WorldWideScience

Sample records for evading temperature quantum

  1. Evading Quantum Mechanics: Engineering a Classical Subsystem within a Quantum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankei Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics is potentially advantageous for certain information-processing tasks, but its probabilistic nature and requirement of measurement backaction often limit the precision of conventional classical information-processing devices, such as sensors and atomic clocks. Here we show that, by engineering the dynamics of coupled quantum systems, it is possible to construct a subsystem that evades the measurement backaction of quantum mechanics, at all times of interest, and obeys any classical dynamics, linear or nonlinear, that we choose. We call such a system a quantum-mechanics-free subsystem (QMFS. All of the observables of a QMFS are quantum-nondemolition (QND observables; moreover, they are dynamical QND observables, thus demolishing the widely held belief that QND observables are constants of motion. QMFSs point to a new strategy for designing classical information-processing devices in regimes where quantum noise is detrimental, unifying previous approaches that employ QND observables, backaction evasion, and quantum noise cancellation. Potential applications include gravitational-wave detection, optomechanical-force sensing, atomic magnetometry, and classical computing. Demonstrations of dynamical QMFSs include the generation of broadband squeezed light for use in interferometric gravitational-wave detection, experiments using entangled atomic-spin ensembles, and implementations of the quantum Toffoli gate.

  2. Back action evading quantum limited measurements of a nanomechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndukum, Tchefor; Rocheleau, Tristan; Hertzberg, Jared; Schwab, Keith

    2009-03-01

    By driving a 5GHz superconducting, co-planar waveguide (CPW) resonator coupled to a radio-frequency nanomechanical resonator with both red- and blue-detuned, phase coherent microwave signals, we demonstrate amplifier noise back action evading(BAE) detection of one quadrature of nanomechanical motion. With this method we show precise measurements of a single motional quadrature with additive measurement noise of 4 times the zero point amplitude, and a reduction in sensitivity to injected measurement noise of a factor of 43 in comparison to a single tone, non-BAE measurement. We have also found a parametric instability which limits the coupling strength possible in our device, which will be described elsewhere. With straightforward improvements to the microwave resonator, we expect to be able to demonstrate sensitivity to one quadrature with additive measurement noise below the zero-point level, a necessary ingredient to produce and measure squeezed states of motion.

  3. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B.; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation—the so-called standard quantum limit—on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational ‘drum’ mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  4. Quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Marcin; Zwierz, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    We provide a detailed description of the quantum interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from the measurements of the optical phase. We rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system prepared in a single-mode Gaussian state with a heated sample modeled as a dissipative thermal reservoir. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperature of a sample in the nanokelvin regime. Furthermore, we compare the fundamental precision of quantum interferometric thermometers with the theoretical precision offered by the classical idealized pyrometers, which infer the temperature from a measurement of the total thermal radiation emitted by the sample. We find that the interferometric thermometer provides a superior performance in temperature sensing even when compared with this idealized pyrometer. We predict that interferometric thermometers will prove useful for ultraprecise temperature sensing and stabilization of quantum optical experiments based on the nonlinear crystals and atomic vapors.

  5. Quantum entanglement and temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider entanglement in a system out of equilibrium, adopting the viewpoint given by the formalism of superstatistics. Such an approach yields a good effective description for a system in a slowly fluctuating environment within a weak interaction between the system and the environment. For this purpose, we introduce an alternative version of the formalism within a quantum mechanical picture and use it to study entanglement in the Heisenberg XY model, subject to temperature fluctuations. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic cases and explore the effect of different temperature fluctuations (χ^{2}, log-normal, and F distributions). Our results suggest that particular fluctuations may enhance entanglement and prevent it from vanishing at higher temperatures than those predicted for the same system at thermal equilibrium.

  6. Towards a quantum network of room temperature quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Namazi, Mehdi; Goham, Connor; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-04-01

    Progressing quantum technologies to room temperature operation is key to unlock the potential and economical viability of novel many-device architectures. Along these lines, warm vapor alleviates the need for laser trapping and cooling in vacuum or cooling to cryogenic temperatures. Here we report our progress towards building a prototypical quantum network, containing several high duty cycle room-temperature quantum memories interconnected using high rate single photon sources. We have already demonstrated important capabilities, such as memory-built photon-shaping techniques, compatibility with BB84-like quantum communication links, and the possibility of interfacing with low bandwidth (MHz range), cavity enhanced, SPDC-based photon source tuned to the Rb transitions. This body of works suggest that an elementary quantum network of room temperature devices is already within experimental reach.

  7. Hõimupäevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Avatakse EKA Saamimaa uurimisreisi temaatikal põhinev näitus "Nelja tuule retk", ungari foto- ja etnograafi Laszlo Kunkovacsi fotonäitus "Ungari karjusekultuur". ERMis on avatud ülevaatenäitus "EKA soomeugri joonised ERMis". Hõimupäevade muusikaprojektidest, mis leiavad seekord aset koostöös "Jazzkaare" projektiga "Piirideta Põhjala"

  8. Effect of temperature on quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHDI AHMADI BORJI

    2017-07-12

    Jul 12, 2017 ... applications. Quantum dot semiconductor lasers, due to the discrete density of states, low threshold current and temperature dependence, high optical gain and quan- tum efficiency and high modulation speed, ... elastic properties of neighbour materials, lattice mis- match, and geometry of the quantum dot ...

  9. Temperature Scaling Law for Quantum Annealing Optimizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2017-09-15

    Physical implementations of quantum annealing unavoidably operate at finite temperatures. We point to a fundamental limitation of fixed finite temperature quantum annealers that prevents them from functioning as competitive scalable optimizers and show that to serve as optimizers annealer temperatures must be appropriately scaled down with problem size. We derive a temperature scaling law dictating that temperature must drop at the very least in a logarithmic manner but also possibly as a power law with problem size. We corroborate our results by experiment and simulations and discuss the implications of these to practical annealers.

  10. Curie and Neel Temperatures of Quantum Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Oitmaa, J.; Zheng, Weihong

    2004-01-01

    We estimate, using high-temperature series expansions, the transition temperatures of the spin 1/2, 1 and 3/2 Heisenberg ferromagnet and antiferromagnet in 3-dimensions. The manner in which the difference between Curie and Neel temperatures vanishes with increasing spin quantum number is investigated.

  11. Interdiction of a Markovian evader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Izraelevitz, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gutfraind, Alexander [CORNELL UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Network interdiction is a combinatorial optimization problem on an activity network arising in a number of important security-related applications. It is classically formulated as a bilevel maximin problem representing an 'interdictor' and an 'evader'. The evader tries to move from a source node to the target node along the shortest or safest path while the interdictor attempts to frustrate this motion by cutting edges or nodes. The interdiction objective is to find the optimal set of edges to cut given that there is a finite interdiction budget and the interdictor must move first. We reformulate the interdiction problem for stochastic evaders by introducing a model in which the evader follows a Markovian random walk guided by the least-cost path to the target. This model can represent incomplete knowledge about the evader and the graph as well as partial interdiction. We formulate the optimization problem for this model and show how, by exploiting topological ordering of the nodes, one can achieve an order-of-magnitude speedup in computing the objective function. We also introduce an evader-motion-based heuristic that can significantly improve solution quality by providing a global view of the network to approximation methods.

  12. On quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jarzyna, Marcin; Zwierz, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    We provide a detailed description of the quantum interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from the measurements of the optical phase. For the first time, we rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system prepared in a single-mode Gaussian state with a heated sample modeled as a dissipative thermal reservoir. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperatu...

  13. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  14. Interplay between quantum phase transitions and the behavior of quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We review the main results and ideas showing that quantum correlations at finite temperatures (T), in particular quantum discord, are useful tools in characterizing quantum phase transitions that only occur, in principle, at the unattainable absolute zero temperature. We first review some interesting results about the behavior of thermal quantum discord for small spin-1/2 chains and show that they already give us important hints of the infinite chain behavior. We then study in detail and in t...

  15. Evader Interdiction and Collateral Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In network interdiction problems, evaders (hostile agents or data packets) are moving through a network towards their targets and we wish to choose sensor placement locations in order to intercept them before they reach their destinations. Sensor locations should be chosen economically, balancing security gains with cost, including the inconvenience sensors inflict upon innocent travelers. We give optimal sensor allocation algorithms for several classes of special graphs and hardness and optimal approximation results for general graphs, including for deterministic or Markov chain-based and oblivious or reactive evaders. In a similar-sounding but much different problem setting posed by [10] where the innocent travelers can also be reactive, we again give optimal algorithms for special cases and hardness and (essentially) optimal approximation results on general graphs.

  16. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  17. High-Temperature Luminescence Quenching of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355358352; Riemersma, C.; Pietra, F|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355358395; de Mello Donega, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2012-01-01

    Thermal quenching of quantum dot (QD) luminescence is important for application in luminescent devices. Systematic studies of the quenching behavior above 300 K are, however, lacking. Here, high-temperature (300–500 K) luminescence studies are reported for highly efficient CdSe core–shell quantum

  18. High-Temperature Luminescence Quenching of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Y.; Riemersma, C.; Pietra, F; de Mello Donega, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal quenching of quantum dot (QD) luminescence is important for application in luminescent devices. Systematic studies of the quenching behavior above 300 K are, however, lacking. Here, high-temperature (300–500 K) luminescence studies are reported for highly efficient CdSe core–shell quantum dots (QDs), aimed at obtaining insight into temperature quenching of QD emission. Through thermal cycling (yoyo) experiments for QDs in polymer matrices, reversible and irreversible luminescence quen...

  19. Quantum gases finite temperature and non-equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanska, Marzena; Davis, Matthew; Gardiner, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The 1995 observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapours spawned the field of ultracold, degenerate quantum gases. Unprecedented developments in experimental design and precision control have led to quantum gases becoming the preferred playground for designer quantum many-body systems. This self-contained volume provides a broad overview of the principal theoretical techniques applied to non-equilibrium and finite temperature quantum gases. Covering Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and the more recently realised exciton-polariton condensates, it fills a gap by linking between different methods with origins in condensed matter physics, quantum field theory, quantum optics, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics. Thematically organised chapters on different methodologies, contributed by key researchers using a unified notation, provide the first integrated view of the relative merits of individual approaches, aided by pertinent introductory chapters and the guidance of ed...

  20. Sudden change of geometric quantum discord in finite temperature reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ming-Liang, E-mail: mingliang0301@163.com; Sun, Jian

    2015-03-15

    We investigate sudden change (SC) behaviors of the distance-based measures of geometric quantum discords (GQDs) for two non-interacting qubits subject to the two-sided and the one-sided thermal reservoirs. We found that the GQDs defined by different distances exhibit different SCs, and thus the SCs are the combined result of the chosen discord measure and the property of a state. We also found that the thermal reservoir may generate states having different orderings related to different GQDs. These inherent differences of the GQDs reveal that they are incompatible in characterizing quantum correlations both quantitatively and qualitatively. - Highlights: • Comparable study of different distance-based geometric quantum discords. • Evolution of the geometric quantum discords in finite temperature reservoirs. • Different geometric quantum discords exhibit distinct sudden changes. • Nonunique states ordering imposed by different geometric quantum discords.

  1. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  2. Quantum simulation of low-temperature metallic liquid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Li, Xin-Zheng; Zhang, Qianfan; Probert, Matthew I J; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2013-01-01

    The melting temperature of solid hydrogen drops with pressure above ~65 GPa, suggesting that a liquid state might exist at low temperatures. It has also been suggested that this low-temperature liquid state might be non-molecular and metallic, although evidence for such behaviour is lacking. Here we report results for hydrogen at high pressures using ab initio methods, which include a description of the quantum motion of the protons. We determine the melting temperature as a function of pressure and find an atomic solid phase from 500 to 800 GPa, which melts at metallic atomic liquid is stable at temperatures as low as 50 K. The quantum motion of the protons is critical to the low melting temperature reported, as simulations with classical nuclei lead to considerably higher melting temperatures of ~300 K across the entire pressure range considered.

  3. Temperature effects on quantum interference in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments have demonstrated that destructive quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular junctions lead to very low conductances even at room temperature. On the other hand, another recent experiment showed increasing conductance with temperature which was attributed to decoherence...

  4. Single-temperature quantum engine without feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Kim, Yong Woon

    2017-08-01

    A cyclically working quantum-mechanical engine that operates at a single temperature is proposed. Its energy input is delivered by a quantum measurement. The functioning of the engine does not require any feedback control. We analyze work, heat, and the efficiency of the engine for the case of a working substance that is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics and that can be adiabatically compressed and expanded. The obtained general expressions are exemplified for a spin in an adiabatically changing magnetic field and a particle moving in a potential with slowly changing shape.

  5. Finite temperature quantum correlations in su(2)(c) quark states and quantum spin models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamieh, S; Tawfik, A

    The entanglement at finite temperatures is analyzed by using thermal models for colored quarks making tip the hadron physical states. We have found that these quantum correlations entirely vanish at T-c >= m(q)/ln(1.5). For temperatures larger than T-c the correlations are classical. We have also

  6. Quantum-gravity fluctuations and the black-hole temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    Bekenstein has put forward the idea that, in a quantum theory of gravity, a black hole should have a discrete energy spectrum with concomitant discrete line emission. The quantized black-hole radiation spectrum is expected to be very different from Hawking's semi-classical prediction of a thermal black-hole radiation spectrum. One naturally wonders: Is it possible to reconcile the discrete quantum spectrum suggested by Bekenstein with the continuous semi-classical spectrum suggested by Hawking? In order to address this fundamental question, in this essay we shall consider the zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime. In a quantum theory of gravity, these spacetime fluctuations are closely related to the characteristic gravitational resonances of the corresponding black-hole spacetime. Assuming that the energy of the black-hole radiation stems from these zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime, we derive the effective temperature of the quantized black-hole radiation spectrum. Remarkably, it is shown that this characteristic temperature of the discrete (quantized) black-hole radiation agrees with the well-known Hawking temperature of the continuous (semi-classical) black-hole spectrum. (orig.)

  7. Experiments on Quantum Hall Topological Phases in Ultra Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Rui-Rui [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-02-14

    This project is to cool electrons in semiconductors to extremely low temperatures and to study new states of matter formed by low-dimensional electrons (or holes). At such low temperatures (and with an intense magnetic field), electronic behavior differs completely from ordinary ones observed at room temperatures or regular low temperature. Studies of electrons at such low temperatures would open the door for fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics. Present studies have been focused on topological phases in the fractional quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor heterostructures, and the newly discovered (by this group) quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb materials. This project consists of the following components: 1) Development of efficient sample cooling techniques and electron thermometry: Our goal is to reach 1 mK electron temperature and reasonable determination of electron temperature; 2) Experiments at ultra-low temperatures: Our goal is to understand the energy scale of competing quantum phases, by measuring the temperature-dependence of transport features. Focus will be placed on such issues as the energy gap of the 5/2 state, and those of 12/5 (and possible 13/5); resistive signature of instability near 1/2 at ultra-low temperatures; 3) Measurement of the 5/2 gaps in the limit of small or large Zeeman energies: Our goal is to gain physics insight of 5/2 state at limiting experimental parameters, especially those properties concerning the spin polarization; 4) Experiments on tuning the electron-electron interaction in a screened quantum Hall system: Our goal is to gain understanding of the formation of paired fractional quantum Hall state as the interaction pseudo-potential is being modified by a nearby screening electron layer; 5) Experiments on the quantized helical edge states under a strong magnetic field and ultralow temperatures: our goal is to investigate both the bulk and edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator under

  8. Quantum correlations at infinite temperature: The dynamical Nagaoka effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanász-Nagy, Márton; Lovas, Izabella; Grusdt, Fabian; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus; Demler, Eugene A.

    2017-07-01

    Do quantum correlations play a role in high-temperature dynamics of many-body systems? A common expectation is that thermal fluctuations lead to fast decoherence and make dynamics classical. In this paper we provide a striking example that a single particle created in a featureless, infinite temperature spin bath not only exhibits nonclassical dynamics but it also induces strong long-lived correlations between the surrounding spins. We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of a hole created in a Mott insulator in the atomic limit, which corresponds to a degenerate spin system. In the absence of interactions, the spin correlations arise purely from quantum interference. Furthermore, these correlations are both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, in striking contrast to the equilibrium Nagaoka effect. These results are relevant for a number of condensed matter spin systems and should be observable using state of the art bosonic or fermionic quantum gas microscopes.

  9. Quantum Mechanical Corrections to Simulated Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-17

    The authors present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a grueneisen equation of state and a quasi-harmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, they derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. They have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of both shock compressed water and methane. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data for these two systems. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or covalent solids, and has the potential to decrease the large uncertainties inherent in many experimental Hugoniot temperature measurements of these systems.

  10. A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum chromodynamics. E LAERMANN. Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany. Abstract. The talk summarizes some new results of lattice investigations of QCD at finite temper- ature. The topics discussed cover the flavor dependence of the ...

  11. Photonic Crystal Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Quantum Dot Nanocoatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Larrión

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot nanocoatings have been deposited by means of the Layer-by-Layer technique on the inner holes of Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs for the fabrication of temperature sensors. The optical properties of these sensors including absorbance, intensity emission, wavelength of the emission band, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM have been experimentally studied for a temperature range from −40 to 70C°.

  12. Quantum Heat Engine and Negative Boltzmann Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jing-Yi; Quan, Hai-Tao

    2017-09-01

    To clarify the ambiguity on negative Boltzmann temperature in literature, we study the Carnot and the Otto cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at the negative Boltzmann temperature based on a canonical ensemble description. The work extraction, entropy production and the efficiency of these cycles are explored. Conditions for constructing and properties of these thermodynamic cycles are elucidated. We find that the apparent “violation” of the second law of thermodynamics in these cycles are due to the fact that the traditional definition of thermodynamic efficiency is inappropriate in this situation. When properly understanding the efficiency and the adiabatic processes, in which the system crosses over “absolute ZERO” in a limit sense, the Carnot cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at a negative Boltzmann temperature can be understood straightforwardly, and it contradicts neither the second nor the third law of thermodynamics. Hence, negative Boltzmann temperature is a consistent concept in thermodynamics. We use a two-level system and an Ising spin system to illustrate our central results. Support from the National Science Foundation of China under Grants Nos. 11375012, 11534002, and The Recruitment Program of Global Youth Experts of China

  13. Optimal interdiction of unreactive Markovian evaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gutfraind, Alex [CORNELL UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    The interdiction problem arises in a variety of areas including military logistics, infectious disease control, and counter-terrorism. In the typical formulation of network interdiction. the task of the interdictor is to find a set of edges in a weighted network such that the removal of those edges would increase the cost to an evader of traveling on a path through the network. Our work is motivated by cases in which the evader has incomplete information about the network or lacks planning time or computational power, e.g. when authorities set up roadblocks to catch bank robbers, the criminals do not know all the roadblock locations or the best path to use for their escape. We introduce a model of network interdiction in which the motion of one or more evaders is described by Markov processes on a network and the evaders are assumed not to react to interdiction decisions. The interdiction objective is to find a node or set. of size at most B, that maximizes the probability of capturing the evaders. We prove that similar to the classical formulation this interdiction problem is NP-hard. But unlike the classical problem our interdiction problem is submodular and the optimal solution can be approximated within 1-lie using a greedy algorithm. Additionally. we exploit submodularity to introduce a priority evaluation strategy that speeds up the greedy algorithm by orders of magnitude. Taken together the results bring closer the goal of finding realistic solutions to the interdiction problem on global-scale networks.

  14. Towards quantum turbulence in finite temperature Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Shanquan [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing, 100049 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors,Shanghai, 200444 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, andThe International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, Brussels, B-1050 (Belgium)

    2016-07-19

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  15. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-15

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  16. Non-equilibrium temperature of well-developed quantum turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jou, D. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Mongiovi, M.S., E-mail: mongiovi@unipa.i [Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli Matematici, Universita di Palermo, Facolta di Ingegneria, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2009-06-22

    A non-equilibrium effective temperature of quantum vortex tangles is defined as the average energy of closed vortex loops. The resulting thermodynamic expressions for the entropy and the energy in terms of the temperature of the tangle are confirmed by a microscopic analysis based on a potential distribution function for the length of vortex loops. Furthermore, these expressions for the entropy and energy in terms of temperature are analogous to those of black holes: this may be of interest for establishing further connections between topological defects in superfluids and cosmology.

  17. Fluctuation-induced heat release from temperature-quenched nuclear spins near a quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y H; Kaur, N; Atkins, B M; Dalal, N S; Takano, Y

    2009-12-11

    At a quantum critical point (QCP)--a zero-temperature singularity in which a line of continuous phase transition terminates--quantum fluctuations diverge in space and time, leading to exotic phenomena that can be observed at nonzero temperatures. Using a quantum antiferromagnet, we present calorimetric evidence that nuclear spins frozen in a high-temperature nonequilibrium state by temperature quenching are annealed by quantum fluctuations near the QCP. This phenomenon, with readily detectable heat release from the nuclear spins as they are annealed, serves as an excellent marker of a quantum critical region around the QCP and provides a probe of the dynamics of the divergent quantum fluctuations.

  18. Quantum non demolition measurement of a single nuclear spin in a room temperature solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Phillip; Beck, Johannes; Steiner, Matthias; Rathgen, Helmut; Rempp, Florian; Zarrabi, Navid; Dolde, Florian; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Hemmer, Philip [A and M University, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The measurement process and its interpretation are in the focus of quantum mechanics since its early days. Today's ability to isolate single quantum objects allows experimental demonstration of former ''gedankenexperiments'' like measurement induced quantum state collaps. Rapidly growing quantum technologies explore fundamental aspects of measurements in quantum computing, however for solid state systems such experiments require operation at very low temperatures. Here we show that projective quantum measurement can be performed on a single nuclear spin in diamond under ambient conditions. Using quantum non demolition (QND) readout we are able to detect quantum jumps and the quantum Zeno effect emphasising the addressability of fundamental questions of quantum mechanics in solids. Single shot measurements with fidelities exceeding 0.9 enable efficient state initialization, quantum error correction and entanglement pumping that is crucial for quantum information processing including measurement based schemes and distributed quantum networks.

  19. Finite temperature static charge screening in quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, B., E-mail: bengt.eliasson@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Physics Department, John Anderson Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-29

    The shielding potential around a test charge is calculated, using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic formulation with the statistical pressure and Bohm potential derived from finite temperature kinetic theory, and the temperature effects on the force between ions is assessed. The derived screening potential covers the full range of electron degeneracy in the equation of state of the plasma electrons. An attractive force between shielded ions in an arbitrary degenerate plasma exists below a critical temperature and density. The effect of the temperature on the screening potential profile qualitatively describes the ion–ion bound interaction strength and length variations. This may be used to investigate physical properties of plasmas and in molecular-dynamics simulations of fermion plasma. It is further shown that the Bohm potential including the kinetic corrections has a profound effect on the Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas with arbitrary degeneracy. - Highlights: • Screening around test charge in a partially degenerate electron plasma is considered. • Quantum fluid theory derived via low-frequency expansion of kinetic theory. • Theory based on Wigner formalism consistent with gradient corrected orbital-free density functional theory.

  20. Room temperature excitation spectroscopy of single quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a single molecule detection scheme to investigate excitation spectra of single emitters at room temperature. We demonstrate the potential of single emitter photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy by recording excitation spectra of single CdSe nanocrystals over a wide spectral range of 100 nm. The spectra exhibit emission intermittency, characteristic of single emitters. We observe large variations in the spectra close to the band edge, which represent the individual heterogeneity of the observed quantum dots. We also find specific excitation wavelengths for which the single quantum dots analyzed show an increased propensity for a transition to a long-lived dark state. We expect that the additional capability of recording excitation spectra at room temperature from single emitters will enable insights into the photophysics of emitters that so far have remained inaccessible.

  1. Local temperature of an interacting quantum system far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Charles A.

    2016-06-01

    A theory of local temperature measurement of an interacting quantum electron system far from equilibrium via a floating thermoelectric probe is developed. It is shown that the local temperature so defined is consistent with the zeroth, first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, provided the probe-system coupling is weak and broadband. For non-broadband probes, the local temperature obeys the Clausius form of the second law and the third law exactly, but there are corrections to the zeroth and first laws that are higher order in the Sommerfeld expansion. The corrections to the zeroth and first laws are related, and can be interpreted in terms of the error of a nonideal temperature measurement. These results also hold for systems at negative absolute temperature.

  2. Realistic finite temperature simulations of magnetic systems using quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Lars; Bergman, Anders

    2018-01-01

    We have performed realistic atomistic simulations at finite temperatures using Monte Carlo and atomistic spin dynamics simulations incorporating quantum (Bose-Einstein) statistics. The description is much improved at low temperatures compared to classical (Boltzmann) statistics normally used in these kind of simulations, while at higher temperatures the classical statistics are recovered. This corrected low-temperature description is reflected in both magnetization and the magnetic specific heat, the latter allowing for improved modeling of the magnetic contribution to free energies. A central property in the method is the magnon density of states at finite temperatures, and we have compared several different implementations for obtaining it. The method has no restrictions regarding chemical and magnetic order of the considered materials. This is demonstrated by applying the method to elemental ferromagnetic systems, including Fe and Ni, as well as Fe-Co random alloys and the ferrimagnetic system GdFe3.

  3. Temperature and voltage measurement in quantum systems far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Abhay; Stafford, Charles A.

    2016-10-01

    We show that a local measurement of temperature and voltage for a quantum system in steady state, arbitrarily far from equilibrium, with arbitrary interactions within the system, is unique when it exists. This is interpreted as a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics. We further derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a solution. In this regard, we find that a positive temperature solution exists whenever there is no net population inversion. However, when there is a net population inversion, we may characterize the system with a unique negative temperature. Voltage and temperature measurements are treated on an equal footing: They are simultaneously measured in a noninvasive manner, via a weakly coupled thermoelectric probe, defined by requiring vanishing charge and heat dissipation into the probe. Our results strongly suggest that a local temperature measurement without a simultaneous local voltage measurement, or vice versa, is a misleading characterization of the state of a nonequilibrium quantum electron system. These results provide a firm mathematical foundation for voltage and temperature measurements far from equilibrium.

  4. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  5. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaxing; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-12-01

    The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  6. A high-temperature quantum spin liquid with polaron spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanjšek, Martin; Zorko, Andrej; Žitko, Rok; Mravlje, Jernej; Jagličić, Zvonko; Biswas, Pabitra Kumar; Prelovšek, Peter; Mihailovic, Dragan; Arčon, Denis

    2017-11-01

    The existence of a quantum spin liquid (QSL) in which quantum fluctuations of spins are sufficiently strong to preclude spin ordering down to zero temperature was originally proposed theoretically more than 40 years ago, but its experimental realization turned out to be very elusive. Here we report on an almost ideal spin liquid state that appears to be realized by atomic-cluster spins on the triangular lattice of a charge-density wave state of 1T-TaS2. In this system, the charge excitations have a well-defined gap of ~0.3 eV, while nuclear quadrupole resonance and muon-spin-relaxation experiments reveal that the spins show gapless QSL dynamics and no long-range magnetic order at least down to 70 mK. Canonical T2 power-law temperature dependence of the spin relaxation dynamics characteristic of a QSL is observed from 200 K to Tf = 55 K. Below this temperature, we observe a new gapless state with reduced density of spin excitations and high degree of local disorder signifying new quantum spin order emerging from the QSL.

  7. Skulptuuripäevad Pärnus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    4.-15. VIII Pärnus Vallikääru aasal 3. rahvusvahelised skulptuuripäevad "Pärnu positiivne märk". Osalevad Serge Samyn (Prantsusmaa), Kestutis Lanauskaټ (Leedu), Asa Hauksdottir (Island), Meeland Sepp, Toomas Kuusing, Toomas Altnurme, Rait Pärg (korraldaja). Lastele vanuses 7-15 avatud töötuba juhendab Eneken Maripuu

  8. Maakunsti päevad Rakveres

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    5.-10. VI Rakvere tammikus rahvusvahelised maakunsti päevad. Korraldaja Anne Kokkov. Rakvere muuseumis lõppes naivistliku kunstniku Berta Mändla näitus "Berta jutustab". Muuseumi teisi üritusi. Richard Sagritsa ateljees Karepal väljapanek kunstniku ja tema kaasaegsete loomingust.

  9. Quantum Coherent Dynamics at Ambient Temperature in Photosynthetic Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, Zachary B

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes are responsible for absorbing energy from sunlight and transmitting it to remote locations where it can be stored. Recent experiments have found that this process involves long-lived quantum coherence between pigment molecules, called chromophores, which make up these complexes. Expected to decay within 100 fs at room temperature, these coherences were instead found to persist for picosecond time scales, despite having no apparent isolation from the thermal environment of the cell. This paper derives a quantum master equation which describes the coherent evolution of a system in strong contact with a thermal environment. Conditions necessary for long coherence lifetimes are identified, and the role of coherence in efficient energy transport is illuminated. Static spectra and exciton transfer rates for the PE545 complex of the cryptophyte algae CS24 are calculated and shown to have good agreement with experiment.

  10. Back-action Evading Measurements of a Nanomechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndukum, Tchefor; Rocheleau, Tristan; Schwab, Keith

    2010-03-01

    By driving a 5GHz superconducting, co-planar waveguide (CPW) resonator coupled to a radio-frequency nanomechanical resonator with both red and blue-detuned, phase coherent microwave signals, we have demonstrated amplifier noise back-action evading (BAE) detection of one quadrature of nanomechanical motion. With this quantum non-demolition (QND) scheme we have shown precise measurements of a single motional quadrature with additive measurement noise of 4 times the zero point amplitude, and a reduction in sensitivity to injected measurement noise of a factor of 43 in comparison to a single tone, non-BAE measurement. By increasing the CPW frequency to 7.5GHz, quadrupling the coupling strength and improving the (internal) quality factor of the CPW, we expect to be able to demonstrate sensitivity to one quadrature with additive measurement noise below the zero-point level, a necessary ingredient to produce and measure squeezed states of motion.

  11. How eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Valent, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes employ sophisticated mechanisms for evading host recognition. After host penetration, many fungi and oomycetes establish a biotrophic interaction. It is assumed that different strategies employed by these pathogens to avoid triggering host defence responses, including establishment of biotrophic interfacial layers between the pathogen and host, masking of invading hyphae and active suppression of host defence mechanisms, are essential for a biotrophic parasitic lifestyle. During the infection process, filamentous plant pathogens secrete various effectors, which are hypothesized to be involved in facilitating effective host infection. Live-cell imaging of fungi and oomycetes secreting fluorescently labeled effector proteins as well as functional characterization of the components of biotrophic interfaces have led to the recent progress in understanding how eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Room-Temperature Dephasing in InAs Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Mørk, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    The room temperature dephasing in InAs/InGaAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots, embedded in a waveguide for laser applications, is measured using two independent methods: spectral hole burning and four-wave mixing. Without the application of bias current for electrical carrier injection......, a dephasing time of ~260 fs, weakly dependent on the optical excitation density, is found and attributed to phonon interaction. The application of bias current, leading to population inversion in the dot ground state and optical gain, strongly decreases the dephasing time to less than 50 fs, likely due...

  13. Decay process of quantum open system at finite-temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, X; Gao, Y. B.

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the formal solution to the Heisenberg equation, we revisit an universal model for a quantum open system with a harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a boson bath. The analysis of the decay process for a Fock state and a coherent state demonstrate that this method is very useful in dealing with the problems in decay process of the open system. For finite temperature, the calculations of the reduced density matrix and the mean excitation number for the open system show that an i...

  14. Global and quantum risks of extreme temperature fluctuations in Moscow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogiljuk Zhanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses topical problems of legal support for construction activities in relation to global climate change. Therefore, the results of high-resolution studies were treated. These studies tracked the pattern of fluctuation intensity changes of maximum and minimum temperatures in Moscow in the period of 1973 to 2009. The article highlights methodology elements for the statistical analysis of technical risks for implementing extreme temperature loads. A quantitative predictive risk assessment of extreme high and low temperatures and thawing risks for the entire life cycle of buildings are given. These estimates are intended to take account of the thermal loads on the ecological systems of urban areas as well as to design buildings and engineering systems that form microclimate of premises. The paper presents for the first time the obtained by the authors and previously unknown quantum regularities of the air temperature variations in the surface layer of the atmosphere. It also contains graphic materials for statistical studies of the fluctuation intensity evolution of maximum and minimum daily temperatures in the city of Moscow.

  15. Room-temperature dephasing in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are receiving increasing attention for fundamental studies on zero-dimensional confinement and for device applications. Quantum-dot lasers are expected to show superior performances, like high material gain, low and temperature...... stacked layers of InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum dots....

  16. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revin, D. G., E-mail: d.revin@sheffield.ac.uk; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W. [Physics and Astronomy Department, The University of Sheffield, S3 7RH Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A. [M Squared Lasers Ltd., G20 0SP Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  17. Ultralow-Noise Room-Temperature Quantum Memory for Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-09-01

    Here, we show an ultralow-noise regime of operation in a simple quantum memory in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. By modeling the quantum dynamics of four-level room-temperature atoms, we achieve fidelities >90 % for single-photon-level polarization qubits, surpassing any classical strategies exploiting the nonunitary memory efficiency. Additionally, we show experimental techniques capable of producing fidelities close to unity. Our results demonstrate the potential of simple, resource-moderate experimental room-temperature quantum devices.

  18. Controllable effects of quantum fluctuations on spin free-induction decay at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Pan, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations of local fields cause decoherence of quantum objects. Usually at high temperatures, thermal noises are much stronger than quantum fluctuations unless the thermal effects are suppressed by certain techniques such as spin echo. Here we report the discovery of strong quantum-fluctuation effects of nuclear spin baths on free-induction decay of single electron spins in solids at room temperature. We find that the competition between the quantum and thermal fluctuations is controllable by an external magnetic field. These findings are based on Ramsey interference measurement of single nitrogen-vacancy center spins in diamond and numerical simulation of the decoherence, which are in excellent agreement. PMID:22666535

  19. Long-lived quantum coherence in photosynthetic complexes at physiological temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Fransted, Kelly A; Caram, Justin R; Harel, Elad; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E; Engel, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes capture and concentrate solar radiation by transferring the excitation to the reaction center which stores energy from the photon in chemical bonds. This process occurs with near-perfect quantum efficiency. Recent experiments at cryogenic temperatures have revealed that coherent energy transfer - a wavelike transfer mechanism - occurs in many photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes (1-4). Using the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna complex (FMO) as a model system, theoretical studies incorporating both incoherent and coherent transfer as well as thermal dephasing predict that environmentally assisted quantum transfer efficiency peaks near physiological temperature; these studies further show that this process is equivalent to a quantum random walk algorithm (5-8). This theory requires long-lived quantum coherence at room temperature, which never has been observed in FMO. Here we present the first evidence that quantum coherence survives in FMO at physiological temperature for at l...

  20. Quantum locality and equilibrium properties in low-temperature parahydrogen: a multiscale simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potestio, R; Delle Site, L

    2012-02-07

    Parahydrogen is the spin-zero singlet state of molecular hydrogen, which at low temperature (between 14 and 25 K) is in a fluid state. A classical treatment of the system leads to unphysical freezing, and the inclusion of quantum delocalization of the molecule is then required to obtain a realistic description of its equilibrium properties. In the present work, we employ the classical-quantum adaptive resolution method AdResS to investigate the spatial extension of quantum delocalization effects in the bulk fluid at low temperature. Specifically, we simulate a small, spherical region of the system in full quantum detail: this region is coupled to a bulk of coarse-grained particles with classical, quantum-derived effective interactions obtained from quantum simulations. The two regions are interfaced through open boundaries and in conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium. Structural properties of the fluid, namely, pair distribution functions, are measured for different sizes of the quantum region. The results of this work show that, for the thermodynamic conditions corresponding to the range of temperature between 14 and 25 K, the bead-based, quantum structural properties of low-temperature parahydrogen are deemed local and do not require the support of an explicit quantum bulk.

  1. Temperature depopulation of the GeSi/Si quantum dots with non-equilibrium charge carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronov, A. N.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Firsov, D. A.; Balagula, R. M.; Tonkikh, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the temperature dependencies of equilibrium and photo-induced infrared absorption in GeSi/Si quantum dots in a wide spectral range. We show that, in spite of the large valence band offset at GeSi/Si interface and strong confinement for holes, the effect of intensive temperature depopulation of the GeSi/Si quantum dots can take place even at the temperatures below 300 K due to the large difference in density of states of the silicon valence band and quantum dot states, when the bipolar diffusion of charge carriers is not restricted.

  2. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of cadmium-free Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films as temperature probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Kang, Xiaojiao; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-12-21

    We reported temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) studies on Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot (QD) thin films. In this paper, cadmium-free and luminescent Cu-Zn-In-S quantum dot thin films were in situ formed by thermal decomposition of molecular-based precursors in the open air, without need of the complicated quantum dot synthesis. Molecular-based precursor solutions were prepared by dissolving Cu2O, ZnO, and In(OH)3 in the ethanol solution of butylamine and carbon disulfide. The effects of sintering temperature, sintering time, and the concentration of capping agents on the photoluminescence properties of Cu-Zn-In-S QD thin films have been systematically investigated. It was found that alkali metal ions play an important role in enhancing the PL quantum yield of quantum dot thin films. The as-prepared QD thin films show composition-tunable emission in the range of 535 nm to 677 nm, and the absolute PL quantum yields can reach as high as 22.1%. All of the as-deposited QD thin films show a single-exponential decay to temperature, indicating that these cadmium-free QD thin films have high potential as temperature probes.

  3. Scalable architecture for a room temperature solid-state quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Jiang, L; Gorshkov, A V; Maurer, P C; Giedke, G; Cirac, J I; Lukin, M D

    2012-04-24

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Here we propose and analyse an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at room temperature. Our approach is based on recent experimental advances involving nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. In particular, we demonstrate that the multiple challenges associated with operation at ambient temperature, individual addressing at the nanoscale, strong qubit coupling, robustness against disorder and low decoherence rates can be simultaneously achieved under realistic, experimentally relevant conditions. The architecture uses a novel approach to quantum information transfer and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Moreover, it alleviates the stringent constraints currently limiting the realization of scalable quantum processors and will provide fundamental insights into the physics of non-equilibrium many-body quantum systems.

  4. Temperature dependence of the single photon emission from interface-fluctuation GaN quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, F; Gao, K; Holmes, M; Kako, S; Arita, M; Arakawa, Y

    2017-11-23

    The temperature dependent single photon emission statistics of interface-fluctuation GaN quantum dots are reported. Quantum light emission is confirmed at temperatures up to ~77 K, by which point the background emission degrades the emission purity and results in a measured g(2) (0) in excess of 0.5. A discussion on the extent of the background contamination is also given through comparison to extensive data taken under various ambient and experimental conditions, revealing that the quantum dots themselves are emitting single photons with high purity.

  5. Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0204 Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism Jose Rodriguez CALIFORNIA...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Theoretical/Computational Studies of High-Temperature Superconductivity from Quantum Magnetism 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT...SUBJECT TERMS quantum magnetism , HTS, superconductivity 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF       ABSTRACT UU 18.  NUMBER        OF

  6. Quantum Chernoff bound metric for the XY model at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasto, Damian F.; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Zanardi, Paolo

    2008-02-01

    We explore the finite-temperature phase diagram of the anisotropic XY spin chain using the quantum Chernoff bound metric on thermal states. The analysis of the metric elements allows one to easily identify, in terms of different scaling with temperature, quasiclassical and quantum-critical regions. These results extend recent ones obtained using the Bures metric and show that different information-theoretic notions of distance can carry the same sophisticated information about the phase diagram of an interacting many-body system featuring quantum-critical points.

  7. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly by the exci......The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly...

  8. An Approach to Detect Malicious Behaviors by Evading Stalling Code

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Dai; Xiaonan Liu; Chao You; Yichi Zhang; Jianmin Pang

    2012-01-01

    Since malwares contain stalling codes, malicious behaviors can’t be detected in emulated analysis environment. This paper proposes an approach to detect malicious behaviors by evade stalling codes. First, we executed a malware in the emulated analysis environment, and saved every executed instruction in a trace file; Second, we began to detect stalling codes with the trace file, and constructed stalling code evasive points; At last, we executed the malware again and evade stalling codes with ...

  9. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible

  10. The Effect of Temperature and Electric Field on a Quantum Pseudodot Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Cong; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2017-10-01

    The electron's probability density (EPD) and the oscillating period (OP) of an electron confined by a three-dimensional RbCl quantum pseudodot (QPD) are studied. Calculations are performed by employing variational method of Pekar type (VMPT) and the quantum statistics theory (QST).The influences of the temperature and electric field on the EPD and the OP of the RbCl QPD qubit have been derived in detail. According to the obtained results, it is observed that the EPD and the OP increase (decrease) with raising temperature at lower (higher) temperature region. They are decaying functions of the electric field.

  11. Temperature and Magnetic Field Effects on the Transport Controlled Charge State of a Single Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalenko ES

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individual InAs/GaAs quantum dots are studied by micro-photoluminescence. By varying the strength of an applied external magnetic field and/or the temperature, it is demonstrated that the charge state of a single quantum dot can be tuned. This tuning effect is shown to be related to the in-plane electron and hole transport, prior to capture into the quantum dot, since the photo-excited carriers are primarily generated in the barrier.

  12. Path integral calculation of free energies: quantum effects on the melting temperature of neon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, R; Herrero, C P; Antonelli, A; Hernández, E R

    2008-08-14

    The path integral formulation has been combined with several methods to determine free energies of quantum many-body systems, such as adiabatic switching and reversible scaling. These techniques are alternatives to the standard thermodynamic integration method. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of these free energy methods in quantum simulations. Our main interest focuses on the calculation of the melting temperature of Ne at ambient pressure, taking into account quantum effects in the atomic dynamics. The free energy of the solid was calculated by considering a quantum Einstein crystal as reference state, while for the liquid, the reference state was defined by the classical limit of the fluid. Our findings indicate that, while quantum effects in the melting temperature of this system are small, they still amount to about 6% of the melting temperature, and are therefore not negligible. The particle density as well as the melting enthalpy and entropy of the solid and liquid phases at coexistence is compared to results obtained in the classical limit and also to available experimental data.

