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Sample records for evades interferon responses

  1. Henipaviruses Employ a Multifaceted Approach to Evade the Antiviral Interferon Response

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    Megan L. Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah virus, which constitute the genus Henipavirus, are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that have been associated with sporadic outbreaks of severe disease and mortality in humans since their emergence in the late 1990s. Similar to other paramyxoviruses, their ability to evade the host interferon (IFN response is conferred by the P gene. The henipavirus P gene encodes four proteins; the P, V, W and C proteins, which have all been described to inhibit the antiviral response. Further studies have revealed that these proteins have overlapping but unique properties which enable the virus to block multiple signaling pathways in the IFN response. The best characterized of these is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway which is targeted by the P, V and W proteins via an interaction with the transcription factor STAT1. In addition the V and W proteins can both limit virus-induced induction of IFN but they appear to do this via distinct mechanisms that rely on unique sequences in their C-terminal domains. The ability to generate recombinant Nipah viruses now gives us the opportunity to determine the precise role for each of these proteins and address their contribution to pathogenicity. Additionally, the question of whether these multiple anti-IFN strategies are all active in the different mammalian hosts for henipaviruses, particularly the fruit bat reservoir, warrants further exploration.

  2. Marburg virus evades interferon responses by a mechanism distinct from ebola virus.

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    Charalampos Valmas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that Marburg viruses (MARV and Ebola viruses (EBOV inhibit interferon (IFN-alpha/beta signaling but utilize different mechanisms. EBOV inhibits IFN signaling via its VP24 protein which blocks the nuclear accumulation of tyrosine phosphorylated STAT1. In contrast, MARV infection inhibits IFNalpha/beta induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. MARV infection is now demonstrated to inhibit not only IFNalpha/beta but also IFNgamma-induced STAT phosphorylation and to inhibit the IFNalpha/beta and IFNgamma-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of upstream Janus (Jak family kinases. Surprisingly, the MARV matrix protein VP40, not the MARV VP24 protein, has been identified to antagonize Jak and STAT tyrosine phosphorylation, to inhibit IFNalpha/beta or IFNgamma-induced gene expression and to inhibit the induction of an antiviral state by IFNalpha/beta. Global loss of STAT and Jak tyrosine phosphorylation in response to both IFNalpha/beta and IFNgamma is reminiscent of the phenotype seen in Jak1-null cells. Consistent with this model, MARV infection and MARV VP40 expression also inhibit the Jak1-dependent, IL-6-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3. Finally, expression of MARV VP40 is able to prevent the tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1, STAT1, STAT2 or STAT3 which occurs following over-expression of the Jak1 kinase. In contrast, MARV VP40 does not detectably inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT2 or Tyk2 when Tyk2 is over-expressed. Mutation of the VP40 late domain, essential for efficient VP40 budding, has no detectable impact on inhibition of IFN signaling. This study shows that MARV inhibits IFN signaling by a mechanism different from that employed by the related EBOV. It identifies a novel function for the MARV VP40 protein and suggests that MARV may globally inhibit Jak1-dependent cytokine signaling.

  3. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

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    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  4. Hepatitis C virus and the controversial role of the interferon sensitivity determining region in the response to interferon treatment.

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    Torres-Puente, Manuela; Cuevas, José M; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-02-01

    The degree of variability of the interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome has been postulated to predict the response to interferon therapy, mainly in patients infected with subtype 1b, although this prediction has been the subject of a long controversy. This prediction has been tested by analyzing a cohort of 67 Spanish patients infected with HCV genotype 1, 23 of which were infected with subtype 1a and 44 with subtype 1b. A sample previous to therapy with alpha-interferon plus ribavirin was obtained and several clones (between 25 and 96) including the ISDR were sequenced from each patient. A significant correlation between mutations at the ISDR and response to treatment for subtype 1b patients, but not for those infected with subtype 1a, has been detected. Although the results suggest that the same relationship holds true for subtype 1a, lack of statistical power because of the small sample size of this subtype prevented firmer conclusions. However, identical ISDR sequences were found in responder and non-responder patients, suggesting that the stability of the ISDR sequence can occasionally help HCV to evade interferon therapy, although this is not a sufficient condition. More complex interactions, including the ISDR or not, are likely to exist and govern the HCV response to interferon treatment. (Copyright) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Protein 18 (Hp1125 Is Involved in Persistent Colonization by Evading Interferon-γ Signaling

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    Yuqun Shan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins (OMPs can induce an immune response. Omp18 (HP1125 of H. pylori is a powerful antigen that can induce significant interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels. Previous studies have suggested that IFN-γ plays an important role in H. pylori clearance. However, H. pylori has multiple mechanisms to avoid host immune surveillance for persistent colonization. We generated an omp18 mutant (H. pylori 26695 and H. pylori SS1 strain to examine whether Omp18 interacts with IFN-γ and is involved in H. pylori colonization. qRT-PCR revealed that IFN-γ induced Omp18 expression. qRT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed reduced expressions of virulence factors CagA and NapA in H. pylori 26695 with IFN-γ treatment, but they were induced in the Δomp18 strain. In C57BL/6 mice infected with H. pylori SS1 and the Δomp18 strain, the Δomp18 strain conferred defective colonization and activated a stronger inflammatory response. Signal transducer phosphorylation and transcription 1 (STAT1 activator was downregulated by the wild-type strain but not the Δomp18 strain in IFN-γ-treated macrophages. Furthermore, Δomp18 strain survival rates were poor in macrophages compared to the wild-type strain. We concluded that H. pylori Omp18 has an important function influencing IFN-γ-mediated immune response to participate in persistent colonization.

