WorldWideScience

Sample records for evading temperature quantum

  1. Quantum Backaction Evading Measurement of Collective Mechanical Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockeloen-Korppi, C F; Damskägg, E; Pirkkalainen, J-M; Clerk, A A; Woolley, M J; Sillanpää, M A

    2016-09-30

    The standard quantum limit constrains the precision of an oscillator position measurement. It arises from a balance between the imprecision and the quantum backaction of the measurement. However, a measurement of only a single quadrature of the oscillator can evade the backaction and be made with arbitrary precision. Here we demonstrate quantum backaction evading measurements of a collective quadrature of two mechanical oscillators, both coupled to a common microwave cavity. The work allows for quantum state tomography of two mechanical oscillators, and provides a foundation for macroscopic mechanical entanglement and force sensing beyond conventional quantum limits.

  2. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B.; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation—the so-called standard quantum limit—on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational ‘drum’ mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  3. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S

    2017-07-12

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation-the so-called standard quantum limit-on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational 'drum' mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  4. Quantum Chromodynamic at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    A formal expression to the Gibbs free energy of topological defects of quantum chromodynamics (QCD)by using the semiclassical approach in the context of field theory at finite temperature and in the high temperature limit is determined. This expression is used to calculate the free energy of magnetic monopoles. Applying the obtained results to a method in which the free energy of topological defects of a theory may indicate its different phases, its searched for informations about phases of QCD. (author) [pt

  5. Spotlighting quantum critical points via quantum correlations at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werlang, T.; Ribeiro, G. A. P.; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    We extend the program initiated by T. Werlang et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 095702 (2010)] in several directions. Firstly, we investigate how useful quantum correlations, such as entanglement and quantum discord, are in the detection of critical points of quantum phase transitions when the system is at finite temperatures. For that purpose we study several thermalized spin models in the thermodynamic limit, namely, the XXZ model, the XY model, and the Ising model, all of which with an external magnetic field. We compare the ability of quantum discord, entanglement, and some thermodynamic quantities to spotlight the quantum critical points for several different temperatures. Secondly, for some models we go beyond nearest neighbors and also study the behavior of entanglement and quantum discord for second nearest neighbors around the critical point at finite temperature. Finally, we furnish a more quantitative description of how good all these quantities are in spotlighting critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite T, bridging the gap between experimental data and those theoretical descriptions solely based on the unattainable absolute zero assumption.

  6. Temperature Scaling Law for Quantum Annealing Optimizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albash, Tameem; Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2017-09-15

    Physical implementations of quantum annealing unavoidably operate at finite temperatures. We point to a fundamental limitation of fixed finite temperature quantum annealers that prevents them from functioning as competitive scalable optimizers and show that to serve as optimizers annealer temperatures must be appropriately scaled down with problem size. We derive a temperature scaling law dictating that temperature must drop at the very least in a logarithmic manner but also possibly as a power law with problem size. We corroborate our results by experiment and simulations and discuss the implications of these to practical annealers.

  7. Local temperature in quantum thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Saez, Artur; Ferraro, Alessandro; Acin, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We consider blocks of quantum spins in a chain at thermal equilibrium, focusing on their properties from a thermodynamical perspective. In a classical system the temperature behaves as an intensive magnitude, above a certain block size, regardless of the actual value of the temperature itself. However, a deviation from this behavior is expected in quantum systems. In particular, we see that under some conditions the description of the blocks as thermal states with the same global temperature as the whole chain fails. We analyze this issue by employing the quantum fidelity as a figure of merit, singling out in detail the departure from the classical behavior. As it may be expected, we see that quantum features are more prominent at low temperatures and are affected by the presence of zero-temperature quantum phase transitions. Interestingly, we show that the blocks can be considered indeed as thermal states with a high fidelity, provided an effective local temperature is properly identified. Such a result may originate from typical properties of reduced subsystems of energy-constrained Hilbert spaces. Finally, the relation between local and global temperatures is analyzed as a function of the size of the blocks and the system parameters.

  8. Quantum Field Theory at non zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.

    1989-01-01

    The formulations of the Φ 4 Quantum Field Theory and of Quantum Electrodynamics in I+d dimensions (d spatial dimensions) at non-zero temperature are reviewed. The behaviours of all those theories in the regime of large distances and high temperatures are surveyed. Only results are reported, all technicalities being omitted. The leading high-temperature contributions to correlation functions, to all perturbative orders, in those theories turn out to be also given by simpler theories, having much milder (superrenormalizable) ultraviolet behaviour and special mass renormalizations. In particular, the triviality/non-triviality issue for the Φ 4 theory in 1+3 dimensions is discussed briefly. (Author)

  9. Effect of temperature on quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHDI AHMADI BORJI

    2017-07-12

    Jul 12, 2017 ... Effect of temperature on InxGa1−xAs/GaAs quantum dots. MAHDI AHMADI BORJI1, ALI ... Attention should be given to the effects of temperature, ... tion 2 explains the model and method of the numerical simulation. Our results ...

  10. Quantum entanglement at negative temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, G B; Meerovich, V M; Sokolovsky, V L

    2013-01-01

    An isolated spin system that is in internal thermodynamic equilibrium and that has an upper limit to its allowed energy states can possess a negative temperature. We calculate the thermodynamic characteristics and the concurrence in this system over the entire range of positive and negative temperatures. Our calculation was performed for different real structures, which can be used in experiments. It is found that the temperature dependence of the concurrence is substantially asymmetrical similarly to other thermodynamic characteristics. At a negative temperature the maximum concurrence and the absolute temperature of the entanglement appearance are significantly larger than those at a positive temperature. The concurrence can be characterized by two dimensionless parameters: the ratio between the Zeeman and dipolar energies and the ratio of the thermal and dipolar energies. It was shown that for all considered structures the dimensionless temperatures of the transition between entanglement and separability of the first and second spins are independent of spin structure and the number of spins. (paper)

  11. Quantum Zeno subspaces induced by temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Militello, B.; Scala, M.; Messina, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    We discuss the partitioning of the Hilbert space of a quantum system induced by the interaction with another system at thermal equilibrium, showing that the higher the temperature the more effective is the formation of Zeno subspaces. We show that our analysis keeps its validity even in the case of interaction with a bosonic reservoir, provided appropriate limitations of the relevant bandwidth.

  12. Evader Interdiction and Collateral Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In network interdiction problems, evaders (hostile agents or data packets) are moving through a network towards their targets and we wish to choose sensor placement locations in order to intercept them before they reach their destinations. Sensor locations should be chosen economically, balancing security gains with cost, including the inconvenience sensors inflict upon innocent travelers. We give optimal sensor allocation algorithms for several classes of special graphs and hardness and optimal approximation results for general graphs, including for deterministic or Markov chain-based and oblivious or reactive evaders. In a similar-sounding but much different problem setting posed by [10] where the innocent travelers can also be reactive, we again give optimal algorithms for special cases and hardness and (essentially) optimal approximation results on general graphs.

  13. Quantum fields at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    These lectures are an elementary introduction to standard many-body techniques applied to the study of quantum fields at finite temperature and density: perturbative expansion, linear response theory, quasiparticles and their interactions, etc... We emphasize the usefulness of the imaginary time formalism in a wide class of problems, as opposed to many recent approaches based on real time. Properties of elementary excitations in an ultrarelativistic plasma at high temperature or chemical potential are discussed, and recent progresses in the study of the quark-gluon plasma are briefly reviewed

  14. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures. PMID:24704874

  15. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  16. Quantum Simulations of Low Temperature High Energy Density Matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voth, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    .... Using classical molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate these equilibrium properties would predict qualitatively incorrect results for low temperature solid hydrogen, because of the highly quantum...

  17. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  18. Unconditional polarization qubit quantum memory at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    The creation of global quantum key distribution and quantum communication networks requires multiple operational quantum memories. Achieving a considerable reduction in experimental and cost overhead in these implementations is thus a major challenge. Here we present a polarization qubit quantum memory fully-operational at 330K, an unheard frontier in the development of useful qubit quantum technology. This result is achieved through extensive study of how optical response of cold atomic medium is transformed by the motion of atoms at room temperature leading to an optimal characterization of room temperature quantum light-matter interfaces. Our quantum memory shows an average fidelity of 86.6 +/- 0.6% for optical pulses containing on average 1 photon per pulse, thereby defeating any classical strategy exploiting the non-unitary character of the memory efficiency. Our system significantly decreases the technological overhead required to achieve quantum memory operation and will serve as a building block for scalable and technologically simpler many-memory quantum machines. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180. B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  19. Quantum gases finite temperature and non-equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanska, Marzena; Davis, Matthew; Gardiner, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The 1995 observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapours spawned the field of ultracold, degenerate quantum gases. Unprecedented developments in experimental design and precision control have led to quantum gases becoming the preferred playground for designer quantum many-body systems. This self-contained volume provides a broad overview of the principal theoretical techniques applied to non-equilibrium and finite temperature quantum gases. Covering Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and the more recently realised exciton-polariton condensates, it fills a gap by linking between different methods with origins in condensed matter physics, quantum field theory, quantum optics, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics. Thematically organised chapters on different methodologies, contributed by key researchers using a unified notation, provide the first integrated view of the relative merits of individual approaches, aided by pertinent introductory chapters and the guidance of ed...

  20. Scalable effective-temperature reduction for quantum annealers via nested quantum annealing correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-02-01

    Nested quantum annealing correction (NQAC) is an error-correcting scheme for quantum annealing that allows for the encoding of a logical qubit into an arbitrarily large number of physical qubits. The encoding replaces each logical qubit by a complete graph of degree C . The nesting level C represents the distance of the error-correcting code and controls the amount of protection against thermal and control errors. Theoretical mean-field analyses and empirical data obtained with a D-Wave Two quantum annealer (supporting up to 512 qubits) showed that NQAC has the potential to achieve a scalable effective-temperature reduction, Teff˜C-η , with 0 temperature of a quantum annealer. Such effective-temperature reduction is relevant for machine-learning applications. Since we demonstrate that NQAC achieves error correction via a reduction of the effective-temperature of the quantum annealing device, our results address the problem of the "temperature scaling law for quantum annealers," which requires the temperature of quantum annealers to be reduced as problems of larger sizes are attempted to be solved.

  1. Towards room temperature solid state quantum devices at the edge of quantum chaos for long-living quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prati, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Long living coherent quantum states have been observed in biological systems up to room temperature. Light harvesting in chromophoresis realized by excitonic systems living at the edge of quantum chaos, where energy level distribution becomes semi-Poissonian. On the other hand, artificial materials suffer the loss of coherence of quantum states in quantum information processing, but semiconductor materials are known to exhibit quantum chaotic conditions, so the exploitation of similar conditions are to be considered. The advancements of nanofabrication, together with the control of implantation of individual atoms at nanometric precision, may open the experimental study of such special regime at the edge of the phase transitions for the electronic systems obtained by implanting impurity atoms in a silicon transistor. Here I review the recent advancements made in the field of theoretical description of the light harvesting in biological system in its connection with phase transitions at the few atoms scale and how it would be possible to achieve transition point to quantum chaotic regime. Such mechanism may thus preserve quantum coherent states at room temperature in solid state devices, to be exploited for quantum information processing as well as dissipation-free quantum electronics. (paper)

  2. Characteristic functions of quantum heat with baths at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik

    2018-06-01

    This paper is about quantum heat defined as the change in energy of a bath during a process. The presentation takes into account recent developments in classical strong-coupling thermodynamics and addresses a version of quantum heat that satisfies quantum-classical correspondence. The characteristic function and the full counting statistics of quantum heat are shown to be formally similar. The paper further shows that the method can be extended to more than one bath, e.g., two baths at different temperatures, which opens up the prospect of studying correlations and heat flow. The paper extends earlier results on the expected quantum heat in the setting of one bath [E. Aurell and R. Eichhorn, New J. Phys. 17, 065007 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/6/065007; E. Aurell, Entropy 19, 595 (2017), 10.3390/e19110595].

  3. Nonlinear quantum fluid equations for a finite temperature Fermi plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear quantum electron fluid equations are derived, taking into account the moments of the Wigner equation and by using the Fermi-Dirac equilibrium distribution for electrons with an arbitrary temperature. A simplified formalism with the assumptions of incompressibility of the distribution function is used to close the moments in velocity space. The nonlinear quantum diffraction effects into the fluid equations are incorporated. In the high-temperature limit, we retain the nonlinear fluid equations for a dense hot plasma and in the low-temperature limit, we retain the correct fluid equations for a fully degenerate plasma

  4. Temperature effects on quantum interference in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments have demonstrated that destructive quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular junctions lead to very low conductances even at room temperature. On the other hand, another recent experiment showed increasing conductance with temperature which was attributed to decoheren...

  5. Single-temperature quantum engine without feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Kim, Yong Woon

    2017-08-01

    A cyclically working quantum-mechanical engine that operates at a single temperature is proposed. Its energy input is delivered by a quantum measurement. The functioning of the engine does not require any feedback control. We analyze work, heat, and the efficiency of the engine for the case of a working substance that is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics and that can be adiabatically compressed and expanded. The obtained general expressions are exemplified for a spin in an adiabatically changing magnetic field and a particle moving in a potential with slowly changing shape.

  6. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-08

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  7. Quantum electrodynamics at high temperature. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The photon sector of QED in d = 3 spatial dimensions is analyzed at high temperature thereby generalizing nontrivially a previous study for d = 1. The imaginary time formalism and an improved renormalized perturbation theory which incorporates second order Debye screening are used. General results are presented for the leading high temperature contributions to all renormalized connected photon Green's functions for fixed external momenta (much smaller than the temperature) to all orders in the improved perturbation theory. Those leading contributions are ultraviolet finite, infrared convergent and gauge invariant, and display an interesting form of dimensional reduction at high temperature. A new path integral representations is given for the high temperature partition function with an external photon source, which is shown to generate all leading high temperature Green's functions mentioned above, and, so, it displays neatly the kind of dimensional reduction which makes QED to become simpler at high temperature. This limiting partition function corresponds to an imaginary time dependent electron positron field interacting with an electromagnetic field at zero imaginary time, and it depends on the renormalized electron mass and electric charge, the second order contribution to the usual renormalization constant Z 3 and a new mass term, which is associated to the photon field with vanishing Lorentz index. The new mass term corresponds to a finite number of diagrams in the high temperature improved perturbation theory and carriers ultraviolet divergences which are compensated for by other contributions (so that the leading high temperature Green's functions referred to above are ultraviolet finite). The dominant high temperature contributions to the renormalized thermodynamic potential to all perturbative orders: i) are given in terms of the above leading high-temperature contributions to the photon Green's functions (except for a few diagrams of low order in the

  8. Deterministic constant-temperature dynamics for dissipative quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    A novel method is introduced in order to treat the dissipative dynamics of quantum systems interacting with a bath of classical degrees of freedom. The method is based upon an extension of the Nose-Hoover chain (constant temperature) dynamics to quantum-classical systems. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic numerical calculations on the relaxation dynamics of the spin-boson model show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics represents the thermal noise of the bath in an accurate and simple way. Numerical comparisons, both with the constant-energy calculation and with the quantum-classical Brownian motion treatment of the bath, show that the quantum-classical Nose-Hoover chain dynamics can be used to introduce dissipation in the evolution of a quantum subsystem even with just one degree of freedom for the bath. The algorithm can be computationally advantageous in modelling, within computer simulation, the dynamics of a quantum subsystem interacting with complex molecular environments. (fast track communication)

  9. Quantum-gravity fluctuations and the black-hole temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-05-15

    Bekenstein has put forward the idea that, in a quantum theory of gravity, a black hole should have a discrete energy spectrum with concomitant discrete line emission. The quantized black-hole radiation spectrum is expected to be very different from Hawking's semi-classical prediction of a thermal black-hole radiation spectrum. One naturally wonders: Is it possible to reconcile the discrete quantum spectrum suggested by Bekenstein with the continuous semi-classical spectrum suggested by Hawking? In order to address this fundamental question, in this essay we shall consider the zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime. In a quantum theory of gravity, these spacetime fluctuations are closely related to the characteristic gravitational resonances of the corresponding black-hole spacetime. Assuming that the energy of the black-hole radiation stems from these zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime, we derive the effective temperature of the quantized black-hole radiation spectrum. Remarkably, it is shown that this characteristic temperature of the discrete (quantized) black-hole radiation agrees with the well-known Hawking temperature of the continuous (semi-classical) black-hole spectrum. (orig.)

  10. Quantum-gravity fluctuations and the black-hole temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    Bekenstein has put forward the idea that, in a quantum theory of gravity, a black hole should have a discrete energy spectrum with concomitant discrete line emission. The quantized black-hole radiation spectrum is expected to be very different from Hawking's semi-classical prediction of a thermal black-hole radiation spectrum. One naturally wonders: Is it possible to reconcile the discrete quantum spectrum suggested by Bekenstein with the continuous semi-classical spectrum suggested by Hawking? In order to address this fundamental question, in this essay we shall consider the zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime. In a quantum theory of gravity, these spacetime fluctuations are closely related to the characteristic gravitational resonances of the corresponding black-hole spacetime. Assuming that the energy of the black-hole radiation stems from these zero-point quantum-gravity fluctuations of the black-hole spacetime, we derive the effective temperature of the quantized black-hole radiation spectrum. Remarkably, it is shown that this characteristic temperature of the discrete (quantized) black-hole radiation agrees with the well-known Hawking temperature of the continuous (semi-classical) black-hole spectrum. (orig.)

  11. Experiments on Quantum Hall Topological Phases in Ultra Low Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Rui-Rui

    2015-01-01

    This project is to cool electrons in semiconductors to extremely low temperatures and to study new states of matter formed by low-dimensional electrons (or holes). At such low temperatures (and with an intense magnetic field), electronic behavior differs completely from ordinary ones observed at room temperatures or regular low temperature. Studies of electrons at such low temperatures would open the door for fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics. Present studies have been focused on topological phases in the fractional quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor heterostructures, and the newly discovered (by this group) quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb materials. This project consists of the following components: 1) Development of efficient sample cooling techniques and electron thermometry: Our goal is to reach 1 mK electron temperature and reasonable determination of electron temperature; 2) Experiments at ultra-low temperatures: Our goal is to understand the energy scale of competing quantum phases, by measuring the temperature-dependence of transport features. Focus will be placed on such issues as the energy gap of the 5/2 state, and those of 12/5 (and possible 13/5); resistive signature of instability near 1/2 at ultra-low temperatures; 3) Measurement of the 5/2 gaps in the limit of small or large Zeeman energies: Our goal is to gain physics insight of 5/2 state at limiting experimental parameters, especially those properties concerning the spin polarization; 4) Experiments on tuning the electron-electron interaction in a screened quantum Hall system: Our goal is to gain understanding of the formation of paired fractional quantum Hall state as the interaction pseudo-potential is being modified by a nearby screening electron layer; 5) Experiments on the quantized helical edge states under a strong magnetic field and ultralow temperatures: our goal is to investigate both the bulk and edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator under

  12. Topological order, entanglement, and quantum memory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazáč, Dalimil; Hamma, Alioscia

    2012-01-01

    We compute the topological entropy of the toric code models in arbitrary dimension at finite temperature. We find that the critical temperatures for the existence of full quantum (classical) topological entropy correspond to the confinement–deconfinement transitions in the corresponding Z 2 gauge theories. This implies that the thermal stability of topological entropy corresponds to the stability of quantum (classical) memory. The implications for the understanding of ergodicity breaking in topological phases are discussed. - Highlights: ► We calculate the topological entropy of a general toric code in any dimension. ► We find phase transitions in the topological entropy. ► The phase transitions coincide with the appearance of quantum/classical memory.

  13. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer between quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2015), 325-330 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : excitation transfer * quantum dots * temperature dependence * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Quantum Heat Engine and Negative Boltzmann Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Jing-Yi; Quan Hai-Tao

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the ambiguity on negative Boltzmann temperature in literature, we study the Carnot and the Otto cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at the negative Boltzmann temperature based on a canonical ensemble description. The work extraction, entropy production and the efficiency of these cycles are explored. Conditions for constructing and properties of these thermodynamic cycles are elucidated. We find that the apparent “violation” of the second law of thermodynamics in these cycles are due to the fact that the traditional definition of thermodynamic efficiency is inappropriate in this situation. When properly understanding the efficiency and the adiabatic processes, in which the system crosses over “absolute ZERO” in a limit sense, the Carnot cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at a negative Boltzmann temperature can be understood straightforwardly, and it contradicts neither the second nor the third law of thermodynamics. Hence, negative Boltzmann temperature is a consistent concept in thermodynamics. We use a two-level system and an Ising spin system to illustrate our central results. (paper)

  15. Results in finite temperature quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Down, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    First, three quantities of physical interest are calculated. The first two quantities are the self energy of the electron at order α and the self mass of the electron at order α 2 due to its interaction with a thermal bath of photons. The third quantity of physical interest is the thermal contribution to the self mass of the axion. Second, some formal developments are presented. First among these is the proof of an extension to the familiar optical theorem to cover processes taking place at finite temperature. Then an example of the application of the theorem is given for a simple field theory involving two types of scalar particles. The example illustrates that the relationship between the forward scattering amplitude and the total cross section is more complex at finite temperature than at zero temperature. Third, a method for calculating the wave function renormalization constant at finite temperature for an electron in a thermal bath of photons is presented. This method is compared with methods invented by other authors

  16. The origins of macroscopic quantum coherence in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Philip; Nottale, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new theoretical approach to superconductivity in p-type cuprates. • Electron pairing mechanisms in the superconducting and pseudogap phases are proposed. • A scale free network of dopants is key to macroscopic quantum coherence. - Abstract: A new, theoretical approach to macroscopic quantum coherence and superconductivity in the p-type (hole doped) cuprates is proposed. The theory includes mechanisms to account for e-pair coupling in the superconducting and pseudogap phases and their inter relations observed in these materials. Electron pair coupling in the superconducting phase is facilitated by local quantum potentials created by static dopants in a mechanism which explains experimentally observed optimal doping levels and the associated peak in critical temperature. By contrast, evidence suggests that electrons contributing to the pseudogap are predominantly coupled by fractal spin waves (fractons) induced by the fractal arrangement of dopants. On another level, the theory offers new insights into the emergence of a macroscopic quantum potential generated by a fractal distribution of dopants. This, in turn, leads to the emergence of coherent, macroscopic spin waves and a second associated macroscopic quantum potential, possibly supported by charge order. These quantum potentials play two key roles. The first involves the transition of an expected diffusive process (normally associated with Anderson localization) in fractal networks, into e-pair coherence. The second involves the facilitation of tunnelling between localized e-pairs. These combined effects lead to the merger of the super conducting and pseudo gap phases into a single coherent condensate at optimal doping. The underlying theory relating to the diffusion to quantum transition is supported by Coherent Random Lasing, which can be explained using an analogous approach. As a final step, an experimental program is outlined to validate the theory and suggests a new

  17. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-15

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  18. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-01

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  19. Thermo field dynamics: a quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, F.; Marinaro, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of the theory of thermo field dynamics (TFD) is presented. TFD is introduced and developed by Umezawa and his coworkers at finite temperature. The most significant concept in TFD is that of a thermal vacuum which satisfies some conditions denoted as thermal state conditions. The TFD permits to reformulate theories at finite temperature. There is no need in an additional principle to determine particle distributions at T ≠ 0. Temperature and other macroscopic parameters are introduced in the definition of the vacuum state. All operator formalisms used in quantum field theory at T=0 are preserved, although the field degrees of freedom are doubled. 8 refs

  20. Room temperature excitation spectroscopy of single quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a single molecule detection scheme to investigate excitation spectra of single emitters at room temperature. We demonstrate the potential of single emitter photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy by recording excitation spectra of single CdSe nanocrystals over a wide spectral range of 100 nm. The spectra exhibit emission intermittency, characteristic of single emitters. We observe large variations in the spectra close to the band edge, which represent the individual heterogeneity of the observed quantum dots. We also find specific excitation wavelengths for which the single quantum dots analyzed show an increased propensity for a transition to a long-lived dark state. We expect that the additional capability of recording excitation spectra at room temperature from single emitters will enable insights into the photophysics of emitters that so far have remained inaccessible.

  1. Finite-temperature effects in helical quantum turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark Di Leoni, Patricio; Mininni, Pablo D.; Brachet, Marc E.

    2018-04-01

    We perform a study of the evolution of helical quantum turbulence at different temperatures by solving numerically the Gross-Pitaevskii and the stochastic Ginzburg-Landau equations, using up to 40963 grid points with a pseudospectral method. We show that for temperatures close to the critical one, the fluid described by these equations can act as a classical viscous flow, with the decay of the incompressible kinetic energy and the helicity becoming exponential. The transition from this behavior to the one observed at zero temperature is smooth as a function of temperature. Moreover, the presence of strong thermal effects can inhibit the development of a proper turbulent cascade. We provide Ansätze for the effective viscosity and friction as a function of the temperature.

  2. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  3. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'danskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerisation, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerisation reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau 0 ) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerisation by radiation and during postpolymerisation and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau 0 slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau 0 reaches a plateau (tau 0 approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life)

  4. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1975-12-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius Law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerization, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerization reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau/sub 0/) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerization by radiation and during postpolymerization and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau/sub 0/ slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau/sub 0/ reaches a plateau (tau/sub 0/ approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life).

  5. Topics in quantum field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Y.C.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on four topics in quantum field theories at finite temperature are presented in this thesis. In Chapter 1, it is shown that the chiral anomaly has no finite temperature corrections by Fujikawa's path integral approach. Chapter 2 deals with the chiral condensate in the finite temperature Schwinger model. The cluster decomposition property is employed to find . No finite critical temperature is found and the chiral condensate vanishes only at infinite temperature. In Chapter 3, the finite temperature behavior of the fermion-number breaking (Rubakov-Callan) condensate around a 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole is studied. It is found that the Rubakov-Callan condensate is suppressed exponentially from the monopole core at high temperature. The limitation of the techniques is understanding the behavior of the condensate for all temperature is also discussed. Chapter 4 is on the topological mass terms in (2 + 1)-dimensional gauge theories. The authors finds that if the gauge bosons have no topological mass at tree level, no topological mass induced radiatively up to two-loop order in either Abelian or non-Abelian theories with massive fermions. The Pauli-Villars regularization is used for fermion loops. The one-loop contributions to the topological mass terms at finite temperature are calculated and the quantization constraints in this case are discussed

  6. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-01

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of ℎ. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  7. Optimal interdiction of unreactive Markovian evaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The network interdiction problem arises in a wide variety of areas including military logistics, infectious disease control and counter-terrorism. In the classical formulation one is given a weighted network G(N, E) and the task is to find b nodes (or edges) whose removal would maximally increase the least-cost path from a source node s to a target node r. In practical applications. G represenLs a transportation or activity network; node/edge removal is done by an agent, the 'interdictor' against another agent the 'evader' who wants to traverse G from s to t along the least-cost route. Our work is motivated by cases in which both agents have bounded rationality: e.g. when the authorities set up road blocks to catch bank robbers, neither party can plot its actions with full information about the other. We introduce a novel model of network interdiction in which the motion of (possibly) several evaders i. described by a Markov pr cess on G.We further suppose that the evaden; do not respond to interdiction decisions because of time, knowledge or computational constraint . We prove that this interdiction problem is NP-hard, like the classical formulation, but unlike the classical problem the objective function is submodular. This implies that the solution could be approximated within 1-lie using a greedy algorithm. Exploiting submodularity again. we demonstrate that a 'priority' (or 'lazy') evaluation algorithm can improve performance by orders of magnitude. Taken together, the results bring closer realistic solutions to the interdiction problem on global-scale networks.

  8. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Ivan P., E-mail: ivan.christov@phys.uni-sofia.bg

    2016-08-15

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  9. Room-Temperature Dephasing in InAs Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Mørk, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    The room temperature dephasing in InAs/InGaAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots, embedded in a waveguide for laser applications, is measured using two independent methods: spectral hole burning and four-wave mixing. Without the application of bias current for electrical carrier injection......, a dephasing time of ~260 fs, weakly dependent on the optical excitation density, is found and attributed to phonon interaction. The application of bias current, leading to population inversion in the dot ground state and optical gain, strongly decreases the dephasing time to less than 50 fs, likely due...

  10. Room-temperature dephasing in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are receiving increasing attention for fundamental studies on zero-dimensional confinement and for device applications. Quantum-dot lasers are expected to show superior performances, like high material gain, low and temperature...... stacked layers of InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum dots....

  11. Effect of carrier dynamics and temperature on two-state lasing in semiconductor quantum dot lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenev, V. V., E-mail: korenev@spbau.ru; Savelyev, A. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Omelchenko, A. V.; Maximov, M. V. [Saint Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    It is analytically shown that the both the charge carrier dynamics in quantum dots and their capture into the quantum dots from the matrix material have a significant effect on two-state lasing phenomenon in quantum dot lasers. In particular, the consideration of desynchronization in electron and hole capture into quantum dots allows one to describe the quenching of ground-state lasing observed at high injection currents both qualitatevely and quantitatively. At the same time, an analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in a single quantum dot allowed us to describe the temperature dependences of the emission power via the ground- and excited-state optical transitions of quantum dots.

  12. Effect of carrier dynamics and temperature on two-state lasing in semiconductor quantum dot lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, V. V.; Savelyev, A. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Omelchenko, A. V.; Maximov, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    It is analytically shown that the both the charge carrier dynamics in quantum dots and their capture into the quantum dots from the matrix material have a significant effect on two-state lasing phenomenon in quantum dot lasers. In particular, the consideration of desynchronization in electron and hole capture into quantum dots allows one to describe the quenching of ground-state lasing observed at high injection currents both qualitatevely and quantitatively. At the same time, an analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in a single quantum dot allowed us to describe the temperature dependences of the emission power via the ground- and excited-state optical transitions of quantum dots

  13. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revin, D. G., E-mail: d.revin@sheffield.ac.uk; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W. [Physics and Astronomy Department, The University of Sheffield, S3 7RH Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A. [M Squared Lasers Ltd., G20 0SP Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm{sup −1} is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity.

  14. Continuous wave room temperature external ring cavity quantum cascade laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Vaitiekus, D.; Cockburn, J. W.; Hempler, N.; Maker, G. T.; Malcolm, G. P. A.

    2015-01-01

    An external ring cavity quantum cascade laser operating at ∼5.2 μm wavelength in a continuous-wave regime at the temperature of 15 °C is demonstrated. Out-coupled continuous-wave optical powers of up to 23 mW are observed for light of one propagation direction with an estimated total intra-cavity optical power flux in excess of 340 mW. The uni-directional regime characterized by the intensity ratio of more than 60 for the light propagating in the opposite directions was achieved. A single emission peak wavelength tuning range of 90 cm −1 is realized by the incorporation of a diffraction grating into the cavity

  15. Quantum effects on the temperature relaxation in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Aono, Osamu.

    1979-03-01

    This work was carried out under the collaborating Research Program at Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University. Further communication about this report is to be sent to the Research Information Center, Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464, Japan. The rate of equilibration of difference between the ion and electron temperatures is obtained on the basis of the unified theory, in which the collective and binary interactions are both treated properly. The electrons obey the Fermi distribution of arbitrary degeneracy. The rate decreases owing to the degeneracy. Even in the nondegenerated case, the quantum effect appeares in the argument of the Coulomb logarithm. When the de Broglie wave length of the electron is much longer than the radius of close collision, the results agree with those obtained on the Born approximation. In the opposite limit, the classical theory applies. For other cases, graphical examples are given. (author)

  16. Quantum-dot temperature profiles during laser irradiation for semiconductor-doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, Swati

    2002-01-01

    Temperature profiles around laser irradiated CdX (X=S, Se, and Te) quantum dots in borosilicate glasses were theoretically modeled. Initially the quantum dots heat up rapidly, followed by a gradual increase of temperature. Also it is found that larger dots reach higher temperatures for the same pulse characteristics. After the pulse is turned off, the dots initially cool rapidly, followed by a gradual decrease in temperature

  17. Quantum-dot temperature profiles during laser irradiation for semiconductor-doped glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Swati

    2002-12-01

    Temperature profiles around laser irradiated CdX (X=S, Se, and Te) quantum dots in borosilicate glasses were theoretically modeled. Initially the quantum dots heat up rapidly, followed by a gradual increase of temperature. Also it is found that larger dots reach higher temperatures for the same pulse characteristics. After the pulse is turned off, the dots initially cool rapidly, followed by a gradual decrease in temperature.

  18. The Amplification of the Critical Temperature by Quantum Size Effects In a Superlattice of Quantum Wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianconi, A.; Missori, M.; Saini, N.L.; Oyanagi, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Nishihara, Y.; Ha, D.H.; Della Longa, S.

    1995-01-01

    Here we report experimental evidence that the high Tc superconductivity in a cuprate perovskite occurs in a superlattice of quantum wires. The structure of the high Tc superconducting CuO 2 plane in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+y (Bi2212) at the mesoscopic level (10-100 A) has been determined. It is decorated by a plurality of parallel superconducting stripes of width L=14± 1 A defined by the domain walls formed by stripes of width W=11+1 A characterized by a 0.17 A shorter Cu-O (apical) distance and a large tilting angle θ =12±4degree of the distorted square pyramids. We show that this particular heterostructure provides the physical mechanism raising Tc from the low temperature range Tc 2 plane by a factor ∼10 is realized by 1) tuning the Fermi level near the bottom of the second ubband of the stripes, with k y =2π/L, formed by the quantum size effect and 2) by forming a superlattice of wires with domain walls of width W of the order of the superconducting coherence length ξ 0 . (author)

  19. Growth and temperature dependent photoluminescence of InGaAs quantum dot chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Haeyeon; Kim, Dong-Jun; Colton, John S.; Park, Tyler; Meyer, David; Jones, Aaron M.; Thalman, Scott; Smith, Dallas; Clark, Ken; Brown, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine the optical properties of novel quantum dot chains. • Study shows that platelets evolve into quantum dots during heating of the InGaAs platelets encapsulated with GaAs. • Single stack of quantum dots emits light at room temperature. • Quantum dots are of high quality, confirmed by cross-section TEM images and photoluminescence. • Light emission at room temperature weakens beyond the detection limit when the quantum dots form above the critical annealing temperature. - Abstract: We report a study of growth and photoluminescence from a single stack of MBE-grown In 0.4 Ga 0.6 As quantum dot chains. The InGaAs epilayers were grown at a low temperature so that the resulting surfaces remain flat with platelets even though their thicknesses exceed the critical thickness of the conventional Stranski–Krastanov growth mode. The flat InGaAs layers were then annealed at elevated temperatures to induce the formation of quantum dot chains. A reflection high energy electron diffraction study suggests that, when the annealing temperature is at or below 480 °C, the surface of growth front remains flat during the periods of annealing and growth of a 10 nm thick GaAs capping layer. Surprisingly, transmission electron microscopy images do indicate the formation of quantum dot chains, however, so the dot-chains in those samples may form from precursory platelets during the period of temperature ramping and subsequent capping with GaAs due to intermixing of group III elements. The optical emission from the quantum dot layer demonstrates that there is a critical annealing temperature of 480–500 °C above which the properties of the low temperature growth approach are lost, as the optical properties begin to resemble those of quantum dots produced by the conventional Stranski–Krastanov technique

  20. Temperature dependence of spectral linewidth of InAs/InP quantum dot distributed feedback lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J.; Huang, H.; Schires, K.; Poole, P. J.; Wang, C.; Grillot, F.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temperature dependence of spectral linewidth of InAs/InP quantum dot distributed feedback lasers. In comparison with their quantum well counterparts, results show that quantum dot lasers have spectral linewidths rather insensitive to the temperature with minimum values below 200 kHz in the range of 283K to 303K. The experimental results are also well confirmed by numerical simulations. Overall, this work shows that quantum dot lasers are excellent candidates for various applications such as coherent communication systems, high-resolution spectroscopy, high purity photonic microwave generation and on-chip atomic clocks.

  1. Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman, Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-05-01

    We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

  2. Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics Shahdrah Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2012-05-15

    We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

  3. Tripolar vortex formation in dense quantum plasma with ion-temperature-gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, Anisa; Ata-ur-Rahman; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-01-01

    We have derived system of nonlinear equations governing the dynamics of low-frequency electrostatic toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode for dense quantum magnetoplasma. For some specific profiles of the equilibrium density, temperature, and ion velocity gradients, the nonlinear equations admit a stationary solution in the form of a tripolar vortex. These results are relevant to understand nonlinear structure formation in dense quantum plasmas in the presence of equilibrium ion-temperature and density gradients.

  4. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of water-soluble quantum dots for a bioprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tiancai; Huang Zhenli; Wang Haiqiao; Wang Jianhao; Li Xiuqing; Zhao Yuandi; Luo Qingming

    2006-01-01

    The photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is found to be temperature-dependent: as temperature arising from 280 K to 351 K, the photoluminescence declines with emission peak shifting towards the red at a rate of ∼0.11 nm K -1 . And the studies show that the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with core capped by a thinner ZnS shell is more sensitive to temperature than that of ones with core capped by a thicker one. That is, with 50% decrement of the quantum yield the temperature of the former need to arise from 280 K to 295 K, while the latter requires much higher temperature (315.6 K), which means that the integrality of shell coverage is a very important factor on temperature-sensitivity to for the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Moreover, it is found that the water-soluble CdSe quantum dots with different core sizes, whose cores are capped by thicker ZnS shells, possess almost the same sensitivity to the temperature. All of the studies about photoluminescence temperature-dependence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots show an indispensable proof for their applications in life science

  5. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of water-soluble quantum dots for a bioprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tiancai [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Huang Zhenli [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang Haiqiao [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang Jianhao [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Li Xiuqing [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Zhao Yuandi [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)]. E-mail: zydi@mail.hust.edu.cn; Luo Qingming [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education - Hubei Bioinformatics and Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2006-02-10

    The photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is found to be temperature-dependent: as temperature arising from 280 K to 351 K, the photoluminescence declines with emission peak shifting towards the red at a rate of {approx}0.11 nm K{sup -1}. And the studies show that the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with core capped by a thinner ZnS shell is more sensitive to temperature than that of ones with core capped by a thicker one. That is, with 50% decrement of the quantum yield the temperature of the former need to arise from 280 K to 295 K, while the latter requires much higher temperature (315.6 K), which means that the integrality of shell coverage is a very important factor on temperature-sensitivity to for the photoluminescence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Moreover, it is found that the water-soluble CdSe quantum dots with different core sizes, whose cores are capped by thicker ZnS shells, possess almost the same sensitivity to the temperature. All of the studies about photoluminescence temperature-dependence of water-soluble CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots show an indispensable proof for their applications in life science.

  6. Quantum gravity and quantum nondemolition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H.H. von; Treder, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that in Quantum Gravity, and more general: in Grand Unified Theory incorporating General Relativity on a basic level, there arise necessarily absolute limitations on measurement which one cannot evade by any 'quantum nondemolition measurements'. This fact is demonstrated not to oppose the existence of certain approximations to the full theory where these limitations do not arise. (author)

  7. Room temperature solid-state quantum bit with second-long memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, Georg; Maurer, Peter; Latta, Christian; Hunger, David; Jiang, Liang; Pastawski, Fernando; Yao, Norman; Bennet, Steven; Twitchen, Daniel; Cirac, Ignacio; Lukin, Mikhail

    2012-02-01

    Realization of stable quantum bits (qubits) that can be prepared and measured with high fidelity and that are capable of storing quantum information for long times exceeding seconds is an outstanding challenge in quantum science and engineering. Here we report on the realization of such a stable quantum bit using an individual ^13C nuclear spin within an isotopically purified diamond crystal at room temperature. Using an electronic spin associated with a nearby Nitrogen Vacancy color center, we demonstrate high fidelity initialization and readout of a single ^13C qubit. Quantum memory lifetime exceeding one second is obtained by using dissipative optical decoupling from the electronic degree of freedom and applying a sequence of radio-frequency pulses to suppress effects from the dipole-dipole interactions of the ^13C spin-bath. Techniques to further extend the quantum memory lifetime as well as the potential applications are also discussed.

  8. Scalable architecture for a room temperature solid-state quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Jiang, L; Gorshkov, A V; Maurer, P C; Giedke, G; Cirac, J I; Lukin, M D

    2012-04-24

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Here we propose and analyse an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at room temperature. Our approach is based on recent experimental advances involving nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. In particular, we demonstrate that the multiple challenges associated with operation at ambient temperature, individual addressing at the nanoscale, strong qubit coupling, robustness against disorder and low decoherence rates can be simultaneously achieved under realistic, experimentally relevant conditions. The architecture uses a novel approach to quantum information transfer and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Moreover, it alleviates the stringent constraints currently limiting the realization of scalable quantum processors and will provide fundamental insights into the physics of non-equilibrium many-body quantum systems.

  9. Täna algavad Eesti Muusika Päevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Muusika Päevade raames toimunud üritustest 21. aprillini: ERSO sümfooniakontserdist Estonia kontserdisaalis, Jüri Reinvere radiofoonilise ooperi "Vastaskallas" esiettekandest Tallinna Linnateatri Hobuveski saalis, kontserdist Kunstihoone Vabaduse väljakul (esitusel Urmas Sisaski uus "Tähistaeva tsükkel" - "Eesti rahvataevas"), lastekontserdist "Kodumaine viis" Estonia kontserdisaalis

  10. Ooperipäevad Saaremaal (II) / Tiiu Levald

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levald, Tiiu, 1940-

    2008-01-01

    21.-27. VII Saaremaa ooperipäevade raames toimunud üritustest - Carmen Tabori lavastatud Aino Kallase ja Tauno Pylkkäneni "Patseba Saaremaal" (esimene osa draama- ja teine ooperilavastus), Gershwini ooperist "Porgy ja Bess" ning 25. VII toimunud galakontserdist

  11. Temperature dependence of magnetopolarons in a parabolic quantum dot in arbitrary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kadi; Gu Shiwei

    1993-10-01

    The temperature and the size dependence of a magnetopolaron in a harmonic quantum dot with an external magnetic field normal to the plane of the quantum dot are investigated theoretically. For a weak magnetic field (ω c LO ), both the cyclotron mass m * c+ and the cyclotron mass m * c- are the increasing functions of temperature, whereas for strong magnetic fields (ω c > ω LO ), the cyclotron mass m * c+ is the decreasing function of temperature, while the cyclotron mass m * c- is the increasing function of temperature. (author). 27 refs, 2 figs

  12. Sudden transitions and scaling behavior of geometric quantum correlation for two qubits in quantum critical environments at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden transitions in geometric quantum correlation of two qubits in spin chain environments at finite temperature. It is shown that when only one qubit is coupled to the spin environment, the geometric discord exhibits a double sudden transition behavior, which is closely related to the quantum criticality of the spin chain environment. When two qubits are uniformly coupled to a common spin chain environment, the geometric discord is found to display a sudden transition behavior whereby the system transits from pure classical decoherence to pure quantum decoherence. Moreover, an interesting scaling behavior is revealed for the frozen time, and we also present a scheme to prolong the time during which the discord remains constant by applying bang–bang pulses. (paper)

  13. Control of Emission Color of High Quantum Yield CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots by Precipitation Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Susha, Andrei S; Kershaw, Stephen V; Hung, Tak Fu; Rogach, Andrey L

    2015-09-01

    Emission color controlled, high quantum yield CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots are obtained by changing the temperature of a bad solvent during synthesis. The products for temperatures between 0 and 60 °C have good spectral purity with narrow emission line widths of 28-36 nm, high absolute emission quantum yields of 74% to 93%, and short radiative lifetimes of 13-27 ns.