  13. Graphene-based room-temperature implementation of a modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, Daniela; Dragoman, Mircea

    2015-12-04

    We present an implementation of a one-qubit and two-qubit modified Deutsch-Jozsa quantum algorithm based on graphene ballistic devices working at room temperature. The modified Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm decides whether a function, equivalent to the effect of an energy potential distribution on the wave function of ballistic charge carriers, is constant or not, without measuring the output wave function. The function need not be Boolean. Simulations confirm that the algorithm works properly, opening the way toward quantum computing at room temperature based on the same clean-room technologies as those used for fabrication of very-large-scale integrated circuits.

  14. Finite-temperature field theory and quantum noise in an electrical network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garavaglia, T.

    1988-10-15

    Finite-temperature (0less than or equal toTquantum noise in an electrical network. Solutions for the finite second moments that satisfy the uncertainty principle bound are given for a dissipative quantum oscillator. A regularization method, based on the analysis of a semi-infinite low-pass filter, is employed, and it leads to results which differ from those of the Drude model. To illustrate the FTF method, an example is given using an ideal finite-temperature coherent state.

  15. Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence of MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dai-Feng; Ding, Xing; Dai, Ru-Cheng; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Zeng-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) from MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots is investigated in a temperature range of 8 K-300 K. The orange emission from the 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions and the blue emission related to the trapped surface state are observed in the MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots. As the temperature increases, the orange emission is shifted toward a shorter wavelength while the blue emission is shifted towards the longer wavelength. Both the orange and blue emissions reduce their intensities with the increase of temperature but the blue emission is quenched faster. The temperature-dependent luminescence intensities of the two emissions are well explained by the thermal quenching theory.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  17. Effect of temperature on the single-particle ground-state energy of a polar quantum dot with Gaussian confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahan, Luhluh K., E-mail: luhluhjahan@gmail.com; Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Gachibowli, Telangana India 500046 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The temperature and size dependence of the ground-state energy of a polaron in a Gaussian quantum dot have been investigated by using a variational technique. It is found that the ground-state energy increases with increasing temperature and decreases with the size of the quantum dot. Also, it is found that the ground-state energy is larger for a three-dimensional quantum dot as compared to a two-dimensional dot.

  18. Quantum entanglement at high temperatures? Bosonic systems in nonequilibrium steady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, Fudan University,Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, B.L. [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, Fudan University,Shanghai 200433 (China); Joint Quantum Institute and Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This is the second of a series of three papers examining how viable it is for entanglement to be sustained at high temperatures for quantum systems in thermal equilibrium (Case A), in nonequilibrium (Case B) and in nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) conditions (Case C). The system we analyze here consists of two coupled quantum harmonic oscillators each interacting with its own bath described by a scalar field, set at temperatures T{sub 1}>T{sub 2}. For constant bilinear inter-oscillator coupling studied here (Case C1) owing to the Gaussian nature, the problem can be solved exactly at arbitrary temperatures even for strong coupling. We find that the valid entanglement criterion in general is not a function of the bath temperature difference, in contrast to thermal transport in the same NESS setting http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.7642. Thus lowering the temperature of one of the thermal baths does not necessarily help to safeguard the entanglement between the oscillators. Indeed, quantum entanglement will disappear if any one of the thermal baths has a temperature higher than the critical temperature T{sub c}, defined as the temperature above which quantum entanglement vanishes. With the Langevin equations derived we give a full display of how entanglement dynamics in this system depends on T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, the inter-oscillator coupling and the system-bath coupling strengths. For weak oscillator-bath coupling the critical temperature T{sub c} is about the order of the inverse oscillator frequency, but for strong oscillator-bath coupling it will depend on the bath cutoff frequency. We conclude that in most realistic circumstances, for bosonic systems in NESS with constant bilinear coupling, ‘hot entanglement’ is largely a fiction.

  19. Photodynamics of quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride revealed by low-temperature spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontheimer, Bernd; Braun, Merle; Nikolay, Niko; Sadzak, Nikola; Aharonovich, Igor; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have recently emerged as promising bright single photon sources. In this Rapid Communication we investigate in detail their optical properties at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, we perform temperature-resolved photoluminescence studies and measure photon coherence times from the hBN emitters. The obtained value of 81 (1 )ps translates to a width of ˜6.5 GHz which is higher than the Fourier transform limited value of ˜32 MHz . To account for the photodynamics of the emitter, we perform ultrafast spectral diffusion measurements that partially account for the coherence times. Our results provide important insight into the relaxation processes in quantum emitters in hBN which is mandatory to evaluate their applicability for quantum information processing.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Dark Current in Quantum Well Infrared Detectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hickey, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...) /cu cm were gathered and analyzed for various temperatures. The device was cooled with a closed cycle refrigerator, and the data were acquired using the Agilent 4155B Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer...

  1. Is Current CMBR Temperature: The Scale Independent Quantum Gravitational Result of Black Hole Cosmology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshavatharam, U. V. S.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    If one is willing to consider the current cosmic microwave back ground temperature as a quantum gravitational effect of the evolving primordial cosmic black hole (universe that constitutes dynamic space-time and exhibits quantum behavior) automatically general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics can be combined into a `scale independent' true unified model of quantum gravity. By considering the `Planck mass' as the initial mass of the baby Hubble volume, past and current physical and thermal parameters of the cosmic black hole can be understood. Current rate of cosmic black hole expansion is being stopped by the microscopic quantum mechanical lengths. In this new direction authors observed 5 important quantum mechanical methods for understanding the current cosmic deceleration. To understand the ground reality of current cosmic rate of expansion, sensitivity and accuracy of current methods of estimating the magnitudes of current CMBR temperature and current Hubble constant must be improved and alternative methods must be developed. If it is true that galaxy constitutes so many stars, each star constitutes so many hydrogen atoms and light is coming from the excited electron of galactic hydrogen atom, then considering redshift as an index of `whole galaxy' receding may not be reasonable. During cosmic evolution, at any time in the past, in hydrogen atom emitted photon energy was always inversely proportional to the CMBR temperature. Thus past light emitted from older galaxy's excited hydrogen atom will show redshift with reference to the current laboratory data. As cosmic time passes, in future, the absolute rate of cosmic expansion can be understood by observing the rate of increase in the magnitude of photon energy emitted from laboratory hydrogen atom. Aged super novae dimming may be due to the effect of high cosmic back ground temperature. Need of new mathematical methods & techniques, computer simulations, advanced engineering skills seem to be essential

  2. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arroyo Rodriguez, C.; Frisenda, R.; Moth-Poulsen, K.; Seldenthuis, J.S.; Bjornholm, T.; Van der Zant, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on

  3. Temperature Dependence of the Polariton Linewidth in a GaAs Quantum Well Microcavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Langbein, W.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature dependent linewidths of the polariton resonances in a GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well microcavity are measured. Due to the dominant homogeneous broadening of the investigated resonances, a direct linewidth analysis of the reflectivity spectra allows us to investigate the role of s...

  4. Temperature dependent behaviour of lead sulfide quantum dot solar cells and films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speirs, Mark J.; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Balazs, Daniel M.; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing greatly in power conversion efficiency in recent times, lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) solar cells still suffer from a low open circuit voltage (V-OC) and fill factor (FF). In this work, we explore the temperature dependent behavior of similar to 9% efficient solar cells. In

  5. Self-exothermic reaction prompted synthesis of single-layered graphene quantum dots at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin Bin; Li, Rong Sheng; Liu, Meng Li; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-05-02

    The easy fabrication of single-layered graphene quantum dots (s-GQDs) still faces challenge. Herein, we report an efficient route to fabricate s-GQDs within 5 min at room temperature by introducing a simple self-exothermic reaction. The as-prepared s-GQDs can specifically bind with aluminium ions to produce an aggregation-induced emission enhancement effect.

  6. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  7. Magnetic Signatures of Quantum Critical Points of the Ferrimagnetic Mixed Spin-(1/2, S) Heisenberg Chains at Finite Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef; Verkholyak, Taras

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic mixed spin-(1/2, S) Heisenberg chains are examined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations for two different quantum spin numbers S=1 and 3/2. The calculated magnetization curves at finite temperatures are confronted with zero-temperature magnetization data obtained within the density matrix renormalization group method, which imply an existence of two quantum critical points determining a breakdown of the gapped Lieb-Mattis ferrimagnetic phase and Tomonaga-Luttinger spin-liquid phase, respectively. While a square root behavior of the magnetization accompanying each quantum critical point is gradually smoothed upon rising temperature, the susceptibility and isothermal entropy change data at low temperatures provide a stronger evidence of the zero-temperature quantum critical points through marked local maxima and minima, respectively.

  8. Low temperature method for synthesis of ZnS quantum dots and its luminescence characterization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, K., E-mail: senovi2007@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AMET University, Chennai 603112 (India); Department of Physics, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Kalaivani, T. [Department of Physics, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Kanagesan, S. [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory (MSCL), Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang 43400, Selangor (Malaysia); Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Chemistry, AMET University, Chennai 603112 (India)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dots of sizes 2.68-4.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is embedded on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix, have been synthesized at 70 Degree-Sign C by wet chemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical absorption spectra showed strong blue shift, which is an indication of strong quantum confinement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS quantum dots exhibit strong quantum confinement effect as the optical band gap increases significantly, from 3.96 eV to 4.06 eV, compared to bulk value 3.68 eV. - Abstract: Zinc Sulfide (ZnS) quantum dots of sizes 2.68-4.8 nm, embedded on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix, have been synthesized at 70 Degree-Sign C by wet chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) Spectroscopy has been adopted for sample characterization. Optical absorption spectra showed strong blue shift, which is an indication of strong quantum confinement. Photoluminescence spectra of the sample have been recorded at room temperature and observed two peaks centred around 415 nm and 440 nm. We have assigned the first peak due to band gap transitions while the later due to sulfur vacancy in the sample.

  9. Täna algavad Eesti Muusika Päevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Muusika Päevade raames toimunud üritustest 21. aprillini: ERSO sümfooniakontserdist Estonia kontserdisaalis, Jüri Reinvere radiofoonilise ooperi "Vastaskallas" esiettekandest Tallinna Linnateatri Hobuveski saalis, kontserdist Kunstihoone Vabaduse väljakul (esitusel Urmas Sisaski uus "Tähistaeva tsükkel" - "Eesti rahvataevas"), lastekontserdist "Kodumaine viis" Estonia kontserdisaalis

  10. Quantum Correlations of Light from a Room-Temperature Mechanical Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sudhir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available When an optical field is reflected from a compliant mirror, its intensity and phase become quantum-correlated due to radiation pressure. These correlations form a valuable resource: the mirror may be viewed as an effective Kerr medium generating squeezed states of light, or the correlations may be used to erase backaction from an interferometric measurement of the mirror’s position. To date, optomechanical quantum correlations have been observed in only a handful of cryogenic experiments, owing to the challenge of distilling them from thermomechanical noise. Accessing them at room temperature, however, would significantly extend their practical impact, with applications ranging from gravitational wave detection to chip-scale accelerometry. Here, we observe broadband quantum correlations developed in an optical field due to its interaction with a room-temperature nanomechanical oscillator, taking advantage of its high-cooperativity near-field coupling to an optical microcavity. The correlations manifest as a reduction in the fluctuations of a rotated quadrature of the field, in a frequency window spanning more than an octave below mechanical resonance. This is due to coherent cancellation of the two sources of quantum noise contaminating the measured quadrature—backaction and imprecision. Supplanting the backaction force with an off-resonant test force, we demonstrate the working principle behind a quantum-enhanced “variational” force measurement.

  11. Low-temperature structure of indium quantum chains on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Bunk, O.; Zeysing, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    The array of quasi-one-dimensional indium chains in the Si(111)- (4×1)-In surface reconstruction exhibits a phase transition to a low-temperature (8×2) phase. It has been suggested that this phase transition is related to a charge density wave (CDW) formation. The x-ray diffraction results...

  12. Coherent control in room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers using shaped pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control quantum coherent Rabi-oscillations in a room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) by shaping the light pulses that trigger them. The experiments described here show that when the excitation is resonant with the short wavelength slope of the SOA gain spectrum, a linear frequency chirp affects its ability to trigger Rabi-oscillations within the SOA: A negative chirp inhibits Rabi-oscillations whereas a positive chirp can enhance them, relative to the interaction of a transform limited pulse. The experiments are confirmed by a numerical calculation that models the propagation of the experimentally shaped pulses through the SOA.

  13. Temperature tunability of quantum emitter - cavity coupling in a photonic wire microcavity with shielded sidewall loss

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advancements have allowed to implement in solid-state cavity-based devices phenomena of quantum nature such as vacuum Rabi splitting, controllable single photon emission and quantum entanglement. For a sufficiently strong coupling between a quantum emitter and a cavity, large quality factors ($Q$) along with small modal volume ($V_{eff}$) are essential. Here we show that by applying a 5nm Al coating to the sidewalls of a submicrometer-sized Fabry-P\\'{e}rot microcavity, the cavity $Q$ can be temperature-tuned from few hundreds at room temperatures to 2$\\times$10$^5$ below 30~K. This is achieved by, first, a complete shielding of the sidewall loss with ideally reflecting lateral metallic mirrors and, secondly, a dramatic decrease of the cavity's axial loss for small-sized devices due to the largely off-axis wavevector within the multilayered structure. Our findings offer a novel temperature-tunable platform to study quantum electrodynamical phenomena of emitter-cavity coupling. We demonstra...

  14. Graphene quantum dots produced by exfoliation of intercalated graphite nanoparticles and their application for temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy Khiem; Kim, TaeYoung

    2018-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have received much attention as a new class of fluorescent materials due to their unique transport phenomena and broadband absorption. Here, we present a method to produce pristine blue-luminescent GQDs from graphite nanoparticles by the intercalation of graphite nanoparticles and subsequent exfoliation in liquids. The as-synthesized GQDs are composed of highly crystalline carbon rings and show uniform size distribution ranging from 3 to 4 nm with an average thickness of ∼1 nm. The GQDs exhibit an excitation-dependent blue photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 22.3%. Furthermore, the GQDs were explored as an active sensing material for temperature measurement. The GQD-based temperature sensors show high responsivity to temperature changes over the range 30-80 °C.

  15. Investigating the temperature dependence of photomultiplier quantum efficiency when operating in the visible spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Clawson, Savannah Ellen

    2017-01-01

    The quantum efficiency of a Burle 8850 photomultiplier tube with a potassium-caesium-antimony (bialkali) photocathode was determined by attenuating a 1 mW HeNe laser emitting at 633 nm and measuring the signal frequency when the laser was incident on the photomultiplier. A temperature range of 5 $^{\\circ}$C $-$ 20 $^{\\circ}$C was investigated and it was found that the quantum efficiency decreases with temperature, with the signal frequency decreasing at a faster rate than the dark current frequency. Therefore, it was concluded that it would not be beneficial to cool photomultiplier tubes operating in the visible spectrum for use in collinear laser spectroscopy due to a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio. The signal pulse height distribution was also analysed and found to be independent of temperature within the range investigated.

  16. Low temperature dynamics of surface and bulk electronic structure of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy Grandhi, G.; Tomar, Renu; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-09-01

    Absolute energies of band edges have proven to be very important for various applications like hydrogen generation, solar water splitting and solar cell optimization. Energy differences as small as 50-100 meV have been shown to largely affect device efficiencies. Device operational temperature can vary largely and temperature dependence of band gap is well known in bulk semiconductor literature. However, there are only a few studies on variation of band gap in quantum dots and none of them characterize the relative energy variation of band edges in spite of their importance in various applications. This is mainly due to the absence of an internal standard that can be used to study the variation of band edges. Here, in this paper, we introduce a technique wherein we utilize Cu dopant emission as an internal probe. Using this technique, we report the variation of band gap, conduction band and valence band edges of CdS and CdSe quantum dots as a function of temperature and size. We found that band gap variation is similar to that of bulk but with a higher average phonon energy. The band edge variation is characterized by a dominant conduction band shift for larger sizes with decreasing temperature while the smaller size QDs show the variation in both conduction band and valence band. Further, we have also utilized this method to study the binding energy of the trap states as a function of temperature using Cu photoluminescence quantum yield and average lifetime of Cu photoluminescence.

  17. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-resonance in the transmission. We then go on to study current induced heating and cooling, and nd that there is a basis for using quantum interference to design molecules that can be cooling by the tunnelling current. The basic idea is to align the incoming and the outgoing transmission channels such that absorption...... of a phonon is favoured over emission of a phonon. The incoming and outgoing channels are usually very alike, but by separating them using quantum interference it is possible to tune the system to observe a cooling eect. The basis is illus- trated in a simple tight-binding model, and the subsequent cooling...

  18. Monte Carlo studies of supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with sixteen supercharges at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Konstantinos N; Hanada, Masanori; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2008-01-18

    We present the first Monte Carlo results for supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics with 16 supercharges at finite temperature. The recently proposed nonlattice simulation enables us to include the effects of fermionic matrices in a transparent and reliable manner. The internal energy nicely interpolates the weak coupling behavior obtained by the high temperature expansion, and the strong coupling behavior predicted from the dual black-hole geometry. The Polyakov line asymptotes at low temperature to a characteristic behavior for a deconfined theory, suggesting the absence of a phase transition. These results provide highly nontrivial evidence for the gauge-gravity duality.

  19. Metrological Array of Cyber-Physical Systems. Part 12. Study of Quantum Unit of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svyatoslav YATSYSHYN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reference measure of temperature may be embedded in appropriate unit of Cyber-Physical System. Whereas this measure made on the basis of fundamental constants of matter would be installed in such System, the latter will get an extra precision. It is shown that metrologically correct Kelvin redefinition which would be changed by CODATA to 2018 is insufficient to create a Temperature Standard on the basis of fundamental constants of matter. New approach to the mentioned Standard and firstly to the Quantum Unit of Temperature is developed.

  20. Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robin [SAIC; Davenport, Roger [SAIC; Talbot, Jan [UCSD; Herz, Richard [UCSD; Genders, David [Electrosynthesis Co.; Symons, Peter [Electrosynthesis Co.; Brown, Lloyd [TChemE

    2014-04-25

    A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are

  1. The effects of pressure and temperature on the exchange energy of a parabolic quantum dot under a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Bzour

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of pressure and temperature on the energy levels of a parabolic GaAs quantum dot under a magnetic field have been studied. The exact diagonalization method was used to solve the two-electron quantum dot Hamiltonian and to obtain the eigenenergies. In addition, we investigated the effects of pressure and temperature on the singlet-triplet exchange energy (J=ET−Es of the quantum dot as a function of a magnetic field. The magnetic field-parabolic confinement (ωc−ω0 phase diagram of the quantum dot was calculated. The comparisons show that our results are in very good agreement with the previously published works. Keywords: Quantum dot, Exact diagonalization method, Pressure, Temperature, Exchange energy

  2. Thermodynamic Properties of a Double Ring-Shaped Quantum Dot at Low and High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Sedehi, H. R. Rastegar

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we study thermodynamic properties of a GaAs double ring-shaped quantum dot under external magnetic and electric fields. To this end, we first solve the Schrödinger equation and obtain the energy levels and wave functions, analytically. Then, we calculate the entropy, heat capacity, average energy and magnetic susceptibility of the quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field using the canonical ensemble approach. According to the results, it is found that the entropy is an increasing function of temperature. At low temperatures, the entropy increases monotonically with raising the temperature for all values of the magnetic fields and it is independent of the magnetic field. But, the entropy depends on the magnetic field at high temperatures. The entropy also decreases with increasing the magnetic field. The heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility show a peak structure. The heat capacity reduces with increasing the magnetic field at low temperatures. The magnetic susceptibility shows a transition between diamagnetic and paramagnetic below for T<4 K. The transition temperature depends on the magnetic field.

  3. Room-temperature near-field reflection spectroscopy of single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Marcher; Madsen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    . This technique suppresses efficiently the otherwise dominating far-field background and reduces topographic artifacts. We demonstrate its performance on a thin, strained near-surface CdS/ZnS single quantum well at room temperature. The optical structure of these topographically flat samples is due to Cd......S thickness fluctuations, and is observed to be uncorrelated within the spatial resolution of the instrument....

  4. Room-Temperature Quantum Coherence and Rabi Oscillations in Vanadyl Phthalocyanine: Toward Multifunctional Molecular Spin Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Matteo; Tesi, Lorenzo; Morra, Elena; Chiesa, Mario; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2016-02-24

    Here we report the investigation of the magnetic relaxation and the quantum coherence of vanadyl phthalocyanine, VOPc, a multifunctional and easy-processable potential molecular spin qubit. VOPc in its pure form (1) and its crystalline dispersions in the isostructural diamagnetic host TiOPc in different stoichiometric ratios, namely VOPc:TiOPc 1:10 (2) and 1:1000 (3), were investigated via a multitechnique approach based on the combination of alternate current (AC) susceptometry, continuous wave, and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. AC susceptibility measurements revealed a linear increase of the relaxation rate with temperature up to 20 K, as expected for a direct mechanism, but τ remains slow over a very wide range of applied static field values (up to ∼5 T). Pulsed EPR spectroscopy experiments on 3 revealed quantum coherence up to room temperature with T(m) ∼1 μs at 300 K, representing the highest value obtained to date for molecular electronic spin qubits. Rabi oscillations are observed in this nuclear spin-active environment ((1)H and (14)N nuclei) at room temperature also for 2, indicating an outstanding robustness of the quantum coherence in this molecular semiconductor exploitable in spintronic devices.

  5. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  6. Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion for Temperature-Dependent Linear Spectra of Light Harvesting Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschel, Gerhard; Möbius, Sebastian; Strunz, Walter T; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Non-Markovian Quantum State Diffusion (NMQSD) has turned out to be an effective method to calculate excitonic properties of aggregates composed of organic chromophores, taking into account the strong coupling of electronic transitions to vibrational modes of the chromophores. In this paper we show how to calculate linear optical spectra at finite temperatures in an efficient way. To this end we map a finite temperature environment to the zero temperature case using the so-called thermofield method. The zero temperature case equations can then be solved efficiently by standard integrators. As an example we calculate absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a linear aggregate. The formalism developed can be applied to calculate arbitrary correlation functions.

  7. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature; Quantentheoretische und klassische Vakuum-Kraefte bei Temperatur Null und bei endlicher Temperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-15

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of {Dirac_h}. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  8. High-temperature quantum oscillations of the Hall resistance in bulk Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Marco; Chiatti, Olivio; Pezzini, Sergio; Wiedmann, Steffen; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Rader, Oliver; Yashina, Lada V; Fischer, Saskia F

    2018-01-11

    Helically spin-polarized Dirac fermions (HSDF) in protected topological surface states (TSS) are of high interest as a new state of quantum matter. In three-dimensional (3D) materials with TSS, electronic bulk states often mask the transport properties of HSDF. Recently, the high-field Hall resistance and low-field magnetoresistance indicate that the TSS may coexist with a layered two-dimensional electronic system (2DES). Here, we demonstrate quantum oscillations of the Hall resistance at temperatures up to 50 K in nominally undoped bulk Bi2Se3 with a high electron density n of about 2·1019 cm-3. From the angular and temperature dependence of the Hall resistance and the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations we identify 3D and 2D contributions to transport. Angular resolved photoemission spectroscopy proves the existence of TSS. We present a model for Bi2Se3 and suggest that the coexistence of TSS and 2D layered transport stabilizes the quantum oscillations of the Hall resistance.

  9. Temperature-dependent Mollow triplet spectra from a single quantum dot: Rabi frequency renormalization and sideband linewidth insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; McCutcheon, Dara P S; Nazir, Ahsan

    2014-08-29

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self-assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum dots may be less sensitive to changes in temperature than expected from a standard weak-coupling analysis of phonon effects.

  10. Effect of Asymmetric Barrier Layers in the Waveguide Region on the Temperature Characteristics of QuantumWell Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukov, A. E.; Asryan, L. V.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity of the threshold-current density in quantum-well lasers is studied and the factors affecting the characteristic temperature and its dependence on optical losses are analyzed. It is shown that the inclusion of asymmetric potential barriers (one barrier on each side...... of the quantum well), which prevent the formation of bipolar carrier population in the waveguide region and lead to weakening of the temperature dependences of the transparency-current density, the gain-saturation parameter and, consequently, to a higher characteristic temperature for both long- and short...

  11. Including temperature in a wavefunction description of the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Michael; Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a wavefunction methodology to account for finite temperature initial conditions in the quantum Rabi model. The approach is based on the Davydov Ansatz together with a statistical sampling of the canonical harmonic oscillator initial density matrix. Equations of motion are gained from a variational principle and numerical results are compared to those of the thermal Hamiltonian approach. For a system consisting of a single spin and a single oscillator and for moderate coupling strength, we compare our new results with full quantum ones as well as with other Davydov-type results based on alternative sampling/summation strategies. All of these perform better than the ones based on the thermal Hamiltonian approach. The best agreement is shown by a Boltzmann weighting of individual eigenstate propagations. Extending this to a bath of many oscillators will, however, be very demanding numerically. The use of any one of the investigated stochastic sampling approaches will then be favorable.

  12. SQUID-based current sensing noise thermometry for quantum resistors at dilution refrigerator temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbaum, Ethan; Shingla, Vidhi; Csáthy, G. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based current amplifier with an estimated input referred noise of only 2.3 fA/√{Hz}. Because of such a low amplifier noise, the circuit is useful for Johnson noise thermometry of quantum resistors in the kΩ range down to mK temperatures. In particular, we demonstrate that our circuit does not contribute appreciable noise to the Johnson noise of a 3.25 kΩ resistor down to 16 mK. Our circuit is a useful alternative to the commonly used High Electron Mobility Transistor-based amplifiers, but in contrast to the latter, it offers a much reduced 1/f noise. In comparison to SQUIDs interfaced with cryogenic current comparators, our circuit has similar low noise levels, but it is easier to build and to shield from magnetic pickup.

  13. Effects of Temperature and Electric Field on the Coherence Time of a RbCl Parabolic Quantum Dot Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of the temperature and electric field on the coherence time of a RbCl parabolic quantum dot (PQD) qubit by using the variational method of Pekar type, the Fermi Golden Rule and the quantum statistics theory (VMPTFGRQST). The ground and the first excited states' (GFES) eigenenergies and the eigenfunctions of an electron in the RbCl PQD with an applied electric field are derived. A single qubit can be realized in this two-level quantum system. It turns out that the coherence time is a decreasing function of the temperature and the electric field, whereas it is an increasing one of the effective confinement length (ECL). By changing the electric field, the temperature and the ECL one can adjust the coherence time. Our research results may be useful for the design and implementation of solid-state quantum computation.

  14. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectra of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, S. S.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    The optical-absorption spectra of InP/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots have been studied in a broad temperature range of T = 6.5-296 K. Using the second-order derivative spectrophotometry technique, the energies of optical transitions at room temperature were found to be E 1 = 2.60 ± 0.02 eV (for the first peak of excitonic absorption in the InP core) and E 2 = 4.70 ± 0.02 eV (for processes in the ZnS shell). The experimental curve of E 1( T) has been approximated for the first time in the framework of a linear model and in terms of the Fan's formula. It is established that the temperature dependence of E 1 is determined by the interaction of excitons and longitudinal acoustic phonons with hω = 15 meV.

  15. Temperature-dependent resonance energy transfer from semiconductor quantum wells to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Nam, Jungtae; Kwon, Se Ra; Byun, Hyeryoung; Lee, Kwanjae; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D; Kim, Jeomoh; Ahn, Gwanghyun; Ryu, Sunmin; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Kim, Jin Soo

    2015-02-11

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been employed for interpreting the energy interaction of graphene combined with semiconductor materials such as nanoparticles and quantum-well (QW) heterostructures. Especially, for the application of graphene as a transparent electrode for semiconductor light emitting diodes, the mechanism of exciton recombination processes such as RET in graphene-semiconductor QW heterojunctions should be understood clearly. Here, we characterized the temperature-dependent RET behaviors in graphene/semiconductor QW heterostructures. We then observed the tuning of the RET efficiency from 5% to 30% in graphene/QW heterostructures with ∼60 nm dipole-dipole coupled distance at temperatures of 300 to 10 K. This survey allows us to identify the roles of localized and free excitons in the RET process from the QWs to graphene as a function of temperature.

  16. Ceiling temperature and photothermalsensitivity of aqueous MSA-CdTe quantum dots thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinbing; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Ben Q.

    2017-02-01

    Ceiling temperature, photothermal sensitivity and size effects of aqueous mercaptosuccinic acid modified CdTe quantum dots (MSA-CdTe QDs) are determined from experimental measurements for temperature sensing applications. Measured data show that the ceiling temperature of MSA-CdTe prepared by the hydrothermal process is 60 °C, better than that of CdTe QDs modified by thioglycolic acid (TGA). Aqueous MSA-CdTe QDs exhibit a reversible PL spectral peak wavelength shift within the temperature range from room temperature up to the ceiling temperature 60 °C. With the size of the QDs increasing from 1.9 nm to 3.1 nm, the photothermal sensitivity remains unchanged and a stable linear correlation with a slope of 0.16 nm/ °C exists between the PL spectral peak wavelength position and the temperature. The morphology of QDs was examined under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The measured emission photoluminescence data by QDs further show that the thermal sensitivity is independent of the size of the QDs for the size range studied. Theoretical analysis is presented to substantiate the experiment results.

  17. Temperature-dependent optical properties of lead selenide quantum dot polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Dennis L; Burke, Rebeckah; Preske, Amanda; Krauss, Todd D; Zawodny, Joseph M; Gupta, Mool C

    2017-03-01

    The optical properties of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) in AB9093 epoxy nanocomposite are examined with respect to temperature over a range of 0°C-80°C, a useful working range for many QD-based sensors and devices, and results are compared to QDs in toluene solution. A complete characterization of QD optical properties is provided as a function of temperature, including the absorption spectrum, first excitonic (1-s) absorption peak intensity and wavelength, fluorescence intensity, and peak wavelength. QD optical properties in toluene were found to be more sensitive to temperature as compared to those in AB9093. Interestingly, 1-s and fluorescence peak wavelength variation with temperature are reversed in AB9093 as compared to those in toluene solution. Results for the fluorescence properties of Lumogen F Red 305 dye in toluene are presented for comparison. The dye was found to have similar sensitivity to temperature to that of the QDs in terms of fluorescence peak wavelength shift, but the fluorescence peak intensity was far less variant. These results can be used to build a temperature sensor or as a guide to building other types of QD-based devices to be more robust against changes in ambient temperature.

  18. Ultra-low temperature studies of the even denominator fractional quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, Nodar

    We have constructed a specialized experimental setup with integrated magnetic field independent thermometry, which has enabled us to cool the charge carriers in two dimensional electron gases down to 5 mK, and reliably measure the temperature. Using this setup, we have conducted studies of nu=5/2 fractional quantum Hall state(FQHS) in so far unexplored regions of the parameter space. Using a sample with a tunable density, we observe, for the first time, an evidence of a transition at nu=5/2 filling factor. This transition takes place at the lowest density at which nu=5/2 state had been measured to date, around 6x1010cm-2. Using a different set of samples, we also demonstrate a consistent way to account for the disorder contribution to the energy gap of nu=5/2 FQHS for several samples of vastly different densities. This lets us quantify, for the first time, the dependence of the experimentally measured intrinsic gap at nu=5/2 on Landau level mixing alone. Finally, we have conducted an ultra-low temperature study of the fractional quantum Hall states in the 1/3mK, the magnetoresistance exhibits developing FQHS at nu=4/11; 5/13, 6/17 and 3/8. However, we find that at lower temperatures only the nu=4/11 and 5/13 develop incompressibility, while the nu=6/17 and 3/8 remain compressible.

  19. High operating temperature in V-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligato, Nadia; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Virtanen, Pauli; Strambini, Elia; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-08-18

    Here we report the fabrication and characterization of fully superconducting quantum interference proximity transistors (SQUIPTs) based on the implementation of vanadium (V) in the superconducting loop. At low temperature, the devices show high flux-to-voltage (up to 0.52 mV/Φ 0 ) and flux-to-current (above 12 nA/Φ 0 ) transfer functions, with the best estimated flux sensitivity ~ 2.6 μΦ 0 /(Hz) 1/2 reached under fixed voltage bias, where Φ 0 is the flux quantum. The interferometers operate up to T bath   [Formula: see text] 2 K, with an improvement of 70% of the maximal operating temperature with respect to early SQUIPTs design. The main features of the V-based SQUIPT are described within a simplified theoretical model. Our results open the way to the realization of SQUIPTs that take advantage of the use of higher-gap superconductors for ultra-sensitive nanoscale applications that operate at temperatures well above 1 K.

  20. Nanoengineering of an Si/MnGe quantum dot superlattice for high Curie-temperature ferromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Tianxiao; Kou, Xufeng; Tang, Jianshi; Fan, Yabin; Lee, Shengwei; He, Qinglin; Chang, Li-Te; Murata, Koichi; Gen, Yin; Wang, Kang L

    2017-03-02

    The realization and application of spintronic devices would be dramatically advanced if room-temperature ferromagnetism could be integrated into semiconductor nanostructures, especially when compatible with mature silicon technology. Herein, we report the observation of such a system - an Si/MnGe superlattice with quantum dots well aligned in the vertical direction successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Such a unique system could take full advantage of the type-II energy band structure of the Si/Ge heterostructure, which could trap the holes inside MnGe QDs, significantly enhancing the hole-mediated ferromagnetism. Magnetic measurements indeed found that the superlattice structure exhibited a Curie temperature of above 400 K. Furthermore, zero-field cooling and field cooling curves could confirm the absence of ferromagnetic compounds, such as Ge8Mn11 (Tc ∼ 270 K) and Ge3Mn5 (Tc ∼ 296 K) in our system. Magnetotransport measurement revealed a clear magnetoresistance transition from negative to positive and a pronounced anomalous Hall effect. Such a unique Si/MnGe superlattice sets a new stage for strengthening ferromagnetism due to the enhanced hole-mediation by quantum confinement, which can be exploited for realizing the room-temperature Ge-based spin field-effect transistors in the future.

  1. Quantum Gas of Polar Molecules Ensembles at Ultralow Temperatures: f-wave Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemâa, Abdelâali

    2017-10-01

    We investigate novel f-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules in a two-dimensional bilayer system with dipole moments polarized perpendicular to the layers and in opposite directions in different layers. The solution of the BCS gap equation reveals that these unconventional superfluids emerge at temperatures on the level of femtokelvin which opens up new possibilities to explore the topological f+i f phase, quantum interferometry and Majorana fermions in experiments with ultracold polar molecules. The experimental realization of such interesting novel f-wave pairings is discussed.

  2. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3......)-phenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives, in which the central benzene ring is coupled to either para- or meta-positions. Using the break-junction technique, we find that the conductance for a single meta-OPV3 molecule wired between gold electrodes is one order of magnitude smaller than that of a para-OPV3 molecule...

  3. Path-integral calculation of the third virial coefficient of quantum gases at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Harvey, Allan H

    2011-04-07

    We derive path-integral expressions for the second and third virial coefficients of monatomic quantum gases. Unlike previous work that considered only Boltzmann statistics, we include exchange effects (Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics). We use state-of-the-art pair and three-body potentials to calculate the third virial coefficient of (3)He and (4)He in the temperature range 2.6-24.5561 K. We obtain uncertainties smaller than those of the limited experimental data. Inclusion of exchange effects is necessary to obtain accurate results below about 7 K.

  4. Rabi oscillations in a quantum dot-cavity system coupled to a nonzero temperature phonon bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Jonas [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Moya-Cessa, Hector [INAOE, Coordinacion de Optica, Apdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue (Mexico)], E-mail: jolarson@kth.se

    2008-06-15

    We study a quantum dot strongly coupled to a single high-finesse optical microcavity mode. We use a rotating wave approximation (RWA) method, commonly used in ion-laser interactions, together with the Lamb-Dicke approximation to obtain an analytic solution of this problem. The decay of Rabi oscillations because of the electron-phonon coupling is studied at arbitrary temperature and analytical expressions for the collapse and revival times are presented. Analyses without the RWA are presented as means of investigating the energy spectrum.

  5. Observation of Quantum-Size Effects at Room Temperature on Metal Surfaces With STM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avouris, P; Lyo, I W

    1994-05-13

    Surface steps act as confining barriers for electrons in metal-surface states. Thus, narrow terraces and small single-atom-high metal islands act as low-dimensional, electron-confining structures. In sufficiently small structures, quantum-size effects are observable even at room temperature. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is used to image the probability amplitude distributions and discrete spectra of the confined states. Examination of the electronic structure of the steps provides evidence for electron-density smoothing and the formation of step-edge states. Estimates of the electron-confining barriers are obtained.

  6. Single superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer for arrays of low-temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M. J.; Richards, P. L.; Skidmore, J. T.

    2001-01-15

    We present the design and experimental evaluation of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer for an array of low-temperature sensors. Each sensor is inductively coupled to a superconducting summing loop which, in turn, is inductively coupled to the readout SQUID. The flux-locked loop of the SQUID is used to null the current in the summing loop and thus cancel crosstalk. The sensors are biased with an alternating current, each with a separate frequency, and the individual sensor signals are separated by lock-in detection at the SQUID output. We have fabricated a prototype 8 channel multiplexer and discuss the application to a larger array.

  7. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  8. Room-temperature luminescence decay of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots: Nonexponentiality revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodunov, Evgeny N. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Danilov, Vladimir V. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Panfutova, Anastasia S. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Simoes Gamboa, A.L. [Center of Information Optical Technologies, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    While time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is commonly used as a quantitative tool for the analysis of the dynamics of photoexcitation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, the interpretation of the virtually ubiquitous nonexponential decay profiles is frequently ambiguous, because the assumption of multiple discrete exponential components with distinct lifetimes for resolving the decays is often arbitrary. Here, an interpretation of the room-temperature luminescence decay of CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots in colloidal solutions is presented based on the Kohlrausch relaxation function. It is proposed that the decay can be understood by using the concept of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assuming that the role of acceptors of photoexcitation energy is played by high-frequency anharmonic molecular vibrations in the environment of the quantum dots. The term EVFRET (Electronic - Vibrational Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer) is introduced in order to unequivocally refer to this energy transfer process. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Effects of Electric Field and Temperature on RbCl Asymmetry Quantum Dot Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2014-03-01

    The effects of the electric field and temperature on a RbCl asymmetry quantum dot (AQD) qubit are investigated by using a variational method of the Pekar type. We first study the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of the ground and first excited states of an electron strongly coupled to bulk longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with a three-dimensional (3D) harmonic potential under the influence of an electric field. This AQD two-level system may serve as a single qubit. We then obtain the time evolution of the electron's probability density when the electron is in the superposition state of the ground and first excited states. Finally, we investigate the effects of the electric field and temperature on the oscillating period, the time evolution of the electron's probability density and the coherence time. The numerical results show that the electron's probability density and its oscillatory period will increase (decrease) with increasing temperature in the low (high) temperature regime. The electron's probability density oscillates with a certain period in the AQD. The oscillating period is an increasing function of the temperature and the electric field. The coherence time is an increasing function of the temperature and the electric field, but it is a decreasing one of the transverse and longitudinal confinement strengths.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Mollow Triplet Spectra from a Single Quantum Dot: Rabi Frequency Renormalization and Sideband Linewidth Insensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self- assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi...... frequency. We also present first evidence for a nonperturbative regime of phonon coupling, in which the expected linear increase in sideband linewidth as a function of temperature is canceled by the corresponding reduction in Rabi frequency. These results indicate that dephasing in semiconductor quantum...

  11. Room-temperature electric-field controlled ferromagnetism in Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Faxian; Wang, Yong; Kim, Jiyoung; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhou, Yi; Kou, Xufeng; Han, Wei; Kawakami, R K; Zou, Jin; Wang, Kang L

    2010-08-24

    Room-temperature control of ferromagnetism by electric fields in magnetic semiconductors has been actively pursued as one of important approaches to realize practical spintronic and nonvolatile logic devices. While Mn-doped III-V semiconductors were considered as potential candidates for achieving this controllability, the search for an ideal material with high Curie temperature (T(c) > 300 K) and controllable ferromagnetism at room temperature has continued for nearly a decade. Recently, Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots (QDs) were demonstrated to have a T(c) above 300 K. However, the field control of ferromagnetism based on hole-mediated effect remained at low temperatures and thus prohibited spintronic devices operable at ambient environment. Here, we report a successful demonstration of electric-field control of ferromagnetism in the Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots up to 300 K. We show that, by using quantum structure, high-quality material can be obtained and effective hole mediation due to quantum confinement effect can be achieved. Upon the application of gate bias to a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the ferromagnetism of the channel layer, that is, the Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots, was manipulated through the change of hole concentration. Our results are fundamentally and technologically important toward the realization of room-temperature spin field-effect transistors and nonvolatile spin logic devices.

  12. Hawking temperature: an elementary approach based on Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, the British physicist Stephen Hawking discovered that black holes have a characteristic temperature and are therefore capable of emitting radiation. Given the scientific importance of this discovery, there is a profuse literature on the subject. Nevertheless, the available literature ends up being either too simple, which does not convey the true physical significance of the issue, or too technical, which excludes an ample segment of the audience interested in science, such as physics teachers and their students. The present article seeks to remedy this shortcoming. It develops a simple and plausible argument that provides insight into the fundamental aspects of Hawking’s discovery, which leads to an approximate equation for the so-called Hawking temperature. The exposition is mainly intended for physics teachers and their students, and it only requires elementary algebra, as well as basic notions of Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory.

  13. Analytical pair correlations in ideal quantum gases: temperature-dependent bunching and antibunching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, J; Pathak, K N; Singh, G S

    2011-10-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem together with the exact density response spectrum for ideal quantum gases has been utilized to yield a new expression for the static structure factor, which we use to derive exact analytical expressions for the temperature-dependent pair distribution function g(r) of the ideal gases. The plots of bosonic and fermionic g(r) display "Bose pile" and "Fermi hole" typically akin to bunching and antibunching as observed experimentally for ultracold atomic gases. The behavior of spin-scaled pair correlation for fermions is almost featureless, but bosons show a rich structure including long-range correlations near T(c). The coherent state at T=0 shows no correlation at all, just like single-mode lasers. The depicted decreasing trend in correlation with decrease in temperature for T

  14. Tunable Room Temperature Second Harmonic Generation in Glasses Doped with CuCI Nanocrystalline Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon; Schley, Robert Scott; B. L. Justus

    2003-05-01

    Two-photon excited emission centered at 379-426 nm in photodarkening borosilicate glass doped with CuCl nanocrystalline quantum dots at room temperature has been observed. The emission is detected in the direction of the fundamental near-infrared beam. Time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature and 77 K indicate that the emission is largely coherent light characteristic of second harmonic generation (SHG). An average conversion efficiency of ~10-10 is obtained for a 2 mm thick sample. The observed SHG can originate in the individual noncentrosymmetric nanocrystals, leading to a bulk-like contribution, and at the nanocrystal-glass interface, leading to a surface contribution. The bulk-like conversion efficiency is estimated using previously reported values of coherence length (5m) and bulk nonlinear susceptibility. This bulk-like conversion efficiency estimate is found to be smaller than the measured value, suggesting a more prominent surface contribution.

