in gene therapy. Our previous studies demonstrated that platelet-targeted factor VIII (FVIII) (2bF8) gene therapy together with in vivo drug selection of transduced cells can rescue the bleeding diathesis and induce immune tolerance in FVIII(null) mice. Objective To investigate whether non-selectable 2bF8 lentiviral vector (LV) for the induction of platelet-FVIII expression is sufficient to induce immune tolerance and how immune tolerance is induced after 2bF8LV gene therapy. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression was introduced by 2bF8LV transduction and transplantation. FVIII assays and tail bleeding tests were used to confirm the success of platelet gene therapy. Animals were challenged with rhF8 to explore if immune tolerance was induced after gene therapy. Treg cell analysis, T-cell proliferation assay and memory B-cell-mediated ELISPOT assay were used to investigate the potential mechanisms of immune tolerance. Results We showed that platelet-FVIII expression was sustained and the bleeding diathesis was restored in FVIII(null) mice after 2bF8LV gene therapy. None of the transduced recipients developed anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies in the groups preconditioned with 660 cGy irradiation or busulfan plus ATG treatment even after rhF8 challenge. Treg cells significantly increased in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients and the immune tolerance developed was transferable. CD4(+) T cells from treated animals failed to proliferate in response to rhF8 re-stimulation, but memory B cells could differentiate into antibody secreting cells in 2bF8LV-transduced recipients. Conclusion 2bF8LV gene transfer without in vivo selection of

  5. Isolation of Mallory bodies and an attempt to demonstrate cell mediated immunity to Mallory body isolate in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Hardt, F; Aldershvile, J

    1981-01-01

    Mallory bodies were isolated from necropsy livers from patients with alcoholic hepatitis with and without cirrhosis with a Ficoll viscosity barrier. The purity of Mallory bodies in the isolate varied between 70 and 90%, estimated by counting Mallory bodies and non-Mallory body structures...... in haematoxylin-eosin stained smears. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Mallory bodies in the isolates. The Mallory body isolate was used as antigen in the agarose leucocyte migration inhibition test in order to test the cell-mediated immunity. No significant difference in leucocyte migration...

  6. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of in ovo exposure to PCBs (coplanar congener, kanechlor mixture, hydroxylated metabolite) on the developing cell-mediated immunity in chickens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Matsuda, M.; Kawano, M.; Wakimoto, T. [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime Univ., Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Kashima, Y. [Dept. of Hygiene, Yokohama City Univ. School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are wide spread environmental contaminants and known to cause various adverse effects on health of human and wildlife. Immune system is one of the several targets for toxic effects of PCBs and its normal balance is often disrupted by the exposure of the compounds. For example, PCBs may induce immune suppression and result in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, or conversely, excessive immune enhancement may cause adverse outcomes including as autoimmune disease and anergy. Therefore immune function is regarded as one of an important endpoint in toxicological risk assessment. There are a number of studies shown that neonatal organisms perinatally exposed to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) such as PCBs have severer effects on their immune system than adult. Dioxins and coplanar PCB congeners, structurally planar PHAHs are known to have high affinity for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have the strongest affinity among such compounds and these are considered to act on immune system through AhR. On the other hand, such as non-planar PCB congeners with low affinity for AhR, which are abundantly contained in commercial PCB preparations have non-additive (antagonistic) effects on immune function. Prenatal exposure of TCDD to rodent induced abnormal lymphoid development in the thymus and thymus-dependent immune functions were remarkably disturbed. Although several experimental studies in mammals have been carried out on the developmental immunotoxicity of PCBs, there are still limited information available on avian species. Thus in this study, prenatal exposure to low level of PCBs and the effects on the developing immune system were investigated with chicken as a model animal of avian species, especially it is focused on the cell-mediated immune function.

  8. Primary vaccination with the LiESP/QA-21 vaccine (CaniLeish) produces a cell-mediated immune response which is still present 1 year later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Javier; Vouldoukis, Ioannis; Schreiber, Paul; Martin, Virginie; McGahie, David; Gueguen, Sylvie; Cuisinier, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-15

    Canine leishmaniasis, an important zoonotic disease of dogs, is the result of an ineffective and inappropriate immune response to infection with Leishmania infantum. It is widely accepted that the appropriate immune response is characterised by a T-helper (Th)1-dominated profile in an overall mixed Th1/Th2 response. The absence of a strong Th1 response is associated with progression to the clinical disease. Thus, there is a need for an effective vaccine that could modulate the immune response to a more appropriate profile against the parasite. In this study we measured the impact of the LiESP/QA-21 canine vaccine, recently launched commercially in Europe, on selected humoral and cellular immune markers for one year after a primary vaccination course. The humoral response to vaccination was characterised by a predominantly IgG2 profile. Vaccinated dogs developed long-lasting cell-mediated immune responses against L. infantum, specifically with a stronger ability of macrophages to reduce intracellular parasite burdens in co-culture with autologous lymphocytes compared to control dogs (p=0.0002), which was correlated with induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) derivatives. These results confirm that vaccination with LiESP/QA-21 is capable of inducing an appropriate Th1-dominated immune profile which persists for a full year. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. T-cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in beta2-integrin (CD18)- and ICAM-1 (CD54)-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1996-01-01

    the inflammatory reaction, indicating that under conditions of more limited immune activation both molecules do play a role in formation of the inflammatory exudate. Finally, virus control was found to be somewhat impaired in both mutant strains. In conclusion, our results indicate that although LFA-1-ICAM-1......The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice with deficient expression of beta2-integrins or ICAM-1. In such mice, the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was only slightly impaired and bystander activation was as extensive as that observed in wild......-type mice. T-cell-mediated inflammation, assessed as primary footpad swelling and susceptibility to intracerebral infection, was slightly compromised only in beta2-integrin-deficient mice. However, adoptive immunization of mutant mice soon after local infection did reveal a reduced capacity to support...

  10. Stress effect on humoral and cell mediated immune response: Indispensable part of corticosterone and cytokine in neutrophil function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakthivel Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This result further concludes that prior immunization of SRBC in animal’s act as a vaccination, which helps to prevent noise stress induced impairment in immune system. Orally administered I. tinctoria prevented noise altered immune system. These results also concluded that I. tinctoria supplementation could act as an immunomodulators and suggesting its therapeutic efficacy as an antistressor.

  11. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  12. Antigen-specific T contrasuppressor factor in cell-mediated immunity: interactions leading to eradication of the tolerant state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Ptak, M; Gershon, R K; Green, D R

    1984-09-01

    Interactions between a T cell-derived, antigen-specific, contrasuppressor factor (TcsF) and immune T cells that block the action of T suppressor factors and allow the transfer of cellular immunity into tolerant recipients are described. Immune T cells from contact-sensitized donors are capable of transferring specific immunity into normal recipients but not into animals rendered tolerant to the specific antigen. Brief exposure of the immune cells to the TcsF enables the effective transfer of immunity into such tolerant recipients. In addition, treated immune cells become resistant to subsequent exposure to T suppressor factor (capable of inhibiting transfer of immunity to normal recipients). A cyclophosphamide-sensitive, I-J+, Ly-2 T transducer cell is required in the immune donor cell population for contrasuppression to be induced by the TcsF plus specific antigen. These cells release an antigen-non-specific contrasuppressive factor capable of rendering immune targets, depleted of transducer cells, resistant to suppression (either by suppressor factor or in the tolerant recipient). The results indicate that contrasuppression in contact sensitivity is antigen specific and that the balance of suppression and contrasuppression determines tolerance vs responsiveness in this system. The symmetrical resemblance of the contrasuppressive interactions to those of suppression in contact sensitivity are discussed.

  13. Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-dependent CD8 T cell-mediated immune attack resulting in suppression of tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbert G van der Most

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-cancer chemotherapy can be simultaneously lymphodepleting and immunostimulatory. Pre-clinical models clearly demonstrate that chemotherapy can synergize with immunotherapy, raising the question how the immune system can be mobilized to generate anti-tumor immune responses in the context of chemotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mouse model of malignant mesothelioma, AB1-HA, to investigate T cell-dependent tumor resolution after chemotherapy. Established AB1-HA tumors were cured by a single dose of cyclophosphamide in a CD8 T cell- and NK cell-dependent manner. This treatment was associated with an IFN-alpha/beta response and a profound negative impact on the anti-tumor and total CD8 T cell responses. Despite this negative effect, CD8 T cells were essential for curative responses. The important effector molecules used by the anti-tumor immune response included IFN-gamma and TRAIL. The importance of TRAIL was supported by experiments in nude mice where the lack of functional T cells could be compensated by agonistic anti-TRAIL-receptor (DR5 antibodies. CONCLUSION: The data support a model in which chemotherapy sensitizes tumor cells for T cell-, and possibly NK cell-, mediated apoptosis. A key role of tumor cell sensitization to immune attack is supported by the role of TRAIL in tumor resolution and explains the paradox of successful CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor responses in the absence of CD8 T cell expansion.

  14. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with a Live-Attenuated Triple Mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 Induces Robust Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity To Completely Protect Animals against Pneumonic Plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Fitts, Eric C; Popov, Vsevolod L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-12-01

    Earlier, we showed that the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 with deleted genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acyltransferase (MsbB), and the attachment invasion locus (Ail), respectively, was avirulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. In this study, we further evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant and its derivative by different routes of vaccination. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous (s.c.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) route with two doses (2 × 10(6) CFU/dose) of the above-mentioned triple mutant with 100% survivability of the animals. Upon subsequent pneumonic challenge with 70 to 92 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of wild-type (WT) strain CO92, all of the mice survived when immunization occurred by the i.m. route. Since Ail has virulence and immunogenic potential, a mutated version of Ail devoid of its virulence properties was created, and the genetically modified ail replaced the native ail gene on the chromosome of the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, creating a Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 vaccine strain. This newly generated mutant was attenuated similarly to the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant when administered by the i.m. route and provided 100% protection to animals against subsequent pneumonic challenge. Not only were the two above-mentioned mutants cleared rapidly from the initial i.m. site of injection in animals with no histopathological lesions, the immunized mice did not exhibit any disease symptoms during immunization or after subsequent exposure to WT CO92. These two mutants triggered balanced Th1- and Th2-based antibody responses and cell-mediated immunity. A substantial increase in interleukin-17 (IL-17) from the T cells of vaccinated mice, a cytokine of the Th17 cells, further augmented their vaccine potential. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants represent excellent vaccine candidates for plague, with the latter mutant still retaining Ail immunogenicity but

  15. Difference in the presence of cell-mediated and humoral immunity in patients with endometriosis compared with healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Slabe

    2011-08-01

    Conclusions: We have not fully confirmed the hypothesis that women with endomeriosis have alterations in the immune response. However, the present study supports and adds important infomation to the views that immune abnormality plays an important role in the etiopathogenesis of endometriosis. On the humoral level, we showed the presence of antiendothelial antibodies reacting with vascular endothelium.

  16. T-cell mediated immune responses in calves primary-infected or re-infected with Cooperia oncophora: similar effector cells but different timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanobana, K; Koets, A; Bakker, N; Ploeger, H W; Vervelde, L

    2003-11-01

    Cooperia oncophora is the most prevalent intestinal nematode of cattle occurring in Western Europe. Primary infection with 100000 third stage infective larvae (L3) induces acquired immunity in a high proportion of the animals but there is little information on immunity against re-infection. In the current experiment, the contribution of the T-cell mediated immunity in protection against re-infection with C. oncophora was investigated in detail. Priming elicited long-lasting protective immunity that was evidenced by a significantly decreased worm burden and egg excretion in primed animals compared to challenge control animals. Lymphocyte proliferation tests with excretory/secretory products (ESP) of C. oncophora and with three distinct ESP fractions indicated an enhanced reactivity in primed animals and suggested that by fractionating of ESP we selected for proteins involved in protective immunity against re-infection with C. oncophora. Phenotypic analysis of T cell subsets at diverse anatomical locations revealed that the enhanced reactivity of lymphocytes from peripheral blood and lymph nodes of the infected animals coincided with a significantly increased frequency of CD4(+) cells at these locations but a deceased frequency of CD4(+) cells in the lamina propria. These findings were independent of the immune status of the animals but more pronounced in the primed animals than in the challenge control animals. In addition we demonstrated that primary and secondary infections with C. oncophora were associated with two waves of eosinophils and that the kinetics of this cell population differed as a result of priming. Based on the observed correlations we propose that the early increase of eosinophils is T cell independent and merely a consequence of inflammation in the parasitised gut. In contrast, the second wave of eosinophils depends upon CD4(+) cells and correlations with parasitological parameters at this time point support a role of eosinophils as effector

  17. The effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, A; Zolfaghari, B; Mirdamadi, M

    2013-07-01

    Turnips with a long history of usage, are helpful in preventing breast and prostate cancer, inflammation and body`s immune system dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice. Chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands were prepared by maceration method. To study the effects of B. rapa on acquired immunity, groups of Balb/c mice (n=8) were used. Sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was injected (s.c., 1×10(8)cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and 5 days later, different extracts (10, 100 and 500 mg/kg), betamethasone (4 mg/kg) and Levamisol (4 mg/kg) as a positive control and normal saline as a negative control were given i.p. After 1 h SRBC was injected to footpad (s.c., 1×10(8)cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and footpad swelling was measured up to 72 h. To investigate the effects of B. rapa on innate immunity the same procedure was used, but animals only received one injection of SRBC 1 h after i.p. injection of test compounds. Our findings showed that SRBC induced an increase in paw swelling with maximum response at 6-8 and 2-4 h for innate and acquired immunity, respectively. Betamethasone inhibited and levamisol increased paw thickness in both models. In both innate and acquired immunity models, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands significantly and dose-dependently reduced paw thickness. Ethyl acetate extract showed better effect. As glucosinolates are better extracted by ethyl acetate, it may be concluded that they are contributed in the more pronounced effects of ethyl acetate extract.

  18. Comparison of antibody and cell-mediated immune responses of foals and adult horses after vaccination with live Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgill, Tracy L; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hurley, David J; Hondalus, Mary K

    2014-03-10

    Equine neonates have reduced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses compared to adult horses after administration of killed vaccines. As a basis for this study, we hypothesized that newborn foals can mount strong immune responses after vaccination with live Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Healthy 4-day-old foals (n=7), 4-month-old foals (n=7) and adult horses (n=6) were vaccinated once with live M. bovis BCG. Age-matched animals (n=5 per group) were used as unvaccinated controls. Relative vaccine-specific immunoglobulin concentrations and whole blood mRNA expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 were measured prior to and 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after vaccination. Eight weeks after vaccination, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed by measuring the increase in double skin thickness after intradermal injection of purified protein derivative. Both groups of foals and adult horses responded with a significant increase in vaccine-specific total IgG, IgGa, IgGc, IgG(T), and IgM concentrations. In contrast, only adult horses mounted significant IgGb responses. Vaccine-specific concentrations of total IgG and IgGa were significantly higher in adult horses than in 4-day-old foals whereas IgGc responses were significantly higher in 4-day-old foals than in the other two age groups. Adult horses had significantly higher basal IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA expression than both groups of foals but vaccination with M. bovis BCG did not significantly increase expression of these cytokines, regardless of age group. Immunized horses had significantly higher DTH responses than age-matched unvaccinated controls. DTH responses were significantly greater in both groups of vaccinated foals than in vaccinated adult horses. Despite a naïve immune system, newborn foals have the ability to mount robust antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to M. bovis BCG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phytoconstituents of Jatropha curcas L. leaves and their immunomodulatory activity on humoral and cell-mediated immune response in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alla, Howaida I; Moharram, Fatma A; Gaara, Ahmed H; El-Safty, Mounir M

    2009-01-01

    A novel biflavone di-C-glucoside, 6,6"-di-C-beta-D-glucopyranoside-methylene-(8,8")-biapigenin (1), was isolated from the leaves of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae), together with six known compounds; apigenin 7-O-beta-D-neohesperidoside (2), apigenin 7-O-beta-D-galactoside (3), orientin (4), vitexin (5), vicenin II (6), and apigenin (7). Their structures were determined on the basis of extensive chemical and spectroscopic analyses (UV, NMR and HRESI-MS). The immunomodulatory effect of an 80% aqueous methanol extract (AME) and compounds 1-5 (0.25 mg/kg body wt) to one-day-old specific pathogen-free (SPF) chicks was determined. Stimulation of both humoral and cell-mediated seroresponse was observed, especially those of AME and compound 1. Remarkable effective increases of the antibody titers, lymphocyte and macrophage cells, in blood were recorded. SPF chicks treated with the tested samples exhibited protection against Newcastle disease challenge virus after being vaccinated.

  20. [Partial deficiency of cell-mediated immunity in a child with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Intercurrent meningeal and pulmonary cryptococcosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbeaux, J; Baculard, A; Tournier, G; Moulias, R; Goust, J M; Drouhet, E d; Saint-Martin, J

    1975-01-01

    The authors report a new case of partial immune deficiency of cellular immunity, associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in a 12 Years-old boy. The disease began very early during the first few weeks of life, with thrush in the mouth. This candidiasis then evolved intermittently and was still present. Numerous cutaneous, pulmonary and ear infections occured throughout this child's life. This morbid association led to a search for an immune deficiency. Humoral immunity was normal. Abnormalities of cellular immunity were as follows: apart from candidine skin anergy, there was a deficiency in the factor which inhibits leukocyte migration, secretion of a factor favouring this migration (MEF). It was also noted the presence of the patient's serum, of a factor inhibiting lymphocyte transformation in the presence of candidine. In spite of treatment with intravenous route, amphotericin B, followed by transfer factor, the oral candidiasis persisted together with the skin anergy to candidine. On the other hand, the serum inhibitory factor disappeared. Pulmonary cryptococcosis probably favoured by corticosteroid treatment, developed on this background of immune deficiency; as usual it spread to the meninges. Treatment associating intraveinous amphotericin B and 5 fluorocytosine oral and later intravenous, total duration 6 months, grave a recovery maintained on a 8 months follow up.

  1. DNA prime/Adenovirus boost malaria vaccine encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 induces sterile protection associated with cell-mediated immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Chuang

    Full Text Available Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection.The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad. The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1. The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea, possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3, preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27% were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44-817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5-102 and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13-408; AMA1 348, range 88-1270 and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019. Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant.The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%. Protection was associated with cell-mediated immunity to AMA1, with CSP

  2. Production of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells and factor, and their use in augmentation of cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Marcinkiewicz, J; Gershon, R K; Green, D R

    1984-08-01

    A single injection of TNP-labeled mouse gamma-globulin (TNP-IgG) can render the contact sensitivity response of mice resistant to suppressor cells (Tsc) and their biologically active cellfree products (TsF). Lyt-1 T cells of mice treated with TNP-IgG can protect the adoptive contact sensitivity response of immune cells from the antigen-specific suppressive effect produced by the addition of antigen-specific TsF or Tsc. When T cells of TNP-IgG-treated mice are put into culture, they produce an antigen-specific contrasuppressor factor (TcsF) that can replace the activity of the cells. When immune cells are preincubated in vitro with TcsF, they become refractory to Tsc and TsF added subsequently. The TcsF, however, has no ability to restore responsiveness to immune cells that had been previously exposed to TsF. The TcsF binds specifically to TNP, expresses an I-J-controlled determinant, and does not express standard determinants found on mouse Ig. The treatment that primes the contrasuppressor system to protect the contact sensitivity response also reportedly renders the antibody-producing system tolerant, (i.e., produces so called "split tolerance"). These results are discussed in light of the possibility that the contrasuppressor system can be responsible for so called isotype-specific immunity by rendering one arm of the immune system resistant to generalized suppressive mechanisms.

  3. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  4. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3 adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  5. PB1 as a potential target for increasing the breadth of T-cell mediated immunity to Influenza A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddbäck, Ida E M; Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Sara R

    2016-01-01

    in the dominant NP366 epitope were not efficiently protected. To address this problem, we envision the use of a cocktail of adenovectors targeting different internal proteins of influenza A virus. Consequently, we investigated the possibility of using PB1 as a target for an adenovector-based vaccine against...... not as efficiently protected against influenza A challenge as similarly NP-vaccinated animals. The reason for this is not a difference in the quality of the primed cells, nor in functional avidity. However, under similar conditions of immunization fewer PB1-specific cells were recruited to the airways, and surface......Recently, we showed that combined intranasal and subcutaneous immunization with a non-replicating adenoviral vector expressing NP of influenza A, strain PR8, induced long-standing protection against a range of influenza A viruses. However, H-2(b) mice challenged with an influenza A strain mutated...

  6. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  7. Modulation of Cell-Mediated Immunity to Suppress High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linna; Song, Kexiu; Gao, Mingming; Qu, Shen; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of immune modulators, cyclosporin A and fingolimod, on high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high fat diet and injected intraperitoneally with cyclosporine A, fingolimod, or vehicle twice weekly for 15 weeks. Body weight and food intake were manually measured every other day. Glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity, and body composition were examined and compared between the control and the immune modulator treated animals. Tissue samples were collected at the end of the experiment and examined for serum biochemistry, histology, and mRNA levels of marker genes for inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues and in the liver. Cyclosporine A and fingolimod suppressed high fat diet-induced weight gain, reduced hepatic fat accumulation, and improved insulin sensitivity. The beneficial effects are associated with altered expression of F4/80, Cd68, Il-6, Tnf-α, and Mcp-1 genes, which are involved in macrophage-related chronic inflammation in adipose and hepatic tissues. Immune modulation represents an important intervention for obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  8. HPV-E7 Delivered by Engineered Exosomes Elicits a Protective CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Di Bonito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed an innovative strategy to induce a cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response against protein antigens of choice. It relies on the production of exosomes, i.e., nanovesicles spontaneously released by all cell types. We engineered the upload of huge amounts of protein antigens upon fusion with an anchoring protein (i.e., HIV-1 Nefmut, which is an inactive protein incorporating in exosomes at high levels also when fused with foreign proteins. We compared the immunogenicity of engineered exosomes uploading human papillomavirus (HPV-E7 with that of lentiviral virus-like particles (VLPs incorporating equivalent amounts of the same antigen. These exosomes, whose limiting membrane was decorated with VSV-G, i.e., an envelope protein inducing pH-dependent endosomal fusion, proved to be as immunogenic as the cognate VLPs. It is noteworthy that the immunogenicity of the engineered exosomes remained unaltered in the absence of VSV-G. Most important, we provide evidence that the inoculation in mouse of exosomes uploading HPV-E7 induces production of anti-HPV E7 CTLs, blocks the growth of syngeneic tumor cells inoculated after immunization, and controls the development of tumor cells inoculated before the exosome challenge. These results represent the proof-of-concept about both feasibility and efficacy of the Nefmut-based exosome platform for the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity.

  9. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  10. Suppression of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses by an interleukin-2-immunoglobulin fusion protein in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzendorf, U; Pohl, T; Bulfone-Paus, S; Krause, H; Notter, M; Onu, A; Walz, G; Diamantstein, T

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) plays a pivotal role in the cellular and humoral immune responses directed against foreign antigens. We characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a chimeric protein consisting of mouse IL-2 fused to the mouse IgG2b Fc domains. This fusion protein binds to IL-2 and Fc receptors and supports IL-2-dependent cell proliferation but does not mediate lysis of IL-2 receptor-positive cells in the presence of murine complement in vitro. However, in vivo the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein suppresses both cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization with sheep erythrocytes. Surprisingly, delayed hypersensitivity is inhibited despite a dramatic increase of splenic CD3+ and NK1.1+ lymphocytes, indicating that altered homing of IL2-IgG2b-activated lymphocytes rather than cytolysis prevents these cells from accumulating in areas of inflammation. Although in vitro the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein does not alter proliferation of B cells in response to mitogenic stimulation, IgM production in response to sheep erythrocytes is profoundly inhibited in mice treated with the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein. Since no side effects are observed, the IL2-IgG2b fusion protein may expand the therapeutic repertoire of reagents used for the treatment of allograft rejection and autoimmune diseases. PMID:8636431

  11. Normalizing microbiota-induced retinoic acid deficiency stimulates protective CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunity in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A.; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E.; Krois, Charles R.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Pham, Tho D.; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA...

  12. Complementing T-cell Function: An Inhibitory Role of the Complement System in T-cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiyi; McKenzie, Jodi A; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    New data from Wang and colleagues show that complement C3 suppresses the function of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating T cells by inhibiting IL10 production, and targeting the complement receptors C3aR and C5aR enhances the antitumor activity of immune checkpoint blockade. Their results not only define a new role of complement receptors as T-cell coinhibitory receptors, but also are useful in the development of novel strategies to improve the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Discov; 6(9); 953-5. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Wang et al., p. 1022. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. CD11b+ migratory dendritic cells mediate CD8 T cell cross-priming and cutaneous imprinting after topical immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne T Nizza

    Full Text Available Topical antigen application is a focus of current vaccine research. This immunization route mimics natural antigen exposure across a barrier tissue and generates T cells imprinted for skin-selective homing. Soluble antigens introduced through this route require cross-presentation by DC to generate CD8 T cell responses. Here we have explored the relative contribution of various skin-derived DC subsets to cross-priming and skin-selective imprinting. In our model, DC acquire soluble Ag in vivo from immunized murine skin for cross-presentation to naïve CD8 T cells ex vivo. We find CD11b(+ migratory DC to be the relevant cross-priming DC in this model. Both Langerin(+ and Langerin(- CD11b(+ migratory DC can cross-present antigen in our system, but only the Langerin+ subset can induce expression of the skin-selective addressin E-selectin ligand. Thus, the CD11b(+ Langerin(+ migratory DC population, comprised primarily of Langerhans cells, both cross-primes naïve CD8 T cells and imprints them with skin-homing capabilities.

  14. Innate Lymphoid Cells Mediate Pulmonary Eosinophilic Inflammation, Airway Mucous Cell Metaplasia, and Type 2 Immunity in Mice Exposed to Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Buglak, Nicholas; Li, Ning; White, Kaylin; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ambient ozone in photochemical smog is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation and nonatopic asthma in children. In the present study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced nonatopic asthma by using lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, ILC-sufficient Rag2 -/- mice (devoid of T and B cells), and ILC-deficient Rag2 -/- Il2rg -/- mice (depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs). Mice were exposed to 0 or 0.8 parts per million ozone for 1 day or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 hr/day). A single exposure to ozone caused neutrophilic inflammation, airway epithelial injury, and reparative DNA synthesis in all strains of mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of ILCs. In contrast, 9-day exposures induced eosinophilic inflammation and mucous cell metaplasia only in the lungs of ILC-sufficient mice. Repeated ozone exposures also elicited increased messenger RNA expression of transcripts associated with type 2 immunity and airway mucus production in ILC-sufficient mice. ILC-deficient mice repeatedly exposed to ozone had no pulmonary pathology or increased gene expression related to type 2 immunity. These results suggest a new paradigm for the biologic mechanisms underlying the development of a phenotype of childhood nonatopic asthma that has been linked to ambient ozone exposures.

  15. Cell-mediated immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum purified soluble antigens in sickle-cell trait subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayoumi, R A; Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible differences in the immune response to Plasmodium falciparum between sickle-cell trait (Hb AS) and normal haemoglobin (Hb AA) individuals, we examined 35 Hb AS and 24 Hb AA subjects matched for age and microenvironment. Their age was 2-55 years and all lived in a malaria...... individuals (P less than 0.025). Responses of BMNCs to PPD and PHA were also higher among Hb AS individuals and correlated positively with responses to SPAg. These findings support the hypotheses that the sickle-cell trait protects individuals from P. falciparum infections, at least in part, by modulating...... endemic area 300 km south of Khartoum. Antibodies to ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155/RESA) and to circumsporozoite (CS) protein (anti-NANP40) indicated equal exposure to falciparum malaria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs) from 20/35 (57%) Hb AS subjects compared with 10/24 (42...

  16. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S.; Norup, Liselotte R.

    2014-01-01

    blood three weeks after the first ND vaccination as compared to non-parasitized chickens. Finally, A. galli significantly increased local mRNA expression of IL-4 and IL-13 and significantly decreased TGF-ß4 expression in the jejunum two weeks after infection with A. galli. At the time of vaccination......Potent vaccine efficiency is crucial for disease control in both human and livestock vaccination programmes. Free range chickens and chickens with access to outdoor areas have a high risk of infection with parasites including Ascaridia galli, a gastrointestinal nematode with a potential influence...... on the immunological response to vaccination against other infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether A. galli infection influences vaccine-induced immunity to Newcastle Disease (ND) in chickens from an MHC-characterized inbred line. Chickens were experimentally infected with A. galli...

  17. Virus-stimulated neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment enhance T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin Yang; Tai, Jiayu A; Li, Sumin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-07-05

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) fosters tumors by attenuating anti-tumor immunity, reinforcing tumor cell survival and increasing angiogenesis. Among the constituents of the TME, here, we focused on tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). First, we found that the combination of poly I:C and inactivated Sendai virus particles (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) synergistically suppressed tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma mouse model. In this model, poly I:C contributed to the recruitment of CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils to the TME, and co-injection of poly I:C and HVJ-E increased CD11b+Ly6G+FAS+ TAN in the TME. Depletion of neutrophils abolished the synergistic anti-tumor effect of HVJ-E and poly I:C in B16-F10 tumors. We revealed that C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) is produced in the TME by poly I:C, but HVJ-E enhanced neutrophil infiltration of the TME does not occur. An anti-CXCL2 antibody inhibited the tumor suppression by HVJ-E+poly I:C. HVJ-E in combination with recombinant CXCL2 protein or CXCL2 pDNA suppressed mouse melanoma by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against B16-F10 melanoma, which was abolished by an anti-Ly6G antibody. HVJ-E directly and indirectly increased FAS and ICAM-1 expression in cultured bone marrow-derived naïve neutrophils. Thus, HVJ-E activates anti-tumor immunity via anti-tumorigenic neutrophils in the TME. An HVJ-E vector containing the CXCL2 gene may be applicable as a novel cancer gene therapy strategy.

  18. Study of biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and molecular oxidative damage in patients with dermal bioimplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Olga; Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernández-Figueras, Teresa; Vilches, Angel; Llurba, Elisa; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several soft-tissue dermal fillers have been reported to provoke immunogenicity and may cause adverse reactions despite claims regarding their safety. This study aimed to assess biomaterial-induced macrophage activation, cell-mediated immune response and oxidative stress in 169 patients with dermal bioimplants. To this end, we analysed plasma concentrations of myeloperoxidase (MPO), the chitinase-like proteins chitotriosidase and YKL-40 and molecular oxidative damage. The present study shows, for the first time, that the components of innate immunity: chitotriosidase and YKL-40, are significantly higher in patients with certain bioimplants and these markers of monocyte/macrophage activation rose progressively as adverse reactions (AR) evolved. Plasma MPO levels increased 4-fold in filler users with AR and 3-fold in those without. Analysis by filler type showed subjects injected with calcium hydroxylapatite, methacrylate, acrylamides and silicone to have values significantly above those of non-filler subjects for at least two plasma biomarkers, probably because the afore-mentioned biomaterials are permanent and prone to trigger AR in the long term. By contrast, hyaluronic acid alone elicited little immune response. Plasma concentrations of markers of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins were found to be significantly higher in users of four of the nine dermal fillers studied. These diffusible products of molecular peroxidation would stem from the reaction catalysed by MPO that generates potent oxidants, leading to cell oxidative damage which, in turn, may exert deleterious effects on the organism. Overall, the results of this study on the effects of a range of dermal fillers point to chronic activation of the immune response mediated by macrophages and PMNs. The increases in plasma of MPO, chitotriosidase and YKL-40 proteins and products of macromolecular peroxidation suggests that these molecules could serve as blood-based biochemical markers and alert to the

  19. Circumsporozoite protein-specific K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells mediate protective antimalaria immunity in sporozoite-immunized MHC-I-K(d) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Tsuji, Moriya

    2014-01-01

    Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6) transgenic (Tg) mice, expressing K(d) molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg), which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  20. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  1. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Drabczyk, Malgorzata; Neff, C Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S; Palmer, Brent E; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-10-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  2. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  3. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-01-01

    ...; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK...

  5. Relationship between cell-mediated immunity to Varicella-Zoster virus and aging in subjects from the community-based Shozu Herpes Zoster study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirane, Risako; Tang, Huamin; Hayashi, Kenichi; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Iso, Hiroyasu; Asada, Hideo; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2017-02-01

    Age-related declines in cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are associated with the incidence and severity of Herpes Zoster (HZ) infection. However, the level of Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV)-specific CMI associated with disease onset is unclear. This study aimed to examine factors associated with VZV-specific CMI, as measured by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, in a Japanese cohort. The study enrolled 365 subjects aged 60 years and over, all of whom were taking part in the Shozu Herpes Zoster (SHEZ) study and had undergone four sets of blood and intradermal reaction tests during a 3 year follow-up period. The VZV-specific immunity profile of each subject was assessed, and linear mixed effects models were constructed to analyze IFN-γ ELISPOT results in association with a combination of factors. The model that best explained the IFN-γ ELISPOT results was selected using the Akaike Information Criteria. The best-fit model consisted of age group as the only explanatory fixed-effect variable. The model showed that VZV-specific CMI, quantified as numbers of spots on the ELISPOT assay, among subjects aged 70-79 was on average 10.30 points lower than that among subjects aged 60-69. There was no statistically significant difference between subjects aged 70-79 and those aged 80-89. Age was the only factor significantly associated with the level of VZV-specific CMI, as measured by the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. These results may represent an important step towards quantifying the relationship between VZV-specific CMI and the onset of HZ. J. Med. Virol. 89:313-317, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 21 Days head-down bed rest induces weakening of cell-mediated immunity - Some spaceflight findings confirmed in a ground-based analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Jens; Bartels, Lars Erik; Dige, Anders; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Boehme, Gisela; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2012-08-01

    Several studies indicate a weakening of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and reactivation of latent herpes viruses during spaceflight. We tested the hypothesis that head-down bed rest (HDBR), a ground-based analog of spaceflight, mimics the impact of microgravity on human immunity. Seven healthy young males underwent two periods of 3 weeks HDBR in the test facility of the German Aerospace Center. As a nutritional countermeasure aimed against bone demineralisation, 90 mmol potassium bicarbonate (KHCO(3)) was administered daily in a crossover design. Blood samples were drawn on five occasions. Whole blood was stimulated with antigen i.e. Candida albicans, purified protein derivative (PPD) tuberculin, tetanus toxoid and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) (CMV-QuantiFERON). Flow cytometric analysis included CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), γδ T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. In one of the two bed rest periods, we observed a significant decrease in production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) following phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, with a rapid normalization being observed after HDBR. The cytokine levels showed a V-shaped pattern that led to a relativeTh2-shift in cytokine balance. Only three individuals responded to the specific T cell antigens without showing signs of an altered response during HDBR, nor did we observe reactivation of CMV or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Of unknown significance, dietary supplementation with KHCO(3) counteracted the decrease in IL-2 levels during HDBR, while there was no impact on other immunological parameters. We conclude that discrete alterations in CMI may be induced by HDBR in selected individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell penetrable-mouse forkhead box P3 suppresses type 1 T helper cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Qihong; Yin, Lei; Wu, Weijiang; Xia, Sheng; Shao, Qixiang

    2017-02-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), which is a transcription factor, has a primary role in the development and function of regulatory T cells, and thus contributes to homeostasis of the immune system. A previous study generated a cell-permeable fusion protein of mouse FOXP3 conjugated to a protein transduction domain (PTD-mFOXP3) that successfully blocked differentiation of type 17 T helper cells in vitro and alleviated experimental arthritis in mice. In the present study, the role of PTD-mFOXP3 in type 1 T helper (Th1) cell-mediated immunity was investigated and the possible mechanisms for its effects were explored. Under Th1 polarization conditions, cluster of differentiation 4(+) T cells were treated with PTD-mFOXP3 and analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro, which revealed that PTD-mFOXP3 blocked Th1 differentiation in vitro. Mice models of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions were generated by subcutaneous sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to the ears of mice. PTD-mFOXP3, which was administered via local subcutaneous injection, significantly reduced DTH-induced inflammation, including ear swelling (ear swelling, P<0.001; pinnae weight, P<0.05 or P<0.01 with 0.25 and 1.25 mg/kg PTD-mFOXP3, respectively), infiltration of T cells, and expression of interferon-γ at local inflammatory sites (mRNA level P<0.05) compared with the DTH group. The results of the present study demonstrated that PTD-mFOXP3 may attenuate DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and activity of Th1 cells.

  8. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel antigens for detection of cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2011-01-01

    included blood samples from 26 heifers from a MAP infected herd, collected three times with four to five-week intervals, and blood samples from 60 heifers of a non-infected herd collected once. Heifers of the non-infected herd were used to establish cut-off values for each antigen. The case definition...... use purified protein derivative of MAP (PPDj) which are complex antigen mixtures with low specificity. The objectives of this study were to evaluate immunogenicity and specificity of 14 novel recombinant antigens for use in the IFN-γ assay and to assess the consistency of IFN-γ responses. The study...

  10. Trace elements and cell-mediated immunity in gestational and pre-gestational diabetes mellitus at third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia Mahmoud

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study: To evaluate the correlations betweenZn2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Se2+ and Cr3+ and alteration in T cell subsetsduring diabetic and normal pregnancy. Methods. The study involved63 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GD and 16 pregnantwomen with Type 2 diabetes and 48 healthy, non-pregnant womenwere included as controls. Ten ml of whole venous blood from eachparticipant was analyzed for electrolytes by atomic absorption; totalantioxidant activity, individual enzymatic antioxidants by spectrophotometry; and lymphocyte sub-populations by flow cytometry. Results. There were significant changes in lymphocyte sub-populations: Naïve T cells were decreased and memory T-cells and activated T cells(CD4+HLA-DR+, CD4+CD29+ were increased in diabetes in pregnancy.Zn2+ and Cr3+ deficiency were observed in Type 2 diabetics with an increase in Cu2+ in all pregnant cohorts. In healthy pregnantsubjects, CD4+-HLA-DR+ was increased in direct proportion to serumMg2+ (p<0.05 and Se2+ (p<0.01. In insulin-treated GD patients,CD4+CD29+ cells were increased proportionally to serum Zn2+(p<0.05 while in diet controlled GD cohort CD45RO+/ CD45RA+ Tcells correlated directly with serum Mg (p<0.05 and Zn2+ (p<0.01while it correlated inversely with serum Cu2+ (p<0.01. Conclusions.The results of the present study show a correlation between trace element deficiency and increased lipid peroxidation in diabetes in pregnancy and lymphocyte activation. Dietary manipulation may, therefore, point to improvement in existing approaches to management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy.

  11. Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immune Responses after Immunization of Calves with a Recombinant Multiantigenic Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Subunit Vaccine at Different Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Aagaard, Claus; Stockmarr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Neonates and juvenile ruminants are very susceptible to paratuberculosis infection. This is likely due to a high degree of exposure from their dams and an immature immune system. To test the influence of age on vaccine-induced responses, a cocktail of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratu...

  12. Dendritic cell-mediated-immunization with xenogenic PrP and adenoviral vectors breaks tolerance and prolongs mice survival against experimental scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bruley Rosset

    Full Text Available In prion diseases, PrP(c, a widely expressed protein, is transformed into a pathogenic form called PrP(Sc, which is in itself infectious. Antibodies directed against PrP(c have been shown to inhibit PrP(c to PrP(Sc conversion in vitro and protect in vivo from disease. Other effectors with potential to eliminate PrPSc-producing cells are cytotoxic T cells directed against PrP-derived peptides but their ability to protect or to induce deleterious autoimmune reactions is not known. The natural tolerance to PrP(c makes difficult to raise efficient adaptive responses. To break tolerance, adenovirus (Ad encoding human PrP (hPrP or control Ad were administered to wild-type mice by direct injection or by transfer of Ad-transduced dendritic cells (DCs. Control Ad-transduced DCs from Tg650 mice overexpressing hPrP were also used for immunization. DC-mediated but not direct administration of AdhPrP elicited antibodies that bound to murine native PrP(c. Frequencies of PrP-specific IFNgamma-secreting T cells were low and in vivo lytic activity only targeted cells strongly expressing hPrP. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD3(+ T cell infiltration was similar in the brain of vaccinated and unvaccinated 139A-infected mice suggesting the absence of autoimmune reactions. Early splenic PrP(Sc replication was strongly inhibited ten weeks post infection and mean survival time prolonged from 209 days in untreated 139A-infected mice to 246 days in mice vaccinated with DCs expressing the hPrP. The efficacy appeared to be associated with antibody but not with cytotoxic cell-mediated PrP-specific responses.

  13. Increased IgA responses to the LPS of commensal bacteria is associated with inflammation and activation of cell-mediated immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank N M; Kubera, Marta; Ringel, Karl; Leunis, Jean-Claude; Geffard, Michel

    2012-02-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is accompanied by a) systemic IgA/IgM responses against the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of commensal bacteria; b) inflammation, e.g. increased plasma interleukin-(IL)1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α; and c) activation of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), as demonstrated by increased neopterin. To study the relationships between the IgA/IgM responses to the LPS of microbiota, inflammation, CMI and the symptoms of ME/CFS we measured the IgA/IgM responses to the LPS of 6 different enterobacteria, serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin, and elastase in 128 patients with ME/CFS and chronic fatigue (CF). Severity of symptoms was assessed by the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale. Serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin and elastase are significantly higher in patients with ME/CFS than in CF patients. There are significant and positive associations between the IgA responses to LPS and serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin and elastase. Patients with an abnormally high IgA response show increased serum IL-1, TNFα and neopterin levels, and higher ratings on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) than subjects with a normal IgA response. Serum IL-1, TNFα and neopterin are significantly related to fatigue, a flu-like malaise, autonomic symptoms, neurocognitive disorders, sadness and irritability. The findings show that increased IgA responses to commensal bacteria in ME/CFS are associated with inflammation and CMI activation, which are associated with symptom severity. It is concluded that increased translocation of commensal bacteria may be responsible for the disease activity in some ME/CFS patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An oral Salmonella-based vaccine inhibits liver metastases by promoting tumor-specific T cell-mediated immunity in celiac & portal lymph nodes. A preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandrina eVendrell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumor excision is one of the therapies of cancer most widely used. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent source of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally-administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was immunized with CVD 915 via o.g. while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac & portal lymph nodes (LDLN 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4+ and DC cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ were found in the celiac & portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination.

  15. polio supplementary immunization campaign evaluation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-20

    Aug 20, 2013 ... is the process of sharing information with the community about polio eradication activities, the polio immunization campaign and why it is important [5.]. In this evaluation, more than three-fourth of the families knew the campaign before the vaccination team visited their houses. Meaning that, majority of the ...