  14. Rapid single flux quantum logic in high temperature superconductor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shunmugavel, K.

    2006-01-01

    A Josephson junction is the basic element of rapid single flux quantum logic (RSFQ) circuits. A high operating speed and low power consumption are the main advantages of RSFQ logic over semiconductor electronic circuits. To realize complex RSFQ circuits in HTS technology one needs a reproducible

  15. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  16. Temperature-Dependent Coercive Field Measured by a Quantum Dot Strain Gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-12-13

    Coercive fields of piezoelectric materials can be strongly influenced by environmental temperature. We investigate this influence using a heterostructure consisting of a single crystal piezoelectric film and a quantum dots containing membrane. Applying electric field leads to a physical deformation of the piezoelectric film, thereby inducing strain in the quantum dots and thus modifying their optical properties. The wavelength of the quantum dot emission shows butterfly-like loops, from which the coercive fields are directly derived. The results suggest that coercive fields at cryogenic temperatures are strongly increased, yielding values several tens of times larger than those at room temperature. We adapt a theoretical model to fit the measured data with very high agreement. Our work provides an efficient framework for predicting the properties of ferroelectric materials and advocating their practical applications, especially at low temperatures.

  17. Performance of an irreversible quantum Ericsson cooler at low temperature limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Feng; Chen Lingen; Wu Shuang; Sun Fengrui

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of quantum properties of the working medium on the performance of an irreversible quantum Ericsson cooler with spin-1/2. The cooler is studied with the losses of heat resistance, heat leakage and internal irreversibility. The optimal relationship between the dimensionless cooling load R * versus the coefficient of performance ε for the irreversible quantum Ericsson cooler is derived. In particular, the performance characteristics of the cooler at the low temperature limit are discussed

  18. Ortho-para H₂ conversion by proton exchange at low temperature: an accurate quantum mechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Jorfi, M; González-Lezana, T; Faure, A; Pagani, L

    2011-07-08

    We report extensive, accurate fully quantum, time-independent calculations of cross sections at low collision energies, and rate coefficients at low temperatures for the H⁺ + H₂(v = 0, j) → H⁺ + H₂(v = 0, j') reaction. Different transitions are considered, especially the ortho-para conversion (j = 1 → j' = 0) which is of key importance in astrophysics. This conversion process appears to be very efficient and dominant at low temperature, with a rate coefficient of 4.15 × 10⁻¹⁰ cm³ molecule⁻¹ s⁻¹ at 10 K. The quantum mechanical results are also compared with statistical quantum predictions and the reaction is found to be statistical in the low temperature regime (T < 100 K).

  19. Quantum critical point in high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V.R. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.ru; Amusia, M.Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Popov, K.G. [Komi Science Center, Ural Division, RAS, Syktyvkar 167982 (Russian Federation); Stephanovich, V.A. [Opole University, Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Opole 45-052 (Poland)], E-mail: stef@math.uni.opole.pl

    2009-02-02

    Recently, in high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSC), exciting measurements have been performed revealing their physics in superconducting and pseudogap states and in normal one induced by the application of magnetic field, when the transition from non-Fermi liquid to Landau-Fermi liquid behavior occurs. We employ a theory, based on fermion condensation quantum phase transition which is able to explain facts obtained in the measurements. We also show, that in spite of very different microscopic nature of HTSC, heavy-fermion metals and 2D {sup 3}He, the physical properties of these three classes of substances are similar to each other.

  20. Towards a Room-Temperature Spin Quantum Bus in Diamond via Electron Photoionization, Transport, and Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Doherty

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a proven solid-state platform for spin-based quantum technology. The nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond has been used to realize small-scale quantum information processing and quantum sensing under ambient conditions. A major barrier in the development of large-scale quantum information processing in diamond is the connection of nitrogen-vacancy spin registers by a quantum bus at room temperature. Given that diamond is expected to be an ideal spin transport material, the coherent transport of spin directly between the spin registers offers a potential solution. Yet, there has been no demonstration of spin transport in diamond due to difficulties in achieving spin injection and detection via conventional methods. Here, we exploit detailed knowledge of the paramagnetic defects in diamond to identify novel mechanisms to photoionize, transport, and capture spin-polarized electrons in diamond at room temperature. Having identified these mechanisms, we explore how they may be combined to realize an on-chip spin quantum bus.

  1. Quantum entanglement of localized excited states at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caputa, Paweł [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Simón, Joan; Štikonas, Andrius [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences,University of Edinburgh,King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Takayanagi, Tadashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU),University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    In this work we study the time evolutions of (Renyi) entanglement entropy of locally excited states in two dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) at finite temperature. We consider excited states created by acting with local operators on thermal states and give both field theoretic and holographic calculations. In free field CFTs, we find that the growth of Renyi entanglement entropy at finite temperature is reduced compared to the zero temperature result by a small quantity proportional to the width of the localized excitations. On the other hand, in finite temperature CFTs with classical gravity duals, we find that the entanglement entropy approaches a characteristic value at late time. This behaviour does not occur at zero temperature. We also study the mutual information between the two CFTs in the thermofield double (TFD) formulation and give physical interpretations of our results.

  2. Estimation of effective temperatures in a quantum annealer: Towards deep learning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Gómez, John; Benedetti, Marcello; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    Sampling is at the core of deep learning and more general machine learning applications; an increase in its efficiency would have a significant impact across several domains. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up these tasks, but several limitations still bar them from being used effectively. One of the main limitations, and the focus of this work, is that using the device's experimentally accessible temperature as a reference for sampling purposes leads to very poor correlation with the Boltzmann distribution it is programmed to sample from. Based on quantum dynamical arguments, one can expect that if the device indeed happens to be sampling from a Boltzmann-like distribution, it will correspond to one with an instance-dependent effective temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling processes. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the quantum-assisted training of Boltzmann machines, which can serve as a building block for deep learning architectures. This work was supported by NASA Ames Research Center.

  3. On the zero temperature limit of the Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández de la Peña, Lisandro

    2014-04-01

    The zero temperature limit of several quantum time correlation functions is analysed. It is shown that while the canonical quantum time correlation function retains the full dynamical information as temperature approaches zero, the Kubo-transformed and the thermally symmetrised quantum time correlation functions lose all dynamical information at this limit. This is shown to be a consequence of the projection onto the ground state, via the limiting process of the quantities ? and ?, either together as a product, or separately. Although these findings would seem to suggest that finite-temperature methods commonly used to estimate Kubo correlation functions would be incapable of retaining any ground state dynamics, we propose a route for recovering in principle all dynamical information at the ground state. It is first shown that the usual frequency space relation between canonical and Kubo correlation functions also holds for microcanonical time correlation functions. Since the Kubo-transformed microcanonical correlation function can be obtained from the usual finite-temperature function by including a projection onto the corresponding microcanonical ensemble, finite-temperature methods, properly modified to incorporate such a constraint, can be used to capture full quantum dynamics at any arbitrary energy state, including the ground state. This approach is illustrated with the application of centroid dynamics to the ground state dynamics of the harmonic oscillator.

  4. On the effect of ballistic overflow on the temperature dependence of the quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudaev, I. A., E-mail: funcelab@gmail.com; Kopyev, V. V.; Romanov, I. S.; Oleynik, V. L. [National Research Tomsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The dependences of the quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes on the temperature and excitation level are studied. The experiment is performed for two luminescence excitation modes. A comparison of the results obtained during photo- and electroluminescence shows an additional (to the loss associated with Auger recombination) low-temperature loss in the high-density current region. This causes inversion of the temperature dependence of the quantum efficiency at temperatures lower than 220–300 K. Analysis shows that the loss is associated with electron leakage from the light-emitting-diode active region. The experimental data are explained using the ballistic-overflow model. The simulation results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the quantum efficiency on temperature and current density.

  5. Precursor concentration and temperature controlled formation of polyvinyl alcohol-capped CdSe-quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan P. Shah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol-capped CdSe quantum dots, with a size within their quantum confinement limit, were prepared in aqueous solution at room temperature, by a simple and environmentally friendly chemical method. The size of the CdSe quantum dots was found to be dependent on the concentrations of the precursors of cadmium and selenium ions, as well as on the aging time and the reaction temperature; all of which could be used conveniently for tuning the size of the particles, as well as their optical properties. The synthesized quantum dots were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The samples were fluorescent at room temperature; the green fluorescence was assigned to band edge emission, and the near-infrared fluorescence peaks at about 665 and 865 nm were assigned to shallow and deep trap states emissions, respectively. The quantum dots were fairly stable up to several days.

  6. Chiral symmetry and finite temperature effects in quantum theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Aa.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation of the harmonic oscillator at finite temperature has been carried out, using the Monte Carlo Metropolis algorithm. Accurate results for the energy and fluctuations have been obtained, with special attention to the manifestation of the temperature effects. Varying the degree of symmetry breaking, the finite temperature behaviour of the asymmetric linear model in a linearized mean field approximation has been studied. In a study of the effects of chiral symmetry on baryon mass splittings, reasonable agreement with experiment has been obtained in a non-relativistic harmonic oscillator model

  7. Quantum field theory in the infinite temperature limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourjine, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The T = infinity limit for renormalizable 4-dimensional Euclidean QFT is considered. A general arguement is presented in three examples: phi 3 , QED, QCD. Using an expansion of the Green's functions generating functional, it is shown at T = infinity quantum dynamics generally becomes 3 dimensional. All superficially divergent diagrams survive at T = infinity and ensure renormalization of effective dynamics. The correction to naive dimensional reduction is studied; appearance of ''electric'' masses in QED and QCD is shown to be the result of such a correction. A curious symmetry of the generating functional in QED and QCD, its implications and breaking by the thermal corrections of heavy modes are discussed. Presence of the symmetry implies survival of some fermion modes at T = infinity

  8. Quantum entanglement at high temperatures? Bosonic systems in nonequilibrium steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Hu, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of a series of three papers examining how viable it is for entanglement to be sustained at high temperatures for quantum systems in thermal equilibrium (Case A), in nonequilibrium (Case B) and in nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) conditions (Case C). The system we analyze here consists of two coupled quantum harmonic oscillators each interacting with its own bath described by a scalar field, set at temperatures T_1>T_2. For constant bilinear inter-oscillator coupling studied here (Case C1) owing to the Gaussian nature, the problem can be solved exactly at arbitrary temperatures even for strong coupling. We find that the valid entanglement criterion in general is not a function of the bath temperature difference, in contrast to thermal transport in the same NESS setting http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.7642. Thus lowering the temperature of one of the thermal baths does not necessarily help to safeguard the entanglement between the oscillators. Indeed, quantum entanglement will disappear if any one of the thermal baths has a temperature higher than the critical temperature T_c, defined as the temperature above which quantum entanglement vanishes. With the Langevin equations derived we give a full display of how entanglement dynamics in this system depends on T_1, T_2, the inter-oscillator coupling and the system-bath coupling strengths. For weak oscillator-bath coupling the critical temperature T_c is about the order of the inverse oscillator frequency, but for strong oscillator-bath coupling it will depend on the bath cutoff frequency. We conclude that in most realistic circumstances, for bosonic systems in NESS with constant bilinear coupling, ‘hot entanglement’ is largely a fiction.

  9. Bacteriophages use hypermodified nucleosides to evade host's defence systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Olsen, Nikoline S.; Carstens, Alexander Byth

    developed several strategies to evade these defence mechanisms. Ultimately, this led to the oldest and still running arms race - microorganisms vs. their molecular parasites. We here describe a remarkable new strategy used by the recently isolated Escherichia coli phage CAjan belonging to...... to investigate this mechanism in detail we have used several methods including direct plaque sequencing, restriction endonuclease analysis and CRISPR-Cas genome editing. Through generation of specific mutants, we were able to introduce a restriction sensitive phenotype in the CAjan bacteriophage providing new...

  10. Evading Lyth bound in models of quintessential inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Wali; Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Quintessential inflation refers to an attempt to unify inflation and late-time cosmic acceleration using a single scalar field. In this letter we consider two different classes of quintessential inflation, one of which is based upon a Lagrangian with non-canonical kinetic term k 2 (ϕ)∂ μ ϕ∂ μ ϕ and a steep exponential potential while the second class uses the concept of steep brane world inflation. We show that in both cases the Lyth bound can be evaded, despite the large tensor-to-scalar ratio of perturbations. The post-inflationary dynamics is consistent with nucleosynthesis constraint in these cases

  11. The temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance with three-magnon splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kouki

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the Schwinger–Keldysh formalism, we have closely investigated the temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance. We have clarified that three-magnon splittings excite non-zero modes of magnons and characterize the temperature dependence of quantum spin pumping generated using electron spin resonance. (paper)

  12. Improvement of temperature-stability in a quantum well laser with asymmetric barrier layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukov, Alexey E.; Kryzhanovskaya, Natalia V.; Zubov, Fedor I.

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated and tested a quantum well laser with asymmetric barrier layers. Such a laser has been proposed earlier to suppress bipolar carrier population in the optical confinement layer and thus to improve temperature-stability of the threshold current. As compared to the conventional reference...

  13. Room-temperature near-field reflection spectroscopy of single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Marcher; Madsen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    . This technique suppresses efficiently the otherwise dominating far-field background and reduces topographic artifacts. We demonstrate its performance on a thin, strained near-surface CdS/ZnS single quantum well at room temperature. The optical structure of these topographically flat samples is due to Cd...

  14. Spin Squeezing and Entanglement with Room Temperature Atoms for Quantum Sensing and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Heng

    magnetometer at room temperature is reported. Furthermore, using spin-squeezing of atomic ensemble, the sensitivity of magnetometer is improved. Deterministic continuous variable teleportation between two distant atomic ensembles is demonstrated. The fidelity of teleportating dynamically changing sequence...... of spin states surpasses a classical benchmark, demonstrating the true quantum teleportation....

  15. High temperature limit of the order parameter correlation functions in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, S. A.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we use the exact results for the anisotropic two-dimensional Ising model obtained by Bugrii and Lisovyy [A.I. Bugrii, O.O. Lisovyy, Theor. Math. Phys. 140 (2004) 987] to derive the expressions for dynamical correlation functions for the quantum Ising model in one dimension at high temperatures.

  16. High temperature limit of the order parameter correlation functions in the quantum Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, S.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Tsvelik, A.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States) and Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail tsvelik@bnl.gov

    2006-06-12

    In this paper we use the exact results for the anisotropic two-dimensional Ising model obtained by Bugrii and Lisovyy [A.I. Bugrii, O.O. Lisovyy, Theor. Math. Phys. 140 (2004) 987] to derive the expressions for dynamical correlation functions for the quantum Ising model in one dimension at high temperatures.

  17. Unravelling the size and temperature dependence of exciton lifetimes in colloidal ZnSe quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, Joren; Van Hest, Jacobine; Meijerink, A; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2014-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the band-edge photoluminescence decay of organically capped colloidal ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) in the size range from 4.0 to 7.5 nm. A similar trend is observed for all investigated sizes: the decay time is short (∼5 ns) above 20 K and increases sharply

  18. Enhanced UV luminescence from InAlN quantum well structures using two temperature growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Sadler, Thomas C.; Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, Shahab N.; Li, Haoning; Pampili, Pietro; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    InAlN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting between 300 and 350 nm have been prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on planar AlN templates. To obtain strong room temperature luminescence from InAlN QWs a two temperature approach was required. The intensity decayed weakly as the temperature was increased to 300 K, with ratios I PL (300 K)/I PL (T) max up to 70%. This high apparent internal quantum efficiency is attributed to the exceptionally strong carrier localization in this material, which is also manifested by a high Stokes shift (0.52 eV) of the luminescence. Based on these results InAlN is proposed as a robust alternative to AlGaN for ultraviolet emitting devices. - Highlights: • InAlN quantum wells with AlGaN barriers emitting in near UV successfully grown using quasi-2T approach. • 1 nm AlGaN capping of InAlN quantum wells used to avoid In desorption during temperature ramp to barrier growth conditions. • Strong, thermally resilient luminescence obtained as a result of growth optimization. • Promise of InAlN as an alternative active region for UV emitters demonstrated

  19. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly...... by the excited-state transitions at higher temperatures. The emission linewidth of the ground-state transitions of QDs ensembles first decreases and then increases with the increase of temperature, which results from the carrier transfer between dots via barrier states....

  20. The thermodynamic meaning of local temperature of nonequilibrium open quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, LvZhou; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the local temperature of nanoscale systems out of equilibrium has emerged as a new tool to study local heating effects and other local thermal properties of systems driven by external fields. Although various experimental protocols and theoretical definitions have been proposed to determine the local temperature, the thermodynamic meaning of the measured or defined quantities remains unclear. By performing analytical and numerical analysis of bias-driven quantum dot systems both in ...

  1. A survey of lattice results on finite temperature quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quite clearly, the pressure rises when the number of degrees of freedom increases. As in the quenched case, up to the highest temperature investigated it deviates substantially from the ideal gas behavior shown as the arrows to the right of the plot. The deviation is too big. 690. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol. 60, No. 4, April 2003 ...

  2. Stochastic formulation of quantum field at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that, based on an extension of the stochastic quantization method of Nelson, it is possible to obtain finite temperature fields in both the imaginary and real time formalisms which are usually quantized by using the functional integral technique

  3. Quantum Correlations of Light from a Room-Temperature Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, V.; Schilling, R.; Fedorov, S. A.; Schütz, H.; Wilson, D. J.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2017-07-01

    When an optical field is reflected from a compliant mirror, its intensity and phase become quantum-correlated due to radiation pressure. These correlations form a valuable resource: the mirror may be viewed as an effective Kerr medium generating squeezed states of light, or the correlations may be used to erase backaction from an interferometric measurement of the mirror's position. To date, optomechanical quantum correlations have been observed in only a handful of cryogenic experiments, owing to the challenge of distilling them from thermomechanical noise. Accessing them at room temperature, however, would significantly extend their practical impact, with applications ranging from gravitational wave detection to chip-scale accelerometry. Here, we observe broadband quantum correlations developed in an optical field due to its interaction with a room-temperature nanomechanical oscillator, taking advantage of its high-cooperativity near-field coupling to an optical microcavity. The correlations manifest as a reduction in the fluctuations of a rotated quadrature of the field, in a frequency window spanning more than an octave below mechanical resonance. This is due to coherent cancellation of the two sources of quantum noise contaminating the measured quadrature—backaction and imprecision. Supplanting the backaction force with an off-resonant test force, we demonstrate the working principle behind a quantum-enhanced "variational" force measurement.

  4. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  5. Quantum statistical mechanics of nonrelativistic membranes: crumpling transition at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, M. E. S.; Kleinert, H.; Schakel, Adriaan M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of quantum fluctuations on a nearly flat, nonrelativistic two-dimensional membrane with extrinsic curvature stiffness and tension is investigated. The renormalization group analysis is carried out in first-order perturbative theory. In contrast to thermal fluctuations, which soften the membrane at large scales and turn it into a crumpled surface, quantum fluctuations are found to stiffen the membrane, so that it exhibits a Hausdorff dimension equal to two. The large-scale behavior of the membrane is further studied at finite temperature, where a nontrivial fixed point is found, signaling a crumpling transition.

  6. Temperature dependence of the fundamental excitonic resonance in lead-salt quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Fangyu; Tomm, Jens W.; Kruschke, Detlef; Ullrich, Bruno; Chu, Junhao

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the fundamental excitonic resonance in PbS and PbSe quantum dots fabricated by various technologies are experimentally determined. Above ∼150 K, sub-linearities of the temperature shifts and halfwidths are observed. This behavior is analyzed within the existing standard models. Concordant modeling, however, becomes possible only within the frame of a three-level system that takes into account both bright and dark excitonic states as well as phonon-assisted carrier redistribution between these states. Our results show that luminescence characterization of lead-salt quantum dots necessarily requires both low temperatures and excitation densities in order to provide reliable ensemble parameters

  7. Enhanced photoluminescence of multilayer Ge quantum dots on Si(001) substrates by increased overgrowth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Cheng, Buwen; Hu, Weixuan; Su, Shaojian; Li, Chuanbo; Wang, Qiming

    2012-07-11

    Four-bilayer Ge quantum dots (QDs) with Si spacers were grown on Si(001) substrates by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. In three samples, all Ge QDs were grown at 520 °C, while Si spacers were grown at various temperatures (520 °C, 550 °C, and 580 °C). Enhancement and redshift of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) were observed from the samples in which Si spacers were grown at a higher temperature. The enhancement of PL is explained by higher effective electrons capturing in the larger size Ge QDs. Quantum confinement of the Ge QDs is responsible for the redshift of PL spectra. The Ge QDs' size and content were investigated by atomic force microscopy and Raman scattering measurements.

  8. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects of an exciton-donor complex in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wenfang

    2012-01-01

    Using the matrix diagonalization method and the compact density-matrix approach, we studied the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the electronic and optical properties of an exciton-donor complex in a disc-shaped quantum dot. We have calculated the binding energy and the oscillator strength of the intersubband transition from the ground state into the first excited state as a function of the dot radius. Based on the computed energies and wave functions, the linear, third-order nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index have been examined. We find that the ground state binding energy and the oscillator strength are strongly affected by the quantum dot radius, hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The results also show that the linear, third-order nonlinear and total absorption coefficients and refractive index changes strongly depend on temperature and hydrostatic pressure.

  9. Zero-temperature Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in a two-dimensional quantum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelnovo, Claudio; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher; Pujol, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    We construct a local interacting quantum dimer model on the square lattice, whose zero-temperature phase diagram is characterized by a line of critical points separating two ordered phases of the valence bond crystal type. On one side, the line of critical points terminates in a quantum transition inherited from a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in an associated classical model. We also discuss the effect of a longer-range dimer interaction that can be used to suppress the line of critical points by gradually shrinking it to a single point. Finally, we propose a way to generalize the quantum Hamiltonian to a dilute dimer model in presence of monomers and we qualitatively discuss the phase diagram

  10. Two aspects of the quantum chromodynamics' transition at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This thesis concerns two aspects of the relation between chiral symmetry breaking and confinement. The first aspect is the relations between different topological objects. The relation between monopoles and center vortices and the relation between instantons and monopoles are well established, in this thesis, we explore the relation between instantons (of finite temperature, called calorons) and center vortices in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory in Chapter 3 and Chapter 4, respectively. The second aspect is about the order parameters. The dual condensate introduced by E. Bilgici et al. is a novel observable that relates the order parameter of chiral symmetry breaking (chiral condensate) and confinement (Polyakov loop). In this thesis, we investigate the dual condensate on dynamical staggered fermions and explore a new dual operator: the dual quark density in Chapter 5.

  11. Increase of temperature of an ideal nondegenerate quantum gas in a suddenly expanding box due to energy quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.V.; Vieira Lopes, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    We show that due to energy quantization the temperature of an ideal nondegenerate quantum gas in a rectangular box always increases after a sudden expansion of the box and a subsequent thermalization. The maximal increment of temperature is proportional to the square root of the product of the initial absolute temperature by the energy of the first discrete quantum level, i.e., it is proportional to the first power of the Planck constant

  12. Temperature dependence of active photonic band gap in bragg-spaced quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhiqiang; Wang Tao; Yu Chunchao; Xu Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel all-optical polarization switch of active photonic band gap structure based on non-resonant optical Stark effect bragg-spaced quantum wells was investigated and it could be compatible with the optical communication system. The theory is based on InGaAsP/InP Bragg-spaced quantum wells (BSQWs). Mainly through the design of the InGaAsP well layer component and InP barrier thickness to make the quantum-period cycle meet the bragg condition and the bragg frequency is equal to re-hole exciton resonance frequency. When a spectrally narrow control pulse is tuned within the forbidden gap, such BSQWs have been shown to exhibit large optical nonlinearities and ps recovery times, which can form T hz switch. However, the exciton binding energy of InGaAsP will be automatically separate at room temperature, so the effect of all-optical polarization switching of active photonic band gap bragg structure quantum wells can only be studied at low temperature. By a large number of experiments, we tested part of the material parameters of BSQWs in the temperature range 10-300K. On this basis, the InGaAsP and InP refractive index changes with wavelength, InP thermal expansion coefficient are studied and a relationship equation is established. Experimental results show that the bragg reflection spectra with temperature mainly is effected by InP refractive index changes with temperature. Our theoretical study and experiment are an instruction as a reference in the designs and experiments of future practical optical switches.

  13. Temperature dependence of active photonic band gap in bragg-spaced quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Zhiqiang; Wang Tao; Yu Chunchao; Xu Wei, E-mail: huzhiqianghzq@163.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    A novel all-optical polarization switch of active photonic band gap structure based on non-resonant optical Stark effect bragg-spaced quantum wells was investigated and it could be compatible with the optical communication system. The theory is based on InGaAsP/InP Bragg-spaced quantum wells (BSQWs). Mainly through the design of the InGaAsP well layer component and InP barrier thickness to make the quantum-period cycle meet the bragg condition and the bragg frequency is equal to re-hole exciton resonance frequency. When a spectrally narrow control pulse is tuned within the forbidden gap, such BSQWs have been shown to exhibit large optical nonlinearities and ps recovery times, which can form T hz switch. However, the exciton binding energy of InGaAsP will be automatically separate at room temperature, so the effect of all-optical polarization switching of active photonic band gap bragg structure quantum wells can only be studied at low temperature. By a large number of experiments, we tested part of the material parameters of BSQWs in the temperature range 10-300K. On this basis, the InGaAsP and InP refractive index changes with wavelength, InP thermal expansion coefficient are studied and a relationship equation is established. Experimental results show that the bragg reflection spectra with temperature mainly is effected by InP refractive index changes with temperature. Our theoretical study and experiment are an instruction as a reference in the designs and experiments of future practical optical switches.

  14. Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robin [SAIC; Davenport, Roger [SAIC; Talbot, Jan [UCSD; Herz, Richard [UCSD; Genders, David [Electrosynthesis Co.; Symons, Peter [Electrosynthesis Co.; Brown, Lloyd [TChemE

    2014-04-25

    A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are

  15. On the size and temperature dependence of the energy gap in cadmium-selenide quantum dots embedded in fluorophosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatova, Zh. O., E-mail: zluka-yo@mail.ru; Kolobkova, E. V.; Babkina, A. N.; Nikonorov, N. V. [ITMO University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The temperature and size dependences of the energy gap in CdSe quantum dots with diameters of 2.4, 4.0, and 5.2 nm embedded in fluorophosphate glasses are investigated. It is shown that the temperature coefficient of the band gap dE{sub g}/dT in the quantum dots differs from the bulk value and depends strictly on the dot size. It is found that, furthermore, the energy of each transition in these quantum dots is characterized by an individual temperature coefficient dE/dT.

  16. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of a Double Ring-Shaped Quantum Dot at Low and High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.; Sedehi, H. R. Rastegar

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we study thermodynamic properties of a GaAs double ring-shaped quantum dot under external magnetic and electric fields. To this end, we first solve the Schrödinger equation and obtain the energy levels and wave functions, analytically. Then, we calculate the entropy, heat capacity, average energy and magnetic susceptibility of the quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field using the canonical ensemble approach. According to the results, it is found that the entropy is an increasing function of temperature. At low temperatures, the entropy increases monotonically with raising the temperature for all values of the magnetic fields and it is independent of the magnetic field. But, the entropy depends on the magnetic field at high temperatures. The entropy also decreases with increasing the magnetic field. The heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility show a peak structure. The heat capacity reduces with increasing the magnetic field at low temperatures. The magnetic susceptibility shows a transition between diamagnetic and paramagnetic below for T<4 K. The transition temperature depends on the magnetic field.

  18. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence study of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy Pham, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence of InP/ZnS quantum dots under 532 nm excitation, which is above the InP transition energy but well below that of ZnS. The overall photoluminescence spectra show two spectral components. The higher-energy one (named X) is assigned to originate from the excitonic transition; while the low-energy spectral component (named I) is normally interpreted as resulting from lattice imperfections in the crystalline structure of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). Peak positions of both the X and I emissions vary similarly with increasing temperature and the same as the InP bandgap narrowing with temperature. In the temperature range from 15 to 80 K, the ratio of the integrated intensity from the X and the I emissions decreases gradually and then this ratio increases fast at temperatures higher than 80 K. This could result from a population of charge carriers in the lattice imperfection states at a temperature below 80 K to increase the I emission but then with these charge carriers being released to contribute to the X emission.

  19. Identifying the quantum correlations in light-harvesting complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradler, Kamil; Wilde, Mark M.; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Uskov, Dmitry B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major efforts in the quantum biological program is to subject biological systems to standard tests or measures of quantumness. These tests and measures should elucidate whether nontrivial quantum effects may be present in biological systems. Two such measures of quantum correlations are the quantum discord and the relative entropy of entanglement. Here, we show that the relative entropy of entanglement admits a simple analytic form when dynamics and accessible degrees of freedom are restricted to a zero- and single-excitation subspace. We also simulate and calculate the amount of quantum discord that is present in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex during the transfer of an excitation from a chlorosome antenna to a reaction center. We find that the single-excitation quantum discord and single-excitation relative entropy of entanglement are equal for all of our numerical simulations, but a proof of their general equality for this setting evades us for now. Also, some of our simulations demonstrate that the relative entropy of entanglement without the single-excitation restriction is much lower than the quantum discord. The first picosecond of dynamics is the relevant time scale for the transfer of the excitation, according to some sources in the literature. Our simulation results indicate that quantum correlations contribute a significant fraction of the total correlation during this first picosecond in many cases, at both cryogenic and physiological temperatures.

  20. The quantum open system theory for quarkonium during finite temperature medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Yukinao

    2015-01-01

    This paper explains theoretical studies on the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a finite temperature medium. As a first step of understanding the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a medium, it explains firstly the definition of potential acting between heavy quarks in a finite temperature medium, and next the stochastic potential and decoherence. While the conventional definition based on thermodynamics lacks theoretical validity, theoretically reasonable definition can be obtained by the spectral decomposition of Wilson loop in the medium. When calculating the potential with this definition, the imaginary part appears, leading to the lacking of theoretical integrity when used in the potential terms of Schroedinger equation, but it is eliminated by the concept of stochastic potential. Decoherence given by thermal fluctuation to wave function is an important physical process of the dynamics of heavy quarkonium in a finite temperature medium. There is a limit of stochastic potential that cannot describe the irreversible process, and this limitation can be overcome by a more comprehensive system based on the theory of quantum open system. By dealing with the heavy quarkonium as quantum open system, phenomena such as color shielding, thermal fluctuation, and dissipation in the quark-gluon plasma, become describable in the way of quantum theory. (A.O.)

  1. Constructiveness and destructiveness of temperature in asymmetric quantum pseudo dot qubit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jie; Song, Hai-Tao; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2018-06-01

    By using the variational method of the Pekar type, we theoretically study the temperature effects on the asymmetric quantum pseudo dot qubit with a pseudoharmonic potential under an electromagnetic field. The numerical results are analyzed and discussed in detail and show that the relationships of the ground and first excited state energies, the electron oscillation period and the electron probability density in the superposition state of the ground state and the first-excited state with the temperature, the chemical potential, the pseudoharmonic potential, the electric field strength, the cyclotron frequency, the electron phonon coupling constant, the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length, respectively.

  2. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. S.; Han, Z.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

  3. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.; Han, Z.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature

  4. Influences of temperature on asymmetric quantum dot qubit in Coulombic impunity potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Song, H.-T.; Xiao, J.-L.

    2018-05-01

    Using the variational method of the Pekar-type, we study the influences of the temperature on the asymmetric quantum dot (QD) qubit in the Coulombic impunity potential. Then we derive the numerical results and formulate the derivative relationships of the electron probability density and the electron oscillation period in the superposition state of the ground state and the first-excited state with the electron-phonon coupling constant, the Coulombic impurity potential, the transverse and longitudinal confinement strengths at different temperatures, respectively.

  5. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  6. Finite-temperature spin dynamics in a perturbed quantum critical Ising chain with an E₈ symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianda; Kormos, Márton; Si, Qimiao

    2014-12-12

    A spectrum exhibiting E₈ symmetry is expected to arise when a small longitudinal field is introduced in the transverse-field Ising chain at its quantum critical point. Evidence for this spectrum has recently come from neutron scattering measurements in cobalt niobate, a quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet. Unlike its zero-temperature counterpart, the finite-temperature dynamics of the model has not yet been determined. We study the dynamical spin structure factor of the model at low frequencies and nonzero temperatures, using the form factor method. Its frequency dependence is singular, but differs from the diffusion form. The temperature dependence of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate has an activated form, whose prefactor we also determine. We propose NMR experiments as a means to further test the applicability of the E₈ description for CoNb₂O₆.

  7. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  8. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature; Quantentheoretische und klassische Vakuum-Kraefte bei Temperatur Null und bei endlicher Temperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-15

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of {Dirac_h}. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  9. Quantum and quasi-classical collisional dynamics of O2–Ar at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulusoy, Inga S.; Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    A hypersonic vehicle traveling at a high speed disrupts the distribution of internal states in the ambient flow and introduces a nonequilibrium distribution in the post-shock conditions. We investigate the vibrational relaxation in diatom-atom collisions in the range of temperatures between 1000 and 10 000 K by comparing results of extensive fully quantum-mechanical and quasi-classical simulations with available experimental data. The present paper simulates the interaction of molecular oxygen with argon as the first step in developing the aerothermodynamics models based on first principles. We devise a routine to standardize such calculations also for other scattering systems. Our results demonstrate very good agreement of vibrational relaxation time, derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with the experimental measurements conducted in shock tube facilities. At the same time, the quasi-classical simulations fail to accurately predict rates of vibrationally inelastic transitions at temperatures lower than 3000 K. This observation and the computational cost of adopted methods suggest that the next generation of high fidelity thermochemical models should be a combination of quantum and quasi-classical approaches.

  10. Temperature and current dependent electroluminescence measurements on colour-coded multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, Werner [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Regensburg (Germany); FH Deggendorf (Germany); Laubsch, Ansgar; Peter, Matthias; Mayer, Tobias; Bader, Stefan; Oberschmid, Raimund; Hahn, Berthold [OSRAM Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Regensburg (Germany); Benstetter, Guenther [FH Deggendorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    As the efficiency and the luminous flux have been increased enormously in the last few years, today Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are even pushed to applications like general lighting and Home Cinema Projection. Still, InGaN/GaN heterostructure based LEDs suffer from loss-mechanisms like non-radiative defect and Auger recombination, carrier leakage and piezo-field induced carrier separation. To optimize the high current efficiency we evaluated the benefit of Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) compared to Single Quantum Well (SQW) LEDs. Temperature dependent electroluminescence of colour-coded structures with different Indium content in certain Quantum Wells was measured. The experiments demonstrated a strong temperature and current dependence of the MQW operation. The comparison between different LED structures showed effectively the increased LED performance of those structures which operate with a well adjusted MQW active area. Due to the enhanced carrier distribution in the high current range, these LEDs show a higher light output and additionally a reduced wavelength shift.

  11. Temperature and current dependent electroluminescence measurements on colour-coded multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, Werner; Laubsch, Ansgar; Peter, Matthias; Mayer, Tobias; Bader, Stefan; Oberschmid, Raimund; Hahn, Berthold; Benstetter, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    As the efficiency and the luminous flux have been increased enormously in the last few years, today Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are even pushed to applications like general lighting and Home Cinema Projection. Still, InGaN/GaN heterostructure based LEDs suffer from loss-mechanisms like non-radiative defect and Auger recombination, carrier leakage and piezo-field induced carrier separation. To optimize the high current efficiency we evaluated the benefit of Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) compared to Single Quantum Well (SQW) LEDs. Temperature dependent electroluminescence of colour-coded structures with different Indium content in certain Quantum Wells was measured. The experiments demonstrated a strong temperature and current dependence of the MQW operation. The comparison between different LED structures showed effectively the increased LED performance of those structures which operate with a well adjusted MQW active area. Due to the enhanced carrier distribution in the high current range, these LEDs show a higher light output and additionally a reduced wavelength shift

  12. Elucidation of the origins of transport behaviour and quantum oscillations in high temperature superconducting cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, John A

    2009-01-01

    A detailed exposition is given of recent transport and 'quantum oscillation' results from high temperature superconducting (HTSC) systems covering the full carrier range from overdoped to underdoped material. This now very extensive and high quality data set is here interpreted within the framework developed by the author of local pairs and boson-fermion resonance, arising in the context of negative- U behaviour within an inhomogeneous electronic environment. The strong inhomogeneity comes with the mixed-valence condition of these materials, which when underdoped lie in close proximity to the Mott-Anderson transition. The observed intense scattering is presented as resulting from pair formation and from electron-boson collisions in the resonant crossover circumstance. The high level of scattering carries the systems to incoherence in the pseudogapped state, p c (= 0.183). In a high magnetic field the striped partition of the inhomogeneous charge distribution becomes much strengthened and regularized. Magnetization and resistance oscillations, of period dictated by the favoured positioning of the fluxon array within the real space environment of the diagonal 2D charge striping array, are demonstrated to be responsible for the recently reported behaviour hitherto widely attributed to the quantum oscillation response of a much more standard Fermi liquid condition. A detailed analysis embracing all the experimental data serves to reveal that in the given conditions of very high field, low temperature, 2D-striped, underdoped, d-wave superconducting, HTSC material the flux quantum becomes doubled to h/e.

  13. Quantum Quench Dynamics in the Transverse Field Ising Model at Non-zero Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeling, Nils; Kehrein, Stefan

    The recently discovered Dynamical Phase Transition denotes non-analytic behavior in the real time evolution of quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit and has been shown to occur in different systems at zero temperature [Heyl et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 135704 (2013)]. In this talk we present the extension of the analysis to non-zero temperature by studying a generalized form of the Loschmidt echo, the work distribution function, of a quantum quench in the transverse field Ising model. Although the quantitative behavior at non-zero temperatures still displays features derived from the zero temperature non-analyticities, it is shown that in this model dynamical phase transitions do not exist if T > 0 . This is a consequence of the system being initialized in a thermal state. Moreover, we elucidate how the Tasaki-Crooks-Jarzynski relation can be exploited as a symmetry relation for a global quench or to obtain the change of the equilibrium free energy density. This work was supported through CRC SFB 1073 (Project B03) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  14. Temperature Dependence of Emission Properties of Self-Assembled InGaN Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wan-Ru; Zhang Jiang-Yong; Zhang Bao-Ping; Weng Guo-En; Liang Ming-Ming; Li Zeng-Cheng; Liu Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Emission properties of self-assembled green-emitting InGaN quantum dots (QDs) grown on sapphire substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition are studied by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. As temperature increases (15–300 K), the PL peak energy shows an anomalous V-shaped (redshift—blueshift) variation instead of an S-shaped (redshift—blueshift—redshift) variation, as observed typically in green-emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs). The PL full width at half maximum (FWHM) also shows a V-shaped (decrease—increase) variation. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and FWHM of QDs are well explained by a model similar to MQWs, in which carriers transferring in localized states play an important role, while the confinement energy of localized states in the QDs is significantly larger than that in MQWs. By analyzing the integrated PL intensity, the larger confinement energy of localized states in the QDs is estimated to be 105.9 meV, which is well explained by taking into account the band-gap shrinkage and carrier thermalization with temperature. It is also found that the nonradiative combination centers in QD samples are much less than those in QW samples with the same In content

  15. Parasitic Cape honeybee workers, Apis mellifera capensis, evade policing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen J.; Beekman, Madeleine; Wossler, Theresa C.; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2002-01-01

    Relocation of the Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, by bee-keepers from southern to northern South Africa in 1990 has caused widespread death of managed African honeybee, A. m. scutellata, colonies. Apis mellifera capensis worker bees are able to lay diploid, female eggs without mating by means of automictic thelytoky (meiosis followed by fusion of two meiotic products to restore egg diploidy), whereas workers of other honeybee subspecies are able to lay only haploid, male eggs. The A. m. capensis workers, which are parasitizing and killing A. m. scutellata colonies in northern South Africa, are the asexual offspring of a single, original worker in which the small amount of genetic variation observed is due to crossing over during meiosis (P. Kryger, personal communication). Here we elucidate two principal mechanisms underlying this parasitism. Parasitic A. m. capensis workers activate their ovaries in host colonies that have a queen present (queenright colonies), and they lay eggs that evade being killed by other workers (worker policing)-the normal fate of worker-laid eggs in colonies with a queen. This unique parasitism by workers is an instance in which a society is unable to control the selfish actions of its members.

  16. Room-temperature light-emission from Ge quantum dots in photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Jinsong [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)], E-mail: jxia@sc.musashi-tech.ac.jp; Nemoto, Koudai; Ikegami, Yuta [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan); Usami, Noritaka [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-2-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai Japan (Japan)], E-mail: usa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Nakata, Yasushi [Horiba, Ltd., 1-7-8 Higashi-Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0031 (Japan)], E-mail: yasushi.nakata@horiba.com; Shiraki, Yasuhiro [Advanced Research Laboratories, Musashi Institute of Technolgy, 8-15-1 Todoroki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-0082 (Japan)

    2008-11-03

    Multiple layers of Ge self-assembled quantum dots were embedded into two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal microcavities fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates. Microphotoluminescence was used to study the light-emission characteristic of the Ge quantum dots in the microcavities. Strong resonant room-temperature light-emission was observed in the telecommunication wavelength region. Significant enhancement of the luminescence from Ge dots was obtained due to the resonance in the cavities. Multiple sharp resonant peaks dominated the spectrum, showing strong optical resonance inside the cavity. By changing the lattice constant of photonic crystal structure, the wavelengths of the resonant peaks are tuned in the wide wavelength range from 1.2 to 1.6 {mu}m.