  15. Bose-Einstein Condensation: Quantum weirdness at the lowest temperature in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl

    2004-10-01

    In 1924 Einstein predicted that a gas would undergo a dramatic transformation at a sufficiently low temperature (now known as Bose-Einstein condensation or BEC). In 1995, my group was able to observe this transformation by cooling a gas sample to the unprecedented temperature of less than 100 billionths of a degree above absolute zero. The BEC state is a novel form of matter in which a large number of atoms lose their individual identities and behave as a single quantum entity, the ``superatom.'' This entity is the atom analogue to laser light, and, although large enough to be easily seen and manipulated, exhibits the nonintuitive quantum behavior normally important only at much tinier size scales. The study and use of the curious properties of BEC has now become an important subfield of physics. I will discuss how we create BEC and some of the subsequent research we have done on it. Interactive applets as a tool for teaching science will be demonstrated in the presentation.

  16. Estimation of effective temperatures in quantum annealers for sampling applications: A case study with possible applications in deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the efficiency of sampling from Boltzmann distributions would have a significant impact on deep learning and other machine-learning applications. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up this task, but several limitations still bar these state-of-the-art technologies from being used effectively. One of the main limitations is that, while the device may indeed sample from a Boltzmann-like distribution, quantum dynamical arguments suggest it will do so with an instance-dependent effective temperature, different from its physical temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the learning of a special class of a restricted Boltzmann machine embedded on quantum hardware, which can serve as a building block for deep-learning architectures. We also provide a comparison to k -step contrastive divergence (CD-k ) with k up to 100. Although assuming a suitable fixed effective temperature also allows us to outperform one-step contrastive divergence (CD-1), only when using an instance-dependent effective temperature do we find a performance close to that of CD-100 for the case studied here.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: A Quantum Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naderi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By developing a two-dimensional (2D full quantum simulation, the attributes of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs in different temperatures have been comprehensively investigated. Simulations have been performed by employing the self-consistent solution of 2D Poisson-Schrödinger equations within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF formalism. Principal characteristics of CNTFETs such as current capability, drain conductance, transconductance, and subthreshold swing (SS have been investigated. Simulation results present that as temperature raises from 250 to 500 K, the drain conductance and on-current of the CNTFET improved; meanwhile the on-/off-current ratio deteriorated due to faster growth in off-current. Also the effects of temperature on short channel effects (SCEs such as drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL and threshold voltage roll-off have been studied. Results show that the subthreshold swing and DIBL parameters are almost linearly correlated, so the degradation of these parameters has the same origin and can be perfectly influenced by the temperature.

  18. Room temperature negative differential resistance in terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albo, Asaf, E-mail: asafalbo@gmail.com; Hu, Qing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Reno, John L. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1303, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1303 (United States)

    2016-08-22

    The mechanisms that limit the temperature performance of GaAs/Al{sub 0.15}GaAs-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) have been identified as thermally activated LO-phonon scattering and leakage of charge carriers into the continuum. Consequently, the combination of highly diagonal optical transition and higher barriers should significantly reduce the adverse effects of both mechanisms and lead to improved temperature performance. Here, we study the temperature performance of highly diagonal THz-QCLs with high barriers. Our analysis uncovers an additional leakage channel which is the thermal excitation of carriers into bounded higher energy levels, rather than the escape into the continuum. Based on this understanding, we have designed a structure with an increased intersubband spacing between the upper lasing level and excited states in a highly diagonal THz-QCL, which exhibits negative differential resistance even at room temperature. This result is a strong evidence for the effective suppression of the aforementioned leakage channel.

  19. Temperature performance analysis of intersubband Raman laser in quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefvand, Hossein Reza

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of temperature on the output characteristics of the intersubband Raman laser (RL) that integrated monolithically with a quantum cascade (QC) laser as an intracavity optical pump. The laser bandstructure is calculated by a self-consistent solution of Schrodinger-Poisson equations, and the employed physical model of carrier transport is based on a five-level carrier scattering rates; a two-level rate equations for the pump laser and a three-level scattering rates to include the stimulated Raman process in the RL. The temperature dependency of the relevant physical effects such as thermal broadening of the intersubband transitions (ISTs), thermally activated phonon emission lifetimes, and thermal backfilling of the final lasing state of the Raman process from the injector are included in the model. Using the presented model, the steady-state, small-signal modulation response and transient device characteristics are investigated for a range of sink temperatures (80-220 K). It is found that the main characteristics of the device such as output power, threshold current, Raman modal gain, turn-on delay time and 3-dB optical bandwidth are remarkably affected by the temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of scattering phases and Friedel phase discontinuity in quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargiamidis, Vassilios; Fessatidis, Vassilios

    2011-07-01

    Two important issues concerning the scattering phases in a quantum wire with an attractive scatterer are investigated. We consider the case of two quasibound states which couple to a scattering channel and give rise to two Fano resonances. First, we examine the effects of temperature on the phase of the transmission amplitude and the Friedel phase. It is shown that temperature effects tend to smear sharp features of the transmission phase; namely, the phase drops become less than π, and acquire finite widths which increase linearly in the low-temperature regime. The influence of temperature on the Friedel phase and density of states becomes stronger as the Fano resonance becomes narrower. Second, we examine the behavior of the Friedel phase when the energy of the incident electron crosses an infinitely narrow Fano resonance, forming bound state in the continuum. It is shown that the Friedel phase exhibits abrupt jump of π at this energy. We discuss this odd behavior in relation to the Friedel sum rule and point out its consequences on the charge in the scattering region.

  1. On the origin of stretched exponential (Kohlrausch) relaxation kinetics in the room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodunov, E N; Antonov, Yu A; Simões Gamboa, A L

    2017-03-21

    The non-exponential room temperature luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is often well described by a stretched exponential function. However, the physical meaning of the parameters of the function is not clear in the majority of cases reported in the literature. In this work, the room temperature stretched exponential luminescence decay of colloidal quantum dots is investigated theoretically in an attempt to identify the underlying physical mechanisms associated with the parameters of the function. Three classes of non-radiative transition processes between the excited and ground states of colloidal quantum dots are discussed: long-range resonance energy transfer, multiphonon relaxation, and contact quenching without diffusion. It is shown that multiphonon relaxation cannot explain a stretched exponential functional form of the luminescence decay while such dynamics of relaxation can be understood in terms of long-range resonance energy transfer to acceptors (molecules, quantum dots, or anharmonic molecular vibrations) in the environment of the quantum dots acting as energy-donors or by contact quenching by acceptors (surface traps or molecules) distributed statistically on the surface of the quantum dots. These non-radiative transition processes are assigned to different ranges of the stretching parameter β.

  2. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  3. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV.

  4. Intersublevel infrared photodetector with strain-free GaAs quantum dot pairs grown by high-temperature droplet epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Shao, Dali; Dorogan, Vitaliy G; Li, Alvason Z; Li, Shibin; DeCuir, Eric A; Manasreh, M Omar; Wang, Zhiming M; Mazur, Yuriy I; Salamo, Gregory J

    2010-04-14

    Normal incident photodetection at mid infrared spectral region is achieved using the intersublevel transitions from strain-free GaAs quantum dot pairs in Al(0.3)Ga(0.7)As matrix. The GaAs quantum dot pairs are fabricated by high temperature droplet epitaxy, through which zero strain quantum dot pairs are obtained from lattice matched materials. Photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation optical spectroscopy, and visible-near-infrared photoconductivity measurement are carried out to study the electronic structure of the photodetector. Due to the intersublevel transitions from GaAs quantum dot pairs, a broadband photoresponse spectrum is observed from 3 to 8 microm with a full width at half-maximum of approximately 2.0 microm.

  5. High Operating Temperature Midwave Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 ??m when operating at 150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to 6 ?m, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  6. Andreev reflection at a graphene-high-temperature superconductor interface in the quantum Hall regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da; Telford, Evan; Benyamini, Avishai; Hone, James; Dean, Cory; Pasupathy, Abhay

    At metal-superconductor interfaces Andreev processes occur where an electron tunneling into the superconductor carries with it a second electron, effectively reflecting a hole with opposite momentum back into the metal. This is due to the superconducting gap, which, at low energies, only allows the formation of cooper pairs inside the superconductor, representing an accessible way to measure Cooper-pair tunneling phenomena. An important requirement for strong Andreev processes is a clean interface with a high transmission probability. Graphene is a promising candidate for achieving an extremely clean interface to superconductors, however recent results show achieving a transparent interface is non-trivial. In the quantum hall regime, chiral edge states open new possibilities to measure novel Andreev processes. In this work, we use controlled assembly in a well-controlled inert atmosphere to create high-quality interfaces between monolayer and bilayer graphene and high-temperature superconductors. Due to the high critical field of these superconductors, we are able to reach the quantum hall state in the graphene layer while preserving superconductivity, and we describe the resultant Andreev processes observed at such interface.

  7. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Carlos R; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Seldenthuis, Johannes S; Bjørnholm, Thomas; van der Zant, Herre Sj

    2013-05-16

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3)-phenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives, in which the central benzene ring is coupled to either para- or meta-positions. Using the break-junction technique, we find that the conductance for a single meta-OPV3 molecule wired between gold electrodes is one order of magnitude smaller than that of a para-OPV3 molecule. Theoretical calculations confirm the occurrence of constructive and destructive interference in the para- and meta-OPV3 molecules respectively, which arises from the phase difference of the transmission coefficients through the molecular orbitals.

  8. Quantum black hole wave packet: Average area entropy and temperature dependent width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Davidson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A quantum Schwarzschild black hole is described, at the mini super spacetime level, by a non-singular wave packet composed of plane wave eigenstates of the momentum Dirac-conjugate to the mass operator. The entropy of the mass spectrum acquires then independent contributions from the average mass and the width. Hence, Bekenstein's area entropy is formulated using the 〈mass2〉 average, leaving the 〈mass〉 average to set the Hawking temperature. The width function peaks at the Planck scale for an elementary (zero entropy, zero free energy micro black hole of finite rms size, and decreases Doppler-like towards the classical limit.

  9. Density dependence of spin relaxation in GaAs quantum well at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, L. H.; Zhang, P.; Lai, T. S.; Wu, M. W.

    2008-10-01

    Carrier density dependence of electron spin relaxation in an intrinsic GaAs quantum well is investigated at room temperature using time-resolved circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy. It is revealed that the spin relaxation time first increases with density in the relatively low-density regime where the linear D'yakonov-Perel' spin-orbit coupling terms are dominant, and then tends to decrease when the density is large and the cubic D'yakonov-Perel' spin-orbit coupling terms become important. These features are in good agreement with theoretical predictions on density dependence of spin relaxation by Lüet al. (Phys. Rev. B, 73 (2006) 125314). A fully microscopic calculation based on numerically solving the kinetic spin Bloch equations with both the D'yakonov-Perel' and the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanisms included, reproduces the density dependence of spin relaxation very well.

  10. The temperature behavior and mechanism of exciton luminescence in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, A F; Biryukov, D Yu

    2017-07-19

    The processes of direct and indirect optical excitation of spatially confined excitons in quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a silica thin-film matrix have been reported and discussed. A generalized scheme for the electronic transitions is employed for a detailed description of luminescence temperature behavior using various excitation methods. This scheme considers three different models of exciton relaxation and substantiates the occupation of the triplet radiative states as a result of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing or excitation energy transfer from free excitons of the matrix. Analytical expressions describing five types of different temperature curves were derived. It is established that their shapes are exactly defined by the excitation mechanism and the parameters involved in the numerical model. The conditions allowing the estimation of the energy and kinetic characteristics of QD photoluminescence are formulated. We have shown that the confinement effect causes a decrease in the thermal activation barriers and frequency characteristics for non-radiative transitions. An application of the developed concepts allows predicting and estimating the temperature dependences for direct and indirect optically excited QD luminescence employing silicon nanoclusters in a silica thin-film matrix as an example.

  11. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, T. J., E-mail: Thomas.badcock@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Dawson, P.; Davies, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10 K and 100 K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10 K and 50 K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers.

  12. Reduced group delay dispersion in quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers operating at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, J. K.; Raghunathan, R.; Murrell, D.; Braga, A.; Li, Y.; Lester, L. F.

    2014-09-01

    A detailed study of the pulse characteristics emitted from a monolithic Quantum Dot (QD) passively Mode-Locked Laser (MLL) has been performed using a state-of-the-art Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) pulse measurement system. While traditionally the time-domain pulse characteristics of semiconductor MLLs have been studied using digital sampling oscilloscope or intensity autocorrelation techniques, the FROG measurements allow for simultaneous characterization of time and frequency, which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for true determination of mode-locked stability. In this paper, FROG pulse measurements are presented on a two-section QD MLL operating over wide temperature excursions. The FROG measurement allows for extraction of the temporal and spectral intensity and phase profiles from which the Group Delay Dispersion (GDD) can be determined. The magnitude of the GDD is found to decrease from 16.1 to 3.5 ps/nm when the temperature is increased from 20 to 50 oC, mirroring the trend of pulse width reduction at elevated temperature, which has been shown to correlate strongly with reduced unsaturated absorption. The possibility to further optimize pulse generation via intra-cavity dispersion compensation in a novel three-section MLL design is also examined, and shows strong potential toward providing valuable insight into the optimal cavity designs and operating parameters for QD MLLs.

  13. Room-temperature cavity quantum electrodynamics with strongly coupled Dicke states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, Jonathan D.; Salvadori, Enrico; Sathian, Juna; Alford, Neil McN.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2017-09-01

    The strong coupling regime is essential for efficient transfer of excitations between states in different quantum systems on timescales shorter than their lifetimes. The coupling of single spins to microwave photons is very weak but can be enhanced by increasing the local density of states by reducing the magnetic mode volume of the cavity. In practice, it is difficult to achieve both small cavity mode volume and low cavity decay rate, so superconducting metals are often employed at cryogenic temperatures. For an ensembles of N spins, the spin-photon coupling can be enhanced by √{N } through collective spin excitations known as Dicke states. For sufficiently large N the collective spin-photon coupling can exceed both the spin decoherence and cavity decay rates, making the strong-coupling regime accessible. Here we demonstrate strong coupling and cavity quantum electrodynamics in a solid-state system at room-temperature. We generate an inverted spin-ensemble with N 1015 by photo-exciting pentacene molecules into spin-triplet states with spin dephasing time T2* 3 μs. When coupled to a 1.45 GHz TE01δ mode supported by a high Purcell factor strontium titanate dielectric cavity (Vm 0.25 cm3, Q 8,500), we observe Rabi oscillations in the microwave emission from collective Dicke states and a 1.8 MHz normal-mode splitting of the resultant collective spin-photon polariton. We also observe a cavity protection effect at the onset of the strong-coupling regime which decreases the polariton decay rate as the collective coupling increases.

  14. Low-Temperature Single Carbon Nanotube Spectroscopy of sp3 Quantum Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ihly, Rachelle R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); He, Xiaowei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gifford, Brendan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartmann, Nicolai F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ma, Xuedan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kilina, Svetlana V. [North Dakota State University; Luo, Yue [Stevens Institute of Technology; Shayan, Kamran [Stevens Institute of Technology; Strauf, Stefan [Stevens Institute of Technology; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-09-28

    Aiming to unravel the relationship between chemical configuration and electronic structure of sp3 defects of aryl-functionalized (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we perform low-temperature single nanotube photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies and correlate our observations with quantum chemistry simulations. We observe sharp emission peaks from individual defect sites that are spread over an extremely broad, 1000-1350 nm, spectral range. Our simulations allow us to attribute this spectral diversity to the occurrence of six chemically and energetically distinct defect states resulting from topological variation in the chemical binding configuration of the monovalent aryl groups. Both PL emission efficiency and spectral line width of the defect states are strongly influenced by the local dielectric environment. Wrapping the SWCNT with a polyfluorene polymer provides the best isolation from the environment and yields the brightest emission with near-resolution limited spectral line width of 270 ueV, as well as spectrally resolved emission wings associated with localized acoustic phonons. Pump-dependent studies further revealed that the defect states are capable of emitting single, sharp, isolated PL peaks over 3 orders of magnitude increase in pump power, a key characteristic of two-level systems and an important prerequisite for single-photon emission with high purity. These findings point to the tremendous potential of sp3 defects in development of room temperature quantum light sources capable of operating at telecommunication wavelengths as the emission of the defect states can readily be extended to this range via use of larger diameter SWCNTs.

  15. Effects of temperature and hydrogen-like impurity on the coherence time of RbCl parabolic quantum dot qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2016-02-01

    By using a variational method of Pekar type, the Fermi Golden Rule and the quantum statistics theory (VMPTFGRQST), we investigate the effects of the hydrogen-like impurity and temperature on the coherence time of a parabolic quantum dot (PQD) qubit with a hydrogen-like impurity at the center. We then derive the ground and the first excited states' (GFES) eigenenergies and the eigenfunctions in a PQD. A single qubit can be realized in this two-level quantum system. The phonon spontaneous emission causes the decoherence of the qubit. The numerical results show that the coherence time is a decreasing function of the temperature, the strength of the Coulombic impurity potential (CIP) and the polaron radius (PR).

  16. Effect of finite energy of intravalley acoustic phonons on the temperature of non-equilibrium electrons in a quantum surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nag, S. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bhattacharya, D.P., E-mail: d_p_bhattacharya@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of finite energy of intravalley acoustic phonons on the electric field dependence of the temperature of the non-equilibrium carriers in a quantum surface has been studied here. The calculations have been made, for a rather pure material, at low lattice temperature. Numerical results are obtained for GaAs and Si. The results are interesting being significantly different from what one obtains by neglecting the phonon energy.

  17. Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Schwab, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 xzp. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion.

  18. High-Yield Fabrication of Entangled Photon Emitters for Hybrid Quantum Networking Using High-Temperature Droplet Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Basset, Francesco; Bietti, Sergio; Reindl, Marcus; Esposito, Luca; Fedorov, Alexey; Huber, Daniel; Rastelli, Armando; Bonera, Emiliano; Trotta, Rinaldo; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2018-01-10

    Several semiconductor quantum dot techniques have been investigated for the generation of entangled photon pairs. Among the other techniques, droplet epitaxy enables the control of the shape, size, density, and emission wavelength of the quantum emitters. However, the fraction of the entanglement-ready quantum dots that can be fabricated with this method is still limited to around 5%, and matching the energy of the entangled photons to atomic transitions (a promising route toward quantum networking) remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we overcome these obstacles by introducing a modified approach to droplet epitaxy on a high symmetry (111)A substrate, where the fundamental crystallization step is performed at a significantly higher temperature as compared with previous reports. Our method drastically improves the yield of entanglement-ready photon sources near the emission wavelength of interest, which can be as high as 95% due to the low values of fine structure splitting and radiative lifetime, together with the reduced exciton dephasing offered by the choice of GaAs/AlGaAs materials. The quantum dots are designed to emit in the operating spectral region of Rb-based slow-light media, providing a viable technology for quantum repeater stations.

  19. Room-temperature storage of quantum entanglement using decoherence-free subspace in a solid-state spin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Zu, C.; Hou, P.-Y.; Yuan, X.-X.; Wang, W.-B.; Zhang, W.-G.; He, L.; Chang, X.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate room-temperature storage of quantum entanglement using two nuclear spins weakly coupled to the electronic spin carried by a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. We realize universal quantum gate control over the three-qubit spin system and produce entangled states in the decoherence-free subspace of the two nuclear spins. By injecting arbitrary collective noise, we demonstrate that the decoherence-free entangled state has coherence time longer than that of other entangled states by an order of magnitude in our experiment.

  20. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 97 October. Tunneling reaction and quantum medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru [eds.

    1998-02-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 3rd Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in Oct. 13 and 14, 1997. The main subject of the meeting is `Tunneling Reaction and Quantum Medium`. In the meeting, the physical and chemical phenomena in the liquid helium such as quantum nucleation, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and tunneling abstraction reaction of tritium atom were discussed as the main topics as well as the tunneling reactions in the solid hydrogen and organic compounds. Through the meetings held in 1995, 1996, and 1997, the tunneling phenomena proceeding at various temperatures (room temperature to mK) in the wide fields of chemistry, biology, and physics were discussed intensively and the importance of the tunneling phenomena in the science has been getting clear. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Towards the unified non-classical physics: account for quantum fluctuations in equilibrium thermodynamics via the effective temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G.Rudoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of effective temperature (ET T*(T0, T is used in order to approximately "quantize" the thermodynamic functions of the dynamical object which is in the thermal equilibrium with thermal bath being at constant temperature T (T0=E0/kB, where E0 is the ground-state energy, kB - Boltzmann constant, is the characteristic ``quantum'' temperature of the system itself. On these grounds the extensive comparative investigation is carried out for the ``standard model'' of statistical mechanics - the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO. Three well-known approaches are considered and their thermodynamic consequences thoroughly studied. These are: the exact quantum, or non-classical Planck-Einstein approach, intermediate, or semiclassical Bloch-Wigner approach and, finally, the pure classical, or Maxwell-Boltzmann approach.

  2. Observation of room temperature optical absorption in InP/GaAs type-II ultrathin quantum wells and quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. D., E-mail: devsh@rrcat.gov.in; Porwal, S.; Mondal, Puspen; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2014-06-14

    Room temperature optical absorption process is observed in ultrathin quantum wells (QWs) and quantum dots (QDs) of InP/GaAs type-II band alignment system using surface photovoltage spectroscopy technique, where no measurable photoluminescence signal is available. Clear signature of absorption edge in the sub band gap region of GaAs barrier layer is observed for the ultrathin QWs and QDs, which red shifts with the amount of deposited InP material. Movement of photogenerated holes towards the sample surface is proposed to be the main mechanism for the generation of surface photovoltage in type-II ultrathin QWs and QDs. QDs of smaller size are found to be free from the dislocations as confirmed by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

  3. Silanization of Low-Temperature-Plasma Synthesized Silicon Quantum Dots for Production of a Tunable, Stable, Colloidal Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I. E.; Shircliff, R. A.; Macauley, C.; Smith, D. K.; Lee, B. G.; Agrawal, S.; Stradins, P.; Collins, R. T.

    2012-02-16

    We present a method for grafting silanes onto low-temperature-plasma synthesized silicon quantum dots. The resulting solution of dots is characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and determined to be a colloidal suspension. The silane is attached at a single point on the quantum dot surface to avoid cross-linking and multilayer formation, and photoluminescence spectroscopy shows the colloidal suspension of dots is stable for over two months in air. The hydroxyl-terminated surfaces required for silanization are created by wet chemical etch, which can be used to tune the luminescence of the silicon dots in the green- to red-wavelength range. We find, however, that the wet etch cannot move the emission into the blue-wavelength range and discuss this observation in terms of the nature of etching process and origin of the emission. In addition, we discuss the photoluminescence quantum yield in the context of other passivation and synthetic techniques.

  4. Temperature-dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots in coherent regime; Temperaturabhaengige Eigenschaften einzelner Halbleiter-Quantenpunkte im Kohaerenten Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Marc C.

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the public has become aware of keywords like ''Quantum computer'' or ''Quantum cryptography''. Regarding their potential application in solid state based quantum information processing and their overall benefit in fundamental research quantum dots have gained more and more public interest. In this context, quantum dots are often referred to as ''artificial atoms'', a term subsuming their physical properties quite nicely and emphasizing the huge potential for further investigations. The basic mechanism to be considered is the theoretical model of a two-level system. A quantum dot itself represents this kind of system quite nicely, provided that only the presence or absence of a single exciton in the ground state of that structure is regarded. This concept can also be expanded to the presence of two excitons (bi-exciton). Transitions between the relevant levels can be induced by optical stimulation. When integrating quantum dots in diode like structures measurements of this phenomena can be accomplished regarding photo currents. This means of detection is highly sensitive and allows for tuning of the energy levels with respect to the energy of an exciting laser utilizing the Stark effect (via an external electric field). The photo current then shows narrow resonances representing those transitions. By this, the system can be used as a highly sensitive nano-spectrometer. The examination of coherent interactions between quantum dots and an electromagnetic field uses laser pulses that are much shorter than the dephasing time of the system (2 ps). The basic study to be done on two level systems is the measurement of Rabi oscillations allowing for the selection of an arbitrary superposition of states. In this work, the existing setup was improved regarding the possibility to control the temperature of the sample. Up to now, only investigations at 4,2 K have been possible. Even at 70 K Rabi oscillations

  5. 1.5 μm InAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum dot laser with improved temperature stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, F. I.; Gladii, S. P.; Shernyakov, Yu M.

    2016-01-01

    Temperature characteristics of InAs/InGaAsP quantum dot (QD) lasers synthesized on InP (001) substrate are presented. The lasers demonstrate high temperature stability: a threshold current characteristic temperature as high as 205 K in the temperature range between 20 to 50°C was measured. Lasing...

  6. Multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dots colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fanglong; Ding, Ling; Li, Yunchao; Li, Xiaohong; Fan, Louzhen; Zhou, Shixin; Fang, Decai; Yang, Shihe

    2015-07-01

    Smart functional nanomaterials colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range are urgently needed due to their widespread applications in biotechnology, drug delivery, diagnosis and optical sensing. Although graphene quantum dots possess remarkable advantages in biological applications, they are only stable in neutral or weak acidic solutions, and strong acidic or alkaline conditions invariably suppress or diminish the fluorescence intensity. Herein, we report a new type of water-soluble, multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dot which is responsive to all-pH from 1 to 14 with the naked eye. The synthesis was accomplished by electrolysis of the graphite rod, followed by refluxing in a concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixed solution. We demonstrate the novel red fluorescence of quinone structures transformed from the lactone structures under strong alkaline conditions. The fluorescence of the resulting graphene quantum dots was also found to be responsive to the temperature changes, demonstrating their great potential as a dual probe of pH and temperature in complicated environments such as biological media.Smart functional nanomaterials colorimetrically responsive to all-pH and a wide temperature range are urgently needed due to their widespread applications in biotechnology, drug delivery, diagnosis and optical sensing. Although graphene quantum dots possess remarkable advantages in biological applications, they are only stable in neutral or weak acidic solutions, and strong acidic or alkaline conditions invariably suppress or diminish the fluorescence intensity. Herein, we report a new type of water-soluble, multicolor fluorescent graphene quantum dot which is responsive to all-pH from 1 to 14 with the naked eye. The synthesis was accomplished by electrolysis of the graphite rod, followed by refluxing in a concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixed solution. We demonstrate the novel red fluorescence of quinone structures transformed

  7. Systematic investigation of the temperature behavior of InAs/InP quantum nanostructure passively mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaime, K.; Piron, R.; Grillot, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effects of the temperature on the mode-locking capability of two section InAs/InP quantum nanostructure (QN) passively mode locked lasers. Devices are made with multi-layers of self-assembled InAs QN either grown on InP(100) (5 quantum dashes (QDashes) layers......) or on InP (311)B (6 quantum dots (QDs) layers). Using an analytical model, the mode-locking stability map is extracted for the two types of QN as a function of optical absorption, cavity length, current density and temperature. We believe that this study is of first importance since it reports...... for the first time a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependence on the mode-locking properties of InAs/InP QN devices. Beside, a rigorous comparison between QDashes and QDs temperature dependence is proposed through a proper analysis of the mode-locking stability maps. Experimental results also show...

  8. Sissejuhatus Tubinasse : Marianne Kõrveri "Äraoldud päevade summa" / Tõnu Karjatse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karjatse, Tõnu

    2005-01-01

    Muusikaline dokumentaalfilm "Äraoldud päevade summa" helilooja Eduard Tubinast : stsenarist ja tekstide autor Jüri Reinvere : režissöör Marianne Kõrver : Exitfilm - Eesti Televisioon - SVT (Rootsi)

  9. Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 : Nädalajagu muusikat igale maitsele / Signe Tamberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamberg, Signe

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 muusikaprogrammis: 34. tudengilaulu võistlusest 29. apr. Tartu Sadamateatris, öölaulupeost 28. apr. Kassitoome orus, kontsertidest "Rokime!" 2. mail ja "Folgime" 3. mail Raekoja platsil

  10. Linear Pursuit Differential Game under Phase Constraint on the State of Evader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar Rakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a linear pursuit differential game of one pursuer and one evader. Controls of the pursuer and evader are subjected to integral and geometric constraints, respectively. In addition, phase constraint is imposed on the state of evader, whereas pursuer moves throughout the space. We say that pursuit is completed, if inclusion y(t1-x(t1∈M is satisfied at some t1>0, where x(t and y(t are states of pursuer and evader, respectively, and M is terminal set. Conditions of completion of pursuit in the game from all initial points of players are obtained. Strategy of the pursuer is constructed so that the phase vector of the pursuer first is brought to a given set, and then pursuit is completed.

  11. Uudised : Voices of Europe tuleb Pärdi teosega. Puhkpillipäevad Võrus / Ingrid Peek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peek, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    1. sept. Tallinnas Kaarli kirikus toimuvast kontserdist, kus tuleb ettekandele Pärdi teos "Which was the son of...". 15. aug. avatakse Võrus V noorte puhkpillimängijate suvekool ja Võru vaskpillipäevad

  12. Eesti Suusapäevad Jay Peak´is / Peeter Teedla ; fotod: Peeter Teedla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teedla, Peeter

    2006-01-01

    märtsikuu esimesel nädalalõpul idaranniku eestlaste suusapäevad, osavõtjaid 156, paljud perekondade ja väikeste lastega, organiseerijaks Kristin Raamot. Peeti murdmaasuusatamise - ja slaalomivõistlused

  13. Superradiant MeV γ Scattered by a Room-Temperature Spinor Quantum Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have revealed the rich long-lived Mossbauer phenomenon of 93mNb, in which it has long been speculated that the delocalized 93mNb undergoes Bose-Einstein condensation following an increase in the 93mNb density beyond the threshold of 1012 cm−3 at room temperature. We now report on the superradiant Rayleigh of the M4 γ at 662 keV scattered into end-fire modes along the long axis of the sample, as evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation. We observed the Arago (Poisson’s spot in order to demonstrate a near-field γ-ray diffraction from a mm-sized γ source, as well as a γ interference beyond the Huygens-Fresnel principle. During the 107-day monitoring period, seven Sisyphus cycles of mode hopping appeared in the superradiance, which demonstrates the optomechanic bistabilty provided by the collective interaction between the spinor quantum fluid and the impinging γs. Condensate-light interaction produces a pm matter-wave grating to become a Fabry-Pérot resonator with a Q-factor on the order of 1020, from which end-fired γs lase.

  14. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-07-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  15. High temperature superconducting thin films and quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Graf zu Eulenburg, A

    1999-01-01

    the best balance and gradient sensitivity at 1kHz were 3x10 sup - sup 3 and 222fT/(cm sq root Hz))) respectively. The measured spatial response to a current carrying wire was in good agreement with a theoretical model. A significant performance improvement was obtained with the development of a single layer gradiometer with 13mm baseline, fabricated on 30x10mm sup 2 bicrystals. For such a device, the gradient sensitivity at 1kHz was 50fT/(cm sq root Hz)) and the gradiometer was used successfully for unshielded magnetocardiography. A parasitic effective area compensation scheme was employed with two neighbouring SQUIDs coupled in an opposite sense to the same gradiometer loop. This improved the balance from the intrinsic value of 10 sup - sup 3 to 3x10 sup - sup 5. This thesis describes several aspects of the development of gradiometers using high temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID). The pulsed laser deposition of thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO) on Sr...

  16. Photophysics of α-furil at room temperature and 77 K: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2016-06-01

    Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic measurements have been exploited to assign the emissions from different conformations of α-furil (2, 2'-furil) in solution phase at room temperature as well as cryogen (liquid nitrogen, LN2) frozen matrices of ethanol and methylcyclohexane. Room temperature studies reveal a single fluorescence from the trans-planar conformer of the fluorophore or two fluorescence bands coming from the trans-planar and the relaxed skew forms depending on excitation at the nπ∗ or the ππ∗ absorption band, respectively. Together with the fluorescence bands, the LN2 studies in both the solvents unambiguously ascertain two phosphorescence emissions with lifetimes 5 ± 0.3 ms (trans-planar triplet) and 81 ± 3 ms (relaxed skew triplet). Quantum chemical calculations have been performed using density functional theory at CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ level to prop up the spectroscopic surveillance. The simulated potential energy curves (PECs) illustrate that α-furil is capable of giving two emissions from each of the S1 and the T1 states - one corresponding to the trans-planar and the other to the relaxed skew conformation. Contrary to the other 1,2-dicarbonyl molecular systems like benzil and α-naphthil, α-furil does not exhibit any fluorescence from its second excited singlet (S2) state. This is ascribed to the proximity of the minimum of the PEC of the S2 state and the hill-top of the PEC of the S1 state.

  17. Analysis and investigation of temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on optical characteristics of multiple quantum well slow light devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Saeed; Kohandani, Reza; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2017-09-10

    This paper represents the influences of temperature and hydrostatic pressure variations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light systems based on coherence population oscillations. An analytical model in non-integer dimension space is used to study the considerable effects of these parameters on optical properties of the slow light apparatus. Exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension constants have special roles on the analytical model in fractional dimension. Hence, the impacts of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension quantity are investigated theoretically in this paper. Based on the achieved results, temperature and hydrostatic pressure play key roles on optical parameters of the slow light systems, such as the slow down factor and central energy of the device. It is found that the slope and value of the refractive index real part change with alterations of temperature and hydrostatic pressure in the range of 5-40 deg of Kelvin and 1 bar to 2 kbar, respectively. Thus, the peak value of the slow down factor can be adjusted by altering these parameters. Moreover, the central energy of the device shifts when the hydrostatic pressure is applied to the slow light device or temperature is varied. In comparison with previous reported experimental results, our simulations follow them successfully. It is shown that the maximum value of the slow down factor is estimated close to 5.5×104 with a fine adjustment of temperature and hydrostatic pressure. Meanwhile, the central energy shift of the slow light device rises up to 27 meV, which provides an appropriate basis for different optical devices in which multiple quantum well slow light is one of their essential subsections. This multiple quantum well slow light device has potential applications for use as a tunable optical buffer and pressure/temperature sensors.

  18. [Case of law-evading herbs poisoning that induced shock and myocardial damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Minoru; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Miyazaki, Dai; Okamori, Satoshi; Akuzawa, Hisashi; Yuasa, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Law-evading herbs may induce poisoning symptoms, especially when they contain synthetic cannabinoids. However, their detailed pharmacological effects have not yet been clarified. Some reports have previously described symptoms of poisoning, but only a few reports have so far described shock and myocardial damage (MD). We experienced a case of shock and MD in a patient who had smoked law-evading herbs. A 61-year-old male presented at an emergency department 8 hours after smoking law-evading herbs (Rush Trip, High Men Monster) with chest pain. A vasopressor agent was administered to treat shock and antiarrhythmic drugs were administered due to ventricular arrhythmia. The contents of the law-evading herbs were unknown, so an in-hospital follow-up was conducted to treat the patient's symptoms. The follow-up blood test showed an increased level of cardiac enzymes, which thereafter demonstrated a spontaneous remission. The systemic conditions tended to improve and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the 5th hospital day. The contents of the law-evading herbs in question were thereafter,analyzed, and synthetic cannabinoids (JWH-210, JWH-081 and JWH-122) as well as caffeine were detected. The cause for the poisoning symptoms were suspected to be the presence of synthetic cannabinoids and caffeine. Such law-evading herbs may contain synthetic cannabinoids and caffeine which both may induce shock and MD.

  19. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation.

  20. Effects of Temperature and Magnetic Field on the Coherence Time of a RbCl Parabolic Quantum Dot Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Ding, Zhao-Hua; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Employing the Pekar variational method, quantum statistics theory and the Fermi golden rule, the temperature and magnetic field effects on the qubit in rubidium chloride (RbCl) parabolic quantum dots (PQDs) are investigated. We then obtain the eigenenergies and corresponding eigenfunctions of ground and first-excited states coupled strongly to an electron to bulk longitudinal optical phonons in a RbCl PQD with applied magnetic field. A two-level system of PQDs may be regarded as a single qubit. The spontaneous emission of phonons causes the qubit decoherence. The numerical results indicate that the coherence time decreases with elevating temperature. The coherence increases the effective confinement length, whereas there is a decrease of the magnetic field's cyclotron frequency.

  1. Long luminescence lifetime in self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Zhang, Yating; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence PL measurements of high-quality self-assembled small In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs quantum dots QDs show that the PL decay time of the QD ground state transition is nearly constant when the temperature is below 80 K and increases monotonously from 1.0 to 5.5 ns when the temper......Time-resolved photoluminescence PL measurements of high-quality self-assembled small In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs quantum dots QDs show that the PL decay time of the QD ground state transition is nearly constant when the temperature is below 80 K and increases monotonously from 1.0 to 5.5 ns when...

  2. Temperature effects on excited state of strong-coupling polaron in an asymmetric RbCl quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Qin; Li, Jing-Qi; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    On the condition of strong electron-LO phonon coupling in an asymmetric RbCl quantum dot (QD), the first excited state energy (FESE), the excitation energy (EE), and the transition frequency (TF) between the first excited ground states (FEGS) of the polaron are calculated by using the linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. The variation of the FESE, the EE and the TF with the temperature, the transverse and longitudinal confinement strengths (TLCS) of the QD are studied in detail. We find that the FESE, the EE and the TF decreases (increases) with increasing temperature when the temperature is in lower (higher) temperature regime. They are increasing functions of the TLCS. We find three ways to tune the FESE, the EE and the TF via controlling the temperature and the TLCS.

  3. Interplay Effect of Excitation and Temperature on Carrier Transfer between Vertically Aligned InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carrier transfer in vertically-coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD pairs is investigated. Photoluminescence (PL and PL excitation spectra measured at low temperature indicate that the PL peak intensity ratio between the emission from the two sets of QDs—i.e., the relative population of carriers between the two layers of QDs—changes with increasing excitation intensity. Temperature-dependent PL reveals unexpected non-monotonic variations in the peak wavelength and linewidth of the seed layer of QDs with temperature. The PL intensity ratio exhibits a “W” behavior with respect to the temperature due to the interplay between temperature and excitation intensity on the inter-layer carrier transfer.

  4. Broadband control of emission wavelength of InAs/GaAs quantum dots by GaAs capping temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaizu, Toshiyuki, E-mail: kaizu@crystal.kobe-u.ac.jp [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Matsumura, Takuya; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-10-21

    We investigated the effects of the GaAs capping temperature on the morphological and photoluminescence (PL) properties of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs(001). The broadband tuning of the emission wavelength from 1.1 to 1.3 μm was achieved at room temperature by only adjusting the GaAs capping temperature. As the capping temperature was decreased, the QD shrinkage due to In desorption and In-Ga intermixing during the capping process was suppressed. This led to QDs with a high aspect ratio, and resultantly, the emission wavelength shifted toward the longer-wavelength side. In addition, the linearly polarized PL intensity elucidated anisotropic characteristics reflecting the shape anisotropy of the embedded QDs, in which a marked change in polarization anisotropy occurred at capping temperatures lower than 460 °C.

  5. Improved photoluminescence characteristics of order-disorder AlGaInP quantum wells at room and elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Deotare, Parag B.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2015-04-01

    A set of nominally undoped CuPt-B type ordered (AlxGa1-x)0.5In0.5P quantum-wells with disordered (Al0.7Ga0.3)0.5In0.5P barriers were grown and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such structures are potentially beneficial for light emitting devices due to the possibility of greater carrier confinement, reduced scattering into the indirect valleys, and band-offset adjustment beyond what is possible with strain and composition. Furthermore, the possibility of independently tuning the composition and the order-parameter of the quantum-well allows for the decoupling of the carrier confinement and the aluminum content and aids in the identification of carrier loss mechanisms. In this study, sharp order-disorder interfaces were achieved via the control of growth temperature between 650 °C and 750 °C using growth pauses. Improved high-temperature (400 K) photoluminescence intensity was obtained from quantum-wells with ordered Ga0.5In0.5P as compared to disordered Ga0.5In0.5P due to greater confinement. Additionally, in the ordered samples with a higher Al/Ga ratio to counter the band-gap reduction, the photoluminescence intensity at high temperature was as bright as that from conventional disordered heterostructures and had slightly improved wavelength stability. Room-temperature time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated a longer radiative lifetime in the ordered quantum-well with reduced scattering into the barrier. These results show that in samples of good material quality, the property controlling the luminescence intensity is the carrier confinement and not the presence of ordering or the aluminum content.

  6. Improved photoluminescence characteristics of order-disorder AlGaInP quantum wells at room and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Fitzgerald, Eugene A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Deotare, Parag B. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    A set of nominally undoped CuPt-B type ordered (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P quantum-wells with disordered (Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P barriers were grown and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such structures are potentially beneficial for light emitting devices due to the possibility of greater carrier confinement, reduced scattering into the indirect valleys, and band-offset adjustment beyond what is possible with strain and composition. Furthermore, the possibility of independently tuning the composition and the order-parameter of the quantum-well allows for the decoupling of the carrier confinement and the aluminum content and aids in the identification of carrier loss mechanisms. In this study, sharp order-disorder interfaces were achieved via the control of growth temperature between 650 °C and 750 °C using growth pauses. Improved high-temperature (400 K) photoluminescence intensity was obtained from quantum-wells with ordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P as compared to disordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P due to greater confinement. Additionally, in the ordered samples with a higher Al/Ga ratio to counter the band-gap reduction, the photoluminescence intensity at high temperature was as bright as that from conventional disordered heterostructures and had slightly improved wavelength stability. Room-temperature time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated a longer radiative lifetime in the ordered quantum-well with reduced scattering into the barrier. These results show that in samples of good material quality, the property controlling the luminescence intensity is the carrier confinement and not the presence of ordering or the aluminum content.