  16. Artesunate enhances γδ T-cell-mediated antitumor activity through augmenting γδ T-cell function and reversing immune escape of HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Zhang, Yong-Wen; Zhou, Zhong-Hai; Liu, Jun-Quan; Yue, Su-Yang; Guo, Xiang-Li; Sun, Lei-Qing; Lv, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2018-02-06

    To explore the effect and mechanism of artesunate on γδ T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses against hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG2) in vitro. Human γδ T cells or HepG2 were respectively treated with artesunate, subjected to co-culture as appropriate, and the following assays were subsequently conducted: CCK8 to examine cell viability; LDH release assay to detect the killing effect of γδ T cells on HepG2 cells; flow cytometry to examine the expression of perforin (PFP) and granzyme B (GraB) of γδ T cells; ELISA to evaluate the levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 in the collected supernatant of HepG2 cells pretreated with artesunate; and Western blot analysis to examine Fas, FasL, STAT3, p-STAT3 expression of HepG2 cells induced by artesunate.  Results: The results showed that the cytotoxicity effect of γδ T cells pretreated with artesunate on HepG2 cells was augmented via elevating the expression of GraB in γδ T cells. Furthermore, treatment with artesunate reversed the inhibition of HepG2 cells on γδ T cells by reducing the secretion of TGF-β1 in HepG2 cells supernatant and enhanced the antitumor effect of γδ T cells against HepG2 cells through increasing the expression of Fas on HepG2 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of STAT3 signaling protein. Artesunate has several mechanisms for augmenting the antitumor immune responses mediated by γδ T cells. These results suggested artesunate may be an efficacious agent in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Gender-specific effects of genetic variants within Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes on the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cáliz

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes differentially influence the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in women and men. In phase one, 27 functional/tagging polymorphisms in C-type lectins and MCP-1/CCR2 axis were genotyped in 458 RA patients and 512 controls. Carriers of Dectin-2 rs4264222T allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.10-1.96 whereas patients harboring the DC-SIGN rs4804803G, MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.49-0.88; OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.50-0.89; OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.55-0.97 and OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.91. Interestingly, significant gender-specific differences were observed for Dectin-2 rs4264222 and Dectin-2 rs7134303: women carrying the Dectin-2 rs4264222T and Dectin-2 rs7134303G alleles had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.93, 95%CI 1.34-2.79 and OR = 1.90, 95%CI 1.29-2.80. Also five other SNPs showed significant associations only with one gender: women carrying the MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of RA (OR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.43-0.87; OR = 0.67, 95%CI 0.47-0.95 and OR = 0.60, 95%CI 0.42-0.86. In men, carriers of the DC-SIGN rs2287886A allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.70, 95%CI 1.03-2.78, whereas carriers of the DC-SIGN rs4804803G had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.32-0.89. In phase 2, we genotyped these SNPs in 754 RA patients and 519 controls, leading to consistent gender-specific associations for Dectin-2 rs4264222, MCP-1 rs1024611, MCP-1 rs13900 and DC-SIGN rs4804803 polymorphisms in the pooled sample (OR = 1.38, 95%CI 1.08-1.77; OR = 0.74, 95%CI 0.58-0.94; OR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.59-0.97 and OR = 0.56, 95%CI 0.34-0.93. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of significant SNPs also showed a

  18. Gender-specific effects of genetic variants within Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes on the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáliz, Rafael; Canet, Luz María; Lupiañez, Carmen Belén; Canhão, Helena; Escudero, Alejandro; Filipescu, Ileana; Segura-Catena, Juana; Soto-Pino, María José; Expósito-Ruiz, Manuela; Ferrer, Miguel Ángel; García, Antonio; Romani, Lurdes; González-Utrilla, Alfonso; Vallejo, Teresa; Pérez-Pampin, Eva; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta; Collantes, Eduardo; Fonseca, João Eurico; Sainz, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune response genes differentially influence the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in women and men. In phase one, 27 functional/tagging polymorphisms in C-type lectins and MCP-1/CCR2 axis were genotyped in 458 RA patients and 512 controls. Carriers of Dectin-2 rs4264222T allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.47, 95%CI 1.10-1.96) whereas patients harboring the DC-SIGN rs4804803G, MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.49-0.88; OR = 0.66, 95%CI 0.50-0.89; OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.55-0.97 and OR = 0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.91). Interestingly, significant gender-specific differences were observed for Dectin-2 rs4264222 and Dectin-2 rs7134303: women carrying the Dectin-2 rs4264222T and Dectin-2 rs7134303G alleles had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.93, 95%CI 1.34-2.79 and OR = 1.90, 95%CI 1.29-2.80). Also five other SNPs showed significant associations only with one gender: women carrying the MCP-1 rs1024611G, MCP-1 rs13900T and MCP-1 rs4586C alleles had a decreased risk of RA (OR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.43-0.87; OR = 0.67, 95%CI 0.47-0.95 and OR = 0.60, 95%CI 0.42-0.86). In men, carriers of the DC-SIGN rs2287886A allele had an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.70, 95%CI 1.03-2.78), whereas carriers of the DC-SIGN rs4804803G had a decreased risk of developing the disease (OR = 0.53, 95%CI 0.32-0.89). In phase 2, we genotyped these SNPs in 754 RA patients and 519 controls, leading to consistent gender-specific associations for Dectin-2 rs4264222, MCP-1 rs1024611, MCP-1 rs13900 and DC-SIGN rs4804803 polymorphisms in the pooled sample (OR = 1.38, 95%CI 1.08-1.77; OR = 0.74, 95%CI 0.58-0.94; OR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.59-0.97 and OR = 0.56, 95%CI 0.34-0.93). SNP-SNP interaction analysis of significant SNPs also showed a significant

  19. Salmonella Typhimurium, the major causative agent of foodborne illness inactivated by a phage lysis system provides effective protection against lethal challenge by induction of robust cell-mediated immune responses and activation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Gayeon; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-10-25

    Salmonella Typhimurium infection via foodborne transmission remains a major public health threat even in developed countries. Vaccines have been developed to reduce the disease burden at the pre-harvest stage, but the cell-mediated immune response against intracellular invasion of the pathogen is not sufficiently elicited by conventional killed Salmonella vaccines, which are safer than live vaccines. In this study, we developed a genetically inactivated vaccine candidate by introducing lysis plasmid pJHL454 harboring the λ phage holin-endolysin system into S. Typhimurium; we designated this vaccine JOL1950. In vitro expression of endolysin was validated by immunoblotting, and complete inactivation of JOL1950 cells was observed following 36 h of the lysis. Electron microscopic examinations by scanning electron microscopy and immunogold labeling transmission EM revealed conserved surface antigenic traits of the JOL1950 cells after lysis. An in vivo immunogenicity study in mice immunized with lysed cells showed significantly increased serum IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a levels. Further, we observed markedly increased in vitro cell proliferation and upregulation of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines in the repulsed splenic T-cells of immunized mice. In dendritic cells (DCs) treated with lysed JOL1950, we observed a significant increase in dendritic cell activation, co-stimulatory molecule production, and levels of immunomodulatory cytokines. In addition, Th1 and Th17 cytokines were also released by naïve CD4+ T-cells pulsed with primed DCs. Lysed JOL1950 also protected against lethal challenge in immunized mice. Together, these results indicate that our vaccine candidate has great potential to induce cell-mediated immunity against S. Typhimurium by facilitating the activation of DCs.

  20. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N; Fuller, Katherine A; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  1. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ubiquitin conjugation of open reading frame F DNA vaccine leads to enhanced cell-mediated immune response and induces protection against both antimony-susceptible and -resistant strains of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankur; Madhubala, Rentala

    2009-12-15

    Resistance of Leishmania donovani to sodium antimony gluconate has become a critical issue in the current, prolonged epidemic in India. Hence, there is an urgent need for a vaccine that is protective against both antimony-susceptible and -resistant strains of L. donovani. The multigene LD1 locus located on chromosome 35 of Leishmania is amplified in approximately 15% of the isolates examined. The open reading frame F (ORFF), a potential vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis, is part of the multigene LD1 locus. ORFF was expressed as a chimeric conjugate of ubiquitin to elicit an Ag-specific cell-mediated immune response. Analysis of the cellular immune responses of ubiquitin-conjugated ORFF (UBQ-ORFF) DNA-immunized, uninfected BALB/c mice demonstrated that the vaccine induced enhanced IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with nonubiquitinated ORFF DNA vaccine. Higher levels of IL-12 and IFN-gamma and the low levels of IL-4 and IL-10 further indicated that the immune responses with UBQ-ORFF were mediated toward the Th1 rather than Th2 type. Infection of immunized mice with either the antimony-susceptible (AG83) or -resistant (GE1F8R) L. donovani strain showed that UBQ-ORFF DNA vaccine induced higher protection when compared with ORFF DNA. UBQ-ORFF DNA-immunized and -infected mice showed a significant increase in IL-12 and IFN-gamma and significant down-regulation of IL-10. High levels of production of nitrite and superoxide, two macrophage-derived oxidants that are critical in controlling Leishmania infection, were observed in protected mice. The feasibility of using ubiquitinated-conjugated ORFF DNA vaccine as a promising immune enhancer for vaccination against both antimony-susceptible and -resistant strains of L. donovani is reported.

  3. Co-delivery of PLGA encapsulated invariant NKT cell agonist with antigenic protein induce strong T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolen, Y.; Kreutz, M.; Gileadi, U.; Tel, J.; Vasaturo, A.; Dinther, E.A.W. van; Hout-Kuijer, M.A. van; Cerundolo, V.; Figdor, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor immunity can be enhanced by the coordinated release and delivery of antigens and immune-stimulating agents to antigen-presenting cells via biodegradable vaccine carriers. So far, encapsulation of TLR ligands and tumor-associated antigens augmented cytotoxic T cell (CTLs) responses. Here,

  4. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-05

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  5. Quantitative PCR evaluation of cellular immune responses in Kenyan children vaccinated with a candidate malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwacharo, Jedidah; Dunachie, Susanna J; Kai, Oscar; Hill, Adrian V S; Bejon, Philip; Fletcher, Helen A

    2009-12-23

    The T-cell mediated immune response plays a central role in the control of malaria after natural infection or vaccination. There is increasing evidence that T-cell responses are heterogeneous and that both the quality of the immune response and the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cells determines the outcome of an infection. As Malaria parasites have been shown to induce immunosuppressive responses to the parasite and non-related antigens this study examined T-cell mediated pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses induced by malaria vaccination in children in an endemic area to determine if these responses were associated with vaccine immunogenicity. Using real-time RT- PCR we profiled the expression of a panel of key markers of immunogenecity at different time points after vaccination with two viral vector vaccines expressing the malaria TRAP antigen (FP9-TRAP and MVA-TRAP) or following rabies vaccination as a control. The vaccine induced modest levels of IFN-gamma mRNA one week after vaccination. There was also an increase in FoxP3 mRNA expression in both TRAP stimulated and media stimulated cells in the FFM ME-TRAP vaccine group; however, this may have been driven by natural exposure to parasite rather than by vaccination. Quantitative PCR is a useful method for evaluating vaccine induced cell mediated immune responses in frozen PBMC from children in a malaria endemic country. Future studies should seek to use vaccine vectors that increase the magnitude and quality of the IFN-gamma immune response in naturally exposed populations and should monitor the induction of a regulatory T cell response.

  6. Quantitative PCR evaluation of cellular immune responses in Kenyan children vaccinated with a candidate malaria vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedidah Mwacharo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The T-cell mediated immune response plays a central role in the control of malaria after natural infection or vaccination. There is increasing evidence that T-cell responses are heterogeneous and that both the quality of the immune response and the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cells determines the outcome of an infection. As Malaria parasites have been shown to induce immunosuppressive responses to the parasite and non-related antigens this study examined T-cell mediated pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses induced by malaria vaccination in children in an endemic area to determine if these responses were associated with vaccine immunogenicity. METHODS: Using real-time RT- PCR we profiled the expression of a panel of key markers of immunogenecity at different time points after vaccination with two viral vector vaccines expressing the malaria TRAP antigen (FP9-TRAP and MVA-TRAP or following rabies vaccination as a control. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine induced modest levels of IFN-gamma mRNA one week after vaccination. There was also an increase in FoxP3 mRNA expression in both TRAP stimulated and media stimulated cells in the FFM ME-TRAP vaccine group; however, this may have been driven by natural exposure to parasite rather than by vaccination. CONCLUSION: Quantitative PCR is a useful method for evaluating vaccine induced cell mediated immune responses in frozen PBMC from children in a malaria endemic country. Future studies should seek to use vaccine vectors that increase the magnitude and quality of the IFN-gamma immune response in naturally exposed populations and should monitor the induction of a regulatory T cell response.

  7. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces tumor regression in synergy with TLR9 agonist via dendritic cell-mediated immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masuda, Yuki; Nawa, Daiki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    ...-glucan maitake D-fraction, extracted from the maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa, acts as a potent immunotherapeutic agent, eliciting innate and adoptive immune responses, thereby contributing to its antitumor activity...

  8. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Sestak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-8 (IL-8 by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments.

  9. The effects of reduced gluten barley diet on humoral and cell-mediated systemic immune responses of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Thwin, Hazel; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P; Liu, David X; Moehs, Charles P

    2015-03-06

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten) barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS) and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading-by co-administration of additional treatments.

  10. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces tumor regression in synergy with TLR9 agonist via dendritic cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yuki; Nawa, Daiki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells into more-immunostimulatory dendritic cells by stimulation with different combinations of immunologic agents is expected to provide efficient, adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Soluble β-glucan maitake D-fraction, extracted from the maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa, acts as a potent immunotherapeutic agent, eliciting innate and adoptive immune responses, thereby contributing to its antitumor activity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of maitake D-fraction, in combination with a Toll-like receptor agonist, to treat tumors in a murine model. Our results showed that maitake D-fraction, in combination with the Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide, synergistically increased the expression of dendritic cell maturation markers and interleukin-12 production in dendritic cells, but it did not increase interleukin-10 production, generating strong effector dendritic cells with an augmented capacity for efficiently priming an antigen-specific, T helper 1-type T cell response. Maitake D-fraction enhances cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide-induced dendritic cell maturation and cytokine responses in a dectin-1-dependent pathway. We further showed that a combination therapy using cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide and maitake D-fraction was highly effective, either as adjuvants for dendritic cell vaccination or by direct administration against murine tumor. Therapeutic responses to direct administration were associated with increased CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the tumor site and the induction of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Our results indicate that maitake D-fraction and cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide synergistically activated dendritic cells, resulting in tumor regression via an antitumor T helper cell 1-type response. Our findings provide the basis for a potent antitumor therapy using a novel combination of immunologic agents for

  11. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-05-01

    of clinical trials. Attempts to develop a vaccine have focused primarily on glycoproteins necessary for HSV-2 entry as target antigens and to which the dominant neutralizing antibody response is directed during natural infection. Individuals with asymptomatic infection have exhibited T cell responses against specific HSV-2 antigens not observed in symptomatic individuals. We describe for the first time the immunogenicity profile in animal models of UL40, a novel HSV-2 T cell antigen that has been correlated with asymptomatic HSV-2 disease. Additionally, vaccine candidates adjuvanted by a robust formulation of the CpG oligonucleotide delivered in emulsion were superior to unadjuvanted or MPL-alum-adjuvanted formulations at eliciting a robust cell-mediated immune response and blocking the establishment of a latent viral reservoir in the guinea pig challenge model of HSV-2 infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Cell-mediated immunity to carcinoma of the urinary bladder : specificity of the reaction and the nature of the effector cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L.H. Bolhuis (Reinder)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe hypothesis that immune mechanisms are a defense system net merely for the eliminatien of microbes, parasites and other foreign material from the body but also for the destruction of aberrant cells of the organism itself was already clearly formulated in 1909 by Paul Ehrlich: 'were

  13. Cell mediated innate responses of cattle and swine are diverse during foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection: A unique landscape of innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogens in general and pathogenic viruses in particular have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to escape the immune response of mammalian species. Viruses that cause acute disease and are rapidly cleared tend to bear characteristics that make them very contagious, as survival does not derive from chr...

  14. Lung CD4 Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity Induced by Previous Infection of Mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Mieszko M; Misiak, Alicja; McManus, Róisín M; Allen, Aideen C; Lynch, Marina A; Mills, Kingston H G

    2017-07-01

    Th1 and Th17 cells have an established role in protective immunity to Bordetella pertussis, but this evidence is based largely on peripheral T cells. There is emerging evidence that local tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells that accumulate in tissue following mucosal infection may be crucial for long-term immunity. In this study, we examined the role of respiratory CD4 TRM cells in immunity to B. pertussis Natural immunity to B. pertussis induced by infection is considered long lasting and effective at preventing reinfection. Consistent with this, we found that convalescent mice rapidly cleared the bacteria after reinfection. Furthermore, CD4 T cells with a TRM cell phenotype (CD44+CD62L-CD69+ or CD44+CD62L-CD69+CD103+) accumulated in the lungs of mice during infection with B. pertussis and significantly expanded through local proliferation following reinfection. These CD4 TRM cells were B. pertussis specific and secreted IL-17 or IL-17 and IFN-γ. Treatment of mice with FTY720, which prevented migration of T and B cells from lymph nodes to the circulation, significantly exacerbated B. pertussis infection. This was associated with significantly reduced infiltration of central memory T cells and B cells into the lungs. However, the local expansion of TRM cells and the associated rapid clearance of the secondary infection were not affected by treatment with FTY720 before rechallenge. Moreover, adoptive transfer of lung CD4 TRM cells conferred protection in naive mice. Our findings reveal that Ag-specific CD4 TRM cells play a critical role in adaptive immunity against reinfection and memory induced by natural infection with B. pertussis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Synthetic Influenza vaccine (FLU-v) stimulates cell mediated immunity in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Phase I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelos, Olga; Robinson, Stuart; Stoloff, Gregory A; Caparrós-Wanderley, Wilson

    2012-06-29

    Current Influenza vaccines elicit antibody mediated prophylactic immunity targeted to viral capsid antigens. Despite their global use these vaccines must be administered yearly to the population, cannot be manufactured until the circulating viral strain(s) have been identified and have limited efficacy. A need remains for Influenza vaccines addressing these issues and here we report the results of a Phase Ib trial of a novel synthetic Influenza vaccine (FLU-v) targeting T cell responses to NP, M1 and M2. Forty-eight healthy males aged 18-40 were recruited for this single-centre, randomised, double blind study. Volunteers received one single low (250 μg) or high (500 μg) dose of FLU-v, either alone or adjuvanted. Safety, tolerability and basic immunogenicity (IgG and IFN-γ responses) parameters were assessed pre-vaccination and for 21 days post-vaccination. FLU-v was found to be safe and well tolerated with no vaccine associated severe adverse events. Dose-dependent IFN-γ responses >2-fold the pre-vaccination level were detected in 80% and 100% of volunteers receiving, respectively, the low and high dose adjuvanted FLU-v formulations. No formulation tested induced any significant FLU-v antibody response. FLU-v is safe and induces a vaccine-specific cellular immunity. Cellular immune responses are historically known to control and mitigate infection and illness during natural infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cutaneous sensitivity induced by immunization with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. I. Induction, elicitation, and adoptive transfer analysis of cell-mediated cutaneous sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ch' ang, L.Y.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-06-01

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mice to highly irradiated (50 kR) cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni leads to the development of partial resistance against subsequent challenge with unattenuated cercariae. We have analyzed the cellular immune responses that occur during the afferent and efferent phases of this protective sensitization. Mice were immunized by exposure to irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. After challenge with irradiated cercariae, delayed-type (18-72 hr) cutaneous sensitivity reaction sites were rich in mononuclear cells and eosinophils. This reactivity was established by 4 days after sensitization, reached its maximum between 7 and 14 days after sensitization, and was maintained for over 20 weeks. These challenge reactions could be abrogated by treatment with either 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or 5 mg of hydrocortisone. Syngeneic adoptive transfer of cutaneous sensitivity was accomplished with lymphoid cells from the draining lymph nodes or spleens of mice sensitized 7-14 days previously. Negative selection studies of nylon-wool non-adherent cells from sensitized donors demonstrated that the cells responsible for transferring this eosinophil-rich, delayed-type cutaneous sensitivity to S. mansoni irradiated cercariae were Thy/sup -1 +/, Lyt/sup 1 +/, Lyt/sup 2 -/, surface Ig/sup -/ lymphocytes.

  17. The Glycosylated Rv1860 Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Inhibits Dendritic Cell Mediated TH1 and TH17 Polarization of T Cells and Abrogates Protective Immunity Conferred by BCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Kumar, Naveen; Jumani, Rajiv S.; Challu, Vijay; Elangovan, Shobha; Khan, Naseem A.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported interferon gamma secretion by human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in response to recombinant E. coli-expressed Rv1860 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) as well as protection of guinea pigs against a challenge with virulent MTB following prime-boost immunization with DNA vaccine and poxvirus expressing Rv1860. In contrast, a Statens Serum Institute Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-SSI) recombinant expressing MTB Rv1860 (BCG-TB1860) showed loss of protective ability compared to the parent BCG strain expressing the control GFP protein (BCG-GFP). Since Rv1860 is a secreted mannosylated protein of MTB and BCG, we investigated the effect of BCG-TB1860 on innate immunity. Relative to BCG-GFP, BCG-TB1860 effected a significant near total reduction both in secretion of cytokines IL-2, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, and up regulation of co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40, CD54, CD80 and CD86 by infected bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC), while leaving secreted levels of TGF-β unchanged. These effects were mimicked by BCG-TB1860His which carried a 6-Histidine tag at the C-terminus of Rv1860, killed sonicated preparations of BCG-TB1860 and purified H37Rv-derived Rv1860 glycoprotein added to BCG-GFP, but not by E. coli-expressed recombinant Rv1860. Most importantly, BMDC exposed to BCG-TB1860 failed to polarize allogeneic as well as syngeneic T cells to secrete IFN-γ and IL-17 relative to BCG-GFP. Splenocytes from mice infected with BCG-SSI showed significantly less proliferation and secretion of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-17, but secreted higher levels of IL-10 in response to in vitro restimulation with BCG-TB1860 compared to BCG-GFP. Spleens from mice infected with BCG-TB1860 also harboured significantly fewer DC expressing MHC-II, IL-12, IL-2 and TNF-α compared to mice infected with BCG-GFP. Glycoproteins of MTB, through their deleterious effects on DC may thus contribute to suppress the generation of a TH1- and TH17-dominated

  18. Lethal Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guérin infection in nitric oxide synthase 2-deficient mice: cell-mediated immunity requires nitric oxide synthase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I; Guler, R; Vesin, D; Olleros, M L; Vassalli, P; Chvatchko, Y; Jacobs, M; Ryffel, B

    2000-09-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) infection was investigated using nitric oxide synthase 2 (nos2)-deficient mice, because NO plays a pivotal protective role in M. tuberculosis infection. We demonstrate that nos2-deficient mice were unable to eliminate BCG and succumbed within 8 to 12 weeks to BCG infection (10(6) CFU) with cachexia and pneumonia, whereas all infected wild-type mice survived. The greatest mycobacterial loads were observed in lung and spleen. Nos2-deficient mice developed large granulomas consisting of macrophages and activated T cells and caseous necrotic lesions in spleen. The macrophages in granulomas from nos2-deficient mice had reduced acid phosphatase activities, suggesting that NO is required for macrophage activation. The absence of NOS2 affected the cytokine production of the Th1 type of immune response, except IL-18. Serum amounts of IL-12p40 were increased and IFN-gamma was decreased compared with wild-type mice. The lack of NOS2 resulted in an overproduction of TNF, observed throughout the infection period. Additionally, TNFR1 and TNFR2 shedding was altered compared with wild-type mice. Up-regulation of TNF may be compensatory for the lack of NOS2. The late neutralization of TNF by soluble TNF receptors resulted in heightened disease severity and accelerated death in nos2-deficient mice but had no effect in wild-type mice. In conclusion, the inability of nos2-deficient mice to kill M. bovis BCG resulted in an accumulation of mycobacteria with a dramatic activation of the immune system and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which resulted in death.

  19. Time-course of antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, S; Guadagnini, G; Salvini, F; Razzuoli, E; Ferrari, M; Alborali, G L; Amadori, M

    2013-06-01

    Major discrepancies are observed between experimental trials of PRRS-virus (PRRSV) infection in isolation facilities and observations made in the field on farm. Owing to the above, a cohort study was carried out in a farrow-to-finish, PRRSV-infected pig farm to characterize the time-course of the virus-specific immune response in two groups of replacement gilts. Despite the occurrence of three and two distinct waves of infection in groups 1 and 2, respectively, the large majority of animals showed little if any PRRSV-specific response in an interferon-gamma release assay on whole blood, whereas non-specific responses were consistently observed. To rule out any possible bias of our test procedure, this was used along with an ELISPOT assay for interferon-gamma-secreting cells with the same reagents on a group of PRRS-virus infected pigs in isolation facilities. A very good agreement was shown between the two sets of results. Also, as opposed to the PRRS model, plenty of Pseudorabies virus-vaccinated pigs under field conditions scored positive in another experiment in the interferon-gamma release assay, ad hoc modified for the Pseudorabies virus. Our results indicate that under field conditions poor or no development rather than delayed development of the PRRS virus-specific interferon-gamma response could be the rule for a long time in non-adult pigs after PRRS virus infection. Housing and hygiene conditions, as well as heavy exposure to environmental microbial payloads in intensive pig farms could adversely affect the host's immune response to PRRS virus and partly account for the discrepancies between experimental and field studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of fucose reducing effects in a humanized antibody on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan; Quarmby, Valerie; Gao, Xiaoying; Ying, Yong; Lin, Linda; Reed, Chae; Fong, Chris; Lau, Wendy; Qiu, Zhihua J; Shen, Amy; Vanderlaan, Martin; Song, An

    2012-01-01

    The presence or absence of core fucose in the Fc region N-linked glycans of antibodies affects their binding affinity toward FcγRIIIa as well as their antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. However, the quantitative nature of this structure-function relationship remains unclear. In this study, the in vitro biological activity of an afucosylated anti-CD20 antibody was fully characterized. Further, the effect of fucose reduction on Fc effector functions was quantitatively evaluated using the afucosylated antibody, its "regular" fucosylated counterpart and a series of mixtures containing varying proportions of "regular" and afucosylated materials. Compared with the "regular" fucosylated antibody, the afucosylated antibody demonstrated similar binding interactions with the target antigen (CD20), C1q and FcγRIa, moderate increases in binding to FcγRIIa and IIb, and substantially increased binding to FcγRIIIa. The afucosylated antibodies also showed comparable complement-dependent cytotoxicity activity but markedly increased ADCC activity. Based on EC 50 values derived from dose-response curves, our results indicate that the amount of afucosylated glycan in antibody samples correlate with both FcγRIIIa binding activity and ADCC activity in a linear fashion. Furthermore, the extent of ADCC enhancement due to fucose depletion was not affected by the FcγRIIIa genotype of the effector cells.

  1. Simultaneous immunisation with a Wilms' tumour 1 epitope and its ubiquitin fusions results in enhanced cell mediated immunity and tumour rejection in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Nasir Saeedi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mousavi, Asadollah; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Nomani, Alireza; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Day, Stephanie; Amanzadeh, Amir; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-07-01

    Protein fusion to ubiquitin results in its targeting to proteasome and processing through MHC class I pathway. We used this approach to induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against a MHC class I epitope. Therefore, two known proteasome targeting systems, "ubiquitin fusion degradation" (UFD) and "N-end rule", were used to immunise C57BL/6 mice. Two plasmids encoding an epitope from Wilms' Tumour 1 (WT1-126), fused N-terminally to ubiquitin, were constructed. They were designated as "pUbVVPT" and "pUbGRPT", targeting the fused epitope to UFD and N-end pathways, respectively. A plasmid encoding WT1-126 without ubiquitin fusion (pPT) was also constructed as control. Three mice groups were immunised using these constructs (UGR, UVV and PT groups). Two other groups received mixed immunisations of pUbVVPT or pUbGRPT plus pPT plasmids (UVV+PT and UGR+PT). All mice received a WT1-126 peptide booster. Lymphoproliferative responses following stimulation with WT1-126 were observed in all immunisation groups, with mice receiving the mixture of plasmids eliciting the highest proliferation (UVV+PT>UGR+PT>PT). Moreover, In vivo cytotoxicity assay results revealed highest specific lysis of target cells in UVV+PT group. Tumour growth was decreased in all immunised groups, and was completely abrogated in UGR+PT group. In addition, T(H)1 type cytokines patterns were detected from all immunised groups and WT1-126-specific IFNγ producing lymphocytes were developed in them. These results suggest that the delivery of ubiquitin-fused epitopes along with epitopes alone can be used to optimise the effect of DNA vaccines on the induction of anti-tumour immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammatory and cell-mediated immune biomarkers in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and depression: inflammatory markers are higher in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome than in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank N M; Ringel, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Depression is an inflammatory disorder while many authors declare myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) to be a functional disorder. The aim of the present study is to compare inflammatory and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses between depression and ME/CFS. We measured two proinflammatory cytokines (PICs) in plasma, interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and serum neopterin with a radioimmunoassay in controls, ME/CFS and depressive patients. Plasma PICs were significantly higher in ME/CFS than in depression and higher in both patient groups than in controls. Increased PIC levels in depression were attributable to the presence of fatigue and physio-somatic symptoms. Serum neopterin did not differ significantly between depression and ME/CFS but was higher in both patient groups than in controls. The significant positive correlations between neopterin and either IL-1 or TNF-α were significantly greater in depression than in ME/CFS. Since PICs cause depression-like behaviors and fatigue/malaise, we suggest that inflammation may play a role in the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and depression. Increased neopterin also seems to contribute to the pathophysiology of both disorders. This study has detected a shared 'pathway phenotype', i.e. disorders in inflammatory and CMI pathways, which underpins both ME/CFS and depression and, therefore, may explain the co-occurrence of both disorders. ME/CFS and depression are discriminated from each other by increased PICs in ME/CFS and differences in the immune cell communication networks. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Immunisation of two rodent species with new live-attenuated mutants of Yersinia pestis CO92 induces protective long-term humoral- and cell-mediated immunity against pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Cong, Yingzi; Kirtley, Michelle L; Andersson, Jourdan A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We showed recently that the live-attenuated Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants of Yersinia pestis CO92 provided short-term protection to mice against developing subsequent lethal pneumonic plague. These mutants were either deleted for genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acetyltransferase (MsbB) and the attachment invasion locus (Ail) (Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail) or contained a modified version of the ail gene with diminished virulence (Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2). Here, long-term immune responses were first examined after intramuscular immunisation of mice with the above-mentioned mutants, as well as the newly constructed Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant, deleted for the plasminogen-activator protease (pla) gene instead of ail. Y. pestis-specific IgG levels peaked between day 35 and 56 in the mutant-immunised mice and were sustained until the last tested day 112. Splenic memory B cells peaked earlier (day 42) before declining in the Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutant-immunised mice while being sustained for 63 days in the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant-immunised mice. Splenic CD4+ T cells increased in all immunised mice by day 42 with differential cytokine production among the immunised groups. On day 120, immunised mice were exposed intranasally to wild-type (WT) CO92, and 80-100% survived pneumonic challenge. Mice immunised with the above-mentioned three mutants had increased innate as well as CD4+ responses immediately after WT CO92 exposure, and coupled with sustained antibody production, indicated the role of both arms of the immune response in protection. Likewise, rats vaccinated with either Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail or the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δpla mutant also developed long-term humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to provide 100% protection against developing pneumonic plague. On the basis of the attenuated phenotype, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail mutant was recently excluded from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention select agent list.

  4. Evaluation of the immune function in HIV/AIDS patients using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migration inhibition factor (MIF) test is one of the in-vitro methods used in monitoring the cell-mediated immunity of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). ... suggests that the cellular immune function in HIV seropositive and AIDS patient is highly compromised. Global Journal of Mathematical Sciences Vol. 6 (1) 2007: pp. 5-8 ...

  5. Evidence for inflammation and activation of cell-mediated immunity in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS): increased interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, PMN-elastase, lysozyme and neopterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank N M; Kubera, Marta; Ringel, Karl

    2012-02-01

    There is evidence that inflammatory pathways and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) play an important role in the pathophysiology of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). Activation of inflammatory and CMI pathways, including increased levels of cytokines, is known to induce fatigue and somatic symptoms. Given the broad spectrum inflammatory state in ME/CFS, the aim of this study was to examine whether inflammatory and CMI biomarkers are increased in individuals with ME/CFS. In this study we therefore measured plasma interleukin-(IL)1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and PMN-elastase, and serum neopterin and lysozyme in 107 patients with ME/CFS, 37 patients with chronic fatigue (CF), and 20 normal controls. The severity of ME/CFS was measured with the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale. Serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin and lysozyme are significantly higher in patients with ME/CFS than in controls and CF patients. Plasma PMN-elastase is significantly higher in patients with ME/CFS than in controls and CF patients and higher in the latter than in controls. Increased IL-1 and TNFα are significantly correlated with fatigue, sadness, autonomic symptoms, and a flu-like malaise; neopterin is correlated with fatigue, autonomic symptoms, and a flu-like malaise; and increased PMN-elastase is correlated with concentration difficulties, failing memory and a subjective experience of infection. The findings show that ME/CFS is characterized by low-grade inflammation and activation of CMI. The results suggest that characteristic symptoms of ME/CFS, such as fatigue, autonomic symptoms and a flu-like malaise, may be caused by inflammatory mediators, e.g. IL-1 and TNFα. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulmonary delivery of an inulin-stabilized influenza subunit vaccine prepared by spray-freeze drying induces systemic, mucosal humoral as well as cell-mediated immune responses in BALB/c mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P.; Saluja, V.; Petersen, A.H.; Hinrichs, W.L.J.; Huckriede, A.; Frijlink, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    In this study pulmonary vaccination with a new influenza subunit vaccine powder was evaluated. Vaccine powder was produced by spray-freeze drying (SFD) using the oligosaccharide inulin as stabilizer. Immune responses after pulmonary vaccination of BALB/c mice with vaccine powder were determined and

  7. Vaccination of mice using the West Nile virus E-protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects mice against a lethal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina De Filette

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the United States. There is currently no antiviral treatment or human vaccine available to treat or prevent WNV infection. DNA plasmid-based vaccines represent a new approach for controlling infectious diseases. In rodents, DNA vaccines have been shown to induce B cell and cytotoxic T cell responses and protect against a wide range of infections. In this study, we formulated a plasmid DNA vector expressing the ectodomain of the E-protein of WNV into nanoparticles by using linear polyethyleneimine (lPEI covalently bound to mannose and examined the potential of this vaccine to protect against lethal WNV infection in mice. Mice were immunized twice (prime--boost regime with the WNV DNA vaccine formulated with lPEI-mannose using different administration routes (intramuscular, intradermal and topical. In parallel a heterologous boost with purified recombinant WNV envelope (E protein was evaluated. While no significant E-protein specific humoral response was generated after DNA immunization, protein boosting of DNA-primed mice resulted in a marked increase in total neutralizing antibody titer. In addition, E-specific IL-4 T-cell immune responses were detected by ELISPOT after protein boost and CD8(+ specific IFN-γ expression was observed by flow cytometry. Challenge experiments using the heterologous immunization regime revealed protective immunity to homologous and virulent WNV infection.

  8. Increased autoimmune activity against 5-HT: a key component of depression that is associated with inflammation and activation of cell-mediated immunity, and with severity and staging of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Ringel, Karl; Kubera, Marta; Berk, Michael; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    Depression is characterized by inflammation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) activation and autoimmune reactions directed against a multitude of self-epitopes. There is evidence that the inflammatory response in depression causes dysfunctions in the metabolism of 5-HT, e.g. lowering the 5-HT precursor tryptophan, and upregulating 5-HT receptor mRNA. This study has been undertaken to examine autoimmune activity directed against 5-HT in relation to CMI activation and inflammation. 5-HT antibodies were examined in major depressed patients (n=109) versus normal controls (n=35) in relation to serum neopterin and lysozyme, and plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines (PIC), i.e. interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Severity of depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and severity of fatigue and somatic symptoms with the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale. The incidence of anti-5-HT antibody activity was significantly higher in depressed patients (54.1%), and in particular in those with melancholia (82.9%), than in controls (5.7%). Patients with positive 5-HT antibodies showed increased serum neopterin and lysozyme, and plasma TNFα and IL-1; higher scores on the HDRS and FF scales, and more somatic symptoms, including malaise and neurocognitive dysfunctions. There was a significant association between autoimmune activity to 5-HT and the number of previous depressive episodes. The autoimmune reactions directed against 5-HT might play a role in the pathophysiology of depression and the onset of severe depression. The strong association between autoimmune activity against 5-HT and inflammation/CMI activation is explained by multiple, reciprocal pathways between these factors. Exposure to previous depressive episodes increases the incidence of autoimmune activity directed against 5-HT, which in turn may increase the likelihood to develop new depressive episodes. These findings suggest that sensitization

  9. Enhancement of humoral and cell mediated immune response to HPV16 L1-derived peptides subsequent to vaccination with prophylactic bivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle vaccine in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomine, Masato; Matsueda, Satoko; Kawano, Kouichiro; Sasada, Tetsuro; Fukui, Akimasa; Yamashita, Takuto; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Tasaki, Kazuto; Matsukuma, Ken; Itoh, Kyogo; Kamura, Toshiharu; Ushijima, Kimio

    2017-04-01

    Currently prophylactic HPV16/18 L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are employed with great success for the prevention of HPV infection. However, limited information is available regarding the immune responses against human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 L1 subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination, primarily due to the lack of widely used assays for immune monitoring. The aim of the present study was to identify HPV16 L1-derived B and T cell epitopes for monitoring the immune responses after HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination in healthy females. The levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgE, IgA and IgM reactive to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were measured by multiplex bead suspension assay. Following detailed B cell epitope mapping, T cell responses specific to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were evaluated by an IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. The levels of IgG, IgM and IgA reactive to 20-mer peptides (PTPSGSMVTSDAQIFNKPYW) at positions 293-312 and 300-319 of HPV16 L1 were significantly increased in the plasma after 2, 7, and 12 months after first vaccination. Detailed epitope mapping identified the amino acid sequence (TSDAQIFNKP) at position 301-310 of HPV16 L1 as an immunogenic B cell epitope. In addition, T cell responses to an HLA-A2- and HLA-A24-restricted epitope (QIFNKPYWL) at position 305-313 of HPV16 L1 were increased following immunization, suggesting that the HPV16/18 L1-VLP vaccination as able to induce specific immune responses in T and B cells simultaneously. The identified B and T cell epitopes may be useful as a biomarker for monitoring the immune responses subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination. Thus, the present study may provide novel information to improve the understanding of the immune responses to HPV16 L1.

  10. Using network properties to evaluate targeted immunization algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Shams

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunization of complex network with minimal or limited budget is a challenging issue for research community. In spite of much literature in network immunization, no comprehensive research has been conducted for evaluation and comparison of immunization algorithms. In this paper, we propose an evaluation framework for immunization algorithms regarding available amount of vaccination resources, goal of immunization program, and time complexity. The evaluation framework is designed based on network topological metrics which is extensible to all epidemic spreading model. Exploiting evaluation framework on well-known targeted immunization algorithms shows that in general, immunization based on PageRank centrality outperforms other targeting strategies in various types of networks, whereas, closeness and eigenvector centrality exhibit the worst case performance.

  11. Study design issues in evaluating immune biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Ronald J; Zhang, Xinyan; Sandler, Netanya G

    2013-03-01

    The dramatic increase in the number and type of immune biomarkers that can be measured, particularly those assessing immune activation, has led to numerous investigations in HIV-infected individuals to explore pathogenesis and to assess therapeutic interventions that aim to attenuate immune activation. An overview is provided on study designs and related statistical and operational issues relevant to these investigations. Cohort studies and nested case-control studies within these cohorts have identified multiple biomarkers that are associated with an increased risk of disease. Early-stage clinical trials of therapies to address these risks in HIV-infected individuals with viral suppression on antiretroviral therapy are a substantial focus of current HIV research. Appropriate study design is essential in biomarker research.

  12. Evaluation of Innate Immune Biomarkers in Saliva for Diagnostic Potential of Bacterial and Viral Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    up-regulated in bacterial and viral infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza virus, and plays a key role in cell-mediated immunity... Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 2 58 male white Saliva/serum Cough, fatigue, fever, Vitek 2 Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 3 52...fever, fatigue, Vitek 2 Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 8 44 female white Saliva/serum Cough, fever, muscle Vitek 2 Klebsiella

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis-specific...

  14. Identification of GLA/SE as an effective adjuvant for the induction of robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to EBV-gp350 in mice and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeke, Darren S; Lin, Rui; Rao, Eileen; Woo, Jennifer C; McCarthy, Michael P; Marshall, Jason D

    2016-05-17

    Childhood infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is often asymptomatic and may result in mild flu-like symptoms, but exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) with a pathology characterized by swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and severe fatigue lasting weeks or months. A vaccine targeting the envelope glycoprotein gp350 adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide complexed with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) achieved a 78% reduction in AIM incidence in a small phase II trial of college-age individuals, but development of this vaccine was halted by the manufacturer. Here, we report the evaluation in mice and rabbits of an EBV-gp350 vaccine combined with an adjuvant composed of the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE). In mice, GLA/SE-adjuvanted gp350 generated high IgG titers (both IgG1 and IgG2a/c subtypes), elevated EBV-neutralizing antibody titers, and robust poly-functional anti-gp350 CD4(+) T cell responses. In addition, GLA/SE routinely demonstrated superior performance over aluminum hydroxide in all immunological readouts, including induction of durable neutralizing antibody titers out to at least 1 year post-vaccination. Both components of the GLA/SE adjuvant were found to be required to get optimal responses in both arms of the immune response: specifically, SE for neutralizing antibodies and GLA for induction of T cell responses. Furthermore, this vaccine also elicited high neutralizing antibody titers in a second species, rabbit. These promising results suggest that clinical development of a vaccine comprised of EBV-gp350 plus GLA/SE has the potential to prevent AIM in post-adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  16. CD4(+) T-cell-mediated antiviral protection of the upper respiratory tract in BALB/c mice following parenteral immunization with a recombinant respiratory syncytial virus G protein fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnicky-Gilquin, H; Robert, A; Chevalet, L; Haeuw, J F; Beck, A; Bonnefoy, J Y; Brandt, C; Siegrist, C A; Nguyen, T N; Power, U F

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed the protective mechanisms induced against respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (RSV-A) infection in the lower and upper respiratory tracts (LRT and URT) of BALB/c mice after intraperitoneal immunization with a recombinant fusion protein incorporating residues 130 to 230 of RSV-A G protein (BBG2Na). Mother-to-offspring antibody (Ab) transfer and adoptive transfer of BBG2Na-primed B cells into SCID mice demonstrated that Abs are important for LRT protection but have no effect on URT infection. In contrast, RSV-A clearance in the URT was achieved in a dose-dependent fashion after adoptive transfer of BBG2Na-primed T cells, while it was abolished in BBG2Na-immunized mice upon in vivo depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), T cells. Furthermore, the conserved RSV-A G protein cysteines and residues 193 and 194, overlapping the recently identified T helper cell epitope on the G protein (P. W. Tebbey et al., J. Exp. Med. 188:1967-1972, 1998), were found to be essential for URT but not LRT protection. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that CD4(+) T cells induced upon parenteral immunization with an RSV G protein fragment play a critical role in URT protection of normal mice against RSV infection.