  17. Holographic geometry of cMERA for quantum quenches and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollabashi, Ali; Naozaki, Masahiro; Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    We study the time evolution of cMERA (continuous MERA) under quantum quenches in free field theories. We calculate the corresponding holographic metric using the proposal in http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3469 and confirm that it qualitatively agrees with its gravity dual given by a half of the AdS black hole spacetime, argued by Hartman and Maldacena in http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.1080. By doubling the cMERA for the quantum quench, we give an explicit construction of finite temperature cMERA. We also study cMERA in the presence of chemical potential and show that there is an enhancement of metric in the infrared region corresponding to the Fermi energy

  18. Room-Temperature Quantum Ballistic Transport in Monolithic Ultrascaled Al-Ge-Al Nanowire Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistani, Masiar; Staudinger, Philipp; Greil, Johannes; Holzbauer, Martin; Detz, Hermann; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2017-08-09

    Conductance quantization at room temperature is a key requirement for the utilizing of ballistic transport for, e.g., high-performance, low-power dissipating transistors operating at the upper limit of "on"-state conductance or multivalued logic gates. So far, studying conductance quantization has been restricted to high-mobility materials at ultralow temperatures and requires sophisticated nanostructure formation techniques and precise lithography for contact formation. Utilizing a thermally induced exchange reaction between single-crystalline Ge nanowires and Al pads, we achieved monolithic Al-Ge-Al NW heterostructures with ultrasmall Ge segments contacted by self-aligned quasi one-dimensional crystalline Al leads. By integration in electrostatically modulated back-gated field-effect transistors, we demonstrate the first experimental observation of room temperature quantum ballistic transport in Ge, favorable for integration in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor platform technology.

  19. Bethe ansatz approach to quantum sine Gordon thermodynamics and finite temperature excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotos, X.

    1982-01-01

    Takahashi and Suzuki (TS) using the Bethe ansatz method developed a formalism for the thermodynamics of the XYZ spin chain. Translating their formalism to the quantum sine-Gordon system, the thermodynamics and finite temperature elementary excitations are analyzed. Criteria imposed by TS on the allowed states simply correspond to the condition of normalizability of the wave functions. A set of coupled nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamic equilibrium densities for particular values of the coupling constant in the attractive regime is derived. Solving numerically these Bethe ansatz equations, curves of the specific heat as a function of temperature are obtained. The soliton contribution peaks at a temperature of about 0.4 soliton masses shifting downward as the classical limit is approached. The weak coupling regime is analyzed by deriving the Bethe ansatz equations including the charged vacuum excitations. It is shown that they are necessary for a consistent presentation of the thermodynamics

  20. Boundary entropy of one-dimensional quantum systems at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedan, Daniel; Konechny, Anatoly

    2004-01-01

    The boundary β function generates the renormalization group acting on the universality classes of one-dimensional quantum systems with boundary which are critical in the bulk but not critical at the boundary. We prove a gradient formula for the boundary β function, expressing it as the gradient of the boundary entropy s at fixed nonzero temperature. The gradient formula implies that s decreases under renormalization, except at critical points (where it stays constant). At a critical point, the number exp(s) is the 'ground-state degeneracy', g, of Affleck and Ludwig, so we have proved their long-standing conjecture that g decreases under renormalization, from critical point to critical point. The gradient formula also implies that s decreases with temperature, except at critical points, where it is independent of temperature. It remains open whether the boundary entropy is always bounded below

  1. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectra of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, S. S.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2017-03-01

    The optical-absorption spectra of InP/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots have been studied in a broad temperature range of T = 6.5-296 K. Using the second-order derivative spectrophotometry technique, the energies of optical transitions at room temperature were found to be E 1 = 2.60 ± 0.02 eV (for the first peak of excitonic absorption in the InP core) and E 2 = 4.70 ± 0.02 eV (for processes in the ZnS shell). The experimental curve of E 1( T) has been approximated for the first time in the framework of a linear model and in terms of the Fan's formula. It is established that the temperature dependence of E 1 is determined by the interaction of excitons and longitudinal acoustic phonons with hω = 15 meV.

  2. Temperature dependent empirical pseudopotential theory for self-assembled quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianping; Gong, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; He, Lixin

    2012-11-28

    We develop a temperature dependent empirical pseudopotential theory to study the electronic and optical properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) at finite temperature. The theory takes the effects of both lattice expansion and lattice vibration into account. We apply the theory to InAs/GaAs QDs. For the unstrained InAs/GaAs heterostructure, the conduction band offset increases whereas the valence band offset decreases with increasing temperature, and there is a type-I to type-II transition at approximately 135 K. Yet, for InAs/GaAs QDs, the holes are still localized in the QDs even at room temperature, because the large lattice mismatch between InAs and GaAs greatly enhances the valence band offset. The single-particle energy levels in the QDs show a strong temperature dependence due to the change of confinement potentials. Because of the changes of the band offsets, the electron wavefunctions confined in QDs increase by about 1-5%, whereas the hole wavefunctions decrease by about 30-40% when the temperature increases from 0 to 300 K. The calculated recombination energies of excitons, biexcitons and charged excitons show red shifts with increasing temperature which are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  3. Decisive role of nuclear quantum effects on surface mediated water dissociation at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Yair; Donadio, Davide; Ceriotti, Michele; Rossi, Mariana

    2018-03-01

    Water molecules adsorbed on inorganic substrates play an important role in several technological applications. In the presence of light atoms in adsorbates, nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) influence the structural stability and the dynamical properties of these systems. In this work, we explore the impact of NQEs on the dissociation of water wires on stepped Pt(221) surfaces. By performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with van der Waals corrected density functional theory, we note that several competing minima for both intact and dissociated structures are accessible at finite temperatures, making it important to assess whether harmonic estimates of the quantum free energy are sufficient to determine the relative stability of the different states. We thus perform ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) in order to calculate these contributions taking into account the conformational entropy and anharmonicities at finite temperatures. We propose that when adsorption is weak and NQEs on the substrate are negligible, PIMD simulations can be performed through a simple partition of the system, resulting in considerable computational savings. We then calculate the full contribution of NQEs to the free energies, including also anharmonic terms. We find that they result in an increase of up to 20% of the quantum contribution to the dissociation free energy compared with the harmonic estimates. We also find that the dissociation process has a negligible contribution from tunneling but is dominated by zero point energies, which can enhance the rate of dissociation by three orders of magnitude. Finally we highlight how both temperature and NQEs indirectly impact dipoles and the redistribution of electron density, causing work function changes of up to 0.4 eV with respect to static estimates. This quantitative determination of the change in the work function provides a possible approach to determine experimentally the most stable configurations of water

  4. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3......)-phenylenevinylene (OPV3) derivatives, in which the central benzene ring is coupled to either para- or meta-positions. Using the break-junction technique, we find that the conductance for a single meta-OPV3 molecule wired between gold electrodes is one order of magnitude smaller than that of a para-OPV3 molecule...

  5. Leading temperature dependence of the conductance in Kondo-correlated quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligia, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Using renormalized perturbation theory in the Coulomb repulsion, we derive an analytical expression for the leading term in the temperature dependence of the conductance through a quantum dot described by the impurity Anderson model, in terms of the renormalized parameters of the model. Taking these parameters from the literature, we compare the results with published ones calculated using the numerical renormalization group obtaining a very good agreement. The approach is superior to alternative perturbative treatments. We compare in particular to the results of a simple interpolative perturbation approach.

  6. Room-temperature luminescence decay of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots: Nonexponentiality revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodunov, Evgeny N. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Danilov, Vladimir V. [Department of Physics, Petersburg State Transport University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Panfutova, Anastasia S. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Simoes Gamboa, A.L. [Center of Information Optical Technologies, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    While time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy is commonly used as a quantitative tool for the analysis of the dynamics of photoexcitation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, the interpretation of the virtually ubiquitous nonexponential decay profiles is frequently ambiguous, because the assumption of multiple discrete exponential components with distinct lifetimes for resolving the decays is often arbitrary. Here, an interpretation of the room-temperature luminescence decay of CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots in colloidal solutions is presented based on the Kohlrausch relaxation function. It is proposed that the decay can be understood by using the concept of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assuming that the role of acceptors of photoexcitation energy is played by high-frequency anharmonic molecular vibrations in the environment of the quantum dots. The term EVFRET (Electronic - Vibrational Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer) is introduced in order to unequivocally refer to this energy transfer process. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Temperature dependence of the CP/sup N-1/ model and the analogy with quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actor, A.

    1985-01-01

    The two-dimensional CP/sup N-1/ model - a simple field-theoretic analogue of four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics (QCD) - is analysed and reviewed. The major themes are the temperature dependence of the CP/sup N-1/ model, and the analogy between CP/sup N-1/ and QCD. A detailed treatment of the 1/N approximation of the CP/sup N-1/ model is given. The main results emerging from this approximation are discussed at length. These are: asymptotic freedom, dimensional transmutation, confinement and topological charge nonquantization at zero temperature T = 0, screening and topological charge quantization at finite temperature T. The analogy with QCD is explained in detail. A new, qualitative, analysis of the CP/sup N-1/ model at finite temperature is introduced. This approach exploits the conformal invariance of the model to 'heat' an arbitrary CP/sup N-1/ field from T = 0 to finite temperature. This is achieved by conformal-transforming the flat Euclidean space-time of the T = 0 theory to the cylindrical space-time of the finite temperature theory. (author)

  8. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm

  9. Temperature-Dependent Mollow Triplet Spectra from a Single Quantum Dot: Rabi Frequency Renormalization and Sideband Linewidth Insensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yu-Jia; He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We investigate temperature-dependent resonance fluorescence spectra obtained from a single self- assembled quantum dot. A decrease of the Mollow triplet sideband splitting is observed with increasing temperature, an effect we attribute to a phonon-induced renormalization of the driven dot Rabi fr...

  10. Quantum oscillations in the parent magnetic phase of an iron arsenide high temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E; Gillett, J; Lau, P H C; Lonzarich, G G; Harrison, N; Mielke, C H; Singh, D J

    2008-01-01

    We report measurements of quantum oscillations in SrFe 2 As 2 -which is an antiferromagnetic parent of the iron arsenide family of superconductors-known to become superconducting under doping and the application of pressure. The magnetic field and temperature dependences of the oscillations between 20 and 55 T in the liquid helium temperature range suggest that the electronic excitations are those of a Fermi liquid. We show that the observed Fermi surface comprising small pockets is consistent with the formation of a spin-density wave. Our measurements thus demonstrate that high T c superconductivity can occur on doping or pressurizing a conventional metallic spin-density wave state. (fast track communication)

  11. Hawking temperature: an elementary approach based on Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, the British physicist Stephen Hawking discovered that black holes have a characteristic temperature and are therefore capable of emitting radiation. Given the scientific importance of this discovery, there is a profuse literature on the subject. Nevertheless, the available literature ends up being either too simple, which does not convey the true physical significance of the issue, or too technical, which excludes an ample segment of the audience interested in science, such as physics teachers and their students. The present article seeks to remedy this shortcoming. It develops a simple and plausible argument that provides insight into the fundamental aspects of Hawking’s discovery, which leads to an approximate equation for the so-called Hawking temperature. The exposition is mainly intended for physics teachers and their students, and it only requires elementary algebra, as well as basic notions of Newtonian mechanics and quantum theory.

  12. Analytical pair correlations in ideal quantum gases: temperature-dependent bunching and antibunching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, J; Pathak, K N; Singh, G S

    2011-10-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem together with the exact density response spectrum for ideal quantum gases has been utilized to yield a new expression for the static structure factor, which we use to derive exact analytical expressions for the temperature-dependent pair distribution function g(r) of the ideal gases. The plots of bosonic and fermionic g(r) display "Bose pile" and "Fermi hole" typically akin to bunching and antibunching as observed experimentally for ultracold atomic gases. The behavior of spin-scaled pair correlation for fermions is almost featureless, but bosons show a rich structure including long-range correlations near T(c). The coherent state at T=0 shows no correlation at all, just like single-mode lasers. The depicted decreasing trend in correlation with decrease in temperature for T

  13. Energy and angular momentum balance in wall-bounded quantum turbulence at very low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosio, J J; Eltsov, V B; Heikkinen, P J; Hänninen, R; Krusius, M; L'vov, V S

    2013-01-01

    A superfluid in the absence of a viscous normal component should be the best realization of an ideal inviscid Euler fluid. As expressed by d'Alembert's famous paradox, an ideal fluid does not drag on bodies past which it flows, or in other words it does not exchange momentum with them. In addition, the flow of an ideal fluid does not dissipate kinetic energy. Here we study experimentally whether these properties apply to the flow of superfluid (3)He-B in a rotating cylinder at low temperatures. It is found that ideal behaviour is broken by quantum turbulence, which leads to substantial energy dissipation, as was also observed earlier. Remarkably, the angular momentum exchange between the superfluid and its container approaches nearly ideal behaviour, as the drag almost disappears in the zero-temperature limit. Here the mismatch between energy and angular momentum transfer results in a new physical situation, with severe implications on the flow dynamics.

  14. The influence of carrier dynamics on double-state lasing in quantum dot lasers at variable temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, V. V.; Savelyev, A. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Omelchenko, A. V.; Maximov, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    It is shown in analytical form that the carrier capture from the matrix as well as carrier dynamics in quantum dots plays an important role in double-state lasing phenomenon. In particular, the de-synchronization of hole and electron captures allows one to describe recently observed quenching of ground-state lasing, which takes place in quantum dot lasers operating in double-state lasing regime at high injection. From the other side, the detailed analysis of charge carrier dynamics in the single quantum dot enables one to describe the observed light-current characteristics and key temperature dependences.

  15. The influence of carrier dynamics on double-state lasing in quantum dot lasers at variable temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, V V; Savelyev, A V; Zhukov, A E; Omelchenko, A V; Maximov, M V

    2014-01-01

    It is shown in analytical form that the carrier capture from the matrix as well as carrier dynamics in quantum dots plays an important role in double-state lasing phenomenon. In particular, the de-synchronization of hole and electron captures allows one to describe recently observed quenching of ground-state lasing, which takes place in quantum dot lasers operating in double-state lasing regime at high injection. From the other side, the detailed analysis of charge carrier dynamics in the single quantum dot enables one to describe the observed light-current characteristics and key temperature dependences

  16. Bose-Einstein Condensation: Quantum weirdness at the lowest temperature in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl

    2004-10-01

    In 1924 Einstein predicted that a gas would undergo a dramatic transformation at a sufficiently low temperature (now known as Bose-Einstein condensation or BEC). In 1995, my group was able to observe this transformation by cooling a gas sample to the unprecedented temperature of less than 100 billionths of a degree above absolute zero. The BEC state is a novel form of matter in which a large number of atoms lose their individual identities and behave as a single quantum entity, the ``superatom.'' This entity is the atom analogue to laser light, and, although large enough to be easily seen and manipulated, exhibits the nonintuitive quantum behavior normally important only at much tinier size scales. The study and use of the curious properties of BEC has now become an important subfield of physics. I will discuss how we create BEC and some of the subsequent research we have done on it. Interactive applets as a tool for teaching science will be demonstrated in the presentation.

  17. Room-temperature InP/InAsP Quantum Discs-in-Nanowire Infrared Photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad; Jain, Vishal; Heurlin, Magnus; Nowzari, Ali; Hussain, Laiq; Lindgren, David; Stehr, Jan Eric; Buyanova, Irina A; Gustafsson, Anders; Samuelson, Lars; Borgström, Magnus T; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-06-14

    The possibility to engineer nanowire heterostructures with large bandgap variations is particularly interesting for technologically important broadband photodetector applications. Here we report on a combined study of design, fabrication, and optoelectronic properties of infrared photodetectors comprising four million n + -i-n + InP nanowires periodically ordered in arrays. The nanowires were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on InP substrates, with either a single or 20 InAsP quantum discs embedded in the i-segment. By Zn compensation of the residual n-dopants in the i-segment, the room-temperature dark current is strongly suppressed to a level of pA/NW at 1 V bias. The low dark current is manifested in the spectrally resolved photocurrent measurements, which reveal strong photocurrent contributions from the InAsP quantum discs at room temperature with a threshold wavelength of about 2.0 μm and a bias-tunable responsivity reaching 7 A/W@1.38 μm at 2 V bias. Two different processing schemes were implemented to study the effects of radial self-gating in the nanowires induced by the nanowire/SiO x /ITO wrap-gate geometry. Summarized, our results show that properly designed axial InP/InAsP nanowire heterostructures are promising candidates for broadband photodetectors.

  18. Pärnus algavad homme Ungari kultuuripäevad / Teet Roossaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roossaar, Teet

    2005-01-01

    Ungari organist Miklos Teleki orelikontsertidest 3. sept. Eliisabeti kirikus ja 4. sept. Pärnu-Jaagupi kirikus ning Pärnu Linnaorkestri hooaja avakontserdist 4. sept. Pärnu kontserdimajas Ungari kultuuripäevade raames

  19. Linear Pursuit Differential Game under Phase Constraint on the State of Evader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar Rakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a linear pursuit differential game of one pursuer and one evader. Controls of the pursuer and evader are subjected to integral and geometric constraints, respectively. In addition, phase constraint is imposed on the state of evader, whereas pursuer moves throughout the space. We say that pursuit is completed, if inclusion y(t1-x(t1∈M is satisfied at some t1>0, where x(t and y(t are states of pursuer and evader, respectively, and M is terminal set. Conditions of completion of pursuit in the game from all initial points of players are obtained. Strategy of the pursuer is constructed so that the phase vector of the pursuer first is brought to a given set, and then pursuit is completed.

  20. XX rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad / Valdo Rüütelmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rüütelmaa, Valdo

    2009-01-01

    17. märtsist kuni 5. aprillini Eesti Muusika- ja Teatriakadeemias toimunud rahvusvahelistest 20. trompetipäevadest, mille raames toimus 5. aprillil konkurss "Trompetitalendid 2009" . Trompetipäevade korraldaja Aavo Otsaga

  1. Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 : Nädalajagu muusikat igale maitsele / Signe Tamberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamberg, Signe

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 muusikaprogrammis: 34. tudengilaulu võistlusest 29. apr. Tartu Sadamateatris, öölaulupeost 28. apr. Kassitoome orus, kontsertidest "Rokime!" 2. mail ja "Folgime" 3. mail Raekoja platsil

  2. Eesti Suusapäevad Jay Peak´is / Peeter Teedla ; fotod: Peeter Teedla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teedla, Peeter

    2006-01-01

    märtsikuu esimesel nädalalõpul idaranniku eestlaste suusapäevad, osavõtjaid 156, paljud perekondade ja väikeste lastega, organiseerijaks Kristin Raamot. Peeti murdmaasuusatamise - ja slaalomivõistlused

  3. Estimation of effective temperatures in quantum annealers for sampling applications: A case study with possible applications in deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Marcello; Realpe-Gómez, John; Biswas, Rupak; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    An increase in the efficiency of sampling from Boltzmann distributions would have a significant impact on deep learning and other machine-learning applications. Recently, quantum annealers have been proposed as a potential candidate to speed up this task, but several limitations still bar these state-of-the-art technologies from being used effectively. One of the main limitations is that, while the device may indeed sample from a Boltzmann-like distribution, quantum dynamical arguments suggest it will do so with an instance-dependent effective temperature, different from its physical temperature. Unless this unknown temperature can be unveiled, it might not be possible to effectively use a quantum annealer for Boltzmann sampling. In this work, we propose a strategy to overcome this challenge with a simple effective-temperature estimation algorithm. We provide a systematic study assessing the impact of the effective temperatures in the learning of a special class of a restricted Boltzmann machine embedded on quantum hardware, which can serve as a building block for deep-learning architectures. We also provide a comparison to k -step contrastive divergence (CD-k ) with k up to 100. Although assuming a suitable fixed effective temperature also allows us to outperform one-step contrastive divergence (CD-1), only when using an instance-dependent effective temperature do we find a performance close to that of CD-100 for the case studied here.

  4. Optical detection of symmetric and antisymmetric states in double quantum wells at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, M.; Sheregii, E. M.; Tralle, I.; Marcelli, A.; Piccinini, M.; Cebulski, J.

    2009-09-01

    We studied the optical reflectivity of a specially grown double quantum well (DQW) structure characterized by a rectangular shape and a high electron density at room temperature. Assuming that the QWs depth is known, reflectivity spectra in the mid-IR range allow to carry out the precise measurements of the SAS-gap values (the energy gap between the symmetric and anti-symmetric states) and the absolute energies of both symmetric and antisymmetric electron states. The results of our experiments are in favor of the existence of the SAS splitting in the DQWs at room temperature. Here we have shown that the SAS gap increases proportionally to the subband quantum number and the optical electron transitions between symmetric and antisymmetric states belonging to different subbands are allowed. These results were used for interpretation of the beating effect in the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations at low temperatures (0.6 and 4.2 K). The approach to the calculation of the Landau-levels energies for DQW structures developed earlier [D. Ploch , Phys. Rev. B 79, 195434 (2009)] is used for the analysis and interpretation of the experimental data related to the beating effect. We also argue that in order to explain the beating effect in the SdH oscillations, one should introduce two different quasi-Fermi levels characterizing the two electron subsystems regarding symmetry properties of their wave functions, symmetric and antisymmetric ones. These states are not mixed neither by electron-electron interaction nor probably by electron-phonon interaction.

  5. Universal linear-temperature resistivity: possible quantum diffusion transport in strongly correlated superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Yinshang; Xiao, Hong; Mu, Gang; Yang, Yi-Feng

    2017-08-25

    The strongly correlated electron fluids in high temperature cuprate superconductors demonstrate an anomalous linear temperature (T) dependent resistivity behavior, which persists to a wide temperature range without exhibiting saturation. As cooling down, those electron fluids lose the resistivity and condense into the superfluid. However, the origin of the linear-T resistivity behavior and its relationship to the strongly correlated superconductivity remain a mystery. Here we report a universal relation [Formula: see text], which bridges the slope of the linear-T-dependent resistivity (dρ/dT) to the London penetration depth λ L at zero temperature among cuprate superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ and heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn 5 , where μ 0 is vacuum permeability, k B is the Boltzmann constant and ħ is the reduced Planck constant. We extend this scaling relation to different systems and found that it holds for other cuprate, pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors as well, regardless of the significant differences in the strength of electronic correlations, transport directions, and doping levels. Our analysis suggests that the scaling relation in strongly correlated superconductors could be described as a hydrodynamic diffusive transport, with the diffusion coefficient (D) approaching the quantum limit D ~ ħ/m*, where m* is the quasi-particle effective mass.

  6. Ambient temperature dependence on emission spectrum of InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, C.Y.; Yoon, S.F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Chua, S.J. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Singapore)

    2009-04-15

    Semiconductor superluminescent diodes (SLDs) are important broadband light source for fiber optic gyroscope and biomedical imaging. Quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed to be the best candidate for broadband light sources due to the inhomogeneous broadening of the gain spectrum as a result of the inherited size inhomogeneity of the self-assembled QD growth. In this work, the effect of ambient temperature (25-100 C) on the emission spectrum of InAs QDs with wideband emission was investigated. It was found that the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra remains more than 125 nm throughout the temperature range, and the redshift as function of temperature is approximately 0.27 meV/K. Activation energy of 270 meV is extracted from the Arrhenius plot and the PL quenching at high temperature is attributed to thermally induced carriers escaping out of the In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As strain-reducing layer. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Room temperature negative differential resistance in terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albo, Asaf, E-mail: asafalbo@gmail.com; Hu, Qing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Reno, John L. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1303, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1303 (United States)

    2016-08-22

    The mechanisms that limit the temperature performance of GaAs/Al{sub 0.15}GaAs-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) have been identified as thermally activated LO-phonon scattering and leakage of charge carriers into the continuum. Consequently, the combination of highly diagonal optical transition and higher barriers should significantly reduce the adverse effects of both mechanisms and lead to improved temperature performance. Here, we study the temperature performance of highly diagonal THz-QCLs with high barriers. Our analysis uncovers an additional leakage channel which is the thermal excitation of carriers into bounded higher energy levels, rather than the escape into the continuum. Based on this understanding, we have designed a structure with an increased intersubband spacing between the upper lasing level and excited states in a highly diagonal THz-QCL, which exhibits negative differential resistance even at room temperature. This result is a strong evidence for the effective suppression of the aforementioned leakage channel.

  8. Internal quantum efficiency and tunable colour temperature in monolithic white InGaN/GaN LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titkov, Ilya E.; Yadav, Amit; Zerova, Vera L.; Zulonas, Modestas; Tsatsulnikov, Andrey F.; Lundin, Wsevolod V.; Sakharov, Alexey V.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-03-01

    Internal Quantum Efficiency (IQE) of two-colour monolithic white light emitting diode (LED) was measured by temperature dependant electro-luminescence (TDEL) and analysed with modified rate equation based on ABC model. External, internal and injection efficiencies of blue and green quantum wells were analysed separately. Monolithic white LED contained one green InGaN QW and two blue QWs being separated by GaN barrier. This paper reports also the tunable behaviour of correlated colour temperature (CCT) in pulsed operation mode and effect of self-heating on device performance.

  9. Electrically pumped single-photon emission at room temperature from a single InGaN/GaN quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Saniya; Frost, Thomas; Hazari, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Pallab, E-mail: pkb@eecs.umich.edu [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a semiconductor quantum dot based electrically pumped single-photon source operating at room temperature. Single photons emitted in the red spectral range from single In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dots exhibit a second-order correlation value g{sup (2)}(0) of 0.29, and fast recombination lifetime ∼1.3 ±0.3 ns at room temperature. The single-photon source can be driven at an excitation repetition rate of 200 MHz.

  10. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  11. Temperature stability of static and dynamic properties of 1.55 µm quantum dot lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahinia, A; Banyoudeh, S; Rippien, A; Schnabel, F; Eyal, O; Cestier, I; Kalifa, I; Mentovich, E; Eisenstein, G; Reithmaier, J P

    2018-03-05

    Static and dynamic properties of InP-based 1.55 µm quantum dot (QD) lasers were investigated. Due to the reduced size inhomogeneity and a high dot density of the newest generation of 1.55 µm QD gain materials, ridge waveguide lasers (RWG) exhibit improved temperature stability and record-high modulation characteristics. Detailed results are shown for the temperature dependence of static properties including threshold current, voltage-current characteristics, external differential efficiency and emission wavelength. Similarly, small and large signal modulations were found to have only minor dependences on temperature. Moreover, we show the impact of the active region design and the cavity length on the temperature stability. Measurements were performed in pulsed and continuous wave operation. High characteristic temperatures for the threshold current were obtained with T 0 values of 144 K (15 - 60 °C), 101 K (60 - 110 °C) and 70 K up to 180 °C for a 900-µm-long RWG laser comprising 8 QD layers. The slope efficiency in these lasers is nearly independent of temperature showing a T 1 value of more than 900 K up to 110 °C. Due to the high modal gain, lasers with a cavity length of 340 µm reached new record modulation bandwidths of 17.5 GHz at 20 °C and 9 GHz at 80 °C, respectively. These lasers were modulated at 26 GBit/s in the non-return to zero format at 80 °C and at 25 GBaud using a four-level pulse amplitude format at 21 °C.

  12. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV.

  13. Density and temperature dependence of carrier dynamics in self-organized InGaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, T B; Kim, K; Urayama, J; Wu, Z K; Singh, J; Bhattacharya, P K

    2005-01-01

    We have used two- and three-pulse femtosecond differential transmission spectroscopy to study the dependence of quantum dot carrier dynamics on temperature. At low temperatures and densities, the rates for relaxation between the quantum dot confined states and for capture from the barrier region into the various dot levels could be directly determined. For electron-hole pairs generated directly in the quantum dot excited state, relaxation is dominated by electron-hole scattering, and occurs on a 5 ps time scale. Capture times from the barrier into the quantum dot are of the order of 2 ps (into the excited state) and 10 ps (into the ground state). The phonon bottleneck was clearly observed in low-density capture experiments, and the conditions for its observation (namely, the suppression of electron-hole scattering for nongeminately captured electrons) were determined. As temperature increases beyond about 100 K, the dynamics become dominated by the re-emission of carriers from the lower dot levels, due to the large density of states in the wetting layer and barrier region. Measurements of the gain dynamics show fast (130 fs) gain recovery due to intradot carrier-carrier scattering, and picosecond-scale capture. Direct measurement of the transparency density versus temperature shows the dramatic effect of carrier re-emission for the quantum dots on thermally activated scattering. The carrier dynamics at elevated temperature are thus strongly dominated by the high density of the high energy continuum states relative to the dot confined levels. Deleterious hot carrier effects can be suppressed in quantum dot lasers by resonant tunnelling injection

  14. Room-temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry and methods of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Charles G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Cunningham, Christopher T.

    2018-05-15

    According to one embodiment, a heterodyne detection system for detecting light, includes: a first input aperture configured to receive first light from a scene input; a second input aperture configured to receive second light from a local oscillator input; a broadband local oscillator configured to provide the second light to the second input aperture; a dispersive element configured to disperse the first light and the second light; and a final condensing lens coupled to a detector. The final condensing lens is configured to concentrate incident light from a primary condensing lens onto the detector. The detector is configured to sense a frequency difference between the first light and the second light; and the final condensing lens comprises a plasmonic condensing lens. Methods for forming a plasmonic condensing lens to enable room temperature quantum noise limited spectrometry are also disclosed.

  15. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  16. Detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile with a pulsed room temperature quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, J.; Jäger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the use of a pulsed, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser centered at 957 cm-1 in combination with an astigmatic Herriot cell with 250 m path length for the detection of acrolein and acrylonitrile. These molecules have been identified as hazardous air-pollutants because of their adverse health effects. The spectrometer utilizes the intra-pulse method, where a linear frequency down-chirp, that is induced when a top-hat current pulse is applied to the laser, is used for sweeping across the absorption line. Up to 450 ns long pulses were used for these measurements which resulted in a spectral window of ~2.2 cm-1. A room temperature mercury-cadmium-telluride detector was used, resulting in a completely cryogen free spectrometer. We demonstrated detection limits of ~3 ppb for acrylonitrile and ~6 ppb for acrolein with ~10 s averaging time. Laser characterization and optimization of the operational parameters for sensitivity improvement are discussed.

  17. The role of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on bound polaron in semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Moussaouy, A.; Ouchani, N.

    2014-01-01

    We studied theoretically the effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the binding energy of shallow hydrogenic impurity in a cylindrical quantum dot (QD) using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The hydrostatic stress was applied along the QD growth axis. The interactions between the charge carriers and confined longitudinal optical (LO) phonon modes are taken into account. The numerical computation for GaAs/Ga 1−x Al x As QD has shown that the binding energy with and without the polaronic correction depends on the location of the impurity and the pressure effect and it is more pronounced for impurities in the QD center. Both the binding energy and the polaronic contribution increase linearly with increasing stress. For each pressure value, these energies are also found to decrease as the temperature increases. The results obtained show that in experimental studies of optical and electronic properties of QDs, the effects of pressure, temperature and polaronic correction on donor impurity binding energy should be taken into consideration

  18. Low temperature carrier redistribution dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badcock, T. J., E-mail: Thomas.badcock@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Dawson, P.; Davies, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Oehler, F.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-21

    We have studied the carrier recombination dynamics in an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure as a function of emission energy and excitation density between temperatures of 10 K and 100 K. Under relatively low levels of excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and decay time of emission on the high energy side of the luminescence spectrum decrease strongly between 10 K and 50 K. In contrast, for emission detected on the low energy side of the spectrum, the PL intensity and decay time increase over the same temperature range. These results are consistent with a thermally activated carrier redistribution process in which the (temperature dependent) average timescale for carrier transfer into or out of a localised state depends on the energy of the given state. Thus, the transfer time out of shallow, weakly localised states is considerably shorter than the arrival time into more deeply localised states. This picture is consistent with carriers hopping between localisation sites in an uncorrelated disorder potential where the density of localised states decreases with increasing localisation depth, e.g., a exponential or Gaussian distribution resulting from random alloy disorder. Under significantly higher levels of excitation, the increased occupation fraction of the localised states results in a greater average separation distance between unoccupied localised states, causing a suppression of the spectral and dynamic signatures of the hopping transfer of carriers.

  19. Growth of room temperature ferromagnetic Ge1-xMnx quantum dots on hydrogen passivated Si (100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, Daniele; Conta, Gianluca; Coïsson, Marco; Amato, Giampiero; Tiberto, Paola; Allia, Paolo

    2018-05-01

    A method for the synthesis of room-temperature ferromagnetic dilute semiconductor Ge1-xMnx (5 % < x < 8 %) quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy by selective growth on hydrogen terminated silicon (100) surface is presented. The functionalized substrates, as well as the nanostructures, were characterized in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The quantum dots density and equivalent radius were extracted from field emission scanning electron microscope pictures, obtained ex-situ. Magnetic characterizations were performed by superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometry revealing that ferromagnetic order is maintained up to room temperature: two different ferromagnetic phases were identified by the analysis of the field cooled - zero field cooled measurements.

  20. Room-temperature operation of quantum cascade lasers at a wavelength of 5.8 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babichev, A. V. [Connector Optics LLC (Russian Federation); Bousseksou, A. [University Paris Saclay, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622 CNRS (France); Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E. [Peter-the-Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Novikov, I. I.; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Egorov, A. Yu., E-mail: anton.egorov@connector-optics.com [Connector Optics LLC (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The room-temperature generation of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers (QCL) at a wavelength of 5.8 μm in the pulsed mode is demonstrated. The heterostructure of a quantum-cascade laser based on a heterojunction of InGaAs/InAlAs alloys is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and incorporates 60 identical cascades. The threshold current density of the stripe laser 1.4 mm long and 22 μm wide is ~4.8 kA/cm{sup 2} at a temperature of 303 K. The maximum power of the optical-radiation output from one QCL face, recorded by a detector, is 88 mW. The actual optical-power output from one QCL face is no less than 150 mW. The results obtained and possible ways of optimizing the structure of the developed quantum-cascade lasers are discussed.

  1. Room temperature PL efficiency of InGaN/GaN quantum well structures with prelayers as a function of number of quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, George M.; Hammersley, Simon; Davies, Matthew J.; Dawson, Philip; Kappers, Menno J.; Massabuau, Fabien C.P.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Humphreys, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the effects of varying the number of quantum wells (QWs) in an InGaN/GaN multiple QW (MQW) structure containing a 23 nm thick In0.05Ga0.95N prelayer doped with Si. The calculated conduction and valence bands for the structures show an increasing total electric field across the QWs with increasing number of QWs. This is due to the reduced strength of the surface polarisation field, which opposes the built-in field across the QWs, as its range is increased over thicker samples. Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements show a red shifted QW emission peak energy, which is attributed to the enhanced quantum confined Stark effect with increasing total field strength across the QWs. Low temperature PL time decay measurements and room temperature internal quantum efficiency (IQE) measurements show decreasing radiative recombination rates and decreasing IQE, respectively, with increasing number of QWs. These are attributed to the increased spatial separation of the electron and hole wavefunctions, consistent with the calculated band profiles. It is also shown that, for samples with fewer QWs, the reduction of the total field across the QWs makes the radiative recombination rate sufficiently fast that it is competitive with the efficiency losses associated with the thermal escape of carriers. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Phys. Status Solidi C published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Quantum rotation and translation of hydrogen molecules encapsulated inside C₆₀: temperature dependence of inelastic neutron scattering spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsewill, A J; Goh, K; Rols, S; Ollivier, J; Johnson, M R; Levitt, M H; Carravetta, M; Mamone, S; Murata, Y; Chen, J Y-C; Johnson, J A; Lei, X; Turro, N J

    2013-09-13

    The quantum dynamics of a hydrogen molecule encapsulated inside the cage of a C60 fullerene molecule is investigated using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The emphasis is on the temperature dependence of the INS spectra which were recorded using time-of-flight spectrometers. The hydrogen endofullerene system is highly quantum mechanical, exhibiting both translational and rotational quantization. The profound influence of the Pauli exclusion principle is revealed through nuclear spin isomerism. INS is shown to be exceptionally able to drive transitions between ortho-hydrogen and para-hydrogen which are spin-forbidden to photon spectroscopies. Spectra in the temperature range 1.6≤T≤280 K are presented, and examples are given which demonstrate how the temperature dependence of the INS peak amplitudes can provide an effective tool for assigning the transitions. It is also shown in a preliminary investigation how the temperature dependence may conceivably be used to probe crystal field effects and inter-fullerene interactions.

  3. Compositional disordering of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells using ion bombardment at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, K.K.; Donnelly, J.P.; Wang, C.A.; Woodhouse, J.D.; Haus, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    A new method has been developed for compositional mixing of heterostructures by ion bombardment at elevated temperatures. Complete mixing of a 1-μm-thick GaAs/AlGaAs 40-period multiple quantum well layer has been achieved by bombardment with 380 keV Ne + ions for 1 h with the sample at 700 0 C. This temperature is much lower than the annealing temperatures used in other vacancy-enhanced disordering techniques, and even lower temperatures and shorter durations should be possible. Compositional disordering is verified by sputter-profile Auger electron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Complete mixing is also demonstrated by optical transmission spectra of the disordered material, which exhibit the same band edge as a uniform alloy with the average aluminum mole fraction of the multiple quantum well layer

  4. Quantum network theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurke, B.; Denker, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general approach, within the framework of canonical quantization, is described for analyzing the quantum behavior of complicated electronic circuits. This approach is capable of dealing with electrical networks having nonlinear or dissipative elements. The techniques are used to analyze a degenerate parametric amplifier, a device capable of generating squeezed coherent state signals. A circuit capable of performing back-action-evading electrical measurements is also discussed. (author)

  5. Self-assembled InAs quantum dots formed by molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and postgrowth annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhan, H.H.; Nötzel, R.; Hamhuis, G.J.; Eijkemans, T.J.; Wolter, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots are grown at low temperature (LT) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs substrates. The growth is in situ monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and ex situ evaluated by atomic force microscopy for the morphological properties, and by

  6. Gain dynamics in p-doped InGaAs quantum dot amplifiers from room to cryogenic temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borri, P.; Cesaria, V.; Rossetti, M.; Fiore, A.; Langbein, W.

    2009-01-01

    We have compared the gain dynamics of the ground state excitonic transition between undoped and p-doped electrically-pumped InGaAs quantum-dot optical amplifiers, for temperatures from 300K to 20K. A pump-probe differential transmission technique in heterodyne detection with sub-picosecond time

  7. Temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on single dopant states in hollow cylindrical core-shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Yadri, M.; Aghoutane, N.; El Aouami, A.; Feddi, E.; Dujardin, F.; Duque, C. A.

    2018-05-01

    This work reports on theoretical investigation of the temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on the confined donor impurity in a AlGaAs-GaAs hollow cylindrical core-shell quantum dot. The charges are assumed to be completely confined to the interior of the shell with approximately rigid walls. Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and by using a variational approach, we have computed the donor binding energies as a function of the shell size in order to study the behavior of the electron-impurity attraction for a very small thickness under the influence of both temperature and hydrostatic pressure. Our results show that the temperature and hydrostatic pressure have a significant influence on the impurity binding energy for large shell quantum dots. It will be shown that the binding energy is more pronounced with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature for any impurity position and quantum dot size. The photoionization cross section is also analyzed by considering only the in-plane incident radiation polarization. Its behavior is investigated as a function of photon energy for different values of pressure and temperature. The opposite effects caused by temperature and hydrostatic pressure reveal a big practical interest and offer an alternative way to tuning of correlated electron-impurity transitions in optoelectronic devices.

  8. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  9. Proper energy of an electron in a topologically massive (2 + 1) quantum electrodynamics system at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovskii, K.V.; Eminov, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The one-loop approximation is used to calculate the effects of finite temperature and nonzero chemical potential on the electron energy shift in a (2 + 1)-quantum electrodynamic system containing a Churn-Simon term. The induced electron mass is derived with a massless (2 + 1)-quantum electrodynamic system together with the exchange correction to the thermodynamic potential for a completely degenerate electron gas. It is shown that in the last case, incorporating the Churn-Simon term leads to loss of the gap in the direction law

  10. Influence of the temperature on the synthesis of CdS quantum dots stabilized with poly (vinil alcohol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Andre L.B. de; Mansur, Alexandra A.P.; Mansur, Herman S.; Gonzalez, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (Quantum Dots, QDs) have been the subject of recent research by presenting quantum properties. This property has stimulated the study of these particles in biological applications such as bookmarks, which creates the necessity of using different synthesis routes resulting in biocompatible systems. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature on the properties of QDs cadmium sulfide, aqueous route using poly (vinyl alcohol), a biocompatible polymer, such as stabilizing agent. The characterization of particles produced was performed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra for obtaining the absorption and emission, respectively and Transmission microscopy (TEM) for analysis of the diameter of the nanocrystals. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 97 October. Tunneling reaction and quantum medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru [eds.

    1998-02-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 3rd Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in Oct. 13 and 14, 1997. The main subject of the meeting is `Tunneling Reaction and Quantum Medium`. In the meeting, the physical and chemical phenomena in the liquid helium such as quantum nucleation, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and tunneling abstraction reaction of tritium atom were discussed as the main topics as well as the tunneling reactions in the solid hydrogen and organic compounds. Through the meetings held in 1995, 1996, and 1997, the tunneling phenomena proceeding at various temperatures (room temperature to mK) in the wide fields of chemistry, biology, and physics were discussed intensively and the importance of the tunneling phenomena in the science has been getting clear. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Towards the unified non-classical physics: account for quantum fluctuations in equilibrium thermodynamics via the effective temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G.Rudoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of effective temperature (ET T*(T0, T is used in order to approximately "quantize" the thermodynamic functions of the dynamical object which is in the thermal equilibrium with thermal bath being at constant temperature T (T0=E0/kB, where E0 is the ground-state energy, kB - Boltzmann constant, is the characteristic ``quantum'' temperature of the system itself. On these grounds the extensive comparative investigation is carried out for the ``standard model'' of statistical mechanics - the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO. Three well-known approaches are considered and their thermodynamic consequences thoroughly studied. These are: the exact quantum, or non-classical Planck-Einstein approach, intermediate, or semiclassical Bloch-Wigner approach and, finally, the pure classical, or Maxwell-Boltzmann approach.

  13. Proceedings of the meeting on tunneling reaction and low temperature chemistry, 97 October. Tunneling reaction and quantum medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Shiotani, Masaru

    1998-02-01

    Present report is the proceedings of the 3rd Meeting on Tunneling Reaction and Low Temperature Chemistry held in Oct. 13 and 14, 1997. The main subject of the meeting is 'Tunneling Reaction and Quantum Medium'. In the meeting, the physical and chemical phenomena in the liquid helium such as quantum nucleation, spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and tunneling abstraction reaction of tritium atom were discussed as the main topics as well as the tunneling reactions in the solid hydrogen and organic compounds. Through the meetings held in 1995, 1996, and 1997, the tunneling phenomena proceeding at various temperatures (room temperature to mK) in the wide fields of chemistry, biology, and physics were discussed intensively and the importance of the tunneling phenomena in the science has been getting clear. The 12 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  14. Overcoming the sign problem at finite temperature: Quantum tensor network for the orbital eg model on an infinite square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnik, Piotr; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2017-07-01

    The variational tensor network renormalization approach to two-dimensional (2D) quantum systems at finite temperature is applied to a model suffering the notorious quantum Monte Carlo sign problem—the orbital eg model with spatially highly anisotropic orbital interactions. Coarse graining of the tensor network along the inverse temperature β yields a numerically tractable 2D tensor network representing the Gibbs state. Its bond dimension D —limiting the amount of entanglement—is a natural refinement parameter. Increasing D we obtain a converged order parameter and its linear susceptibility close to the critical point. They confirm the existence of finite order parameter below the critical temperature Tc, provide a numerically exact estimate of Tc, and give the critical exponents within 1 % of the 2D Ising universality class.