  7. Continuous-wave operation of InAsSb/InP quantum - dot lasers near 2 (mu)m at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yueming; Uhl, David; Keo, Sam

    2004-01-01

    InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 pm were demonstrated in cw operation at room temperature with a threshold current density of below 1 kA/cm, output power of 3 mW/facet and a differential quantum efficiency of 13%.

  8. Carrier trapping induced abnormal temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of novel sandwiched structure InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Juan; Li, Ding; Rajabi, K.; Yang, Wei; Hu, Xiaodong [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Lei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-04-15

    A dual-wavelength LED sample with novel sandwiched structure in high-In-content MQWs is studied by temperature dependent photoluminescence (TDPL) and the abnormal temperature dependence of emission intensity is obtained. The novel MQWs structure which contains staggered quantum wells and an ultra-thin InN interlayer in the wells shows better luminescence property than the reference sample which has conventional quantum wells. Under 325 nm continuous wave laser excitation the LED sample of novel structure exhibits unexpected increasing luminescence intensity as temperature goes up from 140 K to 220 K and reaches its maximum at 220 K. This could be attributed to (1) the carrier redistribution and the novel sandwiched MQWs' high carrier trapping capability; (2) the intrinsic emission property of the MQWs enhanced by improvement of electron-hole overlap and reduction of quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) and compositional fluctuation. TDPL under 405 nm laser excitation is also measured to support this view. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Temperature dependence of X-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra: probing quantum vibrations of light elements in oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemausat, Ruidy; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Trcera, Nicolas; Bordage, Amélie; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Florian, Pierre; Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Errea, Ion; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Cabaret, Delphine

    2017-02-22

    A combined experimental-theoretical study on the temperature dependence of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of periclase (MgO), spinel (MgAl2O4), corundum (α-Al2O3), berlinite (α-AlPO4), stishovite and α-quartz (SiO2) is reported. Predictive calculations are presented when experimental data are not available. For these light-element oxides, both experimental techniques detect systematic effects related to quantum thermal vibrations which are well reproduced by density-functional theory simulations. In calculations, thermal fluctuations of the nuclei are included by considering nonequilibrium configurations according to finite-temperature quantum statistics at the quasiharmonic level. The influence of nuclear quantum fluctuations on XANES and NMR spectroscopies is particularly sensitive to the coordination number of the probed cation. Furthermore, the relative importance of nuclear dynamics and thermal expansion is quantified over a large range of temperatures.

  10. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Pranai; Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of 2a=730nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer

  11. Measurement of the quantum capacitance from two-dimensional surface state of a topological insulator at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyunwoo, E-mail: chw0089@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Changhwan, E-mail: cshin@uos.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The quantum capacitance in topological insulator (TI) at room temperature is directly revealed. • The physical origin of quantum capacitance, the two dimensional surface state of TI, is experimentally validated. • Theoretically calculated results of ideal quantum capacitance can well predict the experimental data. - Abstract: A topological insulator (TI) is a new kind of material that exhibits unique electronic properties owing to its topological surface state (TSS). Previous studies focused on the transport properties of the TSS, since it can be used as the active channel layer in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, a TI with a negative quantum capacitance (QC) effect can be used in the gate stack of MOSFETs, thereby facilitating the creation of ultra-low power electronics. Therefore, it is important to study the physics behind the QC in TIs in the absence of any external magnetic field, at room temperature. We fabricated a simple capacitor structure using a TI (TI-capacitor: Au-TI-SiO{sub 2}-Si), which shows clear evidence of QC at room temperature. In the capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement, the total capacitance of the TI-capacitor increases in the accumulation regime, since QC is the dominant capacitive component in the series capacitor model (i.e., C{sub T}{sup −1} = C{sub Q}{sup −1} + C{sub SiO2}{sup −1}). Based on the QC model of the two-dimensional electron systems, we quantitatively calculated the QC, and observed that the simulated C-V curve theoretically supports the conclusion that the QC of the TI-capacitor is originated from electron–electron interaction in the two-dimensional surface state of the TI.

  12. Evolution of spin excitations in a gapped antiferromagnet from the quantum to the high-temperature limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenzelmann, M.; Cowley, R.A.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped from the quantum to the classical limit the spin excitation spectrum of the antiferromagnetic spin-1 Heisenberg chain system CsNiCl3 in its paramagnetic phase from T=5 to 200 K. Neutron scattering shows that the excitations are resonant and dispersive up to at least T=70 Ksimilar o...... and the experiment is not consistent with the random phase approximation for coupled quantum chains. At T=200 K, the structure factor and second energy moment of the excitation spectrum are in excellent agreement with the high-temperature series expansion.......We have mapped from the quantum to the classical limit the spin excitation spectrum of the antiferromagnetic spin-1 Heisenberg chain system CsNiCl3 in its paramagnetic phase from T=5 to 200 K. Neutron scattering shows that the excitations are resonant and dispersive up to at least T=70 Ksimilar...... is in agreement with quantum Monte Carlo calculations for the spin-1 chain. xi is also consistent with the single mode approximation, suggesting that the excitations are short-lived single particle excitations. Below T=12 K where three-dimensional spin correlations are important, xi is shorter than predicted...

  13. Low-threshold room-temperature AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Wei, Wei; Tang, Fengling; Wang, Xi; Li, Luying; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2017-02-01

    Near-infrared nanowire lasers are promising as ultrasmall, low-consumption light emitters in on-chip optical communications and computing systems. Here, we report on a room-temperature near-infrared nanolaser based on an AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure grown by Au-catalyzed metal organic chemical vapor deposition. When subjects to pulsed optical excitation, the nanowire exhibits lasing, with a low threshold of 600 W/cm2, a narrow linewidth of 0.39 nm, and a high Q factor of 2000 at low temperature. Lasing is observed up to 300 K, with an ultrasmall temperature dependent wavelength shift of 0.045 nm/K. This work paves the way towards ultrasmall, low-consumption, and high-temperature-stability near-infrared nanolasers.

  14. Steady-State Dynamics and Effective Temperature for a Model of Quantum Criticality in an Open System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, P; Zamani, F; Kirchner, S

    2015-11-27

    We study the thermal and nonthermal steady-state scaling functions and the steady-state dynamics of a model of local quantum criticality. The model we consider, i.e., the pseudogap Kondo model, allows us to study the concept of effective temperatures near fully interacting as well as weak-coupling fixed points. In the vicinity of each fixed point we establish the existence of an effective temperature-different at each fixed point-such that the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem is recovered. Most notably, steady-state scaling functions in terms of the effective temperatures coincide with the equilibrium scaling functions. This result extends to higher correlation functions as is explicitly demonstrated for the Kondo singlet strength. The nonlinear charge transport is also studied and analyzed in terms of the effective temperature.

  15. Dipole moment and polarizability of impurity doped quantum dots driven by noise: Influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-06-01

    Present study examines the pattern of variation of electric dipole moment (μ) and polarizability (αp) of impurity doped GaAs quantum dots (QDs) under combined presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries a Gaussian white character and it has been introduced to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of μ and αp have been monitored against the variations of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and the noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, application of noise prominently influences the above two properties. However, the extent of influence depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. The findings divulge feasible routes to control the dipole moment and polarizability of doped QD system through the interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  16. Low temperature motion of hydrogen on metal surfaces signals breakdown of quantum mechanics in 3+1 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakova, D.; Doyen, G.

    2013-06-01

    The low temperature motion of hydrogen on solid metal surfaces displays some unexplained experimental features: in the quantum diffusion regime more than nine orders of magnitude difference between the diffusion rates on different metal surfaces have been measured, the lowest diffusion rates being established in the low temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. Furthermore telegraph-signal-like adsorption site change, rather than Rabi oscillations predicted by Schrödinger equation in 3+1 dimensions, is observed, signaling the breakdown of quantum mechanics in 3+1 dimensions. A theory is presented to resolve these problems, involving the entanglement of the adsorbate motion to gravitons in high-dimensional spacetime. Soft local massive gravonons, induced in the presence of the adsorbate, determine the time scale for surface diffusion. The γη-model is used for the evaluation of the soft gravonon modes. Weak and local entanglement of the adsorbate motion with a nearly degenerate graviton continuum of high density of states are the conditions for the telegraph-signal-like time development of adsorption site change. In contrast to the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, this apparent "classical" behaviour of the adsorbate in 3+1 dimensional spacetime is the result of the solution of Schrödinger's time dependent equation in high-dimensional spacetime.

  17. Room temperature phosphorescence lifetime and quantum yield of erythrosine B and rose bengal in aerobic alkaline aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Simmel, M.; Riedl, D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    The room-temperature phosphorescence behavior of erythrosine B (ER) and rose bengal (RB) in aerobic aqueous solution at pH 10 (10{sup -4} M NaOH) is investigated. The samples were excited with sliced second harmonic pulses of a Q-switched Nd:glass laser. A gated photomultiplier tube was used for instantaneous fluorescence signal discrimination and a digital oscilloscope was used for signal recording. For phosphorescence lifetime measurement the oscilloscope response time was adjusted to appropriate time resolution and sensitivity by the ohmic input resistance. In the case of phosphorescence quantum yield determination the gated photomultiplier - oscilloscope arrangement was operated in integration mode using 10 M{Omega} input resistance. Phosphorescence quantum yield calibration was achieved with erythrosine B and rose bengal doped starch films of known quantum yields. The determined phosphorescence lifetimes (quantum yields) of ER and RB in 0.1 mM NaOH are {tau}{sub P}=1.92{+-}0.1 {mu}s ({phi}{sub P}=(1.5{+-}0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}) and 2.40{+-}0.1 {mu}s ((5.7{+-}0.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}), respectively. The results are discussed in terms of triplet state deactivation by dissolved molecular oxygen. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorescence lifetime of fluorone dyes in aerobe aqueous solution is measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorescence quantum yield of fluorone dyes in aerobe solution is determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental setup with Q-switched laser and gated PMT detection is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorescence quenching by dissolved molecular oxygen is analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption and fluorescence behavior of fluorones in aqueous solution is studied.

  18. Comparative study of low temperature growth of InAs and InMnAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, E [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Zallo, E; Arciprete, F; Fanfoni, M; Patella, F; Balzarotti, A, E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2011-05-13

    The evolution of InAs and In{sub 0.85}Mn{sub 0.15}As quantum dots grown at 270 deg. C is studied as a function of coverage. We show that, in contrast to what occurs at high temperature, the two-dimensional to three-dimensional transition is not abrupt but rather slow. This is due to the finding that part of the deposited material also contributes to the wetting layer growth after quantum dot formation. This aspect is particularly accentuated in In{sub 0.85}Mn{sub 0.15}As deposition. The Voronoi area analysis reveals a significant spatial correlation between islands.

  19. Low-noise and wide-bandwidth current readout at low temperatures using a superconducting-quantum-interference-device amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Thanh Mai; Okazaki, Yuma; Nakamura, Shuji; Ortolano, Massimo; Kaneko, Nobu-Hisa

    2017-04-01

    We report on the development of a current amplifier for measuring small currents from mesoscopic electronic devices at low temperatures down to the milli-Kelvin range. In our setup, a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) located at the mixing chamber stage of the dilution refrigerator is used as the first-stage current amplifier, thereby improving the noise floor down to 8 × 10-27 A2/Hz, which is one order of magnitude as low as those obtained by the conventional methods that utilize a semiconductor-based cryogenic current amplifier. We show the configuration of this setup and demonstrate the amplification of the current generated by a quantum point contact. This approach can open a new way to examine solid-state phenomena that are elusive owing to their small current.

  20. Modeling of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers: The role of temperature and operating field strength on the laser performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefvand, Hossein Reza

    2017-07-01

    In this paper a self-consistent numerical approach to study the temperature and bias dependent characteristics of mid-infrared (mid-IR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is presented which integrates a number of quantum mechanical models. The field-dependent laser parameters including the nonradiative scattering times, the detuning and energy levels, the escape activation energy, the backfilling excitation energy and dipole moment of the optical transition are calculated for a wide range of applied electric fields by a self-consistent solution of Schrodinger-Poisson equations. A detailed analysis of performance of the obtained structure is carried out within a self-consistent solution of the subband population rate equations coupled with carrier coherent transport equations through the sequential resonant tunneling, by taking into account the temperature and bias dependency of the relevant parameters. Furthermore, the heat transfer equation is included in order to calculate the carrier temperature inside the active region levels. This leads to a compact predictive model to analyze the temperature and electric field dependent characteristics of the mid-IR QCLs such as the light-current (L-I), electric field-current (F-I) and core temperature-electric field (T-F) curves. For a typical mid-IR QCL, a good agreement was found between the simulated temperature-dependent L-I characteristic and experimental data, which confirms validity of the model. It is found that the main characteristics of the device such as output power and turn-on delay time are degraded by interplay between the temperature and Stark effects.

  1. Finite-temperature phase transition to a Kitaev spin liquid phase on a hyperoctagon lattice: A large-scale quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Petr A.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-09-01

    The quantum spin liquid is an enigmatic quantum state in insulating magnets, in which conventional long-range order is suppressed by strong quantum fluctuations. Recently, an unconventional phase transition was reported between the low-temperature quantum spin liquid and the high-temperature paramagnet in the Kitaev model on a three-dimensional hyperhoneycomb lattice. Here, we show that a similar "liquid-gas" transition takes place in another three-dimensional lattice, the hyperoctagon lattice. We investigate the critical phenomena by adopting the Green-function based Monte Carlo technique with the kernel polynomial method, which enables systematic analysis of up to 2048 sites. The critical temperature is lower than that in the hyperhoneycomb case, reflecting the smaller flux gap. We also discuss the transition on the basis of an effective model in the anisotropic limit.

  2. New State of Matter: Heavy Fermion Systems, Quantum Spin Liquids, Quasicrystals, Cold Gases, and High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Stephanovich, V. A.; Msezane, A. Z.; Schuck, P.; Clark, J. W.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Japaridze, G. S.; Popov, K. G.; Kirichenko, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a new state of matter manifested by strongly correlated Fermi systems including various heavy fermion (HF) metals, two-dimensional quantum liquids such as ^3He films, certain quasicrystals, and systems behaving as quantum spin liquids. Generically, these systems can be viewed as HF systems or HF compounds, in that they exhibit typical behavior of HF metals. At zero temperature, such systems can experience a so-called fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). Combining analytical considerations with arguments based entirely on experimental grounds, we argue and demonstrate that the class of HF systems is characterized by universal scaling behavior of their thermodynamic, transport, and relaxation properties. That is, the quantum physics of different HF compounds is found to be universal, emerging irrespective of the individual details of their symmetries, interactions, and microscopic structure. This observed universal behavior reveals the existence of a new state of matter manifest in HF compounds. We propose a simple, realistic model to study the appearance of flat bands in two-dimensional ensembles of ultracold fermionic atoms, interacting with coherent resonant light. It is shown that signatures of these flat bands may be found in peculiarities in their thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties. We also show that the FCQPT, in generating flat bands and altering Fermi surface topology, is an essential progenitor of the exotic behavior of the overdoped high-temperature superconductors represented by La_{2-x}SrxxCuO_4, whose superconductivity differs from that predicted by the classical Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. The theoretical results presented are in good agreement with recent experimental observations, closing the colossal gap between these empirical findings and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like theories.

  3. New State of Matter: Heavy Fermion Systems, Quantum Spin Liquids, Quasicrystals, Cold Gases, and High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginyan, V. R.; Stephanovich, V. A.; Msezane, A. Z.; Schuck, P.; Clark, J. W.; Amusia, M. Ya.; Japaridze, G. S.; Popov, K. G.; Kirichenko, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a new state of matter manifested by strongly correlated Fermi systems including various heavy fermion (HF) metals, two-dimensional quantum liquids such as ^3 He films, certain quasicrystals, and systems behaving as quantum spin liquids. Generically, these systems can be viewed as HF systems or HF compounds, in that they exhibit typical behavior of HF metals. At zero temperature, such systems can experience a so-called fermion condensation quantum phase transition (FCQPT). Combining analytical considerations with arguments based entirely on experimental grounds, we argue and demonstrate that the class of HF systems is characterized by universal scaling behavior of their thermodynamic, transport, and relaxation properties. That is, the quantum physics of different HF compounds is found to be universal, emerging irrespective of the individual details of their symmetries, interactions, and microscopic structure. This observed universal behavior reveals the existence of a new state of matter manifest in HF compounds. We propose a simple, realistic model to study the appearance of flat bands in two-dimensional ensembles of ultracold fermionic atoms, interacting with coherent resonant light. It is shown that signatures of these flat bands may be found in peculiarities in their thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties. We also show that the FCQPT, in generating flat bands and altering Fermi surface topology, is an essential progenitor of the exotic behavior of the overdoped high-temperature superconductors represented by La_{2-x}SrxxCuO_4 , whose superconductivity differs from that predicted by the classical Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. The theoretical results presented are in good agreement with recent experimental observations, closing the colossal gap between these empirical findings and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like theories.

  4. Temperature induced degradation mechanisms of AlInAs/InGaAs/InP quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierścińska, D.; Pierściński, K.; Płuska, M.; Sobczak, G.; Kuźmicz, A.; Gutowski, P.; Bugajski, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the investigation of temperature induced degradation mode of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with an emphasis on the influence of different processing technology. We investigate and compare lattice matched AlInAs/InGaAs/InP QCLs of various constructions, i.e., double trench, buried heterostructure and ridge waveguide regarding thermal management, reliability and sources of degradation. The analysis was performed by CCD thermoreflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope inspection and destructive analysis by focused ion beam etching, enabling determination of the source and mode of degradation for investigated lasers. Experimental temperature data relate temperature rise, arising from supply current, with device geometry. Results clearly indicate, that the buried heterostructure geometry, allows reaching the highest maximal operating current densities, before the degradation occurs. Microscopic images of degradation confirm that degradation includes the damage of the contact layer as well as damage of the active region layers.

  5. High Momentum Particle Identification Detector The Study of Cesium Iodide Quantum Efficiency Dependency on Substrate Material, Temperature and Quartz Window

    CERN Document Server

    Wisna, Gde Bimananda M

    2014-01-01

    The Cesium Iodide (CsI) is used as a material for detecting Cherenkov radiation produced by high momentum particle in High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) at ALICE Experiment at CERN. This work provides investigation and analysis of The Quantum Efficiency (QE) result of CsI which is deposited on five samples substrates such as copper passivated red, copper passivated yellow, aluminium, copper coated with nickel and copper coated with nickel then coated with gold. The measurement of five samples is held under temperature $60^{0}$ C and $25^{0}$ C (room temperature) and also with optical quartz window which can be adjusted to limit the wavelength range which reach the CsI. The result shows there are dependency of substrate, temperature due to enhancement effect and also quartz windows usage on QE of CsI. The results of five samples is then compared and analyzed.

  6. An Investigation Into Australian Personal Tax Evaders - Their Attitudes Towards Compliance And The Penalties For Non-Compliance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ken Devos

    2009-01-01

    .... This study investigates the relationship that exists between selected tax compliance variables and the attitudes and behaviour of Australian personal 'tax evaders' towards compliance and the penalties...

  7. 1.5 μm InAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum dot laser with improved temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, F. I.; Gladii, S. P.; Shernyakov, Yu M.; Maximov, M. V.; Semenova, E. S.; Kulkova, I. V.; Yvind, K.; Zhukov, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    Temperature characteristics of InAs/InGaAsP quantum dot (QD) lasers synthesized on InP (001) substrate are presented. The lasers demonstrate high temperature stability: a threshold current characteristic temperature as high as 205 K in the temperature range between 20 to 50°C was measured. Lasing wavelength of 1.5 μm was achieved by covering QDs with 1.7 monolayers of GaAs.

  8. Low-threshold room-temperature AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure laser

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xin; Wei, Wei; Tang, Fengling; Wang, Xi; Li, Luying

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared nanowire lasers are promising as ultrasmall, low-consumption light emitters in on-chip optical communications and computing systems. Here, we report on a room-temperature near-infrared nanolaser based on an AlGaAs/GaAs nanowire/single-quantum-well heterostructure grown by Au-catalyzed metal organic chemical vapor deposition. When subjects to pulsed optical excitation, the nanowire exhibits lasing, with a low threshold of 600 W/cm2, a narrow linewidth of 0.39 nm, and a high Q fac...

  9. Numerical simulation of a quantum controlled-not gate implemented on four-spin molecules at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    López, G V; Berman, G P; Doolen, G D; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We study numerically the non-resonant effects on four-spin molecules at room temperature with the implemented quantum controlled-not gate and using the 2 pi k method. The four nuclear spins in each molecule represent a four-qubit register. The qubits interact with each other through Ising-type interaction which is characterized by the coupling constant J sub a sub , sub b. We study the errors on the reduced density matrix as a function of the Rabi frequency, OMEGA, using the 2 pi k method and when all the coupling constants are equal or when one of them is different from the others.

  10. Room temperature photoluminescence (lambda = 1.3 mu m) of InGaAs quantum dots in Si(001) substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Burbaev, T M; Kurbatov, V A; Rzaev, M M; Tsvetkov, V A; Tsekhosh, V I

    2002-01-01

    A heterostructure with GaAs/In sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As quantum dots has exhibit intense photoluminescence in the range of 1.3 mu m at room temperature. It was grown on Si(001) substrate with Si sub 1 sub - sub x Ge sub x buffer layer. The growth process was performed consecutively in two molecular beam epitaxy systems with over loading through out the atmosphere. Results of growth process study by the fast electron diffraction method are presented

  11. Electromagnetic quantum waves and their effect on the low temperature magnetoacoustic response of a quasi-two-dimensional metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2011-06-01

    We theoretically analyze weakly attenuated electromagnetic waves in quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) metals in high magnetic fields. Within the chosen geometry, the magnetic field is directed perpendicular to the conducting layers of a Q2D conductor. We have shown that longitudinal collective modes could propagate along the magnetic field provided that the Fermi surface is moderately corrugated. The considered wave speeds strongly depend on the magnetic field magnitude. Also, we have analyzed interactions of these quantum waves with sound waves of suitable polarization and propagation direction, and we have shown that such interaction may bring significant changes to the low temperature magnetoacoustic response of Q2D conductors.

  12. Low-temperature growth of thin Pb layers and the quantum size effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmicker, D; Hibma, T; Edwards, K.A.; Howes, P.B.; Macdonald, J.E.; James, M.A; Breeman, M; Barkema, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    It is argued that the growth morphology of ultrathin metal films should fluctuate as a function of film thickness due to the quantum size effect. To verify this, the specularly reflected intensity of x-rays, electrons and He atoms has been measured during the growth of a thin Pb layer on top of an

  13. Quantum dynamics of the Cl+ H 2 reaction at ultracold temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum calculations are reported for the reaction between vibrationally excited H2 molecules and Cl atoms at energies ranging from the ultracold to thermal regimes. It is found that chemical reaction leading to vibrationally excited HCl molecules dominates over non-reactive vibrational quenching. The product HCl ...

  14. Quantum dynamics of the Cl+H2 reaction at ultracold temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Quantum calculations are reported for the reaction between vibrationally excited H2 molecules and. Cl atoms at energies ranging from the ultracold to thermal regimes. It is found that chemical reaction leading to vibrationally excited HCl molecules dominates over non-reactive vibrational quenching. The product ...

  15. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Electronic characteristics of doped InAs/GaAs quantum dot photodetector: temperature dependent dark current and noise density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Chi; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Chiang; Chiang, Cheng-Der; Yang, San-Te; Su, Wen-Kuan

    2006-02-01

    The noise characteristics associated with dark current, photoconductive gain (PC), capture probability in doped InAs dots embedded in In 0.1Ga 0.9As/GaAs spacer layer have been proposed. The photoconductive and photovoltaic behaviors of the InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) from the intersubband transition measurements are also clearly observed. Through noise measurement in dynamic signal analyzer (HP35670A) 1, the electronic bandpass filter frequencies are set up ranging from 3 to 10 KHz in a low noise current preamplifier (SR570) 2. The lock-in amplifier (SR830) 3 can be also used to measure and calibrate the noise density by means of the mean average deviation (MAD) contrast with noise spectra from HP35670A. The InAs/GaAs QDIP studied in this work belongs to n +-n-n + structure with the top and free blocking barrier layers. It is observed that the owing blocking layer of QDIP not only suppress dark current successfully but also probably reduce the photocurrent 4-6. By systematically optoelectronic measurements and simulations, the modified model of noise current, photoconductive gain, and capture probability in the quantum devices have been proposed. It is shown that photoconductive gain is almost independent of bias under the lower bias, then increasing exponentially under higher bias and below the temperature of 80K. In contrast to quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), a higher photoconductive gain of the quantum dot infrared photodetector has been demonstrated and attributed to the longer lifetimes of excited carriers in quantum dots 7-10. At 80K, a photoconductive gain of tens of thousand is shown in the regions of higher biases. It is clear to note that the highest detectivity of the QDIP surprisingly approach to 3.0×10 12 cmHz 1/2/W at -0.6V under measured temperature 20 K. Under 80K, the average D* is obtained ~10 10 cmHz 1/2/W. To our knowledge, this is the one of highest D* data in the world.

  17. Influence of the spin quantum number $s$ on the zero-temperature phase transition in the square lattice $J$-$J'$ model

    OpenAIRE

    Darradi, R.; Richter, J.; Farnell, D. J. J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the phase diagram of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice with two different nearest-neighbor bonds $J$ and $J'$ ($J$-$J'$ model) at zero temperature. The model exhibits a quantum phase transition at a critical value $J'_c > J$ between a semi-classically ordered N\\'eel and a magnetically disordered quantum paramagnetic phase of valence-bond type, which is driven by local singlet formation on $J'$ bonds. We study the influence of spin quantum number $s$ on this p...

  18. Extremely stable temperature characteristics of 1550-nm band, p-doped, highly stacked quantum-dot laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Naokatsu

    2017-04-01

    We fabricated 1.55-µm band, broad-area, p-doped, 30-layer stacked quantum-dot (QD) laser diodes (LDs) grown on an InP(311)B substrate via a delta-doping method employing a strain compensation technique. We doped Be atoms to a depth of 5 nm from the bottom of each QD layer. The concentration of Be atoms doped in the InGaAlAs spacer layer was 1 × 1018 cm-3. We observed a strong photoluminescence emission and a relatively coherent surface of QDs using atomic force microscopy. In addition, we observed that the fabricated QD-LDs had extremely stable temperature characteristics, and a characteristic temperature T 0 of more than 2156 K was obtained.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a two-dimensional quantum dot: Effects of impurity, external fields, hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, G.; Kish, S. Shojaeian; Vaseghi, B.; Taghizadeh, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper effects of external electric and magnetic fields, hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the electromagnetically induced transparency of a two-dimensional quantum dot are investigated. To do this, absorption as well as refractive index and the group velocity of the probe light pulse in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields are discussed. The results show that the electromagnetically induced transparency occurs in the system and its frequency, transparency window and group velocity of the probe field are strongly affected by the confinement potential, external fields, hydrostatic pressure and temperature. It is found that, in comparison with the atomic systems, electromagnetically induced transparency and the group velocity of light can be controlled via the confinement potential and external perturbations.

  20. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Correlation Energy in a Triplet State of a Two Electron Spherical Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rejo Jeice

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on correlation energy in a triplet state of two electron spherical quantum dot with square well potential is computed. The result is presented taking GaAs dot as an example. Our result shows the correlation energies are inegative in the triplet state contrast to the singlet state ii it increases with increase in pressure  iiifurther decreases due to the application  of temperature iv it approaches zero as dot size approaches infinity and v it contribute 10% decrement in total confined energy to the narrow dots. All the calculations have been carried out with finite models and the results are compared with existing literature.

  1. Low Temperature Apertureless Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope for Optical Spectroscopy of Single Ge/Si Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Henry; Patil, N. G.; Levy, Jeremy

    2001-03-01

    A low-temperature apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope has been designed and constructed for the purpose of investigating the optical properties of individual Ge/Si quantum dots. The microscope fits in the 37 mm bore of a Helium vapor magneto-optic cryostat, allowing operations down to liquid helium temperatures in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. An in situ microscope objective focuses light onto the sample, which is scanned in the three spatial directions using a compact modular stage. An AFM/STM tip resides on the top; feedback is achieved using a quartz tuning fork oscillator. Both tip and objective are attached to inertial sliding motors that can move in fine (10 nm) steps to achieve touchdown and focus. A femtosecond optical parametric oscillator is used to excite carriers in the quantum dots both resonantly and non-resonantly; scattered luminescence from the AFM/STM tip is collected and analyzed spectrally using a 1/2 meter imaging spectrometer and a LN_2-cooled InGaAs array. We gratefully acknowledge NSF (DMR-9701725, IMR-9802784) and DARPA (DAAD-16-99-C1036) for financial support of this work.

  2. Eesti Muusika Päevad 2000 : ECPNMi juhatus Tallinnas / Consuelo Diez ; interv. Evelin Kõrvits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diez, Consuelo

    2000-01-01

    28.-30. apr. pidas Tallinnas aastakoosolekut ning külastas Eesti Muusika Päevade kontserte ECPNMi (European Conference of Promoters of New Music) juhatus. ECPNMi juhatuse liikmed räägivad uue muusika üritustest oma riikides, muljeid eesti muusika päevadelt

  3. Märtsipäevade valupisaraid peab lastele näitama / Anu Bollverk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bollverk, Anu

    2009-01-01

    1949. aasta märtsiküüditamisele pühendatud mälestuspäevast Koeru kultuurimajas ning sealse huviteatri poolt ette kantud Herbert Lasti näidendist "Valupisarais märtsipäevad" (lavastajad Herbert Last ja Uno Aav)

  4. Eesti muusika päevad - üks kord aastas, kõigile / Jelena Gandshu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gandshu, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Muusikateadlased Jelena Gandshu ja Gerhard Lock, heliloojad Age Hirv ja Liis Jürgens 3.-10. aprillini toimunud Eesti muusika päevade kontsertidest: kinos Sõprus "Sensatsioon!!!", Kultuuritehases Polymer "Cellissimo", Estonia kontserdisaalis ERSO "Sümfoonilised hääled", Tallinna raekojas Mihkel Poll ja Oliver Kuusik, Katariina kirikus PaukenfEst, Nigulistes Jüri Reinvere autorikontsert. Järgneb

  5. Matemaatikaõpetajate pidupäevad Tartus / Viia Keeru, Tiit Lepmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Keeru, Viia

    2009-01-01

    36. matemaatikaõpetajate päevadest, mis pühendati professor Olaf Prinitsa 85. sünniaastapäevale. Päevade lõpus selgusid tänavused professor G. Rägo nimelise medali laureaadid, kelle seas olid ka TLÜ Haapsalu Kolledži lektor Sirje Piht ja TLÜ matemaatika didaktika dotsent Madis Lepik

  6. Nüüdismuusika päevad pakuvad põnevat kuulamist

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Pärnu nüüdismuusika päevade "Muusika ja arhitektuur" raames 20. jaan. esinevad loengutega Endla teatri sammassaalis arhitektid Veronika Valk ja Leonhard Lapin ning muusikateadlased Gerhard Lock ja Jaan Ross. Toivo Tulevi autorikontserdist Agape keskuses

  7. Effect analysis of quantum chemical descriptors and substituent characteristics on Henry's law constants of polybrominated diphenyl ethers at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiang; Youli, Qiu; Yu, Li

    2017-11-01

    Twelve substituent descriptors, 17 quantum chemical descriptors and 1/T were selected to establish a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model of Henry's law constants for 7 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) at five different temperatures. Then, the lgH of 202 congeners at different temperatures were predicted. The variation rule and regulating mechanism of lgH was studied from the perspectives of both quantum chemical descriptors and substituent characteristics. The R2 for modeling and testing sets of the final QSPR model are 0.977 and 0.979, respectively, thus indicating good fitness and predictive ability for Henry' law constants of PBDEs at different temperatures. The favorable hydrogen binding sites are the 5,5',6,6'-positions for high substituent congeners and the O atom of the ether bond for low substituent congeners, which affects the interaction between PBDEs and water molecules. lgH is negatively and linearly correlated with 1/T, and the variation trends of lgH with temperature are primarily regulated by individual substituent characteristics, wherein: the more substituents involved, the smaller the lgH. The significant sequence for the main effect of substituent positions is para>meta>ortho, where the ortho-positions are mainly involved in second-order interaction effect (64.01%). Having two substituents in the same ring also provides a significant effect, with 81.36% of second-order interaction effects, particularly where there is an adjacent distribution (55.02%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of temperature on the ground state of a strongly-coupling magnetic polaron and mean phonon number in RbCl quantum pseudodot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Ding, Zhao-Hua; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    On the condition of strong electron-LO phonon coupling in a RbCl quantum pseudodot (QPD), the ground state energy and the mean number of phonons are calculated by using the Pekar variational method and quantum statistical theory. The variations of the ground state energy and the mean number with respect to the temperature and the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field are studied in detail. We find that the absolute value of the ground state energy increases (decreases) with increasing temperature when the temperature is in the lower (higher) temperature region, and that the mean number increases with increasing temperature. The absolute value of the ground state energy is a decreasing function of the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field whereas the mean number is an increasing function of it. We find two ways to tune the ground state energy and the mean number: controlling the temperature and controlling the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field.

  9. Temperature dependence of the luminescence intensity in optical fibers of oxyfluoride glass with CdS and CdS x Se1 - x quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, D. S.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the integral luminescence intensity in optical fibers of oxyfluoride glass with CdS and CdS x Se1 - x quantum dots have been studied in a temperature range of 25-250°C. It is established that heating in this range leads to luminescence quenching in accordance with a nearly linear law. This effect can be used for the creation of fiber-optic temperature sensors.

  10. Comparison of quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty in a vertical quantum dot

    OpenAIRE

    Faizi, E.; Eftekhari, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider quantum correlations (quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty) in a vertical quantum dot. Their dependencies on magnetic field and temperature are presented in detail. It is noticeable that, quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty behavior is similar to a large extent. In addition, the time evolution of quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty under dephasing and amplitude damping channels is investigated. It has been found that, for some Belldiagon...

  11. Temperature-driven topological quantum phase transitions in a phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremeev, S V; Rusinov, I P; Echenique, P M; Chulkov, E V

    2016-12-13

    The Ge2Sb2Te5 is a phase-change material widely used in optical memory devices and is a leading candidate for next generation non-volatile random access memory devices which are key elements of various electronics and portable systems. Despite the compound is under intense investigation its electronic structure is currently not fully understood. The present work sheds new light on the electronic structure of the Ge2Sb2Te5 crystalline phases. We demonstrate by predicting from first-principles calculations that stable crystal structures of Ge2Sb2Te5 possess different topological quantum phases: a topological insulator phase is realized in low-temperature structure and Weyl semimetal phase is a characteristic of the high-temperature structure. Since the structural phase transitions are caused by the temperature the switching between different topologically non-trivial phases can be driven by variation of the temperature. The obtained results reveal the rich physics of the Ge2Sb2Te5 compound and open previously unexplored possibility for spintronics applications of this material, substantially expanding its application potential.

  12. Quantum mechanical predictions of the Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence for the 209 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kathy L; Sandler, Stanley I; Greene, Richard W; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2008-11-15

    The Henry's law constants (HLCs) for all 209 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were predicted at 25 degrees C using the quantum mechanical (QM) continuum solvation models COSMO-SAC and SM6, and trends were examined. COSMO-SAC HLCs were also predicted for all congeners at 4, 11, 18, and 31 degrees C. The temperature dependences of the HLCs were used to calculate enthalpy of solvation (deltaHs) values. At 25 degrees C, COSMO-SAC and SM6 predicted similar values of the HLC, which are consistent with all but one of the available sets of measurements, and have smaller root-mean-square prediction errors than other models tested. This supports the validity of the QM values, and the recommendation of their use in environmental transport and fate models. Intercongener trends in the HLCs appear to be dominated by the strength of PCB-water polar interactions. The COSMO-SAC predictions between 4 and 31 degrees C indicate that the temperature dependence of the HLC is similar for all congeners. At low temperatures, the HLC predictions for several heavy congeners are substantially higher than recently reported measurements, supporting claims in the literature that these low-temperature data are inaccurate.

  13. Effects of Temperature on First-Excited-State Energy of the Strong Coupling Magnetopolaron in 2D RbCl Parabolic Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Cui-Lan; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2015-02-01

    We study the effects of external fields that are present in nanostructures and can trap particles and manipulate their quantum states. To obtain the effects of temperature on the strong coupling magnetopolaron's first-excited-state energy (FESE) and transition frequency (TF), we use the Lee-Low-Pines unitary transformation (LLPUT) and linear combination operation (LCO) methods. Numerical results, performed in the 2D RbCl parabolic quantum dot (QD), show that the magnetopolaron's FESE and TF (MFESETF) increase with increasing the effective confinement strength and cyclotron frequency (CF) of the magnetic field and temperature.

  14. Charge carrier dynamics of GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric double quantum wells at room temperature studied by optical pump terahertz probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afalla, Jessica; Ohta, Kaoru; Tokonami, Shunrou; Prieto, Elizabeth Ann; Catindig, Gerald Angelo; Cedric Gonzales, Karl; Jaculbia, Rafael; Vasquez, John Daniel; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Estacio, Elmer; Tani, Masahiko; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Two asymmetric double quantum wells of different coupling strengths (barrier widths) were grown via molecular beam epitaxy, both samples allowing tunneling. Photoluminescence was measured at 10 and 300 K to provide evidence of tunneling, barrier dependence, and structural uniformity. Carrier dynamics at room temperature was investigated by optical pump terahertz probe (OPTP) spectroscopy. Carrier population decay rates were obtained and photoconductivity spectra were analyzed using the Drude model. This work demonstrates that carrier, and possibly tunneling dynamics in asymmetric double quantum well structures may be studied at room temperature through OPTP spectroscopy.

  15. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  16. QSATS: MPI-driven quantum simulations of atomic solids at zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Robert J.

    2011-11-01

    We describe QSATS, a parallel code for performing variational path integral simulations of the quantum mechanical ground state of monatomic solids. QSATS is designed to treat Boltzmann quantum solids, in which individual atoms are permanently associated with distinguishable crystal lattice sites and undergo large-amplitude zero-point motions around these sites. We demonstrate the capabilities of QSATS by using it to compute the total energy and potential energy of hexagonal close packed solid 4He at the density ρ=4.61421×10a0-3. Program summaryProgram title:QSATS Catalogue identifier: AEJE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7329 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 61 685 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77. Computer: QSATS should execute on any distributed parallel computing system that has the Message Passing Interface (MPI) [1] libraries installed. Operating system: Unix or Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI [1]. RAM: The memory requirements of QSATS depend on both the number of atoms in the crystal and the number of replicas in the variational path integral chain. For parameter sets A and C (described in the long write-up), approximately 4.5 Mbytes and 12 Mbytes, respectively, are required for data storage by QSATS (exclusive of the executable code). Classification: 7.7, 16.13. External routines: Message Passing Interface (MPI) [1] Nature of problem: QSATS simulates the quantum mechanical ground state for a monatomic crystal characterized by large-amplitude zero-point motions of individual (distinguishable) atoms around their nominal lattice sites. Solution method: QSATS employs

  17. Temperature evolution of the quantum gap in CsNiCl3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenzelmann, M.; Cowley, R.A.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron-scattering measurements on the one-dimensional gapped S = 1 antiferromagnet, CsNiCl3, have shown that excitation corresponding to the Haldane mass gap Delta at low temperatures persists as a resonant feature to high temperatures. We find that the strong upward renormalization of the gap...

  18. Quantifying Quantumness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Daniel; Giraud, Olivier; Braun, Peter A.

    2010-03-01

    We introduce and study a measure of ``quantumness'' of a quantum state based on its Hilbert-Schmidt distance from the set of classical states. ``Classical states'' were defined earlier as states for which a positive P-function exists, i.e. they are mixtures of coherent states [1]. We study invariance properties of the measure, upper bounds, and its relation to entanglement measures. We evaluate the quantumness of a number of physically interesting states and show that for any physical system in thermal equilibrium there is a finite critical temperature above which quantumness vanishes. We then use the measure for identifying the ``most quantum'' states. Such states are expected to be potentially most useful for quantum information theoretical applications. We find these states explicitly for low-dimensional spin-systems, and show that they possess beautiful, highly symmetric Majorana representations. [4pt] [1] Classicality of spin states, Olivier Giraud, Petr Braun, and Daniel Braun, Phys. Rev. A 78, 042112 (2008)

  19. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  20. Trap State Effects in PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Exciton Kinetics Using Photocarrier Radiometry Intensity and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Sun, Qiming

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted significant interest for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. However, a poor understanding of charge transport in these nanocrystalline films hinders their practical applications. The photocarrier radiometry (PCR) technique, a frequency-domain photoluminescence method spectrally gated for monitoring radiative recombination photon emissions while excluding thermal infrared photons due to non-radiative recombination, has been applied to PbS CQD thin films for the analysis of charge transport properties. Linear excitation intensity responses of PCR signals were found in the reported experimental conditions. The type and influence of trap states in the coupled PbS CQD thin film were analyzed with PCR temperature- and time-dependent results.

  1. Power density and temperature effects on the photoluminescence spectra of InAlAs/GaAlAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Daly, A.; Riahi, H.; Bernardot, F.; Barisien, T.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Maaref, M. A.; Testelin, C.

    2017-04-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurement techniques are used to characterize the size and the density of In1-xAlxAs/Ga0.67Al0.33As quantum dots (QDs) for different QD aluminium compositions. The integrated photoluminescence intensity (IPL) depends on an excitation light power, decreases with increasing the aluminium proportion emphasizing the QDs surface density decreasing. In TRPL experiments, the influence of QD lateral coupling is evidence in high QD density sample, the radiative lifetime increases with increasing temperatures for sample with a low aluminium proportion, instead, the observed radiative lifetime keep constant for samples with a high aluminium proportions in agreement with the QD zero-dimensional confinement.

  2. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  3. Role of interface roughness scattering, temperature, and structural parameters on the performance characteristics of III-nitride quantum cascade detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Kumar, J.