  6. Climate Policy: Stop Wanting to Pay to Evade Our Responsibilities

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    Billette de Villemeur, Etienne; Leroux, Justin

    2016-01-01

    We explore an alternative to existing economic instruments to tackle climate change: carbon liabilities. Such liabilities would hold countries responsible for future climate damage to the tune of their emissions over time. The prospect of having to repay this carbon debt over time is enough to discipline emitters, leading to the efficient emissions level. Contrary to existing instruments, our scheme does not rest on a consensus regarding the discount factor nor about climate forecasts; this, together with its reliance on observed damage, allows for better international participation and leads to a fairer division of costs and risks

  7. The interferon response circuit in antiviral host defense.

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    Haller, O; Weber, F

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have learned to multiply in the face of a powerful innate and adaptive immune response of the host. They have evolved multiple strategies to evade the interferon (IFN) system which would otherwise limit virus growth at an early stage of infection. IFNs induce the synthesis of a range of antiviral proteins which serve as cell-autonomous intrinsic restriction factors. For example, the dynamin-like MxA GTPase inhibits the multiplication of influenza and bunyaviruses (such as La Crosse virus, Hantaan virus, Rift Valley Fever virus, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus) by binding and sequestering the nucleocapsid protein into large perinuclear complexes. To overcome such intracellular restrictions, virulent viruses either inhibit IFN synthesis, bind and inactivate secreted IFN molecules, block IFN-activated signaling, or disturb the action of IFN-induced antiviral proteins. Many viruses produce specialized proteins to disarm the danger signal or express virulence genes that target members of the IFN regulatory factor family (IRFs) or components of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. An alternative evasion strategy is based on extreme viral replication speed which out-competes the IFN response. The identification of viral proteins with IFN antagonistic functions has great implications for disease prevention and therapy. Virus mutants lacking IFN antagonistic properties represent safe yet highly immunogenic candidate vaccines. Furthermore, novel drugs intercepting viral IFN-antagonists could be used to disarm the viral intruders.

  8. Interferon Response and Viral Evasion by Members of the Family Rhabdoviridae

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    Matthias J. Schnell

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Like many animal viruses, those of the Rhabdoviridae family, are able to antagonize the type I interferon response and cause disease in mammalian hosts. Though these negative-stranded RNA viruses are very simple and code for as few as five proteins, they have been seen to completely abrogate the type I interferon response early in infection. In this review, we will discuss the viral organization and type I interferon evasion of rhabdoviruses, focusing on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and rabies virus (RABV. Despite their structural similarities, VSV and RABV have completely different mechanisms by which they avert the host immune response. VSV relies on the matrix protein to interfere with host gene transcription and nuclear export of anti-viral mRNAs. Alternatively, RABV uses its phosphoprotein to interfere with IRF-3 phosphorylation and STAT1 signaling. Understanding the virus-cell interactions and viral proteins necessary to evade the immune response is important in developing effective vaccines and therapeutics for this viral family.

  9. Interferon

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    De Somer,P

    1975-01-01

    Le Prof.Pierre de Somer est né en Belgique et a fait ses études de médecine à l'Université de Louvin où il a obtenu en 1942 son diplôme. En 1961 il a été nommé professeur ordinaire d'hygiène et de microbiologie à cette même Université et depuis 1967 il est recteur de l'Université catholique flamande de Louvin, président de la société belge de microbiologie et expert de l'O.M.S. Il nous parle de l'interferon et de ses perspectives dans le traitement de maladies virales avec présentation des clichées.

  10. Osteopontin as a marker for response to pegylated interferon Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteopontin as a marker for response to pegylated interferon Alpha-2b treatment in Chronic HCV Saudi patients. Yousri Mostafa Hussein1,2, Ayman Alhazmi1, Saad Alzahrani3, Ahmad El-Askary1,4,. Abdulrahman Alghamdy5, Eman Bayomy4, Assmaa Selim6, Mohammed Alghamdy1. 1. Medical Laboratories Department ...

  11. Testing the ability of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus to evade the protective immune response induced in rainbow trout by DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepulveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    , this work aims to evaluate whether VHSV is able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. Earlier studies have demonstrated that VHSV can evade the neutralizing effect of monoclonal antibodies by mutations in the glycoprotein gene. One approach of the present study is therefore...... to try to isolate VHSV variants which can escape the neutralizing activity of serum from fish immunized with the DNA vaccine. To do so, a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate (DK3592B) will be repeatedly passaged in fish cell cultures in the presence of neutralizing fish serum. Another approach comprises...