  15. Temperature-dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots in coherent regime; Temperaturabhaengige Eigenschaften einzelner Halbleiter-Quantenpunkte im Kohaerenten Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Marc C.

    2009-10-15

    Recently, the public has become aware of keywords like ''Quantum computer'' or ''Quantum cryptography''. Regarding their potential application in solid state based quantum information processing and their overall benefit in fundamental research quantum dots have gained more and more public interest. In this context, quantum dots are often referred to as ''artificial atoms'', a term subsuming their physical properties quite nicely and emphasizing the huge potential for further investigations. The basic mechanism to be considered is the theoretical model of a two-level system. A quantum dot itself represents this kind of system quite nicely, provided that only the presence or absence of a single exciton in the ground state of that structure is regarded. This concept can also be expanded to the presence of two excitons (bi-exciton). Transitions between the relevant levels can be induced by optical stimulation. When integrating quantum dots in diode like structures measurements of this phenomena can be accomplished regarding photo currents. This means of detection is highly sensitive and allows for tuning of the energy levels with respect to the energy of an exciting laser utilizing the Stark effect (via an external electric field). The photo current then shows narrow resonances representing those transitions. By this, the system can be used as a highly sensitive nano-spectrometer. The examination of coherent interactions between quantum dots and an electromagnetic field uses laser pulses that are much shorter than the dephasing time of the system (2 ps). The basic study to be done on two level systems is the measurement of Rabi oscillations allowing for the selection of an arbitrary superposition of states. In this work, the existing setup was improved regarding the possibility to control the temperature of the sample. Up to now, only investigations at 4,2 K have been possible. Even at 70 K Rabi oscillations

  16. Evolution of spin excitations in a gapped antiferromagnet from the quantum to the high-temperature limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenzelmann, M.; Cowley, R.A.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    2002-01-01

    We have mapped from the quantum to the classical limit the spin excitation spectrum of the antiferromagnetic spin-1 Heisenberg chain system CsNiCl3 in its paramagnetic phase from T=5 to 200 K. Neutron scattering shows that the excitations are resonant and dispersive up to at least T=70 Ksimilar...... is in agreement with quantum Monte Carlo calculations for the spin-1 chain. xi is also consistent with the single mode approximation, suggesting that the excitations are short-lived single particle excitations. Below T=12 K where three-dimensional spin correlations are important, xi is shorter than predicted...... and the experiment is not consistent with the random phase approximation for coupled quantum chains. At T=200 K, the structure factor and second energy moment of the excitation spectrum are in excellent agreement with the high-temperature series expansion....

  17. Temperature dependence of Coulomb oscillations in a few-layer two-dimensional WS2 quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiang-Xiang; Zhang, Zhuo-Zhi; You, Jie; Liu, Di; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-11-05

    Standard semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate a quantum dot (QD) made of WS2, where Coulomb oscillations were found. The full-width-at-half-maximum of the Coulomb peaks increases linearly with temperature while the height of the peaks remains almost independent of temperature, which is consistent with standard semiconductor QD theory. Unlike graphene etched QDs, where Coulomb peaks belonging to the same QD can have different temperature dependences, these results indicate the absence of the disordered confining potential. This difference in the potential-forming mechanism between graphene etched QDs and WS2 QDs may be the reason for the larger potential fluctuation found in graphene QDs.

  18. A superconducting quantum interference device based read-out of a subattonewton force sensor operating at millikelvin temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenko, O.; Vinante, A.; Wijts, G.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to measure the displacement of a nanomechanical resonator at cryogenic temperature. The technique is based on the use of a superconducting quantum interference device to detect the magnetic flux change induced by a magnetized particle attached on the end of the resonator. Unlike conventional interferometric techniques, our detection scheme does not involve direct power dissipation in the resonator, and therefore, is particularly suitable for ultralow temperature applications. We demonstrate its potential by cooling an ultrasoft silicon cantilever to a noise temperature of 25 mK, corresponding to a subattonewton thermal force noise of 0.5 aN/√(Hz).

  19. Extremely low temperature behaviour of the thermodynamical properties of gaseous UF6 under an exact quantum approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante, J.A.A. do.

    1979-10-01

    The thermodynamic functions of molecules of type XF 6 are calculated under an exact quantum-mechanical approach, which also yields general expressions valid for other types of molecules. The formalism is used to analyse the behavior of gaseous UF 6 at very low temperatures (around and below 1 0 K), where symmetry effects due to Pauli principle lead to results which are very markedly different from those obtained with the semi-classical approximation. It is shown that this approximation becomes sufficiently accurate only for temperatures about ten times the rotational temperature. (Author) [pt

  20. Effects of Temperature on Sensitivity of Bacilus licheniformis RI 75-1 Vegetative Cells at Gamma Quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Larrea Vega, O.; Rios Brito, F.; Marquez Alvarez, M.; Padron Soler, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that strains of E. Coli with wild genotype for reparation, when are irradiated at temperature between 42 0 C and 45 0 C, shown an increase of radioresistance. At the given temperature the number of double strands breaks of DNA decrease. Some authors report that the radioresistance increased is due to the elevation of the irradiation temperature is related to the cell membrane status. The paper includes reports on the effects of increased temperature on the sensitivity - at gamma quantum - of Bacillus licheniformis RI 75-1 vegetative cells. Temperatures of 42 0 C and 60 0 C during irradiation were employed. An increase in radioresistance was found when the temperature of irradiation was increased to 42 0 C. However, a decrease in viability was observed. Heat treatment prior to irradiation showed an increase in the number of radioresistance colonies when compared. (author)

  1. 1.5 μm InAs/InGaAsP/InP quantum dot laser with improved temperature stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, F. I.; Gladii, S. P.; Shernyakov, Yu M.

    2016-01-01

    Temperature characteristics of InAs/InGaAsP quantum dot (QD) lasers synthesized on InP (001) substrate are presented. The lasers demonstrate high temperature stability: a threshold current characteristic temperature as high as 205 K in the temperature range between 20 to 50°C was measured. Lasing...

  2. Systematic investigation of the temperature behavior of InAs/InP quantum nanostructure passively mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaime, K.; Piron, R.; Grillot, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effects of the temperature on the mode-locking capability of two section InAs/InP quantum nanostructure (QN) passively mode locked lasers. Devices are made with multi-layers of self-assembled InAs QN either grown on InP(100) (5 quantum dashes (QDashes) layers......) or on InP (311)B (6 quantum dots (QDs) layers). Using an analytical model, the mode-locking stability map is extracted for the two types of QN as a function of optical absorption, cavity length, current density and temperature. We believe that this study is of first importance since it reports...... for the first time a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependence on the mode-locking properties of InAs/InP QN devices. Beside, a rigorous comparison between QDashes and QDs temperature dependence is proposed through a proper analysis of the mode-locking stability maps. Experimental results also show...

  3. Superradiant MeV γ Scattered by a Room-Temperature Spinor Quantum Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have revealed the rich long-lived Mossbauer phenomenon of 93mNb, in which it has long been speculated that the delocalized 93mNb undergoes Bose-Einstein condensation following an increase in the 93mNb density beyond the threshold of 1012 cm−3 at room temperature. We now report on the superradiant Rayleigh of the M4 γ at 662 keV scattered into end-fire modes along the long axis of the sample, as evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation. We observed the Arago (Poisson’s spot in order to demonstrate a near-field γ-ray diffraction from a mm-sized γ source, as well as a γ interference beyond the Huygens-Fresnel principle. During the 107-day monitoring period, seven Sisyphus cycles of mode hopping appeared in the superradiance, which demonstrates the optomechanic bistabilty provided by the collective interaction between the spinor quantum fluid and the impinging γs. Condensate-light interaction produces a pm matter-wave grating to become a Fabry-Pérot resonator with a Q-factor on the order of 1020, from which end-fired γs lase.

  4. Metallic Contaminant Detection using a High-Temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomohiro; Takemoto, Makoto; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We develop magnetic metallic contaminant detectors using high-temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (HTS-SQUIDs) for industrial products. Finding ultra-small metallic contaminants is an important issue for manufacturers producing commercial products such as lithium ion batteries. If such contaminants cause damages, the manufacturer of the product suffers a big financial loss due to having to recall the faulty products. Previously, we described a system for finding such ultra-small particles in food. In this study, we describe further developments of the system, for the reduction of the effect of the remnant field of the products, and we test the parallel magnetization of the products to generate the remnant field only at both ends of the products. In addition, we use an SQUID gradiometer in place of the magnetometer to reduce the edge effect by measuring the magnetic field gradient. We test the performances of the system and find that tiny iron particles as small as 50 × 50 μm 2 on the electrode of a lithium ion battery could be clearly detected. This detection level is difficult to achieve when using other methods. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. Finite-temperature orbital-free DFT molecular dynamics: Coupling PROFESS and QUANTUM ESPRESSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasiev, Valentin V.; Sjostrom, Travis; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of orbital-free free-energy functionals in the PROFESS code and the coupling of PROFESS with the QUANTUM ESPRESSO code are described. The combination enables orbital-free DFT to drive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on the same footing (algorithms, thermostats, convergence parameters, etc.) as for Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT. All the non-interacting free-energy functionals implemented are single-point: the local density approximation (LDA; also known as finite-T Thomas-Fermi, ftTF), the second-order gradient approximation (SGA or finite-T gradient-corrected TF), and our recently introduced finite-T generalized gradient approximations (ftGGA). Elimination of the KS orbital bottleneck via orbital-free methodology enables high-T simulations on ordinary computers, whereas those simulations would be costly or even prohibitively time-consuming for KS molecular dynamics (MD) on very high-performance computer systems. Example MD simulations on H over a temperature range 2000 K ≤ T ≤4,000,000 K are reported, with timings on small clusters (16-128 cores) and even laptops. With respect to KS-driven calculations, the orbital-free calculations are between a few times through a few hundreds of times faster.

  6. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  7. Temperature and magnetic field effect on oscillations observed in GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.M.; Mazzucato, S.; Ardali, S.; Celik, O.; Mutlu, S.; Royall, B.; Tiras, E.; Balkan, N.; Puustinen, J.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied p-i-n GaInNAs MQW devices as function of temperature and magnetic field. ► Observed oscillations in the sample current–voltage curves at low temperature. ► Shift in oscillation position with magnetic field described by Landau level split. ► Resonant tunnelling and thermionic emission used to describe oscillations. - Abstract: The photoconductivity of p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) mesa structures is investigated. When illuminated with photons at energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, a number of oscillations are observed in the current–voltage I–V characteristics. The amplitude and position of the oscillations is shown to depend upon the temperature, as well as upon the exciting wavelength and intensity. Due to the absence of the oscillations in the dark I–V and at temperatures above T = 200 K, we explain them in terms of photogenerated electrons escaping from quantum wells via tunnelling or thermionic emission. Magnetic fields up to B = 11 T were applied parallel to the planes of the QWs. A small voltage shift in the position of the oscillations was observed, proportional to the magnetic field intensity and dependent upon the temperature. Calculation of the Landau level energy separation (16 meV) agrees with the observed experimental data. Magneto-tunnelling spectroscopy probes in detail the nature of band- or impurity-like states responsible for resonances in first and second subbands, observing the I–V plot in dark condition and under illumination. The field-dependence of the amplitude of the oscillation peaks in I–V has the characteristic form of a quantum mechanical admixing effect. This enhancement is also probably due to the hole recombination with majority electrons tunnelling in the N-related states of the quantum wells.

  8. Temperature and magnetic field effect on oscillations observed in GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, H.M., E-mail: hkhalia@essex.ac.uk [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Mazzucato, S. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Ardali, S.; Celik, O.; Mutlu, S. [Anadolu University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Yunus Emre Campus 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Royall, B. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Tiras, E. [Anadolu University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Yunus Emre Campus 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Balkan, N. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Puustinen, J.; Korpijaervi, V.-M.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 10, FI-33720 Tampere (Finland)

    2012-06-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied p-i-n GaInNAs MQW devices as function of temperature and magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observed oscillations in the sample current-voltage curves at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shift in oscillation position with magnetic field described by Landau level split. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resonant tunnelling and thermionic emission used to describe oscillations. - Abstract: The photoconductivity of p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) mesa structures is investigated. When illuminated with photons at energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, a number of oscillations are observed in the current-voltage I-V characteristics. The amplitude and position of the oscillations is shown to depend upon the temperature, as well as upon the exciting wavelength and intensity. Due to the absence of the oscillations in the dark I-V and at temperatures above T = 200 K, we explain them in terms of photogenerated electrons escaping from quantum wells via tunnelling or thermionic emission. Magnetic fields up to B = 11 T were applied parallel to the planes of the QWs. A small voltage shift in the position of the oscillations was observed, proportional to the magnetic field intensity and dependent upon the temperature. Calculation of the Landau level energy separation (16 meV) agrees with the observed experimental data. Magneto-tunnelling spectroscopy probes in detail the nature of band- or impurity-like states responsible for resonances in first and second subbands, observing the I-V plot in dark condition and under illumination. The field-dependence of the amplitude of the oscillation peaks in I-V has the characteristic form of a quantum mechanical admixing effect. This enhancement is also probably due to the hole recombination with majority electrons tunnelling in the N-related states of the quantum wells.

  9. Photophysics of α-furil at room temperature and 77 K: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-06-21

    Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic measurements have been exploited to assign the emissions from different conformations of α-furil (2, 2′-furil) in solution phase at room temperature as well as cryogen (liquid nitrogen, LN{sub 2}) frozen matrices of ethanol and methylcyclohexane. Room temperature studies reveal a single fluorescence from the trans-planar conformer of the fluorophore or two fluorescence bands coming from the trans-planar and the relaxed skew forms depending on excitation at the nπ{sup ∗} or the ππ{sup ∗} absorption band, respectively. Together with the fluorescence bands, the LN{sub 2} studies in both the solvents unambiguously ascertain two phosphorescence emissions with lifetimes 5 ± 0.3 ms (trans-planar triplet) and 81 ± 3 ms (relaxed skew triplet). Quantum chemical calculations have been performed using density functional theory at CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G{sup ∗∗} level to prop up the spectroscopic surveillance. The simulated potential energy curves (PECs) illustrate that α-furil is capable of giving two emissions from each of the S{sub 1} and the T{sub 1} states—one corresponding to the trans-planar and the other to the relaxed skew conformation. Contrary to the other 1,2-dicarbonyl molecular systems like benzil and α-naphthil, α-furil does not exhibit any fluorescence from its second excited singlet (S{sub 2}) state. This is ascribed to the proximity of the minimum of the PEC of the S{sub 2} state and the hill-top of the PEC of the S{sub 1} state.

  10. Eesti muusika päevad - üks kord aastas, kõigile / Jelena Gandshu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gandshu, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Muusikateadlased Jelena Gandshu ja Gerhard Lock, heliloojad Age Hirv ja Liis Jürgens 3.-10. aprillini toimunud Eesti muusika päevade kontsertidest: kinos Sõprus "Sensatsioon!!!", Kultuuritehases Polymer "Cellissimo", Estonia kontserdisaalis ERSO "Sümfoonilised hääled", Tallinna raekojas Mihkel Poll ja Oliver Kuusik, Katariina kirikus PaukenfEst, Nigulistes Jüri Reinvere autorikontsert. Järgneb

  11. Eesti Muusika Päevad 2000 : ECPNMi juhatus Tallinnas / Consuelo Diez ; interv. Evelin Kõrvits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diez, Consuelo

    2000-01-01

    28.-30. apr. pidas Tallinnas aastakoosolekut ning külastas Eesti Muusika Päevade kontserte ECPNMi (European Conference of Promoters of New Music) juhatus. ECPNMi juhatuse liikmed räägivad uue muusika üritustest oma riikides, muljeid eesti muusika päevadelt

  12. Märtsipäevade valupisaraid peab lastele näitama / Anu Bollverk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bollverk, Anu

    2009-01-01

    1949. aasta märtsiküüditamisele pühendatud mälestuspäevast Koeru kultuurimajas ning sealse huviteatri poolt ette kantud Herbert Lasti näidendist "Valupisarais märtsipäevad" (lavastajad Herbert Last ja Uno Aav)

  13. Why Do Firms Evade Taxes? The Role of Information Sharing and Financial Sector Outreach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Lin, C.; Ma, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Informality is a wide-spread phenomenon across the globe. We show that firms in countries with better information sharing systems and greater financial sector outreach evade taxes to a lesser degree, an effect that is stronger for smaller firms, firms in smaller cities and towns, and firms in

  14. Analysis and investigation of temperature and hydrostatic pressure effects on optical characteristics of multiple quantum well slow light devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Saeed; Kohandani, Reza; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2017-09-10

    This paper represents the influences of temperature and hydrostatic pressure variations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light systems based on coherence population oscillations. An analytical model in non-integer dimension space is used to study the considerable effects of these parameters on optical properties of the slow light apparatus. Exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension constants have special roles on the analytical model in fractional dimension. Hence, the impacts of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on exciton oscillator strength and fractional dimension quantity are investigated theoretically in this paper. Based on the achieved results, temperature and hydrostatic pressure play key roles on optical parameters of the slow light systems, such as the slow down factor and central energy of the device. It is found that the slope and value of the refractive index real part change with alterations of temperature and hydrostatic pressure in the range of 5-40 deg of Kelvin and 1 bar to 2 kbar, respectively. Thus, the peak value of the slow down factor can be adjusted by altering these parameters. Moreover, the central energy of the device shifts when the hydrostatic pressure is applied to the slow light device or temperature is varied. In comparison with previous reported experimental results, our simulations follow them successfully. It is shown that the maximum value of the slow down factor is estimated close to 5.5×10 4 with a fine adjustment of temperature and hydrostatic pressure. Meanwhile, the central energy shift of the slow light device rises up to 27 meV, which provides an appropriate basis for different optical devices in which multiple quantum well slow light is one of their essential subsections. This multiple quantum well slow light device has potential applications for use as a tunable optical buffer and pressure/temperature sensors.

  15. Effects of annealing temperature on shape transformation and optical properties of germanium quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alireza, Samavati; Othaman, Z.; K. Ghoshal, S.; K. Mustafa, M.

    2015-02-01

    The influences of thermal annealing on the structural and optical features of radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtered self-assembled Ge quantum dots (QDs) on Si (100) are investigated. Preferentially oriented structures of Ge along the (220) and (111) directions together with peak shift and reduced strain (4.9% to 2.7%) due to post-annealing at 650 °C are discerned from x-ray differaction (XRD) measurement. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images for both pre-annealed and post-annealed (650 °C) samples reveal pyramidal-shaped QDs (density ˜ 0.26× 1011 cm-2) and dome-shape morphologies with relatively high density ˜ 0.92 × 1011 cm-2, respectively. This shape transformation is attributed to the mechanism of inter-diffusion of Si in Ge interfacial intermixing and strain non-uniformity. The annealing temperature assisted QDs structural evolution is explained using the theory of nucleation and growth kinetics where free energy minimization plays a pivotal role. The observed red-shift ˜ 0.05 eV in addition to the narrowing of the photoluminescence peaks results from thermal annealing, and is related to the effect of quantum confinement. Furthermore, the appearance of a blue-violet emission peak is ascribed to the recombination of the localized electrons in the Ge-QDs/SiO2 or GeOx and holes in the ground state of Ge dots. Raman spectra of both samples exhibit an intense Ge-Ge optical phonon mode which shifts towards higher frequency compared with those of the bulk counterpart. An experimental Raman profile is fitted to the models of phonon confinement and size distribution combined with phonon confinement to estimate the mean dot sizes. A correlation between thermal annealing and modifications of the structural and optical behavior of Ge QDs is established. Tunable growth of Ge QDs with superior properties suitable for optoelectronic applications is demonstrated. Project supported by Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Study, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

  16. Effects of annealing temperature on shape transformation and optical properties of germanium quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samavati, Alireza; Othaman, Z.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Mustafa, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The influences of thermal annealing on the structural and optical features of radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtered self-assembled Ge quantum dots (QDs) on Si (100) are investigated. Preferentially oriented structures of Ge along the (220) and (111) directions together with peak shift and reduced strain (4.9% to 2.7%) due to post-annealing at 650 °C are discerned from x-ray differaction (XRD) measurement. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images for both pre-annealed and post-annealed (650 °C) samples reveal pyramidal-shaped QDs (density ∼ 0.26× 10 11 cm −2 ) and dome-shape morphologies with relatively high density ∼ 0.92 × 10 11 cm −2 , respectively. This shape transformation is attributed to the mechanism of inter-diffusion of Si in Ge interfacial intermixing and strain non-uniformity. The annealing temperature assisted QDs structural evolution is explained using the theory of nucleation and growth kinetics where free energy minimization plays a pivotal role. The observed red-shift ∼ 0.05 eV in addition to the narrowing of the photoluminescence peaks results from thermal annealing, and is related to the effect of quantum confinement. Furthermore, the appearance of a blue-violet emission peak is ascribed to the recombination of the localized electrons in the Ge-QDs/SiO 2 or GeO x and holes in the ground state of Ge dots. Raman spectra of both samples exhibit an intense Ge–Ge optical phonon mode which shifts towards higher frequency compared with those of the bulk counterpart. An experimental Raman profile is fitted to the models of phonon confinement and size distribution combined with phonon confinement to estimate the mean dot sizes. A correlation between thermal annealing and modifications of the structural and optical behavior of Ge QDs is established. Tunable growth of Ge QDs with superior properties suitable for optoelectronic applications is demonstrated. (paper)

  17. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation.

  18. Effects of quantum well growth temperature on the recombination efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells that emit in the green and blue spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, S.; Dawson, P.; Kappers, M. J.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    InGaN-based light emitting diodes and multiple quantum wells designed to emit in the green spectral region exhibit, in general, lower internal quantum efficiencies than their blue-emitting counter parts, a phenomenon referred to as the “green gap.” One of the main differences between green-emitting and blue-emitting samples is that the quantum well growth temperature is lower for structures designed to emit at longer wavelengths, in order to reduce the effects of In desorption. In this paper, we report on the impact of the quantum well growth temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells designed to emit at 460 nm and 530 nm. It was found that for both sets of samples increasing the temperature at which the InGaN quantum well was grown, while maintaining the same indium composition, led to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency measured at 300 K. These increases in internal quantum efficiency are shown to be due reductions in the non-radiative recombination rate which we attribute to reductions in point defect incorporation

  19. Theory of Correlated Pairs of Electrons Oscillating in Resonant Quantum States to Reach the Critical Temperature in a Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Aroche, Raúl Riera; Rosas-Cabrera, Rodrigo Arturo; Burgos, Rodrigo Arturo Rosas; Betancourt-Riera, René; Betancourt-Riera, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    The formation of Correlated Electron Pairs Oscillating around the Fermi level in Resonant Quantum States (CEPO-RQS), when a metal is cooled to its critical temperature T=Tc, is studied. The necessary conditions for the existence of CEPO-RQS are analyzed. The participation of electron-electron interaction screened by an electron dielectric constant of the form proposed by Thomas Fermi is considered and a physical meaning for the electron-phonon-electron interaction in the formation of the CEPO...

  20. Quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  1. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Pranai; Jiang, Jian-Hua; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of 2a=730nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer

  2. Influence of electric field, hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the electric state in a Poschl-Teller quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimyfard, A.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A.; Duque, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Influence of the electric field and hydrostatic pressure on the electronic states in a Poschl-Teller quantum well is studied. In the framework of variational method the dependences of the ground state energy on the electric field and hydrostatic pressure are calculated for different values of the potential parameters and the temperature. It is shown that the increase in the electric field leads to the increase in the ground state energy, while the increase in the well width leads to the strengthening of the electric field effect. The ground state energy decreases with increasing pressure and increases with increasing temperature

  3. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yung Szen, E-mail: yungszen@utm.my [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Tabuchi, Yutaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro, E-mail: kitagawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  4. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzaïene, L.; Ben Mahrsia, R.; Baira, M.; Sfaxi, L.; Maaref, H.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed theoretical calculation of the nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot (0D). The combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the nonlinear optical rectification in lens-shaped InAs QDs are studied under the compact density matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation. From our calculation, it is found that the subband energies and optical rectification susceptibility are quite sensitive to the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The results show that the resonant peak of the optical rectification can be red-shifted or blue-shifted and their intensity also varied by external probes such as hydrostatic pressure and temperature. In addition, the oscillator strength is strongly affected by these parameters. - Highlights: ► Theoretical calculation of the nonlinear optical rectification in a lens shape InAs/GaAs quantum dot was performed. ► Optical rectification susceptibility is quite sensitive to the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature. ► The oscillator strength is strongly affected by the applied hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  5. Measurement of the quantum capacitance from two-dimensional surface state of a topological insulator at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyunwoo, E-mail: chw0089@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Changhwan, E-mail: cshin@uos.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 02504 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The quantum capacitance in topological insulator (TI) at room temperature is directly revealed. • The physical origin of quantum capacitance, the two dimensional surface state of TI, is experimentally validated. • Theoretically calculated results of ideal quantum capacitance can well predict the experimental data. - Abstract: A topological insulator (TI) is a new kind of material that exhibits unique electronic properties owing to its topological surface state (TSS). Previous studies focused on the transport properties of the TSS, since it can be used as the active channel layer in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, a TI with a negative quantum capacitance (QC) effect can be used in the gate stack of MOSFETs, thereby facilitating the creation of ultra-low power electronics. Therefore, it is important to study the physics behind the QC in TIs in the absence of any external magnetic field, at room temperature. We fabricated a simple capacitor structure using a TI (TI-capacitor: Au-TI-SiO{sub 2}-Si), which shows clear evidence of QC at room temperature. In the capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement, the total capacitance of the TI-capacitor increases in the accumulation regime, since QC is the dominant capacitive component in the series capacitor model (i.e., C{sub T}{sup −1} = C{sub Q}{sup −1} + C{sub SiO2}{sup −1}). Based on the QC model of the two-dimensional electron systems, we quantitatively calculated the QC, and observed that the simulated C-V curve theoretically supports the conclusion that the QC of the TI-capacitor is originated from electron–electron interaction in the two-dimensional surface state of the TI.

  6. Quantum corrections to temperature dependent electrical conductivity of ZnO thin films degenerately doped with Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amit K.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    ZnO thin films degenerately doped with Si (Si x Zn 1−x O) in the concentrations range of ∼0.5% to 5.8% were grown by sequential pulsed laser deposition on sapphire substrates at 400 °C. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements in the range from 300 to 4.2 K revealed negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) for the 0.5%, 3.8%, and 5.8% doped Si x Zn 1−x O films in the entire temperature range. On the contrary, the Si x Zn 1−x O films with Si concentrations of 1.0%, 1.7%, and 2.0% showed a transition from negative to positive TCR with increasing temperature. These observations were explained using weak localization based quantum corrections to conductivity

  7. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of multilayered spherical quantum dots: Effects of geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, M.J.; Rezaei, G.; Nazari, M.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the effective mass and parabolic one band approximations, simultaneous effects of the geometrical size, hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, and temperature on the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in multilayered spherical quantum dots are studied. Energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method and optical properties are obtained using the compact density matrix approach. The results indicate that the hydrogenic impurity, hydrostatic pressure, temperature and geometrical parameters such as the well and barrier widths have a great influence on the linear, the third-order nonlinear and the total optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes. -- Highlights: • Hydrogenic impurity effects on the optical properties of a MSQD are investigated. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects are also studied. • Hydrogenic impurity has a great influence on the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs. • Hydrostatic pressure and temperature change the linear and nonlinear ACs and RICs

  8. Groebner bases for finite-temperature quantum computing and their complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Following the recent approach of using order domains to construct Groebner bases from general projective varieties, we examine the parity and time-reversal arguments relating to the Wightman axioms of quantum field theory and propose that the definition of associativity in these axioms should be introduced a posteriori to the cluster property in order to generalize the anyon conjecture for quantum computing to indefinite metrics. We then show that this modification, which we define via ideal quotients, does not admit a faithful representation of the Braid group, because the generalized twisted inner automorphisms that we use to reintroduce associativity are only parity invariant for the prime spectra of the exterior algebra. We then use a coordinate prescription for the quantum deformations of toric varieties to show how a faithful representation of the Braid group can be reconstructed and argue that for a degree reverse lexicographic (monomial) ordered Groebner basis, the complexity class of this problem is bounded quantum polynomial.

  9. Temperature dependent admittance spectroscopy of GaAs/AlGaAs single-quantum-well laser diodes (SQWLDs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengi, A.; Uslu, H.; Asar, T.; Altindal, S.; Cetin, S.S.; Mammadov, T.S.; Ozcelik, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → It is well known the quantum-well (QW) lasers are the most important optoelectronic devices in many application fields. The temperature dependent I-V and C-V measurements allow us to understand the different aspects of conduction mechanisms of these devices. The C-V and G/ω-V measurements should be done over a wide range of temperature in order to have a better understanding of the nature of barrier height and conduction mechanisms. Therefore, in this study, the main electrical parameters of GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As single quantum well (SQW) laser diodes were determined from the admittance spectroscopy C-V and G/ω-V method in the temperature range of 80-360 K. In addition, the capacitance and conductance values measured under both reverse and forward bias were corrected in order to eliminate the effect of R s to obtain the real diode capacitance. - Abstract: In this study, the main electrical parameters, such as doping concentration (N D ), barrier height (Φ CV ), depletion layer width (W D ), series resistance (R s ) and Fermi energy level (E F ), of GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As single quantum well (SQW) laser diodes were investigated using the admittance spectroscopy (C-V and G/ω-V) method in the temperature range of 80-360 K. The reverse bias C -2 vs. V plots gives a straight line in a wide voltage region, especially in weak inversion region. The values of Φ CV at the absolute temperature (T = 0 K) and the temperature coefficient (α) of barrier height were found as 1.22 eV and -8.65 x 10 -4 eV/K, respectively. This value of α is in a close agreement with α of GaAs band gap (-5.45 x 10 -4 eV/K). Experimental results show that the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) characteristics of the diode are affected by not only temperature but also R s . The capacitance-voltage-temperature (C-V-T) and conductance-voltage-temperature (G/ω-V-T) characteristics confirmed that temperature and R s of the diode have effects on the

  10. Temperature dependence of interband recombination energy in symmetric (In,Ga)N spherical quantum dot-quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [LPS, Faculty of Science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco); Special Mathematics, CPGE, 267 Quartier complémentaire Ennahda 1, Rabat (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar [LPS, Faculty of Science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco)

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of effective-mass approximation and finite parabolic potential barrier, single particle and ground-state interband recombination energies in Core|well|shell based on GaN|(In,Ga)N|GaN spherical QDQW are investigated as a function of the inner and the outer radii. The temperature dependency of effective-mass, band-gap energy and potential barrier is taken into account. Particle eigenvalue and band-gap energy competing effects are speculated to explain our numerical results which show that the interband recombination energy increases when the temperature increases. The results we obtained are in quite good agreement with the findings.

  11. Temperature dependence of interband recombination energy in symmetric (In,Ga)N spherical quantum dot-quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of effective-mass approximation and finite parabolic potential barrier, single particle and ground-state interband recombination energies in Core|well|shell based on GaN|(In,Ga)N|GaN spherical QDQW are investigated as a function of the inner and the outer radii. The temperature dependency of effective-mass, band-gap energy and potential barrier is taken into account. Particle eigenvalue and band-gap energy competing effects are speculated to explain our numerical results which show that the interband recombination energy increases when the temperature increases. The results we obtained are in quite good agreement with the findings

  12. Quantum and quasi-classical collisional dynamics of O{sub 2}–Ar at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusoy, Inga S. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Center for Computational and Molecular Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States); Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D. [Nonequilibrium Gas and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2140 (United States); Hernandez, Rigoberto, E-mail: hernandez@gatech.edu [Center for Computational and Molecular Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    A hypersonic vehicle traveling at a high speed disrupts the distribution of internal states in the ambient flow and introduces a nonequilibrium distribution in the post-shock conditions. We investigate the vibrational relaxation in diatom-atom collisions in the range of temperatures between 1000 and 10 000 K by comparing results of extensive fully quantum-mechanical and quasi-classical simulations with available experimental data. The present paper simulates the interaction of molecular oxygen with argon as the first step in developing the aerothermodynamics models based on first principles. We devise a routine to standardize such calculations also for other scattering systems. Our results demonstrate very good agreement of vibrational relaxation time, derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with the experimental measurements conducted in shock tube facilities. At the same time, the quasi-classical simulations fail to accurately predict rates of vibrationally inelastic transitions at temperatures lower than 3000 K. This observation and the computational cost of adopted methods suggest that the next generation of high fidelity thermochemical models should be a combination of quantum and quasi-classical approaches.

  13. Simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots under the aegis of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect DMS. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • DMS also depends on mode of application of noise. - Abstract: We explore the diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise and under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T). Presence of noise and also its mode of application discernibly affect the DMS profile. Application of HP and T invites greater delicacies in the observed DMS profiles. However, whereas the interplay between T and noise comes out to be extremely sensitive in fabricating the DMS profile, the pressure-noise interplay appears to be not that much noticeable. Under all conditions of temperature and pressure, the presence of multiplicative noise diminishes the value of DMS in comparison with that in presence of its additive analogue. The present study renders a deep insight into the remarkable role played by the interplay between noise, hydrostatic pressure and temperature in controlling the effective confinement imposed on the system which bears unquestionable relevance.

  14. Simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots under the aegis of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Surajit [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India); Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Bera, Aindrila [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect DMS. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • DMS also depends on mode of application of noise. - Abstract: We explore the diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise and under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T). Presence of noise and also its mode of application discernibly affect the DMS profile. Application of HP and T invites greater delicacies in the observed DMS profiles. However, whereas the interplay between T and noise comes out to be extremely sensitive in fabricating the DMS profile, the pressure-noise interplay appears to be not that much noticeable. Under all conditions of temperature and pressure, the presence of multiplicative noise diminishes the value of DMS in comparison with that in presence of its additive analogue. The present study renders a deep insight into the remarkable role played by the interplay between noise, hydrostatic pressure and temperature in controlling the effective confinement imposed on the system which bears unquestionable relevance.

  15. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature. - Highlights: • Interband emission energy (IEE) of doped quantum dot is studied. • Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) affect IEE. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • Noise amplifies and suppresses IEE depending on particular condition.

  16. Nonlinear optical rectification in vertically coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dots under electromagnetic fields, pressure and temperature effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubani, M., E-mail: mohsenchoubani3@yahoo.fr; Ben Mahrsia, R.; Bouzaiene, L.; Maaref, H.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper we explore the effects of the structural dimensions, applied electromagnetic fields, hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the nonlinear optical rectification (NOR) in Vertically Coupled InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots (VCQDs). The analytical expression of the NOR is analyzed by using the density matrix formalism, the effective mass and the Finite Difference Method (FDM). Obtained results show that the NOR obtained with this coupled system is not a monotonic function of the barrier width, electromagnetic fields, pressure and temperature. Also, calculated results reveal that the resonant peaks of the NOR can be blue-shifted or red-shifted energies depending on the energy of the lowest confined states in the VCQDs structure. In addition, this condition can be controlled by changes in the structural dimensions and the external proofs mentioned above. -- Highlights: • In this paper we explore the effects of the barrier width, applied electromagnetic fields, hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the nonlinear optical rectification (NOR) in Vertically Coupled InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots (VCQDs). • The calculated results reveal that the resonant peaks of the NOR can be blue-shifted to large photon energies or red-shifted to lower photon energies. • In this paper, all parameters: electromagnetic fields, pressure and temperature effects are introduced and investigated. • The resonant energy and the magnitude of the NOR are controlled and adjusted.

  17. evad : [luuletused] / Philip Larkin ; inglise keelest tlk. Maarja Kangro

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Larkin, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Sisu: Päevad ; Mitte midagi öelda ; See olgu värss ; Uurimus lugemisharjumustest ; Hommage valitsusele ; Vesi ; Vajakud ; Viige üks koju lastele ; Jutt voodis ; Kõrged aknad ; Sa jätkad elu ; Kui. Orig.: Days ; Nothing to be said ; This be the verse ; A study of reading habits ; Homage to a government ; Water ; Wants ; Take one home for the kiddies ; Talking in bed ; High windows ; Continuing to live ; If

  18. DO PENALTIES AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES MAKE TAXPAYERS MORE COMPLIANT? THE VIEW OF AUSTRALIAN TAX EVADERS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Ken Devos

    2013-01-01

    The tax compliance literature indicates that many factors, including, economic, social, psychological and demographic, impact upon the compliance behaviour of individual taxpayers. This study explores the relationship, if any, that exists between selected tax compliance and demographic variables and the compliance behaviour of Australian individual tax evaders. The study employed a mixed method research approach comprising both a survey and interviews. The findings revealed that tax law enfor...

  19. Some connections between classical and quantum anholonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavarini, G.; Rohrlich, D.; Thacker, W.D.

    1988-08-01

    In this paper we study the interplay between the classical and quantum anholonomy effects (Hannay's angle and Berry's phase). When a finite-dimensional quantum system has a Berry phase, it has a nonzero Hannay angle. We show how infinite-dimensional systems can evade this correspondence, and find some necessary conditions for a system with a Berry phase to have no Hannay angle. (orig.)

  20. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, Alasdair J.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I C R N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130μV. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30μΦ 0 /√Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5μΦ 0 /√Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/300 and 308fT/cm√Hz (at 1 kHz) respectively. The larger baseline and larger flux capture area of the pick-up loops in a large area SLG design, fabricated on 30x10mm 2 substrates, resulted in significant improvements in the balance and gradient field sensitivity with 1/1000 and 50fT/cm√Hz (at 1kHz) measured respectively. To reduce the uniform field effective area of SLOs and therefore reduce the direct pick-up of environmental field noise when operated unshielded, a novel gradiometric SQUID (G-SQUID) device was developed. Fabricated from a single layer of YBCO, the G-SQUIDs with inductances of 67pH, had small uniform field effective areas of approximately 2μm 2 - more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the uniform field effective areas of conventional narrow linewidth SQUIDs of similar inductance. Two designs of G-SQUID were fabricated on 10x10mm 2 substrates. Due to their small effective areas, when cooled unshielded these devices showed no increase in their white flux noise. The best balance achieved for a G

  1. High Momentum Particle Identification Detector The Study of Cesium Iodide Quantum Efficiency Dependency on Substrate Material, Temperature and Quartz Window

    CERN Document Server

    Wisna, Gde Bimananda M

    2014-01-01

    The Cesium Iodide (CsI) is used as a material for detecting Cherenkov radiation produced by high momentum particle in High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) at ALICE Experiment at CERN. This work provides investigation and analysis of The Quantum Efficiency (QE) result of CsI which is deposited on five samples substrates such as copper passivated red, copper passivated yellow, aluminium, copper coated with nickel and copper coated with nickel then coated with gold. The measurement of five samples is held under temperature $60^{0}$ C and $25^{0}$ C (room temperature) and also with optical quartz window which can be adjusted to limit the wavelength range which reach the CsI. The result shows there are dependency of substrate, temperature due to enhancement effect and also quartz windows usage on QE of CsI. The results of five samples is then compared and analyzed.

  2. Semiclassical approach to finite-temperature quantum annealing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that an ensemble of trapped ions may serve as a quantum annealer for the number-partitioning problem [Nat. Commun. 7, 11524 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms11524]. This hard computational problem may be addressed by employing a tunable spin-glass architecture. Following the proposal of the trapped-ion annealer, we study here its robustness against thermal effects; that is, we investigate the role played by thermal phonons. For the efficient description of the system, we use a semiclassical approach, and benchmark it against the exact quantum evolution. The aim is to understand better and characterize how the quantum device approaches a solution of an otherwise difficult to solve NP-hard problem.

  3. Nonlinear intersubband absorption and refractive index changes in square and graded quantum well modulated by temperature and Hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Emine; Sokmen, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the linear and nonlinear intersubband transitions and the refractive index changes in the conduction band of square and graded quantum well (QW) are theoretically calculated within the framework of effective mass approximation. Results obtained show that the energy levels in different QWs and intersubband properties can be modified and controlled by the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easily obtained by tuning the temperature and the hydrostatic pressure. - Highlights: ► Linear and nonlinear optical processes can be changed by pressure and temperature. ► Magnitude and energy of absorption peaks decrease as pressure increases. ► Refractive index changes in magnitude and energy decrease by increasing pressure. ► Energy differences are dependent on pressure, temperature and QW shapes. ► By increasing pressure we can obtain redshift in the optical transitions. ► For SQW, the absorption spectrum shows blueshift as the temperature increases. ► For GQW, the absorption spectrum shows redshift by temperature.

  4. Active region dimensionality and quantum efficiencies of InGaN LEDs from temperature dependent photoluminescence transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Nuri; Okur, Serdal; Monavarian, Morteza; Zhang, Fan; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Teke, Ali; Özgür, Ümit

    2015-03-01

    Temperature dependent recombination dynamics in c-plane InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) with different well thicknesses, 1.5, 2, and 3 nm, were investigated to determine the active region dimensionality and its effect on the internal quantum efficiencies. It was confirmed for all LEDs that the photoluminescence (PL) transients are governed by radiative recombination at low temperatures while nonradiative recombination dominates at room temperature. At photoexcited carrier densities of 3 - 4.5 x 1016 cm-3 , the room-temperature Shockley-Read-Hall (A) and the bimolecular (B) recombination coefficients (A, B) were deduced to be (9.2x107 s-1, 8.8x10-10 cm3s-1), (8.5x107 s-1, 6.6x10-10 cm3s-1), and (6.5x107 s-1, 1.4x10-10 cm3s-1) for the six period 1.5, 2, and 3 nm well-width LEDs, respectively. From the temperature dependence of the radiative lifetimes, τrad α Tn/2, the dimensionality n of the active region was found to decrease consistently with decreasing well width. The 3 nm wide wells exhibited ~T1.5 dependence, suggesting a three-dimensional nature, whereas the 1.5 nm wells were confirmed to be two-dimensional (~T1) and the 2 nm wells close to being two-dimensional. We demonstrate that a combination of temperature dependent PL and time-resolved PL techniques can be used to evaluate the dimensionality as well as the quantum efficiencies of the LED active regions for a better understanding of the relationship between active-region design and the efficiency limiting processes in InGaN LEDs.