    2017-02-01

    A III-nitride quantum cascade detector (QCD) for the fiber optic communication wavelength (˜1.5 μm) has been designed, and the effect of intersubband scattering processes such as longitudinal-optical phonon scattering, ionized impurity scattering, and more importantly interface roughness scattering on responsivity performance has been analyzed. Carrier transport in the detector is modeled using a simplified rate equation approach. It is observed that inclusion of interface roughness scattering in the carrier transport model significantly enhances the responsivity performance of the detector. The effects of roughness conditions for instance mean roughness height and correlation length on responsivity have been examined. The responsivity of the designed detector drops by 2.16 mA/W at 400 K compared to its low temperature value at 50 K and the detection wavelength change with temperature is insignificant, which are very helpful for the stable detection of the radiation for a wide range of operating temperatures and show the thermal stability of III-nitride QCDs. The effects of active well widths, extractor barrier widths, and extractor well widths have been further investigated. A higher responsivity performance is observed for narrower barrier widths. It is noticed that change in the active well width significantly modifies the responsivity of the detector and the wavelength gets red shifted for larger active well widths.

  4. Comparison of nickel silicide and aluminium ohmic contact metallizations for low-temperature quantum transport measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polley Craig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We examine nickel silicide as a viable ohmic contact metallization for low-temperature, low-magnetic-field transport measurements of atomic-scale devices in silicon. In particular, we compare a nickel silicide metallization with aluminium, a common ohmic contact for silicon devices. Nickel silicide can be formed at the low temperatures (<400°C required for maintaining atomic precision placement in donor-based devices, and it avoids the complications found with aluminium contacts which become superconducting at cryogenic measurement temperatures. Importantly, we show that the use of nickel silicide as an ohmic contact at low temperatures does not affect the thermal equilibration of carriers nor contribute to hysteresis in a magnetic field.

  5. evad : [luuletused] / Philip Larkin ; inglise keelest tlk. Maarja Kangro

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Larkin, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Sisu: Päevad ; Mitte midagi öelda ; See olgu värss ; Uurimus lugemisharjumustest ; Hommage valitsusele ; Vesi ; Vajakud ; Viige üks koju lastele ; Jutt voodis ; Kõrged aknad ; Sa jätkad elu ; Kui. Orig.: Days ; Nothing to be said ; This be the verse ; A study of reading habits ; Homage to a government ; Water ; Wants ; Take one home for the kiddies ; Talking in bed ; High windows ; Continuing to live ; If

  6. DO PENALTIES AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES MAKE TAXPAYERS MORE COMPLIANT? THE VIEW OF AUSTRALIAN TAX EVADERS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Ken Devos

    2013-01-01

    The tax compliance literature indicates that many factors, including, economic, social, psychological and demographic, impact upon the compliance behaviour of individual taxpayers. This study explores the relationship, if any, that exists between selected tax compliance and demographic variables and the compliance behaviour of Australian individual tax evaders. The study employed a mixed method research approach comprising both a survey and interviews. The findings revealed that tax law enfor...

  7. Room-temperature continuous operation of InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 mu m based on (100) InP substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qui, Y.; Uhl, D.; Keo, S.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stack InAsSb self-assembled quantum-dot lasers based on (001) InP substrate have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The narrow ridge waveguide lasers lased at wavelengths near 2 mu m up to 25 degrees C in continuous-wave operation. At room temperature, a differential quantum efficiency of 13 percent is obtained and the maximum output optical power reaches 3 mW per facet with a threshold current density of 730 A/cm(sup 2). With increasing temperature the emission wavelength is extremely temperature stable, and a very low wavelength temperature sensitivity of 0.05 nm/degrees C is measured, which is even lower than that caused by the refractive index change.

  8. Temperature Effect of Hydrogen-Like Impurity on the Ground State Energy of Strong Coupling Polaron in a RbCl Quantum Pseudodot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2016-11-01

    We study the ground state energy and the mean number of LO phonons of the strong-coupling polaron in a RbCl quantum pseudodot (QPD) with hydrogen-like impurity at the center. The variations of the ground state energy and the mean number of LO phonons with the temperature and the strength of the Coulombic impurity potential are obtained by employing the variational method of Pekar type and the quantum statistical theory (VMPTQST). Our numerical results have displayed that [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] the absolute value of the ground state energy increases (decreases) when the temperature increases at lower (higher) temperature regime, [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] the mean number of the LO phonons increases with increasing temperature, [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] the absolute value of ground state energy and the mean number of LO phonons are increasing functions of the strength of the Coulombic impurity potential.

  9. Temperature effect on first excited state energy and transition frequency of a strong-coupling polaron in a symmetry RbCl quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yong; Ding, Zhao-Hua; Xiao, Jing-Lin, E-mail: xiaojlin@126.com

    2014-07-01

    The first excited state energy, excitation energy and transition frequency of a strong-coupling polaron in a symmetric RbCl quantum dot (SRQD) are obtained by employing the linear combination operator and unitary transformation methods. Effects of temperature and confinement strength are taken into account. It is found that the first excited state energy, excitation energy and transition frequency are increasing functions of temperature and confinement strength.

  10. Temperature effect on first excited state energy and transition frequency of a strong-coupling polaron in a symmetry RbCl quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Ding, Zhao-Hua; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    The first excited state energy, excitation energy and transition frequency of a strong-coupling polaron in a symmetric RbCl quantum dot (SRQD) are obtained by employing the linear combination operator and unitary transformation methods. Effects of temperature and confinement strength are taken into account. It is found that the first excited state energy, excitation energy and transition frequency are increasing functions of temperature and confinement strength.

  11. Comprehensive study of internal quantum efficiency of high-brightness GaN-based light-emitting diodes by temperature-dependent electroluminescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqi; Pan, Mengshu; Li, Ting

    2014-02-01

    We report on the development of a temperature-dependent electroluminescence experimental setup for characterizing the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of high-brightness GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). A systematic IQE study of commercial LED chips from major LED manufacturers (including Cree, Nichia, Osram, and Sanan) is presented. The chips show distinctive temperature- and current-dependence in the IQE behavior. Analysis to correlate the onset of droop with the onset of high injection is also presented.

  12. Influence of nanocrystal size on the quantum dots sensitized solar cells’ performance with low temperature synthesized CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bing; Shen, Chao; Yuan, Shuanglong [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Bo [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Mengya [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yang, Yunxia, E-mail: yangyunxia@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Chen, Guorong, E-mail: grchen@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Avoiding use of phosphine contained solvent makes the preparation of the CdSe QDs green. • The absorption range of the QDs plays an important role in the cell's performance. • Cu{sub 2}S is more suitable than Pt as the counter electrode. - Abstract: The CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized with ethanol and glycerol under 50–160 °C in the present work. The reaction temperature is lower than the traditional solvent thermal method to fabricate the CdSe QDs around 250–350 °C. What’s more, the avoiding of the use of phosphine contained solvent make the whole reaction environmental friendly. Then 3-Mercaptopropionic (MPA) was used to exchange the CdSe QDs’ ligand of olic acid. After that, the MPA-capped CdSe QDs were tethered onto the TiO{sub 2}’s substrate, which guarantee the high coverage of the CdSe QDs on the TiO{sub 2} photoanode and the absorption range of 450–560 nm of light harvest. Furthermore, through the results of the CdSe QD’s size for the cells’ performance, we compared the significance of the QDs’ absorption range, the electron injection from the conduction band of CdSe QDs’ to TiO{sub 2}’s and polysulfide to the valance band of the CdSe QDs in the cells’ performance and discuss the mechanism to improve the efficiency of the QDSCs. Finally, the QDSCs with polysulfide solution and Cu{sub 2}S as counter electrode show excellent cell performance with open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.6 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 10.58 mA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor (FF) of 0.564, and PCE of 3.7%.

  13. Muusika : Jeremija nutulaulud palmipuudepühal. Jätkub "Musica Grande". Lihavõttetervitus Barcelonast. Rannap "Selges eesti helikeeles". Juba XIII trompetipäevad. III klavessiinipäevad / Jaan-Eik Tulve

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tulve, Jaan-Eik, 1967-

    2002-01-01

    Vox Clamantise kontsertidest Tartus ja Tallinnas. Jätkub sari "Musica Grande" kontsertidega Tartus ja Tallinnas pealkirjaga "Kontsertlik". Eestisse sõidab esinema üks Hispaania tippkoore Coral Cantiga Barcelonast. Rein Rannapi tänavusest suurprojektist, klaveriõhtust "Selges eesti helikeeles". 1. - 7. aprillini toimuvad EMA rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad. 4. - 7. aprillini korraldab Eesti Klavessiinisõprade Tsunft III klavessiinipäevad

  14. Solving a quantum chemistry equations and high-temperature superconductivity problems

    CERN Document Server

    Liverts, E Z

    2000-01-01

    The conventional technique for solving the equation of quantum chemistry (of solids) is unusually extended to the structures possessing certain symmetries. The extension proposed gives a chance to find unoccupied electronic states located lower than the Fermi level of the ground state of a specific system. Such states can be treated as 'spectral holes'. Application of this technique, in particular, when calculating the electronic structure of the HTSC-compound YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (0<= delta<=1) results in the following. For all versions of the examined charge distributions over a crystal lattice, spectral holes of high spatial localization are found. The 'spatial spectral holes' are mainly located at the p sub y -orbitals of the apex oxygens. These orbitals overlap and form linear chains which are parallel too but do not coincide with the known Cu(1)-O chains which disappear when delta is close tio 1. One can suppose that these linear chains of the overlapping hole states from a su...

  15. Compensation of phonon-induced renormalization of vacuum Rabi splitting in large quantum dots: Towards temperature-stable strong coupling in the solid state with quantum dot-micropillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfmann, C.; Musiał, A.; Strauß, M.; Barth, A. M.; Glässl, M.; Vagov, A.; Strauß, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Axt, V. M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study experimentally the influence of temperature on the emission characteristics of quantum dot-micropillars in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED). In particular, we investigate its impact on the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) and we address the important question of the temperature stability of the coherent coupling regime in a semiconductor system, which is relevant in view of both fundamental study and future applications. To study the temperature dependence we investigate an unprecedentedly large number of strong coupling cases (89) in a wide temperature range from 10 up to 50 K, which constitutes a good basis for statistical analysis. The experiment indicates a statistically significant increase of the VRS with temperature in contrast to an expected decrease of the VRS due to the dephasing induced by acoustic phonons. From the theoretical point of view, the phonon-induced renormalization of the VRS is calculated using a real-time path-integral approach for strongly confined quantum dots (QDs), which allows for a numerical exact treatment of the coupling between the QD and a continuum of longitudinal acoustic phonons. The absence of the expected decrease of the VRS with temperature in our experimental data can be attributed to a unique optical property of laterally extended I n0.4G a0.6As QDs used in this study. Their electronic structure facilitates an effective temperature-driven increase of the oscillator strength of the excitonic state by up to 40% in the given temperature range. This leads to enhanced light-matter interaction and overcompensates the phonon-related decrease of the VRS. The observed persistence of strong coupling in the presence of phonon-induced decoherence demonstrates the appealing possibility to counteract detrimental phonon effects in the cQED regime via engineering the electronic structure of QDs.

  16. Eight-fold quantum states blossom in a high-temperature superconductor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Researchers based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to reveal eight-fold patterns of quasiparticle interference in the high-temperature superconductor Bi-2212 (bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide)" (2 pages).

  17. Probing Temperature- and pH-Dependent Binding between Quantum Dots and Bovine Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghua Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent quantum dots (QDs with unique optical properties have potential applications in bio-imaging. The interaction between QDs and bio-molecules is important to the biological effect of QDs in vivo. In this paper, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS to probe the temperature- and pH-dependent interactions between CdSe QDs with carboxyl (QDs-COOH and bovine serum albumin (BSA in buffer solutions. The results have shown that microscopic dissociation constant K′D is in the range of (1.5 ± 0.2 × 10−5 to (8.6 ± 0.1 × 10−7 M, the Hill coefficient n is from 0.4 to 2.3, and the protein corona thickness is from 3.0 to 9.4 nm. Variable-temperature measurements have shown both negative values of ∆H and ∆S for BSA adsorption on QDs-COOH, while pH has a profound effect on the adsorption. Additional, FCS measurement QDs-COOH and proteins in whole mice serum and plasma samples has also been conducted. Finally, simulation results have shown four favored QD binding sites in BSA.

  18. Real-time and on-chip surface temperature sensing of GaN LED chips using PbSe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Pengfei; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Tieqiang; Chu, Hairong; Cui, Tian; Wang, Yiding; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W

    2013-11-07

    PbSe quantum dots (QDs) were employed as real-time and on-chip temperature sensors to monitor the surface temperature of GaN LED chips. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra were achieved and confirmed to be a good method for surface temperature sensing in a micro- to nano-region. The nanosized QD sensors did not influence the LED emission spectrum due to their infrared emission and little absorption. The surface temperature of GaN LED chips was analyzed at different working times and voltages. The temperature sensitivity characterized by the photoluminescence peak position of PbSe QDs was found to be 0.15 nm °C(-1) in a range of 30-120 °C and the precision was determined to be ± 3 °C. The QD surface temperature sensors were confirmed to have good reversibility and repeatability.

  19. Preparation and properties of ZnSe/(Zn, Cd)Se multi-quantum-well microcavities for room temperature polariton emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlis, A.; Kharchenko, A.; Husberg, O.; Lischka, K.; Schikora, D.

    2004-09-01

    Due to their large oscillator strengths, ZnSe microcavities with (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells are particularly suited for investigation of the photon-exciton coupling behaviour in semiconductors. We have observed a strong coupling between the excitonic and photonic modes in a ZnSe microcavity with four (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells and distributed Bragg mirrors of ZnS and YF3. A very large Rabi splitting \\hbar \\Omega>40 meV was observed in temperature dependent photoluminescence investigations.

  20. Preparation and properties of ZnSe/(Zn, Cd)Se multi-quantum-well microcavities for room temperature polariton emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlis, A; Kharchenko, A; Husberg, O; Lischka, K; Schikora, D [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2004-09-08

    Due to their large oscillator strengths, ZnSe microcavities with (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells are particularly suited for investigation of the photon-exciton coupling behaviour in semiconductors. We have observed a strong coupling between the excitonic and photonic modes in a ZnSe microcavity with four (Zn, Cd)Se quantum wells and distributed Bragg mirrors of ZnS and YF{sub 3}. A very large Rabi splitting {Dirac_h}{omega} >40 meV was observed in temperature dependent photoluminescence investigations.

  1. Rabi oscillations and self-induced transparency in InAs/InP quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier operating at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karni, Ouri; Capua, Amir; Eisenstein, Gadi; Sichkovskyi, Vitalii; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2013-11-04

    We report direct observations of Rabi oscillations and self-induced transparency in a quantum dot optical amplifier operating at room temperature. The experiments make use of pulses whose durations are shorter than the coherence time which are characterized using Cross-Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating. A numerical model which solves the Maxwell and Schrödinger equations and accounts for the inhomogeneously broadened nature of the quantum dot gain medium confirms the experimental results. The model is also used to explain the relationship between the observability of Rabi oscillations, the pulse duration and the homogeneous and inhomogeneous spectral widths of the semiconductor.

  2. Effect of transverse electric field and temperature on light absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel-coupled quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya., E-mail: mvin@spbstu.ru; Balagula, R. M. [Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil’iev, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence and intersubband absorption spectra are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel- coupled quantum well structures. The peak positions in the photoluminescence and absorption spectra are consistent with the theoretically calculated energies of optical carrier transitions. The effect of a transverse electric field and temperature on intersubband light absorption is studied. It is caused by electron redistribution between the size-quantization levels and a variation in the energy spectrum of quantum wells. The variation in the refractive index in the energy region of observed intersubband transitions is estimated using Kramers–Kronig relations.

  3. Comparison of the Melting Temperatures of Classical and Quantum Water Potential Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Sen; Yoo, Soohaeng; Li, Jinjin

    2017-08-01

    As theoretical approaches and technical methods improve over time, the field of computer simulations for water has greatly progressed. Water potential models become much more complex when additional interactions and advanced theories are considered. Macroscopic properties of water predicted by computer simulations using water potential models are expected to be consistent with experimental outcomes. As such, discrepancies between computer simulations and experiments could be a criterion to comment on the performances of various water potential models. Notably, water can occur not only as liquid phases but also as solid and vapor phases. Therefore, the melting temperature related to the solid and liquid phase equilibrium is an effective parameter to judge the performances of different water potential models. As a mini review, our purpose is to introduce some water models developed in recent years and the melting temperatures obtained through simulations with such models. Moreover, some explanations referred to in the literature are described for the additional evaluation of the water potential models.

  4. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Je-An; Pyo Kim, Sang; Shen, Che-Min

    2018-01-01

    Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  5. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Je-An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  6. Comparison of the Melting Temperatures of Classical and Quantum Water Potential Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Du

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As theoretical approaches and technical methods improve over time, the field of computer simulations for water has greatly progressed. Water potential models become much more complex when additional interactions and advanced theories are considered. Macroscopic properties of water predicted by computer simulations using water potential models are expected to be consistent with experimental outcomes. As such, discrepancies between computer simulations and experiments could be a criterion to comment on the performances of various water potential models. Notably, water can occur not only as liquid phases but also as solid and vapor phases. Therefore, the melting temperature related to the solid and liquid phase equilibrium is an effective parameter to judge the performances of different water potential models. As a mini review, our purpose is to introduce some water models developed in recent years and the melting temperatures obtained through simulations with such models. Moreover, some explanations referred to in the literature are described for the additional evaluation of the water potential models.

  7. Temperature effects on a network of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators: collective damping and dispersion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ponte, M. A.; Mizrahi, S. S.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we extend the results presented in (de Ponte, Mizrahi and Moussa 2007 Phys. Rev. A 76 032101) to treat quantitatively the effects of reservoirs at finite temperature in a bosonic dissipative network: a chain of coupled harmonic oscillators whatever its topology, i.e., whichever the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings and their natural frequencies. Starting with the case where distinct reservoirs are considered, each one coupled to a corresponding oscillator, we also analyze the case where a common reservoir is assigned to the whole network. Master equations are derived for both situations and both regimes of weak and strong coupling strengths between the network oscillators. Solutions of these master equations are presented through the normal ordered characteristic function. These solutions are shown to be significantly involved when temperature effects are considered, making difficult the analysis of collective decoherence and dispersion in dissipative bosonic networks. To circumvent these difficulties, we turn to the Wigner distribution function which enables us to present a technique to estimate the decoherence time of network states. Our technique proceeds by computing separately the effects of dispersion and the attenuation of the interference terms of the Wigner function. A detailed analysis of the dispersion mechanism is also presented through the evolution of the Wigner function. The interesting collective dispersion effects are discussed and applied to the analysis of decoherence of a class of network states. Finally, the entropy and the entanglement of a pure bipartite system are discussed.

  8. Temperature effects on a network of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators: collective damping and dispersion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ponte, M A; Mizrahi, S S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Caixa Postal 676, Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moussa, M H Y [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-09-11

    In this paper we extend the results presented in (de Ponte, Mizrahi and Moussa 2007 Phys. Rev. A 76 032101) to treat quantitatively the effects of reservoirs at finite temperature in a bosonic dissipative network: a chain of coupled harmonic oscillators whatever its topology, i.e., whichever the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings and their natural frequencies. Starting with the case where distinct reservoirs are considered, each one coupled to a corresponding oscillator, we also analyze the case where a common reservoir is assigned to the whole network. Master equations are derived for both situations and both regimes of weak and strong coupling strengths between the network oscillators. Solutions of these master equations are presented through the normal ordered characteristic function. These solutions are shown to be significantly involved when temperature effects are considered, making difficult the analysis of collective decoherence and dispersion in dissipative bosonic networks. To circumvent these difficulties, we turn to the Wigner distribution function which enables us to present a technique to estimate the decoherence time of network states. Our technique proceeds by computing separately the effects of dispersion and the attenuation of the interference terms of the Wigner function. A detailed analysis of the dispersion mechanism is also presented through the evolution of the Wigner function. The interesting collective dispersion effects are discussed and applied to the analysis of decoherence of a class of network states. Finally, the entropy and the entanglement of a pure bipartite system are discussed.

  9. Measurement of the spin temperature of optically cooled nuclei and GaAs hyperfine constants in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Ulhaq, A.; Zallo, E.; Ding, F.; Schmidt, O. G.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    Deep cooling of electron and nuclear spins is equivalent to achieving polarization degrees close to 100% and is a key requirement in solid-state quantum information technologies. While polarization of individual nuclear spins in diamond and SiC (ref. ) reaches 99% and beyond, it has been limited to 50-65% for the nuclei in quantum dots. Theoretical models have attributed this limit to formation of coherent `dark' nuclear spin states but experimental verification is lacking, especially due to the poor accuracy of polarization degree measurements. Here we measure the nuclear polarization in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots with high accuracy using a new approach enabled by manipulation of the nuclear spin states with radiofrequency pulses. Polarizations up to 80% are observed--the highest reported so far for optical cooling in quantum dots. This value is still not limited by nuclear coherence effects. Instead we find that optically cooled nuclei are well described within a classical spin temperature framework. Our findings unlock a route for further progress towards quantum dot electron spin qubits where deep cooling of the mesoscopic nuclear spin ensemble is used to achieve long qubit coherence. Moreover, GaAs hyperfine material constants are measured here experimentally for the first time.

  10. Topological Hubbard model and its high-temperature quantum Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, Titus; Santos, Luiz; Ryu, Shinsei; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher

    2012-01-27

    The quintessential two-dimensional lattice model that describes the competition between the kinetic energy of electrons and their short-range repulsive interactions is the repulsive Hubbard model. We study a time-reversal symmetric variant of the repulsive Hubbard model defined on a planar lattice: Whereas the interaction is unchanged, any fully occupied band supports a quantized spin Hall effect. We show that at 1/2 filling of this band, the ground state develops spontaneously and simultaneously Ising ferromagnetic long-range order and a quantized charge Hall effect when the interaction is sufficiently strong. We ponder on the possible practical applications, beyond metrology, that the quantized charge Hall effect might have if it could be realized at high temperatures and without external magnetic fields in strongly correlated materials.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Spin Relaxation Time in InAs Columnar Quantum Dots at 10 to 150 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Sota; Sasayama, Kazutoshi; Oyanagi, Yoshitsugu; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Lu, Shulong; Li, Lianhe; Fiore, Andrea; Tackeuchi, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated carrier spin relaxation in InAs columnar quantum dots (CQDs) using time-resolved photoluminescence measurement. The CQDs were formed by depositing a 1.8 monolayer InAs seed dot layer and a short-period GaAs/InAs superlattice (SL). The spin relaxations of the 3- and 35-period SL CQDs show double exponential decay up to 50 and 130 K, respectively. The spin relaxation times of the fast component, whose amplitudes are 4-11 times larger than that of the slow component, are around 100 ps for the two samples. For the 3-period SL CQDs, the fast spin relaxation time shows no temperature dependence up to around 50 K, indicating the relevance of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process. The slow spin relaxation time of the 35-period SL CQDs was found to decrease from 3.42 ns at 10 K to 0.849 ns at 130 K. This large change may be explained by the Elliott-Yafet process considering acoustic phonon scattering.

  12. Simultaneous sensing of temperature, CO, and CO2 in a scramjet combustor using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearrin, R. M.; Goldenstein, C. S.; Schultz, I. A.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-07-01

    A mid-infrared laser absorption sensor was developed for gas temperature and carbon oxide (CO, CO2) concentrations in high-enthalpy, hydrocarbon combustion flows. This diagnostic enables non-intrusive, in situ measurements in harsh environments produced by hypersonic propulsion ground test facilities. The sensing system utilizes tunable quantum cascade lasers capable of probing the fundamental mid-infrared absorption bands of CO and CO2 in the 4-5 µm wavelength domain. A scanned-wavelength direct absorption technique was employed with two lasers, one dedicated to each species, free-space fiber-coupled using a bifurcated hollow-core fiber for remote light delivery on a single line of sight. Scanned-wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection was utilized to extend the dynamic range of the CO measurement. The diagnostic was field-tested on a direct-connect scramjet combustor for ethylene-air combustion. Simultaneous, laser-based measurements of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide provide a basis for evaluating combustion completion or efficiency with temporal and spatial resolution in practical hydrocarbon-fueled engines.

  13. High saturation intensity in InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cells and impact on the realization of the intermediate band concept at room-temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Dagenais, Mario

    2017-02-01

    High optical saturation intensity at room temperature is reported for an ensemble of undoped quantum dots. The non-linearity of the light-generated-current under resonant excitation from the valence band to the intermediate band is shown to be made up of two components: a background two-photon absorption term and a resonant optical saturation term. It is argued that the solar intensity is much lower than the saturation intensities involved for the first and second transitions in the intermediate band solar cell under 1-sun illumination and therefore prevents exciting an appreciable amount of population in the terminal level that can be ionized to the continuum and generate an appreciable additional current. This additional current is required for enhancing the energy conversion efficiency of a solar cell based on the intermediate band concept. Operating at cryogenic temperatures leads to a reduction in the saturation intensity but it might not be sufficient for increasing the energy conversion efficiency, unless concentrated sun light, and/or high density of quantum dots, and/or quantum dots with a lifetime more comparable to the radiative lifetime are used. The conclusions of this paper are also expected to apply to other quantum dot systems.

  14. Temperature-dependent properties of single long-wavelength InGaAs quantum dots embedded in a strain reducing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Fabian; Kettler, Jan; Bayerbach, Matthias; Paul, Matthias; Höschele, Jonatan; Portalupi, Simone Luca; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2017-05-01

    We report on temperature-dependent investigations of single metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots at wavelengths above 1 μm. Here, two types of samples are compared, whereas the quantum dots differ in the material composition and are embedded in a strain reducing layer to achieve an emission redshift. The analysis is performed by standard micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, time-correlated photon counting, and intensity second-order autocorrelation measurements. It is found that the long-wavelength quantum dots experience a high charge carrier confinement (˜200 meV), but the thermal emission of carriers into the barrier or the wetting layer is mainly dominated by the shell spacing of individual dots. Additionally, we demonstrate that the single-dot carrier dynamics is reservoir-dominated. The influence of the strain reducing layers seems to cause this effect, leading to changes in the effective dot filling rate and charge configuration. Single-photon emission is preserved up to 77 K for a sample spectrally reaching the telecom O-band and then allowing for quantum dot single-photon operation at liquid nitrogen temperatures.

  15. QUANTUM MECHANICS. Quantum squeezing of motion in a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2015-08-28

    According to quantum mechanics, a harmonic oscillator can never be completely at rest. Even in the ground state, its position will always have fluctuations, called the zero-point motion. Although the zero-point fluctuations are unavoidable, they can be manipulated. Using microwave frequency radiation pressure, we have manipulated the thermal fluctuations of a micrometer-scale mechanical resonator to produce a stationary quadrature-squeezed state with a minimum variance of 0.80 times that of the ground state. We also performed phase-sensitive, back-action evading measurements of a thermal state squeezed to 1.09 times the zero-point level. Our results are relevant to the quantum engineering of states of matter at large length scales, the study of decoherence of large quantum systems, and for the realization of ultrasensitive sensing of force and motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Quantum key distribution based on orthogonal states allows secure quantum bit commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang Ping

    2011-11-01

    For more than a decade, it was believed that unconditionally secure quantum bit commitment (QBC) is impossible. But based on a previously proposed quantum key distribution scheme using orthogonal states, here we build a QBC protocol in which the density matrices of the quantum states encoding the commitment do not satisfy a crucial condition on which the no-go proofs of QBC are based. Thus, the no-go proofs could be evaded. Our protocol is fault-tolerant and very feasible with currently available technology. It reopens the venue for other ‘post-cold-war’ multi-party cryptographic protocols, e.g. quantum bit string commitment and quantum strong coin tossing with an arbitrarily small bias. This result also has a strong influence on the Clifton-Bub-Halvorson theorem which suggests that quantum theory could be characterized in terms of information-theoretic constraints.

  17. Nonlinear optical rectification in a vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots with wetting layers under hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Mahrsia, R.; Choubani, M., E-mail: mohsenchoubani3@yahoo.fr; Bouzaiene, L.; Maaref, H.

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we explore the structure parameters, hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on Nonlinear optical rectification (NOR) in an asymmetric vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots. During epitaxial growth, lens-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). Many theoretical works have neglected WL and its effect on nonlinear optical properties of QD-based systems for sake of simplicity. However, in this work the WL has been shown to be so influential in the intersubband energy and nonlinear optical rectification magnitude. Also, a detailed and comprehensive study of the nonlinear optical rectification is theoretical investigated within the framework of the compact density-matrix approach and finite difference method (FDM). It's found that nonlinear optical rectification coefficient is strongly affected not only by the WL, but also by the pressure, temperature and the coupled width between the QDs. Obtained results revealed that a red or a blue shift cane be observed. This behavior in the NOR gives a new degree of freedom in regions of interest for device applications. - Highlights: • Vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots is investigated. • Photon energy shifts towards the red with increasing pressure. • Photon energy shifts towards the blue with increasing temperature. • Intersubband energy decreases with increasing the wetting layer width. • Nonlinear optical rectification magnitude is controlled and adjusted.

  18. Quantum Spin Liquids in Frustrated Spin-1 Diamond Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buessen, Finn Lasse; Hering, Max; Reuther, Johannes; Trebst, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the recent synthesis of the spin-1 A -site spinel NiRh2 O4 , we investigate the classical to quantum crossover of a frustrated J1-J2 Heisenberg model on the diamond lattice upon varying the spin length S . Applying a recently developed pseudospin functional renormalization group approach for arbitrary spin-S magnets, we find that systems with S ≥3 /2 reside in the classical regime, where the low-temperature physics is dominated by the formation of coplanar spirals and a thermal (order-by-disorder) transition. For smaller local moments S =1 or S =1 /2 , we find that the system evades a thermal ordering transition and forms a quantum spiral spin liquid where the fluctuations are restricted to characteristic momentum-space surfaces. For the tetragonal phase of NiRh2 O4 , a modified J1-J2--J2⊥ exchange model is found to favor a conventionally ordered Néel state (for arbitrary spin S ), even in the presence of a strong local single-ion spin anisotropy, and it requires additional sources of frustration to explain the experimentally observed absence of a thermal ordering transition.

  19. The effect of temperature and dot size on the spectral properties of colloidal InP/ZnS core-shell quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Arun; Feiner, L F; Meijerink, A; van der Zaag, P J

    2009-09-22

    Visual color changes between 300 and 510 K were observed in the photoluminescence (PL) of colloidal InP/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals. A subsequent study of PL spectra in the range 2-510 K and fitting the temperature dependent line shift and line width to theoretical models show that the dominant (dephasing) interaction is due to scattering by acoustic phonons of about 23 meV. Low temperature photoluminescence excitation measurements show that the excitonic band gap depends approximately inversely linearly on the quantum dot size d, which is distinctly weaker than the dependence predicted by current theories.

  20. Temperature dependence and quantum efficiency of ultrabroad NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Guojun; Peng, Mingying; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Ultrabroad near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence from Ni2+-centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics was studied by temperature-dependent static and dynamic photoluminescence spectroscopy in the regime of 10 to 300 K. Photoluminescence covers the spectral range of about 1100 nm to >1600  nm with a typical bandwidth (FWHM) greater than 300 nm. For UV-LED excitation at 352 nm, an internal quantum efficiency of 65% is obtained. The excited state lifetime τ at room temperature is 3...

  1. Effect of temperature and ridge-width on the lasing characteristics of InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers: A thermal analysis view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, E.; Khan, M. T. A.; Ragheb, A. M.; Fathallah, H.; Qureshi, K. K.; Alshebeili, S.; Khan, M. Z. M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the thermal characteristics of multi-stack chirped barrier thickness InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash-in-a-well lasers of different ridge widths 2, 3, 4 and 15 μm. The effect of varying this geometrical parameter on the extracted thermal resistance and characteristic temperature, and their stability with temperature are examined. The results show an inverse relation of ridge-width with junction temperature with 2 μm device exhibiting the largest junction temperature buildup owing to an associated high thermal resistance of ∼45 °C/W. Under the light of this thermal analysis, lasing behavior of different ridge-width quantum-dash (Qdash) lasers with injection currents and operating temperatures, is investigated. Thermionic carrier escape and phonon-assisted tunneling are found to be the dominant carrier transport mechanisms resulting in wide thermal spread of carriers across the available transition states of the chirped active region. An emission coverage of ∼75 nm and 3 dB bandwidth of ∼55 nm is exhibited by the 2 μm device, thus possibly exploiting the inhomogeneous optical transitions to the fullest. Furthermore, successful external modulation of a single Qdash Fabry-Perot laser mode via injection locking is demonstrated with eye diagrams at bit rates of 2-12 Gbit/s incorporating various modulation schemes. These devices are being considered as potential light sources for future high-speed wavelength-division multiplexed optical communication systems.

  2. Low temperature behavior of thermodynamic properties of 1D quantum wire under the Rashba spin-orbit interaction and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Rastegar Sedehi, H. R.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and applied magnetic field on thermodynamic properties of a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire at low temperatures. To this end, we first present an explicit relation for partition function. Then, we give analytical expressions for the mean energy, specific heat, free energy, and entropy of the system. It is found that the specific heat shows a peak structure in the presence of SOI and then reduces to zero. The peak width of the specific heat depends on the strength of SOI. At low temperatures, the entropy reduces with increasing magnetic field in the presence of SOI, but at higher temperatures, it remains almost independent of the magnetic field. The peak of specific heat occurs at a certain value of the magnetic field which depends on the temperature.

  3. Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibian, Sevag; Huang, Yichen; Landau, Zeph; Shin, Seung Woo

    2014-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems are a central pillar of modern computational complexity theory. This survey provides an introduction to the rapidly growing field of Quantum Hamiltonian Complexity, which includes the study of quantum constraint satisfaction problems. Over the past decade and a half, this field has witnessed fundamental breakthroughs, ranging from the establishment of a "Quantum Cook-Levin Theorem" to deep insights into the structure of 1D low-temperature quantum systems via s...

  4. A hot L1 retrotransposon evades somatic repression and initiates human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma C.; Gardner, Eugene J.; Masood, Ashiq; Chuang, Nelson T.; Vertino, Paula M.; Devine, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Although human LINE-1 (L1) elements are actively mobilized in many cancers, a role for somatic L1 retrotransposition in tumor initiation has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we identify a novel somatic L1 insertion in the APC tumor suppressor gene that provided us with a unique opportunity to determine whether such insertions can actually initiate colorectal cancer (CRC), and if so, how this might occur. Our data support a model whereby a hot L1 source element on Chromosome 17 of the patient's genome evaded somatic repression in normal colon tissues and thereby initiated CRC by mutating the APC gene. This insertion worked together with a point mutation in the second APC allele to initiate tumorigenesis through the classic two-hit CRC pathway. We also show that L1 source profiles vary considerably depending on the ancestry of an individual, and that population-specific hot L1 elements represent a novel form of cancer risk. PMID:27197217

  5. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Miyamoto, Yuhei [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Yokoyama, Jun' ichi [Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa, Chiba (JP). Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)

    2012-04-15

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  6. Cl2O photochemistry: ultraviolet/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Feierabend, Karl J; Burkholder, James B

    2011-05-28

    The photochemistry of Cl(2)O (dichlorine monoxide) was studied using measurements of its UV/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the O((3)P) atom quantum yield, Φ(Cl(2)O)(O)(λ), in its photolysis at 193 and 248 nm. The Cl(2)O UV/vis absorption spectrum was measured over the temperature range 201-296 K between 200 and 500 nm using diode array spectroscopy. Cl(2)O absorption cross sections, σ(Cl(2)O)(λ,T), at temperatures <296 K were determined relative to its well established room temperature values. A wavelength and temperature dependent parameterization of the Cl(2)O spectrum using the sum of six Gaussian functions, which empirically represent transitions from the ground (1)A(1) electronic state to excited states, is presented. The Gaussian functions are found to correlate well with published theoretically calculated vertical excitation energies. O((3)P) quantum yields in the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 193 and 248 nm were measured using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O((3)P) atoms. O((3)P) quantum yields were measured to be 0.85 ± 0.15 for 193 nm photolysis at 296 K and 0.20 ± 0.03 at 248 nm, which was also found to be independent of temperature (220-352 K) and pressure (17 and 28 Torr, N(2)). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and include estimated systematic errors. ClO radical temporal profiles obtained following the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 248 nm, as reported previously in Feierabend et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12052, (2010)], were interpreted to establish a <5% upper-limit for the O + Cl(2) photodissociation channel, which indicates that O((3)P) is primarily formed in the three-body, O + 2Cl, photodissociation channel at 248 nm. The analysis also indirectly provided a Cl atom quantum yield of 1.2 ± 0.1 at 248 nm. The results from this work are compared with previous studies where possible. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Temperature dependence of the optical properties of violet, blue and green InGaN/GaN single quantum well light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Youhua; Wang, Meiyu; Deng, Honghai; Huang, Jing; Yin, HaiHong; Sun, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Temperature dependence of the optical properties of InGaN/GaN single quantum well light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with different indium (In) contents is investigated by using the effective mass theory taking into account the band-gap shrinkage and lattice thermal expansion. The peak intensity of the spontaneous emission spectrum is decreased by 30.6%, 30.4%, and 30.3% for the violet, blue, and green LEDs in the temperature range 300 K–400 K, while the reductions of internal quantum efficiency (η) with temperature are ~0.13, ~0.11, and ~0.1 respectively at the injection current density of 100 A cm‑2. Moreover, two different slopes for all the η–T curves are observed: a lower absolute value of the slopes at T  =  300–350 K a larger absolute value of the slopes at T  =  350–400 K. The numerical results also indicate that the efficiency droop effect with increasing the temperature becomes more serious, especially for the InGaN/GaN LED structures with the lower In-content.

  8. Room-temperature InAs/InP Quantum Dots laser operation based on heterogeneous "2.5 D" Photonic Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Bakir, Badhise; Seassal, Christian; Letartre, Xavier; Regreny, Philippe; Gendry, Michel; Viktorovitch, Pierre; Zussy, Marc; Di Cioccio, Léa; Fedeli, Jean-Marc

    2006-10-02

    The authors report on the design, fabrication and operation of heterogeneous and compact "2.5 D" Photonic Crystal microlaser with a single plane of InAs quantum dots as gain medium. The high quality factor photonic structures are tailored for vertical emission. The devices consist of a top two-dimensional InP Photonic Crystal Slab, a SiO(2) bonding layer, and a bottom high index contrast Si/SiO(2) Bragg mirror deposited on a Si wafer. Despite the fact that no more than about 5% of the quantum dots distribution effectively contribute to the modal gain, room-temperature lasing operation, around 1.5 microm, was achieved by photopumping. A low effective threshold, on the order of 350 microW, and a spontaneous emission factor, over 0.13, could be deduced from experiments.

  9. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectra and structure of liquid water from classical and quantum simulations with the MB-pol potential energy function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep K; Moberg, Daniel R; Straight, Shelby C; Paesani, Francesco

    2017-12-28

    The structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is investigated through the modeling of infrared and Raman spectra along with structural order parameters calculated from classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations with the MB-pol many-body potential energy function. The magnitude of nuclear quantum effects is also monitored by comparing the vibrational spectra obtained from classical and centroid molecular dynamics, both in intensities and peak positions. The observed changes in spectral activities are shown to reflect changes in the underlying structure of the hydrogen-bond network and are found to be particularly sensitive to many-body effects in the representation of the electrostatic interactions. Overall, good agreement is found with the experimental spectra, which provides further evidence for the accuracy of MB-pol in predicting the properties of water.

  10. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectra and structure of liquid water from classical and quantum simulations with the MB-pol potential energy function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep K.; Moberg, Daniel R.; Straight, Shelby C.; Paesani, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    The structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is investigated through the modeling of infrared and Raman spectra along with structural order parameters calculated from classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations with the MB-pol many-body potential energy function. The magnitude of nuclear quantum effects is also monitored by comparing the vibrational spectra obtained from classical and centroid molecular dynamics, both in intensities and peak positions. The observed changes in spectral activities are shown to reflect changes in the underlying structure of the hydrogen-bond network and are found to be particularly sensitive to many-body effects in the representation of the electrostatic interactions. Overall, good agreement is found with the experimental spectra, which provides further evidence for the accuracy of MB-pol in predicting the properties of water.

  11. Polarization sensitive lateral photoconductivity in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well based structures on low-temperature grown GaAs(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ashish; Ghosh, Sandip; Arora, B. M.; Malzer, Stefan; Döhler, Gottfried

    2010-08-01

    Polarization-resolved lateral-photoconductivity measurements are reported on device structures made of GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum wells sandwiched between low-temperature grown GaAs(001) layers. The mesa device structures have long length (3 mm∥y) and narrow width (10 and 20 μm∥x) in the (001) plane. For light incident along [001], the ground state light-hole exciton transition is much stronger for light polarization E ∥x, compared to E ∥y. The heavy-hole exciton transition shows a weaker polarization anisotropy of opposite sign, being stronger for E ∥y. Through calculations based on the Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian, the observed in-plane optical polarization anisotropy is shown to arise from valence band mixing induced by anisotropic strain in the plane of quantum wells.

  12. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-05-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed.

  13. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed. PMID:28480900

  14. Scan Quantum Mechanics: Quantum Inertia Stops Superposition

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    A novel interpretation of the quantum mechanical superposition is put forward. Quantum systems scan all possible available states and switch randomly and very rapidly among them. The longer they remain in a given state, the larger the probability of the system to be found in that state during a measurement. A crucial property that we postulate is quantum inertia, that increases whenever a constituent is added, or the system is perturbed with all kinds of interactions. Once the quantum inertia $I_q$ reaches a critical value $I_{cr}$ for an observable, the switching among the different eigenvalues of that observable stops and the corresponding superposition comes to an end. Consequently, increasing the mass, temperature, gravitational force, etc. of a quantum system increases its quantum inertia until the superposition of states disappears for all the observables and the system transmutes into a classical one. The process could be reversible decreasing the size, temperature, gravitational force, etc. leading to...