  17. Perspectives on the impact of varicella immunization on herpes zoster. A model-based evaluation from three European countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Poletti

    Full Text Available The introduction of mass vaccination against Varicella-Zoster-Virus (VZV is being delayed in many European countries because of, among other factors, the possibility of a large increase in Herpes Zoster (HZ incidence in the first decades after the initiation of vaccination, due to the expected decline of the boosting of Cell Mediated Immunity caused by the reduced varicella circulation. A multi-country model of VZV transmission and reactivation, is used to evaluate the possible impact of varicella vaccination on HZ epidemiology in Italy, Finland and the UK. Despite the large uncertainty surrounding HZ and vaccine-related parameters, surprisingly robust medium-term predictions are provided, indicating that an increase in HZ incidence is likely to occur in countries where the incidence rate is lower in absence of immunization, possibly due to a higher force of boosting (e.g. Finland, whereas increases in HZ incidence might be minor where the force of boosting is milder (e.g. the UK. Moreover, a convergence of HZ post vaccination incidence levels in the examined countries is predicted despite different initial degrees of success of immunization policies. Unlike previous model-based evaluations, our investigation shows that after varicella immunization an increase of HZ incidence is not a certain fact, rather depends on the presence or absence of factors promoting a strong boosting intensity and which might or not be heavily affected by changes in varicella circulation due to mass immunization. These findings might explain the opposed empirical evidences observed about the increases of HZ in sites where mass varicella vaccination is ongoing.

  18. Evaluation of Chosen Cytokine Levels among Patients with Herpes Zoster as Ability to Provide Immune Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Zajkowska

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a viral disease caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV which remained latent in the cranial nerve or dorsal root ganglia. Cell-mediated immunity is known to decline with age as part of immunosenescence and can lead to the reactivation of VZV. Whereas herpes zoster is usually mild in healthy young persons, older patients are at increased risk for complications. In the present study we investigated the serum cytokine profile (IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12, representing cellular and humoral immunity and assessed the level of VZV IgG antibodies in patients with herpes zoster.We investigated the serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4, IL-12 and the level of VZV IgG antibodies in 23 patients with herpes zoster who did not develop superinfection. The control group was represented by 21 individuals in similar age with no inflammatory and infectious diseases. Cytokine and antibodies levels were measured by ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed using the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic, t-test, Welch's t-test, and nonparametric tests with STATISTICA 10 software.In patients with herpes zoster, the serum level of IL-17, IL-23, IL-21, IL-4 and IL-12 as well as VZV IgG antibodies titer were statistically significantly increased compared to control group.Our results confirm the broad activation of the immune system involving humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

  19. CD4+ T-Cell-Mediated Antiviral Protection of the Upper Respiratory Tract in BALB/c Mice following Parenteral Immunization with a Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Protein Fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnicky-Gilquin, Hélène; Robert, Alain; Chevalet, Laurent; Haeuw, Jean-Francois; Beck, Alain; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Brandt, Christian; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Nguyen, Thien Ngoc; Power, Ultan F.

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the protective mechanisms induced against respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (RSV-A) infection in the lower and upper respiratory tracts (LRT and URT) of BALB/c mice after intraperitoneal immunization with a recombinant fusion protein incorporating residues 130 to 230 of RSV-A G protein (BBG2Na). Mother-to-offspring antibody (Ab) transfer and adoptive transfer of BBG2Na-primed B cells into SCID mice demonstrated that Abs are important for LRT protection but have no effect on U...

  20. Direct Evidence for a Chronic CD8+-T-Cell-Mediated Immune Reaction to Tax within the Muscle of a Human T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma Virus Type 1-Infected Patient with Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Simona; Cochet, Madeleine; Mikol, Jacqueline; Teixeira, Antonio; Gessain, Antoine; Pique, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can lead to the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), concomitantly with or without other inflammatory disorders such as myositis. These pathologies are considered immune-mediated diseases, and it is assumed that migration within tissues of both HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells and anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cells represents a pivotal event. However, although HTLV-1-infected T cells were found in inflamed lesions, the antigenic specificity of coinfiltrated CD8+ T cells remains to be determined. In this study, we performed both ex vivo and in situ analyses using muscle biopsies obtained from an HTLV-1-infected patient with HAM/TSP and sporadic inclusion body myositis. We found that both HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells directed to the dominant Tax antigen can be amplified from muscle cell cultures. Moreover, we were able to detect in two successive muscle biopsies both tax mRNA-positive mononuclear cells and T cells recognized by the Tax11-19/HLA-A*02 tetramer and positive for perforin. These findings provide the first direct demonstration that anti-Tax cytotoxic T cells are chronically recruited within inflamed tissues of an HTLV-1 infected patient, which validates the cytotoxic immune reaction model for the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease. PMID:15367598

  1. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  2. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  3. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  4. HIV-1 adaptation to NK cell-mediated immune pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Marjet; Boelen, Lies; Rasmussen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The observation, by Alter et al., of the enrichment of NK cell “escape” variants in individuals carrying certain Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) genes is compelling evidence that natural killer (NK) cells exert selection pressure on HIV-1. Alter et al hypothesise that variant peptide......, in complex with HLA class I molecules binds KIR receptors and either increases NK cell inhibition or decreases NK cell activation compared to wild type peptide thus leading to virus escape from the NK cell response. According to this hypothesis, in order for NK cells to select for an escape variant......, an individual must carry both the KIR and an HLA ligand that binds the variant peptide. In this study we estimate the proportion of the population that is capable of selecting for escape variants and use both epidemiological modelling and a model-free approach to investigate whether this proportion explains...

  5. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity in west syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Montelli, Terezinha C. B.; Iwasso, Maria Tereza R.; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha S.; Mota, Norma Gerusa S.

    1981-01-01

    The immunological status of five children with West syndrome consequent to previous cerebral lesions was investigated. Three children had West syndrome and two were in transition from West to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. All of them showed cellular immunological deficiencies in the following tests: sensitization to DNCB, intracutaneous reaction to PHA, inhibition of leucocyte migration, blastic transformation of lymphocytes, T and B lymphocytes in peripheric blood and levels of serum immunoglobul...

  6. T-cell mediated immunity in Wegener's granulomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel Habib

    2008-01-01

    Although the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are not completely understood, considerable evidence support the concepts that activated T-cells play an important role in disease expression. It is, however, not clear which subsets of T-cells are involved in the

  7. Human immunity to rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneaux, P J

    1995-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important cause of severe gastro-enteritis in infants and young children. However, the determinants of protective immunity are poorly understood. Human immunity to rotavirus can be acquired passively or actively. It may be humoral or cell-mediated, protective or non-protective, homotypic or heterotypic and mucosal or systemic, or any combination of these. Mucosal immunity is protective against rotavirus illness, but not against infection, whereas systemic immunity reflects exposure, but probably has little if any role in protection. Both local and cell-mediated immunity are likely to be important in protection. However, there is no agreement as to a reliable surrogate marker of small intestinal protective immunity, and little is known about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in man, especially infants. Passive mucosal immunity, but not systemic immunity, may contribute to protection in breast-fed infants, and in those at increased risk of serious illness who have been given oral immunoglobulin, either as prophylaxis or therapeutically. Animal and adult studies may have only limited relevance to those who are at greatest risk of serious illness. However, it is probably from such studies that hypotheses about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in the protection of infants against rotavirus infection in man remain unclear, and this continues to hinder vaccine research.

  8. A role for NKG2D in NK cell-mediated resistance to poxvirus disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV is an orthopoxvirus (OPV that causes mousepox, the murine equivalent of human smallpox. C57BL/6 (B6 mice are naturally resistant to mousepox due to the concerted action of innate and adaptive immune responses. Previous studies have shown that natural killer (NK cells are a component of innate immunity that is essential for the B6 mice resistance to mousepox. However, the mechanism of NK cell-mediated resistance to OPV disease remains undefined. Here we show that B6 mice resistance to mousepox requires the direct cytolytic function of NK cells, as well as their ability to boost the T cell response. Furthermore, we show that the activating receptor NKG2D is required for optimal NK cell-mediated resistance to disease and lethality. Together, our results have important implication towards the understanding of natural resistance to pathogenic viral infections.

  9. Evaluation of Traditional Medicines III: The Mechanism of Immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results show that PHELA did not stimulate Th1 cytokines of a normal immune system but stimulated them when the immune system was suppressed by cyclosporine-A. In conclusion, PHELA is an immune-stimulant to a compromised immune system. Key words: PHELA, traditional medicine, cyclosporine-A, cytokines, ...

  10. Engineering PTEN-L for Cell-Mediated Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Gont, Alexander; Julian, Lisa M; Stanford, William L; Vlasschaert, Caitlyn; Gray, Douglas A; Jomaa, Danny; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2018-06-15

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently inactivated in glioblastoma. PTEN-L is a long form of PTEN produced by translation from an alternate upstream start codon. Unlike PTEN, PTEN-L has a signal sequence and a tract of six arginine residues that allow PTEN-L to be secreted from cells and be taken up by neighboring cells. This suggests that PTEN-L could be used as a therapeutic to restore PTEN activity. However, effective delivery of therapeutic proteins to treat CNS cancers such as glioblastoma is challenging. One method under evaluation is cell-mediated therapy, where cells with tumor-homing abilities such as neural stem cells are genetically modified to express a therapeutic protein. Here, we have developed a version of PTEN-L that is engineered for enhanced cell-mediated delivery. This was accomplished by replacement of the native leader sequence of PTEN-L with a leader sequence from human light-chain immunoglobulin G (IgG). This version of PTEN-L showed increased secretion and an increased ability to transfer to neighboring cells. Neural stem cells derived from human fibroblasts could be modified to express this version of PTEN-L and were able to deliver catalytically active light-chain leader PTEN-L (lclPTEN-L) to neighboring glioblastoma cells.

  11. Immune Tolerance of Human Dental Pulp-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mediated by CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Regulatory T-Cells and Induced by TGF-β1 and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Won; Lim, Jung Hyun; Chung, Chooryung J; Kang, Tae Jo; Kim, Tae Yeon; Kim, Young Seok; Roh, Tae Suk; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Most studies on immune tolerance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been performed using MSCs derived from bone marrow, cord blood, or adipose tissue. MSCs also exist in the craniofacial area, specifically in teeth. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms of immune tolerance of dental pulp-derived MSC (DP-MSC) in vitro and in vivo. We isolated DP-MSCs from human dental pulp and co-cultured them with CD4⁺ T-cells. To evaluate the role of cytokines, we blocked TGF-β and IL-10, separately and together, in co-cultured DP-MSCs and CD4⁺ T-cells. We analyzed CD25 and FoxP3 to identify regulatory T-cells (Tregs) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and real-time PCR. We performed alloskin grafts with and without DP-MSC injection in mice. We performed mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) to check immune tolerance. Co-culture of CD4⁺ T-cells with DP-MSCs increased the number of CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Tregs (pcells (pcells than in the respective monocultured cells. However, IL-10 mRNA levels were not different. There was no difference in alloskin graft survival rate and area between the DP-MSC injection group and the non-injection group. Nonetheless, MLR was reduced in the DP-MSC injected group (p<0.05). DP-MSCs can modulate immune tolerance by increasing CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ Tregs. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are factors in the immune-tolerance mechanism. Pure DP-MSC therapy may not be an effective treatment for rejection, although it may module immune tolerance in vivo.

  12. Evaluation of non-reciprocal heterologous immunity between unrelated viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jenny W; Selin, Liisa K; Welsh, Raymond M

    2015-08-01

    Heterologous immunity refers to the phenomenon whereby a history of an immune response against one pathogen can provide a level of immunity to a second unrelated pathogen. Previous investigations have shown that heterologous immunity is not necessarily reciprocal, such as in the case of vaccinia virus (VACV). Replication of VACV is reduced in mice immune to a variety of pathogens, while VACV fails to induce immunity to several of the same pathogens, including lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Here we examine the lack of reciprocity of heterologous immunity between VACV and LCMV and find that they induce qualitatively different memory CD8 T cells. However, depending on the repertoire of an individual host, VACV can provide protection against LCMV simply by experimentally amplifying the quantity of T cells cross-reactive with the two viruses. Thus, one cause for lack of reciprocity is differences in the frequencies of cross-reactive T cells in immune hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation — 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  14. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Pickar; Pei Xu; Andrew Elson; James Zengel; Christian Sauder; Steve Rubin; Biao He

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN...

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of geranial, geranial acetate, gingerol, and eugenol essential oils: evidence for humoral and cell-mediated responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Farhath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The immunomodulatory effect of geranial, geranial acetate, gingerol, and eugenol essential oils were evaluated by studying humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Materials and Method: The essential oils were evaluated for immunomodulatory activity in in vivo studies, using rats as the animal model. The essential oils were tested for hypersensitivity and hemagglutination reactions, using sheep red blood cells (SRBC as the antigen while sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (SCMC served as the control in all the tests. Result: Orally administrated essential oils showed a significant increase of test parameters, viz., haemagglutinating antibody titre (HAT and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH response. In rats immunized with sheep RBC, essential oils enhanced the humoral antibody response to the antigen and significantly potentiated the cellular immunity by facilitating the foot pad thickness response to sheep RBC in sensitized rats with doses of 50-800 mg/ml. Haemagglutination titre of geraniol showed the highest increase of 139.3±6.38 and with 5.9±0.7 DTH, respectively. For geranial acetate, the haemagglutination titre showed a moderate increase of 87.5±5.9 and highest increase in DTH with 5.9±0.8, respectively. Using gingerol, the haemagglutination titre showed a moderate increase with 88.2±6.306 and DTH 3.5±0.5, respectively and for eugenol, the haemaggulation titre showed a moderate increase with 112.06±6.169 and DTH 4.4±0.6, respectively. These differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The essential oils were found to have a significant immunostimulant activity on both the specific and non-specific immune mechanisms.

  16. Evaluation of immune response elicited by inulin as an adjuvant with filarial antigens in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmi, N; Aparnaa, R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-10-01

    Filariasis caused by infectious parasitic nematodes has been identified as the second leading source of permanent and long-term disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America. Several vaccine candidates were identified from infective third-stage larvae (L3) which involves in the critical transition from arthropod to human. Hitherto studies of these antigens in combination with alum adjuvant have shown to elicit its characteristic Th2 responses. Inulin is a safe, non-toxic adjuvant that principally stimulates the innate immune response through the alternative complement pathway. In the present study, the immune response elicited by inulin and alum as adjuvants were compared with filarial antigens from different aetiological agents: secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) from Onchocerca volvulus and venom allergen homologue (VAH) from Brugia malayi as single or as cocktail vaccines in mice model. The study revealed that inulin can induce better humoral response against these antigens than alum adjuvant. Antibody isotyping disclosed inulin's ability to elevate the levels of IgG2a and IgG3 antibodies which mediates in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), respectively, in mice. Splenocyte analysis showed that T cells prestimulated with inulin have higher stimulation index (P inulin formulation had induced higher cytotoxicity with filarial antigens (as single P inulin to deplete the levels of Treg and brought a balance in Th1/Th2 arms against filarial antigens in mice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve; He, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/-) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  18. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pickar

    Full Text Available Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/- for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  19. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR−/−) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity. PMID:28362871

  20. Evaluating the Effects of Stressors on Immune Function during Simulated Dives in Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    during Simulated Dives in Marine Mammals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-13-1-0768 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR{S) Tracy...this study were to 1) gain understanding of marine mammal immunology and dive adaptation of the immune system by investigating the response of marine... mammal immune cells to simulated dives and 2) to evaluate the potential for additional stressors to alter the response of marine mammal immune cells to

  1. original article evaluation of immunity against poliovirus serotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    spread of the virus (13). CONCLUSION. The present study demonstrates 81% herd immunity for the three-poliovirus serotypes among children in five riverine communities in two local government areas of Delta state of Nigeria. Identification of some children without detectable antibodies to one or more poliovirus serotypes, ...

  2. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatz L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogenesis-based treatments are currently in development, as psoriasis has also become increasingly relevant for proof-of-concept studies. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge of psoriasis immunopathogenesis, focusing on the T-cell-mediated immune response and its initiation. The authors describe recent advances in psoriasis treatment and discuss pathogenesis-based therapies that are currently in development or which could be envisioned for the future. Although current biologics are well tolerated, several issues such as long-term efficacy, long-term safety, and high costs keep driving the search for new and better therapies. With further advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, more genomic data from psoriasis patients becoming available, and potentially the identification of autoantigens in psoriasis, current research should lead to the development of a growing arsenal of improved targeted treatments and to further breakthrough immunotherapies.Keywords: autoimmunity, autoimmune disease, immune response, immunopathogenesis

  3. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline

    2005-01-01

    T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...

  4. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry ...

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  7. Evaluating plant immunity using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics workflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Heuberger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic processes in plants are key components of physiological and biochemical disease resistance. Metabolomics, the analysis of a broad range of small molecule compounds in a biological system, has been used to provide a systems-wide overview of plant metabolism associated with defense responses. Plant immunity has been examined using multiple metabolomics workflows that vary in methods of detection, annotation, and interpretation, and the choice of workflow can significantly impact the conclusions inferred from a metabolomics investigation. The broad range of metabolites involved in plant defense often supports the need for multiple chemical detection platforms and implementation of a non-targeted approach. A review of the current literature reveals a wide range of workflows that are currently used in plant metabolomics, and new methods for analyzing and reporting mass spectrometry data can improve the ability to translate investigative findings among different plant-pathogen systems.

  8. Evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase awareness of immunizations for urban low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Emmanuel M; Hamilton, Chelsea; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Willis, Earnestine

    2015-02-01

    To assess community awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize children after a social marketing immunization campaign. We used 2 interviewer-assisted street-intercept surveys to evaluate awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize low-income children. The "Take Control! Immunize" social marketing campaign was developed using a community-based participatory research approach and used billboards, flyers, and various "walking billboard" (eg, backpacks, pens) to deliver immunization messages in the community settings. Over 85% of community members recalled the "Take Control! Immunize" message. Almost half of those who saw the immunization message indicated that the message motivated them to act, including getting their children immunized or calling their physician to inquire about their children's immunizations status. All respondents indicated that immunizations were important for children and that they were likely or very likely to immunize their children. Respondents who reported that "Take Control!" messages motivated them to act in the first intercept survey were significantly more likely than those in the second intercept to report being likely or very likely to immunize their children. Culturally appropriate social marketing immunization messages in targeted urban settings can increase parental awareness and behavioral intention to immunize children.

  9. Economic evaluations of rotavirus immunization for developing countries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Kane, Sumit; Rozenbaum, Mark H; Li, Shu Chuen; Postma, Maarten J

    2011-07-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of mortality for children under 5 years of age, and rotavirus is identified as the main cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Since 2006, two rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and Rotateq, have been available in the market. These vaccines have proved to have high efficacy in developed countries. Clinical trials are being undertaken in Asia and Africa, and early clinical results found that the vaccine significantly reduces severe diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus (48.3% for Asia and 30.2% for Africa). The WHO recommended that rotavirus immunization be included in all national immunization programs. Based on WHO's recommendations, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization decided to provide financial support for rotavirus immunization in the developing world. In this article, we attempted to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus immunization in developing countries. After an extensive literature search, we identified and evaluated 15 cost-effectiveness studies conducted in the developing world. The results from these studies showed that rotavirus immunization is a cost-effective strategy and one of the best interventions to prevent rotavirus-related diarrheal disease. However, rotavirus vaccines are expensive and the vaccine price appears to be the most challenging and crucial factor for decision-makers regarding whether to introduce this vaccine into developing countries' immunization schedules. All the studies concluded that rotavirus immunization is cost effective but may not be affordable for the developing world at present. Developing countries will definitely rely on financial support from international organizations to introduce rotavirus vaccination. It is recommended that more research on cost-effective rotavirus immunization with updated data be conducted and new rotavirus vaccine candidates be developed at a cheaper price to speed up the introduction of rotavirus immunization to the developing world.

  10. Cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli Del Giudice, Alessandro; Barbara, Michele; Russo, Giuseppe Maria; Fiocca Matthews, Emily; Cassano, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis is a heterogeneous disease whose etiology is largely unknown. Nasal cytology only allows us to recognize different non-allergic rhinitis forms on the basis of the prevalent inflammatory cell infiltrate: non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils, with neutrophils, with mast-cells and with both eosinophils and mast-cells. The aim of this study is to define the incidence, clinical features and comorbidity of the different types of cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in a pediatric age group. One hundred and fourteen non-allergic children with chronic nasal obstruction and associated symptoms (rhinorrhea, sneezing and nasal itchiness) were retrospectively selected. All patients had been submitted to a clinical history, pediatric evaluation, anterior rhinoscopy and fiberendoscopy, rhinomanometry and nasal cytology. Non-allergic rhinitis with neutrophils was present in 46 (40.4%) children, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in 53 (46.5%), non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells in 12 (10.5%) and non-allergic rhinitis with both eosinophils and mast-cells in 3 (2.6%). Nasal obstruction was prevalent in non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils and in non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells patients (Pallergic rhinitis with eosinophils group showed a higher probability of asthma (Ppediatric age group the most frequent forms of non-allergic rhinitis are those with eosinophils or with neutrophils. A diagnosis of non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in children presumes more severe symptoms and a higher incidence of pulmonary disease and roncopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Athymic nude rat. III natural cell mediated cytotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. de Jong; P.A. Steerenberg; P.S. Ursem; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.G. Vos (Joseph); E.J. Ruitenberg (Joost)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractHomozygous rnu/rnu and heterozygous +/rnu rats were investigated and compared with each other for the existence of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Investigated were total, adherent, and nonadherent cell populations from spleen, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph node. The

  12. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  13. CAF01 potentiates immune responses and efficacy of an inactivated influenza vaccine in ferrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Agger, Else Marie; Poulsen, Julie Juul

    2011-01-01

    response, whereas the induction of cell-mediated immune responses is negligible. Recently, a cationic liposomal adjuvant (dimethyldioctadecylammonium/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate, CAF01) was developed. CAF01 has proven to enhance both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to a number of different...

  14. The Role of Selenium in Human Immunity | Chisenga | Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... including selenium deficiency, so it has been postulated that selenium has a role in immune function. Immune dysfunction, susceptibility to viral infections and increased mortality are some of the outcomes associated with selenium deficiency. Key Words: Selenium; Human; Cell-mediated immunity; Innate immunity; HIV; ...

  15. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Verbrugge, I.; Beltman, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and

  16. Characterization of CD4+T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaole; Gao, Lei; Meng, Kai; Han, Chunting; Li, Qiang; Feng, Zhenjun; Chen, Lei

    2018-02-12

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer characterized by the development of malignant plasma cells. The CD8 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity is considered a major player in antitumor immunity, but in MM patients, the CD8 T cells displayed senescence markers and were functionally impaired. To investigate whether cytotoxic CD4 T cells could act as a treatment alternative in MM, we examined the frequency and function of naturally occurring cytotoxic CD4 T cells in MM patients. The cytotoxic CD4 T cells were identified as granzyme-A, granzyme B-, and perforin-expressing CD4 T cells, and their frequencies were significantly upregulated in MM patients when compared with healthy controls. The frequencies of cytotoxic CD4 T cells in MM patients were not associated with the frequencies of cytotoxic CD8 T cells, but were negatively associated with disease severity. Interestingly, the expression levels of inhibitory molecules, including PD-1 and CTLA-4, were significantly lower in cytotoxic CD4 T cells than in cytotoxic CD8 T cells. When co-incubated with autologous CD38 + CD138 + plasma cells, CD4 T cells were capable of eliminating plasma cells with varying degrees of efficacy. In MM patients, the frequency of circulating plasma cells was negatively correlated with the frequency of cytotoxic CD4 T cells. Therefore, CD4 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity existed naturally in MM patients and could potentially act as an option in antitumor therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the LTK63 adjuvant effect on cellular immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A lot of pathogens enter the body via the nasal route. The construction of non-toxic mutants of heat labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT), which is a potent mucosal adjuvant, represents a major breakthrough for the development of mucosal vaccines. Objective: This study was undertaken to critically evaluate ...

  18. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  19. Isotype-like suppression of T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. II. Suppression of the early component of contact sensitivity by a Ly-2+ T cell-derived suppressor factor that binds to contact sensitivity-initiating, antigen-specific, Ly-1+ T cell-derived factors that are of different antigen specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Ptak, M; Askenase, P W

    1986-03-01

    Recognition that delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions, such as contact sensitivity (CS) in mice, are initiated by Ly-1+ T cell-derived, antigen-specific factors has led to identification of a new kind of suppressor T cell that regulates this initiation phase of CS. Regulation by these suppressor T cells is T cell isotype-like in that initiation of DTH of various antigenic specificities is suppressed, whereas, Ly-1+ T cells mediating the antigen/major histocompatibility complex-restricted, classic delayed phase of CS responses are not affected, nor are other T cell activities. This study shows that these isotype-specific suppressor T cells probably act by release of soluble, isotype-specific, suppressor factors. These isotype-specific T cell factors bind to and can be eluted from columns linked with antigen-specific Ly-1+ T cell factors that initiate CS, and are of different antigen specificities. These T cell regulating, anti-isotypic suppressor factors are derived from Lyt-2+ I-J- T cells and suppress CS-initiating T cells, but do not affect the delayed-acting T cells of CS. This is in contrast with antigen-specific T cell suppressor factors that affect the late-acting and not the early-acting T cells of CS. It is suggested that the antigen-binding, CS-initiating, T cell factors, and their regulatory, anti-isotypic T cell factors are, respectively, T cell analogues of immunoglobulin(Ig)E antibody, and IgE-binding factors, that regulate IgE antibody production by IgE+ B cells.

  20. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity, Cellular Immunity and Phagocytosis in Peripheral Blood of Major Thalassemia Patients Refered to Ahvaz Shafa Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafourian Boroujerdnia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Thalassemia is the most common genetic disorders in the world. These disorders are common in the Middle Estern countries containing Iran. It seems that factors like splenectomy, iron overload, frequent contacts with antigens during blood transfusion & using chelating agents cause severe disturbances to immune system. This study is done to evaluate the immune status in thalasemic patients refered to Ahvaz Shafa Hospital. Materials & Methods: This case- control study was done on 40 major thalassemic patients who had not the history of frequent bacterial and viral infections, splenectomy, using immunosuppressive drugs& patients with hepatitis, diabetes or other chronic diseases. Control group contained 31 healthy persons. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all participants. The last CBC and serum ferritin was taken from patient files. NBT test, evaluation of CD4, CD8, CD5 , CD20 markers with flowcytometry, and assessment of IgG, IgM, and IgA levels with nephlometry method carried out on peripheral blood samples of patient and control groups. Results: The percent of CD4, CD8 and CD5 markers and CD4/CD8 ratio had no significant difference between case & control groups. The percent of CD20 marker, and IgG , IgM & IgA levels were significantly higher in case group in comparison with control group. NBT test in all case and control groups were normal. There was no significant difference in serum ferritin, WBC count and percentage of lymphocytes and neutrophils among two groups. Conclusion: In major thalassemia patients, cellular immunity and phagocytosis are similar to normal individuals. CD4, CD8 and CD5 positive lymphocytes and CD4/CD8 ratio showed no difference between patients and normal groups. CD20 positive lymphocytes and IgM, IgG & IgA levels in patient group were significantly higher than normal control group. This can’t be due to viral or recurrent infections, because these patients were excluded from our

  1. Evaluation of Innate Immunity Biomarkers on Admission and at Discharge From an Acute Heart Failure Episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nuno; Patrício, Emília; Bettencourt, Paulo; Guimarães, João Tiago

    2016-11-01

    The involvement of the immune system in heart failure (HF) has been demonstrated. Evidence shows that innate immunity can have a role in the remodeling process and progression of HF. With previous studies showing the prognostic value of some innate immunity markers and their relevance in this condition, we aim to evaluate how these markers vary on hospitalization due to an acute episode of HF and at discharge. About 154 patients admitted with acute HF were prospectively recruited. Patients were evaluated on admission and at discharge from the hospital. Patients with infection were separately analyzed. Innate immunity, inflammatory, and cardiac biomarkers were measured and were compared between groups and between admission and discharge and with reference values of biological variation. Median patients' age was 78 years, and half of the patients were men. The median duration of hospitalization was 6 days. C3 and C4 protein levels significantly increased (P innate immunity markers such as C3 and C4 increase after treatment for acute HF, supporting the hypothesis that they can be involved in the resolution of the acute episode. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mixed Signals: Co-Stimulation in Invariant Natural Killer T Cell-Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

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    Susannah C. Shissler

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an integral component of the immune system and play an important role in antitumor immunity. Upon activation, iNKT cells can directly kill malignant cells as well as rapidly produce cytokines that stimulate other immune cells, making them a front line defense against tumorigenesis. Unfortunately, iNKT cell number and activity are reduced in multiple cancer types. This anergy is often associated with upregulation of co-inhibitory markers such as programmed death-1. Similar to conventional T cells, iNKT cells are influenced by the conditions of their activation. Conventional T cells receive signals through the following three types of receptors: (1 T cell receptor (TCR, (2 co-stimulation molecules, and (3 cytokine receptors. Unlike conventional T cells, which recognize peptide antigen presented by MHC class I or II, the TCRs of iNKT cells recognize lipid antigen in the context of the antigen presentation molecule CD1d (Signal 1. Co-stimulatory molecules can positively and negatively influence iNKT cell activation and function and skew the immune response (Signal 2. This study will review the background of iNKT cells and their co-stimulatory requirements for general function and in antitumor immunity. We will explore the impact of monoclonal antibody administration for both blocking inhibitory pathways and engaging stimulatory pathways on iNKT cell-mediated antitumor immunity. This review will highlight the incorporation of co-stimulatory molecules in antitumor dendritic cell vaccine strategies. The use of co-stimulatory intracellular signaling domains in chimeric antigen receptor-iNKT therapy will be assessed. Finally, we will explore the influence of innate-like receptors and modification of immunosuppressive cytokines (Signal 3 on cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Integrated Immune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Functional Tooth Regeneration in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Wataru Sonoyama; Yi Liu; Dianji Fang; Takayoshi Yamaza; Byoung-Moo Seo; Chunmei Zhang; He Liu; Stan Gronthos; Cun-Yu Wang; Songlin Wang; Songtao Shi

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This wo...

  5. Externalities in program evaluation: the impact of a women’s empowerment program on immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, W.

    2011-01-01

    Impact evaluations of development programs usually do not explicitly take into account externalities on non-participants. Based on a unique dataset we estimate the direct as well as the spillover effects of Mahila Samakhya, a women's empowerment program in India, on child immunization. The survey

  6. Evaluation of Primary Immunization Coverage of Infants Under Universal Immunization Programme in an Urban Area of Bangalore City Using Cluster Sampling and Lot Quality Assurance Sampling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Punith; K, Lalitha; G, Suman; BS, Pradeep; Kumar K, Jayanth

    2008-01-01

    Research Question: Is LQAS technique better than cluster sampling technique in terms of resources to evaluate the immunization coverage in an urban area? Objective: To assess and compare the lot quality assurance sampling against cluster sampling in the evaluation of primary immunization coverage. Study Design: Population-based cross-sectional study. Study Setting: Areas under Mathikere Urban Health Center. Study Subjects: Children aged 12 months to 23 months. Sample Size: 220 in cluster sampling, 76 in lot quality assurance sampling. Statistical Analysis: Percentages and Proportions, Chi square Test. Results: (1) Using cluster sampling, the percentage of completely immunized, partially immunized and unimmunized children were 84.09%, 14.09% and 1.82%, respectively. With lot quality assurance sampling, it was 92.11%, 6.58% and 1.31%, respectively. (2) Immunization coverage levels as evaluated by cluster sampling technique were not statistically different from the coverage value as obtained by lot quality assurance sampling techniques. Considering the time and resources required, it was found that lot quality assurance sampling is a better technique in evaluating the primary immunization coverage in urban area. PMID:19876474

  7. Evaluation of immunization coverage in the rural area of Pune, Maharashtra, using the 30 cluster sampling technique

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    Pankaj Kumar Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. One of the most cost-effective and easy methods for child survival is immunization. Despite all the efforts put in by governmental and nongovernmental institutes for 100% immunization coverage, there are still pockets of low-coverage areas. In India, immunization services are offered free in public health facilities, but, despite rapid increases, the immunization rate remains low in some areas. The Millennium Development Goals (MDG indicators also give importance to immunization. Objective: To assess the immunization coverage in the rural area of Pune. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the field practice area of the Rural Health Training Center (RHTC using the WHO′s 30 cluster sampling method for evaluation of immunization coverage. Results: A total of 1913 houses were surveyed. A total of 210 children aged 12-23 months were included in the study. It was found that 86.67% of the children were fully immunized against all the six vaccine-preventable diseases. The proportion of fully immunized children was marginally higher in males (87.61% than in females (85.57%, and the immunization card was available with 60.95% of the subjects. The most common cause for partial immunization was that the time of immunization was inconvenient (36%. Conclusion: Sustained efforts are required to achieve universal coverage of immunization in the rural area of Pune district.

  8. Experimental asexual blood stage malaria immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amante, Fiona H; Engwerda, Christian R; Good, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    Immunity to asexual blood stages of malaria is complex, involving both humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms. The availability of murine models of malaria has greatly facilitated the analysis of immune mechanisms involved in resistance to the asexual blood stages. This unit details the materials and methods required for inducing protective immunity toward experimental blood stage malaria parasites by vaccination, repeated infection, and drug cure, as well as adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells.

  9. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  10. Effect of Scoparia dulcis on noise stress induced adaptive immunity and cytokine response in immunized Wistar rats

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    Loganathan Sundareswaran

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: S. dulcis (SD has normalized and prevented the noise induced changes in cell-mediated and humoral immunity and it could be the presence of anti-stressor and immuno stimulant activity of the plant.

  11. How we changed from paper to online education: Teaching Immunization Delivery and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Carol J; Mauldin, Mary P; Gilbertson, Ben O; Darden, Paul M; Kittredge, Diane

    2005-12-01

    This article discusses meeting the challenges encountered in changing a paper-based, interactive immunization delivery curriculum into an online, self-paced format. The program, TIDE (Teaching Immunization Delivery and Evaluation), was developed through collaborative efforts of medical educators and content experts with initial funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Ambulatory Pediatric Association and the Medical University of South Carolina. We summarize the efforts of the development team to create interactive case scenarios, provide ready access to resource materials and an audit tool for assessing the immunization rate of the learner's clinic or practice, and meet the rigorous requirements of awarding continuing education credit. Data based on more than 100 doctors' and nurses' evaluations indicate a trend toward higher overall ratings of the online version than the paper version (88% online vs. 76% paper reported module as very good or excellent). As the TIDE program is evaluated, the team's goal is to incorporate instructional methods to increase relevance and learners' opportunities for 'learning by doing.' Future plans include extending online office assessment tools to encourage use for continuous quality improvement, and providing a mechanism for learners to share their techniques for obtaining and maintaining high immunization rates.

  12. In vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity to the transmissible venereal tumor of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D

    1980-02-01

    Cell-mediated immunity to the transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) of the dog was studied by use of a 51Cr release cytotoxicity assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of dogs in which the TVT had regressed were shown to be cytotoxic to the tumor cells in contrast to PBL of normal dogs and animals during progressive tumor growth, which were not cytotoxic. In addition, sera of dogs in which the TVT had regressed could be demonstrated to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with normal dog lymphocytes or cytotoxic PBL as effector cells. With cytotoxic lymphocytes, the ADCC effect could be observed in addition to the direct cytotoxic effect.

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Masaki Shimono

    Full Text Available Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of

  14. Selenium supplementation restores innate and humoral immune responses in footrot-affected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean A; Vorachek, William R; Stewart, Whitney C; Gorman, M Elena; Mosher, Wayne D; Pirelli, Gene J; Bobe, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Dietary selenium (Se) alters whole-blood Se concentrations in sheep, dependent upon Se source and dosage administered, but little is known about effects on immune function. We used footrot (FR) as a disease model to test the effects of supranutritional Se supplementation on immune function. To determine the effect of Se-source (organic Se-yeast, inorganic Na-selenite or Na-selenate) and Se-dosage (1, 3, 5 times FDA-permitted level) on FR severity, 120 ewes with and 120 ewes without FR were drenched weekly for 62 weeks with different Se sources and dosages (30 ewes/treatment group). Innate immunity was evaluated after 62 weeks of supplementation by measuring neutrophil bacterial killing ability. Adaptive immune function was evaluated by immunizing sheep with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The antibody titer and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test to KLH were used to assess humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity, respectively. At baseline, FR-affected ewes had lower whole-blood and serum-Se concentrations; this difference was not observed after Se supplementation. Se supplementation increased neutrophil bacterial killing percentages in FR-affected sheep to percentages observed in supplemented and non-supplemented healthy sheep. Similarly, Se supplementation increased KLH antibody titers in FR-affected sheep to titers observed in healthy sheep. FR-affected sheep demonstrated suppressed cell-mediated immunity at 24 hours after intradermal KLH challenge, although there was no improvement with Se supplementation. We did not consistently prevent nor improve recovery from FR over the 62 week Se-treatment period. In conclusion, Se supplementation does not prevent FR, but does restore innate and humoral immune functions negatively affected by FR.

  15. [Evaluation of an immunochromatographic dipstick test for the assessment of tetanus immunity in horses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recknagel, Stephan; Snyder, Alice; Blanke, Annemarie; Uhlig, Albrecht; Brüser, Benjamin; Schusser, Gerald Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of tetanus immunity in equine patients is crucial in cases of injuries, elective surgeries, or when effective vaccination protocols are to be designed. The Fassisi® TetaCheck is a stall-side rapid test which was developed to address these issues. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate its performance parameters. To this end, the qualitative test results obtained by two blinded observers were compared to tetanus toxoid antibody levels from 99 serum samples, measured with a double antigen ELISA. Additionally the colour intensities of the test window were quantified using a camera and photo editing software. Assuming that the protective level of tetanus toxoid antibodies is ≥ 0.1 IE/ml, the tetanus quick stick (TQS) showed a sensitivity of 83.6% and a specificity of 100%. almost perfect (K = 0.88). Exchanging the observer did not affect the interpretation of theTQS (K = 0.80; K = 0.84). The definition of five distinct colour intensities of the "test window" enabled a clear differentiation of unprotected individuals from those with a protective immunity. There was a linear relationship between the objectively measured colour intensities and the tetanus toxoid antibody concentration (r2 = 0.74). The TQS thus proved to be a robust and reliable test in the stall-side assessment of tetanus immunity in horses. Its implementation in equine daily practice can help to avoid unnecessary immunizations in adult horses and therefore minimize vaccination side effects.

  16. NLRP3 suppresses NK cell-mediated responses to carcinogen-induced tumors and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Melvyn T; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Paget, Christophe; Wong, Christina S F; Duret, Helene; Tschopp, Jürg; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J

    2012-11-15

    The NLRP3 inflammasome acts as a danger signal sensor that triggers and coordinates the inflammatory response upon infectious insults or tissue injury and damage. However, the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated control of tumor immunity is poorly understood. Here, we show in a model of chemical-induced carcinogenesis and a series of experimental and spontaneous metastases models that mice lacking NLRP3 display significantly reduced tumor burden than control wild-type (WT) mice. The suppression of spontaneous and experimental tumor metastases and methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced sarcomas in mice deficient for NLRP3 was NK cell and IFN-γ-dependent. Focusing on the amenable B16F10 experimental lung metastases model, we determined that expression of NLRP3 in bone marrow-derived cells was necessary for optimal tumor metastasis. Tumor-driven expansion of CD11b(+)Gr-1(intermediate) (Gr-1(int)) myeloid cells within the lung tumor microenvironment of NLRP3(-/-) mice was coincident with increased lung infiltrating activated NK cells and an enhanced antimetastatic response. The CD11b(+)Gr-1(int) myeloid cells displayed a unique cell surface phenotype and were characterized by their elevated production of CCL5 and CXCL9 chemokines. Adoptive transfer of this population into WT mice enhanced NK cell numbers in, and suppression of, B16F10 lung metastases. Together, these data suggested that NLRP3 is an important suppressor of NK cell-mediated control of carcinogenesis and metastases and identify CD11b(+)Gr-1(int) myeloid cells that promote NK cell antimetastatic function. ©2012 AACR.

  17. Evaluation of local immune response to Fasciola hepatica experimental infection in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes of goats immunized with Sm14 vaccine antigen

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    Ricardo E Mendes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Protection against Fasciola hepatica in goats immunized with a synthetic recombinant antigen from Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein 14 (rSm14 was investigated by assessing worm burdens, serum levels of hepatic enzymes, faecal egg count and hepatic damage, which was evaluated using gross and microscopic morphometric observation. The nature of the local immune response was assessed by examining the distribution of CD2+, CD4+, CD8+ and γ´+ T lymphocytes along with IgG+, IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ cells in the liver and hepatic lymph nodes (HLN. The goats used consisted of group 1 (unimmunized and uninfected, group 2 [infected control - immunized with Quillaia A (Quil A] and group 3 (immunized with rSm14 in Quil A and infected, each containing seven animals. Immunization with rSm14 in Quil A adjuvant induced a reduction in gross hepatic lesions of 56.6% (p < 0.001 and reduced hepatic and HLN infiltration of CD2+, CD4+, CD8+ and γ´+ T lymphocytes as well as IL-4+ and IFN-γ+ cells (p < 0.05. This is the first report of caprine immunization against F. hepatica using a complete rSm14 molecule derived from S. mansoni. Immunization reduced hepatic damage and local inflammatory infiltration into the liver and HLN. However, considering that Quil A is not the preferential/first choice adjuvant for Sm14 immunization, further studies will be undertaken using the monophosphoryl lipid A-based family of adjuvants during clinical trials to facilitate anti-Fasciolavaccine development.