  5. Muusika : Jeremija nutulaulud palmipuudepühal. Jätkub "Musica Grande". Lihavõttetervitus Barcelonast. Rannap "Selges eesti helikeeles". Juba XIII trompetipäevad. III klavessiinipäevad / Jaan-Eik Tulve

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tulve, Jaan-Eik, 1967-

    2002-01-01

    Vox Clamantise kontsertidest Tartus ja Tallinnas. Jätkub sari "Musica Grande" kontsertidega Tartus ja Tallinnas pealkirjaga "Kontsertlik". Eestisse sõidab esinema üks Hispaania tippkoore Coral Cantiga Barcelonast. Rein Rannapi tänavusest suurprojektist, klaveriõhtust "Selges eesti helikeeles". 1. - 7. aprillini toimuvad EMA rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad. 4. - 7. aprillini korraldab Eesti Klavessiinisõprade Tsunft III klavessiinipäevad

  6. Zero-temperature renormalization method for quantum systems. I. Ising model in a transverse field in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, R.; Pfeuty, P.; Fields, J.N.; Doniach, S.

    1978-01-01

    A zero-temperature real-space renormalization-group method is presented and applied to the quantum Ising model with a transverse field in one dimension. The transition between the low-field and high-field regimes is studied. Magnetization components, spin correlation functions, and critical exponents are derived and checked against the exact results. It is shown that increasing the size of the blocks in the iterative procedure yields more accurate results, especially for the critical ''magnetic'' exponents near the transition

  7. Spectral properties of polarized light from semipolar grown InGaN quantum wells at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF, Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T.; Ploch, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The polarization dependent photoluminescence at low temperatures of strained semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells was studied as a function of the emission wavelength. We found for semipolar QWs that the maximum of the spectral resolved optical polarization is either red- or blue-shifted with respect to the maximum of the emission. In contrast, the nonpolar emission exhibits no clear maximum. We assign all effects to an inhomogeneous broadening of the emission caused by indium fluctuations and explain this behavior here in the light of the optical polarization switching. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Electromagnetic quantum waves and their effect on the low temperature magnetoacoustic response of a quasi-two-dimensional metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically analyze weakly attenuated electromagnetic waves in quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) metals in high magnetic fields. Within the chosen geometry, the magnetic field is directed perpendicular to the conducting layers of a Q2D conductor. We have shown that longitudinal collective modes could propagate along the magnetic field provided that the Fermi surface is moderately corrugated. The considered wave speeds strongly depend on the magnetic field magnitude. Also, we have analyzed interactions of these quantum waves with sound waves of suitable polarization and propagation direction, and we have shown that such interaction may bring significant changes to the low temperature magnetoacoustic response of Q2D conductors.

  9. Pressure and temperature effects on the third-order nonlinear optical properties in GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, C.M.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Duque, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is used in the density matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation to study the third harmonic generation coefficient in a GaAs disc-shaped quantum dot with parabolic confinement potential. It is discussed the strong and weak confinement regime. The results show that the third harmonic generation coefficient is strongly dependent on the excitonic pair localization. The study is extended to consider effects such as hydrostatic pressure and temperature to show that it is possible to induce a blue-shift and/or red-shift on the resonant peaks of the third harmonic generation coefficient.

  10. Pressure and temperature effects on the third-order nonlinear optical properties in GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, C.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Duque, C.A., E-mail: cduque@fisica.udea.edu.co [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-12-15

    This work is used in the density matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation to study the third harmonic generation coefficient in a GaAs disc-shaped quantum dot with parabolic confinement potential. It is discussed the strong and weak confinement regime. The results show that the third harmonic generation coefficient is strongly dependent on the excitonic pair localization. The study is extended to consider effects such as hydrostatic pressure and temperature to show that it is possible to induce a blue-shift and/or red-shift on the resonant peaks of the third harmonic generation coefficient.

  11. Numerical simulation of a quantum controlled-not gate implemented on four-spin molecules at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    López, G V; Berman, G P; Doolen, G D; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We study numerically the non-resonant effects on four-spin molecules at room temperature with the implemented quantum controlled-not gate and using the 2 pi k method. The four nuclear spins in each molecule represent a four-qubit register. The qubits interact with each other through Ising-type interaction which is characterized by the coupling constant J sub a sub , sub b. We study the errors on the reduced density matrix as a function of the Rabi frequency, OMEGA, using the 2 pi k method and when all the coupling constants are equal or when one of them is different from the others.

  12. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The influence of annealing temperature on the interface and photovoltaic properties of CdS/CdSe quantum dots sensitized ZnO nanorods solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Ling; Gong, Haibo; Zhu, Min; Han, Jun; Zi, Min; Yang, Xiaopeng; Ji, Changjian; Cao, Bingqiang

    2014-09-15

    Arrays of ZnO/CdS/CdSe core/shell nanocables with different annealing temperatures have been investigated for CdS/CdSe quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). CdS/CdSe quantum dots were synthesized on the surface of ZnO nanorods that serve as the scaffold via a simple ion-exchange approach. The uniform microstructure was verified by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. UV-Visible absorption spectrum and Raman spectroscopy analysis indicated noticeable influence of annealing temperature on the interface structural and optical properties of the CdS/CdSe layers. Particularly, the relationship between annealing temperatures and photovoltaic performance of the corresponding QDSSCs was investigated employing photovoltaic conversion, quantum efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectra. It is demonstrated that higher cell efficiency can be obtained by optimizing the annealing temperature through extending the photoresponse range and improving QD layer crystal quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantum Metropolis sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, K; Osborne, T J; Vollbrecht, K G; Poulin, D; Verstraete, F

    2011-03-03

    The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman, who imagined a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems--a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine could have far-reaching applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics in condensed-matter, chemical and high-energy systems. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd, who showed how to approximately decompose the time evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer. However, this left open the problem of how to simulate the equilibrium and static properties of quantum systems. This requires the preparation of ground and Gibbs states on a quantum computer. For classical systems, this problem is solved by the ubiquitous Metropolis algorithm, a method that has basically acquired a monopoly on the simulation of interacting particles. Here we demonstrate how to implement a quantum version of the Metropolis algorithm. This algorithm permits sampling directly from the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian, and thus evades the sign problem present in classical simulations. A small-scale implementation of this algorithm should be achievable with today's technology.

  15. Comparison of post-tonsillectomy pain with two different types of bipolar forceps: low temperature quantum molecular resonance device versus high temperature conventional electrocautery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun; Hah, J Hun

    2012-06-01

    The low temperature device did not show any advantages over the conventional high temperature electrocautery in terms of the postoperative pain, operation time, and complications in pediatric tonsillectomy. To compare post-tonsillectomy pain following the use of two different instruments with the same bipolar forceps techniques: low temperature quantum molecular resonance (QMR) device versus conventional high temperature electrocautery. Pediatric patients admitted from July 2008 through January 2009 were included. The participants underwent bilateral tonsillectomy; one side by the QMR device and the other by the bipolar electrocautery. The sides for each instrument were counterbalanced by the order of presentation. The postoperative pain was measured using the faces pain rating scale. In all, 33 patients with a mean age of 7.6 years were enrolled. The postoperative pain, operation time, and complications in 33 sides dissected by the electrocautery and 33 sides by the QMR device were compared. The average operation times with each device were not statistically different. The mean ratings of the perception of pain related to each instrument were not different on operation day and postoperative day 1, day 4, and day 7 (p = 0.133, 0.057, 0.625, and 1.0, respectively). There was no postoperative complication in any of the patients.

  16. Quantum mechanical study of the proton exchange in the ortho-para H2 conversion reaction at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Jorfi, M; González-Lezana, T; Faure, A; Pagani, L

    2011-11-14

    Ortho-para H(2) conversion reactions mediated by the exchange of a H(+) proton have been investigated at very low energy for the first time by means of a time independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) approach. State-to-state probabilities and cross sections for H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 0,1) processes have been calculated for a collision energy, E(c), ranging between 10(-6) eV and 0.1 eV. Differential cross sections (DCSs) for H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 1) → H(+) + H(2) (v' = 0, j' = 0) for very low energies only start to develop a proper global minimum around the sideways scattering direction (θ≈ 90°) at E(c) = 10(-3) eV. Rate coefficients, a crucial information required for astrophysical models, are provided between 10 K and 100 K. The relaxation ortho-para process j = 1 → j' = 0 is found to be more efficient than the j = 0 → j' = 1 conversion at low temperatures, in line with the extremely small ratio between the ortho and para species of molecular hydrogen predicted at the temperature of interstellar cold molecular clouds. The results obtained by means of a statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) model, which has previously proved to provide an adequate description of the dynamics of the title reactions at a higher collision energy regime, have been compared with the TIQM results. A reasonable good agreement has been found with the only exception of the DCSs for the H(+) + H(2) (v = 0, j = 1) → H(+) + H(2) (v' = 0, j' = 0) process at very low energy. SQM cross sections are also slightly below the quantum results. Estimates for the rate coefficients, in good accord with the TIQM values, are a clear improvement with respect to pioneering statistical studies on the reaction.

  17. Continuous-Wave Operation of GaN Based Multi-Quantum-Well Laser Diode at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Qun, Zhang; Shu-Ming, Zhang; Hui, Yang; Lian, Ji; Jian-Jun, Zhu; Zong-Shun, Liu; De-Gang, Zhao; De-Sheng, Jiang; Li-Hong, Duan; Hai, Wang; Yong-Sheng, Shi; Su-Ying, Liu; Jun-Wu, Liang; Qing, Cao; Liang-Hui, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Room-temperature operation of cw GaN based multi-quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) is demonstrated. The LD structure is grown on a sapphire (0001) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. A 2.5μm × 800μm ridge waveguide structure is fabricated. The electrical and optical characteristics of the laser diode under direct current injection at room temperature are investigated. The threshold current and voltage of the LD under cw operation are 110 mA and 10.5 V, respectively. Thermal induced series resistance decrease and emission wavelength red-shift are observed as the injection current is increased. The full width at half maximum for the parallel and perpendicular far field pattern (FFP) are 12° and 32°, respectively

  18. Perturbative study in quantum field theory at finite temperature, application to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.

    1989-12-01

    The main topic of this thesis is a perturbative study of Quantum Field Theory at Finite Temperature. The real-time formalism is used throughout this work. We show the cancellation of infrared and mass singularities in the case of the first order QCD corrections to lepton pair production from a quark-gluon plasma. Two methods of calculation are presented and give the same finite result in the limit of vanishing quark mass. These finite terms are analysed and give small corrections in the region of interest for ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions, except for a threshold factor. Specific techniques for finite temperature calculations are explicited in the case of the fermionic self-energy in QED [fr

  19. Room temperature continuous wave operation of quantum cascade laser at λ ~ 9.4 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chuncai; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Jinchuan; Zhai, Shenqiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Junqi; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Shuman; Liu, Fengqi; Wang, Zhanguo

    2018-03-01

    Continuous wave (CW) operation of long wave infrared (LWIR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is achieved up to a temperature of 303 K. For room temperature CW operation, the wafer with 35 stages was processed into buried heterostructure lasers. For a 2-mm-long and 10-μm-wide laser with high-reflectivity (HR) coating on the rear facet, CW output power of 45 mW at 283 K and 9 mW at 303 K is obtained. The lasing wavelength is around 9.4 μm locating in the LWIR spectrum range. Project supported by the National Key Research And Development Program (No. 2016YFB0402303), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61435014, 61627822, 61574136, 61774146, 61674144, 61404131), the Key Projects of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Nos. ZDRW-XH-2016-4, QYZDJ-SSW-JSC027), and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (No. 4162060, 4172060).

  20. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Correlation Energy in a Triplet State of a Two Electron Spherical Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rejo Jeice

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on correlation energy in a triplet state of two electron spherical quantum dot with square well potential is computed. The result is presented taking GaAs dot as an example. Our result shows the correlation energies are inegative in the triplet state contrast to the singlet state ii it increases with increase in pressure  iiifurther decreases due to the application  of temperature iv it approaches zero as dot size approaches infinity and v it contribute 10% decrement in total confined energy to the narrow dots. All the calculations have been carried out with finite models and the results are compared with existing literature.

  1. A rapid method for measuring maximum density temperatures in water and aqueous solutions for the study of quantum zero point energy effects in these liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeney, F A; O'Leary, J P

    2008-01-01

    The connection between quantum zero point fluctuations and a density maximum in water and in liquid He 4 has recently been established. Here we present a description of a simple and rapid method of determining the temperatures at which maximum densities in water and aqueous solutions occur. The technique is such as to allow experiments to be carried out in one session of an undergraduate laboratory thereby introducing students to the concept of quantum zero point energy

  2. Accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method to compute real-frequency dynamical spectral functions of quantum models at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio; Tohyama, Takami

    2018-04-01

    We examine the accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method (MCLM) developed by Long et al. [Phys. Rev. B 68, 235106 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevB.68.235106] to compute dynamical spectral functions of interacting quantum models at finite temperatures. The MCLM is based on the microcanonical ensemble, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. To apply the microcanonical ensemble at a fixed temperature, one has to find energy eigenstates with the energy eigenvalue corresponding to the internal energy in the canonical ensemble. Here, we propose to use thermal pure quantum state methods by Sugiura and Shimizu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 010401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.010401] to obtain the internal energy. After obtaining the energy eigenstates using the Lanczos diagonalization method, dynamical quantities are computed via a continued fraction expansion, a standard procedure for Lanczos-based numerical methods. Using one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with S =1 /2 , we demonstrate that the proposed procedure is reasonably accurate, even for relatively small systems.

  3. Accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method to compute real-frequency dynamical spectral functions of quantum models at finite temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio; Tohyama, Takami

    2018-04-01

    We examine the accuracy of the microcanonical Lanczos method (MCLM) developed by Long et al. [Phys. Rev. B 68, 235106 (2003)PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.68.235106] to compute dynamical spectral functions of interacting quantum models at finite temperatures. The MCLM is based on the microcanonical ensemble, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. To apply the microcanonical ensemble at a fixed temperature, one has to find energy eigenstates with the energy eigenvalue corresponding to the internal energy in the canonical ensemble. Here, we propose to use thermal pure quantum state methods by Sugiura and Shimizu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 010401 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.010401] to obtain the internal energy. After obtaining the energy eigenstates using the Lanczos diagonalization method, dynamical quantities are computed via a continued fraction expansion, a standard procedure for Lanczos-based numerical methods. Using one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with S=1/2, we demonstrate that the proposed procedure is reasonably accurate, even for relatively small systems.

  4. A method for quantitative nondestructive evaluation using high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Fumio; Nagashima, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Daisuke; Kasai, Naoko

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a computational method for detecting and characterizing defect shapes in conducting materials using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The mathematical model is described by electrical potential problems with mixed boundary condition. The model output is then represented by Biot-Savart's law. The estimation scheme is proposed for reconstructing defect shapes in sample materials with defect. Successful numerical results are reported in order to show the feasibility of the proposed algorithms. (author)

  5. A method for quantitative nondestructive evaluation using high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Fumio; Nagashima, Yoshinori [Osaka Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Suzuki, Daisuke; Kasai, Naoko

    1998-06-01

    This paper is concerned with a computational method for detecting and characterizing defect shapes in conducting materials using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The mathematical model is described by electrical potential problems with mixed boundary condition. The model output is then represented by Biot-Savart`s law. The estimation scheme is proposed for reconstructing defect shapes in sample materials with defect. Successful numerical results are reported in order to show the feasibility of the proposed algorithms. (author)

  6. The effects of temperature, hydrostatic pressure and size on optical gain for GaAs spherical quantum dot laser with hydrogen impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owji, Erfan; Keshavarz, Alireza; Mokhtari, Hosein

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, hydrostatic pressure and size on optical gain for GaAs spherical quantum dot laser with hydrogen impurity are investigated. For this purpose, the effects of temperature, pressure and quantum dot size on the band gap energy, effective mass, and dielectric constant are studied. The eigenenergies and eigenstates for valence and conduction band are calculated by using Runge-Kutta numerical method. Results show that changes in the temperature, pressure and size lead to the alteration of the band gap energy and effective mass. Also, increasing the temperature redshifts the optical gain peak and at special temperature ranges lead to increasing or decreasing of it. Further, by reducing the size, temperature-dependent of optical gain is decreased. Additionally, enhancing of the hydrostatic pressure blueshifts the peak of optical gain, and its behavior as a function of pressure which depends on the size. Finally, increasing the radius rises the redshifts of the peak of optical gain.

  7. Power density and temperature dependent multi-excited states in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzaïene, L.; Sfaxi, L.; Baira, M.; Maaref, H.; Bru-Chevallier, C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs/GaAs (001) quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using ultra low-growth rate. A typical dot diameter of around 28 ± 2 nm and a typical height of 5 ± 1 nm are observed based on atomic force microscopy image. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra, their power and temperature dependences have been studied for ground (GS) and three excited states (1–3ES) in InAs QDs. By changing the excitation power density, we can significantly influence the distribution of excitons within the QD ensemble. The PL peak energy positions of GS and ES emissions bands depend on an excitation light power. With increasing excitation power, the GS emission energy was red-shifted, while the 1–3ES emission energies were blue-shifted. It is found that the full width at half maximum of the PL spectra has unusual relationship with increasing temperature from 9 to 300 K. The temperature dependence of QD PL spectra shown the existence of two stages of PL thermal quenching and two distinct activation energies corresponding to the temperature ranges I (9–100 K) and II (100–300 K).

  8. Luminescent N-polar (In,Ga)N/GaN quantum wells achieved by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at temperatures exceeding 700 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chèze, C.; Feix, F.; Lähnemann, J.; Flissikowski, T.; Kryśko, M.; Wolny, P.; Turski, H.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Brandt, O.

    2018-01-01

    Previously, we found that N-polar (In,Ga)N/GaN quantum wells prepared on freestanding GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at conventional growth temperatures of about 650 °C do not exhibit any detectable luminescence even at 10 K. In the present work, we investigate (In,Ga)N/GaN quantum wells grown on Ga- and N-polar GaN substrates at a constant temperature of 730 °C . This exceptionally high temperature results in a vanishing In incorporation for the Ga-polar sample. In contrast, quantum wells with an In content of 20% and abrupt interfaces are formed on N-polar GaN. Moreover, these quantum wells exhibit a spatially uniform green luminescence band up to room temperature, but the intensity of this band is observed to strongly quench with temperature. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence transients show that this thermal quenching is related to a high density of nonradiative Shockley-Read-Hall centers with large capture coefficients for electrons and holes.

  9. Room temperature diode-pumped Yb:CaYAlO4 laser with near quantum limit slope efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, W D; Tang, D Y; Zhang, J; Xu, C W; Cong, Z H; Xu, X D; Li, D Z; Xu, J

    2011-01-01

    The room temperature continuous wave (CW) laser performance of a compact Yb:CaYAlO 4 (Yb:CYA) laser with near quantum limit slope efficiency is demonstrated. Pumped with a CW diode operating at 979 nm, the laser emitted a maximum CW output power of 2.3 W at 1050 nm. The corresponding slope efficiency was found to be 92% while the optical to optical conversion efficiency was 70%. The laser can also be continuously tuned from 1008 nm to 1063 nm using an intra-cavity SF 10 prism. The round trip cavity losses of Yb:CYA was 0.6% while the loss coefficient of the crystal was 0.01 cm -1

  10. Spontaneous emission of semiconductor quantum dots in inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Yang, Yingshu; Wang, Yinghui; Gao, Jiechao; Sui, Ning; Chi, Xiaochun; Zou, Lu; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2016-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) infiltrated into inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals (PCs) are systemically studied. The special porous structure of inverse opal PCs enhanced the thermal exchange rate between the CdSe QDs and their surrounding environment. Finally, inverse opal SiO2 PCs suppressed the nonlinear PL enhancement of CdSe QDs in PCs excited by a continuum laser and effectively modulated the PL characteristics of CdSe QDs in PCs at high temperatures in comparison with that of CdSe QDs out of PCs. The final results are of benefit in further understanding the role of inverse opal PCs on the PL characteristics of QDs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Quantum inelastic electron-vibration scattering in molecular wires: Landauer-like versus Green's function approaches and temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of inelastic electron transport in molecular systems in which both electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom are considered on the quantum level. The electronic transport properties of the corresponding molecular nanojunctions are obtained by means of a non-perturbative Landauer-like multi-channel inelastic scattering technique. The connections between this approach and other Green's function techniques that are useful in particular cases are studied in detail. The validity of the wide-band approximation, the effects of the lead self-energy and the dynamical polaron shift are also studied for a wide range of parameters. As a practical application of the method, we consider the effects of the temperature on the conductance properties of molecular breakjunctions in relation to recent experiments

  12. Pressure and temperature-dependent quantum yields for the photodissociation of acetone between 279 and 327.5 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Pilling, M. J.; Arnold, S. R.; Chipperfield, M. P.

    2004-03-01

    The photodissociation of acetone has been studied over the wavelength (λ) range 279-327.5 nm as a function of temperature (T) and pressure (p) using a spectroscopic method to monitor the acetyl (CH3CO) radical fragment. Above 310 nm the quantum yield (QY) is substantially smaller than previous measurements, and decreases with T. The QYs for production of CH3CO + CH3 and CH3 + CH3 + CO have been parameterised as a function of λ, p and T and used to calculate the altitude dependence of the photolysis frequency. In the upper troposphere (UT) the acetone photolysis lifetime is a factor of 2.5-10 longer, dependent upon latitude and season, than if the previously recommended QYs are used.

  13. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit II: Quantum dynamics and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2018-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of Paper I (Toutounji, 2017) of which motivation was testing the applicability of Morse oscillator propagator whose analytical form was derived by Duru (1983). This is because the Morse oscillator propagator was reported (Duru, 1983) in a triple-integral form of a functional of modified Bessel function of the first kind, which considerably limits its applicability. For this reason, I was prompted to find a regime under which Morse oscillator propagator may be simplified and hence be expressed in a closed-form. This was well accomplished in Paper I. Because Morse oscillator is of central importance and widely used in modelling vibrations, its propagator applicability will be extended to applications in quantum dynamics and spectroscopy as will be reported in this paper using the off-diagonal propagator of Morse oscillator whose analytical form is derived.

  14. Low Temperature Synthesis of CdSe Quantum Dots with Amine Derivative and Their Chemical Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seongmi Hwang,; Youngmin Choi,; Sunho Jeong,; Hakyun Jung,; Chang Gyoun Kim,; Teak-Mo Chung,; Beyong-Hwan Ryu,

    2010-05-01

    The chemical kinetics of growing CdSe nanocrystals was studied in order to investigate the effects of amine capping agents on the size of resulting quantum dots (QDs). CdSe QDs were prepared in phenyl ether, and the amine ligand dependence of QD size was determined. The results show that the size of CdSe nanocrystals can be regulated by controlling reaction rate, with smaller QDs being formed in slower processes. The results of photoluminescence (PL) studies show that the emission wavelengths of the QDs well correlate with particle size. This simple process for forming different-sized QDs, which uses a cheap solvent and various capping agents, has the potential for preparing CdSe nanocrystals more economically.

  15. Photoluminescent enhancement of CdSe/Cd(1-x) Zn(x)S quantum dots by hexadecylamine at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Ping

    2012-09-01

    CdSe/Cd(1-x) Zn(x)S core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were fabricated in 1-octadecene via a two step synthesis. CdSe cores were first prepared using CdO, trioctylphosphine (TOP) selenium, and stearic acid. Subsquently, a Cd(1-x) Zn(x)S shell coating was carried out using zinc acetate dihydrate, cadmium acetate dihydrate, TOPS, and hexadecylamine (HDA) starting materials in the friendly organic system under relatively low temperature. The absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra have a significant red shift after the coverage of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S shell on CdSe cores. The X-ray diffraction analysis of samples confirmed the formation of core/shell structure. The PL quantum yields (QYs) of CdSe/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S QDs were improved gradually with time at room temperature. This is ascribed to the surface passivation of HDA to the QDs during store. This phenomenon was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrum of samples. Namely, HDA does not capped on the surface of as-prepared QDs, in which a low PL QYs was observed (less than 10%). Being storing for certain time, HDA attached to the surface of the QDs, in which the PL QYs increased (up to 31%) and the full width at half maximum of PL spectra decreased. Moreover, the fluorescence decay curve of the core/shell QDs is closer to a biexponential decay profile and has a longer average PL lifetime. The variation of average PL lifetime also indicated the influence of HDA during store.

  16. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  17. Room-Temperature Single-Photon Source for Secure Quantum Communication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are asking for four years of support for PhD student Justin Winkler's work on a research project entitled "Room temperature single photon source for secure...

  18. Room-temperature continuous operation of InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 mu m based on (100) InP substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qui, Y.; Uhl, D.; Keo, S.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stack InAsSb self-assembled quantum-dot lasers based on (001) InP substrate have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The narrow ridge waveguide lasers lased at wavelengths near 2 mu m up to 25 degrees C in continuous-wave operation. At room temperature, a differential quantum efficiency of 13 percent is obtained and the maximum output optical power reaches 3 mW per facet with a threshold current density of 730 A/cm(sup 2). With increasing temperature the emission wavelength is extremely temperature stable, and a very low wavelength temperature sensitivity of 0.05 nm/degrees C is measured, which is even lower than that caused by the refractive index change.

  19. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D. J.; Khudchencko, A.; Pavelyev, D. G.; Hovenier, J. N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J. R.; Kao, T. Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60 dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  20. Phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser using a room-temperature superlattice harmonic mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayton, D.J.; Khudchenko, A.; Pavelyev, D.G.; Hovenier, J.N.; Baryshev, A.; Gao, J.R.; Kao, T.Y.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J.L.; Vaks, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the phase locking of a 3.4 THz third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) using a room temperature GaAs/AlAs superlattice diode as both a frequency multiplier and an internal harmonic mixer. A signal-to-noise level of 60?dB is observed in the intermediate frequency

  1. The role of temperature ramp-up time before barrier layer growth in optical and structural properties of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yao; Zhao, Degang; Jiang, Desheng; Liu, Zongshun; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Ping; Yang, Jing; Liu, Wei; Liang, Feng; Liu, Shuangtao; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Wenjie; Li, Mo; Zhang, Yuantao; Du, Guotong

    2018-05-01

    In InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs), a low temperature cap (LT-cap) layer is grown between the InGaN well layer and low temperature GaN barrier layer. During the growth, a temperature ramp-up and ramp-down process is added between LT-cap and barrier layer growth. The effect of temperature ramp-up time duration on structural and optical properties of quantum wells is studied. It is found that as the ramp-up time increases, the Indium floating layer on the top of the well layer can be diminished effectively, leading to a better interface quality between well and barrier layers, and the carrier localization effect is enhanced, thereby the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of QWs increases surprisingly. However, if the ramp-up time is too long, the carrier localization effect is weaker, which may increase the probabilities of carriers to meet with nonradiative recombination centers. Meanwhile, more nonradiative recombination centers will be introduced into well layers due to the indium evaporation. Both of them will lead to a reduction of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of MQWs.

  2. How type 1 fimbriae help Escherichia coli to evade extracellular antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Hosseini, Vahid; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Meier, Stefanie; Weber, Stefan S; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-05

    To survive antibiotics, bacteria use two different strategies: counteracting antibiotic effects by expression of resistance genes or evading their effects e.g. by persisting inside host cells. Since bacterial adhesins provide access to the shielded, intracellular niche and the adhesin type 1 fimbriae increases bacterial survival chances inside macrophages, we asked if fimbriae also influenced survival by antibiotic evasion. Combined gentamicin survival assays, flow cytometry, single cell microscopy and kinetic modeling of dose response curves showed that type 1 fimbriae increased the adhesion and internalization by macrophages. This was caused by strongly decreased off-rates and affected the number of intracellular bacteria but not the macrophage viability and morphology. Fimbriae thus promote antibiotic evasion which is particularly relevant in the context of chronic infections.

  3. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...... the bacterium to adhere to human red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby evade attack by circulating phagocytes. On incubation with normal human serum, the P. gingivalis strain efficiently fixed complement component 3 (C3). Incubation of bacteria with washed whole blood cells suspended in autologous serum resulted...... in a dose- and time-dependent adherence to RBCs. The adherence required functionally intact complement receptor 1 (CR1; also called CD35) on the RBCs and significantly inhibited the uptake of P. gingivalis by neutrophils and B cells within 1 min of incubation (by 64% and 51%, respectively...

  4. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Miyamoto, Yuhei [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Yokoyama, Jun' ichi [Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa, Chiba (JP). Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)

    2012-04-15

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  5. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2012-04-01

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  6. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband optical transitions in InAs/GaAs vertically coupled double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghramyan, H M; Barseghyan, M G; Kirakosyan, A A

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effect of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and the variations of structure's sizes on interband transition energy and absorption coefficient in InAs/GaAs vertically coupled double quantum dots. The threshold energy of interband optical transitions is examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure and temperature for the different geometries of the structure. We also investigated the dependencies of the interband light absorption coefficient on the incident photon energy.

  7. Quantum electrodynamics at a finite temperature with an external field destroying the stability of the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A generating functional for expectation values is found for QED at a finite temperature with an external field which destroys the stability of the vacuum. The equations for connected Green functions and the effective action for the mean field are written out. Their representation is obtained in the form of an integral over the proper time for the Green function taking into account temperature effects in a constant uniform field. By means of this representation the polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant uniform field has been calculated

  8. Temperature evolution of the quantum gap in CsNiCl3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenzelmann, M.; Cowley, R.A.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    2001-01-01

    excitation, by a factor of three between 5 and 70 K, is more than enough to overcome its decreasing lifetime. We find that the gap lifetime is substantially shorter than that predicted by the scaling theory of Damle and Sachdev based on a classical dispersion for the Haldane excitations, but when we include...... their expected relativistic dispersion, the theory, in its low-temperature range of validity, gives a good account of experiment. The upward gap renormalization agrees with the nonlinear sigma model at low temperatures and even up to T of order 2 Delta provided an upper momentum cutoff is included....

  9. Quantum electrodynamics at finite temperatures in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, S.P.; Gitman, D.M.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A functional generating expectation values is obtained for QED at a finite temperature in presence of an external field violating the vacuum stability. Equations for connected Green's functions and the effective action for the mean field are derived. The Green function is obtained as an integral with respect of the proper time; the representation takes into account temperature effects in a constant homogeneous field. The polarization operator for the mean field in an external constant homogeneous field is calculated by means of the integral representation

  10. The elicitin-like glycoprotein, ELI025, is secreted by the pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum and evades host antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassanee Lerksuthirat

    Full Text Available Pythium insidiosum is a unique oomycete that can infect humans and animals. Patients with a P. insidiosum infection (pythiosis have high rates of morbidity and mortality. The pathogen resists conventional antifungal drugs. Information on the biology and pathogenesis of P. insidiosum is limited. Many pathogens secrete proteins, known as effectors, which can affect the host response and promote the infection process. Elicitins are secretory proteins and are found only in the oomycetes, primarily in Phytophthora and Pythium species. In plant-pathogenic oomycetes, elicitins function as pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules, sterol carriers, and plant defense stimulators. Recently, we reported a number of elicitin-encoding genes from the P. insidiosum transcriptome. The function of elicitins during human infections is unknown. One of the P. insidiosum elicitin-encoding genes, ELI025, is highly expressed and up-regulated at body temperature. This study aims to characterize the biochemical, immunological, and genetic properties of the elicitin protein, ELI025. A 12.4-kDa recombinant ELI025 protein (rELI025 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Rabbit anti-rELI025 antibodies reacted strongly with the native ELI025 in P. insidiosum's culture medium. The detected ELI025 had two isoforms: glycosylated and non-glycosylated. ELI025 was not immunoreactive with sera from pythiosis patients. The region near the transcriptional start site of ELI025 contained conserved oomycete core promoter elements. In conclusion, ELI025 is a small, abundant, secreted glycoprotein that evades host antibody responses. ELI025 is a promising candidate for development of diagnostic and therapeutic targets for pythiosis.

  11. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  12. Eight-fold quantum states blossom in a high-temperature superconductor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Researchers based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to reveal eight-fold patterns of quasiparticle interference in the high-temperature superconductor Bi-2212 (bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide)" (2 pages).

  13. High temperature superconductor micro-superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometer for magnetization measurement of a microscale magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Keiji; Mori, Hatsumi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Ishimoto, Hidehiko; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Kuriki, Shinya; Hozumi, Toshiya; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a high temperature superconductor (HTS) micrometer-sized dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer for high field and high temperature operation. It was fabricated from YBa2Cu3O7-delta of 92 nm in thickness with photolithography techniques to have a hole of 4x9 microm2 and 2 microm wide grain boundary Josephson junctions. Combined with a three dimensional magnetic field coil system, the modulation patterns of critical current Ic were observed for three different field directions. They were successfully used to measure the magnetic properties of a molecular ferrimagnetic microcrystal (23x17x13 microm3), [Mn2(H2O)2(CH3COO)][W(CN)8]2H2O. The magnetization curve was obtained in magnetic field up to 0.12 T between 30 and 70 K. This is the first to measure the anisotropy of hysteresis curve in the field above 0.1 T with an accuracy of 10(-12) J T(-1) (10(-9) emu) with a HTS micro-SQUID magnetometer.

  14. Spin-orbit coupling and applied magnetic field effects on electromagnetically induced transparency of a quantum ring at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Setareh, F.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2018-03-01

    A wide variety of semiconductor nanostructures have been fabricated and studied experimentally and alongside theoretical investigations show the great role they have in new generation opto-electronic devices. However, mathematical modeling provide important information due to their definitive goal of predicting features and understanding of such structures' behavior under different circumstances. Hence, in the current work, the effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions of the structure on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a GaAs quantum ring are studied while both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) are taken into account. The Schrödinger equation is solved in cylindrical coordinate with axial symmetry and in order to study the EIT, the imaginary (absorption) and real (refractive index) parts of susceptibility as well as the group velocity of the probe light pulse are investigated. The absorption and refractive index plots show that, for a specific frequency of probe field the absorption vanishes and refractive index becomes unity (known as EIT) while around such frequency the group index is positive (sub-luminal probe propagation) and for higher and lower frequencies it alters to negative (super-luminal probe propagation). The numerical results reveal that the EIT frequency, transparency window and sub(super)-luminal frequency intervals shift as we change applied magnetic field, temperature and also the structure dimensions.

  15. Photoelectric properties of the metamorphic InAs/InGaAs quantum dot structure at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovynskyi, S. L., E-mail: golovynskyi@isp.kiev.ua [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, pr. Nauki 45, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Seravalli, L.; Trevisi, G.; Frigeri, P.; Gombia, E. [Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, CNR-IMEM, Parco delle Scienze 37a, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Dacenko, O. I.; Kondratenko, S. V. [Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64 Volodymyrska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2015-06-07

    We present the study of optical and photoelectric properties of InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on a metamorphic In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As buffer layer: such nanostructures show efficient light emission in the telecom window at 1.3 μm (0.95 eV) at room temperature. We prepared a sample with vertical geometry of contacts isolated from the GaAs substrate. The structure is found to be photosensitive in the spectral range above 0.9 eV at room temperature, showing distinctive features in the photovoltage and photocurrent spectra attributed to QDs, InAs wetting layer, and In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}As metamorphic buffer, while a drop in the photoelectric signal above 1.36 eV is related to the GaAs layer. No effect of defect centers on the photoelectrical properties is found, although they are observed in the absorption spectrum. We conclude that metamorphic QDs have a low amount of interface-related defects close to the optically active region and charge carriers can be effectively collected into InAs QDs.

  16. Low temperature characterization of the photocurrent produced by two-photon transitions in a quantum dot intermediate band solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolin, E.; Marti, A.; Stanley, C.R.; Farmer, C.D.; Canovas, E.; Lopez, N.; Linares, P.G.; Luque, A.

    2008-01-01

    Conceived to exceed the conversion efficiency of conventional photovoltaic devices, the intermediate band solar cell bases its operation on exploiting, besides the usual band-to-band optical transitions, the absorption of two sub-bandgap photons. For the present, the only technology used to implement an intermediate band in real devices has been the growth of an InAs/GaAs quantum dot superlattice. In practice, the obtained material shows two limitations: the narrow energy gap between conduction and intermediate band and the appearance of growth defects due to the lattice stress. The consequences are the presence of non-radiative recombination mechanisms and the thermal escape of electrons from the intermediate to the conduction band, hindering the splitting of the quasi-Fermi levels associated with the intermediate and conduction bands and the observation of photocurrent associated with the two-photon absorption. By reducing the temperature at which the devices are characterised we have suppressed the parasitic thermal mechanisms and have succeeded in measuring the photocurrent caused by the absorption of two below bandgap photons. In this work, the characterization of this photocurrent at low temperature is presented and discussed

  17. Probing Temperature- and pH-Dependent Binding between Quantum Dots and Bovine Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghua Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent quantum dots (QDs with unique optical properties have potential applications in bio-imaging. The interaction between QDs and bio-molecules is important to the biological effect of QDs in vivo. In this paper, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS to probe the temperature- and pH-dependent interactions between CdSe QDs with carboxyl (QDs-COOH and bovine serum albumin (BSA in buffer solutions. The results have shown that microscopic dissociation constant K′D is in the range of (1.5 ± 0.2 × 10−5 to (8.6 ± 0.1 × 10−7 M, the Hill coefficient n is from 0.4 to 2.3, and the protein corona thickness is from 3.0 to 9.4 nm. Variable-temperature measurements have shown both negative values of ∆H and ∆S for BSA adsorption on QDs-COOH, while pH has a profound effect on the adsorption. Additional, FCS measurement QDs-COOH and proteins in whole mice serum and plasma samples has also been conducted. Finally, simulation results have shown four favored QD binding sites in BSA.

  18. Quantum Critical Scaling and Temperature-Dependent Logarithmic Corrections in the Spin-Half Heisenberg Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starykh, O.; Singh, R.; Sandvik, A.

    1997-01-01

    Low temperature dynamics of the S=(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain is studied via a simple ansatz generalizing the conformal mapping and analytic continuation procedures to correlation functions with multiplicative logarithmic factors. Closed form expressions for the dynamic susceptibility and the NMR relaxation rates 1/T 1 and 1/T 2G are obtained, and are argued to improve the agreement with recent experiments. Scaling in q/T and ω/T are violated due to these logarithmic terms. Numerical results show that the logarithmic corrections are very robust. While not yet in the asymptotic low temperature regime, they provide striking qualitative confirmation of the theoretical results. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Lübecki filmipäevad 1999 ja Thomas Manni ekraniseering 1923 / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    1999-01-01

    4.-7. novembrini Lübeckis toimunud Põhjamaade filmipäevade 41. Nordische Filmtage huvitavamatest filmidest, nagu Thomas Manni "Buddenbrookide" ekraniseering 1923. aastast (režissöör Gerhard Lamprecht) ja Rasmus Gerlachi dokumentaal "Operaator Kaufman" Dziga Vertovist ja tema kahest, samuti kino alal tegutsenud vennast

  20. The chiral anomaly of quantum chromodynamics at high temperatures. Lattice investigation of the overlap Dirac spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the spectrum of the overlap Dirac operator has been computed and analyzed on configurations that had been created using highly improved staggered quarks. Although the overlap operator is expensive to compute, it has the advantage that it fully implements chiral symmetry in the same way as the continuum QCD Dirac operator even at finite lattice spacings. This opened the possibility to investigate chiral aspects of QCD and, in particular, the question if the axial anomaly is suppressed at the chiral transition temperature T c . The obtained results indicate that the axial anomaly is still present at T c and even at 1.5 T c as evidenced by a splitting in the integrated pion and delta susceptibilities. The spectrum shows a peak in the near-zero region consisting of zero modes and pairs of near-zero modes. The breaking of the axial symmetry was identified as being caused by these infrared modes. It was discussed how this infrared contribution might change in the thermodynamic, continuum, and chiral limits. The obtained data supports the expectation that the peak becomes narrower with decreasing quark masses, resulting in a Dirac-delta peak in the chiral limit. The area under the peak was found to decrease with decreasing lattice spacing, so in order to resolve how much of it survives the continuum limit further investigations are needed, in particular ones where already for the generation of gauge configurations chiral fermions are used. The infrared modes were investigated and found to be highly localized, supporting the picture of QCD at high temperatures as a dilute instanton gas. The instantons were found to have an average size of 0.239(4) fm and a density of 0.154(5) fm -4 at 1.5 T c . Near-zero modes were found to be induced by instanton-anti-instanton molecules, which are weakly bound. At temperatures closer to T c , this picture becomes more complicated but these features sometimes still can be recognized. In conclusion, in QCD at temperatures

  1. Perfect 3-dimensional lattice actions for 4-dimensional quantum field theories at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerres, U.; Mack, G.; Palma, G.

    1994-12-01

    We propose a two-step procedure to study the order of phase transitions at finite temperature in electroweak theory and in simplified models thereof. In a first step a coarse grained free energy is computed by perturbative methods. It is obtained in the form of a 3-dimensional perfect lattice action by a block spin transformation. It has finite temperature dependent coefficients. In this way the UV-problem and the infrared problem is separated in a clean way. In the second step the effective 3-dimensional lattice theory is treated in a nonperturbative way, either by the Feynman-Bololiubov method (solution of a gap equation), by real space renormalization group methods, or by computer simulations. In this paper we outline the principles for φ 4 -theory and scalar electrodynamics. The Balaban-Jaffe block spin transformation for the gauge field is used. It is known how to extend this transformation to the nonabelian case, but this will not be discussed here. (orig.)

  2. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to moniter high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendrantherma grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janka, Eshetu; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    and quantum yield of PSII remaining low until the temperature reaches 28 °C and 2) the integration of online measurements to monitor photosynthesis and PSII operating efficiency may be used to optimise dynamic greenhouse control regimes by detecting plant stress caused by extreme microclimatic conditions.......Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...

  3. Quantum oscillations and key theoretical issues in high temperature superconductors from the perspective of density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    2011-01-01

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors remains an unsolved problem in theoretical physics. The same statement can also be made about a number of other superconductors that have been dubbed novel. What makes these superconductors so elusive is an interesting question in itself. This paper focuses on the recent magnetic oscillation experiments and how they fit into the broader picture. Many aspects of these experiments can be explained by Fermi liquid theory; the key issue is the extent to which this is true. If true, the entire paradigm developed over the past three decades must be reexamined. A critical analysis of this issue has necessitated a broader analysis of questions about distinct ground states of matter, which may be useful in understanding other novel superconductors.