  15. Temperature dependence of the optical energy gap in CdS sub x Se sub 1 sub - sub x quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Kunets, V P; Kunets, V P; Lisitsa, M P; Malysh, N I

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the optical energy gap E sub g (T) in CdS sub x Se sub 1 sub - sub x quantum dots synthesized in a borosilicate glass matrix has been investigated in the range of 4.2-500 K. A dependence similar to that for bulk crystals is observed for dots with r-bar > a sub B (r-bar being an average radius of the dot and a sub B the Bohr exciton radius in the bulk), which is described by Varshni formula within the whole temperature range. Deviations from the Varshni dependence in the range 4.2-100 K and smaller band-gap temperature coefficient are observed for dots with r-bar < a sub B. These results are explained in terms of the decrease of the macroscopic electron-phonon interaction potential and the modification of the vibration spectrum peculiar to the dot volume shrinkage

  16. Origin of the low critical observing temperature of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in V-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Claassen, M.; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moritz, B.; Jia, T.; Zhang, C.; Rebec, S.; Lee, J. J.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D.-H.; Moore, R. G.; Moodera, J. S.; Devereaux, T. P.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental realization of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in magnetically-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3 films stands out as a landmark of modern condensed matter physics. However, ultra-low temperatures down to few tens of mK are needed to reach the quantization of Hall resistance, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the ferromagnetic phase transition temperature of the films. Here, we systematically study the band structure of V-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3 thin films by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and show unambiguously that the bulk valence band (BVB) maximum lies higher in energy than the surface state Dirac point. Our results demonstrate clear evidence that localization of BVB carriers plays an active role and can account for the temperature discrepancy.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of spin-polarized 3He gas in the temperature range 1 mK-4 K from the quantum second virial coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maaitah, A. F.; Sandouqa, A. S.; Joudeh, B. R.; Ghassib, H. B.

    2017-11-01

    The quantum second virial coefficient Bq of 3He↑ gas is determined in the temperature range 0.001-4 K from the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula. The corresponding phase shifts are calculated from the Lippmann-Schwinger equation using a highly-accurate matrix-inversion technique. A positive Bq corresponds to an overall repulsive interaction; whereas a negative Bq represents an overall attractive interaction. It is found that in the low-energy limit, Bq tends to increase with increasing spin polarization. The compressibility Z is evaluated as another measure of nonideality of the system. Z becomes most significant at low temperatures and increases with polarization. From the pressure-temperature (P-T) behavior of 3He↑ at low T, it is deduced that P decreases with increasing T below 8 mK.

  18. All-fiber reflecting temperature probe based on the simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with aqueous quantum dot solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Yin, Xiaojin; Wang, Wenyuan; Hong, Xueming; Du, Yu; Geng, Youfu; Li, Xuejin

    2016-02-10

    An all-fiber reflecting fluorescent temperature probe is proposed based on the simplified hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (SHC-PCF) filled with an aqueous CdSe/ZnS quantum dot solution. SHC-PCF is an excellent PCF used to fill liquid materials, which has low loss transmission bands in the visible wavelength range and enlarged core sizes. Both end faces of the SHC-PCF were spliced with multimode fiber after filling in order to generate a more stable and robust waveguide structure. The obtained temperature sensitivity dependence of the emission wavelength and the self-referenced intensity are 126.23 pm/°C and -0.007/°C in the temperature range of -10°C-120°C, respectively.

  19. Temperature dependence and quantum efficiency of ultrabroad NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+ centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guojun; Peng, Mingying; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2012-04-01

    Ultrabroad near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence from Ni2+-centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics was studied by temperature-dependent static and dynamic photoluminescence spectroscopy in the regime of 10 to 300 K. Photoluminescence covers the spectral range of about 1100 nm to >1600 nm with a typical bandwidth (FWHM) greater than 300 nm. For UV-LED excitation at 352 nm, an internal quantum efficiency of 65% is obtained. The excited state lifetime τ at room temperature is 39 μs. The stimulated emission cross section σ(em) is 8.5×10(-20) cm2, resulting in a practical figure of merit, σ(em) * τ, of 3.3×10(-24) cm2 s at room temperature. These properties suggest suitability as a broadband gain medium for tunable lasers and optical amplifiers.

  20. Tallinna Merepäevade turismikonverents käsitles mere ja linna kohtumispaiga arenguid ja arendamist / Ain Hinsberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hinsberg, Ain

    2013-01-01

    Tallinna Sadama, linnavalitsuse, Viking Line ja EHTE poolt 12. juulil Admiraliteedi basseiniääres Merepäevade paviljonis korraldatud konverentsist "Mere ja linna kohtumispaik kui linnaruum ja sihtkoht", kus esinesid Allan Kiil, Tiit Kask, Duncan Frazer Inglismaalt, Satu Lehtonen Soomest, Anu Hallik-Jürgenstein, Peeter Pere, Heikki Mäki, Evelyn Sepp ja Ahto Ader

  1. Formulation of a Cooperative-Confinement-Escape problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and formulate the Cooperative-Confinement-Escape (CCE) problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region, in which the defenders are moving on the circle with attempt to prevent possible escape of a single evader who is initially located inside the circle. The main contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we first provide an effective formulation of the CCE problem, which is an emphasis of this paper, with design of two nonlinear control strategies for the cooperative defenders and the adversarial evader, respectively. Particularly, we consider to include a proper interaction between each pair of the nearest-neighbor defenders, and an adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism in the strategies of the defenders to increase the chance of successful confinement. (2) For the first attempt on analyzing the CCE dynamics which is unavoidably strongly nonlinear, we analyze the minimum energy of the evader for possible escape. (3) For understanding of the behaviors of the system under different parameters, (i) we illustrate the effectiveness of the confinement strategy using the adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism, and (ii) the physical roles of the system parameters with respect to the system dynamics, some of which may be unexpected or not straightforward. A separate paper will be presented for systematic analysis of the agents' behaviors with respect to the large intervals of the parameter settings.

  2. Lübecki filmipäevad 1999 ja Thomas Manni ekraniseering 1923 / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    1999-01-01

    4.-7. novembrini Lübeckis toimunud Põhjamaade filmipäevade 41. Nordische Filmtage huvitavamatest filmidest, nagu Thomas Manni "Buddenbrookide" ekraniseering 1923. aastast (režissöör Gerhard Lamprecht) ja Rasmus Gerlachi dokumentaal "Operaator Kaufman" Dziga Vertovist ja tema kahest, samuti kino alal tegutsenud vennast

  3. Sulfated Carbon Quantum Dots as Efficient Visible-Light Switchable Acid Catalysts for Room-Temperature Ring-Opening Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Sun, Chenghua; Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2015-07-13

    Acid catalytic processes play a classic and important role in modern organic synthesis. How well the acid can be controlled often plays the key role in the controllable synthesis of the products with high conversion yield and selectivity. The preparation of a novel, photo-switchable solid-acid catalyst based on carbon quantum dots is described. The carbon quantum dots are decorated with small amounts of hydrogensulfate groups and thus exhibit a photogenerated acidity that produces a highly efficient acid catalysis of the ring opening of epoxides with methanol and other primary alcohols. This reversible, light-switchable acidity is shown to be due to photoexcitation and charge separation in the carbon quantum dots, which create an electron withdrawing effect from the acidic groups. The catalyst is easily separated by filtration, and we demonstrate multiple cycles of its recovery and reuse. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Temperature dependent investigation of carrier transport, injection, and densities in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers for VCSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Kolb, Johanna S.; Römer, Friedhard; Weichmann, Ulrich; Moench, Holger; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The electro-optical efficiency of semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) strongly depends on the efficient carrier injection into the quantum wells (QWs) in the laser active region. However, carrier injection degrades with increasing temperature which limits the VCSEL performance particularly in high power applications where self heating imposes high temperatures in operation. By simulation we investigate the transport of charge carriers in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers with special attention to the temperature dependence of carrier injection into the QWs. Experimental reference data was extracted from oxide-confined, top-emitting VCSELs. The transport simulations follow a drift-diffusion-model complemented by a customized, energy-resolved, semi-classical carrier capture theory. QW gain was calculated in the screened Hartree-Fock approximation with band structures from 8x8 k.p-theory. Using the gain data and by setting losses and the optical confinement factor according to experimental reference results, the appropriate threshold condition and threshold carrier densities in the QWs for a VCSEL are established in simulation for all transport considerations. With the combination of gain and transport model, we can explain experimental reference data for the injection efficiency and threshold current density. Our simulations show that the decreasing injection efficiency with temperature is not solely due to increased thermionic escape of carriers from the QWs. Carrier injection is also hampered by state filling in the QWs initiated from higher threshold carrier densities with temperature. Consequently, VCSEL properties not directly related to the active layer design like optical out-coupling or internal losses link the temperature dependent carrier injection to VCSEL mirror design.

  5. Comment on: “Zero-temperature conductance of parallel T-shape double quantum dots” [Physica E 39 (2007) 214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, P. S.

    2008-06-01

    In a recent paper [Physica E 39 (2007) 214, arXiv:0708.1842v1] Crisan, Grosu, and Tifrea revisited the problem of the conductance through a double-quantum-dot molecule connected to electrodes in a T-shape configuration. The authors obtained an expression for the conductance that disagrees with previous results in the literature. We point out an error in their derivation of the conductance formula and show that it gives unphysical results even for non-interacting quantum dots.

  6. Temperature dependence of excitonic emission in [(CH3)2NH2]3[BiI6] organic-inorganic natural self assembled bimodal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Haitham; Samet, Amira; Mlayah, Adnen; Boughzala, Habib; Abid, Younes

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the optical properties of organic - inorganic natural self assembled bimodal quantum dots (dimetylammonium) hexa-iodobismuthate [(CH3)2NH2]3[BiI6]. The crystal structure consists of isolated BiI6 octahedra, as inorganic ions, surrounded by dimethylamine cations. At room temperature, we investigate the optical properties by: UV/Vis absorption, ellipsometry, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence. A broad Gaussian-shape luminescence band with a large stokes shift is observed in the red spectral range at 2.15 eV, due to radiative recombination of confined excitons in BiI quantum dots, suggesting that excitons are self trapped. The temperature-dependence of the PL emission is investigated. The observed S-shaped emission behavior is explained by thermal escape occurring at lower temperatures for high-energy dots and carriers being recaptured by dots emitting on the low-energy side of the distribution. A rate equation model, showing agreement with the experimental results, is used to investigate the thermal redistribution of the charge carriers. Exciton binding energies of 149.125 and 295.086 meV were determined from the modified Arrhenius analysis.

  7. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct band electroluminescence (EL from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs on a Ge virtual substrate (VS at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L and injection current density (J with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH valance band at higher temperatures.

  8. Advantages of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with two-step grown low temperature GaN cap layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yadan; Lu, Taiping; Zhou, Xiaorun; Zhao, Guangzhou; Dong, Hailiang; Jia, Zhigang; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2017-11-01

    Two-step grown low temperature GaN cap layers (LT-cap) are employed to improve the optical and structural properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The first LT-cap layer is grown in nitrogen atmosphere, while a small hydrogen flow is added to the carrier gas during the growth of the second LT-cap layer. High-resolution X-ray diffraction results indicate that the two-step growth method can improve the interface quality of MQWs. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) tests show about two-fold enhancement in integrated PL intensity, only 25 meV blue-shift in peak energy and almost unchanged line width. On the basis of temperature-dependent PL characteristics analysis, it is concluded that the first and the second LT-cap layer play a different role during the growth of MQWs. The first LT-cap layer acts as a protective layer, which protects quantum well from serious indium loss and interface roughening resulting from the hydrogen over-etching. The hydrogen gas employed in the second LT-cap layer is in favor of reducing defect density and indium segregation. Consequently, interface/surface and optical properties are improved by adopting the two-step growth method.

  9. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  10. Gigabit free-space multi-level signal transmission with a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Xiaodan; Ozolins, Oskars; Schatz, Richard; Storck, Joakim; Udalcovs, Aleksejs; Navarro, Jaime Rodrigo; Kakkar, Aditya; Maisons, Gregory; Carras, Mathieu; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Gigabit free-space transmissions are experimentally demon-strated with a quantum cascaded laser (QCL) emitting at mid-wavelength infrared of 4.65 mu m, and a commercial infrared photovoltaic detector. The QCL operating at room temperature is directly modulated using on - off keying and, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, four-and eight-level pulse amplitude modulations (PAM-4, PAM-8). By applying pre- and post-digital equalizations, we achieve up to 3 Gbit/s line data rate in a...

  11. Characterisation of temperature dependent parameters of multi-quantum well (MQW) Ti/Au/n-AlGaAs/n-GaAs/n-AlGaAs Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali, Walid; Sengouga, Nouredine; Oussalah, Slimane; Mari, Riaz H.; Jameel, Dler; Al Saqri, Noor Alhuda; Aziz, Mohsin; Taylor, David; Henini, Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Forward and reverse current-voltage (Isbnd V) of Ti/Au/n-Al0.33Ga0.67As/n-GaAs/n-Al0.33Ga0.67As multi-quantum well (MQW) Schottky diodes were measured over a range of temperatures from 20 to 400 K by a step of 20 K. The Schottky diodes parameters were then extracted from these characteristics. The Cheung method is used for this purpose, assuming a thermionic conduction mechanism. The extracted ideality factor decrease with increasing temperatures. But their values at low temperatures were found to be unrealistic. In order to explain this uncertainty, three assumptions were explored. Firstly an assumed inhomogeneous barrier height gave better parameters especially the Richardson constant but the ideality factor is still unrealistic at low temperatures. Secondly, by using numerical simulation, it was demonstrated that defects including interface states are not responsible for the apparent unrealistic Schottky diode parameters. The third assumption is the tunnelling mechanism through the barrier in the low temperature range. At these lower temperatures, the tunnelling mechanism was more suitable to explain the extracted parameters values.

  12. The effect of junction temperature on the optoelectrical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jen-Cheng; Fang, Chia-Hui [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ya-Fen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan Dist., New Taipei City 243, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Jen; Kuo, Da-Chuan [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Fan, Ping-Lin [Department of Digital Technology Design and Graduate School of Toy and Game Design, National Taipei University of Education, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Joe-Air [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nee, Tzer-En, E-mail: neete@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    Thermal effects on the optoelectrical characteristics of green InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been investigated in detail for a broad temperature range, from 30 Degree-Sign C to 100 Degree-Sign C. The current-dependent electroluminescence (EL) spectra, current-voltage (I-V) curves and luminescence intensity-current (L-I) characteristics of green InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs have been measured to characterize the thermal-related effects on the optoelectrical properties of the InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs. The experimental results show that both the forward voltages decreased with a slope of -3.7 mV/K and the emission peak wavelength increased with a slope of +0.02 nm/K with increasing temperature, indicating a change in the contact resistance between the metal and GaN layers and the existence of a band gap shrinkage effect. The junction temperature estimated from the forward voltage and the emission peak shift varied from 25.6 to 14.5 Degree-Sign C and from 22.4 to 35.6 Degree-Sign C, respectively. At the same time, the carrier temperature decreased from 371.2 to 348.1 Degree-Sign C as estimated from the slope of high-energy side of the emission spectra. With increasing injection current, there was found to be a strong current-dependent blueshift of -0.15 nm/mA in the emission peak wavelength of the EL spectra. This could be attributed to not only the stronger band-filling effect but also the enhanced quantum confinement effect that resulted from the piezoelectric polarization and spontaneous polarization in InGaN/GaN heterostructures. We also demonstrate a helpful and easy way to measure and calculate the junction temperature of InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the effect of junction temperature on the optoelectrical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Not only the band-filling effect but also the quantum confinement effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piezoelectric polarization and the spontaneous

  13. Quantum heat engine with continuum working medium

    OpenAIRE

    Li, S.; Wang, H.; Sun, Y. D.; Yi, X. X.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new quantum heat engine, in which the working medium is a quantum system with a discrete level and a continuum. Net work done by this engine is calculated and discussed. The results show that this quantum heat engine behaves like the two-level quantum heat engine in both the high-temperature and the low-temperature limits, but it operates differently in temperatures between them. The efficiency of this quantum heat engine is also presented and discussed.

  14. Variation of the external quantum efficiency with temperature and current density in red, blue, and deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The temperature-dependent external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) were investigated for a 620 nm AlGaInP red light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a 450 nm GaInN blue LED, and a 285 nm AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) LED. We observed distinct differences in the variation of the EQE with temperature and current density for the three types of LEDs. Whereas the EQE of the AlGaInP red LED increases as temperature decreases below room temperature, the EQEs of GaInN blue and AlGaN DUV LEDs decrease for the same change in temperature in a low-current density regime. The free carrier concentration, as determined from the dopant ionization energy, shows a strong material-system-specific dependence, leading to different degrees of asymmetry in carrier concentration for the three types of LEDs. We attribute the EQE variation of the red, blue, and DUV LEDs to the different degrees of asymmetry in carrier concentration, which can be exacerbated at cryogenic temperatures. As for the EQE variation with temperature in a high-current density regime, the efficiency droop for the AlGaInP red and GaInN blue LEDs becomes more apparent as temperature decreases, due to the deterioration of the asymmetry in carrier concentration. However, the EQE of the AlGaN DUV LED initially decreases, then reaches an EQE minimum point, and then increases again due to the field-ionization of acceptors by the Poole-Frenkel effect. The results elucidate that carrier transport phenomena allow for the understanding of the droop phenomenon across different material systems, temperatures, and current densities.

  15. Variation of the external quantum efficiency with temperature and current density in red, blue, and deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Kim, Jong Kyu, E-mail: kimjk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehee, E-mail: jcho@chonbuk.ac.kr [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Semiconductor Physics Research Center, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 54896 (Korea, Republic of); Schubert, E. Fred [Department for Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo [LED Business, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-920 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-14

    The temperature-dependent external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) were investigated for a 620 nm AlGaInP red light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a 450 nm GaInN blue LED, and a 285 nm AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) LED. We observed distinct differences in the variation of the EQE with temperature and current density for the three types of LEDs. Whereas the EQE of the AlGaInP red LED increases as temperature decreases below room temperature, the EQEs of GaInN blue and AlGaN DUV LEDs decrease for the same change in temperature in a low-current density regime. The free carrier concentration, as determined from the dopant ionization energy, shows a strong material-system-specific dependence, leading to different degrees of asymmetry in carrier concentration for the three types of LEDs. We attribute the EQE variation of the red, blue, and DUV LEDs to the different degrees of asymmetry in carrier concentration, which can be exacerbated at cryogenic temperatures. As for the EQE variation with temperature in a high-current density regime, the efficiency droop for the AlGaInP red and GaInN blue LEDs becomes more apparent as temperature decreases, due to the deterioration of the asymmetry in carrier concentration. However, the EQE of the AlGaN DUV LED initially decreases, then reaches an EQE minimum point, and then increases again due to the field-ionization of acceptors by the Poole-Frenkel effect. The results elucidate that carrier transport phenomena allow for the understanding of the droop phenomenon across different material systems, temperatures, and current densities.

  16. Quantum Erasure: Quantum Interference Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Walborn, Stephen P.; Cunha, Marcelo O. Terra; Pádua, Sebastião; Monken, Carlos H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in quantum optics have shed light on the foundations of quantum physics. Quantum erasers - modified quantum interference experiments - show that quantum entanglement is responsible for the complementarity principle.

  17. Understanding quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) offer wonderful examples of the radical macroscopic effects inherent in quantum physics: phase changes between different forms of matter driven by quantum rather than thermal fluctuations, typically at very low temperatures. QPTs provide new insight into outstanding problems such as high-temperature superconductivity and display fundamental aspects of quantum theory, such as strong correlations and entanglement. Over the last two decades, our understanding of QPTs has increased tremendously due to a plethora of experimental examples, powerful new numerical meth

  18. Influence of single dye molecules on temperature and time dependent optical properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: Ensemble and single nanoassembly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkevich, Eduard I.; Stupak, Alexander P.; Kowerko, Danny; Borczyskowski, Christian von

    2012-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy on ensembles and single CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) demonstrates a competition of trap and near band edge photoluminescence (PL). This competition can be markedly influenced by a few surface attached pyridyl functionalized dye molecules (porphyrins or perylene diimides) forming nanoassemblies with well defined geometries. Temperature variation and related changes in absorption and emission reveal sharp changes of the ligand shell structure in a narrow temperature range for organic (TOPO and amine) surfactants (phase transition). The effects on QD PL at this transition become considerably pronounced upon attachment of only a few dye molecules to QD surface. Moreover, under ambient conditions amine capped QDs are photodegraded in the course of time. This process is enhanced by attached dye molecules both on the ensemble and single particle/dye level. This investigation elaborates the importance of (switchable) surface states for the characterization of the PL of QDs.

  19. High-temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device with deep-submicron YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 weak links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaine, S.E.; Mankiewich, P.M.; Skocpol, W.J. (Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (USA)); Westerwick, E. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey (USA))

    1991-11-11

    We have fabricated a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) thin-film dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with lithographically defined deep-submicron weak links. At 77 K the voltage response to dc flux is sinusoidal and nonhysteretic, with maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 {mu}V. The maximum response is 8 {mu}V at 70 K, where 2{ital LI}{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0}{approx}1. At lower temperatures, the maximum response oscillates in the range 4--6 {mu}V. Random telegraph noise was observed near 30--40 K. Well-behaved Shapiro steps were observable at all measured temperatures below {ital T}{sub {ital c}}.

  20. Enhanced room-temperature 3.5 µm photoluminescence in stress-balanced metamorphic In(Sb,As)/In(Ga,Al)As/GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Mikhail Yu.; Solov’ev, Victor A.; Komkov, Oleg S.; Firsov, Dmitriy D.; Meltser, Boris Ya.; Yagovkina, Maria A.; Baidakova, Marina V.; Kop’ev, Petr S.; Ivanov, Sergey V.

    2017-12-01

    In this Letter, we report on the design optimization of metamorphic InSb/InAs/In(Ga,Al)As/GaAs heterostructures with type-II-in-type-I quantum well (QW) active regions, aimed at the enhancement of their room-temperature photoluminescence (PL). The strong influence of the design of the convex-graded metamorphic buffer layer (MBL) and the value of the MBL inverse step in the range from 2 to 14 mol % In on stresses in such heterostructures, as well as their PL intensity, are discussed. The optimized metamorphic In(Sb,As)/In0.63Ga0.37As/In0.75Al0.25As/MBL/GaAs structure with the inverse step of 10 mol % demonstrates 3.2–3.5 µm mid-IR PL intensity quenching from liquid-nitrogen to room temperature by a factor of 12.

  1. Second and third harmonic generations of a quantum ring with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ali; Azargoshasb, Tahereh; Niknam, Elahe

    2017-10-01

    In current article, the Zeeman effect is considered in the presence of simultaneous Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) and under such circumstances the second and third harmonic generations (SHG and THG) of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated at finite temperature. The effective Hamiltonian is derived in cylindrical coordinate while the angular part is eliminated because of axial symmetry and the energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of two lowest levels are obtained numerically. Eventually, the optical properties of such system are studied hiring compact density matrix approach. The results show that, an increase in the magnetic field, leads to blue shift in resonant peaks of both SHG and THG. Furthermore, by reducing the temperature, all the resonant peaks of both SHG and THG experience a red shift. Finally, the effect of the structure dimension is studied and results illustrate that variation of size leads to both red and blue shifts in resonant peaks.

  2. [The current situation of aggravated intoxication with "kiken" drugs (law-evading drugs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Akiko; Kashiura, Masahiro; Mikami, Manabu; Hamabe, Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    The intoxication caused by "kiken" drugs (law-evading drugs), such as synthetic cannabinoids, cathinones, and methoxetamine, has recently increased in Japan. We retrospectively examined the characteristics of patients poisoned with the "kiken" drugs. We included patients who presented at the emergency department at the Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital from January 2011 to December 2014. Eighteen patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2013 were included in the early period group and 10 patients admitted between January and December 2014 were categorized into the late period group. The number of the patients transported to our emergency department between 2011 and 2014 increased annually. Patients were mainly admitted between May and October 2014; no patients were admitted after November 2014. The patients' age, history of previous mental disease, habitual use, Triage DOA results, serum creatinine values on admission, and respiratory management differed significantly between the groups. However, the median serum creatinine values of both groups on admission were within the normal level. Patients poisoned with the "kiken" drugs showed more severe symptoms, higher rate of habitual use, and higher average age. The annual increase in the number of the patients observed thus far is expected to decrease in the future. Maintenance of the law and expansion of medical institutions that treat patients addicted to the "kiken" drugs are warranted.

  3. Henipaviruses Employ a Multifaceted Approach to Evade the Antiviral Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah virus, which constitute the genus Henipavirus, are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that have been associated with sporadic outbreaks of severe disease and mortality in humans since their emergence in the late 1990s. Similar to other paramyxoviruses, their ability to evade the host interferon (IFN response is conferred by the P gene. The henipavirus P gene encodes four proteins; the P, V, W and C proteins, which have all been described to inhibit the antiviral response. Further studies have revealed that these proteins have overlapping but unique properties which enable the virus to block multiple signaling pathways in the IFN response. The best characterized of these is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway which is targeted by the P, V and W proteins via an interaction with the transcription factor STAT1. In addition the V and W proteins can both limit virus-induced induction of IFN but they appear to do this via distinct mechanisms that rely on unique sequences in their C-terminal domains. The ability to generate recombinant Nipah viruses now gives us the opportunity to determine the precise role for each of these proteins and address their contribution to pathogenicity. Additionally, the question of whether these multiple anti-IFN strategies are all active in the different mammalian hosts for henipaviruses, particularly the fruit bat reservoir, warrants further exploration.

  4. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagiri, Nalinikanth; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such “stealth” CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid-based nanotheranostic agents for multiplex, multimodal molecular imaging and therapy, as well as in other applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:24872705

  5. Close, but no cigar: certain cigars are pseudo-cigarettes designed to evade regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnevo, Cristine D; Hrywna, Mary; Giovenco, Daniel P; Miller Lo, Erin J; O'Connor, Richard J

    2017-05-01

    An abundance of evidence suggests that the tobacco industry's response to increased regulation imposed on cigarettes has been the development of little cigars and filtered cigars which are tobacco products that are merely cigarettes in disguise. Emphasising these products' physical attributes, the tobacco industry has offered cigar products to its consumers as pseudo-cigarettes. For decades, tobacco manufacturers' response to increased cigarette regulation and taxation has been to exploit policy loopholes by offering these little cigars and filtered cigars pseudo-cigarettes that are exempted from this regulatory oversight. As a result, in spite of increased regulations and taxes on cigarettes, smokers can purchase cigars that are almost physically indistinguishable from their cigarettes at a lower cost. This commentary describes the recent evolution of the cigar market in response to federal regulation, and highlights historical cigar industry attempts to evade taxation, capitalise on product features that are off-limits to cigarettes, and capture the shrinking market of cigarette smokers. We present the case that little cigars and filtered cigars, differing very little physically from cigarettes, are products deserving the same regulatory scrutiny. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Evading plant immunity: feedback control of the T3SS in Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark; Buck, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Microbes are responsible for over 10% of the global yield losses in staple crops such as wheat, rice, and maize. Understanding the decision-making strategies that enable bacterial plant pathogens to evade the host immune system and cause disease is essential for managing their ever growing threat to food security. Many utilise the needle-like type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress plant immunity, by injecting effector proteins that inhibit eukaryotic signalling pathways into the host cell cytoplasm. Plants can in turn evolve resistance to specific pathogens via recognition and blocking of the T3SS effectors, so leading to an ongoing co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between pathogen and host pairs. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL co-ordinates the expression of the T3SS regulon in the leaf-dwelling Pseudomonas syringae and similar pathogens. Recently, we showed that association of HrpL with a target promoter directly adjacent to the hrpL gene imposes negative autogenous control on its own expression level due to overlapping regulatory elements. Our results suggest that by down-regulating T3SS function, this fine-tuning mechanism enables P. syringae to minimise effector-mediated elicitation of plant immunity. PMID:28435841

  7. Temperature-dependent quantum efficiency degradation of K-Cs-Sb bialkali antimonide photocathodes grown by a triple-element codeposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zihao; Karkare, Siddharth; Feng, Jun; Filippetto, Daniele; Johnson, Matthew; Virostek, Steve; Sannibale, Fernando; Nasiatka, James; Gaowei, Mengjia; Sinsheimer, John; Muller, Erik; Smedley, John; Padmore, Howard

    2017-11-01

    K-Cs-Sb bialkali antimonide photocathodes grown by a triple-element codeposition method have been found to have excellent quantum efficiency (QE) and outstanding near-atomic surface smoothness and have been employed in the VHF gun in the Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX), however, their robustness in terms of their lifetime at elevated photocathode temperature has not yet been investigated. In this paper, the relationship between the lifetime of the K-Cs-Sb photocathode and the photocathode temperature has been investigated. The origin of the significant QE degradation at photocathode temperatures over 70 °C has been identified as the loss of cesium atoms from the K-Cs-Sb photocathode, based on the in situ x-ray analysis on the photocathode film during the decay process. The findings from this work will not only further the understanding of the behavior of K-Cs-Sb photocathodes at elevated temperature and help develop more temperature-robust cathodes, but also will become an important guide to the design and operation of the future high-field rf guns employing the use of such photocathodes.

  8. Origin of temperature-induced luminescence peak shifts from semipolar (11 2 ¯2 ) InxGa1 -xN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Takuya; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2017-09-01

    Observed temperature-induced peak shifts in photoluminescence (PL) originating from InxGa1 -xN single quantum wells grown on semipolar (11 2 ¯2 ) GaN bulk substrates are discussed in terms of a numerical exciton hopping model based on the Monte Carlo method. The experimentally observed PL peak shifts cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation models developed for the polar (0001) plane, where the recombination lifetime is assumed to be temperature independent, and blue-shifts in PL signal are found to be induced by exciton thermal repopulation. Therefore, we incorporate temperature-dependent radiative and nonradiative recombination processes into the model, in which temperature-induced reductions in recombination lifetimes effectively limit the exciton motion. This model is found to be a much better fit for the data, indicating that, in addition to the thermal repopulation process, the reduction of lifetime with increasing temperature can also contribute to the PL blue-shift because shortened lifetimes suppress the exciton motion and therefore produce smaller Stokes shifts. We propose that the dominant factor responsible for the PL blue-shifts depends on the degree of potential fluctuation.

  9. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as {open_quotes}key{close_quotes} material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible. We have also constructed a quantum key distribution system for free-space, line-of-sight transmission using single-photon polarization states, which is currently undergoing laboratory testing. 7 figs.

  10. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S.; Das, Nirmalya S.; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for

  11. Emakeelepäevad Riias jätkuvad / Tõnu Karma ; fotod: M. Kulli ja Tõnu Karma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karma, Tõnu

    2003-01-01

    12. märtsil 1989. aastal emakeelepäeva tähistamisest Riias, korraldajaks Läti Eesti Selts, ja sama aasta juunis rahvaluulepäevade pidamist, millega tähistati Jakob Hurda 150. sünniaastapäeva, Kristjan Jaak Petersoni 200. sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest ja mälestuskivi püstitamisest Jakobi kalmistule

  12. Dengue Virus Evades AAV-Mediated Neutralizing Antibody Prophylaxis in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael J; Bailey, Varian K; Gutman, Martin J; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Silveira, Cassia G T; Maxwell, Helen S; Domingues, Aline; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Su, Qin; Newman, Ruchi M; Pack, Melissa; Martins, Mauricio A; Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Rakasz, Eva G; Allen, Todd M; Whitehead, Stephen S; Burton, Dennis R; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Kallas, Esper G; Watkins, David I

    2017-10-04

    Development of vaccines against mosquito-borne Flaviviruses is complicated by the occurrence of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), which can increase disease severity. Long-term delivery of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) has the potential to effectively block infection and represents an alternative to vaccination. The risk of ADE may be avoided by using prophylactic nAbs harboring amino acid mutations L234A and L235A (LALA) in the immunoglobulin G (IgG) constant region. Here, we used recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) to deliver the anti-dengue virus 3 (DENV3) nAb P3D05. While the administration of rAAV-P3D05-rhesus immunoglobulin G1 (rhIgG1)-LALA to rhesus macaques engendered DENV3-neutralizing activity in serum, it did not prevent infection. The emergence of viremia following DENV3 challenge was delayed by 3-6 days in the rAAV-treated group, and replicating virus contained the envelope mutation K64R. This neutralization-resistant variant was also confirmed by virus outgrowth experiments in vitro. By delivering P3D05 with unmutated Fc sequences, we further demonstrated that DENV3 also evaded wild-type nAb prophylaxis, and serum viral loads appeared to be higher in the presence of low levels of unmutated P3D05-rhIgG1. Our study shows that a vectored approach for long-term delivery of nAbs with the LALA mutations is promising, but prophylaxis using a single nAb is likely insufficient at preventing DENV infection and replication. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchita Selot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAVrh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold, migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27–64 fold in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  14. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selot, Ruchita; Arumugam, Sathyathithan; Mary, Bertin; Cheemadan, Sabna; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2017-01-01

    Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAV)rh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold), migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors) in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27-64 fold) in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  15. Note: Ultra-high frequency ultra-low dc power consumption HEMT amplifier for quantum measurements in millikelvin temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, A M; Shnyrkov, V I; Shulga, V M

    2011-01-01

    We have presented theory and experimentally demonstrated an efficient method for drastically reducing the power consumption of the rf/microwave amplifiers based on HEMT in unsaturated dc regime. Conceptual one-stage 10 dB-gain amplifier showed submicrowatt level of the power consumption (0.95 μW at frequency of 0.5 GHz) when cooled down to 300 mK. Proposed technique has a great potential to design the readout amplifiers for ultra-deep-cooled cryoelectronic quantum devices.

  16. Establishment of equilibrium of electrostatic potential by photo-irradiation in a GaAs quantum well at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Masumi; Nomura, Shintaro; Delbecq, Matthieu; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Akazaki, Tatsushi, E-mail: m-yama@will.brl.ntt.co.j [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT corp. 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    We measured photoluminescence (PL) spectra from a 20-nm GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) grown on an n-type substrate by selectively exciting the GaAs at 2 K. We observed a two-stage change of PL spectra as a function of the total amount of photo-irradiation (p x t) after cooling down. This corresponds to the process of establishing the equilibrium of electrostatic potential between the sample surface and QW and between the QW and n-doped substrate.

  17. Quantum mechanics. Mechanically detecting and avoiding the quantum fluctuations of a microwave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J; Weinstein, A J; Lei, C U; Wollman, E E; Steinke, S K; Meystre, P; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2014-06-13

    Quantum fluctuations of the light field used for continuous position detection produce stochastic back-action forces and ultimately limit the sensitivity. To overcome this limit, the back-action forces can be avoided by giving up complete knowledge of the motion, and these types of measurements are called "back-action evading" or "quantum nondemolition" detection. We present continuous two-tone back-action evading measurements with a superconducting electromechanical device, realizing three long-standing goals: detection of back-action forces due to the quantum noise of a microwave field, reduction of this quantum back-action noise by 8.5 ± 0.4 decibels (dB), and measurement imprecision of a single quadrature of motion 2.4 ± 0.7 dB below the mechanical zero-point fluctuations. Measurements of this type will find utility in ultrasensitive measurements of weak forces and nonclassical states of motion. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Extracting Entanglement Geometry from Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Katharine; Garrison, James R.; Bauer, Bela

    2017-10-01

    Tensor networks impose a notion of geometry on the entanglement of a quantum system. In some cases, this geometry is found to reproduce key properties of holographic dualities, and subsequently much work has focused on using tensor networks as tractable models for holographic dualities. Conventionally, the structure of the network—and hence the geometry—is largely fixed a priori by the choice of the tensor network ansatz. Here, we evade this restriction and describe an unbiased approach that allows us to extract the appropriate geometry from a given quantum state. We develop an algorithm that iteratively finds a unitary circuit that transforms a given quantum state into an unentangled product state. We then analyze the structure of the resulting unitary circuits. In the case of noninteracting, critical systems in one dimension, we recover signatures of scale invariance in the unitary network, and we show that appropriately defined geodesic paths between physical degrees of freedom exhibit known properties of a hyperbolic geometry.

  19. Quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shu-shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization.

  20. A Strategy of Solution-Processed All-Inorganic-Heterostructure for Humidity/Temperature-Stable Perovskite Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhifeng; Li, Sen; Li, Ying; Ji, Huifang; Li, Xinjian; Wu, Di; Xu, Tingting; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Yongtao; Zhang, Yuantao; Shan, Chongxin; Du, Guotong

    2018-01-11

    Recently, an pressing requirement of solid-state lighting sources with high-performance and low-cost has motivated increasing research in metal halide perovskites. But the relatively low emission efficiency and poor operation stability of perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are still critical drawbacks. In this study, a strategy of solution-processed all-inorganic-heterostructure was proposed to overcome the emission efficiency and operation stability issues facing perovskite LEDs' challenges. Solution-processed n-ZnO nanoparticles and p-NiO are used as the carrier-injectors to fabricate all-inorganic-heterostructured CsPbBr3 quantum dot LEDs, and a high-efficiency green emission is achieved with maximum luminance of 6093.2 cd/m2, external quantum efficiency of 3.79%, and current efficiency of 7.96 cd/A. More importantly, the studied perovskite LEDs possess a good operation stability after a long test time in air ambient. Typically, the devices can endure a high humidity (75%, 12 h) and a high working temperature (393 K, three heating/cooling cycles) even without encapsulation, and the operation stability is better than any previous reports. It is anticipated that this work provide an effective strategy for the fabrication of high-performance perovskite LEDs with good stability under ambient and harsh conditions, making practical applications of such LEDs a real possibility.

  1. The inhibition effect of Azure A on mild steel in 1 M HCl. A complete study: Adsorption, temperature, duration and quantum chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezk Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r, Demet, E-mail: dozkir@nigde.edu.tr [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 51100 Nigde (Turkey); Kayak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I lmaz, Kadriye; Bayol, Emel [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 51100 Nigde (Turkey); Guerten, A. Ali [Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 80000 Osmaniye (Turkey); Kandemirli, Fatma [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azure A molecule is found to be a good inhibitor for mild steel in HCl solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM results clearly indicate that a protective film formation occurred on the mild steel surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The long term corrosion tests are cleared that the Azure A has effectively protected the mild steel in HCl solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum chemical measurements were cleared the reactive sites and charges of atoms in the molecule. - Abstract: In this study, inhibition effect of Azure A on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were evaluated by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR), and potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) methods. These studies were carried out at different concentrations, temperatures and durations. The inhibitor molecules were chemisorbed on electrode surface according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The quantum chemical calculations were employed to give further insight into the inhibition mechanism of Azure A.

  2. CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} radicals isolated in argon: high resolution ESR spectra and analysis by three-dimensional quantum rotor model. A case study of low temperature quantum effects on radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiotani, Masaru; Yamada, Tomoya; Komaguchi, Kenji [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Benetis, N.P.; Lund, A.; Soernes, A.R.

    1998-10-01

    The present study deals with high resolution isotropic ESR spectra of the CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} radicals isolated in solid argon matrix at low temperature from 4 K to 40 K. Argon gases mixed with methane (Ar/methane {approx_equal} 500 mole ratio) were condensed at the end of Suprasile ESR tube at 4.2 K. Methyl radicals were generated by X-ray irradiation at 4 K and subjected to an ESR study. The 6.0 K ESR spectrum of the CH{sub 4}/Ar system is shown in Fig. 1. For CH{sub 3} radical the {sup 1}H hyperfine (hf) quartet was observed with an equal intensity (A-lines). The E-lines were absent at 4 K, but became visible at m{sub F} = {+-}1/2 positions above 12 K increased with temperature. The CD{sub 3} gave a peculiar spectrum at 4 K with an abnormally strong central singlet superimposed on a much weaker seven line spectrum of a freely rotating CD{sub 3}. The temperature dependent spectra showed clear quantum effects due to three-dimensional spin-rotation couplings. The spectra were analyzed with the following assumptions: (a) a planar D{sub 3} geometry, (b) a free and three-dimensional quantum rotation and (c) a thermally isolated radical. Application of the Pauli principle in combination to the D{sub 3} point group resulted in interesting selections for ESR-transitions for both the CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} spectra. That is, the {sup 1}H hf quartet of CH{sub 3} radical (A-lines) was attributed to the rotational ground state, J=0, with totally symmetric A{sub 1} nuclear states. The central strong singlet of CD{sub 3} was attributed to one spin-rotation state with A{sub 2} antisymmetric nuclear states at the lowest rotational level of J=0. (author)

  3. High-temperature superconducting quantum interference device with cooled LC resonant circuit for measuring alternating magnetic fields with improved signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Longqing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Usoskin, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Certain applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require a magnetic field measurement only in a very narrow frequency range. In order to selectively improve the alternating-current (ac) magnetic field sensitivity of a high-temperature superconductor SQUID for a distinct frequency, a single-coil LC resonant circuit has been used. Within the liquid nitrogen bath, the coil surrounds the SQUID and couples to it inductively. Copper coils with different numbers of windings were used to cover the frequency range from circuit, the signal-to-noise ratio of measurements could be improved typically by one order of magnitude or more in a narrow frequency band around the resonance frequency exceeding a few kilohertz. The best attained equivalent magnetic field resolution was 2.5 fT/radicalHz at 88 kHz. The experimental findings are in good agreement with mathematical analysis of the circuit with copper coil.

  4. Ultrafast all-optical imaging technique using low-temperature grown GaAs/AlxGa1 - xAs multiple-quantum-well semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guilong; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Tao; He, Kai; Zhang, Chunmin; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shaorong; Jia, Hui; Yuan, Fenfang; Liang, Lingliang; Yan, Xin; Li, Shaohui; Wang, Chao; Yin, Fei

    2017-11-01

    We report and experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast all-optical imaging technique capable of single-shot ultrafast recording with a picosecond-scale temporal resolution and a micron-order two-dimensional spatial resolution. A GaAs/AlxGa1 - xAs multiple-quantum-well (MQW) semiconductor with a picosecond response time, grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at a low temperature (LT), is used for the first time in ultrafast imaging technology. The semiconductor transforms the signal beam information to the probe beam, the birefringent delay crystal time-serializes the input probe beam, and the beam displacer maps different polarization probe beams onto different detector locations, resulting in two frames with an approximately 9 ps temporal separation and approximately 25 lp/mm spatial resolution in the visible range.

  5. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quinone-Modified Mn-Doped ZnS Quantum Dots for Room-Temperature Phosphorescence Sensing of Human Cancer Cells That Overexpress NQO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yi-Ming; Gayam, Srivardhan Reddy; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2015-11-25

    Early detection of cancer cells in a rapid and sensitive approach is one of the great challenges in modern clinical cancer care. This study has demonstrated the first example of a rapid, selective, and sensitive phosphorescence probe based on phosphorescence energy transfer (PET) for cancer-associated human quinone oxidoreductase isozyme 1 (NQO1). An efficient room-temperature phosphorescence NQO1 probe was constructed by using Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (Mn:ZnS QDs) as donors and trimethylquinone propionic acids as acceptors. Phosphorescence quenching of Mn:ZnS QDs from the Mn:ZnS QDs to a covalently bonded quinone was achieved through PET. Phosphorescence of Mn:ZnS QDs was turned on by the rapid reduction-initiated removal of the quinone quencher by NQO1. This probe shows low cellular toxicity and can rapidly distinguish between NQO1-expressing and -nonexpressing cancer cell lines through phosphorescence imaging.