  18. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Imaging Allows Noninvasive Evaluation of Immune Cell Modulation in Esophageal Dysplasia

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    Peiman Habibollahi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal tumors provide unique challenges and opportunities for developing and testing surveillance imaging technology for different tumor microenvironment components, including assessment of immune cell modulation, with the ultimate goal of promoting early detection and response evaluation. In this context, accessibility through the lumen using a minimally invasive approach provides a means for repetitive evaluation longitudinally by combining fluorescent endoscopic imaging technology with novel fluorescent nanoparticles that are phagocytized by immune cells in the microenvironment. The agent we developed for imaging is synthesized from Feraheme (ferumoxytol, a Food and Drug Administration-approved monocrystaline dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticle, which we conjugated to a near-infrared fluorochrome, CyAL5.5. We demonstrate a high level of uptake of the fluorescent nanoparticles by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in the esophagus and spleen of L2Cre;p120ctnflox/flox mice. These mice develop esophageal dysplasia leading to squamous cell carcinoma; we have previously demonstrated that dysplastic and neoplastic esophageal lesions in these mice have an immune cell infiltration that is dominated by MDSCs. In the L2Cre;p120ctnflox/flox mice, evaluation of the spleen reveals that nearly 80% of CD45+ leukocytes that phagocytized the nanoparticle were CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs. After dexamethasone treatment, we observed concordant decreased fluorescent signal from esophageal lesions during fluorescent endoscopy and decreased CyAL5.5-fluorescent-positive immune cell infiltration in esophageal dysplastic lesions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Our observations suggest that this translatable technology may be used for the early detection of dysplastic changes and the serial assessment of immunomodulatory therapy and to visualize changes in MDSCs in the esophageal tumor microenvironment.

  19. AVIDITY EVALUATION OF LOCAL IgA ANTIBODIES IN PERSONS IMMUNIZED WITH LIVE INFLUENZA VACCINE

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    S. A. Donina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. At present, immunogenicity evaluation of influenza vaccines is performed by quantitative assessment of increased serum antibodies. It was, however, shown that the degree of human defense against influenza is mostly related to their qualitative characteristics, i.e., avidity (functional activity. Leading role of local immunity is demonstrated in protection against influenza. Such immunity is mediated by IgA antibodies from mucosal airways. Meanwhile, the avidity issues for local antibodies still remain open.In present study, an attempt was undertaken to evaluate post-vaccination local immunological memory for influenza A virus, according to IgA antibodies from upper respiratory secretions. Two techniques were used to evaluate antibody avidity, that were previously applied for studying this phenomenon with serum imunoglobulins, i.e., a dynamic test (measurement of antigen-antibody reaction rates, and a test with urea, a chaotropic agent (avidity is determined as a strength of antigen-antibody complex. A total of 202 persons (18 to 20 years old were enrolled into the study.With both tests, a broad range of individual avidity values was observed for the antibodies. A significant cohort (up to 30 per cent of persons immunized with live influenza vaccine, showed sharply increased avidity of secretory IgA antibodies by both methods, along with accumulation of these immunoglobulins after vaccination. A reverse relationship is revealed between avidity levels of these antibodies before vaccination, and increase of this parameter post-immunization. The data present convincing arguments for specific renewal of local humoral immunological memory, as induced by live influenza vaccine. The study substantiates a necessity for application of the both tests in parallel, when determining avidity of secretory IgA antibodies. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 4-5, pp 423-430.

  20. Integrin αvβ8-Mediated TGF-β Activation by Effector Regulatory T Cells Is Essential for Suppression of T-Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, John J.; Kelly, Aoife; Smedley, Catherine; Bauché, David; Campbell, Simon; Marie, Julien C.; Travis, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in suppressing self-harmful T cell responses, but how Treg cells mediate suppression to maintain immune homeostasis and limit responses during inflammation is unclear. Here we show that effector Treg cells express high amounts of the integrin αvβ8, which enables them to activate latent transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Treg-cell-specific deletion of integrin αvβ8 did not result in a spontaneous inflammatory phenotype, suggesting that this pathway is not important in Treg-cell-mediated maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, Treg cells lacking expression of integrin αvβ8 were unable to suppress pathogenic T cell responses during active inflammation. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which Treg cells suppress exuberant immune responses, highlighting a key role for effector Treg-cell-mediated activation of latent TGF-β in suppression of self-harmful T cell responses during active inflammation. PMID:25979421

  1. Impact of immunization technology and assay application on antibody performance--a systematic comparative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Brown

    Full Text Available Antibodies are quintessential affinity reagents for the investigation and determination of a protein's expression patterns, localization, quantitation, modifications, purification, and functional understanding. Antibodies are typically used in techniques such as Western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA, among others. The methods employed to generate antibodies can have a profound impact on their success in any of these applications. We raised antibodies against 10 serum proteins using 3 immunization methods: peptide antigens (3 per protein, DNA prime/protein fragment-boost ("DNA immunization"; 3 per protein, and full length protein. Antibodies thus generated were systematically evaluated using several different assay technologies (ELISA, IHC, and Western blot. Antibodies raised against peptides worked predominantly in applications where the target protein was denatured (57% success in Western blot, 66% success in immunohistochemistry, although 37% of the antibodies thus generated did not work in any of these applications. In contrast, antibodies produced by DNA immunization performed well against both denatured and native targets with a high level of success: 93% success in Western blots, 100% success in immunohistochemistry, and 79% success in ELISA. Importantly, success in one assay method was not predictive of success in another. Immunization with full length protein consistently yielded the best results; however, this method is not typically available for new targets, due to the difficulty of generating full length protein. We conclude that DNA immunization strategies which are not encumbered by the limitations of efficacy (peptides or requirements for full length proteins can be quite successful, particularly when multiple constructs for each protein are used.

  2. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

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    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  3. Methods for Health Economic Evaluation of Vaccines and Immunization Decision Frameworks : A Consensus Framework from a European Vaccine Economics Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultsch, Bernhard; Damm, Oliver; Beutels, Philippe; Bilcke, Joke; Brueggenjuergen, Bernd; Gerber-Grote, Andreas; Greiner, Wolfgang; Hanquet, Germaine; Hutubessy, Raymond; Jit, Mark; Knol, Mirjam; von Kries, Ruediger; Kuhlmann, Alexander; Levy-Bruhl, Daniel; Perleth, Matthias; Postma, Maarten; Salo, Heini; Siebert, Uwe; Wasem, Jurgen; Wichmann, Ole

    Incremental cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses [health economic evaluations (HEEs)] of vaccines are routinely considered in decision making on immunization in various industrialized countries. While guidelines advocating more standardization of such HEEs (mainly for curative drugs) exist,

  4. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated effects in bancroftian filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, K; Sindhu, R K; Subrahmanyam, D; Hopper, K; Nelson, D S; Rao, C K

    1981-01-01

    The nature of immunoglobulin and effector cells involved in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated adhesion and cytotoxicity to Wuchereria bancrofti larvae has been investigated. Human neutrophils and eosinophils purified from peripheral blood by metrizamide gradients readily adhered to the parasites in presence of IgG fraction of sera from majority of elephantiasis cases with amicrofilaraemia and many of the endemic normals. The cells from normal, microfilariae and elephantiasis cases were equally effective inthe adhesion reaction. While the adhered neutrophils killed the larvae, eosinophils were ineffective in this respect. DEC treatment of elephantiasis cases results in a significant reduction in the ability of their sera to promote cellular adhesion. Images Figure 1 PMID:7019047

  5. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  6. Clinical evaluation of immune-promoting functions of the developed product (HemoHIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Ill Kyoo; Kwon, Soon Gil [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We performed a clinical study to evaluate the immune promotion and antioxidant effects of the developed product (HemoHIM) in healthy or subhealthy people. Volunteers with white blood cell numbers between 5000 and 10000/ul were recruited and the subjects were selected by appropriate inclusion and exclusion rules. The subjects were randomly assigned to 3 groups (HemoHIM 6g/day, HemoHIM 12g/day, Placebo). HemoHIM or placebo were adminstered for 2 months and the blood were collected and analyzed at 1 month and 2 month after the intake. The collected blood was analyzed for blood cell number, serum biochemical values (liver and kidney function), immunological activity of blood cells, antioxidant activity of blood plasma, and stress hormone level in the saliva. Finally the data of 88 subjects were analyzed for the immune promoting and antioxidant effects of HemoHIM. In results, no significant changes in blood cell numbers (white blood cell, lymphocyte, red blood cell) were observed in HemoHIM intake groups. However, NK cell activity were increased in HemoHIM intake groups and also IFN-gamma and IL-12, the biomarkers of immune cell functions, were increased in proportion to the dose and intake periode of HemoHIM. The antioxidant biomarker (TAS) was not significantly changed by HemoHIM intake. Besides, the serum biochemical analysis for liver and kidney functions, and the general medical examination showed the HemoHIM showed no side-effects, thus reconfirming its safety in humans. In conclusion, this study showed HemoHIM has a significant effects on the promotion of immune functions, while it has neither side-effects nor toxicity in humans. The results of this study may be utilized for the scientific data to acquire the Health Functional Food Certification of HemoHIM from Korea FDA

  7. Concurrent evaluation of general, immune, and genetic toxicity endpoints as part of an integrated testing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisler, Melissa R; Sura, Radhakrishna; Visconti, Nicolo R; Sosinski, Lindsay K; Murphy, Lynea A; LeBaron, Matthew J; Boverhof, Darrell R

    2014-08-01

    Integrated testing strategies involve the assessment of multiple endpoints within a single toxicity study and represent an important approach for reducing animal use and streamlining testing. The present study evaluated the ability to combine general, immune, and genetic toxicity endpoints into a single study. Specifically, this study evaluated the impact of sheep red blood cell (SRBC) immunization, as part of the T-cell dependent antibody response (TDAR) assay, on organ weights, micronuclei (MN) formation (bone marrow and peripheral blood), and the Comet assay response in the liver of female F344/DuCrl rats treated with cyclophosphamide (CP) a known immunosuppressive chemical and genotoxicant. For the TDAR assay, treatment with CP resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the antibody response with a suppression of greater than 95% at the high dose. Injection with SRBC had no impact on evaluated organ weights, histopathology, hematology, and clinical chemistry parameters. Analysis of MN formation in bone marrow and peripheral blood revealed a dose-dependent increase in response to CP treatment. Injection with SRBC had no impact on the level of MN in control animals and did not alter the dose response of CP. There was a slight increase in liver DNA damage in response to CP as measured by the Comet assay; however, injection with SRBCs did not alter this endpoint. Overall these data provide strong support for the concurrent assessment of general, immune, and genetic toxicology endpoints within a single study as part of an integrated testing strategy approach. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Inclusion of the value of herd immunity in economic evaluations of vaccines. A systematic review of methods used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymark, Liv Solvår; Sharma, T; Miller, A

    2017-01-01

    human-transmissible diseases from 1976 to 2015. Of these, 172 (28%) included herd immunity. While 4% of studies included herd immunity in 2001, 53% of those published in 2015 did this. Pneumococcal, human papilloma and rotavirus vaccines represented the majority of studies (63%) considering herd......OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this review were to identify vaccine economic evaluations that include herd immunity and describe the methodological approaches used. METHODS: We used Kim and Goldie's search strategy from a systematic review (1976-2007) of modelling approaches used in vaccine economic...... evaluations and additionally searched PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase for 2007-2015. Studies were classified according to modelling approach used. Methods for estimating herd immunity effects were described, in particular for the static models. RESULTS: We identified 625 economic evaluations of vaccines against...

  9. Comparative analysis of cellular immune responses and cytokine levels in sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype 1 and 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Pérez de Diego, A C; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Pleguezuelos, F J; Garfia, B; del Carmen, P; Pedrera, M

    2015-05-15

    Protective immunity in sheep with bluetongue virus (BTV) infection as well as the role of BTV-induced cytokines during immune response remains unclear. Understanding the basis immunological mechanisms in sheep experimentally infected with serotypes 1 and 8 (BTV-1 and -8) was the aim of this study. A time-course study was carried out in order to evaluate cell-mediated immune response and serum concentrations of cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-12, IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-10) with inflammatory and immunological functions. Depletion of T cell subsets (mainly CD4(+), γδ and CD25(+)) together with the absence of cytokines (IFNγ and IL-12) involved in the regulation of cell-mediated antiviral immunity at the first stage of the disease suggested that both BTV-1 and BTV-8 might impair host's capability against primary infections which would favor viral replication and spreading. However, cellular immune response and cytokines elicited an immune response in sheep that efficiently reduced viremia in the final stage of the experiment. Recovery of T cell subsets (CD4(+) and CD25(+)) together with a significant increase of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in both infected groups were observed in parallel with the decrease of viremia. Additionally, the recovery of CD4(+) T lymphocytes together with the significant increase of IL-4 serum levels at the final stage of the experiment might contribute to humoral immune response activation and neutralizing antibodies production against BTV previously described in the course of this experiment. These results suggested that both cellular and humoral immune response may contribute to protective immunity against BTV-1 and BTV-8 in sheep. The possible role played by IL-10 and CD25(+) cells in controlling inflammatory and immune response in the final stage of the experiment has also been suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Current and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability, and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  11. Developing a vaccination evaluation model to support evidence-based decision making on national immunization programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimman, Tjeerd G; Boot, Hein J; Berbers, Guy A M; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E; Ardine de Wit, G; de Melker, Hester E

    2006-05-29

    Among all public health provisions national immunization programs (NIPs) are beyond doubt one of the most effective in reducing mortality, morbidity, and costs associated with major infectious diseases. To maintain their success, NIPs have to modernize in response to many new and old demands regarding efficacy, safety, availability of new vaccines, emerging and evolving pathogens, waning immunity, altered epidemiological situations, and the public's trust in the program. In this paper we present an evaluation model in the form of a checklist that may help in collecting relevant scientific information that is necessary for evaluation and decision making when considering changes in a NIP. Such a checklist points to relevant information on the vaccine-preventable disease, the pathogen causing it, the vaccine, and the cost-effectiveness ratio of the vaccine. However, the final judgment on a potential change in the NIP cannot be based on a simple algorithm, as the relevant information reflects factors of a very different kind and magnitude, to which different value judgements may be added, and which may have certain degrees of uncertainty. Because any change in the NIP may be accompanied by more or less unforeseen changes in the vaccine's efficacy, evolutionary consequences, including the antigenic composition of the pathogen, and the vaccine's safety profile, an intensive surveillance program should accompany any NIP. Elements thereof include clinical-epidemiological surveillance, surveillance of vaccination coverage, immune surveillance, surveillance of microbial population dynamics, and surveillance of adverse events and safety issues. We emphasize that the decision to introduce a vaccine in the NIP should be taken as seriously, both scientifically and ethically, as the decision to withhold a vaccine from the NIP. In the latter case one might be responsible for vaccine-preventable disease and mortality.

  12. Dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide enhances neonatal immune responses in chickens during natural exposure to Eimeria spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Gerardo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control and eradication of intestinal infections caused by protozoa are important biomedical challenges worldwide. Prophylactic control of coccidiosis has been achieved with the use of anticoccidial drugs; however, the increase in anticoccidial resistance has raised concerns about the need for new alternatives for the control of coccidial infections. In fact, new strategies are needed to induce potent protective immune responses in neonatal individuals. Methods The effects of a dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide (yeast cell wall; YCW on the local, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and intestinal replication of coccidia were evaluated in a neonatal animal model during natural exposure to Eimeria spp. A total of 840 one-day-old chicks were distributed among four dietary regimens: A Control diet (no YCW plus anticoccidial vaccine; B Control diet plus coccidiostat; C YCW diet plus anticoccidial vaccination; and D YCW diet plus coccidiostat. Weight gain, feed consumption and immunological parameters were examined within the first seven weeks of life. Results Dietary supplementation of 0.05% of YCW increased local mucosal IgA secretions, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and reduced parasite excretion in feces. Conclusion Dietary supplementation of yeast cell wall in neonatal animals can enhance the immune response against coccidial infections. The present study reveals the potential of YCW as adjuvant for modulating mucosal immune responses.

  13. Immunological Evaluation of Two Local Isolates of Eimeria tenella Gametocytes against Coccidiosis in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Akhtar*, M. Irfan Anwar, Zafar Iqbal, Faqir Muhammad1, Mian Muhammad Awais, Ahsan ul Haq2 and Elzbieta Hiszczynska-Sawicka3

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two local isolates of Eimeria tenella gametocytes against coccidiosis were immunologically evaluated in chickens. Cell mediated immune response was detected by modified splenic cell migration inhibition assay (MSCMIA and data were expressed in terms of per cent migration index. No significant difference in per cent migration index was detected for the chickens immunized either with Vaccine-I (local isolate-I or with Vaccine-II (local isolate-II; however per cent migration index was comparatively lower in chickens immunized with Vaccine-II as compared to Vaccine-I; indicating a somewhat higher cell mediated immune (CMI response. Humoral immune response was monitored by ELISA in vaccinated and control chickens. Significantly elevated (P<0.05 antibody titer (IgG in chickens immunized with Vaccine-II as compared to Vaccine-I was detected. Significantly higher protection (67% in chickens immunized with Vaccine-II followed by vaccine-I (49% was recorded. Further, oocyst count was significantly lower (P<0.05 in chickens immunized with Vaccine-II as compared to those immunized with Vaccine-I. It was concluded that vaccinal strain (Vaccine-II contained additional protein of high molecular weight (49.23 kDa in its gametocytes provided cross protection and can be used to prepare commercial vaccine against coccidiosis in poultry.

  14. Loss of STAT3 in Lymphoma Relaxes NK Cell-Mediated Tumor Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Eva Maria [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Hoelzl, Maria Agnes [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Baeck, Julia [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Clinical Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Gürtel 18-20, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Schuster, Christian [Institute of Pharmacology, Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Waehringer Strasse 13A, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Reichholf, Brian [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria); Kern, Daniela; Aberger, Fritz [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg 5020 (Austria); Sexl, Veronika; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.hoelbl@vetmeduni.ac.at [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinaerplatz 1, Vienna 1210 (Austria)

    2014-01-27

    The transcription factors and proto-oncogenes STAT3 and STAT5 are highly activated in hematological malignancies and represent promising therapeutic targets. Whereas the importance of STAT5 as tumor promoter is beyond doubt, the role of STAT3 in hematological cancers is less well understood. Both, enforced as well as attenuated expression of STAT3 were reported in hematopoietic malignancies. Recent evidence implicates STAT3 as key player for tumor immune surveillance as it both mediates the production of and response to inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of STAT3 deletion in a BCR/ABL-induced lymphoma model, which is tightly controlled by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo. Upon STAT3 deletion tumor growth is significantly enhanced when compared to STAT3-expressing controls. The increased tumor size upon loss of STAT3 was accompanied by reduced NK cell infiltration and decreased levels of the cytokine IFN-γ and the chemokine RANTES. Upon transplantation into NK cell-deficient mice differences in lymphoma size were abolished indicating that STAT3 expression in the tumor cells controls NK cell-dependent tumor surveillance. Our findings indicate that STAT3 inhibition in lymphoma patients will impair NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance, which needs to be taken into account when testing STAT3 inhibitors in preclinical or clinical trials.

  15. Evaluation of blood T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in host cellular immunity in dogs with mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannopoulou, Maria; Anagnostou, Tilemachos; Margariti, Apostolia; Kostakis, Charalampos; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, Maria; Psalla, Dimitra; Savvas, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    Cancer-bearing patients are often immunosuppressed. In dogs with mammary or other cancers, various alterations in blood cell populations involved in host cellular immunity have been reported; among these cell populations some T-lymphocyte subsets play an important role against cancer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate any alterations in circulating T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in cellular immunity in bitches with mammary cancer, in comparison to age-matched healthy intact bitches. Twenty eight dogs with mammary cancer and 14 control dogs were included in this study. Twelve out of the 28 bitches had mammary cancer of clinical stage II and 16/28 of stage III. Histological examination revealed that 23/28 animals had carcinomas, 3/28 sarcomas and 2/28 carcinosarcomas. White blood cell, neutrophil and lymphocyte absolute numbers were measured by complete blood count. Furthermore, blood T-lymphocyte population (CD3(+)) and the subpopulations CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD5(low+) were assessed by flow cytometry. White blood cell and neutrophil but not lymphocyte absolute numbers were higher (P=0.003 and P=0.001, respectively) in cancer patients than controls. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the relative percentage of T-lymphocytes (CD3(+)) and of CD4(+), CD8(+) subpopulations was lower (the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio was higher), whereas the percentage of CD5(low+) T-cells was higher, in dogs with cancer compared to controls; however, a statistically significant difference was found only in the case of CD8(+) T-cells (P=0.014), whereas in the case of the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio the difference almost reached statistical significance (P=0.059). Based on these findings, it can be suggested that, although the absolute number of blood lymphocytes is unchanged, the relative percentages of T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in host cell-mediated immunity are altered, but only cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells are significantly suppressed, in dogs with mammary cancer of

  16. Differences in systemic adaptive immunity contribute to the 'frequent exacerbator' COPD phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, J.X.; Simons, S.O.; Pike, R.; Stauss, H.J.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Hurst, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some COPD patients are more susceptible to exacerbations than others. Mechanisms underlying these differences in susceptibility are not well understood. We hypothesized that altered cell mediated immune responses may underlie a propensity to suffer from frequent exacerbations in COPD.

  17. The perioperative immune/inflammatory insult in cancer surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Roxburgh, Campbell S; Horgan, Paul G; McMillan, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    Within the tumor microenvironment, non-specific innate immune responses can suppress adaptive cytotoxic immunity and hence promote tumor progression. Surgery and trauma provokes high-grade, non-specific inflammatory responses that suppress cell-mediated immunity. Here, the surgical resection of neoplastic lesions is considered in the context of antitumor immunity, providing the rationale for development of perioperative interventions to maintain the immunological competence of the host.

  18. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  19. Implications for registry-based vaccine effectiveness studies from an evaluation of an immunization registry: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Kimberly M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based electronic immunization registries create the possibility of using registry data to conduct vaccine effectiveness studies which could have methodological advantages over traditional observational studies. For study validity, the base population would have to be clearly defined and the immunization status of members of the population accurately recorded in the registry. We evaluated a city-wide immunization registry, focusing on its potential as a tool to study pertussis vaccine effectiveness, especially in adolescents. Methods We conducted two evaluations – one in sites that were active registry participants and one in sites that had implemented an electronic medical record with plans for future direct data transfer to the registry – of the ability to match patients' medical records to registry records and the accuracy of immunization records in the registry. For each site, records from current pediatric patients were chosen randomly. Data regarding pertussis-related immunizations, clinic usage, and demographic and identifying information were recorded; for 11–17-year-old subjects, information on MMR, hepatitis B, and varicella immunizations was also collected. Records were then matched, when possible, to registry records. For records with a registry match, immunization data were compared. Results Among 350 subjects from sites that were current registry users, 307 (87.7% matched a registry record. Discrepancies in pertussis-related data were common for up-to-date status (22.6%, number of immunizations (34.7%, dates (10.2%, and formulation (34.4%. Among 442 subjects from sites that planned direct electronic transfer of immunization data to the registry, 393 (88.9% would have matched a registry record; discrepancies occurred frequently in number of immunizations (11.9%, formulation (29.1%, manufacturer (94.4%, and lot number (95.1%. Inability to match and immunization discrepancies were both more common

  20. Effect of long-term fluticasone treatment on immune function in horses with heaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvillier, J; Felippe, M J B; Lunn, D P; Lavoie-Lamoureux, A; Leclère, M; Beauchamp, G; Lavoie, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Corticosteroids currently are the most effective pharmacological treatment available to control heaves in horses. Systemically administered corticosteroids have been shown to alter immune response in horses, humans, and other species. Aerosolized administration theoretically minimizes systemic adverse effects, but the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on immune function has not been evaluated in horses. To evaluate the effects of prolonged administration of inhaled fluticasone on the immune system of heaves-affected horses. Heaves-affected horses were treated with inhaled fluticasone (n = 5) for 11 months or received environmental modifications only (n = 5). Prospective analysis. Clinical parameters and CBC, lymphocyte subpopulations and function, and circulating neutrophil gene expression were sequentially measured. Primary and anamnestic immune responses also were evaluated by measuring antigen-specific antibodies in response to vaccination with bovine viral antigen and tetanus toxoid, respectively. No clinical adverse effects were observed and no differences in immune function were detected between treated and untreated horses. The treatment of heaves-affected horses with inhaled fluticasone at therapeutic dosages for 11 months has no significant detectable effect on innate and adaptive (both humoral and cell-mediated) immune parameters studied. These results suggest that prolonged administration of fluticasone would not compromise the systemic immune response to pathogens nor vaccination in adult horses. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  2. Cell-mediated immunity in recent-onset type 1 diabetic children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    T-cells recognize peptide epitopes displayed on the beta cells surface in the context of HLA class1 molecules. A population ... beta-cell autoantigens in patients of type 1 diabetes compared with their non-diabetic counterparts ..... with modified anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies in patients with T1DM. They too, documented in ...

  3. Stimulation by levamisole of cell-mediated immunity in weaned pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frane Božić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial crossbred pigs weaned at four weeks were allocated into three equal groups. The experimental group 1 was primed intramuscularly, and the experimental group 2 was primed per os, with levamisole at an immunostimulatory dose of 2.5mg/kg once daily, for three consecutive days, and controls received saline. Venous blood samples from all pigs were collected after the last levamisole or saline dose was given (day 0, and 35 days later (day 35 for flow cytometry analysis. The results obtained by immunophenotyping of isolated circulating lymphocytes on day 35 indicate that priming by levamisole of weaned pigs selectively recruited CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+, but not CD21+ cells in the systemic circulation.

  4. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown...

  5. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that g...

  6. Cell-mediated immunity and postpartum thyroid dysfunction: a possibility for the prediction of disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpens, J. L.; de Hann-Meulman, M.; Vader, H. L.; Pop, V. J.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Drexhage, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    Postpartum (pp) thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) is thought to be caused by an autoimmune (AI) destruction of thyroid follicles during the pp period. The chronic thyroid AI process [already present in pregnancy, as shown by the positivity for thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab)] becomes overt disease

  7. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Dilthey, Alexander; Su, Zhan; Freeman, Colin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Booth, David R.; Potter, Simon C.; Goris, An; Band, Gavin; Oturai, Annette Bang; Strange, Amy; Saarela, Janna; Bellenguez, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gillman, Matthew; Hemmer, Bernhard; Gwilliam, Rhian; Zipp, Frauke; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Martin, Roland; Leslie, Stephen; Hawkins, Stanley; Giannoulatou, Eleni; D’alfonso, Sandra; Blackburn, Hannah; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Liddle, Jennifer; Harbo, Hanne F.; Perez, Marc L.; Spurkland, Anne; Waller, Matthew J; Mycko, Marcin P.; Ricketts, Michelle; Comabella, Manuel; Hammond, Naomi; Kockum, Ingrid; McCann, Owen T.; Ban, Maria; Whittaker, Pamela; Kemppinen, Anu; Weston, Paul; Hawkins, Clive; Widaa, Sara; Zajicek, John; Dronov, Serge; Robertson, Neil; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Abraham, Roby; Alfredsson, Lars; Ardlie, Kristin; Aubin, Cristin; Baker, Amie; Baker, Katharine; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Bernstein, Allan; Berthele, Achim; Boggild, Mike; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brassat, David; Broadley, Simon A.; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Capra, Ruggero; Carroll, William M.; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Cepok, Sabine; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Clysters, Katleen; Comi, Giancarlo; Cossburn, Mark; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cox, Mathew B.; Cozen, Wendy; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Cross, Anne H.; Cusi, Daniele; Daly, Mark J.; Davis, Emma; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Debouverie, Marc; D’hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Dixon, Katherine; Dobosi, Rita; Dubois, Bénédicte; Ellinghaus, David; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Fontenille, Claire; Foote, Simon; Franke, Andre; Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Glessner, Joseph; Gomez, Refujia; Gout, Olivier; Graham, Colin; Grant, Struan F.A.; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Heard, Rob N.; Heath, Simon; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muna; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Ingram, Gillian; Ingram, Wendy; Islam, Talat; Jagodic, Maja; Kabesch, Michael; Kermode, Allan G.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Kim, Cecilia; Klopp, Norman; Koivisto, Keijo; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S.; Leone, Maurizio A.; Leppä, Virpi; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Lincoln, Robin R.; Link, Jenny; Liu, Jianjun; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Mack, Thomas; Marriott, Mark; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; McCauley, Jacob L.; Mentch, Frank; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mihalova, Tania; Montalban, Xavier; Mottershead, John; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Naldi, Paola; Ollier, William; Page, Alison; Palotie, Aarno; Pelletier, Jean; Piccio, Laura; Pickersgill, Trevor; Piehl, Fredrik; Pobywajlo, Susan; Quach, Hong L.; Ramsay, Patricia P.; Reunanen, Mauri; Reynolds, Richard; Rioux, John D.; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Roesner, Sabine; Rubio, Justin P.; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Salvetti, Marco; Salvi, Erika; Santaniello, Adam; Schaefer, Catherine A.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schulze, Christian; Scott, Rodney J.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selmaj, Krzysztof W.; Sexton, David; Shen, Ling; Simms-Acuna, Brigid; Skidmore, Sheila; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Smestad, Cathrine; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Stankovich, Jim; Strange, Richard C.; Sulonen, Anna-Maija; Sundqvist, Emilie; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Taddeo, Francesca; Taylor, Bruce; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Tienari, Pentti; Bramon, Elvira; Tourbah, Ayman; Brown, Matthew A.; Tronczynska, Ewa; Casas, Juan P.; Tubridy, Niall; Corvin, Aiden; Vickery, Jane; Jankowski, Janusz; Villoslada, Pablo; Markus, Hugh S.; Wang, Kai; Mathew, Christopher G.; Wason, James; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Plomin, Robert; Willoughby, Ernest; Rautanen, Anna; Winkelmann, Juliane; Wittig, Michael; Trembath, Richard C.; Yaouanq, Jacqueline; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Zhang, Haitao; Wood, Nicholas W.; Zuvich, Rebecca; Deloukas, Panos; Langford, Cordelia; Duncanson, Audrey; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Ivinson, Adrian J.; De Jager, Philip L.; Peltonen, Leena; Stewart, Graeme J.; Hafler, David A.; Hauser, Stephen L.; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter; Compston, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (OMIM 126200) is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability.1 Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals;2,3 and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk.4 Modestly powered Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS)5-10 have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects play a key role in disease susceptibility.11 Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the Class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly over-represented amongst those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T helper cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:21833088

  8. Characterization of the long-term immune response to vaccination against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Danish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Vibeke Thulstrup; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Thakur, Aneesh

    2012-01-01

    to characterize the long-term effect of whole-cell based vaccination against MAP on the immune response. A secondary objective was to evaluate whether immunodiagnosis of MAP and Mycobacterium bovis infections is affected by MAP vaccination.Two studies were performed: (1) A retrospective longitudinal study......Vaccination of cattle against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) provides partial protection by delayed shedding of MAP and reduced numbers of clinically affected animals. The duration of vaccine induced immune response is not known. The primary objective of this study was therefore...... of vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response and to evaluate a possible interference with the diagnosis of M. bovis infections.The results showed that 37% of samples from vaccinated animals and 5% of samples from non-vaccinated animals, respectively, were test positive in the milk antibody ELISA...

  9. Evaluation of the immune status against measles, mumps, and rubella in adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Koji; Yamazaki, Rie; Akahoshi, Yu; Nakano, Hirofumi; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Nakasone, Hideki; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that most patients lose immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) during long-term follow-up after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and immunizations against them have been investigated. However, these previous studies mainly targeted pediatric patients and information in adult patients is still insufficient. We evaluated the immunity to MMR in 45 adult allogeneic HSCT patients. None of these patients received vaccination after HSCT. The seropositive rates at six years after allogeneic HSCT were estimated to be less than 44% for measles, less than 10% for mumps, and less than 36% for rubella. Thirteen of the 16 female patients who were 16-39 years old were negative or equivocal for rubella. Patients who developed grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease tended to become seronegative for measles and rubella at two years after HSCT, although the difference was not statistically significant. This study showed that most adult patients lost immunity to MMR after allogeneic HSCT. Although we did not evaluate the safety and efficacy of vaccination in this study, most HSCT guidelines recommend vaccination for HSCT recipients without active chronic graft-versus-host disease or ongoing immunosuppressive therapy at 24 months after HSCT. Immunization against rubella is especially important for female patients of reproductive age. Further studies will be necessary to evaluate the effect of vaccination on the antibody response in adult allogeneic HSCT recipients.

  10. The role of cell-mediated cytolysis in antitumor responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Gravekamp (Claudia)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the work described in this thesis was (1) to study the effector cell types involved in antitumor responses; (2) to investigate whether of the immune system in cancer patient may occur at tumor-target or at lymphocyte-effector cell level; and (3) to explore new

  11. Induction of NKG2D ligands and subsequent enhancement of NK cell-mediated lysis of cancer cells by arsenic trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Young; Bae, Jae-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, Eun-Yup; Chung, Byung-Seon; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kang, Chi-Dug

    2008-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effector cells in immune responses to tumor cells and the activation of NK cells is mediated through specific interactions between activating receptors and their cognate ligands. Recently, it has been demonstrated that induction of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells by various stresses render them more sensitive to NK cell-mediated killing. Therefore, in this study, it was investigated whether arsenic trioxide (ATO) could up-regulate NKG2D ligands on tumor cells and increase the susceptibility of cancer cells against NK cells. ATO increased transcription of NKG2D ligands, predominantly ULBP1, in various cancer cell lines, such as K562 chronic myelogenous leukemic cells, NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemic cells, and MCF7 breast cancer cells, and subsequently the surface expression of NKG2D ligands. These results were followed by increased susceptibility of cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity after treatment with ATO. This increase in cytotoxicity was abolished by addition of a blocking NKG2D monoclonal antibody, indicating that the increased susceptibility of ATO-treated cancer cells to cytotoxicity of NK cells was mediated through up-regulation of NKG2D ligands. In addition, abrogation of heat shock proteins induction with KNK437 would sensitize the ATO-treated MCF-7 cells to NK cell-mediated killing. This study suggests that the immunomodulatory property of ATO would be an attractive strategy to improve the effectiveness of NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Ready-to-use colloidal adjuvant systems for intranasal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Jun; Shim, Aeri; Lee, Song Yi; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Kim, Seong Ryeol; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Adjuvant systems based on oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions (MEs) for vaccination via intranasal administration were prepared and evaluated. A ready-to-use blank ME system composed of mineral oil (oil), Labrasol (surfactant), Tween 80 (cosurfactant), and water was prepared and blended with antigen (Ag) solution prior to use. The o/w ME system developed exhibited nano-size droplets within the tested range of Ag concentrations and dilution factors. The maintenance of primary, secondary, and tertiary structural stability of ovalbumin (OVA) in ME, compared with OVA in solution, was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence intensity measurements, respectively. The uptake efficiency in RAW 264.7 cells, evaluated by flow cytometry, of OVA in the ME group was significantly higher than that of the OVA solution group (p<0.05). In an intranasal immunization study with OVA ME in mice, elevated adjuvant effects in terms of mucosal immunization and Th1-dominant cell-mediated immune responses were identified. Given the convenience of use (simply mixing with Ag solution prior to use) and the adjuvant effects after intranasal immunization, the new o/w ME may be a practical and efficient adjuvant system for intranasal vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effector cell mediated cytotoxicity measured by intracellular Granzyme B release in HIV infected subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activity is currently believed to be one of the key immunologic mechanisms responsible for the prevention or attenuation of HIV-1 infection. The induction of CD8+ T cell activation may also result in the production of soluble or non-classical lytic factors that are associated with protection from infection or slower disease progression. Traditionally, CD8+ CTL responses have been measured by the classic chromium release assay, monitoring the ability of T cells (Effector cells to lyse radiolabelled HLA – matched “target cells” that express the appropriate antigen-MHC complex. This method is not only labor intensive, semi quantitative assay at best, but also needs fresh, non-cryopreserved cells. Recently, cytokine specific ELISPOT assays or tetrameric MHC-I/ peptide complexes have utilized to directly quantitate circulating CD8+ effector cells, and these assays are more sensitive, quantitative and reproducible than the traditional CTL lysis assay and can also be performed on cryopreserved cells. Although these are reproducible assays for the assessment of soluble antiviral activity secreted by activated T cell populations they can be extremely expensive to perform. We have used FACS Analysis to measure Granzyme B release as a function of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This method helps quantitate the CTL activity and also identifies the phenotype of the cells elucidating this immune response. The method described not only monitors immunological response but also is also simple to perform, precise and extremely time efficient and is ideal for screening a large number of samples.

  14. Evaluation of Rubella Immunity in Women before Marriage and Pregnancy in Isfahan During 1997-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Allameh

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital Rubella syndrome is a public health problem in many developing countries which has not yet been sufficiently put into account. There is an urgent need for collecting appropriate data to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a potential global Rubella control program. This study was conducted to determine susceptibility to Rubella in women who are going to marry or consult for pregnancy. Methods: This study began in 1997 and ended in 2000. The study was analytic descriptive and prospective. Eight hundred and thirty eight women who referred for premarriage tests or counselling for conception were included. According to antibody levels, test results were reported as immune and non-immune (susceptible for every individual. Results: Among 838 cases, 253 women (30.1% were non-immune (susceptible and 585 women (69.9% were immune. The educational status of the two groups were recorded. Analysis of data showed that the higher the educational level (62.2% for University degree holder, the lower the immunity against Rubella would be (75.2% for unfinished high school individuals. Furthermore, immunity in the younger group was higher (73.9% in <20 years than in the older group(61% in >30 years. Conclusion: More than one third of pre marriage and pre conceptional women were non-immune (susceptible to Rubella, so health providers should be aware of Rubella prevention and control in childbearing age via screening and vaccination. Immunity against Rubella can vary over time and the socioeconomic status is believed to play an important role in the level of immunity. Keywords: Congenital Rubella Syndrome, Rubella immunity, Rubella non-immunity.

  15. Bronchoalveolar lavage is an ideal tool in evaluation of local immune response of pigs vaccinated with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiney George

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL technique in evaluating the local immune response of pig immunized with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine. Materials and Methods: Weaned piglets were immunized with formalin-inactivated P52 strain of P. multocida bacterin and evaluated for pulmonary immune response in BAL fluid. BAL was performed before vaccination and at different post vaccination days. The BAL fluid was assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study the development of P. multocida specific antibody isotypes and also evaluated for different cell populations using standard protocol. Results: The average recovery percentage of BAL fluid varies from 58.33 to 61.33 in vaccinated and control group of piglets. The BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs showed increase in antibody titer up to 60th days post vaccination (8.98±0.33, IgG being the predominant isotype reached maximum titer of 6.12±0.20 on 45th days post vaccination, followed by IgM and a meager concentration of IgA could be detected. An increased concentration of the lymphocyte population and induction of plasma cells was detected in the BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs. Conclusion: Though intranasal vaccination with P. multocida plain bacterin vaccine could not provoke a strong immune response, but is promising as lymphocyte population was increased and plasma cells were detected. BAL can be performed repeatedly up to 3/4 months of age in pigs to study pulmonary immune response without affecting their health.

  16. Immune Efficacy of a Genetically Engineered Vaccine against Lymphocystis Disease Virus: Analysis of Different Immunization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengrong Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the construction of a vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV using nucleic acid vaccination technology. A fragment of the major capsid protein encoding gene from an LCDV isolated from China (LCDV-cn was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-N2, yielding a recombinant plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV-cn0.6 kb. This plasmid was immediately expressed after liposomal transfer into the Japanese flounder embryo cell line. The recombinant plasmid was inoculated into Japanese flounder via two routes (intramuscular injection and hypodermic injection at three doses (0.1, 5, and 15 μg, and then T-lymphopoiesis in different tissues and antibodies raised against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicated that this recombinant plasmid induced unique humoral or cell-mediated immune responses depending on the inoculation route and conferred immune protection. Furthermore, the humoral immune responses and protective effects were significantly increased at higher vaccine doses via the two injection routes. Plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV0.6 kb is therefore a promising vaccine candidate against LCDV in Japanese flounder.

  17. Evaluation of immunomodulation by lactobacillus casei shirota: immune function, autoimmunity and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, A.; Ezendam, J.; Gremmer, E.R.; Klerk, de A.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Matthee, B.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Loveren, van H.

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are claimed to have immunomodulating effects. Stimulation as well as suppression of T helper (Th)1 mediated immune responses, have been described for various strains. Experiments involving Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) detected mainly enhancement of innate immune responses

  18. [Evaluation of indices of the immune status in children during ambulatory care of the entire population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, L A; Osin, A Ia

    1989-01-01

    Confidence intervals have been used to derive the reference values of certain immune status parameters in children. Mathematical analysis has helped define such values for every age group. These values permit singling out children with normal or mean values of these parameters and with deviations from the norm in respect of the immunity status.

  19. Evaluation of a DLA-79 allele associated with multiple immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Steven G; Buhrman, Greg; Chdid, Lhoucine; Olby, Natasha J; Olivry, Thierry; Guillaumin, Julien; O'Toole, Theresa; Goggs, Robert; Kennedy, Lorna J; Rose, Robert B; Meurs, Kathryn M

    2016-03-01

    Immune-mediated diseases are common and life-threatening disorders in dogs. Many canine immune-mediated diseases have strong breed predispositions and are believed to be inherited. However, the genetic mutations that cause these diseases are mostly unknown. As many immune-mediated diseases in humans share polymorphisms among a common set of genes, we conducted a candidate gene study of 15 of these genes across four immune-mediated diseases (immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA), and atopic dermatitis) in 195 affected and 206 unaffected dogs to assess whether causative or predictive polymorphisms might exist in similar genes in dogs. We demonstrate a strong association (Fisher's exact p = 0.0004 for allelic association, p = 0.0035 for genotypic association) between two polymorphic positions (10 bp apart) in exon 2 of one allele in DLA-79, DLA-79*001:02, and multiple immune-mediated diseases. The frequency of this allele was significantly higher in dogs with immune-mediated disease than in control dogs (0.21 vs. 0.12) and ranged from 0.28 in dogs with IMPA to 0.15 in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This allele has two non-synonymous substitutions (compared with the reference allele, DLA-79*001:01), resulting in F33L and N37D amino acid changes. These mutations occur in the peptide-binding pocket of the protein, and based upon our computational modeling studies, are likely to affect critical interactions with the peptide N-terminus. Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings more broadly and to determine the specific mechanism by which the identified variants alter canine immune system function.