  4. Integrated nanoplasmonic quantum interfaces for room-temperature single-photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyskens, Frédéric; Englund, Dirk; Chang, Darrick

    2017-12-01

    We describe a general analytical framework of a nanoplasmonic cavity-emitter system interacting with a dielectric photonic waveguide. Taking into account emitter quenching and dephasing, our model directly reveals the single-photon extraction efficiency η as well as the indistinguishability I of photons coupled into the waveguide mode. Rather than minimizing the cavity modal volume, our analysis predicts an optimum modal volume to maximize η that balances waveguide coupling and spontaneous emission rate enhancement. Surprisingly, our model predicts that near-unity indistinguishability is possible, but this requires a much smaller modal volume, implying a fundamental performance trade-off between high η and I at room temperature. Finally, we show that maximizing η I requires that the system has to be driven in the weak coupling regime because quenching effects and decreased waveguide coupling drastically reduce η in the strong coupling regime.

  5. Two-point Green's functions in quantum electrodynamics at finite temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechler, A.

    1981-01-01

    One-particle propagators of the relativistic electron--positron gas are systematically investigated. With the nonvanishing chemical potential the neutrality of the whole system is secured by a uniformly charged classical background described by a classical current J/sub μ/. Due to the translational invariance of this model it is natural to investigate the properties of the propagators in the momentum space. The Fourier-transforms of the Green's functions have been expressed in terms of the generalized spectral Lehmann representation and the second-order spectral functions of the photon and electron propagators have been found. The matter-dependent part of the propagator is finite and only the vacuum part has to be renormalized with the use of standard renormalization counterterms. The singularities of the gauge-independent photon propagator have been further investigated with the use of the spectral representation and nonperturbative expressions for the spectrum of collective excitations have been obtained. In the second order of perturbation they reproduce the asymptotic formulas at T→0 and T→infinity cited previously in the literature. In particular, the relativistic plasma frequency (photon effective mass) has been expressed in a simple form in terms of the integrals over the spectral functions. Our formulas for the relativistic plasmon mass squared Ω 2 exhibit an interesting property that at some temperature and density Ω 2 should become negative. However, simple estimates show that this phenomenon occurs at highly nonrealistic temperatures of the order of e 137 , i.e., in the region where the perturbation theory fails. The damping of the collective excitations is also considered

  6. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Je-An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  7. QUANTUM MECHANICS. Quantum squeezing of motion in a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2015-08-28

    According to quantum mechanics, a harmonic oscillator can never be completely at rest. Even in the ground state, its position will always have fluctuations, called the zero-point motion. Although the zero-point fluctuations are unavoidable, they can be manipulated. Using microwave frequency radiation pressure, we have manipulated the thermal fluctuations of a micrometer-scale mechanical resonator to produce a stationary quadrature-squeezed state with a minimum variance of 0.80 times that of the ground state. We also performed phase-sensitive, back-action evading measurements of a thermal state squeezed to 1.09 times the zero-point level. Our results are relevant to the quantum engineering of states of matter at large length scales, the study of decoherence of large quantum systems, and for the realization of ultrasensitive sensing of force and motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Measurement of the spin temperature of optically cooled nuclei and GaAs hyperfine constants in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhovich, E. A.; Ulhaq, A.; Zallo, E.; Ding, F.; Schmidt, O. G.; Skolnick, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    Deep cooling of electron and nuclear spins is equivalent to achieving polarization degrees close to 100% and is a key requirement in solid-state quantum information technologies. While polarization of individual nuclear spins in diamond and SiC (ref. ) reaches 99% and beyond, it has been limited to 50-65% for the nuclei in quantum dots. Theoretical models have attributed this limit to formation of coherent `dark' nuclear spin states but experimental verification is lacking, especially due to the poor accuracy of polarization degree measurements. Here we measure the nuclear polarization in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots with high accuracy using a new approach enabled by manipulation of the nuclear spin states with radiofrequency pulses. Polarizations up to 80% are observed--the highest reported so far for optical cooling in quantum dots. This value is still not limited by nuclear coherence effects. Instead we find that optically cooled nuclei are well described within a classical spin temperature framework. Our findings unlock a route for further progress towards quantum dot electron spin qubits where deep cooling of the mesoscopic nuclear spin ensemble is used to achieve long qubit coherence. Moreover, GaAs hyperfine material constants are measured here experimentally for the first time.

  9. Application of hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) to time dependent quantum transport at zero and finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Heng; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-10-01

    Going beyond the limitations of our earlier works [X. Zheng, F. Wang, C.Y. Yam, Y. Mo, G.H. Chen, Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); X. Zheng, G.H. Chen, Y. Mo, S.K. Koo, H. Tian, C.Y. Yam, Y.J. Yan, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 114101 (2010)], we propose, in this manuscript, a new alternative approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport phenomenon from first-principles. This new practical approach, still retaining the formal exactness of HEOM framework, does not rely on any intractable parametrization scheme and the pole structure of Fermi distribution function, thus, can seamlessly incorporated into first-principles simulation and treat transient response of an open electronic systems to an external bias voltage at both zero and finite temperatures on the equal footing. The salient feature of this approach is surveyed, and its time complexity is analysed. As a proof-of-principle of this approach, simulation of the transient current of one dimensional tight-binding chain, driven by some direct external voltages, is demonstrated.

  10. Henipaviruses Employ a Multifaceted Approach to Evade the Antiviral Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah virus, which constitute the genus Henipavirus, are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that have been associated with sporadic outbreaks of severe disease and mortality in humans since their emergence in the late 1990s. Similar to other paramyxoviruses, their ability to evade the host interferon (IFN response is conferred by the P gene. The henipavirus P gene encodes four proteins; the P, V, W and C proteins, which have all been described to inhibit the antiviral response. Further studies have revealed that these proteins have overlapping but unique properties which enable the virus to block multiple signaling pathways in the IFN response. The best characterized of these is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway which is targeted by the P, V and W proteins via an interaction with the transcription factor STAT1. In addition the V and W proteins can both limit virus-induced induction of IFN but they appear to do this via distinct mechanisms that rely on unique sequences in their C-terminal domains. The ability to generate recombinant Nipah viruses now gives us the opportunity to determine the precise role for each of these proteins and address their contribution to pathogenicity. Additionally, the question of whether these multiple anti-IFN strategies are all active in the different mammalian hosts for henipaviruses, particularly the fruit bat reservoir, warrants further exploration.

  11. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagiri, Nalinikanth; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such “stealth” CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid-based nanotheranostic agents for multiplex, multimodal molecular imaging and therapy, as well as in other applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:24872705

  12. STRONG CORRELATIONS AND ELECTRON-PHONON COUPLING IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS - A QUANTUM MONTE-CARLO STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, [No Value; FRICK, M; VONDERLINDEN, W

    We present quantum simulation studies for a system of strongly correlated fermions coupled to local anharmonic phonons. The Monte Carlo calculations are based on a generalized version of the Projector Quantum Monte Carlo Method allowing a simultaneous treatment of fermions and dynamical phonons. The

  13. Quantum Link Models and Quantum Simulation of Gauge Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, U.J.

    2015-01-01

    This lecture is about Quantum Link Models and Quantum Simulation of Gauge Theories. The lecture consists out of 4 parts. The first part gives a brief history of Computing and Pioneers of Quantum Computing and Quantum Simulations of Quantum Spin Systems are introduced. The 2nd lecture is about High-Temperature Superconductors versus QCD, Wilson’s Lattice QCD and Abelian Quantum Link Models. The 3rd lecture deals with Quantum Simulators for Abelian Lattice Gauge Theories and Non-Abelian Quantum Link Models. The last part of the lecture discusses Quantum Simulators mimicking ‘Nuclear’ physics and the continuum limit of D-Theorie models. (nowak)

  14. The effects of temperature on optical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Youhua; Huang, Jing; Deng, Honghai; Wang, Meiyu; Yin, HaiHong

    2017-02-01

    The effects of temperature on the optical properties of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) light-emitting diodes have been investigated by using the six-by-six K-P method taking into account the temperature dependence of band gaps, lattice constants, and elastic constants. The numerical results indicate that the increase of temperature leads to the decrease of the spontaneous emission rate at the same injection current density due to the redistribution of carrier density and the increase of the non-radiative recombination rate. The product of Fermi-Dirac distribution functions of electron fc n and hole ( 1 - fv U m ) for the transitions between the three lowest conduction subbands (c1-c3) and the top six valence subbands (v1-v6) is larger at the lower temperature, which indicates that there are more electron-hole pairs distributed on the energy levels. It should be noted that the optical matrix elements of the inter-band transitions slightly increase at the higher temperature. In addition, the internal quantum efficiency of the InGaN/GaN QW structure is evidently decreased with increasing temperature.

  15. Nonlinear optical rectification in a vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots with wetting layers under hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Mahrsia, R.; Choubani, M., E-mail: mohsenchoubani3@yahoo.fr; Bouzaiene, L.; Maaref, H.

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we explore the structure parameters, hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on Nonlinear optical rectification (NOR) in an asymmetric vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots. During epitaxial growth, lens-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). Many theoretical works have neglected WL and its effect on nonlinear optical properties of QD-based systems for sake of simplicity. However, in this work the WL has been shown to be so influential in the intersubband energy and nonlinear optical rectification magnitude. Also, a detailed and comprehensive study of the nonlinear optical rectification is theoretical investigated within the framework of the compact density-matrix approach and finite difference method (FDM). It's found that nonlinear optical rectification coefficient is strongly affected not only by the WL, but also by the pressure, temperature and the coupled width between the QDs. Obtained results revealed that a red or a blue shift cane be observed. This behavior in the NOR gives a new degree of freedom in regions of interest for device applications. - Highlights: • Vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots is investigated. • Photon energy shifts towards the red with increasing pressure. • Photon energy shifts towards the blue with increasing temperature. • Intersubband energy decreases with increasing the wetting layer width. • Nonlinear optical rectification magnitude is controlled and adjusted.

  16. Temperature dependence of optical transitions in Al xGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero-Rosas, A.; Mejia-Garcia, C.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum well (QW) structures of Al x Ga 1-x As/GaAs were characterized by photoluminescence technique as a function of the temperature between 10 and 300 K. The structures were grown on a 500 nm thick GaAs buffer layer with Molecular Beam Epitaxy technique. We have studied the properties of in-situ Cl 2 -etched GaAs surfaces and overgrown QW structures as a function of the etching temperature (70 and 200 deg. C). Several models were used to fit the experimental points. Best fit to experimental points was obtained with the Paessler model

  17. The effect of temperature and dot size on the spectral properties of colloidal InP/ZnS core-shell quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Arun; Feiner, L F; Meijerink, A; van der Zaag, P J

    2009-09-22

    Visual color changes between 300 and 510 K were observed in the photoluminescence (PL) of colloidal InP/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals. A subsequent study of PL spectra in the range 2-510 K and fitting the temperature dependent line shift and line width to theoretical models show that the dominant (dephasing) interaction is due to scattering by acoustic phonons of about 23 meV. Low temperature photoluminescence excitation measurements show that the excitonic band gap depends approximately inversely linearly on the quantum dot size d, which is distinctly weaker than the dependence predicted by current theories.

  18. Low-temperature conductivity of weakly interacting quantum spin Hall edges in strained-layer InAs/GaInSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingxin; Wang, Pengjie; Sullivan, Gerard; Lin, Xi; Du, Rui-Rui

    2017-12-01

    We report low-temperature transport measurements in strained InAs /G a0.68I n0.32Sb quantum wells, which supports time-reversal symmetry-protected helical edge states. The temperature and bias voltage dependence of the helical edge conductance for devices of various sizes are consistent with the theoretical expectation of a weakly interacting helical edge state. Moreover, we found that the magnetoresistance of the helical edge states is related to the edge interaction effect and the disorder strength.

  19. Effect of temperature and ridge-width on the lasing characteristics of InAs/InP quantum-dash lasers: A thermal analysis view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, E.; Khan, M. T. A.; Ragheb, A. M.; Fathallah, H.; Qureshi, K. K.; Alshebeili, S.; Khan, M. Z. M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the thermal characteristics of multi-stack chirped barrier thickness InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum-dash-in-a-well lasers of different ridge widths 2, 3, 4 and 15 μm. The effect of varying this geometrical parameter on the extracted thermal resistance and characteristic temperature, and their stability with temperature are examined. The results show an inverse relation of ridge-width with junction temperature with 2 μm device exhibiting the largest junction temperature buildup owing to an associated high thermal resistance of ∼45 °C/W. Under the light of this thermal analysis, lasing behavior of different ridge-width quantum-dash (Qdash) lasers with injection currents and operating temperatures, is investigated. Thermionic carrier escape and phonon-assisted tunneling are found to be the dominant carrier transport mechanisms resulting in wide thermal spread of carriers across the available transition states of the chirped active region. An emission coverage of ∼75 nm and 3 dB bandwidth of ∼55 nm is exhibited by the 2 μm device, thus possibly exploiting the inhomogeneous optical transitions to the fullest. Furthermore, successful external modulation of a single Qdash Fabry-Perot laser mode via injection locking is demonstrated with eye diagrams at bit rates of 2-12 Gbit/s incorporating various modulation schemes. These devices are being considered as potential light sources for future high-speed wavelength-division multiplexed optical communication systems.

  20. State-to-state quantum mechanical calculations of rate coefficients for the D+ + H2 → HD + H+ reaction at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honvault, P; Scribano, Y

    2013-10-03

    The dynamics of the D(+) + H2 → HD + H(+) reaction on a recent ab initio potential energy surface (Velilla, L.; Lepetit, B.; Aguado, A.; Beswick, J. A.; Paniagua, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 084307) has been investigated by means of a time-independent quantum mechanical approach. Cross-sections and rate coefficients are calculated, respectively, for collision energies below 0.1 eV and temperatures up to 100 K for astrophysical application. An excellent accord is found for collision energy above 5 meV, while a disagreement between theory and experiment is observed below this energy. We show that the rate coefficients reveal a slightly temperature-dependent behavior in the upper part of the temperature range considered here. This is in agreement with the experimental data above 80 K, which give a temperature independent value. However, a significant decrease is found at temperatures below 20 K. This decrease can be related to quantum effects and the decay back to the reactant channel, which are not considered by simple statistical approaches, such as the Langevin model. Our results have been fitted to appropriate analytical expressions in order to be used in astrochemical and cosmological models.

  1. Room temperature synthesis of PbSe quantum dots in aqueous solution: Stabilization by interactions with ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Arslan, Zikri; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    An aqueous route of synthesis is described for rapid synthesis of lead selenide quantum dots (PbSe QDs) at room temperature in an attempt to produce water-soluble and stable nanocrystals. Several thiol-ligands, including thioglycolic acid (TGA), thioglycerol (TGC), 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), 2-mercaptoethyleamine hydrochloride (MEA), 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA), and L-cysteine (L-cys), were used for capping/stabilization of PbSe QDs. The effects of the ligands on the stability of PbSe QDs were evaluated for a period of two months at room temperature under normal light conditions and at 4 °C in dark. The TGA- and MEA-capped QDs exhibited the highest stability prior to purification, almost two months when kept in dark at 4 °C. However, the stability of TGA-capped QDs was reduced substantially after purification to about 5 days under same conditions, while MEA-capped QDs did not show any significant instability. The stabilization energies of Pb-thiolate complexes determined by theoretical DFT simulations supported the experimental results. The PbSe QDs capped with TGA, MPA and MEA were successfully purified and re-dispersed in water, while those stabilized with TGC, MHA and L-cys aggregated during purification attempts. The purified PbSe QDs possess very susceptible surface resulting in poor stability for about 30 – 45 min after re-dispersion in water. In the presence of an excess of free ligand, the stability increased up to 5 days for TGA-capped QDs at pH 7.19, 9 –12 days for MPA-capped QDs at pH 7.3–7.5 and 45–47 days for MEA-capped QDs at pH 7.35. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed that the QDs possess a cubic rock salt structure with the most intense peaks located at 2θ = 25.3° (200) and 2θ = 29.2° (100). TEM images showed that the size of the QDs ranges between 5 and 10 nm. ICP-MS results revealed that Pb:Se ratio was 1.26, 1.28, 3.85, 1.18, and 1.31 for the QDs capped with TGA, MPA, MEA, L-Cys, and TGC, respectively. The proposed method

  2. High-resolution room-temperature sample scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscope configurable for geological and biomagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, L. E.; Holzer, J. R.; McBride, K. K.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F.; Radparvar, M.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with submillimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensors are mounted on the tip of a sapphire and thermally anchored to the helium reservoir. A 25μm sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows us to adjust the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. We achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm, which could be maintained for periods of up to four weeks. Different SQUID sensor designs are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given source configuration. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, we used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80μm, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4×10-18Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires a higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. We developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250μm to 1mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480-180fT /Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of geological samples.

  3. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotagiri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nalinikanth Kotagiri,1–4 Jin-Woo Kim1–31Bio/Nano Technology Laboratory, Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, 2Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 3Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 4Optical Radiology Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such "stealth" CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid

  4. The effect of confinement on the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition energy in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M A T da; Morais, R R O; Dias, I F L; Lourenco, S A; Duarte, J L; Laureto, E; Quivy, A A; Silva, E C F da

    2008-01-01

    We determined by means of photoluminescence measurements the dependence on temperature of the transition energy of excitons in GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As quantum wells with different alloy concentrations (with different barrier heights). Using a fitting procedure, we determined the parameters which describe the behavior of the excitonic transition energy as a function of temperature according to three different theoretical models. We verified that the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition energy does not only depend on the GaAs material but also depends on the barrier material, i.e. on the alloy composition. The effect of confinement on the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition is discussed

  5. High-temperature operation of self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN quantum-dot lasers grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.Y.; Yoon, S.F.; Sun, Z.Z.; Yew, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN single layer quantum-dot (QD) lasers grown using solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy have been fabricated and characterized. Temperature-dependent measurements have been carried out on the GaInNAs QD lasers. The lowest obtained threshold current density in this work is ∼1.05 kA/cm 2 from a GaInNAs QD laser (50x1700 μm 2 ) at 10 deg. C. High-temperature operation up to 65 deg. C was also demonstrated from an unbonded GaInNAs QD laser (50x1060 μm 2 ), with high characteristic temperature of 79.4 K in the temperature range of 10-60 deg. C

  6. Magneto-optical controlled transmittance alteration of PbS quantum dots by moderately applied magnetic fields at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Akhilesh K.; Barik, Puspendu; Ullrich, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    We observed changes of the transmitted monochromatic light passing through a colloidal PbS quantum dot film on glass owing to an applied moderate (smaller than 1 T) magnetic field under ambient conditions. The observed alterations show a square dependence on the magnetic field increase that cannot be achieved with bulk semiconductors. The findings point to so far not recognized application potentials of quantum dots

  7. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungan, F.; Restrepo, R.L.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications

  8. CdS quantum dots in a novel glass with a very low activation energy and its variation of diffusivity with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Swati

    2011-07-01

    CdS quantum dots of different average sizes in the range 2 to 3.8 nm were grown by diffusion-limited growth process in indigenously made silicate glass. The absorption spectra showed a strong quantum confinement effect with a blue shift of the order of 500 meV depending on the average size. Critical radius of quantum dots was found to be 1.8 nm. The size dispersion decreased from 15.2 to 12.5% with a 20% increase in the particle size. The activation energy for diffusion was found to be very low i.e. 193 kJ mol-1 and the diffusion coefficient increased by 60% for 10 K rise in temperature. The PL emission spectra showed the presence of only deep traps around 600 nm with a red shift of 200 nm. No shallow traps or band edge emission was observed. The PL peak position changed from 560 to 640 nm with a 35 K increase in annealing temperature.

  9. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungan, F., E-mail: fungan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Restrepo, R.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications.

  10. Effects of growth temperature and arsenic pressure on size distribution and density of InAs quantum dots on Si (001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.M.; Hul'ko, O.; Kim, H.J.; Liu, J.; Shi, B.; Xie, Y.H.

    2005-01-01

    InAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) were grown on Si (001) substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. The size distribution and density of InAs QDs grown under different conditions were studied using plan-view transmission electron microscopy. Dot density was shown to strongly depend on arsenic beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ranging from 2.8x10 -5 to 1.2x10 -3 Pa. In contrast, dot density was nearly independent of substrate temperature from 295 to 410 deg. C under constant arsenic BEP, while broadening of size distribution was observed with increasing temperature. The mechanism accounting for some of the main features of the experimental observations is discussed. Finally, InAs quantum dots with optimized narrow size distribution and high density were grown at low arsenic BEP of 7.2 x10 -5 Pa and low temperature of 250 deg. C followed by annealing at arsenic BEP of 1.9 x10 -4 Pa and temperature of 410 deg. C

  11. The inhibition effect of Azure A on mild steel in 1 M HCl. A complete study: Adsorption, temperature, duration and quantum chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özkır, Demet; Kayakırılmaz, Kadriye; Bayol, Emel; Gürten, A. Ali; Kandemirli, Fatma

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Azure A molecule is found to be a good inhibitor for mild steel in HCl solution. ► SEM results clearly indicate that a protective film formation occurred on the mild steel surface. ► The long term corrosion tests are cleared that the Azure A has effectively protected the mild steel in HCl solution. ► The quantum chemical measurements were cleared the reactive sites and charges of atoms in the molecule. - Abstract: In this study, inhibition effect of Azure A on mild steel in 1.0 M HCl were evaluated by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR), and potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) methods. These studies were carried out at different concentrations, temperatures and durations. The inhibitor molecules were chemisorbed on electrode surface according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The quantum chemical calculations were employed to give further insight into the inhibition mechanism of Azure A.

  12. Hydration structure and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in water clusters of varying size and temperature: Quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A theoretical study of hydroxide ion-water clusters is carried for varying cluster size and temperature. ► The structures of OH − (H 2 O) n are found out through quantum chemical calculations for n = 4, 8, 16 and 20. ► The finite temperature behavior of the clusters is studied through ab initio dynamical simulations. ► The spectral features of OH modes (deuterated) and their dependence on hydrogen bonding states of water are discussed. ► The mechanism and kinetics of proton transfer processes in these anionic clusters are also investigated. - Abstract: We have investigated the hydration structure and dynamics of OH − (H 2 O) n clusters (n = 4, 8, 16 and 20) by means of quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that the solvation structure of the hydroxide ion transforms from three and four-coordinated surface states to five-coordinated interior state with increase in cluster size. Several other isomeric structures with energies not very different from the most stable isomer are also found. Ab initio simulations show that the most probable configurations at higher temperatures need not be the lowest energy isomeric structure. The rates of proton transfer in these clusters are found to be slower than that in bulk water. The vibrational spectral calculations reveal distinct features for free OH (deuterated) stretch modes of water in different hydrogen bonding states. Effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties are also investigated for the largest cluster considered here.

  13. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  14. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C). Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic...

  15. Absorption coefficient and refractive index changes of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    Effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions on the optical absorption coefficients (AC) and refractive index (RI) changes of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI). To this end, the finite difference method (FDM) is used in order to numerically calculate the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates of the system while the compact density matrix approach is hired to calculate the optical properties. It is shown that application of magnetic field, temperature as well as the geometrical size in the presence of spin-orbit interactions, alter the electronic structure and consequently influence the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes of the system. Results show an obvious blue shift in optical curves with enhancing external magnetic field and temperature while the increment of dimensions result in red shift.

  16. Temperature dependence of the optical energy gap in CdS sub x Se sub 1 sub - sub x quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Kunets, V P; Kunets, V P; Lisitsa, M P; Malysh, N I

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the optical energy gap E sub g (T) in CdS sub x Se sub 1 sub - sub x quantum dots synthesized in a borosilicate glass matrix has been investigated in the range of 4.2-500 K. A dependence similar to that for bulk crystals is observed for dots with r-bar > a sub B (r-bar being an average radius of the dot and a sub B the Bohr exciton radius in the bulk), which is described by Varshni formula within the whole temperature range. Deviations from the Varshni dependence in the range 4.2-100 K and smaller band-gap temperature coefficient are observed for dots with r-bar < a sub B. These results are explained in terms of the decrease of the macroscopic electron-phonon interaction potential and the modification of the vibration spectrum peculiar to the dot volume shrinkage

  17. Growth mechanisms of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of green emission InGaN/GaN single quantum wells at high growth temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W. C.; Wu, C. H.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chiu, S. Y.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The results of the growth of thin (∼3 nm) InGaN/GaN single quantum wells (SQWs) with emission wavelengths in the green region by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are present. An improved two-step growth method using a high growth temperature up to 650 °C is developed to increase the In content of the InGaN SQW to 30% while maintaining a strong luminescence intensity near a wavelength of 506 nm. The indium composition in InGaN/GaN SQW grown under group-III-rich condition increases with increasing growth temperature following the growth model of liquid phase epitaxy. Further increase in the growth temperature to 670 °C does not improve the photoluminescence property of the material due to rapid loss of indium from the surface and, under certain growth conditions, the onset of phase separation

  18. Quantum theory from questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehn, Philipp [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Wever, Christopher [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In contrast to relativity, quantum theory has evaded a commonly accepted apprehension, in part because of the lack of physical statements that fully characterize it. In an attempt to remedy the situation, we summarize a novel reconstruction of the explicit formalism of quantum theory (for arbitrarily many qubits) from elementary rules on an observer's information acquisition. Our approach is purely operational: we consider an observer O interrogating a system S with binary questions and define S's state as O's ''catalogue of knowledge'' about S; no ontic assumptions are necessary. From the rules, one can derive, among other things, the state spaces, the unitary group, the von Neumann evolution and show that the binary questions correspond to Pauli operators. The reconstruction also offers new structural insights in the form of novel informational charges and informational complementarity relations which define the state spaces and the unitary group. This reconstruction permits a new perspective on quantum theory.

  19. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct band electroluminescence (EL from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs on a Ge virtual substrate (VS at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L and injection current density (J with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH valance band at higher temperatures.

  20. Time-resolved study of a pulsed dc discharge using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy : NO and gas temperature kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Gatilova, L.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a pulsed dc discharge of an Ar–N2 mixture containing 0.91% of NO the kinetics of the destruction of NO has been studied under static and flowing conditions, i.e. in a closed and open discharge tube (p = 266 Pa). For this purpose quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the

  1. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: II. Temperature dependence of carrier diffusion coefficients from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xinxin; Zhao, Yi; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method for carrier quantum dynamics (Zhong and Zhao 2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 014111), a truncated version of the stochastic Schrödinger equation/wavefunction approach that approximately satisfies the detailed balance principle and scales well with the size of the system, is applied to investigate the carrier transport in one-dimensional systems including both the static and dynamic disorders on site energies. The predicted diffusion coefficients with respect to temperature successfully bridge from band-like to hopping-type transport. As demonstrated in paper I (Moix et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 085010), the static disorder tends to localize the carrier, whereas the dynamic disorder induces carrier dynamics. For the weak dynamic disorder, the diffusion coefficients are temperature-independent (band-like property) at low temperatures, which is consistent with the prediction from the Redfield equation, and a linear dependence of the coefficient on temperature (hopping-type property) only appears at high temperatures. In the intermediate regime of dynamic disorder, the transition from band-like to hopping-type transport can be easily observed at relatively low temperatures as the static disorder increases. When the dynamic disorder becomes strong, the carrier motion can follow the hopping-type mechanism even without static disorder. Furthermore, it is found that the memory time of dynamic disorder is an important factor in controlling the transition from the band-like to hopping-type motions. (paper)

  2. The effect of junction temperature on the optoelectrical properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jen-Cheng; Fang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Ya-Fen; Chen, Wei-Jen; Kuo, Da-Chuan; Fan, Ping-Lin; Jiang, Joe-Air; Nee, Tzer-En

    2012-01-01

    Thermal effects on the optoelectrical characteristics of green InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been investigated in detail for a broad temperature range, from 30 °C to 100 °C. The current-dependent electroluminescence (EL) spectra, current–voltage (I–V) curves and luminescence intensity–current (L–I) characteristics of green InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs have been measured to characterize the thermal-related effects on the optoelectrical properties of the InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs. The experimental results show that both the forward voltages decreased with a slope of −3.7 mV/K and the emission peak wavelength increased with a slope of +0.02 nm/K with increasing temperature, indicating a change in the contact resistance between the metal and GaN layers and the existence of a band gap shrinkage effect. The junction temperature estimated from the forward voltage and the emission peak shift varied from 25.6 to 14.5 °C and from 22.4 to 35.6 °C, respectively. At the same time, the carrier temperature decreased from 371.2 to 348.1 °C as estimated from the slope of high-energy side of the emission spectra. With increasing injection current, there was found to be a strong current-dependent blueshift of −0.15 nm/mA in the emission peak wavelength of the EL spectra. This could be attributed to not only the stronger band-filling effect but also the enhanced quantum confinement effect that resulted from the piezoelectric polarization and spontaneous polarization in InGaN/GaN heterostructures. We also demonstrate a helpful and easy way to measure and calculate the junction temperature of InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs. - Highlights: ► We examine the effect of junction temperature on the optoelectrical properties. ► Not only the band-filling effect but also the quantum confinement effect. ► Piezoelectric polarization and the spontaneous polarization in InGaN/GaN structures. ► Carrier transport was responsible for the influences on the

  3. Evading the top-quark mass bound at the Fermilab Tevatron: New signals for the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyaya, B.; Nandi, S.

    1991-01-01

    If an SU(2)-singlet charge-2/3 quark exists, current data allow a wide range for the parameters of the 4x4 mixing matrix in which the usual ''hard-lepton'' signal of the top quark is suppressed. For a light Higgs boson, the top quark decays predominantly via the flavor-changing Yukawa interaction, thus evading the Fermilab Tevatron bounds on its mass. For a heavier Higgs boson, flavor-changing neutral-current decays become important, giving rise to anomalous Z-pair production, testable at the upgraded Tevetron, at the CERN Large Hardon Collider, and at the Superconducting Super Collider

  4. Temperature-dependent measurement of Auger recombination in In{sub 0.40}Ga{sub 0.60}N/GaN red-emitting (λ = 630 nm) quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, Thomas; Banerjee, Animesh; Jahangir, Shafat; Bhattacharya, Pallab, E-mail: pkb@eecs.umich.edu [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    We have derived the Auger recombination coefficients, as a function of temperature, for In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN self-organized quantum dots from large-signal modulation measurements made on lasers in which the quantum dots form the gain media. The value of C{sub a} = 1.3 ±0.2 × 10{sup −31} cm{sup 6} s{sup −1} at room temperature and the coefficient decreases with increase of temperature.

  5. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  6. Second and third harmonic generations of a quantum ring with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ali; Azargoshasb, Tahereh; Niknam, Elahe

    2017-10-01

    In current article, the Zeeman effect is considered in the presence of simultaneous Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) and under such circumstances the second and third harmonic generations (SHG and THG) of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated at finite temperature. The effective Hamiltonian is derived in cylindrical coordinate while the angular part is eliminated because of axial symmetry and the energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of two lowest levels are obtained numerically. Eventually, the optical properties of such system are studied hiring compact density matrix approach. The results show that, an increase in the magnetic field, leads to blue shift in resonant peaks of both SHG and THG. Furthermore, by reducing the temperature, all the resonant peaks of both SHG and THG experience a red shift. Finally, the effect of the structure dimension is studied and results illustrate that variation of size leads to both red and blue shifts in resonant peaks.

  7. Nucleation temperature-controlled synthesis and in vitro toxicity evaluation of L-cysteine-capped Mn:ZnS quantum dots for intracellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Pandey, Gajanan; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Yadav, Sapna; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy

    2016-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), one of the fastest developing and most exciting fluorescent materials, have attracted increasing interest in bioimaging and biomedical applications. The long-term stability and emission in the visible region of QDs have proved their applicability as a significant fluorophore in cell labelling. In this study, an attempt has been made to explore the efficacy of L-cysteine as a capping agent for Mn-doped ZnS QD for intracellular imaging. A room temperature nucleation strategy was adopted to prepare non-toxic, water-dispersible and biocompatible Mn:ZnS QDs. Aqueous and room temperature QDs with L-cysteine as a capping agent were found to be non-toxic even at a concentration of 1500 µg/mL and have wide applications in intracellular imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Simultaneous effects of electron-hole correlation, hydrostatic pressure, and temperature on the third harmonic generation in parabolic GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, C. M.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of electron-hole correlation, hydrostatic pressure, and temperature on the third harmonic generation in disk-shaped parabolic GaAs quantum dots are studied under the density matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation. Two well-defined regimes are discussed: (1) the strong-confinement regime, where the Coulomb interaction between the electron and hole is neglected and (2) the weak-confinement regime where the parabolic confinement term is neglected and the system reaches the limit of a hydrogenic problem. The results show that the third harmonic-generation coefficient is strongly dependent on the localization of the electron-hole pair. Also, that by using external perturbations like hydrostatic pressure or by considering the temperature effects it is possible to induce a blue-shift and/or red-shift on the resonant peaks of the third harmonic generation coefficient.

  9. An off Axis Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer and a Rapid Scan Spectrometer with a Room-Temperature External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunchen; Kang, Cheolhwa; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a new type of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers with superior output power and mode quality. Recent developments, such as room temperature operation, wide frequency tunability, and narrow line width, make QCLs an ideal light source for high resolution spectroscopy. Two slit jet infrared spectrometers, namely an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption (CEA) spectrometer and a rapid scan spectrometer with an astigmatic multi-pass cell assembly, have been coupled with a newly purchased room temperature tunable mod-hop-free QCL with a frequency coverage from 1592 cm^{-1} to 1698 cm^{-1} and a scan rate of 0.1 cm^{-1}/ms. Our aim is to utilize these two sensitive spectrometers, that are equipped with a molecular jet expansion, to investigate the chiral molecules-(water)_n clusters. To demonstrate the resolution and sensitivity achieved, the rovibrational transitions of the static N_2O gas and the bending rovibrational transitions of the Ar-water complex, a test system, at 1634 cm^{-1} have been measured. D. Hofstetter and J. Faist in High performance quantum cascade lasers and their applications, Vol.89 Springer-Verlag Berlin & Heidelberg, 2003, pp. 61-98. Y. Xu, X. Liu, Z. Su, R. M. Kulkarni, W. S. Tam, C. Kang, I. Leonov and L. D'Agostino, Proc. Spie, 2009, 722208 (1-11). M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 106, 3078-3089.

  10. Nuclear quantum effects on the structure and the dynamics of [H2O]8 at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videla, Pablo E.; Rossky, Peter J.; Laria, D.

    2013-01-01

    We use ring-polymer-molecular-dynamics (RPMD) techniques and the semi-empirical q-TIP4P/F water model to investigate the relationship between hydrogen bond connectivity and the characteristics of nuclear position fluctuations, including explicit incorporation of quantum effects, for the energetically low lying isomers of the prototype cluster [H 2 O] 8 at T = 50 K and at 150 K. Our results reveal that tunneling and zero-point energy effects lead to sensible increments in the magnitudes of the fluctuations of intra and intermolecular distances. The degree of proton spatial delocalization is found to map logically with the hydrogen-bond connectivity pattern of the cluster. Dangling hydrogen bonds exhibit the largest extent of spatial delocalization and participate in shorter intramolecular O-H bonds. Combined effects from quantum and polarization fluctuations on the resulting individual dipole moments are also examined. From the dynamical side, we analyze the characteristics of the infrared absorption spectrum. The incorporation of nuclear quantum fluctuations promotes red shifts and sensible broadening relative to the classical profile, bringing the simulation results in much more satisfactory agreement with direct experimental information in the mid and high frequency range of the stretching band. While RPMD predictions overestimate the peak position of the low frequency shoulder, the overall agreement with that reported using an accurate, parameterized, many-body potential is reasonable, and far superior to that one obtains by implementing a partially adiabatic centroid molecular dynamics approach. Quantum effects on the collective dynamics, as reported by instantaneous normal modes, are also discussed

  11. A hybrid stochastic hierarchy equations of motion approach to treat the low temperature dynamics of non-Markovian open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-10-01

    The hierarchical equations of motion technique has found widespread success as a tool to generate the numerically exact dynamics of non-Markovian open quantum systems. However, its application to low temperature environments remains a serious challenge due to the need for a deep hierarchy that arises from the Matsubara expansion of the bath correlation function. Here we present a hybrid stochastic hierarchical equation of motion (sHEOM) approach that alleviates this bottleneck and leads to a numerical cost that is nearly independent of temperature. Additionally, the sHEOM method generally converges with fewer hierarchy tiers allowing for the treatment of larger systems. Benchmark calculations are presented on the dynamics of two level systems at both high and low temperatures to demonstrate the efficacy of the approach. Then the hybrid method is used to generate the exact dynamics of systems that are nearly impossible to treat by the standard hierarchy. First, exact energy transfer rates are calculated across a broad range of temperatures revealing the deviations from the Förster rates. This is followed by computations of the entanglement dynamics in a system of two qubits at low temperature spanning the weak to strong system-bath coupling regimes.

  12. Impact of ion-implantation-induced band gap engineering on the temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties of InAs/InP quantum dashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadj Alouane, M. H.; Ilahi, B.; Maaref, H.; Salem, B.; Aimez, V.; Morris, D.; Turala, A.; Regreny, P.; Gendry, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of the As/P intermixing induced by phosphorus ion implantation in InAs/InP quantum dashes (QDas) on their photoluminescence (PL) properties. For nonintermixed QDas, usual temperature-dependent PL properties characterized by a monotonic redshift in the emission band and a continual broadening of the PL linewidth as the temperature increases, are observed. For intermediate ion implantation doses, the inhomogeneous intermixing enhances the QDas size dispersion and the enlarged distribution of carrier confining potential depths strongly affects the temperature-dependent PL properties below 180 K. An important redshift in the PL emission band occurs between 10 and 180 K which is explained by a redistribution of carriers among the different intermixed QDas of the ensemble. For higher implantation doses, the homogeneous intermixing reduces the broadening of the localized QDas state distribution and the measured linewidth temperature behavior matches that of the nonintermixed QDas. An anomalous temperature-dependent emission energy behavior has been observed for extremely high implantation doses, which is interpreted by a possible QDas dissolution.

  13. Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN quantum dot lasers: solid source molecular beam epitaxy growth and high-temperature operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon SF

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSelf-assembled GaInNAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on GaAs (001 substrate using solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy (SSMBE equipped with a radio-frequency nitrogen plasma source. The GaInNAs QD growth characteristics were extensively investigated using atomic-force microscopy (AFM, photoluminescence (PL, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM measurements. Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN single layer QD lasers grown using SSMBE have been fabricated and characterized. The laser worked under continuous wave (CW operation at room temperature (RT with emission wavelength of 1175.86 nm. Temperature-dependent measurements have been carried out on the GaInNAs QD lasers. The lowest obtained threshold current density in this work is ∼1.05 kA/cm2from a GaInNAs QD laser (50 × 1,700 µm2 at 10 °C. High-temperature operation up to 65 °C was demonstrated from an unbonded GaInNAs QD laser (50 × 1,060 µm2, with high characteristic temperature of 79.4 K in the temperature range of 10–60 °C.

  14. Zero-Bias Offsets in the Low-Temperature Dark Current of Quantum-Well Infrared Photodetectors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Anjali

    1999-01-01

    .... In this environment, the detector arrays may need to be operated at temperatures lower then 77 K. At these temperatures, tunneling mechanisms such as Fowler-Nordheim and trap-assisted tunneling could dominate the dark current...

  15. Quantum Erasure: Quantum Interference Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Walborn, Stephen P.; Cunha, Marcelo O. Terra; Pádua, Sebastião; Monken, Carlos H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in quantum optics have shed light on the foundations of quantum physics. Quantum erasers - modified quantum interference experiments - show that quantum entanglement is responsible for the complementarity principle.

  16. Quantum mechanics. Mechanically detecting and avoiding the quantum fluctuations of a microwave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J; Weinstein, A J; Lei, C U; Wollman, E E; Steinke, S K; Meystre, P; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2014-06-13

    Quantum fluctuations of the light field used for continuous position detection produce stochastic back-action forces and ultimately limit the sensitivity. To overcome this limit, the back-action forces can be avoided by giving up complete knowledge of the motion, and these types of measurements are called "back-action evading" or "quantum nondemolition" detection. We present continuous two-tone back-action evading measurements with a superconducting electromechanical device, realizing three long-standing goals: detection of back-action forces due to the quantum noise of a microwave field, reduction of this quantum back-action noise by 8.5 ± 0.4 decibels (dB), and measurement imprecision of a single quadrature of motion 2.4 ± 0.7 dB below the mechanical zero-point fluctuations. Measurements of this type will find utility in ultrasensitive measurements of weak forces and nonclassical states of motion. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Colossal magnetoresistance in amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots at room temperature: manifestation of weak anti-localization and doorway to spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rajarshi; Thapa, Ranjit; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Mazumder, Nilesh; Sen, Dipayan; Sinthika, S.; Das, Nirmalya S.; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for future graphene quantum dot based spintronic applications.In this work, we have demonstrated the signatures of localized surface distortions and disorders in functionalized graphene quantum dots (fGQD) and consequences in magneto-transport under weak field regime (~1 Tesla) at room temperature. Observed positive colossal magnetoresistance (MR) and its suppression is primarily explained by weak anti-localization phenomenon where competitive valley (inter and intra) dependent scattering takes place at room temperature under low magnetic field; analogous to low mobility disordered graphene samples. Furthermore, using ab-initio analysis we show that sub-lattice sensitive spin-polarized ground state exists in the GQD as a result of pz orbital asymmetry in GQD carbon atoms with amino functional groups. This spin polarized ground state is believed to help the weak anti-localization dependent magneto transport by generating more disorder and strain in a GQD lattice under applied magnetic field and lays the premise for

  18. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltukov, Y M; Greshnov, A A

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given

  19. Study of Exciton Hopping Transport in PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Thin Films Using Frequency- and Temperature-Scanned Photocarrier Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lilei; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Lan, Xinzheng; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Solution-processed colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for realizing low-cost, large-area, and flexible photovoltaic devices. The study of charge carrier transport in quantum dot solids is essential for understanding energy conversion mechanisms. Recently, solution-processed two-layer oleic-acid-capped PbS CQD solar cells with one layer treated with tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI) serving as the main light-absorbing layer and the other treated with 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) acting as an electron-blocking/hole-extraction layer were reported. These solar cells demonstrated a significant improvement in power conversion efficiency of 8.55% and long-term air stability. Coupled with photocarrier radiometry measurements, this work used a new trap-state mediated exciton hopping transport model, specifically for CQD thin films, to unveil and quantify exciton transport mechanisms through the extraction of hopping transport parameters including exciton lifetimes, hopping diffusivity, exciton detrapping time, and trap-state density. It is shown that PbS-TBAI has higher trap-state density than PbS-EDT that results in higher PbS-EDT exciton lifetimes. Hopping diffusivities of both CQD thin film types show similar temperature dependence, particularly higher temperatures yield higher hopping diffusivity. The higher diffusivity of PbS-TBAI compared with PbS-EDT indicates that PbS-TBAI is a much better photovoltaic material than PbS-EDT. Furthermore, PCR temperature spectra and deep-level photothermal spectroscopy provided additional insights to CQD surface trap states: PbS-TBAI thin films exhibit a single dominant trap level, while PbS-EDT films with lower trap-state densities show multiple trap levels.