  7. Influence of single dye molecules on temperature and time dependent optical properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: Ensemble and single nanoassembly detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenkevich, Eduard I., E-mail: zenkev@tut.by [National Technical University of Belarus, Department of Information Technologies and Robotics, Nezavisimosti Ave., 65, Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Stupak, Alexander P. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Science of Belarus, Nezavisimosti Ave., 70, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Kowerko, Danny; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Institute of Physics and Center for Nanostructured Materials and Analytics (nanoMA), Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-10-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensemble and single assembly optical experiments for CdSe/ZnS QD-dye nanocomposites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature lowering or dye attachment leads to a phase transition of capping layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It changes the distribution and energy of surface traps and QD band edge emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QD photodegradation in the course of time is enlarged by attached dye molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transition has impact on QD core structure and exciton-phonon coupling. -- Abstract: Optical spectroscopy on ensembles and single CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) demonstrates a competition of trap and near band edge photoluminescence (PL). This competition can be markedly influenced by a few surface attached pyridyl functionalized dye molecules (porphyrins or perylene diimides) forming nanoassemblies with well defined geometries. Temperature variation and related changes in absorption and emission reveal sharp changes of the ligand shell structure in a narrow temperature range for organic (TOPO and amine) surfactants (phase transition). The effects on QD PL at this transition become considerably pronounced upon attachment of only a few dye molecules to QD surface. Moreover, under ambient conditions amine capped QDs are photodegraded in the course of time. This process is enhanced by attached dye molecules both on the ensemble and single particle/dye level. This investigation elaborates the importance of (switchable) surface states for the characterization of the PL of QDs.

  8. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei

    2012-05-25

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  9. A new low temperature solid modification in 1-isothiocyanato-4-(trans‑4-propylcyclohexyl)benzene (3CHBT) probed by Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, K; Singh, Ranjan K; Gupta, Satyendra Nath

    2018-02-05

    Raman spectra of 1-isothiocyanato-4-(trans 4-propylcyclohexyl)benzene (3CHBT) were studied in the region, 1450-2300cm-1 at twenty two different temperatures in the range, 83-293K in cooling and heating cycles. All bands in this region were critically evaluated in term of linewidth, peak position and relative intensity. Raman bands at ~2085cm-1 and ~2120cm-1 shows clear evidence of a solid modification through anomaly in temperature dependence peak positions and linewidths variation in the temperature range 173-203K. A detailed analysis of the variation of the linewidth and peak position of the two component bands leads to the conclusion that the molecular/dimer arrangement in crystalline packing changed between 173K and 203K. This solid modification was also analyzed at the molecular level. The ~2085cm-1 and ~2120cm-1 bands were corresponded as parallel and anti-parallel dimers of 3CHBT, which are identified as dimer I (D1) and dimer II (D2), respectively. The structures of both the dimers have been optimized by quantum chemical calculations employing density functional theoretic (DFT) methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-perturbative studies of scalar and scalar-fermion quantum field theories at zero and finite temperature using the Gaussian effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajj, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Gaussian effective potential (GEP), a non-perturbative approach to study quantum field theory, is applied to scalar and scalar-fermion models. We study the scalar {phi}{sup 6} field coupled to fermions through g{sub B}{phi}{psi}{psi} or g{sub B}{phi}{sup 2}{psi}{psi} in 2 and 3 space-time dimensions. In addition, we derive the finite temperature (T > 0) GEP from first principles and apply it to study these models at T > 0. Also the Autonomous {lambda}{phi}{sup 4}, coupled to fermions through a Yukawa term (g{sub B}{phi}{psi}{psi}), is examined in 4 dimensions at T > 0. In all these models, in order to obtain stable theories, it is found that g{sub B} must vanish as 1/log(M{sub uv}), 1/M{sub uv} or 1/M{sub uv}{sup 2} in 2, 3 or 4 dimensions respectively, M{sub uv} being an ultraviolet cutoff which is sent to infinity. The contribution of fermions to the GEP, however, is nonvanishing. It is also found that for the class of theories discussed, symmetry, if broken, is restored above a critical temperature. The coupling constant parameter space for each model is studied carefully, and regions where symmetry breaking occurs are determined both at zero and finite temperature.

  11. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  12. FREE-SPACE QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY IN DAYLIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T. [and others

    2000-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  13. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  14. Amplification and squeezing of quantum noise with a tunable Josephson metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Irwin, K. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Vale, L. R.; Lehnert, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    It has recently become possible to encode the quantum state of superconducting qubits and the position of nanomechanical oscillators into the states of microwave fields. However, to make an ideal measurement of the state of a qubit, or to detect the position of a mechanical oscillator with quantum-limited sensitivity, requires an amplifier that adds no noise. If an amplifier adds less than half a quantum of noise, it can also squeeze the quantum noise of the electromagnetic vacuum. Highly squeezed states of the vacuum can be used to generate entanglement or to realize back-action-evading measurements of position. Here we introduce a general-purpose parametric device, which operates in a frequency band between 4 and 8GHz. It adds less than half a noise quantum, it amplifies quantum noise above the added noise of commercial amplifiers and it squeezes quantum fluctuations by 10 dB.

  15. Double quantum dot memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Holloway, Gregory W.; Benjamin, Simon C.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Baugh, Jonathan; Mol, Jan A.

    2017-08-01

    Memristive systems are generalizations of memristors, which are resistors with memory. In this paper, we present a quantum description of quantum dot memristive systems. Using this model we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and practical scheme for realizing memristive systems with quantum dots. The approach harnesses a phenomenon that is commonly seen as a bane of nanoelectronics, i.e., switching of a trapped charge in the vicinity of the device. We show that quantum dot memristive systems have hysteresis current-voltage characteristics and quantum jump-induced stochastic behavior. While our experiment requires low temperatures, the same setup could, in principle, be realized with a suitable single-molecule transistor and operated at or near room temperature.

  16. Noise-modulated self-polarization effect of impurity doped quantum dots under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-10-01

    We explore the profiles of self-polarization effect (SPE) of doped GaAs QD under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries Gaussian white character and it has been administered to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of SPE have been monitored as a function of HP, temperature and noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, noise marks its prominent signature on the SPE profile. However, the extent to which noise affects the SPE profile visibly depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. As interesting observations we have found that SPE exhibits minimization at a pressure of ∼ 170 kbar in absence of noise and at ∼ 150 kbar when noise is present. Furthermore, in presence of multiplicative noise SPE exhibits a very faint decrease with increase in T up to T ∼ 420 K. However, beyond T ∼ 420 K, further increase in temperature causes abrupt fall of SPE in a highly sharp way. The findings highlight viable ways of tuning SPE of doped QD system through subtle interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  17. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  18. Timing matters: the underappreciated role of temperature ramp rate for shape control and reproducibility of quantum dot synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the coupled kinetic and thermodynamics factors governing colloidal nanocrystals nucleation and growth are critical factors in the predictable and reproducible synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. We show that the temporal temperature profile is decisive in tuning the particle shape from pseudo-spherical to monodisperse cubes. The shape of the nanocrystals was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We introduce a mechanism for the shape controlled synthesis in the context of temperature-dependent nucleation and growth and provide experimental evidence to support it. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Photonic-band-gap architectures for long-lifetime room-temperature polariton condensation in GaAs quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Vasudev, Pranai; John, Sajeev

    2017-10-01

    We describe AlGaAs photonic-crystal architectures that simultaneously realize strong exciton-photon coupling, long polariton lifetime, and room-temperature polariton Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). Strong light trapping, induced by a 3D photonic band gap (PBG), leads to peak field intensity 20 times as large as that in an AlGaAs Fabry-Pérot microcavity and exciton-photon coupling as large as 20 meV (i.e., vacuum Rabi splitting 40 meV). The strong exciton-photon coupling, small polariton effective mass, and long polariton lifetime lead to possible realizations of equilibrium room-temperature BEC. We also consider the influence of polarization degeneracy and symmetry breaking in the ground state on the BEC-onset temperature and condensate fraction. Woodpile and slanted-pore PBG structures that break X-Y symmetry facilitate larger condensate fractions at moderate temperatures. The effects of electronic and photonic disorder are marginal, thanks to the 3D photonic band gap.

  20. Luminescent Poly(vinyl alcohol)/Carbon Quantum Dots Composites with Tunable Water-Induced Shape Memory Behavior in Different pH and Temperature Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanghui; Wan, Xuejuan; Liu, Yijin; Li, Rui; Su, Yikun; Zeng, Xierong; Tang, Jiaoning

    2016-12-21

    Luminescent water-induced shape memory polymer (SMP) composites with tunable shape recovery rate are developed by blending poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and carbon quantum dots (CQDs). The oxygen and active hydrogen-rich CQDs can serve as extra physical cross-linking points in PVA via strong hydrogen bonding interaction, which largely improves the shape memory performances of PVA. At room temperature, water can successfully actuate the shape recovery of deformed PVA/CQDs composite. It is demonstrated that this water-induced shape recovery is mainly attributed to the plasticizing effect of water and its competitive hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, a quantitative bending test suggests that the shape recovery time of this water-induced SMP is tunable by altering the environmental pH value and temperature, and a relatively large shape recovery time window (from 20 to 200 s) can be achieved. In addition, the introduction of CQDs endows the PVA/CQDs SMP composites with excellent luminescent property, which makes the shape change of SMP visible under UV light. It should be noted that the mild stimulus condition and tunable shape recovery performances make the luminescent visible PVA/CQDs SMP feasible for diverse biological applications in smart medical devices, stimuli-responsive drug-release, and intelligent sensors in vivo and in vitro.

  1. Electronic structure and Landé g-factor of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit coupling: Temperature and Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Setareh, F.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    A wide variety of semiconductor nanostructures have been fabricated experimentally and both theoretical and experimental investigations of their features imply the great role they have in new generation technological devices. However, mathematical modeling provide a powerful means due to definitive goal of predicting the features and understanding of such structures behavior under different circumstances. Therefore, effective Hamiltonian for an electron in a quantum ring with axial symmetry in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) is derived. Here we report our study of the electronic structure and electron g-factor in the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings under the influence of external magnetic field at finite temperature. This investigation shows that, when Rashba and Dresselhaus couplings are simultaneously present, the degeneracy is removed and energy levels split into two branches. Furthermore, with enhancing the applied magnetic field, separation of former degenerate levels increases and also avoided crossings (anti-crossing) in the energy spectra is detected. It is also discussed how the energy levels of the system can be adjusted with variation of temperature as well as the magnetic field and geometrical sizes.

  2. Single-step, rapid low-temperature synthesis of Si quantum dots embedded in an amorphous SiC matrix in high-density reactive plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Qijin [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Xu Shuyan [Plasma Sources and Applications Centre, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk 637616 (Singapore); Ostrikov, Kostya, E-mail: Kostya.Ostrikov@csiro.au [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia) and School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    A simple, effective and innovative approach based on low-pressure, thermally nonequilibrium, high-density inductively coupled plasmas is proposed to rapidly synthesize Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an amorphous SiC (a-SiC) matrix at a low substrate temperature and without any commonly used hydrogen dilution. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that uniform crystalline Si QDs with a size of 3-4 nm embedded in the silicon-rich (carbon content up to 10.7at.%) a-SiC matrix can be formed from the reactive mixture of silane and methane gases, with high growth rates of {approx}1.27-2.34 nm s{sup -1} and at a low substrate temperature of 200 deg. C. The achievement of the high-rate growth of Si QDs embedded in the a-SiC without any commonly used hydrogen dilution is discussed based on the unique properties of the inductively coupled plasma-based process. This work is particularly important for the development of the all-Si tandem cell-based third generation photovoltaic solar cells.

  3. Quantum mechanical free energy profiles with post-quantization restraints: Binding free energy of the water dimer over a broad range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    Free energy calculations are a crucial part of understanding chemical systems but are often computationally expensive for all but the simplest of systems. Various enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to improve the efficiency of these calculations in numerical simulations. However, the majority of these approaches have been applied using classical molecular dynamics. There are many situations where nuclear quantum effects impact the system of interest and a classical description fails to capture these details. In this work, path integral molecular dynamics has been used in conjunction with umbrella sampling, and it has been observed that correct results are only obtained when the umbrella sampling potential is applied to a single path integral bead post quantization. This method has been validated against a Lennard-Jones benchmark system before being applied to the more complicated water dimer system over a broad range of temperatures. Free energy profiles are obtained, and these are utilized in the calculation of the second virial coefficient as well as the change in free energy from the separated water monomers to the dimer. Comparisons to experimental and ground state calculation values from the literature are made for the second virial coefficient at higher temperature and the dissociation energy of the dimer in the ground state.

  4. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  5. Quantum phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachdev, S. [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Phase transitions are normally associated with changes of temperature but a new type of transition - caused by quantum fluctuations near absolute zero - is possible, and can tell us more about the properties of a wide range of systems in condensed-matter physics. Nature abounds with phase transitions. The boiling and freezing of water are everyday examples of phase transitions, as are more exotic processes such as superconductivity and superfluidity. The universe itself is thought to have passed through several phase transitions as the high-temperature plasma formed by the big bang cooled to form the world as we know it today. Phase transitions are traditionally classified as first or second order. In first-order transitions the two phases co-exist at the transition temperature - e.g. ice and water at 0 deg., or water and steam at 100 deg. In second-order transitions the two phases do not co-exist. In the last decade, attention has focused on phase transitions that are qualitatively different from the examples noted above: these are quantum phase transitions and they occur only at the absolute zero of temperature. The transition takes place atthe ''quantum critical'' value of some other parameter such as pressure, composition or magnetic field strength. A quantum phase transition takes place when co-operative ordering of the system disappears, but this loss of order is driven solely by the quantum fluctuations demanded by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The physical properties of these quantum fluctuations are quite distinct from those of the thermal fluctuations responsible for traditional, finite-temperature phase transitions. In particular, the quantum system is described by a complex-valued wavefunction, and the dynamics of its phase near the quantum critical point requires novel theories that have no analogue in the traditional framework of phase transitions. In this article the author describes the history of quantum phase

  6. Influence of the temperature on the synthesis of CdS quantum dots stabilized with poly (vinil alcohol); Influencia da temperatura na sintese de pontos quanticos de sulfeto de cadmio estabilizados por poli (alcool vinilico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (Quantum Dots, QDs) have been the subject of recent research by presenting quantum properties. This property has stimulated the study of these particles in biological applications such as bookmarks, which creates the necessity of using different synthesis routes resulting in biocompatible systems. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature on the properties of QDs cadmium sulfide, aqueous route using poly (vinyl alcohol), a biocompatible polymer, such as stabilizing agent. The characterization of particles produced was performed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra for obtaining the absorption and emission, respectively and Transmission microscopy (TEM) for analysis of the diameter of the nanocrystals. (author)

  7. GaAsBi/GaAs multi-quantum well LED grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan Patil, Pallavi; Luna, Esperanza; Matsuda, Teruyoshi; Yamada, Kohki; Kamiya, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Shimomura, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    We report a GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature (TST) technique. In particular, the QWs and the barriers in the intrinsic region were grown at the different temperatures of {T}{{GaAsBi}} = 350 °C and {T}{{GaAs}} = 550 ^\\circ {{C}}, respectively. Investigations of the microstructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal homogeneous MQWs free of extended defects. Furthermore, the local determination of the Bi distribution profile across the MQWs region using TEM techniques confirm the uniform Bi distribution, while revealing a slightly chemically graded GaAs-on-GaAsBi interface due to Bi surface segregation. Despite this small broadening, we found that Bi segregation is significantly reduced (up to 18% reduction) compared to previous reports on Bi segregation in GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs. Hence, the TST procedure proves as a very efficient method to reduce Bi segregation and thus increase the quality of the layers and interfaces. These improvements positively reflect in the optical properties. Room temperature photoluminescence and electroluminescence (EL) at 1.23 μm emission wavelength are successfully demonstrated using TST MQWs containing less Bi content than in previous reports. Finally, LED fabricated using the present TST technique show current-voltage (I-V) curves with a forward voltage of 3.3 V at an injection current of 130 mA under 1.0 kA cm-2 current excitation. These results not only demonstrate that TST technique provides optical device quality GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs but highlight the relevance of TST-based growth techniques on the fabrication of future heterostructure devices based on dilute bismides.

  8. Quantum Multiverses

    OpenAIRE

    Hartle, James B.

    2018-01-01

    A quantum theory of the universe consists of a theory of its quantum dynamics and a theory of its quantum state The theory predicts quantum multiverses in the form of decoherent sets of alternative histories describing the evolution of the universe's spacetime geometry and matter content. These consequences follow: (a) The universe generally exhibits different quantum multiverses at different levels and kinds of coarse graining. (b) Quantum multiverses are not a choice or an assumption but ar...

  9. Quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Traub, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain what quantum computing is. The information for the thesis was gathered from books, scientific publications, and news articles. The analysis of the information revealed that quantum computing can be broken down to three areas: theories behind quantum computing explaining the structure of a quantum computer, known quantum algorithms, and the actual physical realizations of a quantum computer. The thesis reveals that moving from classical memor...

  10. High-temperature measurements of methane and acetylene using quantum cascade laser absorption near 8μm

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, M.B.

    2015-04-01

    The mid-infrared wavelength region near 8 mu m contains absorption bands of several molecules such as water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, nitrous oxide, methane and acetylene. A new laser absorption sensor based on the v(4) band of methane and the v(4)+v(5) band of acetylene is reported for interference-free, time-resolved measurements under combustion-relevant conditions. A detailed line-selection procedure was used to identify optimum transitions. Methane and acetylene were measured at the line centers of Q12 (1303.5 cm(-1)) and P23 (1275.5 cm(-1)) transitions, respectively. High-temperature absorption cross sections of methane and acetylene were measured at peaks (on-line) and valleys (off-line) of the selected absorption transitions. The differential absorption strategy was employed to eliminate interference absorption from large hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1200-2200 K, between pressures of 1-4 atm. The diagnostics were then applied to measure the respective species time-history profiles during the shock-heated pyrolysis of n-pentane. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  12. Efficient Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes at Low Temperature and Pressure Using Tantalum Hydride on MCM-41, and a Quantum Chemical Study

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogenolysis of hydrocarbons is of considerable technological importance for applications such as the hydroprocessing of petrochemical feedstocks to generate high-value and useful chemicals and fuels. We studied the catalytic activity of tantalum hydride supported on MCM-41 for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes at low temperature and low atmospheric pressure in a dynamic reactor. The reactions proceed with good turnover numbers, and the catalyst could be reused for several times, which makes the overall catalytic process sustainable. We derived the plausible mechanism by using DFT calculations and identified the preferred pathways by the analysis of potential energy surface. Our results and the proposed reaction mechanism demonstrate the viability of the "catalyst-by-design" approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Hunter

    2017-10-17

    Common approaches to synthesizing alloyed quantum dots employ high-cost, air-sensitive phosphine complexes as the selenium precursor. Disclosed quantum dot synthesis embodiments avoid these hazardous and air-sensitive selenium precursors. Certain embodiments utilize a combination comprising a thiol and an amine that together reduce and complex the elemental selenium to form a highly reactive selenium precursor at room temperature. The same combination of thiol and amine acts as the reaction solvent, stabilizing ligand, and sulfur source in the synthesis of quantum dot cores. A non-injection approach may also be used. The optical properties of the quantum dots synthesized by this new approach can be finely tuned for a variety of applications by controlling size and/or composition of size and composition. Further, using the same approach, a shell can be grown around a quantum dot core that improves stability, luminescence efficiency, and may reduce toxicity.

  14. Enhancing the Performance of Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes Using Room-Temperature-Processed Ga-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles as the Electron Transport Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Sheng

    2017-04-19

    Colloidal ZnO nanoparticle (NP) films are recognized as efficient electron transport layers (ETLs) for quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with good stability and high efficiency. However, because of the inherently high work function of such films, spontaneous charge transfer occurs at the QD/ZnO interface in such a QD-LED, thus leading to reduced performance. Here, to improve the QD-LED performance, we prepared Ga-doped ZnO NPs with low work functions and tailored band structures via a room-temperature (RT) solution process without the use of bulky organic ligands. We found that the charge transfer at the interface between the CdSe/ZnS QDs and the doped ZnO NPs was significantly weakened because of the incorporated Ga dopants. Remarkably, the as-assembled QD-LEDs, with Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, exhibited superior luminances of up to 44 000 cd/m2 and efficiencies of up to 15 cd/A, placing them among the most efficient red-light QD-LEDs ever reported. This discovery provides a new strategy for fabricating high-performance QD-LEDs by using RT-processed Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, which could be generalized to improve the efficiency of other optoelectronic devices.

  15. Quantum-mechanical study of tensorial elastic and high-temperature thermodynamic properties of grain boundary states in superalloy-phase Ni3Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friák, Martin; Všianská, Monika; Holec, David; Šob, Mojmír

    2017-07-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs), the most important defects in solids and their properties are crucial for many materials properties including (in-)stability. Quantum-mechanical methods can reliably compute properties of GBs and we use them to analyze (tensorial) anisotropic elastic properties of interface states associated with GBs in one of the most important intermetallic compounds for industrial applications, Ni3Al. Selecting the Σ5(210) GBs as a case study because of its significant extra volume, we address the mechanical stability of the GB interface states by checking elasticity-based Born stability criteria. One critically important elastic constant, C 55, is found nearly three times smaller at the GB compared with the bulk, contributing thus to the reduction of the mechanical stability of Ni3Al polycrystals. Next, comparing properties of Σ5(210) GB state which is fully relaxed with those of a Σ5(210) GB state when the supercell dimensions are kept equal to those in the bulk we conclude that lateral relaxations have only marginal impact on the studied properties. Having the complete elastic tensor of Σ5(210) GB states we combine Green’s-function based homogenization techniques and an approximative approach to the Debye model to compare thermodynamic properties of a perfect Ni3Al bulk and the Σ5(210) GB states. In particular, significant reduction of the melting temperature (to 79-81% of the bulk value) is predicted for nanometer-size grains.

  16. Room-temperature CW operation of a nitride-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser using thick GaInN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takashi; Matsui, Kenjo; Horikawa, Kosuke; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Kozuka, Yugo; Yoshida, Shotaro; Akagi, Takanobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Iwaya, Motoaki; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated a room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) operation of a GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) using a thick GaInN quantum well (QW) active region and an AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector. We first investigated the following two characteristics of a 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs active region in light-emitting diode (LED) structures. The light output power at a high current density (∼10 kA/cm2) from the 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs was the same or even higher than that from standard 3 nm 5 QWs. In addition, we found that hole injection into the farthest QW from a p-layer was sufficient. We then demonstrated a GaN-based VCSEL with the 6 nm 5 QWs, resulting in the optical confinement factor of 3.5%. The threshold current density under CW operation at RT was 7.5 kA/cm2 with a narrow (0.4 nm) emission spectrum of 413.5 nm peak wavelength.

  17. Conformational properties of 1-cyano-1-silacyclohexane, C5H10SiHCN: Gas electron diffraction, low-temperature NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Alexander V.; Sigolaev, Yrii F.; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Wallevik, Sunna Ó.; Jonsdottir, Nanna R.; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Kvaran, Ágúst; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Arnason, Ingvar

    2017-03-01

    The conformational preference of the cyano group of the 1-cyano-1-silacyclohexane was studied experimentally by means of gas electron diffraction (GED) and dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (DNMR) as well as by quantum chemical (QC) calculations applying high-level coupled cluster methods as well as DFT methods. According to the GED experiment, the compound exists in the gas-phase as a mixture of two conformers possessing the chair conformation of the six-membered ring and Cs symmetry while differing in the axial or equatorial position of the substituent (axial = 84(12) mol %/equatorial = 16(12) mol %) at T = 279(3) K, corresponding to an A value (Gax - Geq) of -1.0(4) kcal mol-1. Gas-phase CCSD(T) calculations predict an A value of -0.72 kcal mol-1 at 279 K. In contrast, the low-temperature 13C NMR experiments resulted in an axial/equatorial ratio of 35/65 mol % at 120 K corresponding to an A value of 0.14 kcal mol-1. An average value for ΔG#e→a = 5.6 ± 0.1 kcal mol-1 was obtained for the temperature range 110-145 K. The dramatically different conformational behaviour in the gas-phase (GED) compared to the liquid phase (DNMR) suggests a strong solvation effect. According to natural bond orbital analysis the axial conformer of the title compound is an example of stabilization of a form, which is not favored by electrostatic effects and is favored predominantly by steric and conjugation effects.

  18. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  19. Testing the ability of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus to evade the protective immune response induced in rainbow trout by DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepulveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    glycoprotein, the only surface protein of the VHSV, has been successful as an experimental prophylactic treatment against this disease, because it induces a strong innate (interferon) and adaptive (cellular and humoral) immune response. However, since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability......, this work aims to evaluate whether VHSV is able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. Earlier studies have demonstrated that VHSV can evade the neutralizing effect of monoclonal antibodies by mutations in the glycoprotein gene. One approach of the present study is therefore...

  20. Quantum Subcritical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, T.; Morikawa, M.; Shiromizu, T.

    1996-08-01

    We quantize subcritical bubbles which are formed in the weakly first order phase transition. We find that the typical size of the thermal fluctuation reduces in quantum-statistical physics. We estimate the typical size and the amplitude of thermal fluctuations near the critical temperature in the electroweak phase transition using a quantum statistical average. Furthermore, based on our study, we discuss implications for the dynamics of phase transitions.

  1. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  2. Conformational properties of 1-silyl-1-silacyclohexane, C(5)H(10)SiHSiH(3): gas electron diffraction, low-temperature NMR, temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations (&).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallevik, Sunna O; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Kvaran, Agúst; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Arnason, Ingvar; Belyakov, Alexander V; Baskakov, Alexander A; Hassler, Karl; Oberhammer, Heinz

    2010-02-11

    The molecular structure of axial and equatorial conformers of 1-silyl-silacyclohexane, C(5)H(10)SiHSiH(3), and the thermodynamic equilibrium between these species were investigated by means of gas electron diffraction (GED), dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (DNMR), temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations (CCSD(T), MP2 and DFT methods). According to GED, the compound exists as a mixture of two conformers possessing the chair conformation of the six-membered ring and C(s) symmetry and differing in the axial or equatorial position of the SiH(3) group (axial = 57(7) mol %/equatorial = 43(7) mol %) at T = 321 K. This corresponds to an A value (free energy difference = G(axial) - G(equatorial)) of -0.17(15) kcal mol(-1). A low-temperature (13)C NMR experiment using SiD(4) as a solvent resulted in an axial/equatorial ratio of 45(3)/55(3) mol % at 110 K corresponding to an A value of 0.05(3) kcal mol(-1), and a DeltaG(#) value of 5.7(2) kcal mol(-1) was found at 124 K. Temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range of 210-300 K of the neat liquid, a THF solution, and a heptane solution indicates that the axial conformer is favored over the equatorial one by 0.26(10), 0.23(10), and 0.22(10) kcal mol(-1) (DeltaH values), respectively. CCSD(T)/CBS and MP2/CBS calculations in general predict both conformations to have very similar stability and are, thus, in excellent agreement with the DNMR result but in a slight disagreement with the GED and Raman results. Two DFT functionals, that account for dispersion interactions, M06-2X/pc-3 and B2PLYP-D/QZVPP, deviate from the high-level coupled cluster and MP2 calculations by only 0.1 kcal mol(-1) on average, whereas B3LYP/pc-3 calculations greatly overestimate the stability of the equatorial conformer.

  3. Quantum CPU and Quantum Simulating

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, An Min

    1999-01-01

    Making use of an universal quantum network or QCPU proposed by me [6], some special quantum networks for simulating some quantum systems are given out. Specially, it is obtained that the quantum network for the time evolution operator which can simulate, in general, Schr\\"odinger equation.

  4. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  5. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  6. Comparative study of the hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on the impurity-related optical properties in single and double GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odhiambo Oyoko, H. [Department of Physics, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X 54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Porras-Montenegro, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, AA 25360, Cali (Colombia); Lopez, S.Y. [Facultad de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    Using a variational technique within the effective mass approximation we have carried out a comparative study of the effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the shallow-impurity related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As single and double quantum wells. The results show a pressure dependent read-shift and a temperature dependent blue-shift in the optical absorption spectra. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Can butterflies evade fire? Pupa location and heat tolerance in fire prone habitats of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Matthew D; Daniels, Jaret C; Kobziar, Leda N; Colburn, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur. Pupae of these butterflies are noted to reside at the base of host plants or in the leaf litter and soil, which may allow them to escape direct mortality by fire, a prominent disturbance in many areas they inhabit. The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found. Survival of E. atala pupae in relation to temperature and duration of heat pulse was tested using controlled water bath experiments and a series of prescribed fire field experiments. Survival of E. atala pupae was correlated to peak temperature and heat exposure in both laboratory and field trials. In addition, E. atala survival following field trials was correlated to depth of burial; complete mortality was observed for pupae at the soil surface. Fifty percent of E. atala survived the heat generated by prescribed fire when experimentally placed at depths ≥ 1.75 cm, suggesting that pupation of butterflies in the soil at depth can protect from fatal temperatures caused by fire. For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

  8. QUANTUM AND CLASSICAL CORRELATIONS IN GAUSSIAN OPEN QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian ISAR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable quantum correlations (quantum entanglement and quantum discord for a system consisting of two noninteracting bosonic modes embedded in a thermal environment. We solve the Kossakowski-Lindblad master equation for the time evolution of the considered system and describe the entanglement and discord in terms of the covariance matrix for Gaussian input states. For all values of the temperature of the thermal reservoir, an initial separable Gaussian state remains separable for all times. We study the time evolution of logarithmic negativity, which characterizes the degree of entanglement, and show that in the case of an entangled initial squeezed thermal state, entanglement suppression takes place for all temperatures of the environment, including zero temperature. We analyze the time evolution of the Gaussian quantum discord, which is a measure of all quantum correlations in the bipartite state, including entanglement, and show that it decays asymptotically in time under the effect of the thermal bath. This is in contrast with the sudden death of entanglement. Before the suppression of the entanglement, the qualitative evolution of quantum discord is very similar to that of the entanglement. We describe also the time evolution of the degree of classical correlations and of quantum mutual information, which measures the total correlations of the quantum system.

  9. Stochastic Energetics of Quantum Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2006-01-01

    We examine the stochastic energetics of directed quantum transport due to rectification of non-equilibrium thermal fluctuations. We calculate the quantum efficiency of a ratchet device both in presence and absence of an external load to characterize two quantifiers of efficiency. It has been shown that the quantum current as well as efficiency in absence of load (Stokes efficiency) is higher as compared to classical current and efficiency, respectively, at low temperature. The conventional ef...

  10. Muusikamaailm : Festivalil Schwetzingenis. Ellingtoni sajandi tähistamine. Linz saab uue ooperimaja. Isaac Stern viiulita Saksamaal. Muusikapäevad Luksemburgis / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    1999-01-01

    30. apr.-7. juunini toimuvast muusikafestivalist Schwetzingenis. D. Ellingtoni 100. sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest maailmas. Valmis Linzi uue ooperimaja planeering. I. Stern juhatas kümnepäevast seminari Kölni Kõrgema Muusikakooli juures. Rahvusvahelise Nüüdismuusika Ühingu (ISCM) iga-aastased maailma muusikapäevad toimuvad 2000. aastal Luksemburgis

  11. Quantum trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to many-particle systems has been an active area of research in recent years as researchers have looked for ways to tackle difficult problems in this area. The quantum trajectory method provides an efficient computational technique for solving both stationary and time-evolving states, encompassing a large area of quantum mechanics. Quantum Trajectories brings the expertise of an international panel of experts who focus on the epistemological significance of quantum mechanics through the quantum theory of motion.Emphasizing a classical interpretation of quan

  12. Quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Ter Haar, D

    1975-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics focuses on the formulation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in its most general and most abstract form: relativistic quantum field theory. It describes QED as a program, rather than a closed theory, that rests on the theory of the quantum Maxwellian field interacting with given (external) classical sources of radiation and on the relativistic quantum mechanics of electrons interacting with a given (external) classical electromagnetic field.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental principles of quantum theory formulated in a

  13. Quantum Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Blaise, Paul

    2011-01-01

    An invaluable reference for an overall but simple approach to the complexity of quantum mechanics viewed through quantum oscillators Quantum oscillators play a fundamental role in many areas of physics; for instance, in chemical physics with molecular normal modes, in solid state physics with phonons, and in quantum theory of light with photons. Quantum Oscillators is a timely and visionary book which presents these intricate topics, broadly covering the properties of quantum oscillators which are usually dispersed in the literature at varying levels of detail and often combined with other p

  14. Temperature-Dependent Optical Properties of PbS/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dot Thin Films : Probing the Wave Function Delocalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Honghua; Balazs, Daniel M.; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are extraordinarily appealing for the development of cheap and large area solar cells due to high absorption efficiency; tunable bandgap energies; and solution processability. Understanding:and controlling electronic wave function delocalitation in QD thin

  15. Quantum Cryptography for Secure Communications to Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Twyeffort, E.; Simmons, C.M.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit. We have developed an experimental quantum cryptography system based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on in orbit.

  16. Quantum criticality as a resource for quantum estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2008-10-01

    We address quantum critical systems as a resource in quantum estimation and derive the ultimate quantum limits to the precision of any estimator of the coupling parameters. In particular, if L denotes the size of a system and λ is the relevant coupling parameters driving a quantum phase transition, we show that a precision improvement of order 1/L may be achieved in the estimation of λ at the critical point compared to the noncritical case. We show that analog results hold for temperature estimation in classical phase transitions. Results are illustrated by means of a specific example involving a fermion tight-binding model with pair creation (BCS model).

  17. Can hibernators sense and evade fires? Olfactory acuity and locomotor performance during deep torpor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Julia; Delesalle, Marine; Stawski, Clare; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-10-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation, global warming and other human activities have caused a rise in the frequency of wildfires worldwide. To reduce the risks of uncontrollable fires, prescribed burns are generally conducted during the colder months of the year, a time when in many mammals torpor is expressed regularly. Torpor is crucial for energy conservation, but the low body temperatures ( T b) are associated with a decreased responsiveness and torpid animals might therefore face an increased mortality risk during fires. We tested whether hibernators in deep torpor (a) can respond to the smell of smoke and (b) can climb to avoid fires at T bs below normothermic levels. Our data show that torpid eastern pygmy-possums ( Cercartetus nanus) are able to detect smoke and also can climb. All males aroused from torpor when the smoke stimulus was presented at an ambient temperature ( T a) of 15 °C ( T b ˜18 °C), whereas females only raised their heads. The responses were less pronounced at T a 10 °C. The first coordinated movement of possums along a branch was observed at a mean T b of 15.6 °C, and animals were even able to climb their prehensile tail when they reached a mean T b of 24.4 °C. Our study shows that hibernators can sense smoke and move at low T b. However, our data also illustrate that at T b ≤13 °C, C. nanus show decreased responsiveness and locomotor performance and highlight that prescribed burns during winter should be avoided on very cold days to allow torpid animals enough time to respond.

  18. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  19. Relative quantum yield of I-asterisk(2P1/2) in the tunable laser UV photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I - Effect of temperature and exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J. E.; Leone, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-specific relative quantum yields of metastable I from pulsed laser photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I in the range 265-336 nm are determined by measuring the time-resolved infrared emission from the atomic I(P-2(1/2) P-2(3/2) transition. It is shown that although this yield appears to be unity from 265 to 298 nm, it decreases dramatically at longer wavelengths. Values are also reported for the enhancement of emission from metastable I due to exciplex formation at several temperatures. The exciplex formation emission increases linearly with parent gas pressure, but decreases with increasing temperature. Absorption spectra of i- and n-C3F7I between 303 and 497 K are presented, and the effect of temperature on the quantum yields at selected wavelengths greater than 300 nm, where increasing the temperature enhances the absorption considerably, are given. The results are discussed in regard to the development of solar-pumped iodine lasers.

  20. Temperature-dependent investigation of carrier transport, injection, and densities in AlGaAs-based multi-quantum-well active layers for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Kolb, Johanna S.; Roemer, Friedhard; Weichmann, Ulrich; Moench, Holger; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The electro-optical efficiency of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) strongly depends on the efficient carrier injection into the quantum wells (QWs) in the laser active region. Carrier injection degrades with increasing temperature, which limits VCSEL performance in high-power applications where self-heating imposes high-operating temperatures. In a numerical model, we investigate the transport of charge carriers in an 808-nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well structure with special attention to the temperature dependence of carrier injection into the QWs. Experimental reference data were extracted from oxide-confined, top-emitting VCSELs. The transport simulations follow a drift-diffusion-model complemented by an energy-resolved carrier-capture model. The QW gain was calculated in the screened Hartree-Fock approximation. With the combination of the gain and transport model, we explain experimental reference data for the injection efficiency and threshold current. The degradation of the injection efficiency with increasing temperature is not only due to increased thermionic escape of carriers from the QWs, but also to state filling in the QWs initiated from higher threshold carrier densities. With a full opto-electro-thermal VCSEL model, we demonstrate how changes in VCSEL properties affecting the threshold carrier density, like mirror design or optical confinement, have consequences on the thermal behavior of the injection and the VCSEL performance.

  1. Quantum Darwinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  2. Quantum cryptography

    OpenAIRE

    Gisin, Nicolas; Ribordy, Grégoire; Tittel, Wolfgang; Zbinden, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Quantum cryptography could well be the first application of quantum mechanics at the individual quanta level. The very fast progress in both theory and experiments over the recent years are reviewed, with emphasis on open questions and technological issues.

  3. Quantum Econophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban Guevara Hidalgo

    2006-01-01

    The relationships between game theory and quantum mechanics let us propose certain quantization relationships through which we could describe and understand not only quantum but also classical, evolutionary and the biological systems that were described before through the replicator dynamics. Quantum mechanics could be used to explain more correctly biological and economical processes and even it could encloses theories like games and evolutionary dynamics. This could make quantum mechanics a...

  4. Practical Quantum Cryptography for Secure Free-Space Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttler, W.T.; Hughes, R.J.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-02-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generate shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light. The security of these transmissions is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics and information-theoretically secure post-processing methods. An adversary can neither successfully tap the quantum transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In this paper we describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from our experimental free-space system with which we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of quantum key generation over a point-to-point outdoor atmospheric path in daylight. We achieved a transmission distance of 0.5 km, which was limited only by the length of the test range. Our results provide strong evidence that cryptographic key material could be generated on demand between a ground station and a satellite (or between two satellites), allowing a satellite to be securely re-keyed on orbit. We present a feasibility analysis of surface-to-satellite quantum key generation.

  5. Quantum cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Fehr (Serge)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractQuantum cryptography makes use of the quantum-mechanical behavior of nature for the design and analysis of cryptographic schemes. Optimally (but not always), quantum cryptography allows for the design of cryptographic schemes whose security is guaranteed solely by the laws of nature.

  6. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. Free-Space Quantum Communication with a Portable Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Vallone, Giuseppe; Jordaan, Bertus; Goham, Connor; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Villoresi, Paolo; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-12-01

    The realization of an elementary quantum network that is intrinsically secure and operates over long distances requires the interconnection of several quantum modules performing different tasks. In this work, we report the realization of a communication network functioning in a quantum regime, consisting of four different quantum modules: (i) a random polarization qubit generator, (ii) a free-space quantum-communication channel, (iii) an ultralow-noise portable quantum memory, and (iv) a qubit decoder, in a functional elementary quantum network possessing all capabilities needed for quantum-information distribution protocols. We create weak coherent pulses at the single-photon level encoding polarization states |H ⟩ , |V ⟩, |D ⟩, and |A ⟩ in a randomized sequence. The random qubits are sent over a free-space link and coupled into a dual-rail room-temperature quantum memory and after storage and retrieval are analyzed in a four-detector polarization analysis akin to the requirements of the BB84 protocol. We also show ultralow noise and fully portable operation, paving the way towards memory-assisted all-environment free-space quantum cryptographic networks.

  8. High-temperature photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of Al0.60Ga0.40N/Al0.70Ga0.30N multiple quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murotani, Hideaki; Nakamura, Katsuto; Fukuno, Tomonori; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Yamada, Yoichi

    2017-02-01

    The excitonic optical properties of an Al0.60Ga0.40N/Al0.70Ga0.30N multiple quantum well (MQW) structure were studied using photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopy at high temperatures. Clear excitonic PL was observed at temperatures up to 750 K. Biexciton luminescence was clearly observed even at this high temperature. These observations unambiguously demonstrated the extremely high thermal stability of biexcitons in this MQW. Furthermore, additional PL peaks were observed on the low-energy side of the biexciton luminescence. The observation of biexciton two-photon resonance in the PLE spectra of these peaks indicates that these peaks can be explained by processes involving inelastic scattering of excitons and biexcitons.