  20. Evaluation of low immunization coverage among the Amish population in rural Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Christine; Nemecek, John; Wenger, Olivia

    2017-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Review included childhood immunizations among the 10 great public health achievements in the United States in the 20th century. Despite this acknowledged success, childhood immunization rates continue to be much lower in select populations. Amish communities have persistently lower immunization rates. Recent outbreaks in Amish communities include a 2014 measles outbreak in Ohio, resulting in 368 cases reported. A recent outbreak of pertussis in an Amish community in Ohio resulted in the death of a 6-week-old Amish baby. A study was designed to determine the knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and opinions of Amish parents relative to the immunization of Amish children. Data were collected through a questionnaire. Each potential participant was mailed a copy of a letter describing the proposed study. The questionnaire, a copy of the current immunization schedule, and a return stamped envelope were also included in the mailed packet. The study sample consisted of 84 Amish individuals who voluntarily filled out and returned questionnaires. The findings from the data analysis demonstrated that fear, especially concern over too many recommended immunizations and immunizations overwhelming the child's system, was the most frequent reported reasons for not having children immunized according to recommendations. Religious factors and access to care were not among reasons most reported. Designing an educational campaign for educating Amish parents on the risks and benefits of immunizations with focus on specific concerns may improve immunization rates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating the Efficiency of Physical and Cryptographic Security Solutions for Quantum Immune IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Suomalainen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The threat of quantum-computer-assisted cryptanalysis is forcing the security community to develop new types of security protocols. These solutions must be secure against classical and post-quantum cryptanalysis techniques as well as feasible for all kinds of devices, including energy-restricted Internet of Things (IoT devices. The quantum immunity can be implemented in the cryptographic layer, e.g., by using recent lattice-based key exchange algorithms NewHope or Frodo, or in the physical layer of wireless communication, by utilizing eavesdropping-resistant secrecy coding techniques. In this study, we explore and compare the feasibility and energy efficiency of selected cryptographic layer and physical layer approaches by applying an evaluation approach that is based on simulation and modeling. In particular, we consider NewHope and Frodo key exchange algorithms as well as novel physical layer secrecy coding approach that is based on polar codes. The results reveal that our proposed physical layer implementation is very competitive with respect to the cryptographic solutions, particularly in short-range wireless communication. We also observed that the total energy consumption is unequally divided between transmitting and receiving devices in all the studied approaches. This may be an advantage when designing security architectures for energy-restricted devices.

  2. Evaluation of P2X7 receptor expression in peripheral lymphocytes and immune profile from patients with indeterminate form of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Viviane do Carmo Gonçalves; Dos Santos, Joabel Tonellotto; Cabral, Fernanda Licker; Barbisan, Fernanda; Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Dias Carli, Luiz Felipe; de Avila Botton, Sonia; Dos Santos Jaques, Jeandre Augusto; Rosa Leal, Daniela Bitencourt

    2017-03-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, an intracellular protozoan which is a potent stimulator of cell-mediated immunity. In the indeterminate form of CD (IFCD) a modulation between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses establishes a host-parasite adaptation. It was previously demonstrated that purinergic ecto-enzymes regulates extracellular ATP and adenosine levels, influencing immune and inflammatory processes during IFCD. In inflammatory sites ATP, as well as its degradation product, adenosine, function as signaling molecules and immunoregulators through the activation of purinergic receptors. In this work, it was analyzed the gene and protein expression of P2X7 purinergic receptor in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoregulatory cytokines from IFCD patients. Gene and protein expression of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), and serum cytokines (IL-2, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) were unaltered. However, IFCD group showed significantly higher IL-4 and IL-6 levels while TNF-α was significantly decreased. These results indicate that imune profile of IFCD patients displays anti-inflammatory characteristics, consistent with the establishment of an immunomodulatory response. Further study about the molecular knowledge of P2X7R in IFCD is useful to clarify the participation of purinergic system in the regulatory mechanism which avoid the progression of CD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Innate immunity in vertebrates: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Romo, Mario; Pérez-Martínez, Dayana; Castillo Ferrer, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity is a semi-specific and widely distributed form of immunity, which represents the first line of defence against pathogens. This type of immunity is critical to maintain homeostasis and prevent microbe invasion, eliminating a great variety of pathogens and contributing with the activation of the adaptive immune response. The components of innate immunity include physical and chemical barriers, humoral and cell-mediated components, which are present in all jawed vertebrates. The understanding of innate defence mechanisms in non-mammalian vertebrates is the key to comprehend the general picture of vertebrate innate immunity and its evolutionary history. This is also essential for the identification of new molecules with applications in immunopharmacology and immunotherapy. In this review, we describe and discuss the main elements of vertebrate innate immunity, presenting core findings in this field and identifying areas that need further investigation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Molecular approaches for the evaluation of immune responses to zona pellucida (ZP) and development of second-generation ZP vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, B S; Kaul, G; Prasad, M; Skinner, S M

    2002-01-01

    It has long been established that there are major variations in both the immunogenicity and antigenicity of native zona pellucida (ZP) proteins. These differences appear to be more pronounced with respect to genetically engineered ZP proteins, which do not have native post-translational modifications (for example glycosylation and sulphation). As the number of animal species that are now included in population management programmes using native porcine zona pellucida (PZP) proteins expands, it is increasingly important to carry out studies to evaluate the immune response variations among different species as well as the individual variation within a species. In an attempt to compare these complex immune responses, we have evaluated antibodies from numerous species immunized with native, genetically engineered ZP and synthetic ZP peptides. Such an immunocontraceptive method could have great potential. These studies are critical not only for the development of predictable immune responses that result in permanent sterilization versus reversible contraceptive effects, but also for predicting which vaccinogens (native ZP protein versus genetically engineered ZP proteins) might have detrimental effects on animal and human populations.

  5. Evaluation of scales and measurement instruments in immune-mediated polyneuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmune-mediated neuropathies mainly include Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) (most common form: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AJDP)), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

  6. Immune Response Evaluation in Sheep Infected with Larvae of Wohlfahrtia Magnifica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marina Mot

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The sheep myiasis is a seriously debilitating disease that has the potential to generate a substantial stress to affected animals. All lesions severity and animals state of health can be retrieved in immunological parameters detection, because always results an immune response to challenge factors which intercede in their productive life. Today is important to find non-chemical methods of ectoparasites control, from natural resistance or vaccine induced resistance. The study was carried out to infected and uninfected sheep with larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica. From two groups of healthy and parasited sheep were been taken blood samples. From the group from sheep with myiasis were been detected the cutaneous lesions with W. magnifica maggots and these maggots were been collected. The mechanisms of unspecific immune defending were been studied through cellular effectors by leucogram. In leucogram appear quantitative differences between different categories of cells which take part in immune response, such as polymorphonuclears (neutrophiles, eozinophiles and mononuclears (limphocytes.  The immune specific answer were been detected through radial simple immunodiffusion test made with antigen prepared from W. magnifica maggots from the third stage of development, in the view of estimating the presence of an immune reaction through antibodies synthesis in infested sheep. In both studies were been detected immune responses of parasite hosts. All immunological studies may allow a sustainable ectoparasites control utilizing host resistance which seems to be attainable in the near future.

  7. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  8. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  9. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  10. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Endo, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Tsuritani, Mitsuhiro; Shimazu, Yukiko; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Saga, Kotaro; Tamai, Katsuto; Flake, Alan W; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model. Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6) mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP) transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP. Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37). Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5) mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay. In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  11. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to human leukocyte antigens in Brazilian renal transplant candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Keiko Saito

    Full Text Available Pre-transplant sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA is a risk factor for graft failure. Studies of the immunological profile related to anti-HLA antibodies in Brazilian renal transplant candidates are few. In this study, we evaluated the humoral immune response to HLA antigens in 269 renal transplant candidates, in Paraná State, Brazil. The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO combined with Luminex technology, using an SSO-LABType commercial kit (One Lambda, Inc., Canoga Park, CA, USA. The percentages of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA and the specificity of anti-HLA antibodies were determined using the LS1PRA and LS2PRA commercial kits (One Lambda, Inc.. The PRA-positive group consisted of 182 (67.7% patients, and the PRA-negative group of 87 (32.3% patients. The two groups differed significantly only with respect to gender. Females were the most sensitized. Among the 182 patients with PRA- positive, 62 (34.1% were positive for class I and negative for class II, 39 (21.4% were negative for class I and positive for class II, and 81 (44.5% were positive for both classes I and II. The HLA-A*02, A*24, A*01, B*44, B*35, B*15, DRB1*11, DRB1*04 and DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent. The specificities of anti-HLA antibodies were more frequent: A34, B57, Cw15, Cw16, DR51, DQ8 and DP14. This study documented the profile of anti-HLA antibodies in patients with chronic renal failure who were on waiting lists for an organ in Paraná, and found high sensitization to HLA antigens in the samples.

  12. Evaluation of immune responses in dogs to oral rabies vaccine under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Todd G; Millien, Max; Vos, Ad; Fracciterne, Franso A; Crowdis, Kelly; Chirodea, Cornelius; Medley, Alexandra; Chipman, Richard; Qin, Yunlong; Blanton, Jesse; Wallace, Ryan

    2017-10-17

    During the 20th century parenteral vaccination of dogs at central-point locations was the foundation of successful canine rabies elimination programs in numerous countries. However, countries that remain enzootic for canine rabies have lower infrastructural development compared to countries that have achieved elimination, which may make traditional vaccination methods less successful. Alternative vaccination methods for dogs must be considered, such as oral rabies vaccine (ORV). In 2016, a traditional mass dog vaccination campaign in Haiti was supplemented with ORV to improve vaccination coverage and to evaluate the use of ORV in dogs. Blisters containing live-attenuated, vaccine strain SPBNGAS-GAS were placed in intestine bait and distributed to dogs by hand. Serum was collected from 107 dogs, aged 3-12 months with no reported prior rabies vaccination, pre-vaccination and from 78/107 dogs (72.9%) 17 days post-vaccination. The rapid florescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) was used to detect neutralizing antibodies and an ELISA to detect rabies binding antibodies. Post-vaccination, 38/41 (92.7%) dogs that received parenteral vaccine had detectable antibody (RFFIT >0.05 IU/mL), compared to 16/27 (59.3%, p 40% blocking, p 0.05 IU/mL) were detected in 10/107 reportedly vaccine-naïve dogs (9.3%). Parenteral vaccination remains the most reliable method for ensuring adequate immune response in dogs, however ORV represents a viable strategy to supplement existing parental vaccination campaigns in hard-to-reach dog populations. The hand-out model reduces the risk of unintended contact with ORV through minimizing vaccine blisters left in the community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Immunological Evaluation of Formulated Drugs against Typhoid

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    Syed S. Haque

    2014-09-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Animal treated with L-arginine, ciprofloxacin and their combination showed increased cell mediated immune responses as evident by DTH response whereas groups (B+S shows decreases CMI responses.

  14. Toll-Like Receptors and Cytokines as Surrogate Biomarkers for Evaluating Vaginal Immune Response following Microbicide Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana M. Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical microbicides are intended for frequent use by women in reproductive age. Hence, it is essential to evaluate their impact on mucosal immune function in the vagina. In the present study, we evaluated nisin, a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide (AMP, for its efficacy as an intravaginal microbicide. Its effect on the vaginal immune function was determined by localizing Toll-like receptors (TLRs-3, 9 and cytokines (IL-4, 6 , 10 and TNF-α in the rabbit cervicovaginal epithelium following intravaginal administration of high dose of nisin gel for 14 consecutive days. The results revealed no alteration in the expression of TLRs and cytokines at both protein and mRNA levels. However, in SDS gel-treated group, the levels were significantly upregulated with the induction of NF-κB signalling cascade. Thus, TLRs and cytokines appear as sensitive indicators for screening immunotoxic potential of candidate microbicides.

  15. Combination approaches with immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Swart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, immune checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate anti-tumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune checkpoint blockade, aimed at increasing response-rates to the single treatments.

  16. Recombinant capripoxviruses expressing proteins of bluetongue virus: evaluation of immune responses and protection in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Aurélie; Albina, Emmanuel; Bréard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Promé, Sylvie; Grillet, Colette; Kwiatek, Olivier; Russo, Pierre; Thiéry, Richard; Zientara, Stephan; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine

    2007-09-17

    The development of recombinant capripoxviruses for protective immunization of ruminants against bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is described. Sheep (n=11) and goats (n=4) were immunized with BTV recombinant capripoxviruses (BTV-Cpox) individually expressing four different genes encoding two capsid proteins (VP2 and VP7) and two non-structural proteins (NS1, NS3) of BTV serotype 2 (BTV-2). Seroconversion was observed against NS3, VP7 and VP2 in both species and a lymphoproliferation specific to BTV antigens was also demonstrated in goats. Finally, partial protection of sheep challenged 3 weeks after BTV-Cpox administration with a virulent strain of BTV-2, was observed.

  17. Integrated Immune Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  18. Inula japonica extract inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reaction and mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Li, Ying; Jin, Meihua; Yang, Ju Hye; Li, Xian; Chao, Guang Hsuan; Park, Hyo-Hyun; Park, Young Na; Son, Jong Keun; Lee, Eunkyung; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2012-08-30

    The flowers of Inula japonica (Inulae Flos) have long been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of bronchitis, digestive disorders, and inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effects remain yet to be elucidated. The objectives of this study were 1) to assess the anti-allergic activity of the ethanol extract of flowers of Inula japonica extract (IFE) in vivo, 2) to investigate the mechanism of its action on mast cells in vitro, and 3) to identify its major phytochemical compositions. The anti-allergic activity of IFE was evaluated using mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in vitro and a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) animal model in vivo. The effects of IFE on mast cell activation were evaluated in terms of degranulation, eicosanoid generation, Ca(2+) influx, and immunoblotting of various signaling molecules. IFE inhibited degranulation and the generation of eicosanoids (PGD(2) and LTC(4)) in stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated BMMCs. Biochemical analysis of the SCF-mediated signaling pathways demonstrated that IFE inhibited the activation of multiple downstream signaling processes including mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), PLCγ1, and cPLA(2) pathways. When administered orally, IFE attenuated the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction in IgE-sensitized mice. Its major phytochemical composition included three sesquiterpenes, 1-O-acetylbritannilactone, britanin and tomentosin. This study suggests that IFE modulates eicosanoids generation and degranulation through the suppression of SCF-mediated signaling pathways that would be beneficial for the prevention of allergic inflammatory diseases. Anti-allergic activity of IFE may be in part attributed particularly to the presence of britanin and tomentosin as major components evidenced by a HPLC analysis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  20. μ-opioid Receptor-Mediated Alterations of Allergen-Induced Immune Responses of Bronchial Lymph Node Cells in a Murine Model of Stress Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Okuyama

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Restraint stress aggravated allergic airway inflammation in association with alterations in local immunity characterized by greater Th2-associated cytokine production and a reduced development of regulatory T cells, mediated by MORs.

  1. Smoldering myocarditis following immune checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Timothy G; Westbrook, Brian C; Johnson, Douglas B; Litovsky, Silvio H; Terry, Nina L; McKee, Svetlana B; Gertler, Alan S; Moslehi, Javid J; Conry, Robert M

    2017-11-21

    Severe myocarditis associated with electrical conduction abnormalities and occasionally heart failure has been well documented following treatment with immune checkpoint blockade with an estimated incidence of less than 1%. However, the incidence, early detection, and management of less severe immune-related myocarditis are unknown since most immunotherapy trials have not included routine cardiac monitoring. Herein, we provide the first description of subclinical or smoldering myocarditis with minimal signs and symptoms following immune checkpoint blockade with a single dose of ipilimumab and nivolumab. Our patient was diagnosed with immune checkpoint blockade-induced myocarditis based upon an acute rise in serum cardiac troponin I beginning 2 weeks after the initial dose of ipilimumab/nivolumab consistent with the reported median onset of clinical myocarditis at 17 days, as well as a lack of other causes despite extensive cardiac evaluation. The patient initially presented with intractable nausea with no known gastrointestinal etiology. High dose glucocorticoid therapy led to rapid resolution of nausea and a four-fold decrease in troponin I over 4 days. Serum troponin I spiked again following a steroid taper to 13 times the upper limit of normal with endomyocardial biopsy revealing collagen fibrosis and lymphocytic inflammation predominantly comprised of CD8+ T cells consistent with chronic smoldering myocarditis. Serum anti-striated muscle antibodies were also detected with no evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Serum cardiac troponin I levels as an indicator of ongoing myocyte damage gradually improved with chronic prednisone at 10 mg daily. Late addition of intravenous immunoglobulin was associated with rapid normalization of creatine kinase-myocardial band. This case demonstrates that subclinical, smoldering myocarditis may occur following immune checkpoint blockade, with evidence of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity responsive to corticosteroid therapy

  2. Sublethal Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Challenge Model in Pigs To Evaluate Protection following Immunization with a Soybean-Derived Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Laura C.; Seabolt, Brynn S.; Odle, Jack; Stahl, Chad H.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to develop a sustainable platform for manufacturing protein-based vaccine candidates, we expressed a triple mutant of staphylococcal enterotoxin B carrying the L45R, Y89A, and Y94A modifications in transgenic soybean seeds (soy-mSEB). Soy-mSEB possessed no detectable superantigen activity in vitro. We found that this soybean-derived, nontoxic mutant of SEB could be stably expressed, stored in seeds for extended periods at room temperature without degradation, and easily purified from contaminating soy proteins. Vaccination of pigs with purified soy-mSEB, or the identical triple mutant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli-mSEB), resulted in high antibody titers against the native toxin in immunized animals. In fact, titers were indistinguishable regardless of the immunogen used, demonstrating the equivalence of soy-mSEB and E. coli-mSEB vaccinations. Antisera from either immunized group were able to block native SEB superantigen activity in an in vitro neutralization assay. Similar results were obtained when immunized animals were challenged with a sublethal dose of native toxin. Significant reductions in toxin-induced serum cytokine levels were observed in soy-mSEB- and E. coli-mSEB-immunized pigs compared to control animals. The reductions in SEB-induced cytokine responses were similar regardless of the immunogen used for vaccination. Surprisingly, however, some clinical symptoms, such as prostration, lethargy, emesis, and/or diarrhea, were still observed in all immunized animals. These studies demonstrate the potential for soybean-derived proteins as a platform technology for sustainable vaccine manufacturing and the usefulness of a sublethal challenge model in pigs for evaluating the efficacy of potential SEB vaccine candidates. PMID:23114702

  3. Developing a vaccination evaluation model to support evidence-based decision making on national immunization programs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimman, Tjeerd G; Boot, Hein J; Berbers, Guy A M; Vermeer-de Bondt, Patricia E; Wit, G Ardine de; Melker, Hester E de

    2006-01-01

    Among all public health provisions national immunization programs (NIPs) are beyond doubt one of the most effective in reducing mortality, morbidity, and costs associated with major infectious diseases. To maintain their success, NIPs have to modernize in response to many new and old demands

  4. Evaluation of the hepatitis B antenatal screening and neonatal immunization program in Amsterdam, 1993-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, J. E.; Leentvaar-Kuijpers, A.; Baayen, D.; Dukers, H. T.; van Doornum, G. J.; van den Hoek, J. A.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    In the enhanced antenatal hepatitis B screening and neonatal immunization program in Amsterdam, 691 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive expectant mothers were reported in the period 1993-1998. The coverage of the screening was calculated at 97%. HBsAg-prevalence was high in women from Ghana

  5. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Andre; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Beckert, Annika; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Franta, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1). Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder) were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body). The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2), which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1) was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold). The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body) was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  6. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Baumann

    Full Text Available The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1. Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2, which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1 was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold. The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  7. Addressing immune tolerance issues in inflammatory bowel disease and adeno-associated virus based gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majowicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focusing on cell-mediated induction of immune tolerance and consists of two parts. The studies described in Part I report the development of strategies for possible treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). Induction of immune tolerance, in IBD mouse model, with the use of

  8. Effects of alcohol consumption on the allergen-specific immune response in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Roursgaard, Martin; Hersoug, Lars-Georg

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence that chronic alcohol consumption impairs the T-helper 1 (Th1) lymphocyte-regulated cell-mediated immune response possibly favoring a Th2 deviation of the immune response. Moreover, a few epidemiological studies have linked alcohol consumption to allergen-specific IgE sensitization....

  9. [Novel methodological approaches to the evaluation of the immune status in sickly children with ENT organ pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhamalutdinov, Iu A; Davudov, Kh Sh; Saidov, M Z; Nazhmudinov, I I; Matela, I I

    2009-01-01

    Principles of a novel methodology for the combined assessment of the immune function in sickly children with pathological changes in the organs of the otorhinolaringological system are expounded. The new approach includes investigations into local cellular and humoral immunity, evaluation of functional relationships and correlations between its parameters, interpretation of these findings, and the use of the characteristics thus obtained in the development of concrete recommendations for immunotropic and/or anti-inflammatory therapy. This approach is illustrated by examples of variations in the number of CD4(+) and CD20(+) cells and interplay between them. These findings taken together with the data on the levels of serum IgG, IgA, IgM, and percentage of immunohistochemical preparations positive for these immunoglobulins indicate that the proposed method may prove useful for the development of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of sickly children with ENT organ pathology following adenotomy and tonsilotomy.

  10. Colonic Immune Stimulation by Targeted Oral Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Mahesh Kathania; Mojgan Zadeh; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Robert M Roman; Bikash Sahay; Abbott, Jeffrey R.; Mansour Mohamadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, sufficient data exist to support the use of lactobacilli as candidates for the development of new oral targeted vaccines. To this end, we have previously shown that Lactobacillus gasseri expressing the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin genetically fused to a dendritic cell (DC)-binding peptide (DCpep) induced efficacious humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses against Bacillus anthracis Sterne challenge. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present ...

  11. Preliminary study on dental pulp stem cell-mediated pulp regeneration in canine immature permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Yuming; Jia, Weiqian; Yang, Jie; Ge, Lihong

    2013-02-01

    The health of human teeth depends on the integrity of the hard tissue and the activity of the pulp and periodontal tissues, which are responsible for nutritional supply. Without the nourishing of the pulp tissue, the possibility of tooth fracture can increase. In immature permanent teeth, root development may be influenced as well. This study explored the potential of using autologous dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to achieve pulp regeneration in a canine pulpless model. The establishment of the pulpless animal model involved pulp extirpation and root canal preparation of young permanent incisor teeth in beagles. Autologous DPSCs were obtained from extracted first molars and expanded ex vivo to obtain a larger number of cells. The biological characteristics of canine DPSCs (cDPSCs) were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo by using the same method as used in human DPSCs. cDPSCs were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, and root development was evaluated by radiographic and histologic analyses. cDPSCs with rapid proliferation, multiple differentiation capacity, and development potential were successfully isolated and identified both in vitro and in vivo. After they were transplanted into the pulpless root canal with Gelfoam as the scaffold, DPSCs were capable of generating pulp-like tissues containing blood vessels and dentin-like tissue. Thickening of the root canal wall was also observed. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to realize pulp regeneration in immature teeth. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity by lipids extracted from Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozemond, R. C.; Halperin, M.; Das, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated an augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity by various adjuvants including BCG. Inhibitory effects of BCG have also been reported, particularly for relatively high doses. Because the cell wall of Mycobacterium bovis BCG contains a high

  13. Evaluation of Immune Indices and Serum Vitamin D Content in Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipińska-Opałka, Agnieszka; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Lewicki, Sławomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Kalicki, Bolesław

    2017-01-01

    The influence of vitamin D on allergic diseases, including atopic dermatitis, is linked to the presence of vitamin D nuclear receptors in immune cells. The present study seeks to determine the possible relationship between serum vitamin D content and immune indices in children with atopic dermatitis. The study was conducted in 19 children with atopic dermatitis. The control consisted of 17 age-matched healthy children. A single significant finding was a distinctly lower number of serum regulatory T cells in atopic dermatitis compared with controls (p atopic dermatitis. In conclusion, the results point to a regulatory role of T cells in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, but fail to substantiate the influence of vitamin D on the course of the disease.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology in pregnancy: immune pathways linking stress with maternal health, adverse birth outcomes, and fetal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    It is well-established that psychological stress promotes immune dysregulation in nonpregnant humans and animals. Stress promotes inflammation, impairs antibody responses to vaccination, slows wound healing, and suppresses cell-mediated immune function. Importantly, the immune system changes substantially to support healthy pregnancy, with attenuation of inflammatory responses and impairment of cell-mediated immunity. This adaptation is postulated to protect the fetus from rejection by the maternal immune system. Thus, stress-induced immune dysregulation during pregnancy has unique implications for both maternal and fetal health, particularly preterm birth. However, very limited research has examined stress-immune relationships in pregnancy. The application of psychoneuroimmunology research models to the perinatal period holds great promise for elucidating biological pathways by which stress may affect adverse pregnancy outcomes, maternal health, and fetal development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparation of ESAT-6 Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Humoral Immunity after Intranasal Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Najminezhad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among several tuberculosis vaccine candidates for replacement of BCG, ESAT-6 protein has a special role. Since mycobacterium tuberculosis infection most often attacks the lungs, intranasal rout can be regarded as appropriate methods for tuberculosis vaccines and drug delivery. One of the appropriate systems for intranasal vaccine delivery is using biodegradable nanoparticles. Among biodegradable polymers, chitosan polymer has great features to increase the response of immunity system. This study aimed to investigate the specific humoral immune response of mice model after encapsulation of recombinant ESAT-6 antigen in chitosan nanoparticles. Methods: The chitosan nanoparticles containing ESAT-6 antigen were synthesized by ionic gelation. Nanoparticle properties including morphology, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation rates, and protein release were measured in vitro. The immunization was performed through the nose for 3 times on days 0 and 14 and 28. 2 weeks after last administration, blood samples were collected and specific IgG titers were measured by indirect ELISA. Results: The nanoparticles synthesized had appropriate properties. The mean size of resulting nanoparticles was 242.8 nm by excellent antigen loading capacity (95.23 %. The vitro release of antigen from nanoparticles after 200 hours was detected as 67.5%. The Level of IgG antibody showed significant increase in the group that had received chitosan nanoparticles containing ESAT-6 compared with other groups. Conclusion: ESAT-6 protein was encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles successfully. Administration of chitosan nanoparticles can be a suitable method for administration of humoral immunity antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through intranasal rout.

  16. Pathway-focused genetic evaluation of immune and inflammation related genes with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Mangalathu S; Dimulescu, Irina; Murray, Janna; Falkenberg, Virginia R; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests immune and inflammatory alterations are important in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This study was done to explore the association of functionally important genetic variants in inflammation and immune pathways with CFS. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated from 50 CFS and 121 non-fatigued (NF) control participants in a population-based study. Genotyping was performed with the Affymetrix Immune and Inflammation Chip that covers 11K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) following the manufacturer's protocol. Genotyping accuracy for specific genes was validated by pyrosequencing. Golden Helix SVS software was used for genetic analysis. SNP functional annotation was done using SPOT and GenomePipe programs. CFS was associated with 32 functionally important SNPs: 11 missense variants, 4 synonymous variants, 11 untranslated regulatory region (UTR) variants and 6 intronic variants. Some of these SNPs were in genes within pathways related to complement cascade (SERPINA5, CFB, CFH, MASP1 and C6), chemokines (CXCL16, CCR4, CCL27), cytokine signaling (IL18, IL17B, IL2RB), and toll-like receptor signaling (TIRAP, IRAK4). Of particular interest is association of CFS with two missense variants in genes of complement activation, rs4151667 (L9H) in CFB and rs1061170 (Y402H) in CFH. A 5' UTR polymorphism (rs11214105) in IL18 also associated with physical fatigue, body pain and score for CFS case defining symptoms. This study identified new associations of CFS with genetic variants in pathways including complement activation providing additional support for altered innate immune response in CFS. Additional studies are needed to validate the findings of this exploratory study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Evaluation of immune and stress status in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena): can hormones and mRNA expression levels serve as indicators to assess stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sabine; Lehnert, Kristina; Seibel, Henrike; Driver, Jörg; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Teilmann, Jonas; van Elk, Cornelius; Kristensen, Jakob; Everaarts, Eligius; Siebert, Ursula

    2013-07-17

    The harbour porpoise is exposed to increasing pressure caused by anthropogenic activities in its marine environment. Numerous offshore wind farms are planned or under construction in the North and Baltic Seas, which will increase underwater noise during both construction and operation. A better understanding of how anthropogenic impacts affect the behaviour, health, endocrinology, immunology and physiology of the animals is thus needed. The present study compares levels of stress hormones and mRNA expression of cytokines and acute-phase proteins in blood samples of harbour porpoises exposed to different levels of stress during handling, in rehabilitation or permanent human care.Free-ranging harbour porpoises, incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark, were compared to harbour porpoises in rehabilitation at SOS Dolfijn in Harderwijk, the Netherlands, and individuals permanently kept in human care in the Dolfinarium Harderwijk and Fjord & Belt Kerteminde, Denmark. Blood samples were investigated for catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, as well as for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, metanephrine and normetanephrine. mRNA expression levels of relevant cell mediators (cytokines IL-10 and TNFα, acute-phase proteins haptoglobin and C-reactive protein and the heat shock protein HSP70) were measured using real-time PCR. Biomarker expression levels varied between free-ranging animals and porpoises in human care. Hormone and cytokine ranges showed correlations to each other and to the health status of investigated harbour porpoises. Hormone concentrations were higher in free-ranging harbour porpoises than in animals in human care. Adrenaline can be used as a parameter for the initial reaction to acute stress situations; noradrenaline, dopamine, ACTH and cortisol are more likely indicators for the following minutes of acute stress. There is evidence for different correlations between production of normetanephrine, metanephrine, cortisol and

  18. Augmentation of humoral and cellular immunity in response to Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoids by supercritical carbon dioxide extracts of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashankar, Bindhya; Singh, Divya; Tanwar, Himanshi; Mishra, K P; Murthy, Swetha; Chanda, Sudipta; Mishra, Jigni; Tulswani, R; Misra, K; Singh, S B; Ganju, Lilly

    2017-03-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides L. commonly known as Seabuckthorn (SBT), a wild shrub of family Elaegnacea, has extensively used for treating various ailments like skin diseases, jaundice, asthma, lung troubles. SBT leaves have been reported to possess several pharmacological properties including immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and tissue regeneration etc. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the adjuvant property of supercritical carbon dioxide extracts (SCEs 300ET and 350ET) of SBT leaves in balb/c mice immunized with Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoids. The dynamic changes in the immune response were measured in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. We have seen the effect of SCEs on immunoglobulin subtypes and secondary immune response generation. In addition, the effect of SCEs on antigen specific cellular immunity was evaluated. Our results show that SCEs 300ET and 350ET significantly enhanced antibody titers in response to both TT and DT antigens. The secondary immune response generated was significantly increased in case of TT immunized animals. SCEs also enhanced cytokine levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α and IL-1β) and increased lymphoproliferation. Besides, both SCEs did not show any toxic effects. Therefore, the study suggests that SCEs are safe and have potent immunostimulatory activity and hence, seems to be a promising balanced Th1 and Th2 directing immunological adjuvant for various veterinary as well as human vaccines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Evaluation of the universal immunization program and challenges in coverage of migrant children in Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India

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    Latika Nath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies show that immunization among migrant children is poor. India has a dropout rate of 17.7% between Bacillus Calmette-Guιrin (BCG and measles (District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. Haridwar district had the highest dropout rate of 27.4% from BCG to diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT 3 (DLHS-3 in Uttarakhand. We evaluated the Universal Immunization Programme (UIP among migrants in Haridwar in two blocks. Materials and Methods: We developed input, process, and output indicators on infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery. A facility, session site and cross-sectional survey of 180 children were done and proportions for various indicators were estimated. We determined factors associated with not taking vaccination using multivariate analysis. Results: We surveyed 11 cold chain centers, 25 subcenters, 14 sessions, and interviewed 180 mothers. Dropouts were supposed to be tracked using vaccination card counterfoils and tracking registers. The dropout rate from BCG to DPT3 was 30%. Lack of knowledge (adjusted odds ratio (AOR 6.6,95% confidence interval (CI 2.6-16.7, mother not being decision maker (AOR 4.0,95%CI 1.7-9.2, lack of contact by Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA; AOR 3.0,95%CI 1.1-7.7, not being given four post-vaccination messages (AOR 7.7, 95% CI 2.9-20.2, and longer duration of stay in Haridwar (AOR 3.0 95% 1.9-7.6 were risk factors for nonimmunization. The reasons stated by mothers included lack of awareness of session site location (67% and belief that child should only be vaccinated in their resident district (43%. Conclusions: There was low immunization coverage among migrants within adequate supervision, poor cold chain maintenance, and improper tracking of dropouts. Mobile immunization teams, prelisting of migrant children, and change in incentives of ASHAs for child tracking were needed. A monitoring plan for sessions and cold chain needed enforcement.

  20. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle

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    S.B. Colavecchia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM, in combination with Freund’s incomplete adjuvant (FIA, was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05. Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis.

  1. Chediak-Higashi gene in humans. II. The selectivity of the defect in natural- killer and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M; Roder, J; Haliotis, T; Korec, S; Jett; Herberman, RB; Katz, P; Fauci, AS

    1980-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) of human tumor cells by FcR(+) nonadherent effector lymphocytes as well as natural killer (NK) activity was markedly impaired in Chediak-Steinbrinck-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS) patients. Compared to a more than 400-fold defect in NK activity in terms of lytic units, the abnormal ADCC response in C-HS donors was 24-fold below normal suggesting a partial but not complete overlap of lymphocytes or lytic mechanisms responsible for ADCC and NK. The ADCC mechanism against erythrocyte targets, however, was normal, thereby suggesting a qualitative difference in these two forms of ADCC. Other effector-cell functions against tumor-cell targets were normal as measured by (a) spontaneous cytolysis mediated by monocytes, (b) spontaneous cytostasis mediated by neutrophils, and (c) lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by neutrophils. Although one C-HS patient was low in lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by lymphocytes, the other C-HS patient was normal, thereby suggesting that cytolytic T function was not linked to the NK-ADCC defect. In addition, the proliferative response to T-dependent mitogens was also relatively normal. These results, combined with other studies showing normal cell-mediated and humoral immunity in these same patients, suggest that patients with C-HS have an immunodeficiency which is selective for NK and ADCC activity. PMID:6966316

  2. Chédiak-Higashi gene in humans. II. The selectivity of the defect in natural-killer and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M; Roder, J; Haliotis, T; Korec, S; Jett, J R; Herberman, R B; Katz, P; Fauci, A S

    1980-05-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) of human tumor cells by FcR(+) nonadherent effector lymphocytes as well as natural killer (NK) activity was markedly impaired in Chediak-Steinbrinck-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS) patients. Compared to a more than 400-fold defect in NK activity in terms of lytic units, the abnormal ADCC response in C-HS donors was 24-fold below normal suggesting a partial but not complete overlap of lymphocytes or lytic mechanisms responsible for ADCC and NK. The ADCC mechanism against erythrocyte targets, however, was normal, thereby suggesting a qualitative difference in these two forms of ADCC. Other effector-cell functions against tumor-cell targets were normal as measured by (a) spontaneous cytolysis mediated by monocytes, (b) spontaneous cytostasis mediated by neutrophils, and (c) lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by neutrophils. Although one C-HS patient was low in lectin-dependent cytolysis mediated by lymphocytes, the other C-HS patient was normal, thereby suggesting that cytolytic T function was not linked to the NK-ADCC defect. In addition, the proliferative response to T-dependent mitogens was also relatively normal. These results, combined with other studies showing normal cell-mediated and humoral immunity in these same patients, suggest that patients with C-HS have an immunodeficiency which is selective for NK and ADCC activity.

  3. Evaluation of kefir as a potential probiotic on growth performance, serum biochemistry and immune responses in broiler chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Toghyani, Majid; Mosavi, Seyed kazem; Modaresi, Mehrdad; Landy, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of milk or molasses kefir as a probiotic on growth performance, carcass traits, serum biochemistry and humoral immune responses in broiler chickens. A total of 192 one-d-old as hatched broiler chicks (Ross 308) were randomly allotted to 4 treatments, each with 4 replicate pens of 12 chicks. The following treatments were applied: 1) a basal diet (C) and normal drinking water, 2) 2% milk kefir in drinking water, 3) 2% molasses kefir in drinki...

  4. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovsca Janjatović, A; Lacković, G; Bozić, F; Kezić, D; Popović, M; Valpotić, H; Harapin, I; Pavicić, Z; Njari, B; Valpotić, I

    2010-02-11

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the most common type of porcine postweaning colibacillosis (PWC). Among fimbriae of porcine ETEC strains the best studied family of fimbriae are the members of F4 adhesins, existing in at least three variants: ab, ac, ad. Active immunization against porcine PWC is difficult due to: i) ETEC strains are only one of the essential predisposing factors, ii) the success of vaccinal antigen uptake depends on the presence of enterocyte receptors for F4 adhesins, iii) the intestinal immune system may react with tolerance or hypersensitivity to the same antigens depending on the dose and form of the vaccinal immunogen, and iv) kinetics of the specific immune responses may be different in the case of F4 (earlier) and the other ETEC adhesins, particularly F18 (later). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a live attenuated F4ac+ non-ETEC vaccine against porcine PWC by analyzing quantitative differences in the small intestinal lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets of immunized (with or without levamisole given as an adjuvant) vs control non-immunized pigs. Four week-old pigs were intragastrically immunized with a vaccine candidate F4ac+ non-ETEC strain 2407 at day 0, challenged 7 days later with a virulent F4ac+ strain ETEC 11-800/1/94, euthanatized at day 13 and sampled for immunohistology. Non-immunized pigs received saline at day 0 and were processed as the principals. Immuno-phenotypes of lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets were demonstrated within jejunal and ileal mucosa by immunohistochemical avidin-biotin complex method and corresponding morphometric data were analyzed using software program Lucia G for digital image analyses. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with surface molecules on porcine immune cells such as CD3, CD45RA, CD45RC, CD21 and SWC3 enabled clear insight into distribution patterns and amount of these cells within the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) examined. The numbers of jejunal and

  5. A passive cold storage device economic model to evaluate selected immunization location scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Bryan A; Nourollahi, Sevnaz; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T; Claypool, Erin G; Connor, Diana L; Schmitz, Michelle M; Rajgopal, Jayant; Wateska, Angela R; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-10-25

    The challenge of keeping vaccines cold at health posts given the unreliability of power sources in many low- and middle-income countries and the expense and maintenance requirements of solar refrigerators has motivated the development of passive cold storage devices (PCDs), containers that keep vaccines cold without using an active energy source. With different PCDs under development, manufacturers, policymakers and funders need guidance on how varying different PCD characteristics may affect the devices' cost and utility. We developed an economic spreadsheet model representing the lowest two levels of a typical Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccine supply chain: a district store, the immunization locations that the district store serves, and the transport vehicles that operate between the district store and the immunization locations. The model compares the use of three vaccine storage device options [(1) portable PCDs, (2) stationary PCDs, or (3) solar refrigerators] and allows the user to vary different device (e.g., size and cost) and scenario characteristics (e.g., catchment area population size and vaccine schedule). For a sample set of select scenarios and equipment specification, we found the portable PCD to generally be better suited to populations of 5,000 or less. The stationary PCD replenished once per month can be a robust design especially with a 35L capacity and a cost of $2,500 or less. The solar device was generally a reasonable alternative for most of the scenarios explored if the cost was $2,100 or less (including installation). No one device type dominated over all explored circumstances. Therefore, the best device may vary from country-to-country and location-to-location within a country. This study introduces a quantitative model to help guide PCD development. Although our selected set of explored scenarios and device designs was not exhaustive, future explorations can further alter model input values to represent additional scenarios

  6. Time-course evaluation and treatment of skin inflammatory immune response after ultraviolet B irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Mariela L; Ferrari, Alejandro; Weill, Federico S; Leoni, Juliana; Maglio, Daniel H Gonzalez

    2008-10-01

    Skin exposure to high doses of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation generates a severe inflammatory skin response. In the present study we aim to investigate, using in vitro and in vivo models, the time-course of the inflammatory skin immune response after an acute exposure to UVB irradiation, as well as its modulation by a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment, naproxen. PGE2 production and TNF-alpha levels increase in a post-irradiation time-dependent manner both in vivo and in vitro. This production pattern is also reflected in the iNOS expression levels in vivo and in the IL-6 levels in vitro. Changes observed in these mediators are correlated with histological alterations and dermal infiltration after the acute UVB irradiation. Naproxen treatment notably reduces PGE2 production and iNOS expression, reflecting the COX-NOS crosstalk already reported, although it causes an important increment in TNF-alpha synthesis in the epidermis of irradiated mice. Taken together, our data indicates that the epidermis is severely damaged by UVB radiation but then it is able to fully recover, and that the immune response is modulated by the NSAID treatment, since it is able to reduce the levels of some mediators as well as it can increase others.

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of Colloidal Silver on Immune Function: Antilymphoproliferative Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Franco-Molina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal silver (AgC is currently used by humans and it can be internalized through inhalation, injection, ingestion, and dermal contact. However, there is limited information about immunological activity; more investigations using colloidal silver are needed. In the present study, the effects of AgC (17.5 ng/mL on immunological parameters (proliferation and immunophenotyping using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and macrophages (phagocytosis and cytotoxicity on leukemia and lymphoma cancer cell lines (1.75 to 17.5 ng/mL were investigated. AgC was observed to significantly (p<0.05 decrease interleukin-2 (IL-2 production and proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A in PBMC without affecting its cell viability but with cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, and IL-17A cytokines production and CD3+, CD3−CD19+, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, and CD16+CD56+ PBMC phenotypes were not affected by AgC. The present study demonstrates that colloidal silver is harmless and nontoxic to the immune system cells and its ability to interfere with the immune response by decreasing cell proliferation when stimulated with mitogens demonstrated the antilymphoproliferative potential of AgC.

  8. Evaluation of renal function and immune system cells in elderly individuals from São Paulo City

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    Daniela Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Both renal function and immune system function decline with age. Although controversial, a significant number of studies have shown that the decline in kidney function is associated with the worsening of the immune system. These findings are reinforced by the increased susceptibility to infections and deficient immunization coverage after vaccination both in patients with chronic renal disease and in elderly individuals. Our objective was to evaluate a non-institutionalized elderly population from São Paulo City and correlate the estimated glomerular filtration rate with the percentage of lymphocytes in circulation. METHODS: A random population of 237 individuals (107 men and 130 women, ranging in age from 60 to 101 years, who were enrolled in the Health, Well-Being and Aging Study was evaluated for renal function (Modification on Diet in Renal Disease formula and lymphocyte percentage (flow cytometry. RESULTS: Aging was associated with a decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate in both male and female individuals. We did not identify a significant correlation between the estimated glomerular filtration rate and either the percentage of CD4, CD8, and B cells or CD4/CD8 ratio. The median percentage of CD8+ T cells was significantly lower in individuals with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m². CONCLUSIONS: In this study, no statistical correlation was found between the estimated glomerular filtration rate and either the lymphocyte phenotype (CD4+,CD8+, and CD19+ cells or the CD4/CD8 ratio in blood.