  20. Effects of the temperature and pressure on the electronic and optical properties of an exciton in GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bakkari, K.; Sali, A.; Iqraoun, E.; Rezzouk, A.; Es-Sbai, N.; Ouazzani Jamil, M.

    2018-06-01

    Using a variational approach, we have calculated the binding energies (E1s,2sb) and interband emission energy (Eph) of an exciton confined in GaAs / Ga1 - x Alx As quantum rings (QRs) structures under effects of the temperature and pressure, in the effective mass approximation. We have taken into consideration the difference in the effective masses of the charge carriers in two materials, well and barrier. The results that we have obtained show clearly that E1s,2sb and Eph are influenced by the structure geometries of QR (height H, radial thickness Δ R and potential barrier), the temperature and pressure. Indeed, with a smaller geometric parameter, E1s,2sb and Eph become higher due to the improvement in confinement of the charge carriers. We have also observed that for a given value of the temperature, the pressure leads to an increasing of the E1s,2sb and Eph , and the latter quantities are decreasing with temperature. In addition, these variations of the E1s,2sb and Eph under the external perturbations are more remarkable in small H for fixed Δ R , and for larger Δ R for a given value of the H, because for the choice of a finite height of the barrier in the z direction and an infinite confinement in ρ direction.

  1. Room temperature ferromagnetism in magic-sized Cr-doped CdS diluted magnetic semiconducting quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Punita; Kumar, Pushpendra; Singh, Kedar

    2011-01-01

    Manipulation of carrier spins in semiconductors for spintronics applications has received great attention driven by improved functionalities and higher speed operation. Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals by transition-metal ions pronounced as diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) has attracted tremendous attention. Such doping is, however, difficult to achieve in low-dimensional strongly quantum-confined nanostructures by conventional growth procedures. In the present case, magic-sized, pure, and Cr-doped CdS DM-QDs have been synthesized by solution phase chemistry (lyothermal method). Structural, optical, and magnetic investigation suggest an intrinsic nature of ferromagnetism with highly quantum-confined system. Optical and magnetic results of pure and doped QDs reveal major physical consequences of dopant localization within the capacity to engineer dopant-carrier exchange interactions introducing magnetic functionalities within the host semiconductor lattice. Unpaired Cr ions in Cd substitutional sites could create spin ordering and ferromagnetic coupling. The results presented herein illustrate some of the remarkable and unexpected complexities that can arise in doped QDs.

  2. Combined quantum-mechanical and Calphad approach to description of heat capacity of pure elements below room temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlů, J.; Řehák, Petr; Vřešťál, Jan; Šob, Mojmír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 1 (2015), s. 161-171 ISSN 0364-5916 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Einstein temperature * Heat capacity * Low temperature * Pure elements * SGTE data * Zero Kelvin Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.129, year: 2015

  3. Long luminescence lifetime in self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Zhang, Yating; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2008-01-01

    the temperature increases from 80 to 300 K. The increased radiative lifetime of the QD ground state at higher temperatures is attributed to the thermal population of the subwetting-layer continuum states and could be one of the fundamental reasons for the low modal gain of the QD ground state transition in single...

  4. Nonequilibrium quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Combining the Feynman-Vernon influence functional formalism with the real-time formulation of finite-temperature quantum field theories we present a general approach to relativistic quantum field theories out of thermal equilibrium. We clarify the physical meaning of the additional fields encountered in the real-time formulation of quantum statistics and outline diagrammatic rules for perturbative nonequilibrium computations. We derive a generalization of Boltzmann's equation which gives a complete characterization of relativistic nonequilibrium phenomena. (orig.)

  5. Testing the ability of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus to evade the protective immune response induced in rainbow trout by DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepulveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    , this work aims to evaluate whether VHSV is able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. Earlier studies have demonstrated that VHSV can evade the neutralizing effect of monoclonal antibodies by mutations in the glycoprotein gene. One approach of the present study is therefore...... to try to isolate VHSV variants which can escape the neutralizing activity of serum from fish immunized with the DNA vaccine. To do so, a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate (DK3592B) will be repeatedly passaged in fish cell cultures in the presence of neutralizing fish serum. Another approach comprises...

  6. Causal quantum theory and the collapse locality loophole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Causal quantum theory is an umbrella term for ordinary quantum theory modified by two hypotheses: state vector reduction is a well-defined process, and strict local causality applies. The first of these holds in some versions of Copenhagen quantum theory and need not necessarily imply practically testable deviations from ordinary quantum theory. The second implies that measurement events which are spacelike separated have no nonlocal correlations. To test this prediction, which sharply differs from standard quantum theory, requires a precise definition of state vector reduction. Formally speaking, any precise version of causal quantum theory defines a local hidden variable theory. However, causal quantum theory is most naturally seen as a variant of standard quantum theory. For that reason it seems a more serious rival to standard quantum theory than local hidden variable models relying on the locality or detector efficiency loopholes. Some plausible versions of causal quantum theory are not refuted by any Bell experiments to date, nor is it evident that they are inconsistent with other experiments. They evade refutation via a neglected loophole in Bell experiments--the collapse locality loophole--which exists because of the possible time lag between a particle entering a measurement device and a collapse taking place. Fairly definitive tests of causal versus standard quantum theory could be made by observing entangled particles separated by ≅0.1 light seconds

  7. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} radicals isolated in argon: high resolution ESR spectra and analysis by three-dimensional quantum rotor model. A case study of low temperature quantum effects on radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiotani, Masaru; Yamada, Tomoya; Komaguchi, Kenji [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Benetis, N.P.; Lund, A.; Soernes, A.R.

    1998-10-01

    The present study deals with high resolution isotropic ESR spectra of the CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} radicals isolated in solid argon matrix at low temperature from 4 K to 40 K. Argon gases mixed with methane (Ar/methane {approx_equal} 500 mole ratio) were condensed at the end of Suprasile ESR tube at 4.2 K. Methyl radicals were generated by X-ray irradiation at 4 K and subjected to an ESR study. The 6.0 K ESR spectrum of the CH{sub 4}/Ar system is shown in Fig. 1. For CH{sub 3} radical the {sup 1}H hyperfine (hf) quartet was observed with an equal intensity (A-lines). The E-lines were absent at 4 K, but became visible at m{sub F} = {+-}1/2 positions above 12 K increased with temperature. The CD{sub 3} gave a peculiar spectrum at 4 K with an abnormally strong central singlet superimposed on a much weaker seven line spectrum of a freely rotating CD{sub 3}. The temperature dependent spectra showed clear quantum effects due to three-dimensional spin-rotation couplings. The spectra were analyzed with the following assumptions: (a) a planar D{sub 3} geometry, (b) a free and three-dimensional quantum rotation and (c) a thermally isolated radical. Application of the Pauli principle in combination to the D{sub 3} point group resulted in interesting selections for ESR-transitions for both the CH{sub 3} and CD{sub 3} spectra. That is, the {sup 1}H hf quartet of CH{sub 3} radical (A-lines) was attributed to the rotational ground state, J=0, with totally symmetric A{sub 1} nuclear states. The central strong singlet of CD{sub 3} was attributed to one spin-rotation state with A{sub 2} antisymmetric nuclear states at the lowest rotational level of J=0. (author)

  9. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    ..., quantum metrology, spin squeezing, control of decoherence and many other key topics. Readers are guided through the principles of quantum optics and their uses in a wide variety of areas including quantum information science and quantum mechanics...

  10. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei

    2012-05-25

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  11. The effects of fabrication temperature on current-voltage characteristics and energy efficiencies of quantum dot sensitized ZnOH-GO hybrid solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, S. M. Z.; Gayen, Taposh; Tint, Naing; Alfano, Robert; Shi, Lingyan; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of fabrication temperature are investigated on the performance of CdSe quantum dot (QD)-sensitized hybrid solar cells of the composite material of zinc (hydr)oxide (ZnOH-GO)with 2 wt. % graphite oxide. The current-voltage (I-V) and photo-current measurements show that higher fabrication temperatures yield greater photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies that essentially indicate more efficient solar cells. Two Photon Fluorescence images show the effects of temperature on the internal morphologies of the solar devices based on such materials. The CdSe-QD sensitized ZnOH-GO hybrid solar cells fabricated at 450 °C showing conversion of ∼10.60% under a tungsten lamp (12.1 mW/cm 2 ) are reported here, while using potassium iodide as an electrolyte. The output photocurrent, I (μA) with input power, P (mW/cm 2 ) is found to be superlinear, showing a relation of I = P n , where n = 1.4.

  12. Spin relaxation dynamics of holes in intrinsic GaAs quantum wells studied by transient circular dichromatic absorption spectroscopy at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shaoyin; Zhu, Ruidan; Lai, Tianshu

    2017-03-21

    Spin relaxation dynamics of holes in intrinsic GaAs quantum wells is studied using time-resolved circular dichromatic absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. It is found that ultrafast dynamics is dominated by the cooperative contributions of band filling and many-body effects. The relative contribution of the two effects is opposite in strength for electrons and holes. As a result, transient circular dichromatic differential transmission (TCD-DT) with co- and cross-circularly polarized pump and probe presents different strength at several picosecond delay time. Ultrafast spin relaxation dynamics of excited holes is sensitively reflected in TCD-DT with cross-circularly polarized pump and probe. A model, including coherent artifact, thermalization of nonthermal carriers and the cooperative contribution of band filling and many-body effects, is developed, and used to fit TCD-DT with cross-circularly polarized pump and probe. Spin relaxation time of holes is achieved as a function of excited hole density for the first time at room temperature, and increases with hole density, which disagrees with a theoretical prediction based on EY spin relaxation mechanism, implying that EY mechanism may be not dominant hole spin relaxation mechanism at room temperature, but DP mechanism is dominant possibly.

  13. CO concentration and temperature sensor for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 4.7 μm

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Wei; Farooq, Aamir; Davidson, David Frank; Hanson, Ronald Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    A sensor for sensitive in situ measurements of carbon monoxide and temperature in combustion gases has been developed using absorption transitions in the (v′ = 1 ← v″ = 0) and (v′ = 2 ← v″ = 1) fundamental bands of CO. Recent availability of mid-infrared quantum-cascade (QC) lasers provides convenient access to the CO fundamental band near 4.7 μm, having approximately 104 and 102 times stronger absorption line-strengths compared to the overtone bands near 1.55 μm and 2.3 μm used previously to sense CO in combustion gases. Spectroscopic parameters of the selected transitions were determined via laboratory measurements in a shock tube over the 1100-2000 K range and also at room temperature. A single-laser absorption sensor was developed for accurate CO measurements in shock-heated gases by scanning the line pair v″ = 0, R(12) and v″ = 1, R(21) at 2.5 kHz. To capture the rapidly varying CO time-histories in chemical reactions, two different QC lasers were then used to probe the line-center absorbance of transitions v″ = 0, P(20) and v″ = 1, R(21) with a bandwidth of 1 MHz using fixed-wavelength direct absorption. The sensor was applied in successful shock tube measurements of temperature and CO time-histories during the pyrolysis and oxidation of methyl formate, illustrating the capability of this sensor for chemical kinetic studies. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  15. Timing matters: the underappreciated role of temperature ramp rate for shape control and reproducibility of quantum dot synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.; Quan, Zewei; Fang, Jiye; Hanrath, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the coupled kinetic and thermodynamics factors governing colloidal nanocrystals nucleation and growth are critical factors in the predictable and reproducible synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. We show that the temporal temperature

  16. Can butterflies evade fire? Pupa location and heat tolerance in fire prone habitats of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Matthew D; Daniels, Jaret C; Kobziar, Leda N; Colburn, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Butterflies such as the atala hairstreak, Eumaeus atala Poey, and the frosted elfin, Callophrys irus Godart, are restricted to frequently disturbed habitats where their larval host plants occur. Pupae of these butterflies are noted to reside at the base of host plants or in the leaf litter and soil, which may allow them to escape direct mortality by fire, a prominent disturbance in many areas they inhabit. The capacity of these species to cope with fire is a critical consideration for land management and conservation strategies in the locations where they are found. Survival of E. atala pupae in relation to temperature and duration of heat pulse was tested using controlled water bath experiments and a series of prescribed fire field experiments. Survival of E. atala pupae was correlated to peak temperature and heat exposure in both laboratory and field trials. In addition, E. atala survival following field trials was correlated to depth of burial; complete mortality was observed for pupae at the soil surface. Fifty percent of E. atala survived the heat generated by prescribed fire when experimentally placed at depths ≥ 1.75 cm, suggesting that pupation of butterflies in the soil at depth can protect from fatal temperatures caused by fire. For a species such as E. atala that pupates above ground, a population reduction from a burn event is a significant loss, and so decreasing the impact of prescribed fire on populations is critical.

  17. Energy Dissipation in Quantum Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Granik, A.; Chapline, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the heat generated in a quantum computer due to loss of quantum phase information. Amazingly enough, this heat generation can take place at zero temperature. and may explain why it is impossible to extract energy from vacuum fluctuations. Implications for optical computers and quantum cosmology are also briefly discussed.

  18. Quantum Instantons and Quantum Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Jirari, H.; Kröger, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rubin, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Based on a closed form expression for the path integral of quantum transition amplitudes, we suggest rigorous definitions of both, quantum instantons and quantum chaos. As an example we compute the quantum instanton of the double well potential.

  19. Quantum metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Guo-Yong; Guo Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    The statistical error is ineluctable in any measurement. Quantum techniques, especially with the development of quantum information, can help us squeeze the statistical error and enhance the precision of measurement. In a quantum system, there are some quantum parameters, such as the quantum state, quantum operator, and quantum dimension, which have no classical counterparts. So quantum metrology deals with not only the traditional parameters, but also the quantum parameters. Quantum metrology includes two important parts: measuring the physical parameters with a precision beating the classical physics limit and measuring the quantum parameters precisely. In this review, we will introduce how quantum characters (e.g., squeezed state and quantum entanglement) yield a higher precision, what the research areas are scientists most interesting in, and what the development status of quantum metrology and its perspectives are. (topical review - quantum information)

  20. Noise-modulated self-polarization effect of impurity doped quantum dots under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-10-01

    We explore the profiles of self-polarization effect (SPE) of doped GaAs QD under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries Gaussian white character and it has been administered to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of SPE have been monitored as a function of HP, temperature and noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, noise marks its prominent signature on the SPE profile. However, the extent to which noise affects the SPE profile visibly depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. As interesting observations we have found that SPE exhibits minimization at a pressure of ∼ 170 kbar in absence of noise and at ∼ 150 kbar when noise is present. Furthermore, in presence of multiplicative noise SPE exhibits a very faint decrease with increase in T up to T ∼ 420 K. However, beyond T ∼ 420 K, further increase in temperature causes abrupt fall of SPE in a highly sharp way. The findings highlight viable ways of tuning SPE of doped QD system through subtle interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  1. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  2. The room-temperature synthesis of anisotropic CdHgTe quantum dot alloys: a "molecular welding" effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shohei; Green, Mark; Lim, Teck

    2011-03-16

    The room-temperature chemical transformation of spherical CdTe nanoparticles into anisotropic alloyed CdHgTe particles using mercury bromide in a toluene/methanol system at room temperature has been investigated. The resulting materials readily dissolved in toluene and exhibited a significant red-shift in the optical properties toward the infrared region. Structural transformations were observed, with electron microscopy showing that the CdTe nanoparticles were chemically attached ('welded') to other CdTe nanoparticles, creating highly complex anisotropic heterostructures which also incorporated mercury.

  3. Timing matters: the underappreciated role of temperature ramp rate for shape control and reproducibility of quantum dot synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the coupled kinetic and thermodynamics factors governing colloidal nanocrystals nucleation and growth are critical factors in the predictable and reproducible synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. We show that the temporal temperature profile is decisive in tuning the particle shape from pseudo-spherical to monodisperse cubes. The shape of the nanocrystals was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We introduce a mechanism for the shape controlled synthesis in the context of temperature-dependent nucleation and growth and provide experimental evidence to support it. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Muusikamaailm : Arvo Pärdi uus teos. Telemanni päevad Magdeburgis. Uus orkester Soomes. Ingvar Lidholm 80. Auhindu ja preemiaid / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2001-01-01

    21. veebr. tuli Oxfordis maailmaesiettekandele A. Pärdi teos "Littlemore Tractus". Telemanni päevade raames toimuvast rahvusvahelisest kammeransamblite konkursist Magdeburgis. O. Mustonen asutas Helsingis uue orkestri. Lühidalt I.Lidholmi tegevusest ja loomingust. P. Norgaardile ja H. von Manen'ile antud autasust ja preemiast

  5. Muusikamaailm : Festivalil Schwetzingenis. Ellingtoni sajandi tähistamine. Linz saab uue ooperimaja. Isaac Stern viiulita Saksamaal. Muusikapäevad Luksemburgis / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    1999-01-01

    30. apr.-7. juunini toimuvast muusikafestivalist Schwetzingenis. D. Ellingtoni 100. sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest maailmas. Valmis Linzi uue ooperimaja planeering. I. Stern juhatas kümnepäevast seminari Kölni Kõrgema Muusikakooli juures. Rahvusvahelise Nüüdismuusika Ühingu (ISCM) iga-aastased maailma muusikapäevad toimuvad 2000. aastal Luksemburgis

  6. Quantum qubit measurement by a quantum point contact with a quantum Langevin equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Bing; Lei, X.L.; Horing, N.J.M.; Cui, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    We employ a microscopic quantum Heisenberg-Langevin equation approach to establish a set of quantum Bloch equations for a two-level system (coupled quantum dots) capacitively coupled to a quantum point contact (QPC). The resulting Bloch equations facilitate our analysis of qubit relaxation and decoherence in coupled quantum dots induced by measurement processes at arbitrary bias-voltage and temperature. We also examine the noise spectrum of the meter output current for a symmetric qubit. These results help resolve a recent debate about a quantum oscillation peak in the noise spectrum. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. pi-dimerization of pleiadiene radical cations at low temperatures revealed by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry and quantum theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van het Goor, Layo; van Duijnen, Piet Th.; Koper, Carola; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Hartl, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    One-electron oxidation of the non-alternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pleiadiene and related cyclohepta[c,d]pyrene and cyclohepta[c,d]fluoranthene in THF produces corresponding radical cations detectable in the temperature range of 293-263 K only on the subsecond time scale of cyclic

  8. Finite-temperature correlation function for the one-dimensional quantum Ising model:The virial expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, S. A.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2006-06-01

    We rewrite the exact expression for the finite-temperature two-point correlation function for the magnetization as a partition function of some field theory. This removes singularities and provides a convenient form to develop a virial expansion (expansion in powers of the soliton density).

  9. Effect of quantum lattice fluctuations on quantum coherent oscillations in a coherently driven quantum dot-cavity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Ka-Di; Li, Wai-Sang

    2003-01-01

    The quantum coherent oscillations in a coherently driven quantum dot-cavity system with the presence of strong exciton-phonon interactions are investigated theoretically in a fully quantum treatment. It is shown that even at zero temperature, the strong exciton-phonon interactions still affect the quantum coherent oscillations significantly

  10. Ultra-large scale synthesis of high electrochemical performance SnO{sub 2} quantum dots within 5 min at room temperature following a growth self-termination mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Hongtao, E-mail: htcui@ytu.edu.cn; Xue, Junying; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Minmin

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} quantum dots were prepared at an ultra-large scale at room temperature within 5 min. • The grinding of SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine produces quantum dots. • The reactions were self-terminated through the rapid consumption of water. • The obtained SnO{sub 2} quantum dots own high electrochemical performance. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} quantum dots are prepared at an ultra-large scale by a productive synthetic procedure without using any organic ligand. The grinding of solid mixture of SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine in a mortar at room temperature produces 1.2 nm SnO{sub 2} quantum dots within 5 min. The formation of SnO{sub 2} is initiated by the reaction between tin ions and hydroxyl groups generated from hydrolysis of morpholine in the released hydrate water from SnCl{sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O. It is considered that as water is rapidly consumed by the hydrolysis reaction of morpholine, the growth process of particles is self-terminated immediately after their transitory period of nucleation and growth. As a result of simple procedure and high toleration to scaling up of preparation, at least 50 g of SnO{sub 2} quantum dots can be produced in one batch in our laboratory. The as prepared quantum dots present high electrochemical performance due to the effective faradaic reaction and the alternative trapping of electrons and holes.

  11. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  12. Electronic structure and Landé g-factor of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit coupling: Temperature and Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Setareh, F.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    A wide variety of semiconductor nanostructures have been fabricated experimentally and both theoretical and experimental investigations of their features imply the great role they have in new generation technological devices. However, mathematical modeling provide a powerful means due to definitive goal of predicting the features and understanding of such structures behavior under different circumstances. Therefore, effective Hamiltonian for an electron in a quantum ring with axial symmetry in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) is derived. Here we report our study of the electronic structure and electron g-factor in the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings under the influence of external magnetic field at finite temperature. This investigation shows that, when Rashba and Dresselhaus couplings are simultaneously present, the degeneracy is removed and energy levels split into two branches. Furthermore, with enhancing the applied magnetic field, separation of former degenerate levels increases and also avoided crossings (anti-crossing) in the energy spectra is detected. It is also discussed how the energy levels of the system can be adjusted with variation of temperature as well as the magnetic field and geometrical sizes.

  13. Quantum mechanical free energy profiles with post-quantization restraints: Binding free energy of the water dimer over a broad range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kevin P; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2018-03-14

    Free energy calculations are a crucial part of understanding chemical systems but are often computationally expensive for all but the simplest of systems. Various enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to improve the efficiency of these calculations in numerical simulations. However, the majority of these approaches have been applied using classical molecular dynamics. There are many situations where nuclear quantum effects impact the system of interest and a classical description fails to capture these details. In this work, path integral molecular dynamics has been used in conjunction with umbrella sampling, and it has been observed that correct results are only obtained when the umbrella sampling potential is applied to a single path integral bead post quantization. This method has been validated against a Lennard-Jones benchmark system before being applied to the more complicated water dimer system over a broad range of temperatures. Free energy profiles are obtained, and these are utilized in the calculation of the second virial coefficient as well as the change in free energy from the separated water monomers to the dimer. Comparisons to experimental and ground state calculation values from the literature are made for the second virial coefficient at higher temperature and the dissociation energy of the dimer in the ground state.

  14. Influence of quantum degeneracy and regeneration on the performance of Bose-Stirling refrigeration-cycles operated in different temperature regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Bihong; Zhang Yue; Chen Jincan

    2006-01-01

    The Stirling refrigeration cycle using an ideal Bose-gas as the working substance is called the Bose-Stirling refrigeration cycle, which is different from other thermodynamic cycles such as the Carnot cycle, Ericsson cycle, Brayton cycle, Otto cycle, Diesel cycle and Atkinson cycle working with an ideal Bose gas and may be operated across the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of the Bose system. The performance of the cycle is investigated, based on the equation of state of an ideal Bose gas. The inherent regenerative losses of the cycle are considered and the coefficient of performance and the amount of refrigeration of the cycle are calculated. The results obtained here are compared with those derived from the classical Stirling refrigeration cycle, using an ideal gas as the working substance. The influence of quantum degeneracy and inherent regenerative losses on the performance of the Bose Stirling refrigeration cycle operated in different temperature regions is discussed in detail, and consequently, general performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed

  15. BeZnCdSe quantum-well ridge-waveguide laser diodes under low threshold room-temperature continuous-wave operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jijun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China); Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Akimoto, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-akimoto@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    Low threshold current ridge-waveguide BeZnCdSe quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) have been developed by completely etching away the top p-type BeMgZnSe/ZnSe:N short-period superlattice cladding layer, which can suppress the leakage current that flows laterally outside of the electrode. The waveguide LDs are covered with a thick SiO{sub 2} layer and planarized with chemical-mechanical polishing and a reactive ion etching process. Room-temperature lasing under continuous-wave condition is achieved with the laser cavity formed by the cleaved waveguide facets coated with high-reflectivity dielectric films. For a 4 μm-wide green LD lasing around a wavelength of 535 nm, threshold current and voltage of 7.07 mA and 7.89 V are achieved for a cavity length of 300 μm, and the internal differential quantum efficiency, internal absorption loss, gain constant, and nominal transparency current density are estimated to be 27%, 4.09 cm{sup −1}, 29.92 (cm × μm)/kA and 6.35 kA/(cm{sup 2 }× μm), respectively. This compact device can realize a significantly improved performance with much lower threshold power consumption, which would benefit the potential application for ZnSe-based green LDs as light sources in full-color display and projector devices installed in consumer products such as pocket projectors.

  16. Modulating optical rectification, second and third harmonic generation of doped quantum dots: Interplay between hydrostatic pressure, temperature and noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-10-01

    We examine the profiles of optical rectification (OR), second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) of impurity doped QDs under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In order to study the above nonlinear optical (NLO) properties the doped dot has been subjected to a polarized monochromatic electromagnetic field. Effect of application of noise is nicely reflected through alteration of peak shift (blue/red) and variation of peak height (increase/decrease) of above NLO properties as temperature and pressure are varied. All such changes again sensitively depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The remarkable influence of interplay between noise strength and its mode of application on the said profiles has also been addressed. The findings illuminate fascinating role played by noise in tuning above NLO properties of doped QD system under the active presence of both hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  17. Influence of the temperature on the synthesis of CdS quantum dots stabilized with poly (vinil alcohol); Influencia da temperatura na sintese de pontos quanticos de sulfeto de cadmio estabilizados por poli (alcool vinilico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (Quantum Dots, QDs) have been the subject of recent research by presenting quantum properties. This property has stimulated the study of these particles in biological applications such as bookmarks, which creates the necessity of using different synthesis routes resulting in biocompatible systems. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature on the properties of QDs cadmium sulfide, aqueous route using poly (vinyl alcohol), a biocompatible polymer, such as stabilizing agent. The characterization of particles produced was performed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra for obtaining the absorption and emission, respectively and Transmission microscopy (TEM) for analysis of the diameter of the nanocrystals. (author)

  18. GaAsBi/GaAs multi-quantum well LED grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisan Patil, Pallavi; Luna, Esperanza; Matsuda, Teruyoshi; Yamada, Kohki; Kamiya, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Shimomura, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    We report a GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a two-substrate-temperature (TST) technique. In particular, the QWs and the barriers in the intrinsic region were grown at the different temperatures of {T}{{GaAsBi}} = 350 °C and {T}{{GaAs}} = 550 ^\\circ {{C}}, respectively. Investigations of the microstructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal homogeneous MQWs free of extended defects. Furthermore, the local determination of the Bi distribution profile across the MQWs region using TEM techniques confirm the uniform Bi distribution, while revealing a slightly chemically graded GaAs-on-GaAsBi interface due to Bi surface segregation. Despite this small broadening, we found that Bi segregation is significantly reduced (up to 18% reduction) compared to previous reports on Bi segregation in GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs. Hence, the TST procedure proves as a very efficient method to reduce Bi segregation and thus increase the quality of the layers and interfaces. These improvements positively reflect in the optical properties. Room temperature photoluminescence and electroluminescence (EL) at 1.23 μm emission wavelength are successfully demonstrated using TST MQWs containing less Bi content than in previous reports. Finally, LED fabricated using the present TST technique show current-voltage (I-V) curves with a forward voltage of 3.3 V at an injection current of 130 mA under 1.0 kA cm-2 current excitation. These results not only demonstrate that TST technique provides optical device quality GaAsBi/GaAs MQWs but highlight the relevance of TST-based growth techniques on the fabrication of future heterostructure devices based on dilute bismides.

  19. Quantum phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, S.

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions are normally associated with changes of temperature but a new type of transition - caused by quantum fluctuations near absolute zero - is possible, and can tell us more about the properties of a wide range of systems in condensed-matter physics. Nature abounds with phase transitions. The boiling and freezing of water are everyday examples of phase transitions, as are more exotic processes such as superconductivity and superfluidity. The universe itself is thought to have passed through several phase transitions as the high-temperature plasma formed by the big bang cooled to form the world as we know it today. Phase transitions are traditionally classified as first or second order. In first-order transitions the two phases co-exist at the transition temperature - e.g. ice and water at 0 deg., or water and steam at 100 deg. In second-order transitions the two phases do not co-exist. In the last decade, attention has focused on phase transitions that are qualitatively different from the examples noted above: these are quantum phase transitions and they occur only at the absolute zero of temperature. The transition takes place at the ''quantum critical'' value of some other parameter such as pressure, composition or magnetic field strength. A quantum phase transition takes place when co-operative ordering of the system disappears, but this loss of order is driven solely by the quantum fluctuations demanded by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The physical properties of these quantum fluctuations are quite distinct from those of the thermal fluctuations responsible for traditional, finite-temperature phase transitions. In particular, the quantum system is described by a complex-valued wavefunction, and the dynamics of its phase near the quantum critical point requires novel theories that have no analogue in the traditional framework of phase transitions. In this article the author describes the history of quantum phase transitions. (UK)

  20. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  1. Towards the Fundamental Quantum Limit of Linear Measurements of Classical Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Haixing; Adhikari, Rana X; Ma, Yiqiu; Pang, Belinda; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-08-04

    The quantum Cramér-Rao bound (QCRB) sets a fundamental limit for the measurement of classical signals with detectors operating in the quantum regime. Using linear-response theory and the Heisenberg uncertainty relation, we derive a general condition for achieving such a fundamental limit. When applied to classical displacement measurements with a test mass, this condition leads to an explicit connection between the QCRB and the standard quantum limit that arises from a tradeoff between the measurement imprecision and quantum backaction; the QCRB can be viewed as an outcome of a quantum nondemolition measurement with the backaction evaded. Additionally, we show that the test mass is more a resource for improving measurement sensitivity than a victim of the quantum backaction, which suggests a new approach to enhancing the sensitivity of a broad class of sensors. We illustrate these points with laser interferometric gravitational-wave detectors.

  2. High-temperature measurements of methane and acetylene using quantum cascade laser absorption near 8μm

    KAUST Repository

    Sajid, M.B.

    2015-04-01

    The mid-infrared wavelength region near 8 mu m contains absorption bands of several molecules such as water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, nitrous oxide, methane and acetylene. A new laser absorption sensor based on the v(4) band of methane and the v(4)+v(5) band of acetylene is reported for interference-free, time-resolved measurements under combustion-relevant conditions. A detailed line-selection procedure was used to identify optimum transitions. Methane and acetylene were measured at the line centers of Q12 (1303.5 cm(-1)) and P23 (1275.5 cm(-1)) transitions, respectively. High-temperature absorption cross sections of methane and acetylene were measured at peaks (on-line) and valleys (off-line) of the selected absorption transitions. The differential absorption strategy was employed to eliminate interference absorption from large hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1200-2200 K, between pressures of 1-4 atm. The diagnostics were then applied to measure the respective species time-history profiles during the shock-heated pyrolysis of n-pentane. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  4. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  5. Cooperative option of pursuit game with two pursuers and one evader. A strong stability of division variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor D. Shiryayev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article deals with a simple differential game on the plane of pursuit with two consistently active players and one evader E; the game is considered in the form of the characteristic function. Materials and Methods: The geometric constructions and methods are used for solving the problem. The security zone of the escapee is bounded by the Apollonius circle, the pursuit team uses a strategy of parallel approach. Results: A method of finding the optimal players strategies and the optimal players’ trajectory is proposed. The way of forming the characteristic function is provided. All the variety of division is considered as a solution. However, the use of the results of cooperative theory of differential games is impossible without solving the problems associated with the specifics of differential equations of motion. Foremost, it is the problem of dynamic stability of optimality principles. The article introduces an auxiliary function of making the redistribution of winnings in time, keeping his total winnings throughout the game. The dynamic stability of the cooperative solution is determined with the help of this function. Strong dynamic stability of the entire set of solutions is shown. Discussion and Conclusions: The obtained results are consistent with similar research of other authors. Further research in this field can be used in the development of methods for “regularization” of optimality principles, for which the condition of dynamic stability is always fulfilled.

  6. Pasteurella pneumotropica evades the human complement system by acquisition of the complement regulators factor H and C4BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sahagún-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.

  7. Escape and evade control policies for ensuring the physical security of nonholonomic, ground-based, unattended mobile sensor nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-06-01

    In order to realize the wide-scale deployment of high-endurance, unattended mobile sensing technologies, it is vital to ensure the self-preservation of the sensing assets. Deployed mobile sensor nodes face a variety of physical security threats including theft, vandalism and physical damage. Unattended mobile sensor nodes must be able to respond to these threats with control policies that facilitate escape and evasion to a low-risk state. In this work the Precision Immobilization Technique (PIT) problem has been considered. The PIT maneuver is a technique that a pursuing, car-like vehicle can use to force a fleeing vehicle to abruptly turn ninety degrees to the direction of travel. The abrupt change in direction generally causes the fleeing driver to lose control and stop. The PIT maneuver was originally developed by law enforcement to end vehicular pursuits in a manner that minimizes damage to the persons and property involved. It is easy to imagine that unattended autonomous convoys could be targets of this type of action by adversarial agents. This effort focused on developing control policies unattended mobile sensor nodes could employ to escape, evade and recover from PIT-maneuver-like attacks. The development of these control policies involved both simulation as well as small-scale experimental testing. The goal of this work is to be a step toward ensuring the physical security of unattended sensor node assets.

  8. The p75 neurotrophin receptor evades the endolysosomal route in neuronal cells, favouring multivesicular bodies specialised for exosomal release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Claudia A.; Lazo, Oscal M.; Galleguillos, Carolina; Parraguez, Jose I.; Lopez-Verrilli, Maria A.; Cabeza, Carolina; Leon, Luisa; Saeed, Uzma; Retamal, Claudio; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Carter, Bruce D.; Court, Felipe A.; Bronfman, Francisca C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75, also known as NGFR) is a multifaceted signalling receptor that regulates neuronal physiology, including neurite outgrowth, and survival and death decisions. A key cellular aspect regulating neurotrophin signalling is the intracellular trafficking of their receptors; however, the post-endocytic trafficking of p75 is poorly defined. We used sympathetic neurons and rat PC12 cells to study the mechanism of internalisation and post-endocytic trafficking of p75. We found that p75 internalisation depended on the clathrin adaptor protein AP2 and on dynamin. More surprisingly, p75 evaded the lysosomal route at the level of the early endosome, instead accumulating in two different types of endosomes, Rab11-positive endosomes and multivesicular bodies (MVBs) positive for CD63, a marker of the exosomal pathway. Consistently, depolarisation by KCl induced the liberation of previously endocytosed full-length p75 into the extracellular medium in exosomes. Thus, p75 defines a subpopulation of MVBs that does not mature to lysosomes and is available for exosomal release by neuronal cells. PMID:24569882

  9. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  10. Full conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol revealed by room temperature mm-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roucou, Anthony; Fontanari, Daniele; Dhont, Guillaume; Jabri, Atef; Bray, Cédric; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2018-03-30

    Room temperature millimeter-wave rotational spectroscopy supported by high level of theory calculations have been employed to fully characterise the conformational landscape of 3-Methoxyphenol, a semi-volatile polar oxygenated aromatic compound precursor of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere arising from biomass combustion. While previous rotationally-resolved spectroscopic studies in the microwave and in the UV domains failed to observe the complete conformational landscape, the 70 - 330 GHz rotational spectrum measured in this study reveals the ground state rotational signatures of the four stable conformations theoretically predicted. Moreover, rotational transitions in the lowest energy vibrationally excited states were assigned for two conformers. While the inertial defect of methoxyphenol does not signicantly change between conformers and isomers, the excitation of the methoxy out-of-plane bending is the main contribution to the non-planarity of the molecule. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Efficient Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes at Low Temperature and Pressure Using Tantalum Hydride on MCM-41, and a Quantum Chemical Study

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogenolysis of hydrocarbons is of considerable technological importance for applications such as the hydroprocessing of petrochemical feedstocks to generate high-value and useful chemicals and fuels. We studied the catalytic activity of tantalum hydride supported on MCM-41 for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes at low temperature and low atmospheric pressure in a dynamic reactor. The reactions proceed with good turnover numbers, and the catalyst could be reused for several times, which makes the overall catalytic process sustainable. We derived the plausible mechanism by using DFT calculations and identified the preferred pathways by the analysis of potential energy surface. Our results and the proposed reaction mechanism demonstrate the viability of the "catalyst-by-design" approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Precise measurement of coupling strength and high temperature quantum effect in a nonlinearly coupled qubit-oscillator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li; Zhao, Nan

    2018-04-01

    We study the coherence dynamics of a qubit coupled to a harmonic oscillator with both linear and quadratic interactions. As long as the linear coupling strength is much smaller than the oscillator frequency, the long time behavior of the coherence is dominated by the quadratic coupling strength g 2. The coherence decays and revives at a period , with the width of coherence peak decreasing as the temperature increases, hence providing a way to measure g 2 precisely without cooling. Unlike the case of linear coupling, here the coherence dynamics never reduces to the classical limit in which the oscillator is classical. Finally, the validity of linear coupling approximation is discussed and the coherence under Hahn-echo is evaluated.

  13. Efficient Hydrogenolysis of Alkanes at Low Temperature and Pressure Using Tantalum Hydride on MCM-41, and a Quantum Chemical Study

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; De Mallmann, Aimery; Norsic, Sé bastien; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenolysis of hydrocarbons is of considerable technological importance for applications such as the hydroprocessing of petrochemical feedstocks to generate high-value and useful chemicals and fuels. We studied the catalytic activity of tantalum hydride supported on MCM-41 for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes at low temperature and low atmospheric pressure in a dynamic reactor. The reactions proceed with good turnover numbers, and the catalyst could be reused for several times, which makes the overall catalytic process sustainable. We derived the plausible mechanism by using DFT calculations and identified the preferred pathways by the analysis of potential energy surface. Our results and the proposed reaction mechanism demonstrate the viability of the "catalyst-by-design" approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Chemical equilibrium between particles and complex particles in quantum many-body system at very low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium state at very low temperature and phase state at 0 K between the particle 1 and particle 2 and the particle 12, which particle 1 bond with particle 2, of infinite uniform system was investigated. Boson and fermion are thought as particle and three kinds of reactions are considered. On the case of boson + boson ? boson, the system is all molecules or atoms when ΔE≠0 and T=0, and the density is not determined under Tc when ΔE=0. On the case of boson + fermion ? fermion, molecules and atoms are able to exist together at T=0. On fermion + fermion ? boson, molecule is formed and condensed. The chemical equilibrium between particles and complex particles and three cases of equilibrium are explained. (S.Y.)

  15. High-temperature measurements of methane and acetylene using quantum cascade laser absorption near 8 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, M.B.; Javed, T.; Farooq, A.

    2015-01-01

    The mid-infrared wavelength region near 8 μm contains absorption bands of several molecules such as water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, nitrous oxide, methane and acetylene. A new laser absorption sensor based on the ν 4 band of methane and the ν 4 +ν 5 band of acetylene is reported for interference-free, time-resolved measurements under combustion-relevant conditions. A detailed line-selection procedure was used to identify optimum transitions. Methane and acetylene were measured at the line centers of Q12 (1303.5 cm −1 ) and P23 (1275.5 cm −1 ) transitions, respectively. High-temperature absorption cross sections of methane and acetylene were measured at peaks (on-line) and valleys (off-line) of the selected absorption transitions. The differential absorption strategy was employed to eliminate interference absorption from large hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1200–2200 K, between pressures of 1–4 atm. The diagnostics were then applied to measure the respective species time-history profiles during the shock-heated pyrolysis of n-pentane. - Highlights: • Methane measured at the peak of Q(12) transition in the ν 4 band. • Acetylene measured at the peak of P(23) transition in the ν 4 +ν 5 band. • Differential absorption strategy employed to eliminate broadband interference absorption. • Absorption cross-sections measured over 1200–2200 K and 1–4 atm. • Methane and acetylene time-histories measured during the pyrolysis of n-pentane

  16. Frequency-domain cascading microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers; beyond limitations originating from room-temperature electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori

    2018-07-01

    A novel approach, frequency-domain cascading microwave multiplexers (MW-Mux), has been proposed and its basic operation has been demonstrated to increase the number of pixels multiplexed in a readout line U of MW-Mux for superconducting detector arrays. This method is an alternative to the challenging development of wideband, large power, and spurious-free room-temperature (300 K) electronics. The readout system for U pixels consists of four main parts: (1) multiplexer chips connected in series those contain U superconducting resonators in total. (2) A cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor amplifier (HEMT). (3) A 300 K microwave frequency comb generator based on N(≡U/M) parallel units of digital-to-analog converters (DAC). (4) N parallel units of 300 K analog-to-digital converters (ADC). Here, M is the number of tones each DAC produces and each ADC handles. The output signal of U detectors multiplexed at the cryogenic stage is transmitted through a cable to the room temperature and divided into N processors where each handles M pixels. Due to the reduction factor of 1/N, U is not anymore dominated by the 300 K electronics but can be increased up to the potential value determined by either the bandwidth or the spurious-free power of the HEMT. Based on experimental results on the prototype system with N = 2 and M = 3, neither excess inter-pixel crosstalk nor excess noise has been observed in comparison with conventional MW-Mux. This indicates that the frequency-domain cascading MW-Mux provides the full (100%) usage of the HEMT band by assigning N 300 K bands on the frequency axis without inter-band gaps.

  17. Quantum stochastics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Mou-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    The classical probability theory initiated by Kolmogorov and its quantum counterpart, pioneered by von Neumann, were created at about the same time in the 1930s, but development of the quantum theory has trailed far behind. Although highly appealing, the quantum theory has a steep learning curve, requiring tools from both probability and analysis and a facility for combining the two viewpoints. This book is a systematic, self-contained account of the core of quantum probability and quantum stochastic processes for graduate students and researchers. The only assumed background is knowledge of the basic theory of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, and classical Markov processes. From there, the book introduces additional tools from analysis, and then builds the quantum probability framework needed to support applications to quantum control and quantum information and communication. These include quantum noise, quantum stochastic calculus, stochastic quantum differential equations, quantum Markov semigrou...

  18. Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain what quantum computing is. The information for the thesis was gathered from books, scientific publications, and news articles. The analysis of the information revealed that quantum computing can be broken down to three areas: theories behind quantum computing explaining the structure of a quantum computer, known quantum algorithms, and the actual physical realizations of a quantum computer. The thesis reveals that moving from classical memor...