  9. Quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  10. Quantum cheques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  11. Small RNA-mediated Cry toxin silencing allows Bacillus thuringiensis to evade Caenorhabditis elegans avoidance behavioral defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Luo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Ni; Guo, Suxia; Zheng, Jinshui; Chen, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Pathogen avoidance behavior protects animal hosts against microbial pathogens. Pathogens have evolved specific strategies during coevolution in response to such host defenses. However, these strategies for combatting host avoidance behavioral defenses remain poorly understood. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans and its bacterial pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis as a model and determined that small RNA (sRNA)-mediated Cry toxin silencing allowed pathogens to evade host avoidance behavioral defenses. The B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1518, which encodes three nematicidal cry genes, is highly toxic to C. elegans. However, the expression of the most potent toxin, Cry5Ba, was silenced in this strain when YBT-1518 was outside the host. Cry5Ba silencing was due to the sRNA BtsR1, which bound to the RBS site of the cry5Ba transcript via direct base pairing and inhibited Cry5Ba expression. Upon ingestion by C. elegans, Cry5Ba was expressed in vivo by strain YBT-1518. Cry5Ba silencing may allow B. thuringiensis to avoid nematode behavioral defenses and then express toxins once ingested to kill the host and gain a survival advantage. Our work describes a novel model of sRNA-mediated regulation to aid pathogens in combating host avoidance behavioral defenses. PMID:29069426

  12. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  13. Upregulated Op18/stathmin activity causes chromosomal instability through a mechanism that evades the spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmfeldt, Per; Sellin, Mikael E. [Department of Molecular Biology, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Gullberg, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Gullberg@molbiol.umu.se [Department of Molecular Biology, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    Op18/stathmin (Op18) is a microtubule-destabilizing protein that is phosphorylation-inactivated during mitosis and its normal function is to govern tubulin subunit partitioning during interphase. Human tumors frequently overexpress Op18 and a tumor-associated Q18{yields}E mutation has been identified that confers hyperactivity, destabilizes spindle microtubules, and causes mitotic aberrancies, polyploidization, and chromosome loss in K562 leukemia cells. Here we determined whether wild-type and mutant Op18 have the potential to cause chromosomal instability by some means other than interference with spindle assembly, and thereby bypassing the spindle assembly checkpoint. Our approach was based on Op18 derivatives with distinct temporal order of activity during mitosis, conferred either by differential phosphorylation inactivation or by anaphase-specific degradation through fusion with the destruction box of cyclin B1. We present evidence that excessive Op18 activity generates chromosomal instability through interference occurring subsequent to the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, which reduces the fidelity of chromosome segregation to spindle poles during anaphase. Similar to uncorrected merotelic attachment, this mechanism evades detection by the spindle assembly checkpoint and thus provides an additional route to chromosomal instability.

  14. Cooperative option of pursuit game with two pursuers and one evader. A strong stability of division variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor D. Shiryayev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article deals with a simple differential game on the plane of pursuit with two consistently active players and one evader E; the game is considered in the form of the characteristic function. Materials and Methods: The geometric constructions and methods are used for solving the problem. The security zone of the escapee is bounded by the Apollonius circle, the pursuit team uses a strategy of parallel approach. Results: A method of finding the optimal players strategies and the optimal players’ trajectory is proposed. The way of forming the characteristic function is provided. All the variety of division is considered as a solution. However, the use of the results of cooperative theory of differential games is impossible without solving the problems associated with the specifics of differential equations of motion. Foremost, it is the problem of dynamic stability of optimality principles. The article introduces an auxiliary function of making the redistribution of winnings in time, keeping his total winnings throughout the game. The dynamic stability of the cooperative solution is determined with the help of this function. Strong dynamic stability of the entire set of solutions is shown. Discussion and Conclusions: The obtained results are consistent with similar research of other authors. Further research in this field can be used in the development of methods for “regularization” of optimality principles, for which the condition of dynamic stability is always fulfilled.

  15. Pasteurella pneumotropica evades the human complement system by acquisition of the complement regulators factor H and C4BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sahagún-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.

  16. Stiff quantum polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, H.

    2009-01-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  17. Response to “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’” [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, “General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation,” Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, “Comment on ‘General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation’ [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)],” Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  18. Low-temperature thermodynamics of the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}(Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} within a topological scenario for the quantum critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodel, V A; Zverev, M V [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Clark, J W, E-mail: vak@wuphys.wustl.ed, E-mail: jwc@wuphys.wustl.ed, E-mail: zverev@mbslab.kiae.r [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    We describe a topological scenario for the quantum critical point signaled by a divergent density of states at zero temperature, in which the Landau quasiparticle picture survives but the topology of the Fermi surface is altered. Predictions of this scenario for thermodynamic properties of the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}(Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 2} are shown to be in agreement with available experimental data, whereas the conventional scenario based on critical fluctuations of a collective mode fails to explain these properties.

  19. Quantum coherence versus quantum uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shunlong; Sun, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The notion of measurement is of both foundational and instrumental significance in quantum mechanics, and coherence destroyed by measurements (decoherence) lies at the very heart of quantum to classical transition. Qualitative aspects of this spirit have been widely recognized and analyzed ever since the inception of quantum theory. However, axiomatic and quantitative investigations of coherence are attracting great interest only recently with several figures of merit for coherence introduced [Baumgratz, Cramer, and Plenio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401]. While these resource theoretic approaches have many appealing and intuitive features, they rely crucially on various notions of incoherent operations which are sophisticated, subtle, and not uniquely defined, as have been critically assessed [Chitambar and Gour, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 030401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.030401]. In this paper, we elaborate on the idea that coherence and quantum uncertainty are dual viewpoints of the same quantum substrate, and address coherence quantification by identifying coherence of a state (with respect to a measurement) with quantum uncertainty of a measurement (with respect to a state). Consequently, coherence measures may be set into correspondence with measures of quantum uncertainty. In particular, we take average quantum Fisher information as a measure of quantum uncertainty, and introduce the corresponding measure of coherence, which is demonstrated to exhibit desirable properties. Implications for interpreting quantum purity as maximal coherence, and quantum discord as minimal coherence, are illustrated.

  20. Quantum games as quantum types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  1. Uudised : Üheteistkümnendad trompetipäevad. Eesti Muusikanõukogus. Tüüri "Motus I" Londonis / Kadri Ruudi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruudi, Kadri

    2000-01-01

    4.-15. apr. toimuvad EMA XI trompetipäevad. 14.-19. märtsil viibis Eestis IMC asepresident F. Müller-Heuser, 22. märtsil toimus EMN juhatuse koosolek. 19. märtsil andis Londoni South Bank Centre'is kontserdi P. Carneiro, kes tõi Inglismaal esiettekandele ka E.-S. Tüüri teose "Motus I"

  2. Quantum and Thermal Fluctuations in Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Sen-Ben; Polonyi, Janos; Xu, Dapeng

    1994-01-01

    Blocking transformation is performed in quantum field theory at finite temperature. It is found that the manner temperature deforms the renormalized trajectories can be used to understand better the role played by the quantum fluctuations. In particular, it is conjectured that domain formation and mass parameter generation can be observed in theories without spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  3. Quantum flywheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amikam; Diósi, Lajos; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the concept of a quantum flywheel coupled to a quantum heat engine. The flywheel stores useful work in its energy levels, while additional power is extracted continuously from the device. Generally, the energy exchange between a quantum engine and a quantized work repository is accompanied by heat, which degrades the charging efficiency. Specifically when the quantum harmonic oscillator acts as a work repository, quantum and thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics. Quantum monitoring and feedback control are applied to the flywheel in order to reach steady state and regulate its operation. To maximize the charging efficiency one needs a balance between the information gained by measuring the system and the information fed back to the system. The dynamics of the flywheel are described by a stochastic master equation that accounts for the engine, the external driving, the measurement, and the feedback operations.

  4. Quantum Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shabbir A

    2013-01-01

    Quantum plasma physics is a rapidly evolving research field with a very inter-disciplinary scope of potential applications, ranging from nano-scale science in condensed matter to the vast scales of astrophysical objects. The theoretical description of quantum plasmas relies on various approaches, microscopic or macroscopic, some of which have obvious relation to classical plasma models. The appropriate model should, in principle, incorporate the quantum mechanical effects such as diffraction, spin statistics and correlations, operative on the relevant scales. However, first-principle approaches such as quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory or quantum-statistical methods such as quantum kinetic theory or non-equilibrium Green's functions require substantial theoretical and computational efforts. Therefore, for selected problems, alternative simpler methods have been put forward. In particular, the collective behavior of many-body systems is usually described within a self-consistent scheme of parti...

  5. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Gerald; Hamrick, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed account of the theory and practice of quantum cryptography. Suitable as the basis for a course in the subject at the graduate level, it crosses the disciplines of physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering. The theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject are derived from first principles, and attention is devoted to the practical development of realistic quantum communications systems. The book also includes a comprehensive analysis of practical quantum cryptography systems implemented in actual physical environments via either free-space or fiber-optic cable quantum channels. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students, as well as professional scientists and engineers, who desire an introduction to the field that will enable them to undertake research in quantum cryptography. It will also be a useful reference for researchers who are already active in the field, and for academic faculty members who are teaching courses in quantum information s...

  6. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  7. Quantum correlations in a long range interaction spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Yan-Shen

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new type of long range interaction spin chain. The quantum correlations such as quantum discord, entanglement, and structure factor are investigated in the thermal state with considering them both in zero temperature and finite temperature. Based on our results, we compare the differences and show the relations between the three types of quantum correlations in this long range interaction model.

  8. Single photon quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Villing, André; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2002-10-28

    We report the full implementation of a quantum cryptography protocol using a stream of single photon pulses generated by a stable and efficient source operating at room temperature. The single photon pulses are emitted on demand by a single nitrogen-vacancy color center in a diamond nanocrystal. The quantum bit error rate is less that 4.6% and the secure bit rate is 7700 bits/s. The overall performances of our system reaches a domain where single photons have a measurable advantage over an equivalent system based on attenuated light pulses.

  9. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Evades Calprotectin-Mediated Nutritional Immunity and Survives Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Production of TdfH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sophonie; Juneau, Richard A; Criss, Alison K; Cornelissen, Cynthia N

    2016-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae successfully overcomes host strategies to limit essential nutrients, termed nutritional immunity, by production of TonB-dependent transporters (TdTs)-outer membrane proteins that facilitate nutrient transport in an energy-dependent manner. Four gonococcal TdTs facilitate utilization of iron or iron chelates from host-derived proteins, including transferrin (TbpA), lactoferrin (LbpA), and hemoglobin (HpuB), in addition to xenosiderophores from other bacteria (FetA). The roles of the remaining four uncharacterized TdTs (TdfF, TdfG, TdfH, and TdfJ) remain elusive. Regulatory data demonstrating that production of gonococcal TdfH and TdfJ are unresponsive to or upregulated under iron-replete conditions led us to evaluate the role of these TdTs in the acquisition of nutrients other than iron. In this study, we found that production of gonococcal TdfH is both Zn and Zur repressed. We also found that TdfH confers resistance to calprotectin, an immune effector protein highly produced in neutrophils that has antimicrobial activity due to its ability to sequester Zn and Mn. We found that TdfH directly binds calprotectin, which enables gonococcal Zn accumulation in a TdfH-dependent manner and enhances bacterial survival after exposure to neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These studies highlight Zn sequestration by calprotectin as a key functional arm of NET-mediated killing of gonococci. We demonstrate for the first time that N. gonorrhoeae exploits this host strategy in a novel defense mechanism, in which TdfH production hijacks and directly utilizes the host protein calprotectin as a zinc source and thereby evades nutritional immunity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Rice OsFLS2-Mediated Perception of Bacterial Flagellins Is Evaded by Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanzhi; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Huiqin; Liu, Lijuan; Lu, Fen; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Shiyong; Guo, Zejian; Bent, Andrew F; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial flagellins are often recognized by the receptor kinase FLAGELLIN SENSITIVE2 (FLS2) and activate MAMP-triggered immunity in dicotyledonous plants. However, the capacity of monocotyledonous rice to recognize flagellins of key rice pathogens and its biological relevance remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that ectopically expressed OsFLS2 in Arabidopsis senses the eliciting flg22 peptide and in vitro purified Acidovorax avenae (Aa) flagellin in an expression level-dependent manner, but does not recognize purified flagellins or derivative flg22(Xo) peptides of Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzae (Xoo) and oryzicola (Xoc). Consistently, the flg22 peptide and purified Aa flagellin, but not Xoo/Xoc flagellins, induce various immune responses such as defense gene induction and MAPK activation in rice. Perception of flagellin by rice does induce strong resistance to Xoo infection, as shown after pre-treatment of rice leaves with Aa flagellin. OsFLS2 was found to differ from AtFLS2 in its perception specificities or sensitivities to different flg22 sequences. In addition, post-translational modification of Xoc flagellin was altered by deletion of glycosyltransferase-encoding rbfC, but this had little effect on Xoc motility and rpfC mutation did not detectably reduce Xoc virulence on rice. Deletion of flagellin-encoding fliC from Xoo/Xoc blocked swimming motility but also did not significantly alter Xoo/Xoc virulence. These results suggest that Xoo/Xoc carry flg22-region amino acid changes that allow motility while evading the ancient flagellin detection system in rice, which retains recognition capacity for other bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum Locality

    OpenAIRE

    Stapp, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a 'consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. O...

  12. Quantum ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Peguiron, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, ratchet systems operating in the quantum regime are investigated. Ratchet systems, also known as Brownian motors, are periodic systems presenting an intrinsic asymmetry which can be exploited to extract work out of unbiased forces. As a model for ratchet systems, we consider the motion of a particle in a one-dimensional periodic and asymmetric potential, interacting with a thermal environment, and subject to an unbiased driving force. In quantum ratchets, intrinsic quantum flu...

  13. Quantum information and computation

    OpenAIRE

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with theoretical developments in the subject of quantum information and quantum computation, and includes an overview of classical information and some relevant quantum mechanics. The discussion covers topics in quantum communication, quantum cryptography, and quantum computation, and concludes by considering whether a perspective in terms of quantum information sheds new light on the conceptual problems of quantum mechanics.

  14. Quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information- the subject- is a new and exciting area of science, which brings together physics, information theory, computer science and mathematics. "Quantum Information"- the book- is based on two successful lecture courses given to advanced undergraduate and beginning postgraduate students in physics. The intention is to introduce readers at this level to the fundamental, but offer rather simple, ideas behind ground-breaking developments including quantum cryptography,teleportation and quantum computing. The text is necessarily rather mathematical in style, but the mathema

  15. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This is the third, revised and extended edition of the acknowledged "Lectures on Quantum Optics" by W. Vogel and D.-G. Welsch.It offers theoretical concepts of quantum optics, with special emphasis on current research trends. A unified concept of measurement-based nonclassicality and entanglement criteria and a unified approach to medium-assisted electromagnetic vacuum effects including Van der Waals and Casimir Forces are the main new topics that are included in the revised edition. The rigorous development of quantum optics in the context of quantum field theory and the attention to details makes the book valuable to graduate students as well as to researchers

  16. Evading the Boomerang Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Moreira, Solon; Reichstein, Toke

    2017-01-01

    Technology licensing agreements potentially can create future appropriability problems. Drawing on the appropriability literature, we argue that the inclusion of a grant-back clause in technology licensing agreements is an attempt to balance the gains from and protection of the focal firms’ techn...

  17. Extracting Entanglement Geometry from Quantum States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Katharine; Garrison, James R; Bauer, Bela

    2017-10-06

    Tensor networks impose a notion of geometry on the entanglement of a quantum system. In some cases, this geometry is found to reproduce key properties of holographic dualities, and subsequently much work has focused on using tensor networks as tractable models for holographic dualities. Conventionally, the structure of the network-and hence the geometry-is largely fixed a priori by the choice of the tensor network ansatz. Here, we evade this restriction and describe an unbiased approach that allows us to extract the appropriate geometry from a given quantum state. We develop an algorithm that iteratively finds a unitary circuit that transforms a given quantum state into an unentangled product state. We then analyze the structure of the resulting unitary circuits. In the case of noninteracting, critical systems in one dimension, we recover signatures of scale invariance in the unitary network, and we show that appropriately defined geodesic paths between physical degrees of freedom exhibit known properties of a hyperbolic geometry.

  18. Development of steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique for thermal characterization of one dimensional (1D) structures by employing graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Li, Changzheng; Yue, Yanan; Xie, Danmei; Xue, Meixin; Hu, Niansu

    2016-11-01

    A fluorescence signal has been demonstrated as an effective implement for micro/nanoscale temperature measurement which can be realized by either direct fluorescence excitation from materials or by employing nanoparticles as sensors. In this work, a steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique is developed for the thermal characterization of one-dimensional (1D) materials. In this method, the sample is suspended between two electrodes and applied with steady-state Joule heating. The temperature response of the sample is monitored by collecting a simultaneous fluorescence signal from the sample itself or nanoparticles uniformly attached on it. According to the 1D heat conduction model, a linear temperature dependence of heating powers is obtained, thus the thermal conductivity of the sample can be readily determined. In this work, a standard platinum wire is selected to measure its thermal conductivity to validate this technique. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are employed as the fluorescence agent for temperature sensing. Parallel measurement by using the transient electro-thermal (TET) technique demonstrates that a small dose of GQDs has negligible influence on the intrinsic thermal property of platinum wire. This SEF technique can be applied in two ways: for samples with a fluorescence excitation capability, this method can be implemented directly; for others with weak or no fluorescence excitation, a very small portion of nanoparticles with excellent fluorescence excitation can be used for temperature probing and thermophysical property measurement.

  19. Effect of temperature and phonons on the spectral properties of a multi-level semiconductor quantum dot single-photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lodahl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Since it was realized that efficient quantum computing can be performed using single photons and standard linear optics elements, immense international research activity has been aimed at developing semiconductor quantum dot (QD) single-photon sources (SPS). In order to optimise the design of SPS...... for high efficiency as well as increase the understanding of the physics, advanced and accurate models are needed that describes the complex solid-state environment the SPS is part of. This paper investigates a many-body model of a SPS based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF), where...... the most important many-body interactions occurring in a semiconductor, namely the electron- phonon, electron-photon, and electron-electron interaction are included. The novel part of the model is that both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustical (LA) phonons in the NEGF model are included, which allows...

  20. Quantum physics without quantum philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Detlef [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Mathematisches Inst.; Goldstein, Sheldon [Rutgers State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Zanghi, Nino [Genova Univ. (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Genova (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    Integrates and comments on the authors' seminal papers in the field. Emphasizes the natural way in which quantum phenomena emerge from the Bohmian picture. Helps to answer many of the objections raised to Bohmian quantum mechanics. Useful overview and summary for newcomers and students. It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schroedinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  1. Nuclear quantum effects on the structure and the dynamics of [H{sub 2}O]{sub 8} at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0165 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-11-07

    We use ring-polymer-molecular-dynamics (RPMD) techniques and the semi-empirical q-TIP4P/F water model to investigate the relationship between hydrogen bond connectivity and the characteristics of nuclear position fluctuations, including explicit incorporation of quantum effects, for the energetically low lying isomers of the prototype cluster [H{sub 2}O]{sub 8} at T = 50 K and at 150 K. Our results reveal that tunneling and zero-point energy effects lead to sensible increments in the magnitudes of the fluctuations of intra and intermolecular distances. The degree of proton spatial delocalization is found to map logically with the hydrogen-bond connectivity pattern of the cluster. Dangling hydrogen bonds exhibit the largest extent of spatial delocalization and participate in shorter intramolecular O-H bonds. Combined effects from quantum and polarization fluctuations on the resulting individual dipole moments are also examined. From the dynamical side, we analyze the characteristics of the infrared absorption spectrum. The incorporation of nuclear quantum fluctuations promotes red shifts and sensible broadening relative to the classical profile, bringing the simulation results in much more satisfactory agreement with direct experimental information in the mid and high frequency range of the stretching band. While RPMD predictions overestimate the peak position of the low frequency shoulder, the overall agreement with that reported using an accurate, parameterized, many-body potential is reasonable, and far superior to that one obtains by implementing a partially adiabatic centroid molecular dynamics approach. Quantum effects on the collective dynamics, as reported by instantaneous normal modes, are also discussed.

  2. Quantum Phase Liquids-Fermionic Superfluid without Phase Coherence

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ya-Jie; Zhou, Jiang; Kou, Su-Peng

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the two dimensional generalized attractive Hubbard model in a bipartite lattice, and and a "quantum phase liquid" phase, in which the fermions are paired but don't have phase coherence at zero temperature, in analogy to quantum spin liquid phase. Then, two types of topological quantum phase liquids with a small external magnetic field-Z2 quantum phase liquids and chiral quantum phase liquids-are discussed.

  3. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  4. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  5. Toward quantum FinFET

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhiming

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews a range of quantum phenomena in novel nanoscale transistors called FinFETs, including quantized conductance of 1D transport, single electron effect, tunneling transport, etc. The goal is to create a fundamental bridge between quantum FinFET and nanotechnology to stimulate readers' interest in developing new types of semiconductor technology. Although the rapid development of micro-nano fabrication is driving the MOSFET downscaling trend that is evolving from planar channel to nonplanar FinFET, silicon-based CMOS technology is expected to face fundamental limits in the near future. Therefore, new types of nanoscale devices are being investigated aggressively to take advantage of the quantum effect in carrier transport. The quantum confinement effect of FinFET at room temperatures was reported following the breakthrough to sub-10nm scale technology in silicon nanowires. With chapters written by leading scientists throughout the world, Toward Quantum FinFET provides a comprehensive introductio...

  6. Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Matthias

    Solving computational problems require resources such as time, memory, and space. In the classical model of computation, computational complexity theory has categorized problems according to how difficult it is to solve them as the problem size increases. Remarkably, a quantum computer could solve certain problems using fundamentally fewer resources compared to a conventional computer, and therefore has garnered significant attention. Yet because of the delicate nature of entangled quantum states, the construction of a quantum computer poses an enormous challenge for experimental and theoretical scientists across multi-disciplinary areas including physics, engineering, materials science, and mathematics. While the field of quantum computing still has a long way to grow before reaching full maturity, state-of-the-art experiments on the order of 10 qubits are beginning to reach a fascinating stage at which they can no longer be emulated using even the fastest supercomputer. This raises the hope that small quantum computer demonstrations could be capable of approximately simulating or solving problems that also have practical applications. In this talk I will review the concepts behind quantum computing, and focus on the status of superconducting qubits which includes steps towards quantum error correction and quantum simulations.

  7. Quantum Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2004-11-01

    Financial mathematics is currently almost completely dominated by stochastic calculus. Presenting a completely independent approach, this book applies the mathematical and conceptual formalism of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory (with particular emphasis on the path integral) to the theory of options and to the modeling of interest rates. Many new results, accordingly, emerge from the author's perspective.

  8. Internal quantum efficiency enhancement of GaInN/GaN quantum-well structures using Ag nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iida, Daisuke; Fadil, Ahmed; Chen, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    We report internal quantum efficiency enhancement of thin p-GaN green quantumwell structure using self-assembled Ag nanoparticles. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements are conducted to determine the internal quantum efficiency. The impact of excitation power density...

  9. Spin superfluid Josephson quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Mohseni, Masoud

    2017-04-01

    A macroscopic spintronic qubit based on spin superfluidity and spin Hall phenomena is proposed. This magnetic quantum information processing device realizes the spin-supercurrent analog of the superconducting phase qubit and allows for full electrical control and readout. We also show that an array of interacting magnetic phase qubits can realize a quantum annealer. These devices can be built through standard solid-state fabrication technology, allowing for scalability. However, the upper bound for the operational temperature can, in principle, be higher than the superconducting counterpart, as it is ultimately governed by the magnetic ordering temperatures, which could be much higher than the critical temperatures of the conventional superconducting devices.

  10. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  11. Coherence in quantum estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Paolo; Allegra, Michele

    2018-01-01

    The geometry of quantum states provides a unifying framework for estimation processes based on quantum probes, and it establishes the ultimate bounds of the achievable precision. We show a relation between the statistical distance between infinitesimally close quantum states and the second order variation of the coherence of the optimal measurement basis with respect to the state of the probe. In quantum phase estimation protocols, this leads to propose coherence as the relevant resource that one has to engineer and control to optimize the estimation precision. Furthermore, the main object of the theory i.e. the symmetric logarithmic derivative, in many cases allows one to identify a proper factorization of the whole Hilbert space in two subsystems. The factorization allows one to discuss the role of coherence versus correlations in estimation protocols; to show how certain estimation processes can be completely or effectively described within a single-qubit subsystem; and to derive lower bounds for the scaling of the estimation precision with the number of probes used. We illustrate how the framework works for both noiseless and noisy estimation procedures, in particular those based on multi-qubit GHZ-states. Finally we succinctly analyze estimation protocols based on zero-temperature critical behavior. We identify the coherence that is at the heart of their efficiency, and we show how it exhibits the non-analyticities and scaling behavior proper of a large class of quantum phase transitions.

  12. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  13. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  14. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  15. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...... coherence. The inferred homogeneous line widths are significantly smaller than the line widths usually observed in the photoluminescence from single quantum dots indicating an additional inhomogeneours broadening mechanism in the latter....

  16. A quantum–quantum Metropolis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    The classical Metropolis sampling method is a cornerstone of many statistical modeling applications that range from physics, chemistry, and biology to economics. This method is particularly suitable for sampling the thermal distributions of classical systems. The challenge of extending this method to the simulation of arbitrary quantum systems is that, in general, eigenstates of quantum Hamiltonians cannot be obtained efficiently with a classical computer. However, this challenge can be overcome by quantum computers. Here, we present a quantum algorithm which fully generalizes the classical Metropolis algorithm to the quantum domain. The meaning of quantum generalization is twofold: The proposed algorithm is not only applicable to both classical and quantum systems, but also offers a quantum speedup relative to the classical counterpart. Furthermore, unlike the classical method of quantum Monte Carlo, this quantum algorithm does not suffer from the negative-sign problem associated with fermionic systems. Applications of this algorithm include the study of low-temperature properties of quantum systems, such as the Hubbard model, and preparing the thermal states of sizable molecules to simulate, for example, chemical reactions at an arbitrary temperature. PMID:22215584

  17. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  18. Projected gradient descent algorithms for quantum state tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Eliot; Knee, George C.; Gauger, Erik M.; Leach, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Accurate quantum tomography is a vital tool in both fundamental and applied quantum science. It is a task that involves processing a noisy measurement record in order to construct a reliable estimate of an unknown quantum state, and is central to quantum computing, metrology and communication. To date, many different approaches to quantum state estimation have been developed, yet no one method fits all applications, and all fail relatively quickly as the dimensionality of the unknown state grows. In this work, we suggest that projected gradient descent is a method that can evade some of these shortcomings. We present three tomography algorithms that use projected gradient descent and compare their performance with state-of-the-art alternatives, i.e., the diluted iterative algorithm and convex programming. Our results find in favour of the general class of projected gradient descent methods due to their speed, applicability to large states, and the range of conditions in which they perform as well as providing insight into which variant of projected gradient descent ought to be used in various measurement scenarios.

  19. Quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates that a quantum communication system using the coherent light of a laser can achieve performance orders of magnitude superior to classical optical communications Quantum Communications provides the Masters and PhD signals or communications student with a complete basics-to-applications course in using the principles of quantum mechanics to provide cutting-edge telecommunications. Assuming only knowledge of elementary probability, complex analysis and optics, the book guides its reader through the fundamentals of vector and Hilbert spaces and the necessary quantum-mechanical ideas, simply formulated in four postulates. A turn to practical matters begins with and is then developed by: ·         development of the concept of quantum decision, emphasizing the optimization of measurements to extract useful information from a quantum system; ·         general formulation of a transmitter–receiver system ·         particular treatment of the most popular quantum co...

  20. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  1. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  2. Picturing Quantum Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Guide to reading this textbook; 3. Processes as diagrams; 4. String diagrams; 5. Hilbert space from diagrams; 6. Quantum processes; 7. Quantum measurement; 8. Picturing classical-quantum processes; 9. Picturing phases and complementarity; 10. Quantum theory: the full picture; 11. Quantum foundations; 12. Quantum computation; 13. Quantum resources; 14. Quantomatic; Appendix A. Some notations; References; Index.

  3. Quantum Cryptography Beyond Quantum Key Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C

    2015-01-01

    textabstractQuantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation, secure two- and multi-party computation and delegated quantum computation. Quantum cryptography also studies the limitations and challenges resulting from quantum adversaries—including the ...

  4. Quantum simulations with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, G.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits have become a leading quantum technology for testing fundamentals of quantum mechanics and for the implementation of advanced quantum information protocols. In this chapter, we revise the basic concepts of circuit network theory and circuit quantum electrodynamics for the sake of digital and analog quantum simulations of quantum field theories, relativistic quantum mechanics, and many-body physics, involving fermions and bosons. Based on recent improvements in scalabi...

  5. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  6. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  7. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chowdhury, Sujaul

    2014-01-01

    This book presents comprehensive account of the course for undergraduate students with thorough and complete calculations. The book has been written with the notion that a wave is associated with a material particle i.e. wave and particle coexist. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle has been described in light of this. A chapter is dedicated to mathematical structure of Quantum Mechanics followed by applications to one-dimensional (1D) problems. Orbital and general angular momentum are treated in two separate chapters, the latter also treats addition of angular momentum. Quantum theory of scattering, matrix formulation of Quantum Mechanics variational method and WKB approximation method have also been discussed.

  8. Quantum algorithmic information theory

    OpenAIRE

    Svozil, Karl

    1995-01-01

    The agenda of quantum algorithmic information theory, ordered `top-down,' is the quantum halting amplitude, followed by the quantum algorithmic information content, which in turn requires the theory of quantum computation. The fundamental atoms processed by quantum computation are the quantum bits which are dealt with in quantum information theory. The theory of quantum computation will be based upon a model of universal quantum computer whose elementary unit is a two-port interferometer capa...

  9. Quantum coherence of an XY spin chain with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and quantum phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the quantum coherence of an XY spin chain with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction using a quantum renormalization group-based method, and show that the relative entropy of coherence increases with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction strength at zero temperature, as well as at finite temperature. We also study the quantum criticality of the system by making use of the relative entropy of coherence and violation of Bell inequality, and find that the first derivatives of the renormalized quantum coherence exhibit singularity near the critical point of the quantum phase transition. Finally, we explore the finite-size scaling behaviors of the derivatives of the quantum coherence at the critical point of the quantum phase transition, and obtain several universal finite-size scaling laws.

  10. Interacting lattice systems with quantum dissipation: A quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Pollet, Lode; Lou, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqun; Chen, Yan; Cai, Zi

    2018-01-01

    Quantum dissipation arises when a large system can be split in a quantum system and an environment to which the energy of the former flows. Understanding the effect of dissipation on quantum many-body systems is of particular importance due to its potential relationship with quantum information. We propose a conceptually simple approach to introduce dissipation into interacting quantum systems in a thermodynamical context, in which every site of a one-dimensional (1D) lattice is coupled off-diagonally to its own bath. The interplay between quantum dissipation and interactions gives rise to counterintuitive interpretations such as a compressible zero-temperature state with spontaneous discrete symmetry breaking and a thermal phase transition in a 1D dissipative quantum many-body system as revealed by quantum Monte Carlo path-integral simulations.

  11. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...... in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn...

  12. Temperature sensing property of hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber filled with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in an UV curing adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Helin; Yang, Aijun

    2017-11-01

    A temperature sensor based on the hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber filled with the CdSe/ZnS QDs dissolved in an ultraviolet (UV) curing adhesive is reported. The sensor shows a linear variation of the photoluminescence (PL) peak wavelength for a temperature range from 40 °C to 140 °C, with a correlation factor of 0.99263 and a sensitivity of 0.05744 nm/°C. Although the peak intensity of emission spectrum increased exponentially with the temperature, a linear temperature-dependence result with a correlation factor of 0.99917 and a slope of 2.04 × 10-3 °C-1 can be obtained with a self-reference spectral intensity method. The linear variation characteristics of the peak wavelength and the self-reference intensity of PL spectrum indicates the designed fiber temperature sensor is feasible in the practical application.

  13. Functional quantum biology in photosynthesis and magnetoreception

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Neill; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Is there a functional role for quantum mechanics or coherent quantum effects in biological processes? While this question is as old as quantum theory, only recently have measurements on biological systems on ultra-fast time-scales shed light on a possible answer. In this review we give an overview of the two main candidates for biological systems which may harness such functional quantum effects: photosynthesis and magnetoreception. We discuss some of the latest evidence both for and against room temperature quantum coherence, and consider whether there is truly a functional role for coherence in these biological mechanisms. Finally, we give a brief overview of some more speculative examples of functional quantum biology including the sense of smell, long-range quantum tunneling in proteins, biological photoreceptors, and the flow of ions across a cell membrane.

  14. Quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  15. Quantum Computation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Quantum Computation - Particle and Wave Aspects of Algorithms. Apoorva Patel. General Article Volume 16 ... Keywords. Boolean logic; computation; computational complexity; digital language; Hilbert space; qubit; superposition; Feynman.

  16. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spehner, Dominique [Université Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, Institut Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble, France and Laboratoire de Physique et Modélisation des Milieux Condensés, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-15

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  17. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  18. Quantum curves

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    One says that a pair (P,Q) of ordinary differential operators specify a quantum curve if [P,Q]=const. If a pair of difference operators (K,L) obey the relation KL=const LK we say that they specify a discrete quantum curve. This terminology is prompted by well known results about commuting differential and difference operators, relating pairs of such operators with pairs of meromorphic functions on algebraic curves obeying some conditions. ...

  19. Quantum torsors

    OpenAIRE

    Grunspan, C.

    2002-01-01

    This text gives some results about quantum torsors. Our starting point is an old reformulation of torsors recalled recently by Kontsevich. We propose an unification of the definitions of torsors in algebraic geometry and in Poisson geometry. Any quantum torsor is equipped with two comodule-algebra structures over Hopf algebras and these structures commute with each other. In the finite dimensional case, these two Hopf algebras share the same finite dimension. We show that any Galois extension...

  20. Quantum lottery

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On April Fools' Day, CERN Quantum Diaries blogger Pauline Gagnon held a giveaway of microscopic proportion. Up for grabs? Ten Higgs bosons, courtesy of CERN. Pauline announced the winners last week; let's see what they'll really be getting in the mail...   Custom-made Particle Zoo Higgs bosons were sent out to the winners. Read more about the prize in the Quantum Diaries post "Higgs boson lottery: when CERN plays April Fools' jokes".

  1. Optimal quantum thermometry by dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; Wang, An Min

    2017-06-01

    Decoherence often happens in the quantum world. We try to utilize quantum dephasing to build an optimal thermometry. By calculating the Cramér-Rao bound, we prove that the Ramsey measurement is the optimal way to measure the temperature for uncorrelated probe particles. Using the optimal measurement, the metrological equivalence of product and maximally entangled state of initial quantum probes always holds. Contrary to frequency estimation, the optimal temperature estimation can be obtained in the case ν 1. For the general Zeno regime (ν =2), uncorrelated product states are the optimal choice in typical Ramsey spectroscopy setup. In order to improve the resolution of temperature, one should reduce the characteristic time of dephasing factor γ (t)∝ t^2, and the power ν new way to measure non-Markovian effect.

  2. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 56; Issue 2-3. Quantum entanglement ... Arvind. Quantum information processing Volume 56 Issue 2-3 February-March 2001 pp 357-365 ... The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum ...

  3. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  4. Multidimensional entropy landscape of quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, K.; Zaum, S.; Stockert, O.; Si, Q.; Löhneysen, H. V.

    2017-08-01

    The third law of thermodynamics states that the entropy of any system in equilibrium has to vanish at absolute zero temperature. At nonzero temperatures, on the other hand, matter is expected to accumulate entropy near a quantum critical point, where it undergoes a continuous transition from one ground state to another. Here, we determine, based on general thermodynamic principles, the spatial-dimensional profile of the entropy S near a quantum critical point and its steepest descent in the corresponding multidimensional stress space. We demonstrate this approach for the canonical quantum critical compound CeCu 6-xAux near its onset of antiferromagnetic order. We are able to link the directional stress dependence of S to the previously determined geometry of quantum critical fluctuations. Our demonstration of the multidimensional entropy landscape provides the foundation to understand how quantum criticality nucleates novel phases such as high-temperature superconductivity.

  5. Normal Incident Long Wave Infrared Quantum Dash Quantum Cascade Photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Jiao; Ren, Fei; Liu, Shu-Man; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a quantum dash quantum cascade photodetector (QDash-QCD) by incorporating self-assembled InAs quantum dashes into the active region of a long wave infrared QCD. Sensitive photoresponse to normal incident light at 10 μm was observed, which is attributed to the intersubband (ISB) transitions in the quantum well/quantum dash (QW/QDash) hybrid absorption region and the following transfer of excited electrons on the extraction stair-like quantum levels separated by LO-phonon energy. The high density InAs quantum dashes were formed in the Stranski-Krastanow mode and stair-like levels were formed by a lattice matched InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice. A stable responsivity from 5 mA/W at 77 K to 3 mA/W at as high as 190 K was observed, which makes the QDash-QCD promising in high temperature operation.

  6. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  7. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  8. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  9. Quantum biology on the edge of quantum chaos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Vattay

    Full Text Available We give a new explanation for why some biological systems can stay quantum coherent for a long time at room temperature, one of the fundamental puzzles of quantum biology. We show that systems with the right level of complexity between chaos and regularity can increase their coherence time by orders of magnitude. Systems near Critical Quantum Chaos or Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT can have long coherence times and coherent transport at the same time. The new theory tested in a realistic light harvesting system model can reproduce the scaling of critical fluctuations reported in recent experiments. Scaling of return probability in the FMO light harvesting complex shows the signs of universal return probability decay observed at critical MIT. The results may open up new possibilities to design low loss energy and information transport systems in this Poised Realm hovering reversibly between quantum coherence and classicality.

  10. Quantum biology on the edge of quantum chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattay, Gabor; Kauffman, Stuart; Niiranen, Samuli

    2014-01-01

    We give a new explanation for why some biological systems can stay quantum coherent for a long time at room temperature, one of the fundamental puzzles of quantum biology. We show that systems with the right level of complexity between chaos and regularity can increase their coherence time by orders of magnitude. Systems near Critical Quantum Chaos or Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) can have long coherence times and coherent transport at the same time. The new theory tested in a realistic light harvesting system model can reproduce the scaling of critical fluctuations reported in recent experiments. Scaling of return probability in the FMO light harvesting complex shows the signs of universal return probability decay observed at critical MIT. The results may open up new possibilities to design low loss energy and information transport systems in this Poised Realm hovering reversibly between quantum coherence and classicality.

  11. Quantum phase slips: from condensed matter to ultracold quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Errico, C.; Abbate, S. Scaffidi; Modugno, G.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPS) are the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids and superconductors at low temperatures. They have been well characterized in most condensed-matter systems, and signatures of their existence have been recently observed in superfluids based on quantum gases too. In this review, we briefly summarize the main results obtained on the investigation of phase slips from superconductors to quantum gases. In particular, we focus our attention on recent experimental results of the dissipation in one-dimensional Bose superfluids flowing along a shallow periodic potential, which show signatures of QPS. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  12. Quantum nondemolition measurement by pulsed oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Kai-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Paramagnetic Faraday rotation is a quantum nondemolition measurement method that can generate spin squeezing and improve the measurement precision of a collective spin component beyond the standard quantum limit. In practice, a constant bias magnetic field is used to drive the spin precessing at sufficiently high frequency in order to lift the signal out of low-frequency technical noises. However, continuous measurement of precessing spins introduces back-action noise (BAN) due to the light-shift effect. Two types of back-action-evading (BAE) measurement of collective spin components have been demonstrated recently: continuous measurement of a two-ensemble system and stroboscopic measurement of a single ensemble. Here we propose another single ensemble BAE measurement by periodically modulating the bias field with π pulses. Our theoretical calculation shows that under experimental settings where pulse-field modulation does not introduce significant decoherences, the proposed method can suppress the BAN and generate spin squeezing faster than the stroboscopic one at the same probe light power. Moreover, if it is combined with synchronous stroboscopic probing, light-shift BAN can be completely eliminated.

  13. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  14. Quantum Phase Transitions in Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Rau, I. G.; Amasha, S.; Oreg, Y.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2013-01-01

    This review article describes theoretical and experimental advances in using quantum dots as a system for studying impurity quantum phase transitions and the non-Fermi liquid behavior at the quantum critical point.

  15. Quantum Communication and Quantum Multivariate Polynomial Interpolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang

    2017-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of multivariate polynomial interpolation and its application to quantum secret sharing. We show that using quantum Fourier transform one can produce the protocol for quantum secret sharing distribution.

  16. Quantum Electrodynamics in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup

    in the local density of states (LDOS) in PhC waveguides. From decay rate measurements on quantum dot lines temperature tuned in the vicinity of the waveguide band edge, a β-factor for a single quantum dot of more then 85% has been extracted. Finite difference time domain simulations (FDTD) for disordered Ph...

  17. Optical studies of capped quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuister, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and spectroscopy of CdSe and CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The first chapter gives an introduction into the unique size dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent QDs of CdSe and CdTe were prepared via a high temperature method

  18. Quantum fluctuations in FRLW space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Rabochaya, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a quantum field theoretical approach, where a quantum probe is used to investigate the properties of generic non-flat FRLW space time. The fluctuations related to a massless conformal coupled scalar field defined on a space-time with horizon is identified with a probe and the procedure to measure the local temperature is presented.

  19. Long distance quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiu-Xiu; Sun, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is a core protocol in quantum information science. Besides revealing the fascinating feature of quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation provides an ultimate way to distribute quantum state over extremely long distance, which is crucial for global quantum communication and future quantum networks. In this review, we focus on the long distance quantum teleportation experiments, especially those employing photonic qubits. From the viewpoint of real-world application, both the technical advantages and disadvantages of these experiments are discussed.

  20. Quantum annealing with manufactured spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M W; Amin, M H S; Gildert, S; Lanting, T; Hamze, F; Dickson, N; Harris, R; Berkley, A J; Johansson, J; Bunyk, P; Chapple, E M; Enderud, C; Hilton, J P; Karimi, K; Ladizinsky, E; Ladizinsky, N; Oh, T; Perminov, I; Rich, C; Thom, M C; Tolkacheva, E; Truncik, C J S; Uchaikin, S; Wang, J; Wilson, B; Rose, G

    2011-05-12

    Many interesting but practically intractable problems can be reduced to that of finding the ground state of a system of interacting spins; however, finding such a ground state remains computationally difficult. It is believed that the ground state of some naturally occurring spin systems can be effectively attained through a process called quantum annealing. If it could be harnessed, quantum annealing might improve on known methods for solving certain types of problem. However, physical investigation of quantum annealing has been largely confined to microscopic spins in condensed-matter systems. Here we use quantum annealing to find the ground state of an artificial Ising spin system comprising an array of eight superconducting flux quantum bits with programmable spin-spin couplings. We observe a clear signature of quantum annealing, distinguishable from classical thermal annealing through the temperature dependence of the time at which the system dynamics freezes. Our implementation can be configured in situ to realize a wide variety of different spin networks, each of which can be monitored as it moves towards a low-energy configuration. This programmable artificial spin network bridges the gap between the theoretical study of ideal isolated spin networks and the experimental investigation of bulk magnetic samples. Moreover, with an increased number of spins, such a system may provide a practical physical means to implement a quantum algorithm, possibly allowing more-effective approaches to solving certain classes of hard combinatorial optimization problems.