  9. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  10. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  11. Timing and delay in children vaccination; evaluation of expanded program of immunization in outskirt of Iranian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejali, Mehri; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Mokhtari, Mohsen; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Eshrati, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Most studies evaluated the vaccine coverage, but the time of vaccination is important as coverage. This study was conducted to evaluate the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) in outskirt of Iranian cities regarding to incidence of delay vaccination among children less than 4 years. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among children 24-47 months old, living in the suburbs of five metropolises of Iran. Totally, 3610 eligible children selected with proportioned cluster sampling method and data of vaccination card extracted after interview with child parents. Delayed incidence rate reported and predictive factors assessed by Chi square test and Multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 56.6% to 93.2% vaccines were administered out of time. Delayed vaccination incidence with more than one-week delay varies from 5.5% to 74.9% for polio at birth and MMR2 at 18 month, respectively. Mother's educational level and birth order were the most important predictors of delayed vaccination. Incidence of delayed vaccination was enlarged by increasing birth order and decreased in lower educated mothers. Incidence rate of delayed vaccination is more than expectation. Regarding to high coverage vaccines in Iran, heath officers and health policy makers should attempt for on-time vaccination beside of high immunization coverage especially in slum areas with more concentrated immigrants due to low literature and crowded families.

  12. The interleukin-15 system suppresses T cell-mediated autoimmunity by regulating negative selection and nT(H)17 cell homeostasis in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mau-Sheng; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yen, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Yein-Gei; Liou, Yae-Huei; Lin, Chih-Kung; Liao, Nan-Shih

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin-15 (IL-15) system is important for regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, however, its role in autoimmune disease remained unclear. Here we found that Il15(-/-) and Il15ra(-/-) mice spontaneously developed late-onset autoimmune phenotypes. CD4(+) T cells of the knockout mice showed elevated autoreactivity as demonstrated by the induction of lymphocyte infiltration in the lacrimal and salivary glands when transferred into nude mice. The antigen-presenting cells in the thymic medullary regions expressed IL-15 and IL-15Rα, whose deficiency resulted in insufficient negative selection and elevated number of natural IL-17A-producing CD4(+) thymocytes. These findings reveal previously unknown functions of the IL-15 system in thymocyte development, and thus a new layer of regulation in T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical role for the chemokine receptor CXCR6 in NK cell-mediated antigen-specific memory of haptens and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paust, Silke; Gill, Harvinder S; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Flynn, Michael P; Moseman, E Ashley; Senman, Balimkiz; Szczepanik, Marian; Telenti, Amalio; Askenase, Philip W; Compans, Richard W; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells mediate antigen-specific contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice deficient in T cells and B cells. We report here that hepatic NK cells, but not splenic or naive NK cells, also developed specific memory of vaccines containing antigens from influenza, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Adoptive transfer of virus-sensitized NK cells into naive recipient mice enhanced the survival of the mice after lethal challenge with the sensitizing virus but not after lethal challenge with a different virus. NK cell memory of haptens and viruses depended on CXCR6, a chemokine receptor on hepatic NK cells that was required for the persistence of memory NK cells but not for antigen recognition. Thus, hepatic NK cells can develop adaptive immunity to structurally diverse antigens, an activity that requires NK cell-expressed CXCR6.

  14. Toxicopathological evaluation in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) following repeated oral exposure to acephate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadaniya, Amit R; Kalariya, Vinay A; Joshi, Dilip V; Patel, Bakor J; Chaudhary, Sandhya; Patel, Hitesh B; Patel, Jignesh M; Patel, Urvesh D; Patel, Harshad B; Ghodasara, Sanjay N; Savsani, Harish H

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of exposure at different doses of acephate on hematology, blood biochemistry, oxidative stress and immune system of Wistar rats. The experiment was carried out on 40 Wistar rats, which were divided in four groups. Animals of the three treatment groups were given with different sublethal doses (1/40th, 1/20th, 1/10th of lethal dose 50 value) of acephate by oral gavage. The hematology, blood biochemistry, oxidative stress marker, humoral immune response and cell-mediated immunity were evaluated following acephate exposure. Significant alteration in hematological parameters was not observed following different doses of acephate; however, significant alteration in alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transferase, acetyl cholinesterase, lipid peroxidase and superoxide dismutase was observed in medium- and high-dose group animals. Nonsignificant decrease in antibody titer in animals exposed to high dose has been observed compared with animals of control group. However, significant alteration in cell-mediated immunity was not observed in animals treated with acephate at different doses. © The Author(s) 2012.

  15. Systematic evaluation of multiple immune markers reveals prognostic factors in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Reyes, Carolina; Wang, Li-Ping; McLane, Mike W; Feldman, Michael D; Tanyi, Janos L; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Several factors prognostic for survival have been identified including the presence of certain lymphocyte markers. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), particularly cytotoxic CD8+ TILs, have been shown to be most favorable for prognosis in ovarian cancer, although other immune cells including CD3+ T-cells, CD4+ T-cells, and B-cells have also demonstrated survival benefits. Although data for these markers exists, results are not uniform in the literature. Furthermore, other immunomodulatory protein markers that have been targeted in effective immunotherapies for other malignancies may prove to be favorable in ovarian cancer. Here, extensive immunohistochemical analysis was performed on a tissue microarray, containing 135 ovarian cancer cases obtained during tumor debulking detecting 15 key lymphocyte markers such as CD3, CD4, and CD20, as well as activation and immunomodulatory molecules such as TIA-1 and PD-L1. Samples were analyzed for expression of markers in tumor islets or stroma and expression was correlated with overall survival, histotype, stage, age, debulking grade, and response to chemotherapy. Our results confirm the presence of CD8+ and CD20+ TILs is positively correlated with overall survival, with further multivariate modeling replicating that prognostic benefit. Additional markers of significant prognostic importance, including TIA-1, CD103 and HLA Class-II were also revealed. Our results further support the vital role of cytotoxic T-cells in defense against ovarian cancer and reveals new questions as to the role of B-cells in tumor control as well as the potential benefits of immunotherapy involving other immune modulating molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Curdin; Flatz,

    2013-01-01

    Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogen...

  17. Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Toward Measles Virus-Infected Target Cells in Randomly Bred Syrian Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Natalie E.; O'Keefe, Beatrice; Hagens, Shirley J.; Diggs, Janice

    1982-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) toward measles virus-infected cells was studied by a 51Cr release assay with spleen cells from hamsters inoculated with measles virus (strain Lec) or control antigen and with spleen cells from normal hamsters. Spleen cells from measles virus-inoculated hamsters showed greater CMC toward infected than toward noninfected target cells (designated specific CMC). Specific CMC was maximal 7 days after virus inoculation and was declining by 9 to 10 days. Effector cel...

  18. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated with cell culture adapted classical swine fever vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal K. Nath

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine an efficient vaccination schedule on the basis of the humoral immune response of cell culture adapted live classical swine fever virus (CSFV vaccinated pigs and maternally derived antibody (MDA in piglets of vaccinated sows. Materials and Methods: A cell culture adapted live CSFV vaccine was subjected to different vaccination schedule in the present study. Serum samples were collected before vaccination (day 0 and 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 180, 194, 208, 270, 284 and 298 days after vaccination and were analyzed by liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MDA titre was detected in the serum of piglets at 21 and 42 days of age after farrowing of the vaccinated sows. Results: On 28 days after vaccination, serum samples of 83.33% vaccinated pigs showed the desirable level of antibody titer (log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution, whereas 100% animals showed log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution after 42 days of vaccination. Animals received a booster dose at 28 and 180 days post vaccination showed stable high-level antibody titre till the end of the study period. Further, piglets born from pigs vaccinated 1 month after conception showed the desirable level of MDA up to 42 days of age. Conclusion: CSF causes major losses in pig industry. Lapinised vaccines against CSFV are used routinely in endemic countries. In the present study, a cell culture adapted live attenuated vaccine has been evaluated. Based on the level of humoral immune response of vaccinated pigs and MDA titer in piglets born from immunized sows, it may be concluded that the more effective vaccination schedule for prevention of CSF is primary vaccination at 2 months of age followed by booster vaccination at 28 and 180 days post primary vaccination and at 1 month of gestation.

  20. Evaluation of anti-norovirus IgY from egg yolk of chickens immunized with norovirus P particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Chun; Wang, Yun-Yun; Zhang, Xu-Fu; Tan, Ming; Xia, Ming; Wu, Xian-Bo; Jiang, Xi; Nie, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are a leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis affecting millions of people worldwide. Understanding of NoV remains limited due to the lack of a cell culture system and small animal models. Currently, there are no effective vaccines or antivirals against NoVs. In this study, an approach for large-scale production of anti-NoV antibodies for use as a potential treatment for NoV disease using passive immunization was evaluated. NoV-specific immunoglobulins (IgYs) were produced by immunizing chickens with NoV P particles. The birds continuously produced high titers of antibodies in their eggs for at least 3months, in which NoV-specific antibody levels reached 4.7-9.2mg/egg yolk. The egg yolk antibodies strongly reacted with NoV P particles by both ELISA and Western blot and blocked NoV virus-like particle (VLP) and P particle binding to the histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors with a BT(50) of about 1:800. The blocking activity of the chicken IgY remained after an incubation at 70°C for 30min or treatments at pH 4-9 for 3h. These data suggested that chicken IgY could be a practical strategy for large-scale production of anti-NoV antibodies for potential use as passive immunization against NoV infection, as well as for diagnostic purposes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetically attenuated, P36p-deficient malarial sporozoites induce protective immunity and apoptosis of infected liver cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.R. van; Douradinha, B.G.; Franke-Fayard, B.; Heussler, V.; Dooren, M.W. van; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mota, M.M.; Waters, A.P.; Janse, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization with Plasmodium sporozoites that have been attenuated by gamma-irradiation or specific genetic modification can induce protective immunity against subsequent malaria infection. The mechanism of protection is only known for radiation-attenuated sporozoites, involving cell-mediated and

  2. Immune evaluation and vaccine responses in Down syndrome: evidence of immunodeficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Avni Y; Abraham, Roshini S; Snyder, Melissa R; Boyce, Thomas G

    2011-07-12

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) appear to be at a greater risk for serious infections, but it is unclear whether this is due to anatomic variations or intrinsic immune defects. We assessed a cohort of pediatric subjects with DS to determine if immunological abnormalities indeed account for the excess infections. We performed quantitative assessment of T-independent (type 2 - pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) and T-dependent Ab responses (with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine) along with numerical quantitation of lymphocyte subpopulations and thymic output in a random population sample of children with DS (cases) along with family-matched sibling or community controls. Median serum IgG levels were significantly higher in cases (1090 mg/dL) as compared with controls (808 mg/dL, P=0.02). Cases had significantly lower median CD4 T cell counts than the controls (636 cells/μL, P=0.01). Cases had reduced CD19 B cell counts and CD19% than the controls (P=0.009 and 0.006 respectively). Cases also showed decreased total memory (CD19+CD27+, P=0.002) and class-switched memory (CD19+CD27+IgM-IgD-, P=0.004) B cells. The median CD4 recent thymic emigrant (RTE) in females and males cases was lower than controls (P=0.007 and 0.07 respectively). Cases had a lower median T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) count of 2556 as compared to the controls count of 5216, P<0.006 although both the cases and controls were within the established reference range. There were no differences in the percentage of cases and controls who responded to inactivated influenza vaccine, but the response to polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine was suboptimal in cases. Our study suggests that there are subtle abnormalities in both humoral and cellular arms of the immune response in children with DS as compared to the control subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The exonuclease domain of Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in antigen-presenting-cell-mediated NK cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a recombinant Lassa virus in

  4. To B or not to B cells-mediate a healthy start to life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T G; Ward, C M; Morris, J M

    2013-02-01

    Maternal immune responses during pregnancy are critical in programming the future health of a newborn. The maternal immune system is required to accommodate fetal immune tolerance as well as to provide a protective defence against infections for the immunocompromised mother and her baby during gestation and lactation. Natural immunity and antibody production by maternal B cells play a significant role in providing such immunoprotection. However, aberrations in the B cell compartment as a consequence of maternal autoimmunity can pose serious risks to both the mother and her baby. Despite their potential implication in shaping pregnancy outcomes, the role of B cells in human pregnancy has been poorly studied. This review focuses on the role of B cells and the implications of B cell depletion therapy in pregnancy. It highlights the evidence of an association between aberrant B cell compartment and obstetric conditions. It also alludes to the potential mechanisms that amplify these B cell aberrances and thereby contribute to exacerbation of some maternal autoimmune conditions and poor neonatal outcomes. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests strongly that maternal autoantibodies contribute directly to the pathologies of obstetric and neonatal conditions that have significant implications for the lifelong health of a newborn. The evidence for clinical benefit and safety of B cell depletion therapies in pregnancy is reviewed, and an argument is mounted for further clinical evaluation of B cell-targeted therapies in high-risk pregnancy, with an emphasis on improving neonatal outcomes and prevention of neonatal conditions such as congenital heart block and fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Building an immune-mediated coagulopathy consensus: early recognition and evaluation to enhance post-surgical patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils Stacy A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topical hemostats, fibrin sealants, and surgical adhesives are regularly used in a variety of surgical procedures involving multiple disciplines. Generally, these adjuncts to surgical hemostasis are valuable means for improving wound visualization, reducing blood loss or adding tissue adherence; however, some of these agents are responsible for under-recognized adverse reactions and outcomes. Bovine thrombin, for example, is a topical hemostat with a long history of clinical application that is widely used alone or in combination with other hemostatic agents. Hematologists and coagulation experts are aware that these agents can lead to development of an immune-mediated coagulopathy (IMC. A paucity of data on the incidence of IMC contributes to under-recognition and leaves many surgeons unaware that this clinical entity, originating from normal immune responses to foreign antigen exposure, requires enhanced post-operative vigilance and judicious clinical judgment to achieve best outcomes. Postoperative bleeding may result from issues such as loosened ties or clips or the occurrence of a coagulopathy due to hemodilution, vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC or post-transfusion, post-shock coagulopathic states. Other causes, such as liver disease, may be ruled out by a careful patient history and common pre-operative liver function tests. Less common are coagulopathies secondary to pathologic immune responses. Such coagulopathies include those that may result from inherent patient problems such as patients with an immune dysfunction related to systemic lupus erythrematosus (SLE or lymphoma that can invoke antibodies against native coagulation factors. Medical interventions may also provoke antibody formation in the form of self-directed anti-coagulation factor antibodies, that result in problematic bleeding; it is these iatrogenic post-operative coagulopathies, including those associated with bovine thrombin

  6. Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) venom toxins: Evaluation of biological conservation by immune cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Daniela Regina; Souza, Fernanda Nunes; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Morgon, Adriano Marcelo; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Boia-Ferreira, Mariana; Sade, Youssef Bacila; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Gremski, Waldemiro; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    Loxosceles spiders are responsible for serious human envenomations worldwide. The collection of symptoms found in victims after accidents is called loxoscelism and is characterized by two clinical conditions: cutaneous loxoscelism and systemic loxocelism. The only specific treatment is serum therapy, in which an antiserum produced with Loxosceles venom is administered to the victims after spider accidents. Our aim was to improve our knowledge, regarding the immunological relationship among toxins from the most epidemiologic important species in Brazil (Loxosceles intermedia, Loxosceles gaucho and Loxosceles laeta). Immunoassays using spider venoms and L. intermedia recombinant toxins were performed and their cross-reactivity assessed. The biological conservation of the main Loxosceles toxins (Phospholipases-D, Astacin-like metalloproteases, Hyaluronidase, ICK-insecticide peptide and TCTP-histamine releasing factor) were investigated. An in silico analysis of the putative epitopes was performed and is discussed on the basis of the experimental results. Our data is an immunological investigation in light of biological conservation throughout the Loxosceles genus. The results bring out new insights on brown spider venom toxins for study, diagnosis and treatment of loxoscelism and putative biotechnological applications concerning immune conserved features in the toxins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, immune compatibility and antibacterial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Składanowski, M; Golinska, P; Rudnicka, K; Dahm, H; Rai, M

    2016-12-01

    The study was focused on assessment of antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and immune compatibility of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized from Streptomyces sp. NH28 strain. Nanoparticles were biosynthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis system and zeta potential. Antibacterial activity was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; minimal inhibitory concentration was recorded. Cytotoxicity was estimated using L929 mouse fibroblasts via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Biocompatibility of AgNPs was performed using THP1-XBlue™ cells. Biogenic AgNPs presented high antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs against bacterial cells was found to be in range of 1.25-10 μg/mL. Silver nanoparticles did not show any harmful interaction to mouse fibroblast cell line, and no activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) cells was observed at concentration below 10 µg/mL. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value was established at 64.5 μg/mL. Biological synthesis of silver can be used as an effective system for formation of metal nanoparticles. Biosynthesized AgNPs can be used as an antibacterial agent, which can be safe for eukaryotic cells.

  8. Impact of maternally derived immunity on piglets' immune response and protection against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) after vaccination against PCV2 at different age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Paolo; Saleri, Roberta; Ferrarini, Giulia; De Angelis, Elena; Cavalli, Valeria; Benetti, Michele; Ferrari, Luca; Canelli, Elena; Bonilauri, Paolo; Arioli, Elena; Caleffi, Antonio; Nathues, Heiko; Borghetti, Paolo

    2016-05-11

    This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical protection, the level of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) viremia and the immune response (antibodies and IFN-γ secreting cells (SC)) in piglets derived from PCV2 vaccinated sows and themselves vaccinated against PCV2 at different age, namely at 4, 6 and 8 weeks. The cohort study has been carried out over three subsequent production cycles (replicates). At the start/enrolment, 46 gilts were considered at first mating, bled and vaccinated. At the first, second and third farrowing, dams were bled and re-vaccinated at the subsequent mating after weaning piglets. Overall 400 piglets at each farrowing (first, second and third) were randomly allocated in three different groups (100 piglets/group) based on the timing of vaccination (4, 6 or 8 weeks of age). A fourth group was kept non-vaccinated (controls). Piglets were vaccinated intramuscularly with one dose (2 mL) of a commercial PCV2a-based subunit vaccine (Porcilis® PCV). Twenty animals per group were bled at weaning and from vaccination to slaughter every 4 weeks for the detection of PCV2 viremia, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Clinical signs and individual treatments (morbidity), mortality, and body weight of all piglets were recorded. All vaccination schemes (4, 6 and 8 weeks of age) were able to induce an antibody response and IFN-γ SC. The highest clinical and virological protection sustained by immune reactivity was observed in pigs vaccinated at 6 weeks of age. Overall, repeated PCV2 vaccination in sows at mating and the subsequent higher levels of maternally derived antibodies did not significantly interfere with the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in their piglets after vaccination. The combination of vaccination in sows at mating and in piglets at 6 weeks of age was more effective for controlling PCV2 natural infection, than other vaccination schemas, thus sustaining that some interference of MDA with the induction of an

  9. Effect of dietary mannanoligosaccharide supplementation on nutrient digestibility, hindgut fermentation, immune response and antioxidant indices in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Mahesh M; Pattanaik, Ashok K; Sinha, Dharmendra K; Goswami, Tapas K; Sharma, Kusumakar

    2017-01-01

    Use of prebiotics in companion animal nutrition is often considered advantageous over probiotics because of the ease of handling, ability to withstand processing and storage etc. While most of the studies on prebiotic use in dogs have been done with processed food as basal diet, the response in relation to homemade diet feeding is not very well explored. The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary mannanoligosaccharide (MOS) supplementation on nutrient digestibility, hindgut fermentation, immune response and antioxidant indices in dogs. Ten Spitz pups were divided into two groups: control (CON) with no supplementation, and experimental (MOS) wherein the basal diet was supplemented with MOS at 15 g/kg diet. All dogs were fed on a home-prepared diet for a period of 150 days. The study protocol included a digestion trial, periodic blood collection and analysis for lipid profile and erythrocytic antioxidants. Immune response of the animals was assessed towards the end of the feeding period. Results revealed no significant (P > 0.05) variations in palatability score, intake and apparent digestibility of nutrients between the groups. Faecal score, faeces voided, faecal pH, concentrations of ammonia, lactate and short-chain fatty acids were comparable (P > 0.05) between the two groups. Cell-mediated immune response, assessed as delayed-type of hypersensitivity response, was significantly higher (P sub-populations CD4+ and ratio of CD4+:CD8+ were also significantly (P  0.05) in both the groups. Supplementation of MOS lowered (P  0.05) between the two groups. The results indicated that supplementation of MOS at the rate of 15 g/kg in the diet of dog augmented the cell-mediated immune response and serum lipid profile without any influences on digestibility of nutrients, hindgut fermentation and antioxidants indices.

  10. Evaluation of approaches to identify the targets of cellular immunity on a proteome-wide scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Cardoso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccine development against malaria and other complex diseases remains a challenge for the scientific community. The recent elucidation of the genome, proteome and transcriptome of many of these complex pathogens provides the basis for rational vaccine design by identifying, on a proteome-wide scale, novel target antigens that are recognized by T cells and antibodies from exposed individuals. However, there is currently no algorithm to effectively identify important target antigens from genome sequence data; this is especially challenging for T cell targets. Furthermore, for some of these pathogens, such as Plasmodium, protein expression using conventional platforms has been problematic but cell-free in vitro transcription translation (IVTT strategies have recently proved successful. Herein, we report a novel approach for proteome-wide scale identification of the antigenic targets of T cell responses using IVTT products. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments using IVTT proteins either unpurified, absorbed to carboxylated polybeads, or affinity purified through nickel resin or magnetic beads. In vitro studies in humans using CMV, EBV, and Influenza A virus proteins showed antigen-specific cytokine production in ELIspot and Cytometric Bead Array assays with cells stimulated with purified or unpurified IVTT antigens. In vitro and in vivo studies in mice immunized with the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite DNA vaccine with or without IVTT protein boost showed antigen-specific cytokine production using purified IVTT antigens only. Overall, the nickel resin method of IVTT antigen purification proved optimal in both human and murine systems. CONCLUSIONS: This work provides proof of concept for the potential of high-throughput approaches to identify T cell targets of complex parasitic, viral or bacterial pathogens from genomic sequence data, for rational vaccine development against emerging and re

  11. Comparative efficacy of piperine and curcumin in deltamethrin induced splenic apoptosis and altered immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Sharma, Neelima

    2015-03-01

    Deltamethrin (DLM) being a potent immunotoxicant affects both humoral and cell mediated immunity. Thus, for the amelioration of its effects, two different bioactive herbal extracts piperine and curcumin are evaluated and their efficacy has been compared. The docking results demonstrated that curcumin has good binding affinity towards CD28 and CD45 receptors as compared to piperine but in vitro studies revealed that piperine is more effective. DLM induced apoptotic markers such as oxidative stress and caspase 3 have been attenuated more significantly by piperine as compared to curcumin. Phenotypic and cytokine changes have also been mitigated best with piperine. Thus, these findings strongly demonstrate that piperine displays the more anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and chemo-protective properties in the DLM induced splenic apoptosis as compared to curcumin. So, piperine can be considered the drug of choice under immunocompromised conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the Effects of Stressors on Immune Function during Simulated Dives in Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    evaluated; blood will also be used to archive white blood cells for subsequent lymphocyte proliferation and IL2 receptor assays. Plasma...proliferation and T cell expression of the IL2 receptor. In addition, plasma catecholamines will be measured by high performance liquid chromatography and...neutrophil phagocytosis, neutrophil expression of CD11b, lymphocyte proliferation and T cell expression of the IL2 receptor. For dive profiles three

  13. Evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammation and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the evaluation value of intestinal flora detection for intestinal mucosal inflammatory response and immune response in patients with ulcerative colitis. Methods: The patients who were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in Zigong Fifth People’s Hospital between March 2015 and February 2017 were selected as the UC group, and those who were diagnosed with colonic polyps were selected as the control group. Fresh excreta were collected to detect the number of intestinal flora, and the diseased intestinal mucosa tissue was collected to detect the expression of inflammatory response molecules and immune cell transcription factors. Results: enterococcus contents in intestinal tract and TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC group were significantly higher than those of control group while bifidobacteria contents in intestinal tract and SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade II and grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with normal flora and grade I flora disturbance; TLR4, NF-kB, TNF-α, HMGB-1, T-bet and RORC mRNA expression levels in intestinal mucosa of UC patients with grade III flora disturbance were significantly higher than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance while SOCS2, SOCS3, Foxp3 and GATA-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly lower than those of UC patients with grade II flora disturbance. Conclusion: The intestinal flora disturbance in patients with ulcerative colitis can result in inflammatory response activation and immune response disorder.

  14. Strengthening national decision-making on immunization by building capacity for economic evaluation: Implementing ProVac in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Julia; Hoestlandt, Céline; D Clark, Andrew; Baxter, Louise; Felix Garcia, Ana Gabriela; Mounaud, Bérénice; Mosina, Liudmila

    2015-05-07

    For many years, low- and middle-income countries have made efforts to strengthen national decision-making on immunization. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) ProVac Initiative was established to help expedite the use of evidence-based decision-making around new vaccine introduction. This initiative provides training in user-friendly cost-effectiveness models and supports the development of country-led economic evaluations. Due to the success of the ProVac Initiative in the Americas, and following requests from countries from outside the Americas, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded a two-year pilot effort to expand the initiative to other world regions. Called the ProVac International Working Group (IWG), this endeavor took place in 2012 and 2013. It was coordinated by PAHO and carried out in collaboration with several international partners, including the Agence de Médecine Préventive (AMP), London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, Sabin Vaccine Institute, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization (WHO). In the WHO European Region, technical support was provided by AMP, in close collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Europe and other ProVac IWG partners. In 2012, AMP, the WHO Regional Office for Europe, and other partners held a training workshop in Dubrovnik, Croatia, for 31 participants from four countries of the WHO European Region. The aim was to train health professionals in standard methods of economic evaluation and to assess regional demand for economic studies to support decision-making on immunization. AMP and the other organizations also supported four national cost-effectiveness studies in the WHO European Region. The assistance included country visits and support over a period of six months, the establishment of multidisciplinary teams of experts, ongoing training on the TRIVAC decision-support model for new

  15. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng, E-mail: quanshengzhou@yahoo.com; Cao, Zhifei, E-mail: hunancao@163.com

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  16. Stem cell mediation of functional recovery after stroke in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ramos-Cabrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regenerative strategies of stem cell grafting have been demonstrated to be effective in animal models of stroke. In those studies, the effectiveness of stem cells promoting functional recovery was assessed by behavioral testing. These behavioral studies do, however, not provide access to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the observed functional outcome improvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to address the underlying mechanisms of stem cell mediated functional improvement, this functional improvement after stroke in the rat was investigated for six months after stroke by use of fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials by electrophysiology, and sensorimotor behavior testing. Stem cells were grafted ipsilateral to the ischemic lesion. Rigorous exclusion of spontaneous recovery as confounding factor permitted to observe graft-related functional improvement beginning after 7 weeks and continuously increasing during the 6-month observation period. The major findings were i functional improvement causally related to the stem cells grafting; ii tissue replacement can be excluded as dominant factor for stem cell mediated functional improvement; iii functional improvement occurs by exclusive restitution of the function in the original representation field, without clear contributions from reorganization processes, and iv stem cells were not detectable any longer after six months. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A delayed functional improvement due to stem cell implantation has been documented by electrophysiology, fMRI and behavioral testing. This functional improvement occurred without cells acting as a tissue replacement for the necrotic tissue after the ischemic event. Combination of disappearance of grafted cells after six months on histological sections with persistent functional recovery was interpreted as paracrine effects by the grafted stem cells being the dominant mechanism of cell activity underlying the observed

  17. Successful Treatment of T Cell-Mediated Acute Rejection with Delayed CTLA4-Ig in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Young

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations that kidney transplant recipients receiving belatacept who experienced T cell-mediated acute rejection can be successfully treated and subsequently maintained on belatacept-based immunosuppression suggest that belatacept is able to control memory T cells. We recently reported that treatment with CTLA4-Ig from day 6 posttransplantation successfully rescues allografts from acute rejection in a BALB/c to C57BL/6 heart transplant model, in part, by abolishing B cell germinal centers and reducing alloantibody titers. Here, we show that CTLA4-Ig is additionally able to inhibit established T cell responses independently of B cells. CTLA4-Ig inhibited the in vivo cytolytic activity of donor-specific CD8+ T cells, and the production of IFNγ by graft-infiltrating T cells. Delayed CTLA4-Ig treatment did not reduce the numbers of graft-infiltrating T cells nor prevented the accumulation of antigen-experienced donor-specific memory T cells in the spleen. Nevertheless, delayed CTLA4-Ig treatment successfully maintained long-term graft acceptance in the majority of recipients that had experienced a rejection crisis, and enabled the acceptance of secondary BALB/c heart grafts transplanted 30 days after the first transplantation. In summary, we conclude that delayed CTLA4-Ig treatment is able to partially halt ongoing T cell-mediated acute rejection. These findings extend the functional efficacy of CTLA4-Ig therapy to effector T cells and provide an explanation for why CTLA4-Ig-based immunosuppression in the clinic successfully maintains long-term graft survival after T cell-mediated rejection.

  18. The evaluation of yeast derivatives as adjuvants for the immune response to the Bm86 antigen in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Héctor

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gavac™ vaccine against the cattle tick Boophilus microplus has proven its efficacy in a large number of controlled and field experiments. However, this vaccine could be further improved by searching for new alternative adjuvants that would induce a stronger long-lasting immune response. We conducted several experiments to assay the adjuvant effect of fractions of the recombinant yeast Pichia pastoris in mouse and cattle models. In previous experiments, the combination of the yeast membrane with saponin was the most effective formulation in stimulating the humoral immune response in mice, eliciting a response higher than Montanide 888. The response was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Here, we evaluated the response in cattle and compared the results with that obtained in mice. Results Bm86 on the membrane of P. pastoris plus saponin produced high antibody titers in cattle, though the protection level against tick infestations was lower when compared to Gavac™, probably due to a decrease in the IgG1/IgG2 ratio. The predictive value of the mouse model was studied through correlation analysis between the isotype levels in mice and the efficacy of formulations in cattle. Good correlation was established between the level of antibodies in mice and cattle, and between the amount of anti -Bm86 IgG1 in mice and the degree of protection in cattle. Conclusion Mouse model have the potential to predict immunogenicity and efficacy of formulations in cattle. These results also support the use of the yeast expression system for recombinant vaccine formulations, enabling the prediction of more cost - effective formulations.

  19. Seasonal changes in cell mediated immune responses to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens in children with haemoglobin AA and haemoglobin AS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Zeid, Y A; Abdulhadi, N H; Theander, T G

    1992-01-01

    In this longitudinal study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained before and during the malaria season from healthy HbAA and HbAS children. Cells were compared for proliferation in response to stimulation by soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens (SPAg) or purified derivative...... of tuberculin (PPD). The lymphoproliferative responses to SPAg of the paired PBMC samples showed 2 distinct seasonal changes in relation to the haemoglobin phenotype. In HbAA children, the lymphoproliferative responses to SPAg were suppressed during the malaria season. In contrast, they were enhanced in Hb...

  20. Endo-polysaccharide of Phellinus igniarius exhibited anti-tumor effect through enhancement of cell mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Pan, Jingzhi; Li, Xue; Zhou, Yong; Meng, Qinglong; Wang, Qi

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the anti-tumor and immunomodulatory effects of PIE on tumor cells Sarcoma 180 and Hepatoma 22 in implanted mice. The monosaccharide composition of PIE was analyzed by GC. The results demonstrated that PIE monosaccharide composition was n(Xyl): n(Man): n(Fuc): n(Glc): n(Gal)=2.3: 1: 6.4: 22.1: 19.83. The oral administration of PIE characteristically inhibited the growth of S180 and H22 cells and increased the life span. The concentrations of serum IL-2 and IL-18 were significantly increased in the S180 implanted mice fed with PIE in the doses of 500 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg compared with those in control (p<0.01). The concentrations of serum IL-2 were significantly increased in H22 implanted mice in the doses of 500 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg compared with those in control (p<0.01). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgical Stress Abrogates Pre-Existing Protective T Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Immunity Leading to Postoperative Cancer Recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirami A Ananth

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells are a key determinant for overall survival in patients following surgical resection for solid malignancies. Using a mouse model of cancer vaccination (adenovirus expressing melanoma tumor-associated antigen (TAA-dopachrome tautomerase (AdDCT and resection resulting in major surgical stress (abdominal nephrectomy, we demonstrate that surgical stress results in a reduction in the number of CD8+ T cell that produce cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, Granzyme B in response to TAA. This effect is secondary to both reduced proliferation and impaired T cell function following antigen binding. In a prophylactic model, surgical stress completely abrogates tumor protection conferred by vaccination in the immediate postoperative period. In a clinically relevant surgical resection model, vaccinated mice undergoing a positive margin resection with surgical stress had decreased survival compared to mice with positive margin resection alone. Preoperative immunotherapy with IFNα significantly extends survival in surgically stressed mice. Importantly, myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC population numbers and functional impairment of TAA-specific CD8+ T cell were altered in surgically stressed mice. Our observations suggest that cancer progression may result from surgery-induced suppression of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. Preoperative immunotherapies aimed at targeting the prometastatic effects of cancer surgery will reduce recurrence and improve survival in cancer surgery patients.

  2. Effects of sinusoidal magnetic field 50Hz /0,5 MT/ on cell-mediated immunity of human leukocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čoček, A.; Jandová, Anna; Pokorný, Jiří; Dohnalová, A.; Nedbalová, M.; Hahn, A.; Ambruš, M.; Trojan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2004), 9P ISSN 0862-8408. [Fyziologické dny /80./. Praha, 03.02.2004-05.02.2004] R&D Projects: GA MZd NJ7546; GA MŠk OC 281.001; GA MŠk OC 244B.40; GA ČR GA102/97/0867 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : electromagnetic fields * cellular biophysics * cancer Subject RIV: FM - Hygiene Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  3. Colonic Immune Stimulation by Targeted Oral Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathania, Mahesh; Zadeh, Mojgan; Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Roman, Robert M.; Sahay, Bikash; Abbott, Jeffrey R.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, sufficient data exist to support the use of lactobacilli as candidates for the development of new oral targeted vaccines. To this end, we have previously shown that Lactobacillus gasseri expressing the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin genetically fused to a dendritic cell (DC)-binding peptide (DCpep) induced efficacious humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses against Bacillus anthracis Sterne challenge. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present study, we investigated the effects of a dose dependent treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing the PA-DCpep fusion protein on intestinal and systemic immune responses and confirmed its safety. Treatment of mice with different doses of L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep stimulated colonic immune responses, resulting in the activation of innate immune cells, including dendritic cells, which induced robust Th1, Th17, CD4+Foxp3+ and CD8+Foxp3+ T cell immune responses. Notably, high doses of L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep (1012 CFU) were not toxic to the mice. Treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep triggered phenotypic maturation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells and macrophages. Moreover, treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep enhanced antibody immune responses, including IgA, IgG1, IgG2b, IgG2c and IgG3. L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep also increased the gene expression of numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and NOD-like receptors. Conclusion/Significance These findings suggest that L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep has substantial immunopotentiating properties, as it can induce humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses upon oral administration and may be used as a safe oral vaccine against anthrax challenge. PMID:23383086

  4. Colonic immune stimulation by targeted oral vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kathania

    Full Text Available Currently, sufficient data exist to support the use of lactobacilli as candidates for the development of new oral targeted vaccines. To this end, we have previously shown that Lactobacillus gasseri expressing the protective antigen (PA component of anthrax toxin genetically fused to a dendritic cell (DC-binding peptide (DCpep induced efficacious humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses against Bacillus anthracis Sterne challenge.In the present study, we investigated the effects of a dose dependent treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing the PA-DCpep fusion protein on intestinal and systemic immune responses and confirmed its safety. Treatment of mice with different doses of L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep stimulated colonic immune responses, resulting in the activation of innate immune cells, including dendritic cells, which induced robust Th1, Th17, CD4(+Foxp3(+ and CD8(+Foxp3(+ T cell immune responses. Notably, high doses of L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep (10(12 CFU were not toxic to the mice. Treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep triggered phenotypic maturation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells and macrophages. Moreover, treatment of mice with L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep enhanced antibody immune responses, including IgA, IgG(1, IgG(2b, IgG(2c and IgG(3. L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep also increased the gene expression of numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and NOD-like receptors.These findings suggest that L. gasseri expressing PA-DCpep has substantial immunopotentiating properties, as it can induce humoral and T cell-mediated immune responses upon oral administration and may be used as a safe oral vaccine against anthrax challenge.

  5. Evaluation of immune responses to combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in HIV-infected children and children on immunosuppressive medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderok, Sanne-Meike; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; van Rossum, Marion; van Dijk-Hummelman, Annette; Hartwig, Nico; Scherpbier, Henriette; Geelen, Sibyl; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Baaten, Gijs; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A phase IV interventional study with a combined hepatitis A and B vaccine was conducted in HIV-infected children and children receiving immunosuppressive medication for treatment of rheumatic diseases to evaluate immune responses. Methods: Both groups (1-16 years of age) received combined

  6. The Ameliorative Effect of Sophoricoside on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Um

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sophoricoside exhibits numerous pharmacological effects, including anti- inflammatory and anti-cancer actions, yet the exact mechanism that accounts for the anti-allergic effects of sophoricoside is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether and how sophoricoside modulates the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the pharmacological effects of sophoricoside on both compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, to find a possible explanation for the anti-inflammatory effects of sophoricoside, we evaluated the effects of sophoricoside on the production of histamine and inflammatory cytokines and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and caspase-1 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1. The finding of this study demonstrated that sophoricoside reduced compound 48/80 or histamine-induced scratching behaviors and DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis in mice. Additionally, sophoricoside inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines as well as the activation of NF-κB and caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1. Collectively, the findings of this study provide us with novel insights into the pharmacological actions of sophoricoside as a potential molecule for use in the treatment of allergic inflammation diseases.

  7. Cell-mediated contraction of vitreous explants from chicken embryo: Possibility of screening for therapeutic agents against proliferative vitreoretinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Keitaro; Shimada, Arata; Nagase, Terumasa; Katsura, Yoshiya; Kosano, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to establish a novel screening system for identifying potential therapeutic agents for treating proliferative vitreoretinal diseases (PVDs). In this study, we focused on vitreous explants from chicken embryos and evaluated the usefulness of quantitatively analyzing the effects of potential candidates on cell-mediated vitreous contraction, which leads to blindness in PVDs. Methods Vitreous explants were extracted from 19-day-old embryonic chickens and then incubated with retinal Müller cells or endothelial cells to permit cell adhesion. After cell adhesion occurred, we examined the effect of the attached cells on the wet weight of vitreous explants as an index of vitreous contraction. We also performed hematoxylin and eosin staining to characterize the cell morphology on the vitreous surface. Results Contraction of the vitreous explants was observed after cell adhesion of not only retinal Müller cells but also endothelial cells. We confirmed the adhesion of these cells on vitreous explants and estimated the number of adherent cells with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. The cells on the vitreous surface presented an elongated fibroblast-like phenotype. Integrin was found to be a receptor involved in cell adhesion on the vitreous surface. Discussion Our results suggest that vitreous explants from chicken embryos may be novel useful tools for screening antiadhesion therapeutic agents in PVDs. This preliminary study must be validated with human vitreous and human retinal pigment epithelial cells. PMID:24319331

  8. Urinary metabolomics for noninvasive detection of borderline and acute T cell-mediated rejection in children after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blydt-Hansen, T D; Sharma, A; Gibson, I W; Mandal, R; Wishart, D S

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of urinary metabolomics for noninvasive diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Urine samples (n = 277) from 57 patients with surveillance or indication kidney biopsies were assayed for 134 unique metabolites by quantitative mass spectrometry. Samples without TCMR (n = 183) were compared to borderline tubulitis (n = 54) and TCMR (n = 30). Partial least squares discriminant analysis identified distinct classifiers for TCMR (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.892; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.827-0.957) and borderline tubulitis (AUC = 0.836; 95% CI 0.781-0.892), respectively. Application of the TCMR classifier to borderline tubulitis samples yielded a discriminant score (-0.47 ± 0.33) mid-way between TCMR (-0.20 ± 0.34) and No TCMR (-0.80 ± 0.32) (p metabolomics is a sensitive, specific and noninvasive tool for TCMR identification that is superior to serum creatinine, with minimal confounding by other allograft injury processes. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. A comparison of cell mediators and serum cytokines transcript expression between male and female mice infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and/or consuming probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, Kevin W; Kurkure, Paresh C; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-11-01

    The gut immune system is complex, and dysregulation leads to a number of disorders including inflammatory bowel syndrome and (in livestock) Johne's disease. Previous work has demonstrated that males and females respond differently to treatment with pathologic and probiotic microorganisms, suggesting that a 'one-size-fits-all' approach to treat GIT inflammation may be inadequate. While we had observed significant differences between males and females in terms of cytokine production, it remains unclear how these changes occur. To better understand the mechanisms, transcript expression of genes important to gut immunoregulation were monitored from male and female BALB/c mice consuming the probiotic Lactobacillus animalis (1 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) ) and infected with the gut pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (1 × 10(7) CFU). Expression of transcripts analyzed included those important to the immune system, intestinal cell differentiation, and/or regulation. Males generally displayed increased expression of Th 2 and B-cell mediators, and females showed repressed cytokine expression after MAP infection (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1 among others). Additionally, regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in female mice consuming probiotics suggests females responded positively to L. animalis when compared to males. Therefore, we speculate that studying mechanistic changes associated with sex and immunoregulation in gastrointestinal tissues could further elucidate host response to microorganisms. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immune Mechanism: A ‘Double-Edged Sword’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Mustaffa

    2013-01-01

    Immunology has now developed into an independent discipline in medicine which covers not only germ infection which is related to immunity solely but also covers a lot of non-infectious diseases such as autoimmune disease, allergies, and others. Therefore, “The Immune Mechanism: “A Double-Edged Sword” means that the immune mechanism (consisted of antibody mediated mechanism and T cell mediated mechanism), just like one edge playing the role of giving benefit (immunity) as it destroys the agent of infection, and another one can be detrimental as it will cause tissue/cell damages and then give rise to immune diseases (immunopathology). Now, the prevalence of these immune diseases is on the rise and has become a new challenge to our country towards developed country in 2020. Therefore, we have to make ample preparation (laboratory facilities/services, main power, and research) from now on in order to face the problems and challenges. PMID:23966827

  11. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-01-01

    abstract Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  12. Systemic minor histocompatibility antigen expression in blood endothelial cells prevents T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviezel-Firner, Sonja; Engeler, Daniel; Bolinger, Beatrice; Onder, Lucas; Scandella, Elke; Yu, Meimei; Kroczek, Richard A; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2013-12-01

    Attenuation of T cell-mediated damage of blood endothelial cells (BECs) in transplanted organs is important to prevent transplant vasculopathy (TV) and chronic rejection. Here, we assessed the importance of minor histocompatibility antigen (mHA) distribution and different coinhibitory molecules for T cell-BEC interaction. A transgenic mHA was directed specifically to BECs using the Tie2 promoter and cellular interactions were assessed in graft-versus-host disease-like and heterotopic heart transplantation settings. We found that cognate CD4(+) T-cell help was critical for the activation of BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. However, systemic mHA expression on BECs efficiently attenuated adoptively transferred, BEC-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and hence prevented tissue damage, whereas restriction of mHA expression to heart BECs precipitated the development of TV. Importantly, the lack of the coinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1) and B and T lymphocyte attenuator fostered the initial activation of BEC-specific CD4(+) T cells, but did not affect development of TV. In contrast, TV was significantly augmented in the absence of PD-1 on BEC-specific CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that antigen distribution in the vascular bed determines the impact of coinhibition and, as a consequence, critically impinges on T cell-mediated vascular immunopathology. © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. CD47 blockade triggers T cell-mediated destruction of immunogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Here, using syngeneic immunocompetent mouse tumor models, we reveal that the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the antitumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of antitumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors.