  19. Quantum Malware

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    When quantum communication networks proliferate they will likely be subject to a new type of attack: by hackers, virus makers, and other malicious intruders. Here we introduce the concept of "quantum malware" to describe such human-made intrusions. We offer a simple solution for storage of quantum information in a manner which protects quantum networks from quantum malware. This solution involves swapping the quantum information at random times between the network and isolated, distributed an...

  20. Adsorption Energies of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Atoms on the Low-temperature Amorphous Water Ice: A Systematic Estimation from Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Nakatani, Naoki; Furuya, Kenji; Hama, Tetsuya

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new simple computational model to estimate the adsorption energies of atoms and molecules to low-temperature amorphous water ice, and we present the adsorption energies of carbon (3 P), nitrogen (4 S), and oxygen (3 P) atoms based on quantum chemistry calculations. The adsorption energies were estimated to be 14,100 ± 420 K for carbon, 400 ± 30 K for nitrogen, and 1440 ± 160 K for oxygen. The adsorption energy of oxygen is consistent with experimentally reported values. We found that the binding of a nitrogen atom is purely physisorption, while that of a carbon atom is chemisorption, in which a chemical bond to an O atom of a water molecule is formed. That of an oxygen atom has a dual character, with both physisorption and chemisorption. The chemisorption of atomic carbon also implies the possibility of further chemical reactions to produce molecules bearing a C–O bond, though this may hinder the formation of methane on water ice via sequential hydrogenation of carbon atoms. These properties would have a large impact on the chemical evolution of carbon species in interstellar environments. We also investigated the effects of newly calculated adsorption energies on the chemical compositions of cold dense molecular clouds with the aid of gas-ice astrochemical simulations. We found that abundances of major nitrogen-bearing molecules, such as N2 and NH3, are significantly altered by applying the calculated adsorption energy, because nitrogen atoms can thermally diffuse on surfaces, even at 10 K.

  1. Potential Fluctuations at Low Temperatures in Mesoscopic-Scale SmTiO3/SrTiO3/SmTiO3 Quantum Well Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Will J; Isaac, Brandon; Marshall, Patrick; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhou, Panpan; Stemmer, Susanne; Natelson, Douglas

    2017-04-25

    Heterointerfaces of SrTiO 3 with other transition metal oxides make up an intriguing family of systems with a bounty of coexisting and competing physical orders. Some examples, such as LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 , support a high carrier density electron gas at the interface whose electronic properties are determined by a combination of lattice distortions, spin-orbit coupling, defects, and various regimes of magnetic and charge ordering. Here, we study electronic transport in mesoscale devices made with heterostructures of SrTiO 3 sandwiched between layers of SmTiO 3 , in which the transport properties can be tuned from a regime of Fermi-liquid like resistivity (ρ ∝ T 2 ) to a non-Fermi liquid (ρ ∝ T 5/3 ) by controlling the SrTiO 3 thickness. In mesoscale devices at low temperatures, we find unexpected voltage fluctuations that grow in magnitude as T is decreased below 20 K, are suppressed with increasing contact electrode size, and are independent of the drive current and contact spacing distance. Magnetoresistance fluctuations are also observed, which are reminiscent of universal conductance fluctuations but not entirely consistent with their conventional properties. Candidate explanations are considered, and a mechanism is suggested based on mesoscopic temporal fluctuations of the Seebeck coefficient. An improved understanding of charge transport in these model systems, especially their quantum coherent properties, may lead to insights into the nature of transport in strongly correlated materials that deviate from Fermi liquid theory.

  2. Enhancing the Performance of Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes Using Room-Temperature-Processed Ga-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles as the Electron Transport Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Sheng

    2017-04-19

    Colloidal ZnO nanoparticle (NP) films are recognized as efficient electron transport layers (ETLs) for quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with good stability and high efficiency. However, because of the inherently high work function of such films, spontaneous charge transfer occurs at the QD/ZnO interface in such a QD-LED, thus leading to reduced performance. Here, to improve the QD-LED performance, we prepared Ga-doped ZnO NPs with low work functions and tailored band structures via a room-temperature (RT) solution process without the use of bulky organic ligands. We found that the charge transfer at the interface between the CdSe/ZnS QDs and the doped ZnO NPs was significantly weakened because of the incorporated Ga dopants. Remarkably, the as-assembled QD-LEDs, with Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, exhibited superior luminances of up to 44 000 cd/m2 and efficiencies of up to 15 cd/A, placing them among the most efficient red-light QD-LEDs ever reported. This discovery provides a new strategy for fabricating high-performance QD-LEDs by using RT-processed Ga-doped ZnO NPs as the ETLs, which could be generalized to improve the efficiency of other optoelectronic devices.

  3. Quantumness beyond quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Ángel S

    2012-01-01

    Bohmian mechanics allows us to understand quantum systems in the light of other quantum traits than the well-known ones (coherence, diffraction, interference, tunnelling, discreteness, entanglement, etc.). Here the discussion focusses precisely on two of these interesting aspects, which arise when quantum mechanics is thought within this theoretical framework: the non-crossing property, which allows for distinguishability without erasing interference patterns, and the possibility to define quantum probability tubes, along which the probability remains constant all the way. Furthermore, taking into account this hydrodynamic-like description as a link, it is also shown how this knowledge (concepts and ideas) can be straightforwardly transferred to other fields of physics (for example, the transmission of light along waveguides).

  4. Influence of the annealing temperature on the optical transitions of InGaAsP-based quantum well structures investigated by photoreflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Kudrawiec, R.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Wojcik, J.; Robinson, B.J.; Thompson, D.A.; Mascher, P.

    2005-01-01

    Photoreflectance (PR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies have been used to study the effect of the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on InGaAsP-based quantum wells (QWs) which are the active part of a laser structure tailored at 1.5 μm. In the case of PL, it has been observed that the RTA enhances PL intensity and tunes the emission wavelength of the laser structure to blue. In case of PR due to its absorption character, we were able to study QW transitions related to excited states, besides the fundamental transition observed in PL. In addition, optical transitions related to other part of the laser structure have been observed in PR. It has been shown that there exists a ''critical'' annealing temperature (720 C) where the energy shift appears. We have observed a blueshift for both the ground and excited state transitions, but in the case of the ground state transitions the blueshift has been found to be bigger. The magnitude of this blueshift has been found to change linearly from 0 to ∝15 meV with the rise of temperature from 720 to 780 C. Below 720 C no significant change in the energy of the QW transitions is observed. In the case of PR transitions related to the other part of the laser structure, i.e., the quaternary InGaAsP barriers, it has been observed that after annealing PR features associated with these layers rather do not shift, they change only their line-shape. Also, it has been shown that RTA does not destroy the optical quality of the samples. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  6. Synthesis of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Hunter

    2017-10-17

    Common approaches to synthesizing alloyed quantum dots employ high-cost, air-sensitive phosphine complexes as the selenium precursor. Disclosed quantum dot synthesis embodiments avoid these hazardous and air-sensitive selenium precursors. Certain embodiments utilize a combination comprising a thiol and an amine that together reduce and complex the elemental selenium to form a highly reactive selenium precursor at room temperature. The same combination of thiol and amine acts as the reaction solvent, stabilizing ligand, and sulfur source in the synthesis of quantum dot cores. A non-injection approach may also be used. The optical properties of the quantum dots synthesized by this new approach can be finely tuned for a variety of applications by controlling size and/or composition of size and composition. Further, using the same approach, a shell can be grown around a quantum dot core that improves stability, luminescence efficiency, and may reduce toxicity.

  7. Uudised : Üheteistkümnendad trompetipäevad. Eesti Muusikanõukogus. Tüüri "Motus I" Londonis / Kadri Ruudi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruudi, Kadri

    2000-01-01

    4.-15. apr. toimuvad EMA XI trompetipäevad. 14.-19. märtsil viibis Eestis IMC asepresident F. Müller-Heuser, 22. märtsil toimus EMN juhatuse koosolek. 19. märtsil andis Londoni South Bank Centre'is kontserdi P. Carneiro, kes tõi Inglismaal esiettekandele ka E.-S. Tüüri teose "Motus I"

  8. Effect of temperature and phonons on the spectral properties of a multi-level semiconductor quantum dot single-photon source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lodahl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Since it was realized that efficient quantum computing can be performed using single photons and standard linear optics elements, immense international research activity has been aimed at developing semiconductor quantum dot (QD) single-photon sources (SPS). In order to optimise the design of SPS...... us to study complicated multi-level QDs, not possible within the commonly used independent boson model (IBM)....

  9. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeevchs@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, CMR College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad (India); Chatterjee, Ashok [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2016-11-15

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron–electron and spin–orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin–orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron–electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron–electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin–orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures. - Highlights: • Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime but reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. • Electron-electron interaction reduces magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic region. • Rashba spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields. • Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction shifts the paramagnetic peak towards lower magnetic fields. • Spin–orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  10. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions.

  11. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  12. EST: Evading Scientific Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeremy

    2001-01-01

    Examines chemical engineering students' attitudes to text and other parts of English language textbooks. A questionnaire was administered to a group of undergraduates. Results reveal one way students get around the problem of textbook reading. (Author/VWL)

  13. Evading the Boomerang Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Moreira, Solon; Reichstein, Toke

    2017-01-01

    Technology licensing agreements potentially can create future appropriability problems. Drawing on the appropriability literature, we argue that the inclusion of a grant-back clause in technology licensing agreements is an attempt to balance the gains from and protection of the focal firms’ techn...

  14. Evading the CKM Hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the presence of intrinsic charm in the hadrons' light-cone wave functions, even at a few percent level, provides new, competitive decay mechanisms for B decays which are nominally CKM-suppressed. For example, the weak decays of the B-meson to two-body exclusive states consisting of strange plus light hadrons, such as B → π K, are expected to be dominated by penguin contributions since the tree-level b → s u bar u decay is CKM suppressed However, higher Fock states in the B wave function containing charm quark pairs can mediate the decay via a CKM-favored b → s cbar c tree-level transition. Such intrinsic charm contributions can be phenomenologically significant. Since they mimic the amplitude structure of ''charming'' penguin contributions, charming penguins need not be penguins at all

  15. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  16. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  17. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  18. Quantum Dot Systems: a versatile platform for quantum simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, Pierre; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics often results in extremely complex phenomena, especially when the quantum system under consideration is composed of many interacting particles. The states of these many-body systems live in a space so large that classical numerical calculations cannot compute them. Quantum simulations can be used to overcome this problem: complex quantum problems can be solved by studying experimentally an artificial quantum system operated to simulate the desired hamiltonian. Quantum dot systems have shown to be widely tunable quantum systems, that can be efficiently controlled electrically. This tunability and the versatility of their design makes them very promising quantum simulators. This paper reviews the progress towards digital quantum simulations with individually controlled quantum dots, as well as the analog quantum simulations that have been performed with these systems. The possibility to use large arrays of quantum dots to simulate the low-temperature Hubbard model is also discussed. The main issues along that path are presented and new ideas to overcome them are proposed. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  20. Quantum-entanglement storage and extraction in quantum network node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhuoyu; Zhang, Yong

    Quantum computing and quantum communication have become the most popular research topic. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have been shown the great advantage of implementing quantum information processing. The generation of entanglement between NV centers represents a fundamental prerequisite for all quantum information technologies. In this paper, we propose a scheme to realize the high-fidelity storage and extraction of quantum entanglement information based on the NV centers at room temperature. We store the entangled information of a pair of entangled photons in the Bell state into the nuclear spins of two NV centers, which can make these two NV centers entangled. And then we illuminate how to extract the entangled information from NV centers to prepare on-demand entangled states for optical quantum information processing. The strategy of engineering entanglement demonstrated here maybe pave the way towards a NV center-based quantum network.

  1. Comparative study of the hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on the impurity-related optical properties in single and double GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odhiambo Oyoko, H. [Department of Physics, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X 54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Porras-Montenegro, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, AA 25360, Cali (Colombia); Lopez, S.Y. [Facultad de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    Using a variational technique within the effective mass approximation we have carried out a comparative study of the effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the shallow-impurity related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As single and double quantum wells. The results show a pressure dependent read-shift and a temperature dependent blue-shift in the optical absorption spectra. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya

    1999-01-01

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  3. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    1999-05-31

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Quantum ontologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs

  5. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence and contactless electroreflectance characterization of a ZnxCd1-xSe/Znx'Cdy'Mg1-x'-y'Se asymmetric coupled quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.D.; Huang, Y.S.; Lin, D.Y.; Charles, W.O.; Shen, A.; Tamargo, M.C.; Tiong, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We report a detailed study of a ZnxCd 1-x Se/Znx'Cdy'Mg 1-x '-y'Se asymmetric coupled quantum well structure by using temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and contactless electroreflectance (CER) techniques. → The PL peak position yielded information of the fundamental excitonic recombinations. → Analysis of the CER spectra led to the identification of various interband transitions. →Study of the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition energies indicated that main influence of temperature on the quantized transitions is through temperature dependence of the constituent material band gap in the well. - Abstract: Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and contactless electroreflectance (CER) were used to characterize a Zn x Cd 1-x Se/Zn x' Cd y' Mg 1-x'-y' Se asymmetric coupled quantum well (ACQW) structure in the range of 10-300 K. The PL peak position yielded information of the fundamental excitonic recombinations. A detailed analysis of the CER spectra led to the identification of various interband transitions. The intersubband transitions were then estimated and found to be in a good agreement with the previous report of Fourier-transform infrared absorption measurements. At low temperature, the PL spectra of the sample showed an asymmetric behavior with an exponential tail at the lower-energy side and were attributed to the localized excitonic recombinations due to potential fluctuations. Detailed study of the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition energies indicated that the main influence of temperature on the quantized transitions is through the temperature dependence of the band gap of the constituent material in the well.

  6. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  7. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  8. Quadra-quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called ‘‘Droplet Epitaxy” has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390°C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7–8×10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200°C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or , which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  9. Nonequilibrium quantum mechanics: A "hot quantum soup" of paramagnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, H. D.; Sushkov, O. P.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of the lifetime (decay width) of paramagnons in quantum antiferromagnet TlCuCl3, we investigate paramagnon decay in a heat bath and formulate an appropriate quantum theory. Our formulation can be split into two regimes: (i) a nonperturbative, "hot quantum soup" regime where the paramagnon width is comparable to its energy; (ii) a usual perturbative regime where the paramagnon width is significantly lower than its energy. Close to the Neel temperature, the paramagnon width becomes comparable to its energy and falls into the hot quantum soup regime. To describe this regime, we develop a new finite frequency, finite temperature technique for a nonlinear quantum field theory; the "golden rule of quantum kinetics." The formulation is generic and applicable to any three-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet in the vicinity of a quantum critical point. Specifically, we apply our results to TlCuCl3 and find agreement with experimental data. Additionally, we show that logarithmic running of the coupling constant in the upper critical dimension changes the commonly accepted picture of the quantum disordered and quantum critical regimes.

  10. Temperature dependence of spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinling; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zheng, Qiao; Zhu, Laipan; Chen, Yonghai; Ren, Jun

    2015-10-19

    Spin photocurrent spectra induced by Rashba- and Dresselhaus-type circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) at inter-band excitation have been experimentally investigated in InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at a temperature range of 80 to 290 K. It is found that, the sign of Rashba-type current reverses at low temperatures, while that of Dresselhaus-type remains unchanged. The temperature dependence of ratio of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling parameters, increasing from -6.7 to 17.9, is obtained, and the possible reasons are discussed. We also develop a model to extract the Rashba-type effective electric field at different temperatures. It is demonstrated that excitonic effect will significantly influence the Rashba-type CPGE, while it has little effect on Dresselhaus-type CPGE.

  11. QUANTUM AND CLASSICAL CORRELATIONS IN GAUSSIAN OPEN QUANTUM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian ISAR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable quantum correlations (quantum entanglement and quantum discord for a system consisting of two noninteracting bosonic modes embedded in a thermal environment. We solve the Kossakowski-Lindblad master equation for the time evolution of the considered system and describe the entanglement and discord in terms of the covariance matrix for Gaussian input states. For all values of the temperature of the thermal reservoir, an initial separable Gaussian state remains separable for all times. We study the time evolution of logarithmic negativity, which characterizes the degree of entanglement, and show that in the case of an entangled initial squeezed thermal state, entanglement suppression takes place for all temperatures of the environment, including zero temperature. We analyze the time evolution of the Gaussian quantum discord, which is a measure of all quantum correlations in the bipartite state, including entanglement, and show that it decays asymptotically in time under the effect of the thermal bath. This is in contrast with the sudden death of entanglement. Before the suppression of the entanglement, the qualitative evolution of quantum discord is very similar to that of the entanglement. We describe also the time evolution of the degree of classical correlations and of quantum mutual information, which measures the total correlations of the quantum system.

  12. Recent progress in self-assembled quantum-dot optical devices for optical telecommunication: temperature-insensitive 10 Gb s-1 directly modulated lasers and 40 Gb s-1 signal-regenerative amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, M; Hatori, N; Ishida, M; Ebe, H; Arakawa, Y; Akiyama, T; Otsubo, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakata, Y

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the field of semiconductor lasers and optical amplifiers with InAs-based self-assembled quantum dots in the active region for optical telecommunication. Based on our design in terms of the maximum bandwidth for high-speed modulation and p-type doping in quantum dots for high temperature stability, we realized temperature-insensitive 10 Gb s -1 laser diodes on a GaAs substrate at 1.3 μm. The output waveform at 10 Gb s -1 maintained a clear eye opening, average output power and extinction ratio without current adjustments from 20 deg. C to 70 deg. C. We developed ultrawide-band high-power amplifiers in the 1.5 μm wavelength region on an InP substrate. The amplifier showed ultrafast gain response under gain saturation, and enabled signal regeneration at 40 Gb s -1 by suppressing the '1'-level noise due to the beating between the signal and amplified spontaneous emission. We present our amplifier module with polarization diversity to enable a stable polarization-insensitive performance, and also, discuss prospects for polarization-insensitive quantum dots by the close stacking technique

  13. Quantum optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, P D [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD (Australia).Physics Department

    1999-07-01

    Full text: Quantum optics in Australia has been an active research field for some years. I shall focus on recent developments in quantum and atom optics. Generally, the field as a whole is becoming more and more diverse, as technological developments drive experiments into new areas, and theorists either attempt to explain the new features, or else develop models for even more exotic ideas. The recent developments include quantum solitons, quantum computing, Bose-Einstein condensation, atom lasers, quantum cryptography, and novel tests of quantum mechanics. The talk will briefly cover current progress and outstanding problems in each of these areas. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society.

  14. Relative quantum yield of I-asterisk(2P1/2) in the tunable laser UV photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I - Effect of temperature and exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J. E.; Leone, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-specific relative quantum yields of metastable I from pulsed laser photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I in the range 265-336 nm are determined by measuring the time-resolved infrared emission from the atomic I(P-2(1/2) P-2(3/2) transition. It is shown that although this yield appears to be unity from 265 to 298 nm, it decreases dramatically at longer wavelengths. Values are also reported for the enhancement of emission from metastable I due to exciplex formation at several temperatures. The exciplex formation emission increases linearly with parent gas pressure, but decreases with increasing temperature. Absorption spectra of i- and n-C3F7I between 303 and 497 K are presented, and the effect of temperature on the quantum yields at selected wavelengths greater than 300 nm, where increasing the temperature enhances the absorption considerably, are given. The results are discussed in regard to the development of solar-pumped iodine lasers.

  15. Quantum entanglement and quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Y.H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is the entanglement of two or more distance particles. The ''ghost'' interference and the ''ghost'' image experiments demonstrated the astonishing nonlocal behavior of an entangled photon pair. Even though we still have questions in regard to fundamental issues of the entangled quantum systems, quantum entanglement has started to play important roles in quantum information and quantum computation. Quantum teleportation is one of the hot topics. We have demonstrated a quantum teleportation experiment recently. The experimental results proved the working principle of irreversibly teleporting an unknown arbitrary quantum state from one system to another distant system by disassembling into and then later reconstructing from purely classical information and nonclassical EPR correlations. The distinct feature of this experiment is that the complete set of Bell states can be distinguished in the Bell state measurement. Teleportation of a quantum state can thus occur with certainty in principle. (orig.)

  16. Firewalls and flat mirrors: An alternative to the AMPS experiment which evades the Harlow-Hayden obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Jonathan; Unruh, Bill

    2014-03-01

    If quantum gravity does not lead to a breakdown of predictability, then Almheiri-Marolf-Polchinski-Sully (AMPS) have argued that an observer falling into a black hole can perform an experiment which verifies a violation of entanglement monogamy — that late time Hawking radiation is maximally entangled with early time Hawking radiation and also with in-falling radiation — something impossible in quantum field theory. However, as pointed out by Hayden and Harlow, this experiment is infeasible, as the time required to perform the experiment is almost certainly longer than the lifetime of the black hole. Here we propose an alternative firewall experiment which could actually be performed within the black hole's lifetime. The alternative experiment involves forming an entangled black hole in which the unscrambling of information is precomputed on a quantum memory prior to the creation of the black hole and without acting on the matter which forms the black hole or emerges from it. This would allow an observer near a black hole to signal faster than light. As another application of our precomputing strategy, we show how one can produce entangled black holes which acts like "flat mirrors", in the sense that information comes out almost instantly (as in the Hayden-Preskill scenario), but also emerge unscrambled, so that it can actually be observed instantly as well. Finally, we prove that a black hole in thermal equilibrium with its own radiation, is uncorrelated with this radiation.

  17. Firewalls and flat mirrors: An alternative to the AMPS experiment which evades the Harlow-Hayden obstacle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, Jonathan; Unruh, Bill

    2014-01-01

    If quantum gravity does not lead to a breakdown of predictability, then Almheiri-Marolf-Polchinski-Sully (AMPS) have argued that an observer falling into a black hole can perform an experiment which verifies a violation of entanglement monogamy — that late time Hawking radiation is maximally entangled with early time Hawking radiation and also with in-falling radiation — something impossible in quantum field theory. However, as pointed out by Hayden and Harlow, this experiment is infeasible, as the time required to perform the experiment is almost certainly longer than the lifetime of the black hole. Here we propose an alternative firewall experiment which could actually be performed within the black hole’s lifetime. The alternative experiment involves forming an entangled black hole in which the unscrambling of information is precomputed on a quantum memory prior to the creation of the black hole and without acting on the matter which forms the black hole or emerges from it. This would allow an observer near a black hole to signal faster than light. As another application of our precomputing strategy, we show how one can produce entangled black holes which acts like “flat mirrors”, in the sense that information comes out almost instantly (as in the Hayden-Preskill scenario), but also emerge unscrambled, so that it can actually be observed instantly as well. Finally, we prove that a black hole in thermal equilibrium with its own radiation, is uncorrelated with this radiation

  18. Quantum-Circuit Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    MöTtöNen, Mikko; Tan, Kuan Y.; Masuda, Shumpei; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Silveri, Matti; Grabert, Hermann

    Quantum technology holds great potential in providing revolutionizing practical applications. However, fast and precise cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom on demand remains a major challenge in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. We demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable quantum tunneling of electrons in a nanoscale refrigerator. In our first experiments on this type of a quantum-circuit refrigerator, we measure the drop in the mode temperature by electron thermometry at a resistor which is coupled to the resonator mode through ohmic losses. To eliminate unwanted dissipation, we remove the probe resistor and directly observe the power spectrum of the resonator output in agreement with the so-called P(E) theory. We also demonstrate in microwave reflection experiments that the internal quality factor of the resonator can be tuned by orders of magnitude. In the future, our refrigerator can be integrated with different quantum electric devices, potentially enhancing their performance. For example, it may prove useful in the initialization of superconducting quantum bits and in dissipation-assisted quantum annealing. We acknowledge European Research Council Grant SINGLEOUT (278117) and QUESS (681311) for funding.

  19. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  20. Quantum computers and quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, Kamil' A

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Quantum mystery

    CERN Document Server

    Chanda, Rajat

    1997-01-01

    The book discusses the laws of quantum mechanics, several amazing quantum phenomena and some recent progress in understanding the connection between the quantum and the classical worlds. We show how paradoxes arise and how to resolve them. The significance of Bell's theorem and the remarkable experimental results on particle correlations are described in some detail. Finally, the current status of our understanding of quantum theory is summerised.

  2. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this article, we had looked at how quantum physics can be harnessed to make the building blocks of a quantum computer. In this concluding part, we look at algorithms which can exploit the power of this computational device, and some practical difficulties in building such a device. Quantum Algorithms.

  3. I, Quantum Robot: Quantum Mind control on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzi, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The logic which describes quantum robots is not orthodox quantum logic, but a deductive calculus which reproduces the quantum tasks (computational processes, and actions) taking into account quantum superposition and quantum entanglement. A way toward the realization of intelligent quantum robots is to adopt a quantum metalanguage to control quantum robots. A physical implementation of a quantum metalanguage might be the use of coherent states in brain signals.

  4. Quantum Logic and Quantum Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Stairs, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Quantum logic understood as a reconstruction program had real successes and genuine limitations. This paper offers a synopsis of both and suggests a way of seeing quantum logic in a larger, still thriving context.

  5. Quantum dynamics of quantum bits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2011-01-01

    The theory of coherent oscillations of the matrix elements of the density matrix of the two-state system as a quantum bit is presented. Different calculation methods are elaborated in the case of a free quantum bit. Then the most appropriate methods are applied to the study of the density matrices of the quantum bits interacting with a classical pumping radiation field as well as with the quantum electromagnetic field in a single-mode microcavity. The theory of decoherence of a quantum bit in Markovian approximation is presented. The decoherence of a quantum bit interacting with monoenergetic photons in a microcavity is also discussed. The content of the present work can be considered as an introduction to the study of the quantum dynamics of quantum bits. (review)

  6. Free-Space Quantum Communication with a Portable Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Vallone, Giuseppe; Jordaan, Bertus; Goham, Connor; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Villoresi, Paolo; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-12-01

    The realization of an elementary quantum network that is intrinsically secure and operates over long distances requires the interconnection of several quantum modules performing different tasks. In this work, we report the realization of a communication network functioning in a quantum regime, consisting of four different quantum modules: (i) a random polarization qubit generator, (ii) a free-space quantum-communication channel, (iii) an ultralow-noise portable quantum memory, and (iv) a qubit decoder, in a functional elementary quantum network possessing all capabilities needed for quantum-information distribution protocols. We create weak coherent pulses at the single-photon level encoding polarization states |H ⟩ , |V ⟩, |D ⟩, and |A ⟩ in a randomized sequence. The random qubits are sent over a free-space link and coupled into a dual-rail room-temperature quantum memory and after storage and retrieval are analyzed in a four-detector polarization analysis akin to the requirements of the BB84 protocol. We also show ultralow noise and fully portable operation, paving the way towards memory-assisted all-environment free-space quantum cryptographic networks.

  7. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng; Djie, Hery Susanto; Hwang, James C. M.; Koch, Thomas L.; Lester, Luke F.; Ooi, Boon S.; Wang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Intrinsic Dynamics of Quantum-Dash Lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Temperature-dependent intrinsic modulation response of InAs/InAlGaAs quantum-dash lasers was investigated by using pulse optical injection modulation to minimize the effects of parasitics and self-heating. Compared to typical quantum-well lasers, the quantum-dash lasers were found to have comparable differential gain but approximately twice the gain compression factor, probably due to carrier heating by free-carrier absorption, as opposed to stimulated transition. Therefore, the narrower modulation bandwidth of the quantum-dash lasers than that of quantum-well lasers was attributed to their higher gain compression factor. In addition, as expected, quantum-dash lasers with relatively long and uniform dashes exhibit higher temperature stability than quantum-well lasers. However, the lasers with relatively short and nonuniform dashes exhibit stronger temperature dependence, probably due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio and nonuniform dash sizes. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. Quantum frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  10. Quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  11. Quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouwenhoven, L.; Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum dots are man-made ''droplets'' of charge that can contain anything from a single electron to a collection of several thousand. Their typical dimensions range from nanometres to a few microns, and their size, shape and interactions can be precisely controlled through the use of advanced nanofabrication technology. The physics of quantum dots shows many parallels with the behaviour of naturally occurring quantum systems in atomic and nuclear physics. Indeed, quantum dots exemplify an important trend in condensed-matter physics in which researchers study man-made objects rather than real atoms or nuclei. As in an atom, the energy levels in a quantum dot become quantized due to the confinement of electrons. With quantum dots, however, an experimentalist can scan through the entire periodic table by simply changing a voltage. In this article the authors describe how quantum dots make it possible to explore new physics in regimes that cannot otherwise be accessed in the laboratory. (UK)

  12. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  13. Colloidal quantum dot photodetectors

    KAUST Repository

    Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Sargent, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    in particular on visible-, near-infrared, and short-wavelength infrared photodetectors based on size-effect-tuned semiconductor nanoparticles made using quantum-confined PbS, PbSe, Bi 2S3, and In2S3. These devices have in recent years achieved room-temperature D

  14. Stiff quantum polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, H.

    2009-01-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  15. Quantum information. Teleporation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test house, quantum teleportation, 100 years of quantum theory, the reality of quanta, interactionless quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view into the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  16. Quantum symmetry in quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomerus, V.

    1993-02-01

    Symmetry concepts have always been of great importance for physical problems like explicit calculations, classification or model building. More recently, new 'quantum symmetries' ((quasi) quantum groups) attracted much interest in quantum theory. It is shown that all these quantum symmetries permit a conventional formulation as symmetry in quantum mechanics. Symmetry transformations can act on the Hilbert space H of physical states such that the ground state is invariant and field operators transform covariantly. Models show that one must allow for 'truncation' in the tensor product of representations of a quantum symmetry. This means that the dimension of the tensor product of two representations of dimension σ 1 and σ 2 may be strictly smaller than σ 1 σ 2 . Consistency of the transformation law of field operators local braid relations leads us to expect, that (weak) quasi quantum groups are the most general symmetries in local quantum theory. The elements of the R-matrix which appears in these local braid relations turn out to be operators on H in general. It will be explained in detail how examples of field algebras with weak quasi quantum group symmetry can be obtained. Given a set of observable field with a finite number of superselection sectors, a quantum symmetry together with a complete set of covariant field operators which obey local braid relations are constructed. A covariant transformation law for adjoint fields is not automatic but will follow when the existence of an appropriate antipode is assumed. At the example of the chiral critical Ising model, non-uniqueness of the quantum symmetry will be demonstrated. Generalized quantum symmetries yield examples of gauge symmetries in non-commutative geometry. Quasi-quantum planes are introduced as the simplest examples of quasi-associative differential geometry. (Weak) quasi quantum groups can act on them by generalized derivations much as quantum groups do in non-commutative (differential-) geometry

  17. Quantum computing with defects in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelezko, F.; Gaebel, T.; Popa, I.; Domhan, M.; Wittmann, C.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Single spins in semiconductors, in particular associated with defect centers, are promising candidates for practical and scalable implementation of quantum computing even at room temperature. Such an implementation may also use the reliable and well known gate constructions from bulk nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computing. Progress in development of quantum processor based on defects in diamond will be discussed. By combining optical microscopy, and magnetic resonance techniques, the first quantum logical operations on single spins in a solid are now demonstrated. The system is perspective for room temperature operation because of a weak dependence of decoherence on temperature (author)

  18. Geometric control theory for quantum back-action evasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokotera, Yu; Yamamoto, Naoki [Keio University, Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Engineering a sensor system for detecting an extremely tiny signal such as the gravitational-wave force is a very important subject in quantum physics. A major obstacle to this goal is that, in a simple detection setup, the measurement noise is lower bounded by the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL), which is originated from the intrinsic mechanical back-action noise. Hence, the sensor system has to be carefully engineered so that it evades the back-action noise and eventually beats the SQL. In this paper, based on the well-developed geometric control theory for classical disturbance decoupling problem, we provide a general method for designing an auxiliary (coherent feedback or direct interaction) controller for the sensor system to achieve the above-mentioned goal. This general theory is applied to a typical opto-mechanical sensor system. Also, we demonstrate a controller design for a practical situation where several experimental imperfections are present. (orig.)

  19. Geometric control theory for quantum back-action evasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokotera, Yu; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Engineering a sensor system for detecting an extremely tiny signal such as the gravitational-wave force is a very important subject in quantum physics. A major obstacle to this goal is that, in a simple detection setup, the measurement noise is lower bounded by the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL), which is originated from the intrinsic mechanical back-action noise. Hence, the sensor system has to be carefully engineered so that it evades the back-action noise and eventually beats the SQL. In this paper, based on the well-developed geometric control theory for classical disturbance decoupling problem, we provide a general method for designing an auxiliary (coherent feedback or direct interaction) controller for the sensor system to achieve the above-mentioned goal. This general theory is applied to a typical opto-mechanical sensor system. Also, we demonstrate a controller design for a practical situation where several experimental imperfections are present. (orig.)

  20. Security bound of cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang Ping

    2015-03-23

    Cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment (CSQBC) loosens the security requirement of quantum bit commitment (QBC), so that the existing impossibility proofs of unconditionally secure QBC can be evaded. But here we analyze the common features in all existing CSQBC protocols, and show that in any CSQBC having these features, the receiver can always learn a non-trivial amount of information on the sender's committed bit before it is unveiled, while his cheating can pass the security check with a probability not less than 50%. The sender's cheating is also studied. The optimal CSQBC protocols that can minimize the sum of the cheating probabilities of both parties are found to be trivial, as they are practically useless. We also discuss the possibility of building a fair protocol in which both parties can cheat with equal probabilities.

  1. Security bound of cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment (CSQBC) loosens the security requirement of quantum bit commitment (QBC), so that the existing impossibility proofs of unconditionally secure QBC can be evaded. But here we analyze the common features in all existing CSQBC protocols, and show that in any CSQBC having these features, the receiver can always learn a non-trivial amount of information on the sender's committed bit before it is unveiled, while his cheating can pass the security check with a probability not less than 50%. The sender's cheating is also studied. The optimal CSQBC protocols that can minimize the sum of the cheating probabilities of both parties are found to be trivial, as they are practically useless. We also discuss the possibility of building a fair protocol in which both parties can cheat with equal probabilities.

  2. Quantum games as quantum types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  3. The second quantum revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larousserie, D.

    2008-01-01

    The development of quantum mechanics has now reached such a level that we can consider its promising applications in various fields as a looming second quantum revolution. The classical computer that relies on logical gates is out, now quantum properties open the way to new machines that will simulate nature's events exactly, this will be possible because both nature and the machine will be quantum. The machine will mimic nature and some problems like high temperature superconductivity that resist any modelling will be reproduced easily and then put within hand reach to be understood. Another application is quantum imaging based on the property of quantum entanglement. In the case of 2 entangled particle beams, the measurement of the properties of one beam fixes the values on the other beam. In other words, in case of entangled fluctuations, the measurement of the fluctuations on one beam fixes the value of the fluctuations on the other beam and by subtracting them on the second beam, we get a more accurate result: we have made the background noise disappear. Another application, that has already entered our daily life, is the generation of random numbers in a simple way: quantum mechanics states that a photon has a probability of 50 % to be reflected by a semi-reflecting plate and be detected, this experimental setting is a perfect toss play. The most known application of quantum mechanics is cryptography to assure the security of information transfer. Various systems have proved its efficiency but this technology is hampered by the damping of the signal in optical fibers and is reliable on distances shorter than a few hundreds kilometers. (A.C.)

  4. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  5. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, D F

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Optics gives a comprehensive coverage of developments in quantum optics over the past years. In the early chapters the formalism of quantum optics is elucidated and the main techniques are introduced. These are applied in the later chapters to problems such as squeezed states of light, resonance fluorescence, laser theory, quantum theory of four-wave mixing, quantum non-demolition measurements, Bell's inequalities, and atom optics. Experimental results are used to illustrate the theory throughout. This yields the most comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of experiment and theory in quantum optics in any textbook. More than 40 exercises helps readers test their understanding and provide practice in quantitative problem solving.

  6. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.; West, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the state of the art of quantum gravity, quantum effects in cosmology, quantum black-hole physics, recent developments in supergravity, and quantum gauge theories. Topics considered include the problems of general relativity, pregeometry, complete cosmological theories, quantum fluctuations in cosmology and galaxy formation, a new inflationary universe scenario, grand unified phase transitions and the early Universe, the generalized second law of thermodynamics, vacuum polarization near black holes, the relativity of vacuum, black hole evaporations and their cosmological consequences, currents in supersymmetric theories, the Kaluza-Klein theories, gauge algebra and quantization, and twistor theory. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Second Seminar on Quantum Gravity held in Moscow in 1981

  7. Nuclear quantum effects on the structure and the dynamics of [H{sub 2}O]{sub 8} at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0165 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-11-07

    We use ring-polymer-molecular-dynamics (RPMD) techniques and the semi-empirical q-TIP4P/F water model to investigate the relationship between hydrogen bond connectivity and the characteristics of nuclear position fluctuations, including explicit incorporation of quantum effects, for the energetically low lying isomers of the prototype cluster [H{sub 2}O]{sub 8} at T = 50 K and at 150 K. Our results reveal that tunneling and zero-point energy effects lead to sensible increments in the magnitudes of the fluctuations of intra and intermolecular distances. The degree of proton spatial delocalization is found to map logically with the hydrogen-bond connectivity pattern of the cluster. Dangling hydrogen bonds exhibit the largest extent of spatial delocalization and participate in shorter intramolecular O-H bonds. Combined effects from quantum and polarization fluctuations on the resulting individual dipole moments are also examined. From the dynamical side, we analyze the characteristics of the infrared absorption spectrum. The incorporation of nuclear quantum fluctuations promotes red shifts and sensible broadening relative to the classical profile, bringing the simulation results in much more satisfactory agreement with direct experimental information in the mid and high frequency range of the stretching band. While RPMD predictions overestimate the peak position of the low frequency shoulder, the overall agreement with that reported using an accurate, parameterized, many-body potential is reasonable, and far superior to that one obtains by implementing a partially adiabatic centroid molecular dynamics approach. Quantum effects on the collective dynamics, as reported by instantaneous normal modes, are also discussed.

  8. Rare-Earth Ions in Niobium-Based Devices as a Quantum Memory: Magneto-Optical Effects on Room Temperature Electrical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    heterostructure can be used to implement cryogenic memory for superconducting digital computing. Our concept involves embedding rare-earth ions in...rare-earth neodymium by ion implantation in thin films of niobium and niobium-based heterostructure devices. We model the ion implantation process...the films and devices so they can properly designed and optimized for utility as quantum memory. We find that the magnetic field has a strong effect

  9. Quantum Locality?

    OpenAIRE

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-01-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a 'consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. O...

  10. Quantum ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Grifoni, Milena

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, ratchet systems operating in the quantum regime are investigated. Ratchet systems, also known as Brownian motors, are periodic systems presenting an intrinsic asymmetry which can be exploited to extract work out of unbiased forces. As a model for ratchet systems, we consider the motion of a particle in a one-dimensional periodic and asymmetric potential, interacting with a thermal environment, and subject to an unbiased driving force. In quantum ratchets, intrinsic quantum flu...

  11. Quantum space and quantum completeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurić, Tajron

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the question whether quantum gravity can "smear out" the classical singularity we analyze a certain quantum space and its quantum-mechanical completeness. Classical singularity is understood as a geodesic incompleteness, while quantum completeness requires a unique unitary time evolution for test fields propagating on an underlying background. Here the crucial point is that quantum completeness renders the Hamiltonian (or spatial part of the wave operator) to be essentially self-adjoint in order to generate a unique time evolution. We examine a model of quantum space which consists of a noncommutative BTZ black hole probed by a test scalar field. We show that the quantum gravity (noncommutative) effect is to enlarge the domain of BTZ parameters for which the relevant wave operator is essentially self-adjoint. This means that the corresponding quantum space is quantum complete for a larger range of BTZ parameters rendering the conclusion that in the quantum space one observes the effect of "smearing out" the singularity.

  12. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...

  13. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.; Joffre, M.

    2008-01-01

    All physics is quantum from elementary particles to stars and to the big-bang via semi-conductors and chemistry. This theory is very subtle and we are not able to explain it without the help of mathematic tools. This book presents the principles of quantum mechanics and describes its mathematical formalism (wave function, Schroedinger equation, quantum operators, spin, Hamiltonians, collisions,..). We find numerous applications in the fields of new technologies (maser, quantum computer, cryptography,..) and in astrophysics. A series of about 90 exercises with their answers is included. This book is based on a physics course at a graduate level. (A.C.)

  14. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.

    1998-01-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  15. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  16. Quantum Integers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Klein, Moshe; Mor, Tal

    2010-01-01

    In number theory, a partition of a positive integer n is a way of writing n as a sum of positive integers. The number of partitions of n is given by the partition function p(n). Inspired by quantum information processing, we extend the concept of partitions in number theory as follows: for an integer n, we treat each partition as a basis state of a quantum system representing that number n, so that the Hilbert-space that corresponds to that integer n is of dimension p(n); the 'classical integer' n can thus be generalized into a (pure) quantum state ||ψ(n) > which is a superposition of the partitions of n, in the same way that a quantum bit (qubit) is a generalization of a classical bit. More generally, ρ(n) is a density matrix in that same Hilbert-space (a probability distribution over pure states). Inspired by the notion of quantum numbers in quantum theory (such as in Bohr's model of the atom), we then try to go beyond the partitions, by defining (via recursion) the notion of 'sub-partitions' in number theory. Combining the two notions mentioned above, sub-partitions and quantum integers, we finally provide an alternative definition of the quantum integers [the pure-state |ψ'(n)> and the mixed-state ρ'(n),] this time using the sub-partitions as the basis states instead of the partitions, for describing the quantum number that corresponds to the integer n.

  17. Quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.

    1992-01-01

    As computers become ever more complex, they inevitably become smaller. This leads to a need for components which are fabricated and operate on increasingly smaller size scales. Quantum theory is already taken into account in microelectronics design. This article explores how quantum theory will need to be incorporated into computers in future in order to give them their components functionality. Computation tasks which depend on quantum effects will become possible. Physicists may have to reconsider their perspective on computation in the light of understanding developed in connection with universal quantum computers. (UK)

  18. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  19. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  20. Self-assembled quantum dot structures in a hexagonal nanowire for quantum photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Dou, Xiu-Ming; Wei, Bin; Zha, Guo-Wei; Shang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Li; Su, Dan; Xu, Jian-Xing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Sun, Bao-Quan; Ji, Yuan; Han, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-05-01

    Two types of quantum nanostructures based on self-assembled GaAs quantumdots embedded into GaAs/AlGaAs hexagonal nanowire systems are reported, opening a new avenue to the fabrication of highly efficient single-photon sources, as well as the design of novel quantum optics experiments and robust quantum optoelectronic devices operating at higher temperature, which are required for practical quantum photonics applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.