  14. Clinical evaluation of developed product for recovery of immune system in the treatment of cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul-Ku; Choi, Soo Yong; Rhyu, Sung Ryeol; Kim, Ki Wha; Kim, Ji Yun; Yun, Na Ra [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-01-15

    We evaluate the clinical efficacy of pilot product (HemoHIM) on recovery from hematopoiesis damage in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The cancer patients studied were as follows : cancer of the breast(47 intakers and 136 non-intakers), uterine cervix(38 intakers and 73 non-intakers), and head and neck(7 intakers and 15 non-intakers). The clinical efficacy of pilot product(HemoHIM) in cancer patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy was analyzed. In breast cancer patients, the number of leukocytes decreased according to duration of treatment in both groups. However, intakers showed a less decreasing trend compared with non-intakers. Especially, under limiting value in range of leukocyte number of intakers was significantly higher than that of non-intakers. This result incicates that HemoHIM reduce the severe leukopenia. Values of lymphocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, and it was similar to that of leukocyte. Values of erythrocyte in both groups decreased similarly after treatment, but the values were within normal range. In cervix cancer patients, the results were similar to that of breast cancer patients. In cancer of head and neck, values of leukocyte slightly decreased according to duration of treatment in both group. However, it needs to collect more subjects continuously because of small number of cancer patients. No toxicological side effects of HemoHIM were observed in serological analysis, and possibility to alleviate fatigue and inflammation was investigated in some cases.

  15. Evaluation of two yellow fever vaccines for routine immunization programs in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Carlos; Ponce, Amalia; Wilson, Mario M; Sharif, Norma; Vides, José B; Armoni, Judith; Teuwen, Dirk E

    2008-01-01

    Although highly effective vaccines have been available for almost 70 years, an estimated 200,000 cases of YF, including 30,000 deaths, still occur annually. This study evaluated the safety of two yellow fever (YF) vaccines [Stamaril and Vacina Contra Febre Amarela (VCFA)]. A total of 2,514 subjects were randomized equally to receive Stamaril or VCFA. Immediate reactions occurring within 30 minutes after vaccination, and solicited local and systemic reactions occurring within eight days, were monitored. Unsolicited local, systemic adverse events and serious adverse events (SAE) were recorded for 21 days after vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse reactions were reported by 15.3-17.6% and 30.4-31.6% of the Stamaril and VCFA groups, respectively. Only 56 of the 2,514 study subjects (2.2%) reported a severe solicited adverse reaction, 25 in the Stamaril group (1.99%) and 31 in the VFCA group (2.49%), (p=0.403). Ten subjects (0.8%) in each group reported at least one severe solicited local reaction (p = 0.988). A total of 18 Stamaril subjects (1.43%) and 21 VCFA subjects (1.68%) reported at least one severe solicited systemic reaction (p = 0.617) One SAE considered related to vaccination occurred, polymyalgia in the VCFA group. No immediate reactions to vaccination were seen. Vaccine-related unsolicited events were infrequent, 1.4% in the Stamaril group and 2.0% VCFA group, generally of mild or moderate intensity. We conclude that the safety profiles of Stamaril and VCFA support routine vaccination to prevent YF in residents of and travelers to endemic areas of South America and Africa.

  16. Evaluation of kefir as a potential probiotic on growth performance, serum biochemistry and immune responses in broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Toghyani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of milk or molasses kefir as a probiotic on growth performance, carcass traits, serum biochemistry and humoral immune responses in broiler chickens. A total of 192 one-d-old as hatched broiler chicks (Ross 308 were randomly allotted to 4 treatments, each with 4 replicate pens of 12 chicks. The following treatments were applied: 1 a basal diet (C and normal drinking water, 2 2% milk kefir in drinking water, 3 2% molasses kefir in drinking water, and 4 the diet C supplemented with commercial probiotic. At d 42, eight birds per treatment were killed for determination of carcass traits. Broilers at 28 days of age were bled for measuring antibody titers against Newcastle disease virus (NDV and avian influenza virus (AIV, at 30 days of age for antibody titers against sheep red blood cell (SRBC, and at 42 days of age for biochemical analysis. Supplementing 2% milk kefir increased body weight of broilers at 28 and 42 days of age (P  0.05 influenced. Broilers supplemented with molasses kefir, had a significantly lower concentration of serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 42 days of age (P < 0.05. In conclusion, the results indicated that inclusion of 2% milk kefir in drinking water would improve growth performance of broiler chickens.

  17. Evaluation of 143 Cases of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura With Regards to Clinical Course and Response to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Murat; Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Aki, Sahika Zeynep; Gokmen, Ayla; Ceran, Funda; Yokus, Osman; Dagdas, Simten; Ayli, Meltem; Ozet, Gulsum

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is also known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Increased platelet destruction and insufficient platelet production are both responsible for its etiopathogenesis. ITP can be diagnosed after excluding other possible causes of thrombocytopenia. Materials and Methods: One hundred forty-three cases of chronic ITP that were monitored in a hematology clinic were retrospectively evaluated. All cases received first line treatment of 1 mg/kg/day prednisolone. Corticosteroid nonresponsive (CN) cases and corticosteroid-dependent (CD) cases underwent splenectomies. Results: The rate of CN/CD cases was found to be 53% (n=76). Sixty-six percent of these cases (n=50) underwent splenectomies. The ratio of non-responsive cases to relapse cases after splenectomy (SN/SR) was 30% (n=15). The total number of cases was 41, including those without splenectomy (n=26) and with SY/SR (n=15). Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication, immunosuppressive agents and danazol treatments were administered to patients (n=10, n=14 and n=4, respectively). Currently, 13 patients are being monitored without treatment. Fifteen patients who were non-responsive to Hp eradication treatment, immunosuppressive treatment or danazol treatment are still being monitored without any treatment. Conclusion: Optimal treatment is not available for splenectomy-resistant cases of ITP. The response rates for Hp eradication treatment, immunosuppressive treatments and anabolic agents are low. Therefore, larger studies with more patients are required using new agents, such as thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25610140

  18. Effects of Long-Term Immunization with Multiple Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    such as the Guillain - barre syndrome, may occur by a mechanism not yet clarified. The administration of vaccines containing viable agents can result in...mainly from a cell-mediated immunologic reaction directed at peripheral nervous tissue. However, the observation that Landry- Guillain - Barr ( syndrome...complex reaction. Two reports of patients with Landry- Guillain - Barr ( syndrome and immune-complex glomerulonedphritis suggest cellular sen- sitivity to

  19. Enhancement of Immune Memory Responses to Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of autophagy gene expression in healthy donors. Completion of these studies will provide novel insights into...induction of highly specific B and T cell responses against viral infections. Despite recent progress in vaccine development, the molecular mechanisms ...BMI 31±8 36±5 The purpose of this application is to find mechanisms that could improve B cell mediated immune response to influenza. This

  20. Evaluation of a panel of antibodies for the immunohistochemical identification of immune cells in paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissues of new- and old-world camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Ann-Kathrin; Lehmbecker, Annika; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Spitzbarth, Ingo

    2017-02-01

    Different species of camelids play an important role in the epidemiology of various emerging infectious diseases such as Middle East respiratory syndrome. For precise investigations of the immunopathogenesis in these host species, appropriate immunohistochemical markers are highly needed in order to phenotype distinct immune cells populations in camelids. So far, specific immunohistochemical markers for camelid immune cells are rarely commercially available, and cross-reactivity studies are restricted to the use of frozen dromedary tissues. To bridge this gap, 14 commercially available primary antibodies were tested for their suitability to demonstrate immune cell populations on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections of dromedaries, Bactrian camels, llamas, and alpacas in the present study. Out of these, 9 antibodies directed against CD3, CD20, CD79α, HLA-DR, Iba-1, myeloid/histiocyte antigen, CD204, CD208, and CD68 antigen exhibited distinct immunoreaction patterns to certain camelid immune cell subsets. The distribution of these antigens was comparatively evaluated in different anatomical compartments of thymus, spleen, mesenteric, and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. The presented results will provide a basis for further investigations in camelids, especially with respect to the role of the immune response in certain infectious diseases, which harbor a considerable risk to spill over to other species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the United States public health service guidelines for discontinuation of anticytomegalovirus therapy after immune recovery in patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Janet T; Colvin, Ryan; van Natta, Mark L; Thorne, Jennifer E; Bardsley, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate United States Public Health Service (USPHS) guidelines for discontinuing anticytomegalovirus (CMV) therapy in patients with AIDS who have immune recovery and quiescent retinitis after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy. Cohort study of patients with CMV retinitis (Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS). Participants had CMV retinitis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 50 cells/μL or fewer enrolled from 1998 through 2009 who demonstrated sustained immune recovery (2 consecutive CD4+ T-cell counts of 100 cells/μL or more at least 6 months apart) and inactive retinitis. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to anti-CMV treatment after immune recover: (1) continued anti-CMV therapy and (2) discontinued therapy. We evaluated survival, visual acuity, and CMV retinitis activity; we used propensity scores to adjust for confounding factors for these analyses. Of 152 participants reviewed, 71 demonstrated immune recovery, 37 of whom discontinued therapy and 34 of whom continued therapy. At immune recovery, participants continuing therapy tended to be older (44 vs 40 years; P = .09), have bilateral retinitis (53% vs 32%; P = .10), and have lower CD4+ T-cell counts (148 vs 207 cells/μL; P visual acuity, or incidence of bilateral retinitis). Both groups lost visual acuity during follow-up, on average 1.2 letters per year (P risk of poor outcomes. These results support the current guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after achievement of sustained immune recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the Stability of RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles and Drug-Induced Immune-Related Expression Changes in Whole Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Bowyer

    Full Text Available Methods were developed to evaluate the stability of rat whole blood expression obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and assess changes in whole blood transcriptome profiles in experiments replicated over time. Expression was measured in globin-depleted RNA extracted from the whole blood of Sprague-Dawley rats, given either saline (control or neurotoxic doses of amphetamine (AMPH. The experiment was repeated four times (paired control and AMPH groups over a 2-year span. The transcriptome of the control and AMPH-treated groups was evaluated on: 1 transcript levels for ribosomal protein subunits; 2 relative expression of immune-related genes; 3 stability of the control transcriptome over 2 years; and 4 stability of the effects of AMPH on immune-related genes over 2 years. All, except one, of the 70 genes that encode the 80s ribosome had levels that ranked in the top 5% of all mean expression levels. Deviations in sequencing performance led to significant changes in the ribosomal transcripts. The overall expression profile of immune-related genes and genes specific to monocytes, T-cells or B-cells were well represented and consistent within treatment groups. There were no differences between the levels of ribosomal transcripts in time-matched control and AMPH groups but significant differences in the expression of immune-related genes between control and AMPH groups. AMPH significantly increased expression of some genes related to monocytes but down-regulated those specific to T-cells. These changes were partially due to changes in the two types of leukocytes present in blood, which indicate an activation of the innate immune system by AMPH. Thus, the stability of RNA-seq whole blood transcriptome can be verified by assessing ribosomal protein subunits and immune-related gene expression. Such stability enables the pooling of samples from replicate experiments to carry out differential expression analysis with acceptable power.

  3. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. © The Author 2016. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Induction of Robust Immune Responses against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Is Supported by the Inherent Tropism of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 5 for Dendritic Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ke-Qin; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Urabe, Masashi; Toda, Yoshihiko; Shinoda, Kaori; Yoshida, Atsushi; Oomura, Kenji; Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Ichino, Motohide; Klinman, Dennis; Ozawa, Keiya; Okuda, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    The ability of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 to 8 (AAV1 to AAV8) vectors expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Env gp160 (AAV-HIV) to induce an immune response was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The AAV5 vector showed a higher tropism for both mouse and human dendritic cells (DCs) than did the AAV2 vector, whereas other AAV serotype vectors transduced DCs only poorly. AAV1, AAV5, AAV7, and AAV8 were more highly expressed in muscle cells than AAV2. An immunogenicity study of AAV serotypes indicates that AAV1, AAV5, AAV7, and AAV8 vectors expressing the Env gp160 gene induced higher HIV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the AAV2 vector did, with the AAV5 vector producing the best responses. Furthermore, mice injected with DCs that had been transduced ex vivo with an AAV5 vector expressing the gp160 gene elicited higher HIV-specific cell-mediated immune responses than did DCs transduced with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors. We also found that AAV vectors produced by HEK293 cells and insect cells elicit similar levels of antigen-specific immune responses. These results demonstrate that the immunogenicity of AAV vectors depends on their tropism for both antigen-presenting cells (such as DCs) and non-antigen-presenting cells (such as muscular cells) and that AAV5 is a better vector than other AAV serotypes. These results may aid in the development of AAV-based vaccine and gene therapy. PMID:17005662

  5. Induction of robust immune responses against human immunodeficiency virus is supported by the inherent tropism of adeno-associated virus type 5 for dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ke-Qin; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Urabe, Masashi; Toda, Yoshihiko; Shinoda, Kaori; Yoshida, Atsushi; Oomura, Kenji; Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Ichino, Motohide; Klinman, Dennis; Ozawa, Keiya; Okuda, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    The ability of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 to 8 (AAV1 to AAV8) vectors expressing the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Env gp160 (AAV-HIV) to induce an immune response was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The AAV5 vector showed a higher tropism for both mouse and human dendritic cells (DCs) than did the AAV2 vector, whereas other AAV serotype vectors transduced DCs only poorly. AAV1, AAV5, AAV7, and AAV8 were more highly expressed in muscle cells than AAV2. An immunogenicity study of AAV serotypes indicates that AAV1, AAV5, AAV7, and AAV8 vectors expressing the Env gp160 gene induced higher HIV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the AAV2 vector did, with the AAV5 vector producing the best responses. Furthermore, mice injected with DCs that had been transduced ex vivo with an AAV5 vector expressing the gp160 gene elicited higher HIV-specific cell-mediated immune responses than did DCs transduced with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors. We also found that AAV vectors produced by HEK293 cells and insect cells elicit similar levels of antigen-specific immune responses. These results demonstrate that the immunogenicity of AAV vectors depends on their tropism for both antigen-presenting cells (such as DCs) and non-antigen-presenting cells (such as muscular cells) and that AAV5 is a better vector than other AAV serotypes. These results may aid in the development of AAV-based vaccine and gene therapy.

  6. Yoga and immune system functioning: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, R I; Eising, C; Peters, M L

    2018-02-10

    Yoga is an ancient mind-body practice that is increasingly recognized to have health benefits in a variety of clinical and non-clinical conditions. This systematic review summarizes the findings of randomized controlled trials examining the effects of yoga on immune system functioning which is imperative to justify its application in the clinic. Fifteen RCTs were eligible for the review. Even though the existing evidence is not entirely consistent, a general pattern emerged suggesting that yoga can downregulate pro-inflammatory markers. In particular, the qualitative evaluation of RCTs revealed decreases in IL-1beta, as well as indications for reductions in IL-6 and TNF-alpha. These results imply that yoga may be implemented as a complementary intervention for populations at risk or already suffering from diseases with an inflammatory component. Beyond this, yoga practice may exert further beneficial effects by enhancing cell-mediated and mucosal immunity. It is hypothesized that longer time spans of yoga practice are required to achieve consistent effects especially on circulating inflammatory markers. Overall, this field of investigation is still young, hence the current body of evidence is small and for most immune parameters, more research is required to draw distinct conclusions.

  7. Immune-mediated changes in actinic keratosis following topical treatment with imiquimod 5% cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Shalini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to identify the molecular processes responsible for the anti-lesional activity of imiquimod in subjects with actinic keratosis using global gene expression profiling. Methods A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study was conducted to evaluate gene expression changes in actinic keratosis treated with imiquimod 5% cream. Male subjects (N = 17 with ≥ 5 actinic keratosis on the scalp applied placebo cream or imiquimod 3 times a week on nonconsecutive days for 4 weeks. To elucidate the molecular processes involved in actinic keratosis lesion regression by imiquimod, gene expression analysis using oligonucleotide arrays and real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed on shave biopsies of lesions taken before and after treatment. Results Imiquimod modulated the expression of a large number of genes important in both the innate and adaptive immune response, including increased expression of interferon-inducible genes with known antiviral, anti-proliferative and immune modulatory activity, as well as various Toll-like receptors. In addition, imiquimod increased the expression of genes associated with activation of macrophages, dendritic cells, cytotoxic T cells, and natural killer cells, as well as activation of apoptotic pathways. Conclusion Data suggest that topical application of imiquimod stimulates cells in the skin to secrete cytokines and chemokines that lead to inflammatory cell influx into the lesions and subsequent apoptotic and immune cell-mediated destruction of lesions.

  8. Immunity Elicited by an Experimental Vaccine Based on Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein in Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhu

    Full Text Available In a recent study, we reported that a recombinant protein from fusion expression of flagellin to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 Cap induced robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity that afforded full protection for PCV2 infection using BALB/c mice. Here, we further evaluated the immunogenicity and protection of the recombinant protein using specific pathogen free (SPF pigs. Twenty-five 3-week-old piglets without passively acquired immunity were divided into 5 groups. All piglets except negative controls were challenged with a virulent PCV2 at 21 days after booster vaccination and necropsied at 21 days post-challenge. Vaccination of piglets with the recombinant protein without adjuvant induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses as observed by high levels of PCV2-specific IgG antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, as well as frequencies of PCV2-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells that conferred good protection against PCV2 challenge, with significant reduced PCV2 viremia, mild lesions, low PCV2 antigen-positive cells, as well as improved body weight gain, comparable to piglets vaccinated with a commercial PCV2 subunit vaccine. These results further demonstrated that the recombinant flagellin-Cap fusion protein is capable of inducing solid protective humoral and cellular immunity when administered to pigs, thereby becoming an effective PCV2 vaccine candidate for control of PCV2 infection.

  9. [Evaluation on impact of hepatitis B vaccine integrated into routine immunization in the areas of Ministry of Health/Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization (GAVI) Cooperation Project P.R. China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fu-Qiang; Gong, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Yuan-Sheng

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of hepatitis B vaccination after hepatitis B vaccine integrated into routine immunization in the areas of Ministry of Health/Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization GAVI Cooperation Project (MOH/GAVI Coopreation Project). Children born between 2002 and 2005 were selected from 68 counties of GAVI project by multi-stage random sampling method. Demographic information and hepatitis B vaccination history were collected by questionnaire and review of vaccination records, and 2-4ml serum sample was taken for testing of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (Anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antibody (Anti-HBs) by Enzyme Linksed Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) method. Coverage of HepB3 and timely birth dose (HepB1) was 80.02% and 60.06% respectively, the younger, the higher. HepB coverage among children born in urban was higher than children born in rural, born in hospital was higher than born at home. The prevalence of HBsAg for children born between 2002-2005 was decreased to GAVI project areas, the immunization coverage was improved dramatically.

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with recombinant Dengue virus 3 envelope proteins induce significant and specific immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versiani, Alice F; Astigarraga, Ruiz G; Rocha, Eliseu S O; Barboza, Ana Paula M; Kroon, Erna G; Rachid, Milene A; Souza, Daniele G; Ladeira, Luiz O; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel F; Jorio, Ado; Da Fonseca, Flávio G

    2017-04-04

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in the world. In this article we present results on the development, characterization and immunogenic evaluation of an alternative vaccine candidate against Dengue. The MWNT-DENV3E nanoconjugate was developed by covalent functionalization of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) with recombinant dengue envelope (DENV3E) proteins. The recombinant antigens were bound to the MWNT using a diimide-activated amidation process and the immunogen was characterized by TEM, AFM and Raman Spectroscopy. Furthermore, the immunogenicity of this vaccine candidate was evaluated in a murine model. Immunization with MWNT-DENV3E induced comparable IgG responses in relation to the immunization with non-conjugated proteins; however, the inoculation of the nanoconjugate into mice generated higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Cell-mediated responses were also evaluated, and higher dengue-specific splenocyte proliferation was observed in cell cultures derived from mice immunized with MWNT-DENV3E when compared to animals immunized with the non-conjugated DENV3E. Despite the recent licensure of the CYD-TDV dengue vaccine in some countries, results from the vaccine's phase III trial have cast doubts about its overall efficacy and global applicability. While questions about the effectiveness of the CYD-TDV vaccine still lingers, it is wise to keep at hand an array of vaccine candidates, including alternative non-classical approaches like the one presented here.

  11. Magnetic-Field Immunity Examination and Evaluation of Transcutaneous Energy-Transmission System for a Totally Implantable Artificial Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET is the most promising noninvasive method for supplying driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart. Induction-heating (IH cookers generate a magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with its external and internal coils. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. In this paper, we present the design and development of a coil to be used for a magnetic immunity test, and we detail the investigation of the magnetic immunity of a transcutaneous transformer. The experimental coil, with five turns like a solenoid, was able to generate a uniform magnetic field in the necessary bandwidth. A magnetic-field immunity examination of the TET system was performed using this coil, and the system was confirmed to have sufficient immunity to the magnetic field generated as a result of the conventional operation of induction-heating cooker.

  12. Systemic and mucosal immunity induced by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Bum; Rahman, Masudur; Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Lee, Byung Min; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Ki In; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Eo, Seong Kug

    2011-07-01

    Oral administration of attenuated Salmonella vaccine may provide valuable advantages such as low cost, easy preparation, and safety. Attenuated Salmonella vaccines also serve as carriers of foreign antigens and immunomodulatory cytokines. Presently, an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain was used as a carrier for open reading frame 7 (ORF7) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a swine pathogen of significant global economic importance. Initially, an attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing ORF7 gene derived from PRRSV Korean isolate was constructed. Following oral administration of a single dose of the attenuated Salmonella vaccine expressing PRRSV ORF7, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses specific for ORF7 were induced at both systemic and mucosal sites including spleen, mesenteric lymph node, Peyer's patch, and laminar propria, as evaluated by determining serum ORF7-specific IgG and mucosal IgA responses, as well as Th1- and Th2-type cytokine production from antigen-stimulated T cells. The induced humoral responses were sustained for at least 12weeks post-immunization. In particular, the immunized mice displayed immune responses to both the foreign ORF7 antigen and Salmonella itself. The results indicate the value of attenuated S. enterica serovar Typhimurium as an oral carrier of PRRSV antigenic proteins to induce effective systemic and mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  14. Effects of Reactive Nitrogen Scavengers on NK-Cell-Mediated Killing of K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of reactive nitrogen metabolites (RNMS on natural-killer- (NK- cell-mediated killing of K562 cells and the influence of RNM scavengers, such as tiopronin (TIP, glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH, and histamine dihydrochloride (DHT, on reversing the suppressing effect of RNM. We administered exogenous and endogenous RNM in the NK + K562 culture system and then added RNM scavengers. The concentrations of RNM, TNF-β and IFN-γ, and NK-cell cytotoxicity (NCC and the percentage of living NK cells were then examined. We found that both exogenous and endogenous RNM caused the KIR to decrease (<0.01; however, RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH rescued this phenomenon dose dependently. In conclusion, our data suggests that RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH enhance the antineoplasmic activity of NK cells.

  15. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  16. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwet, K; Vitale, M; De Pelsmaeker, S; Jacob, T; Laval, K; Moretta, L; Parodi, M; Parolini, S; Cantoni, C; Favoreel, H W

    2015-11-18

    Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The identification of this

  17. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  18. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  19. Evaluation of different heterologous prime-boost immunization strategies against Babesia bovis using viral vectored and protein-adjuvant vaccines based on a chimeric multi-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Paoletta, Martina Soledad; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2016-07-19

    Protection against the intraerythrocytic bovine parasite Babesia bovis requires both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, tailored combinations of immunogens targeted at both arms of the immune system are strategies of choice to pursue sterilizing immunity. In this study, different heterologous prime-boost vaccination schemes were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by a recombinant adenovirus, a modified vaccinia Ankara vector or a subunit vaccine all expressing a chimeric multi-antigen. This multi-antigen includes the immunodominant B and T cell epitopes of three B. bovis proteins: Merozoite Surface Antigen - 2c (MSA-2c), Rhoptry Associated Protein - 1 (RAP-1) and Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSP20). Both priming with the adenovirus or recombinant multi-antigen and boosting with the modified vaccinia Ankara vector achieved a high degree of activation of TNFα and IFNγ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells 60days after the first immunization. High titers of specific IgG antibodies were also detected at the same time point and lasted up to day 120 of the first immunization. Only the adenovirus - MVA combination triggered a marked isotype skew for the IgG2a antibody subclass meanwhile for the other immune traits analyzed here, both vaccination schemes showed similar performances. The immunological characterization in the murine model of these rationally designed immunogens led us to propose that adenoviruses as well as the bacterially expressed multi-antigen are highly reliable primer candidates to be considered in future experiments in cattle to test protection against bovine babesiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue Virus Group Specific Antigen by Viral Vectors: Analysis of the Induced Immune Responses and Evaluation of Protective Potential in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet-Cararo, Coraline; Contreras, Vanessa; Caruso, Agathe; Top, Sokunthea; Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Relmy, Anthony; Guibert, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Eric; Thiery, Richard; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bertagnoli, Stephane; Richardson, Jennifer; Foucras, Gilles; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Zientara, Stephan; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0) or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7), to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity. PMID:25364822

  1. Expression of VP7, a Bluetongue virus group specific antigen by viral vectors: analysis of the induced immune responses and evaluation of protective potential in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Bouet-Cararo

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV is an economically important Orbivirus transmitted by biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. The need for new vaccines has been highlighted by the occurrence of repeated outbreaks caused by different BTV serotypes since 1998. The major group-reactive antigen of BTV, VP7, is conserved in the 26 serotypes described so far, and its role in the induction of protective immunity has been proposed. Viral-based vectors as antigen delivery systems display considerable promise as veterinary vaccine candidates. In this paper we have evaluated the capacity of the BTV-2 serotype VP7 core protein expressed by either a non-replicative canine adenovirus type 2 (Cav-VP7 R0 or a leporipoxvirus (SG33-VP7, to induce immune responses in sheep. Humoral responses were elicited against VP7 in almost all animals that received the recombinant vectors. Both Cav-VP7 R0 and SG33-VP7 stimulated an antigen-specific CD4+ response and Cav-VP7 R0 stimulated substantial proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Encouraged by the results obtained with the Cav-VP7 R0 vaccine vector, immunized animals were challenged with either the homologous BTV-2 or the heterologous BTV-8 serotype and viral burden in plasma was followed by real-time RT-PCR. The immune responses triggered by Cav-VP7 R0 were insufficient to afford protective immunity against BTV infection, despite partial protection obtained against homologous challenge. This work underscores the need to further characterize the role of BTV proteins in cross-protective immunity.

  2. Evaluation of the systemic innate immune response and metabolic alterations of nonlactating cows with diet-induced subacute ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lecompte, J C; Kroeker, A D; Ceballos-Márquez, A; Li, S; Plaizier, J C; Gomez, D E

    2014-12-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) increases lipopolysaccharide endotoxin in the rumen, which might translocate into the systemic circulation, triggering a cascade of clinical and immunological alterations. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical immune and metabolic responses to ruminal-derived lipopolysaccharide in nonlactating cows induced with SARA using 2 challenges, a grain-based SARA challenge (GBSC) or an alfalfa-pellet SARA challenge (APSC). Six dry, nonlactating Holstein cows were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement of treatments with 4-wk experimental cycles. All cows received the control diet containing 70% forage and 30% mixed concentrates (dry matter basis) for 3 wk. In wk 4, cows received a control diet, GBSC (38% wheat-barley pellets, 32% other mixed concentrate, and 30% forages), or APSC (45% mixed concentrate, 32% alfalfa pellets, and 23% other forages). Total plasma proteins and immunology-related proteins, acute phase proteins, blood cells, serum chemistry, mRNA gene expression of peripheral blood cell surface markers, and selected proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated. Ruminal pH was lower in both groups with induced SARA compared with a control group. Ruminal endotoxins were higher in GBSC; however, plasma endotoxin was not detected in any study group. No significant differences in feed intake, rectal temperature, white blood cell counts, or differentials were found between control and SARA challenge groups; changes in glucose, urea, Ca, and Mg were observed in SARA groups. Total plasma proteins were lower in both SARA groups, and acute phase proteins were higher in GBSC. The expression of CD14, MD2, and TLR4 mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes was not affected by SARA induction. The induction of SARA as a result of GBSC or APSC challenge was successful; however, LPS was not detected in plasma. Changes in clinical, metabolic, and inflammatory responses were not observed in the SARA-challenged cows, suggesting that

  3. Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be given as part of a combination vaccine so that a child gets fewer shots. Talk with your doctor about ... Kids Teens Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations Your Child's Immunizations Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Word! Immunizations ...

  4. Intranasal Immunization Using Mannatide as a Novel Adjuvant for an Inactivated Influenza Vaccine and Its Adjuvant Effect Compared with MF59.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Ren

    Full Text Available Intranasal vaccination is more potent than parenteral injection for the prevention of influenza. However, because the poor efficiency of antigen uptake across the nasal mucosa is a key issue, immunostimulatory adjuvants are essential for intranasal vaccines. The immunomodulator mannatide or polyactin (PA has been used for the clinical treatment of impaired immunity in China, but its adjuvant effect on an inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (ITIV via intranasal vaccination is unclear. To explore the adjuvant effect of PA, an inactivated trivalent influenza virus with or without PA or MF59 was instilled intranasally once a week in BALB/c mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by both the ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI methods using antigen-specific antibodies. Splenic lymphocyte proliferation and the IFN-γ level were measured to evaluate cell-mediated immunity. The post-vaccination serum HI antibody geometric mean titers (GMTs for the H1N1 and H3N2 strains, antigen-specific serum IgG and IgA GMTs, mucosal SIgA GMT, splenic lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ were significantly increased in the high-dose PA-adjuvanted vaccine group. The seroconversion rate and the mucosal response for the H3N2 strain were significantly elevated after high-dose PA administration. These adjuvant effects of high-dose PA for the influenza vaccine were comparable with those of the MF59 adjuvant, and abnormal signs or pathological changes were not found in the evaluated organs. In conclusion, PA is a novel mucosal adjuvant for intranasal vaccination with the ITIV that has safe and effective mucosal adjuvanticity in mice and successfully induces both serum and mucosal antibody responses and a cell-mediated response.

  5. Immunization with r-Lactococcus lactis expressing outer membrane protein A of Shigella dysenteriae type-1: evaluation of oral and intranasal route of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, B; Sharma, D; Padh, H; Desai, P

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the comparative immunogenic potential of food grade Lactococcus lactis expressing outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Shigella dysenteriae type-1 (SD-1) when administered either orally or intranasally. OmpA of SD-1 was cloned and expressed first in Escherichia coli and then in L. lactis. Presence of recombinant gene was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and immunoblot analysis. Using immobilized metal affinity chromatography, OmpA was purified from recombinant E. coliBL21 (DE3) and subcutaneously administered in BALB/c mice. Detection of OmpA-specific IgG antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the immunogenicity of OmpA. In order to establish r-L. lactis as a mucosal delivery vehicle, it was administered orally and nasally in BALB/c mice. Serum IgG and faecal IgA were assessed through ELISA to compare the relative potential of immunization routes and immunogenic potential of r-L. lactis. Immunization via the oral route proved superior to intranasal exposure. Recombinant L. lactis expressing OmpA of SD-1 was found to be immunogenic. Oral administration of r-L. lactis elicited higher systemic and mucosal immune response when compared with the nasal route. Using food grade recombinant L. lactis has implications in the development of a prophylactic against multidrug-resistant Shigella, which can be used as a prospective vaccine candidate. Evaluating mucosal routes of immunization demonstrated that the oral route of administration elicited better immune response against OmpA of Shigella. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Immunization with Hexon modified adenoviral vectors integrated with gp83 epitope provides protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitra L Farrow

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Chagas disease is an endemic infection that affects over 8 million people throughout Latin America and now has become a global challenge. The current pharmacological treatment of patients is unsuccessful in most cases, highly toxic, and no vaccines are available. The results of inadequate treatment could lead to heart failure resulting in death. Therefore, a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses and protection against Chagas disease is necessary.The "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy is based upon the display of the T. cruzi epitope as an integral component of the adenovirus' capsid rather than an encoded transgene. This strategy is predicted to induce a robust humoral immune response to the presented antigen, similar to the response provoked by native Ad capsid proteins. The antigen chosen was T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that is used by T. cruzi to attach to host cells to initiate infection. The gp83 epitope, recognized by the neutralizing MAb 4A4, along with His6 were incorporated into the Ad serotype 5 (Ad5 vector to generate the vector Ad5-HVR1-gp83-18 (Ad5-gp83. This vector was evaluated by molecular and immunological analyses. Vectors were injected to elicit immune responses against gp83 in mouse models. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with the vector Ad5-gp83 and challenged with a lethal dose of T. cruzi trypomastigotes confer strong immunoprotection with significant reduction in parasitemia levels, increased survival rate and induction of neutralizing antibodies.This data demonstrates that immunization with adenovirus containing capsid-incorporated T. cruzi antigen elicits a significant anti-gp83-specific response in two different mouse models, and protection against T. cruzi infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses, as evidenced by the production of several Ig isotypes

  7. Perioperative stress in dogs undergoing elective surgery: evaluation of the Dog Appeasing Pheromone (DAP) for the control of behavioural, neuroendocrine, immune and acute phase stress responses

    OpenAIRE

    Siracusa, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Descripció del recurs: el 7 de gener de 2011 This clinical study is composed of two different trials. In the first we investigated and described the perioperative stress response in dogs undergoing elective orchiectomy and ovariohysterectomy. In the second trial we evaluated the efficacy of a commercial dog synthetic appeasing pheromone for the control of the perioperative stress response. The aim of this trial is to describe the behavioural, neuroendocrine, immune and acute phase stress r...

  8. Green tea EGCG, T-cell function, and T-cell-mediated autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoimmune diseases are common, disabling immune disorders affecting millions of people. Recent studies indicate that dysregulated balance of different CD4+ T-cell subpopulations plays a key role in immune pathogenesis of several major autoimmune diseases. Green tea and its active ingredient, epigal...

  9. Effects of immunosuppression on avian coccidiosis: cyclosporin A but not hormonal bursectomy abrogates host protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillehoj, H S

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment and hormonal bursectomy on Eimeria tenella infection of chickens were investigated to evaluate the role of humoral antibody and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the host protective immunity to an intestinal protozoan disease, coccidiosis. Hormonal bursectomy had no significant effect on the host response to E. tenella. CsA treatment had a differential effect on the course of disease depending on how CsA was given relative to infection. Daily administration of CsA for 7 days beginning 1 day before primary infection with E. tenella enhanced disease resistance, whereas a single dose of CsA given before primary infection enhanced disease susceptibility compared with that of untreated controls. Chickens treated with CsA during the primary infection were resistant to reinfection at 5 weeks post-primary infection. Treatment of chickens immune to E. tenella with CsA at the time of secondary infection abrogated their resistance to reinfection despite the presence of high levels of coccidia-specific secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G. Splenic lymphocytes obtained after CsA treatment demonstrated a substantially depressed concanavalin A response, but not a depressed lipopolysaccharide response. Because CsA was not directly toxic to parasites in vivo when administered during the secondary infection, these results suggest that CsA interacts with the immune system to allow priming during the primary infection, while interfering with the effector function of CMI during the secondary infection. Taken together, present findings indicate that CMI plays a major role in host protective immunity to E. tenella. PMID:3496277

  10. Flavored e-cigarette liquids and cinnamaldehyde impair respiratory innate immune cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Phillip W; Pawlak, Erica A; Lackey, Justin T; Keating, James E; Reeber, Steven L; Glish, Gary L; Jaspers, Ilona

    2017-08-01

    Innate immune cells of the respiratory tract are the first line of defense against pathogenic and environmental insults. Failure of these cells to perform their immune functions leaves the host susceptible to infection and may contribute to impaired resolution of inflammation. While combustible tobacco cigarettes have been shown to suppress respiratory immune cell function, the effects of flavored electronic cigarette liquids (e-liquids) and individual flavoring agents on respiratory immune cell responses are unknown. We investigated the effects of seven flavored nicotine-free e-liquids on primary human alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and natural killer (NK) cells. Cells were challenged with a range of e-liquid dilutions and assayed for their functional responses to pathogenic stimuli. End points included phagocytic capacity (neutrophils and macrophages), neutrophil extracellular trap formation, proinflammatory cytokine production, and cell-mediated cytotoxic response (NK cells). E-liquids were then analyzed via mass spectrometry to identify individual flavoring components. Three cinnamaldehyde-containing e-liquids exhibited dose-dependent broadly immunosuppressive effects. Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to determine concentrations of cinnamaldehyde in each of the three e-liquids, and cells were subsequently challenged with a range of cinnamaldehyde concentrations. Cinnamaldehyde alone recapitulated the impaired function observed with e-liquid exposures, and cinnamaldehyde-induced suppression of macrophage phagocytosis was reversed by addition of the small-molecule reducing agent 1,4-dithiothreitol. We conclude that cinnamaldehyde has the potential to impair respiratory immune cell function, illustrating an immediate need for further toxicological evaluation of chemical flavoring agents to inform regulation governing their use in e-liquid formulations. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Enteric Immunization of Mice Against Influenza with Recombinant Vaccinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitin, Catherine A.; Bender, Bradley S.; Small, Parker A., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Intrajejunal administration to mice of a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induced IgA antibody in nasal, gut, and vaginal secretions. It also induced IgG antibody in serum and cell-mediated immunity. The immunization provided significant protection against an influenza virus challenge. This work suggests that enteric-coated recombinant vaccinia could be an orally administered, inexpensive, multivalent, temperature-stable, safe, and effective vaccine for children that could be particularly useful in developing nations, where multiple injections are not easily administered. Oral administration of vaccines should also reduce children's fear of shots at the doctor's office.

  12. Chronological assessment of mast cell-mediated gut dysfunction and mucosal inflammation in a rat model of chronic psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, María; Guilarte, Mar; Alonso, Carmen; Yang, Pinchang; Martínez, Cristina; Ramos, Laura; Lobo, Beatriz; González, Ana; Guilà, Meritxell; Pigrau, Marc; Saperas, Esteban; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier

    2010-10-01

    Life stress and mucosal inflammation may influence symptom onset and severity in certain gastrointestinal disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in connection with dysregulated intestinal barrier. However, the mechanism responsible remains unknown. Crowding is a validated animal model reproducing naturalistic psychosocial stress, whose consequences on gut physiology remain unexplored. Our aims were to prove that crowding stress induces mucosal inflammation and intestinal dysfunction, to characterize dynamics in time, and to evaluate the implication of stress-induced mast cell activation on intestinal dysfunction. Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to 15 days of crowding stress (8 rats/cage) or sham-crowding (2 rats/cage). We measured spontaneous and corticotropin-releasing factor-mediated release of plasma corticosterone. Stress-induced intestinal chrono-pathobiology was determined by measuring intestinal inflammation, epithelial damage, mast cell activation and infiltration, and intestinal barrier function. Corticosterone release was higher in crowded rats throughout day 15. Stress-induced mild inflammation, manifested earlier in the ileum and the colon than in the jejunum. While mast cell counts remained mostly unchanged, piecemeal degranulation increased along time, as the mucosal content and luminal release of rat mast cell protease-II. Stress-induced mitochondrial injury and increased jejunal permeability, both events strongly correlated with mast cell activation at day 15. Taken together, we have provided evidences that long-term exposure to psychosocial stress promotes mucosal inflammation and mast cell-mediated barrier dysfunction in the rat bowel. The notable resemblance of these findings with those in some IBS patients, support the potential interest and translational validity of this experimental model for the research of stress-sensitive intestinal disorders, particularly IBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of an economical sunlamp that emits a near solar UV power spectrum for conducting photoimmunological and sunscreen immune protection studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.G.; Roberts, L.K. [Schering-Plough HealthCare Products, Memphis, TN (United States). Advanced Product Research; Beard, J.; Stanfield, J.W. [Schering-Plough HealthCare Products, Memphis, TN (United States). Solar Research Laboratories

    1996-08-01

    Unlike FS-type UVB sunlamps, which have a significant amount of effective immunosuppressive non-solar UV energy at wavelengths below 295 nm, the immunosuppression effectiveness spectrum of UVA-340 sunlamps was nearly identical to that of a solar simulator. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this sunlamp for conducting photoimmunological and sunscreen immune protection studies. Groups of C3H mice were exposed to a range of UVA-340 sunlamp doses (0.25 kJ/m{sup 2} to 20.0 kJ/m{sup 2}) to establish a dose-response curve and determine the minimum immune suppression dose (MISD) for induction of local-type suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CH). The MISD, defined as the lowest UV dose given to produce {approx} 50% suppression of the CH response in mice, was determined to be 1.0 kJ/m{sup 2} for UVA-340 sunlamps. Immune protection tests on four marketed sunscreen lotions (sun protection factors [SPF] 4, 8, 15 and 30) were then conducted with UVA-340 sunlamps using MISD as the endpoint. The immune protection factors for these sunscreens were equivalent to the level of protection predicted by their labeled SPF. These results are similar to those we have previously obtained using a solar simulator. (author).

  14. Equine influenza: evaluation of the humoral immune response through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis, in vaccinated horses with commercial and experimental vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Equine Influenza: evaluation of the humoral immune response through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis, in horses vaccinated with commercial and experimental vaccines. From 4 equine groups, the antibody protection levels against influenza were evaluted through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis. One group of these animals received immunization from 2 doses of influenza vaccine, of experimental preparation, at the Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brasil (IB. Two other horse groups, regularly vaccinated received the annual booster dose from both commercial and experimental vaccines (IB. A control group remained without vaccination. Differences were observed among the antibody level medians of the serum samples harvested prior and post immunization of those vaccinated animals. No evident differences were detected among the antibody level medians from animals that received annual booster doses, due to the persistence of the protective antibody level, 12 months after the regular immunization. In the control group, the animals showed low antibody levels, for both serum samples. In fact these results suggested the good serologic response of both vaccines, the commercial and the experimental, tested preparations.

  15. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  16. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies....

  17. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4+ T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3+ Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3+ Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3+ Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of a non-viral vaccine in smallpox-vaccinated individuals and immunized HLA-transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alice P; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Chen, Xiaochuan; Gold, David V; Goldenberg, David M

    2012-06-01

    The current poxvirus vaccine is associated with rare, but serious adverse events. Therefore, we investigated a non-replicating approach to vaccine design. Peptides encoding potential HLA-binding motifs were derived from the orthopoxvirus genes, D8L, A27L, and C12L (the IL-18-binding protein [vIL18BP105]), all of which are preserved among poxviruses that infect humans, and which may be a target of host immunity. The peptides were tested with poxvirus-vaccinated human PBMC and serum for eliciting memory responses, as well as with splenocytes and serum from peptide-immunized, human HLA-DR04 transgenic (HLA tg) mice. vIL18BP105 induced 5-fold proliferation of vaccinated-donor PBMC over non-vaccinated (P<0.001), including IL-2-producing CD8+ cells. Serum IgG recognizing vIL18BP105 was detected (P<0.002 vs non-vaccinated) by ELISA. Viral peptides were conjugated to the HLA-targeting mAb, L243, for immunization of HLA tg mice. Splenocytes from vIL18BP105-L243-immunized mice proliferated upon exposure to vIL18BP105 (P<0.001). Proliferating splenocytes were interferon-γ-producing CD4(+)CD45RA(neg). vIL18BP105-L243-immunized mice generated IgG more rapidly than free-peptide-immunized mice. Peptide-specific antibody was also detected when different L243-peptide conjugates were combined. vIL18BP, by eliciting human memory responses, is a viable antigen for inclusion in a virus-free vaccine. The immunogenicity of peptides was boosted by conjugation to L243, whether administered alone or combined. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuhong; Huang, Yuju; Liang, Yin; Ho, Yuchin; Wang, Yichen; Chang, Lung-Ji

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC) activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm) cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications. PMID:19660111

  20. Orally administered lactoferrin restores humoral immune response in immunocompromised mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michal; Paprocka, Maria; Kruzel, Marian L

    2003-10-09

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is an anti-tumor drug commonly used in the chemotherapy of human cancer and autoimmune diseases. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF), given orally to CP-immunosuppressed mice, could reconstitute a T cell mediated immune response by the renewal of the T cell population. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the effects of LF on humoral responses in mice treated with cyclophosphamide. We demonstrate that a single, sublethal dose of cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg body weight) profoundly inhibited the humoral immune response of CBA mice to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), as measured by the number of antibody forming cells (AFC) in the spleen after 5 weeks following CP treatment. Administration of 0.5% bovine LF in drinking water for 5 weeks partially reconstituted the AFC number (30-40% of the control values, but 7-10x more than in CP-treated controls). Determination of T and B cell levels in the spleens by flow cytometry revealed that the content of CD3+ and CD4+ as well as Ig+ splenocytes was elevated in the immunocompromised mice treated with LF. In addition, the number of peritoneal macrophages was partially restored following LF treatment. Evaluation of the proliferative response to concanavalin A (ConA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) demonstrated that the diminished reactivity of splenocytes from CP-treated mice was significantly enhanced by LF. In summary, we conclude that the prolonged, oral treatment of immunocompromised mice with LF led to partial reconstitution of the humoral response, associated with elevation of T and B cell and macrophage content and the proliferative response of splenocytes to mitogens.

  1. An endogenous immune adjuvant released by necrotic cells for enhancement of DNA vaccine potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorostkar, Rohollah; Bamdad, Taravat; Parsania, Masoud; Pouriayevali, Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Improving vaccine potency in the induction of a strong cell-mediated cytotoxicity can enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Necrotic cells and the supernatant of necrotic tumor cells are attractive adjuvants, on account of their ability to recruit antigen-presenting cells to the site of antigen synthesis as well as its ability to stimulate the maturation of dendritic cells. To evaluate the utility of supernatant of necrotic tumor cells as a DNA vaccine adjuvant in a murine model. The supernatant of EL4 necrotic cells was co-administered with a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein B of Herpes simplex virus-1 as an antigen model under the control of Cytomegalovirus promoter. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated three times at two weeks intervals with glycoprotein B DNA vaccine and supernatant of necrotic EL4 cells. Five days after the last immunization, cell cytotoxicity, IFN-γ and IL-4 were evaluated. The obtained data showed that the production of IFN-γ from the splenocytes after antigenic stimulation in the presence of the supernatant of necrotic EL4 cells was significantly higher than the other groups (pEL4 cells in the mice immunized with DNA vaccine and supernatant of necrotic EL4 cells comparing to the other groups (p<0.001). The supernatant of necrotic cells contains adjuvant properties that can be considered as a candidate for tumor vaccination.

  2. Modulation of CD112 by the alphaherpesvirus gD protein suppresses DNAM-1-dependent NK cell-mediated lysis of infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwet, Korneel; Cantoni, Claudia; Parodi, Monica; De Maria, Andrea; Devriendt, Bert; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W

    2014-11-11

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key players in the innate response to viruses, including herpesviruses. In particular, the variety of viral strategies to modulate the recognition of certain herpesviruses witnesses the importance of NK cells in the control of this group of viruses. Still, NK evasion strategies have remained largely elusive for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. Here, we report that the gD glycoprotein of the alphaherpesviruses pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties toward NK cells. Expression of gD during infection or transfection led to degradation and consequent down-regulation of CD112, a ligand for the activating NK receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1). CD112 downregulation resulted in a reduced ability of DNAM-1 to bind to the surface of both virus-infected and gD-transfected cells. Consequently, expression of gD suppressed NK cell degranulation and NK cell-mediated lysis of PRV- or HSV-2-infected cells. These data identify an alphaherpesvirus evasion strategy from NK cells and point out that interactions between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors can have biological consequences that stretch beyond virus entry.

  3. Modulation of CD112 by the alphaherpesvirus gD protein suppresses DNAM-1–dependent NK cell-mediated lysis of infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwet, Korneel; Cantoni, Claudia; Parodi, Monica; De Maria, Andrea; Devriendt, Bert; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key players in the innate response to viruses, including herpesviruses. In particular, the variety of viral strategies to modulate the recognition of certain herpesviruses witnesses the importance of NK cells in the control of this group of viruses. Still, NK evasion strategies have remained largely elusive for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. Here, we report that the gD glycoprotein of the alphaherpesviruses pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties toward NK cells. Expression of gD during infection or transfection led to degradation and consequent down-regulation of CD112, a ligand for the activating NK receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1). CD112 downregulation resulted in a reduced ability of DNAM-1 to bind to the surface of both virus-infected and gD-transfected cells. Consequently, expression of gD suppressed NK cell degranulation and NK cell-mediated lysis of PRV- or HSV-2–infected cells. These data identify an alphaherpesvirus evasion strategy from NK cells and point out that interactions between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors can have biological consequences that stretch beyond virus entry. PMID:25352670

  4. Disruption of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 5 Exacerbates Murine Experimental Colitis via Regulating T Helper Cell-Mediated Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jian; Li, Lixia; Wang, Xiaobing; Pan, Huaqin; Liu, Shi; He, Ruohang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5) is a key mediator of TNF receptor superfamily members and is important in both T helper (Th) cell immunity and the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To clarify TRAF5's influence on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), we investigated TRAF5 deficiency's effect on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced colitis. Colitis was induced in TRAF5 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates by administering 3% DSS orally for 7 days. The mice were then sacrificed, and their colons were removed. Our data suggested that KO mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17a mRNA and protein levels in the colons of DSS-fed mice, and the mRNA expression of T-bet and GATA-3 was also markedly elevated. However, ROR-α and ROR-γt mRNA levels did not differ between DSS-induced KO and WT mice. Flow cytometry showed increased frequencies of Th2 and IFN-γ/IL-17a-coproducing CD4(+) T cells in the colons of DSS-induced KO mice. Additionally, TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced the activation of NF-κB in CD4(+) T cells after DSS administration. These results indicated that TRAF5 deficiency significantly aggravated DSS-induced colitis, most likely by regulating Th cell-mediated inflammation.

  5. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  6. Evaluation of Humoral Immune Response against Somatic and Excretory-Secretory Antigens of Dicrocoelium Dendriticum in Infected Sheep by Western Blot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Razi Jalali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Dicrocoelium dendriticum is a worldwide spread parasite of liver, bile ducts and gallbladder of especially ruminants and humans as well. Identification of specific antigens is useful for early diagnosis of the infection. The goal of this study was the isolation and identification of excretory-secretory and somatic antigens from D. dendriticum by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS-PAGE and evaluation of humoral immune response against these antigens.   Methods: The parasites were collected and washed by phosphate buffered saline (PBS and supplemented by antibiotic for several times. For preparing somatic antigens, parasites were sonicated and centrifuged prior to collect supernatant. For preparing excretory-secretory antigens the viable parasites were transferred to the sterile medium. The samples were centrifuged and supernatants were collected. The sera of infected sheep with different infection degrees were collected too. Somatic and excretory-secretory proteins were isolated with SDS PAGE and stained with coomassie blue. Immunogenicity properties of the resulting proteins were determined using western blot analysis.   Results: The total extract of somatic antigens analyzed by SDS-PAGE revealed 21 proteins. In mild infection, bands of 130 KDa were immune dominant. In moderate infections 48, 80 and 130 KDa and in heavy infections 48, 60, 80, 130 KDa were detected as immune dominant bands. In excretory- secretory antigens seven bands of protein were detected. In mild infection 130 KDa, in moderate infection 100, 120 and 130 KDa and in heavy infection 45, 80, 85, 100, 120 and 130 KDa were immune dominant bands.   Conclusion: Probably the most immunogenic protein band during different degrees of infection was 130KDa that can be used for vaccination and inducing immunity.

  7. Evaluation of immune response, microbiota, and blood markers after probiotic bacteria administration in obese mice induced by a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Ivanna Novotny; Galdeano, Carolina Maldonado; de LeBlanc, Alejandra de Moreno; Perdigón, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with alterations in intestinal microbiota and immunity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 administration on intestinal and humoral immune response, clinical parameters, and gut microbiota was evaluated using a high-fat diet to induce obesity in a mouse model. Adult mice received a conventional balanced diet or a high-fat diet supplemented with milk, milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei (FM), L. casei as suspension, or water over 60 d. Histology of liver and small intestine (SI), immunoglobulin A-positive cells and macrophages in SI, phagocytic activity of spleen and peritoneal macrophages, and humoral immune response to ovalbumin were studied. Clinical parameters in serum and gut microbiota were also analyzed. FM was the most effective supplement for decreasing body weight and clinical parameters in serum. The histology of liver and SI was also improved in obese mice given FM. These animals had increased numbers of immunoglobulin A-positive cells and macrophages in SI. The gut microbiota showed that obese mice given probiotics had increased Bacteroides and bifidobacteria. Administration of FM or L. casei as suspension enhanced the phagocytic activity of macrophages. The anti-ovalbumin specific immune response was not increased by any supplement assayed. Administration of probiotics to obese hosts improved the gut microbiota and the mucosal immunity altered by obesity, down-regulated some biochemical parameters in blood associated with metabolic syndrome, and decreased liver steatosis. These results demonstrate the potential use of probiotics in obese individuals to decrease the body weight and to improve the biochemical and immunologic parameters altered by obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photoperiod, ambient temperature, and food availability interact to affect reproductive and immune function in adult male deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, G E; Nelson, R J

    1998-06-01

    Winter is often stressful. Increased energetic demands in winter and concurrent reductions in energy availability can lead to an energetic imbalance and compromise survival. To increase the odds of surviving winter, individuals of some nontropical rodent species have evolved mechanisms to enhance immune function in advance of harsh winter conditions. Short day lengths provide a proximate cue for enhancement of immune function, an adaptive functional response to counter environmental stress-induced reduction in immune function. In the present study, photoperiod, ambient temperature, and food availability were manipulated and reproductive function and cell-mediated immunity were assessed in adult male deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Mice maintained in short days regressed their reproductive systems and displayed enhanced immune function compared to long-day animals. Reduced food availability elevated corticosterone concentrations and suppressed reproductive and immune function, whereas ambient temperature alone had no effect on cell-mediated immunity. The suppressive effect of food restriction on reproductive and immune function was overcome by maintaining animals in short days. However, short-day, food-restricted mice maintained at low ambient temperatures displayed reduced reproductive and immune function compared to animals maintained at mild temperatures. Taken together, these results suggest that short-day enhancement of immune function can counteract some, but not all, of the immunosuppressive effects of winter stressors. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that immune function is enhanced in short days to counteract stress-mediated immune suppression occurring during winter.

  9. Impact of a pharmacist immunizer on adult immunization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Suzanne; Stewart, Autumn; Pfalzgraf, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To describe the immunization needs of indigent community-dwelling patients from a primary care center for the medically underserved, evaluate the impact of a pharmacist immunizer on vaccination rates of adults presenting for care, and evaluate the impact of a pharmacist immunizer on the percent of adult patients who are current on immunizations. Prospective, controlled, parallel study among patients aged 18 to 79 years presenting for a medical appointment at a primary health care center located in a metropolitan area and providing care to the medically underserved. An immunization needs assessment (INA) was used to identify patients not current on adult immunizations. The intervention group received an offer to be immunized by a pharmacist using the results from the INA. Vaccination rates and percent of patients current on vaccinations were obtained using electronic medical records. Of 101 participants, 82 (81.2%) needed at least one immunization. The availability of a pharmacist immunizer had a significant impact on the number of patients who were current on all immunizations at the completion of the study. The combination of the INA by a pharmacist demonstrated a significant effect on influenza and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccination rates. The use of an identical tool by other health care providers did not have an impact on individual vaccine rates or the likelihood of patients being brought current on vaccinations. A dedicated pharmacist immunizer embedded in an indigent care primary health care clinic had a significant impact on increasing adult immunization rates and bringing patients current on vaccinations.

  10. Evaluation of immune and apoptosis related gene responses using an RNAi approach in vaccinated Penaeus monodon during oral WSSV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, A.D.; Caipang, C.M.A.; Kiron, V.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Fernandes, J.M.O.; Brinchmann, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study RNA interference was used to elucidate the connection between two endogenous genes [Penaeus monodon Rab7 (PmRab7) or P. monodon inhibitor of apoptosis (PmIAP)], and selected immune/apoptosis-related genes in orally ‘vaccinated’ shrimp after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)

  11. A prospective study of the influence of a thalassaemia on morbidity from malaria and immune responses to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens in Gambian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, S J; Rowe, P; Allsopp, C E

    1993-01-01

    and morbidity from malaria determined by weekly surveillance were similar in children with alpha thalassaemia and in those with a normal alpha-globin genotype. However, the small number of children who carried both alpha thalassaemia and the sickle cell trait had fewer clinical episodes of malaria than children...... with the sickle cell trait alone. Specific antibody responses and cell-mediated immune responses in vitro to defined Plasmodium falciparum antigens were measured in children participating in the study. In general, there was no evidence of an increased prevalence or intensity of humoral or cell-mediated immune...

  12. Relevance of compartmentalization of T-cell subsets for clinical improvement in psoriasis: effect of immune-targeted antipsoriatic therapies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingen, R.G. van; Korver, J.E.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Berends, M.A.M.; Rens, D.W.A. van; Langewouters, A.M.G.; Boezeman, J.B.M.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapies targeting the T cell-mediated pathology of psoriasis have been found to achieve remarkable clinical improvement and have confirmed the crucial role of the immune system either in peripheral blood (PB) or in skin. No analyses of T-cell counts in both compartments have been

  13. Immune Responses of Dairy Cattle to Parainfluenza-3 Virus in Intranasal Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis-Parainfluenza-3 Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Burroughs, A.L.; Morrill, J.L.; Bostwick, J.L.; Ridley, R.K.; Fryer, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty dairy heifers were vaccinated at three to six months of age with an intranasal infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-parainfluenza-3 vaccine. Eighteen additional heifers were tested prior to vaccination and again three to four weeks after vaccination. Neither cell-mediated nor humoral immunity was significantly raised to parainfluenza-3 virus in either group of cattle.

  14. Immunotherapy with internally inactivated virus loaded dendritic cells boosts cellular immunity but does not affect feline immunodeficiency virus infection course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella; Mazzetti, Paola; Tarabella, Francesca; Ricci, Enrica; Bozzacco, Leonia; Merico, Antonio; Pistello, Mauro; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2008-04-17

    Immunotherapy of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDCs) loaded with aldrithiol-2 (AT2)-inactivated homologous FIV was performed. Although FIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses were markedly increased, viral loads and CD4+ T cell depletion were unaffected, thus indicating that boosting antiviral cell-mediated immunity may not suffice to modify infection course appreciably.

  15. Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID: An Acute Response to Ocular Insult Protects from Future Immune-Mediated Damage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Cone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The “immune privilege” that inhibits immune defense mechanisms that could lead to damage to sensitive ocular tissue is based on the expression of immunosuppressive factors on ocular tissue and in ocular fluids. In addition to this environmental protection, the injection of antigen into the anterior chamber or infection in the anterior chamber induces a systemic suppression of potentially damaging cell-mediated and humoral responses to the antigen. Here we discuss evidence that suggests that Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID a is initiated by an ocular response to moderate inflammation that leads to a systemic immunoregulatory response. Injection into the anterior chamber induces a rise in TNF-α and MCP-1 in aqueous humor and an infiltration of circulating F4/80 + monocytes that home to the iris. The induction of ACAID is dependent on this infiltration of circulating monocytes that eventually emigrate to the thymus and spleen where they induce regulatory T cells that inhibit the inductive or effector phases of a cell-mediated immune response. ACAID therefore protects the eye from the collateral damage of an immune response to infection by suppressing a future potentially damaging response to infection.

  16. Use of mycophenolate mofetil to treat immune-mediated skin disease in 14 dogs - a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Amanda L; May, Elizabeth R; Frank, Linda A

    2017-04-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a lymphocytotoxic immunosuppressive agent used in human and companion animal medicine for the treatment of immune-mediated disease. Mycophenolate mofetil is reported to have reduced myelotoxicity and hepatotoxicity when compared to azathioprine. It was hypothesized that treatment with MMF as a secondary agent with glucocorticoids would be effective in treating immune-mediated skin disease. In addition, adverse effects associated with the drug are reported. Fourteen dogs from a hospital population diagnosed with immune-mediated skin disease. A retrospective review of medical records from 2010 to 2015 was used to identify dogs with immune-mediated skin disease that were treated with MMF. All dogs were treated with MMF (mean dose 14.7 mg/kg twice daily) in conjunction with glucocorticoids. Ten of 14 cases showed positive results, with complete remission in eight cases and partial remission in two cases. Mean time to remission was 5.7 weeks. Therapy was discontinued in one case (perianal fistula) due to lack of response. Adverse events were noted in six cases and included diarrhoea (n = 6), haematochezia (n = 2), vomiting (n = 3) and papilloma formation (n = 1). Therapy was discontinued in two cases with diarrhoea. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued in an additional case because of a diagnosis of neoplasia. All other adverse events were self-limiting or easily medically managed. No hepatotoxicity or bone marrow suppression was noted. This study supports the use of MMF as a second-line immunotherapeutic in immune-mediated skin disease in dogs. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. A marked reduction in priming of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells mediated by stress-induced glucocorticoids involves multiple deficiencies in cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunzeker, John T; Elftman, Michael D; Mellinger, Jennifer C; Princiotta, Michael F; Bonneau, Robert H; Truckenmiller, Mary E; Norbury, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Protracted psychological stress elevates circulating glucocorticoids, which can suppress CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs), required for initiating CTL responses, are vulnerable to stress/corticosterone, which can contribute to diminished CTL responses. Cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells by DCs is required for initiating CTL responses against many intracellular pathogens that do not infect DCs. We examined the effects of stress/corticosterone on MHC class I (MHC I) cross-presentation and priming and show that stress/corticosterone-exposed DCs have a reduced ability to cross-present OVA and activate MHC I-OVA(257-264)-specific T cells. Using a murine model of psychological stress and OVA-loaded β(2)-microglobulin knockout "donor" cells that cannot present Ag, DCs from stressed mice induced markedly less Ag-specific CTL proliferation in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner, and endogenous in vivo T cell cytolytic activity generated by cross-presented Ag was greatly diminished. These deficits in cross-presentation/priming were not due to altered Ag donation, Ag uptake (phagocytosis, receptor-mediated endocytosis, or fluid-phase uptake), or costimulatory molecule expression by DCs. However, proteasome activity in corticosterone-treated DCs or splenic DCs from stressed mice was partially suppressed, which limits formation of antigenic peptide-MHC I complexes. In addition, the lymphoid tissue-resident CD11b(-)CD24(+)CD8α(+) DC subset, which carries out cross-presentation/priming, was preferentially depleted in stressed mice. At the same time, CD11b(-)CD24(+)CD8α(-) DC precursors were increased, suggesting a block in development of CD8α(+) DCs. Therefore, glucocorticoid-induced changes in both the cellular composition of the immune system and intracellular protein degradation contribute to impaired CTL priming in stressed mice.

  18. Tryptophan biosynthesis protects mycobacteria from CD4 T cell-mediated killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjia J.; Reddy, Manchi C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Dartois, Veronique; Schuster, Brian M.; Trauner, Andrej; Wallis, Deeann; Galaviz, Stacy; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sacchettini, James C.; Behar, Samuel M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteria that cause disease rely on their ability to counteract and overcome host defenses. Here we present a genome-scale study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that uncovers the bacterial determinants of surviving host immunity, sets of genes we term “counteractomes.” Through this, we find that CD4 T cells attempt to starve Mtb of tryptophan through a mechanism that limits Chlamydia and Leishmania infections. In those cases, tryptophan starvation works well, since those pathogens are natural tryptophan auxotrophs. Mtb, however, can synthesize tryptophan, and thus starvation fails as an Mtb-killing mechanism. We then describe a small molecule inhibitor of Mtb tryptophan synthesis, which turns Mtb into a tryptophan auxotroph and restores the efficacy of a failed host defense. Together, our findings demonstrate that the Mtb determinants for surviving host immunity—Mtb’s immune counteractomes—serve as probes of host immunity, uncovering immune-mediated stresses that can be leveraged for therapeutic discovery. PMID:24315099

  19. T Lymphocyte Immunity in Host Defence against Chlamydia trachomatis and Its Implication for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Yang

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes several significant human infectious diseases, including trachoma, urethritis, cervicitis and salpingitis, and is an important cofactor for transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Until very recently, over three decades of research effort aimed at developing a C trachomatis vaccine had failed, due mainly to the lack of a precise understanding of the mechanisms for protective immunity. Although most studies concerning protective immunity to C trachomatis have focused on humoral immune responses, recent studies have clearly shown that T helper-1 (Th1-like CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses play the dominant role in protective immunity. These studies suggest a paradigm for chlamydial immunity and pathology based on the concept of heterogeneity (Th1/Th2 in CD4 T cell immune responses. This concept for chlamydial immunity offers a rational template on which to base renewed efforts for development of a chlamydial vaccine that targets the induction of cell-mediated Th1 immune responses.

  20. Mosquito immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Julián F

    2010-01-01

    Throughout their lifetime, mosquitoes are exposed to pathogens during feeding, through breaks in their cuticle and following pathogen-driven cuticular degradation. To resist infection, mosquitoes mount innate cellular and humoral immune responses that are elicited within minutes of exposure and can lead to pathogen death via three broadly defined mechanisms: lysis, melanization and hemocyte-mediated phagocytosis. This chapter reviews our current understanding of the mosquito immune system, with an emphasis on the physical barriers that prevent pathogens from entering the body, the organs and tissues that regulate immune responses and the mechanistic and molecular bases of immunity.

  1. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-allergic activity of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) in mast cell mediated allergy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, V M; Halagali, K S; Nidavani, R B; Shalavadi, M H; Biradar, B S; Biswas, D; Muchchandi, I S

    2011-09-01

    Chamomile is most popular used medicinal plant and extensively consumed as a tea or tisanes. Traditionally this plant was used for treatment of many ailments such as allergy disorders and inflammatory mediated diseases. We investigated the effects of anti-allergic activity of Matricaria recutita L. on mast cell mediated allergic models. The protective effect of methanol extract of Matricaria recutita against compound 48/80 induced anaphylaxis and pruritis models for acute phase of hypersensitivity reactions were carried out. The late phase hypersensitivity reactions by compound 48/80 induced mast cell degranulation and histamine release from blood along with serum nitric oxide (NO), rat peritoneal fluid nitric oxide (NO) and bronchoalveolar fluid nitric oxide (NO) levels were measured. The methanol extract of Matricaria recutita L. showed inhibitory effects on anaphylaxis induced by compound 48/80 and significant dose dependent anti-pruritis property was observed by inhibiting the mast cell degranulation. Mast cell membrane stabilization activity was also observed in compound 48/80 induced mast cell activation. Dose dependent reduction in the histamine release, along with decreased release of serum, rat peritoneal and BAL fluid nitric oxide (NO) levels were observed. These results suggest that the methanol extract of Matricaria recutita showed potent anti-allergic activity by inhibition of histamine release from mast cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Optimization of triple plasmids transfection into HEK293 cells mediated by polyethylenimine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Li, Yan; Zheng, Zhaofen; Liu, Aizhong; Yuan, Zhenhua; Peng, Jianqiang; He, Jin

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, packaging system composed of pAAV-CMV-GFP, pAAV-RC and pHelper were transfected into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) to explore an optimal transfection condition. Different total plasmid DNA dosages (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 μg) and different PEI/Plasmid ratios (1:1, 3:1, 5:1, 7:1) were tested with detection of green fluorescence protein (GFP) with ImagePro Plus6. 0 Software. Then transfection efficiency of the optimized transfection system was further observed for different time periods(12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h). The results showed that total plasmid dosage of 4 μg/well with PEI/plasmid ratio of 3 : 1-5 : 1 was an efficient transfection condition. Transfection efficiency-time curve was an S-shaped curve. Transfection efficiency reached a plateau at 60 h after transfection. The optimized conditions for PEI-mediated transfection at the optimal time result in enhanced transfection efficiency of triple plasmid into HEK293 cells.

  4. [Bortezomib enhances the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Gao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether bortezomib can enhance the sensitivity of human prostate cancer (PCa) cells to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and whether it produces the same effect on different PCa cell lines. We treated androgen-dependent PCa LNCaP cells and androgen-independent PCa DU145 cells with bortezomib at the concentrations of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 nmol/L for 24, 48 and 72 hours, and then detected the proliferation and apoptosis of the tumor cells by CCK-8 and Annexin V/PI, respectively. The proliferation rates of the DU145 cells treated with 15, 20 and 25 nmol/L bortezomib were (82.79 +/-2.04)%, (73.59+/- 2.95)% and (74.16+/- 6. 16)% at 48 hours and (71.24+/- 5.30)%, (51.20+/- 2.91)% and (38.02+/- 2.67)% at 72 hours, and those of the LNCaP cells were (77.04+/- 7.74)% , (42.61 +/- 6.62)% and (23.85 +/-6.04)% at 48 hours and (36.45 +/-7.02)%, (14.94 +/-5.76)% and (11.65 +/-5. 87)% at 72 hours, both significantly inhibited as compared with the control group (P cancer therapies, and it is more efficacious for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  5. Crosstalk between PKCζ and the IL4/Stat6 pathway during T-cell-mediated hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Angeles; Rodriguez, Angelina; Martin, Pilar; Serrano, Manuel; Flores, Juana Maria; Leitges, Michael; Diaz-Meco, María T; Moscat, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    PKCζ is required for nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κB) activation in several cell systems. NF-κB is a suppressor of liver apoptosis during development and in concanavalin A (ConA)-induced T-cell-mediated hepatitis. Here we show that PKCζ−/− mice display inhibited ConA-induced NF-κB activation and reduced damage in liver. As the IL-4/Stat6 pathway is necessary for ConA-induced hepatitis, we addressed here the potential role of PKCζ in this cascade. Interestingly, the loss of PKCζ severely attenuated serum IL-5 and liver eotaxin-1 levels, two critical mediators of liver damage. Stat6 tyrosine phosphorylation and Jak1 activation were ablated in the liver of ConA-injected PKCζ−/− mice and in IL-4-stimulated PKCζ−/− fibroblasts. PKCζ interacts with and phosphorylates Jak1 and PKCζ activity is required for Jak1 function. In contrast, Par-4−/− mice have increased sensitivity to ConA-induced liver damage and IL-4 signaling. This unveils a novel and critical involvement of PKCζ in the IL-4/Stat6 signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15526032

  6. Cross-reactivity and tolerability of cephalosporins in patients with cell-mediated allergy to penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonomo, A; Nucera, E; Pecora, V; Rizzi, A; Aruanno, A; Pascolini, L; Ricci, A G; Colagiovanni, A; Schiavino, D

    2014-01-01

    13-Lactams are the most commonly used antibiotics but they can cause hypersensitivity reactions. We sought to estimate cross-reactivity and tolerability of cephalosporins in patients with cell-mediated allergy to penicillins. We studied 97 patients with a clinical history of nonimmediate reactions to a penicillin and a positive patch test result to at least 1 of the penicillins tested. All patients also underwent patch testing with several cephalosporins. Patients with a negative patch test to a cephalosporin underwent test dosing in order to assess tolerability. We recorded 129 reactions. The most commonly involved drugs were aminopenicillins, and the most widely reported symptoms were delayed urticaria and maculopapular exanthema. Seventeen patients had positive patch test results for cephalosporins, mostly for cephalexin (n=10), cefaclor (n=9), and cefuroxime axetil (n=5). All the patients-except 4 who experienced an exanthema after the challenge test with cephalexin-tolerated a therapeutic dose of the cephalosporin tested without any adverse effects. Our data show that cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins may be as high as 10.9% for first-generation cephalosporins and 1.1% for third-generation cephalosporins, possibly due to the involvement of similar side chains. Patch tests are a useful diagnostic tool to assess cross-reactivity, but a graded challenge is mandatory because a negative patch test does not always mean tolerability.

  7. An objective definition for clinical suspicion of T-cell-mediated rejection after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; De Luca, Laura; Crespo, Gonzalo; Rubin, Ángel; Marín, Sandra; Benlloch, Salvador; Colmenero, Jordi; Berenguer, Marina; Navasa, Miguel; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel; De la Mata, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    A uniform definition of clinical suspicion of T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) in liver transplantation (LT) is needed to homogenize clinical decisions, especially within randomized trials. This multicenter study included a total of 470 primary LT recipients. The derivation cohort consisted of 142 patients who had clinically driven liver biopsies at any time after LT. The external validation cohort included 328 patients who underwent protocol biopsies at day 7-10 after LT. The rates of moderate-severe histological TCMR were 33.8% in the derivation cohort and 43.6% in the validation cohort. Independent predictors (ie, risk factors) of moderate-severe TCMR in the derivation cohort were as follows: serum bilirubin >4 mg/dL (OR=5.83; P0.1×109 /L (OR=3.81; P=.004). In the validation cohort, the number of risk factors was an independent predictor of moderate-severe TCMR (OR=1.74; P=.001), after controlling for hepatitis C status. The number of risk factors paralleled the rates of moderate-severe TCMR in the derivation and validation cohorts (Pobjective criteria to select candidates for liver biopsy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Active immunization with Brucella abortus S19 phage lysate elicits serum IgG that protects guinea pigs against virulent B. abortus and protects mice by passive immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Lata; Rawat, Mayank; Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Kumar, Bablu

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is an economically important zoonosis of worldwide significance. Earlier (Jain et al., 2015) we reported methodology for generation of phage lysate preparations against Brucella abortus S19 using brucellaphage 'ϕLd'. In this study, using a fixed dose (Two mouse PD 100 ) of lysates, the prophylactic efficacies of both plain and alum gel adjuvanted lysates were evaluated in guinea pig by direct virulent challenge and passive mouse protection test (PMPT). Strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses in guinea pigs and protection comparable to S19 vaccine was observed with low dose (1.0 μg protein and 120 μg carbohydrate adsorbed on 0.1% aluminium gel). Passive transfer of antibodies to mice using d 90 post immunization sera of guinea pig protected the animals against challenge. The study suggested the significance of humoral immunity in murine brucellosis. Further, the methodology can be explored to produce a new class of immunotherapeutic agents against bovine brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MYD88-DEPENDENT PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY ELICITED BY ADENOVIRUS 5 EXPRESSING THE SURFACE ANTIGEN 1 FROM TOXOPLASMA GONDII IS MEDIATED BY CD8+ T LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Érica A.; Caetano, Bráulia C.; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite widely spread around the world. The Surface Antigens (SAG) 1, 2 and 3 are the main proteins expressed on the surface of T. gondii tachyzoites. Replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) is one of the most potent recombinant viral vectors for eliciting T cell-mediated immunity in mice and humans. Here we show that vaccination with rAd5 expressing SAG1 (AdSAG1), but neither SAG2 nor SAG3, induces protective immunity in the highly susceptible C57BL/6 mice challenged with T. gondii. Furthermore, we evaluated different immunological components involved on viral induced protective immunity. We observed that host protection elicited by AdSAG1 is highly dependent on IL-12, IFN-γ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Importantly, the induction of protective immunity (T cell-derived IFN-γ) was also dependent on Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (MyD88), and thus, likely to involve Toll-Like receptors. We conclude that protective parasite specific-CD8+ T cells are elicited by a mechanism that involves MyD88-dependent induction of IL-12. PMID:21549794

  10. EXPRESSION OF GLYCOPROTEIN gD AND EVALUATION OF IMMUNE RESPONSE OF BOVINE HERPES VIRUS TYPE-1 IN BUFFALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Chowdhury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Herpes Virus type-1 (BoHV-1 causes a multitude of clinical symptoms in cattle, buffaloes and small ruminants. No effective live attenuated or killed vaccine is currently available and extensive research work in progress towards the development of the subunit and genetically engineered vaccine. Since DNA vaccine is currently regarded as most important breakthrough in vaccinology, the present work was aimed at construction of DNA vaccine using most immunogenic glycoprotein gD and studying its immune response and protection in buffalo. gD specific DIG labelled probe was used to screen gD specific clones from cDNA library. The gD specific cloned plasmid was purified for eukaryotic expression. The SDS-PAGE & Western blot analysis showed the transient expression of the expected 71 kDa gD following transfection in COS-7 cells. Four seronegative buffalo calves were immunized at 0, 30 and 60 days with recombinant purified plasmid and two calves were kept as control. The result of SNT, ELISA and MTT indicate gene specific seroconversion and CMI response following immunization with plasmid. At 86 days of post first vaccination, animals were challenged with virulent BoHV-1 (216/IBR. Hematological picture of the control animals showed leucopenia and that was due to destruction of lymphocytes shown by TLC and apoptosis study. Vaccinated animals showed reduced virus shedding in terms of days post challenge as well as titers compared to the controls. Based on the above findings, we concluded that DNA based vaccine induces specific and protective immune responses to the buffalo.

  11. Evaluation of the protective immunity of a novel subunit fusion vaccine in a murine model of systemic MRSA infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Fei Zuo

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common commensal organism in humans and a major cause of bacteremia and hospital acquired infection. Because of the spread of strains resistant to antibiotics, these infections are becoming more difficult to treat. Therefore, exploration of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is currently a high priority. Iron surface determinant B (IsdB is an iron-regulated cell wall-anchored surface protein of S. aureus. Alpha-toxin (Hla is a secreted cytolytic pore-forming toxin. Previous studies reported that immunization with IsdB or Hla protected animals against S. aureus infection. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we constructed chimeric vaccines based on IsdB and Hla. Immunization with the chimeric bivalent vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses. When the protective efficacy of the chimeric bivalent vaccine was compared to that of individual proteins in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection, the bivalent vaccine showed a stronger protective immune response than the individual proteins (IsdB or Hla. Based on the results presented here, the chimeric bivalent vaccine affords higher levels of protection against S. aureus and has potential as a more effective candidate vaccine.

  12. Evaluation of immune responses following infection of ponies with an EHV-1 ORF1/2 deletion mutant

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    Soboll Hussey Gisela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1 infection remains a significant problem despite the widespread use of vaccines. The inability to generate a protective immune response to EHV-1 vaccination or infection is thought to be due to immunomodulatory properties of the virus, and the ORF1 and ORF2 gene products have been hypothesized as potential candidates with immunoregulatory properties. A pony infection study was performed to define immune responses to EHV-1, and to determine if an EHV-1 ORF1/2 deletion mutant (ΔORF1/2 would have different disease and immunoregulatory effects compared to wild type EHV-1 (WT. Infection with either virus led to cytokine responses that coincided with the course of clinical disease, particularly the biphasic pyrexia, which correlates with respiratory disease and viremia, respectively. Similarly, both viruses caused suppression of proliferative T-cell responses on day 7 post infection (pi. The ΔORF1/ORF2 virus caused significantly shorter primary pyrexia and significantly reduced nasal shedding, and an attenuated decrease in PBMC IL-8 as well as increased Tbet responses compared to WT-infected ponies. In conclusion, our findings are (i that infection of ponies with EHV-1 leads to modulation of immune responses, which are correlated with disease pathogenesis, and (ii that the ORF1/2 genes are of importance for disease outcome and modulation of cytokine responses.

  13. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... viruses, and substances that appear foreign and harmful. Information The immune system protects the body from possibly harmful substances by ... reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Immune System and Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read ...

  14. Evaluation of the immune response induced by DNA vaccines expressing MIF and MCD-1 genes of Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2012-12-01

    Plasmids expressing macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) of Trichinella spiralis (TsMIF), multi-cystatin-like domain protein (MCD-1) of T. spiralis (TsMCD-1), or co-expressing TsMIF and TsMCD-1 were constructed with a pVAX1 vector. Their ability to generate a protective immune response against T. spiralis infection was evaluated in BALB/c mice. Groups of mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of recombinant plasmids pVAX1-Tsmif, pVAX1-Tsmcd-1 or pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1. Control animals were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17) and CD4+/CD8+ T cells were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks following the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Vaccination with pVAX1-Tsmif induced moderate serum IFN-γ and increases of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but no specific immunoglobulin antibody response. Vaccination with pVAX1-Tsmcd-1 induced a predominant Th1 antibody (IgG2a and IgG2b) response and strong levels of serum IFN-γ, and increases of CD4+ T cells. Importantly, co-expression of TsMIF and TsMCD-1 in DNA immunization produced more serum IFN-γ and markedly enhanced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the single DNA vaccine of the two genes. Challenge infection demonstrated that immunization with pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 reduced worm burdens (by 23.17%; P < 0.05).

  15. The potential of adjuvants to improve immune responses against TdaP vaccines: A preclinical evaluation of MF59 and monophosphoryl lipid A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnolon, Valentina; Bruno, Cristina; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Galletti, Bruno; D'Oro, Ugo; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Seubert, Anja; O'Hagan, Derek T; Baudner, Barbara C

    2015-08-15

    The successful approach of combining diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis antigens into a single vaccine has become a cornerstone of immunization programs. Yet, even if vaccination coverage is high, a resurgence of pertussis has been reported in many countries suggesting current vaccines may not provide adequate protection. To induce better tailored and more durable immune responses against pertussis vaccines different approaches have been proposed, including the use of novel adjuvants. Licensed aP vaccines contain aluminum salts, which mainly stimulate humoral immune responses and might not be ideal for protecting against Bordetella pertussis infection. Adjuvants inducing more balanced T-helper profiles or even Th1-prone responses might be more adequate. In this study, two adjuvants already approved for human use have been tested: MF59 emulsion and the combination of aluminum hydroxide with the Toll-Like Receptor 4 agonist MPLA. Adjuvanticity was evaluated in a mouse model using a TdaP vaccine containing three B. pertussis antigens: genetically detoxified pertussis toxin (PT-9K/129G), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (PRN) The physico-chemical compatibility of TdaP antigens with the proposed adjuvants, together with a quicker onset and changed quality of the antibody responses, fully supports the replacement of aluminum salts with a new adjuvant to enhance aP vaccines immunogenicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Maternal immunity enhances systemic recall immune responses upon oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ut V; Melkebeek, Vesna; Devriendt, Bert; Goetstouwers, Tiphanie; Van Poucke, Mario; Peelman, Luc; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Cox, Eric

    2015-06-23

    F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause diarrhoea and mortality in piglets leading to severe economic losses. Oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae induces a protective intestinal immune response evidenced by an F4-specific serum and intestinal IgA response. However, successful oral immunization of pigs with F4 fimbriae in the presence of maternal immunity has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of maternal immunity on the induction of a systemic immune response upon oral immunization of piglets. Whereas F4-specific IgG and IgA could be induced by oral immunization of pigs without maternal antibodies and by intramuscular immunization of pigs with maternal antibodies, no such response was seen in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Since maternal antibodies can mask an antibody response, we also looked by ELIspot assays for circulating F4-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs). Enumerating the F4-specific ASCs within the circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the number of F4-specific IgA ASCs within the circulating IgA(+) B-cells revealed an F4-specific immune response in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Interestingly, results suggest a more robust IgA booster response by oral immunization of pigs with than without maternal antibodies. These results demonstrate that oral immunization of piglets with F4-specific maternal antibodies is feasible and that these maternal antibodies seem to enhance the secondary systemic immune response. Furthermore, our ELIspot assay on enriched IgA(+) B-cells could be used as a screening procedure to optimize mucosal immunization protocols in pigs with maternal immunity.

  17. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.

  18. Immune response to fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, R D

    1989-01-01

    In general, fungi are saprophytes that are well adapted to grow in nature supported by diverse nutritional substrates. For fungi, in contrast to many other microorganisms that infect humans, parasitism is an accidental phenomenon rather than an obligatory requirement for survival. Thus, with progressive improvement in our capabilities to prolong survival of patients with global defects in host defense mechanisms, clinical experience suggests that human tissues may support growth of numerous species of saprophytic fungi that share the capacity to grow at 37 degrees C. Normally, however, a broad array of natural and acquired host defense mechanisms make the occurrence of progressive, systemic, life-threatening mycoses extremely rare events. When one or another of these host defense mechanisms is compromised, one of a variety of significant fungal infections may then progress. Mycoses may be broadly categorized into those controlled largely by natural cellular defenses vs. acquired cell-mediated immunity. Notwithstanding data that permit such general classification of host factors controlling one or another invasive mycosis, the diverse structural and antigenic properties of individual fungi create unique patterns of infections in individual, characteristic host settings. Thus, while some broad generalizations are possible, definition of predisposing factors for specific individual mycoses (and, ultimately, prospects for corrective immunotherapy) requires careful characterization of diverse features of fungal forms mediating divergent immune responses.

  19. Distinct effects on diversifying selection by two mechanisms of immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation to evade host immunity h