  12. Comparative therapeutic response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin versus interferon alpha-2b in chronic hepatitis C patients

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    Ali, S.; Nazir, G.; Khan, S.A.; Fatima, F.; Iram, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is an epidemic worldwide since discovery in 1989. Conventional interferon alpha-2b plus Ribavirin therapy was started in 1998 but over all sustained viral response (SVR) rates are much below the desired rates to eradicate the diseases and stopping its epidemic. This study was conducted to access the therapeutic and cost-effectiveness of long acting pegylated interferon alpha-2b plus Ribavirin therapy verses conventional interferon alpha-2b plus Ribavirin. Methods: This comparative study was done at PAF Hospital Shorkot Cantt from July 2005 to July 2008. One hundred anti-HCV positive patients were selected randomly for the study according to willingness due to cost afford ability of the patients for conventional interferon. Group-A was labelled as pegylated interferon alpha-2b plus Ribavirin group, and Group-B interferon alpha-2b plus Ribavirin group. Both groups were given treatment for 24 weeks. Early virological response (EVR) was accessed at 12 weeks of the treatment. Sustained virological response (SVR) in both the groups was done at 24 week during the treatment and 6 monthly after treatment for 2 years. Initially non-responders and relapsed patients within 2 years of treatment were re-treated for 24 weeks with the same treatment. In both groups non-responders and relapsed patients were labelled as resistant patients. Both groups were followed with same protocol for 2 years. Results: Out of 100 patients included in the study, 34% were females and 66% were males. Group-A patients over all showed 94% SVR as compare to 80% in Group-B in 2 year follow-up. Group-A showed 6% resistant patients as compare to Group-B (20%). Conventional interferons were better tolerated. Higher incidence of side-effects was seen in Group-A. Conclusion: Pegylated interferon plus Ribavirin showed 94% SVR in 2 years. Pegylated interferon plus Ribavirin is the treatment of choice.

  13. How Flaviviruses Activate and Suppress the Interferon Response

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    Brenda L. Fredericksen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The flavivirus genus includes viruses with a remarkable ability to produce disease on a large scale. The expansion and increased endemicity of dengue and West Nile viruses in the Americas exemplifies their medical and epidemiological importance. The rapid detection of viral infection and induction of the innate antiviral response are crucial to determining the outcome of infection. The intracellular pathogen receptors RIG-I and MDA5 play a central role in detecting flavivirus infections and initiating a robust antiviral response. Yet, these viruses are still capable of producing acute illness in humans. It is now clear that flaviviruses utilize a variety of mechanisms to modulate the interferon response. The non-structural proteins of the various flaviviruses reduce expression of interferon dependent genes by blocking phosphorylation, enhancing degradation or down-regulating expression of major components of the JAK/STAT pathway. Recent studies indicate that interferon modulation is an important factor in the development of severe flaviviral illness. This suggests that an increased understanding of viral-host interactions will facilitate the development of novel therapeutics to treat these viral infections and improved biological models to study flavivirus pathogenesis.

  14. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

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    Ren Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV and pseudorabies virus (PRV, typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs. The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β or gamma interferon (IFN-γ significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1 only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion.

  15. Prediction of response to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

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    Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding interferon response factor (IRF)-5, IRF-8 and glypican-5 (GPC5) have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-β. We analysed whether SNPs in the IRF5, IRF8 and GPC5...... genes are associated with clinical disease activity in MS patients beginning de novo treatment with IFN-β. METHODS: The SNPs rs2004640, rs3807306 and rs4728142 in IRF5, rs13333054 and rs17445836 in IRF8 and rs10492503 in GPC5 were genotyped in 575 patients with relapsing-remitting MS followed...... prospectively after the initiation of their first treatment with IFN-β. RESULTS: 62% of patients experienced relapses during the first 2 years of treatment, and 32% had disability progression during the first 5 years of treatment. Patients with a pretreatment annualized relapse rate >1 had an increased risk...

  16. The elicitin-like glycoprotein, ELI025, is secreted by the pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum and evades host antibody responses.

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    Tassanee Lerksuthirat

    Full Text Available Pythium insidiosum is a unique oomycete that can infect humans and animals. Patients with a P. insidiosum infection (pythiosis have high rates of morbidity and mortality. The pathogen resists conventional antifungal drugs. Information on the biology and pathogenesis of P. insidiosum is limited. Many pathogens secrete proteins, known as effectors, which can affect the host response and promote the infection process. Elicitins are secretory proteins and are found only in the oomycetes, primarily in Phytophthora and Pythium species. In plant-pathogenic oomycetes, elicitins function as pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules, sterol carriers, and plant defense stimulators. Recently, we reported a number of elicitin-encoding genes from the P. insidiosum transcriptome. The function of elicitins during human infections is unknown. One of the P. insidiosum elicitin-encoding genes, ELI025, is highly expressed and up-regulated at body temperature. This study aims to characterize the biochemical, immunological, and genetic properties of the elicitin protein, ELI025. A 12.4-kDa recombinant ELI025 protein (rELI025 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Rabbit anti-rELI025 antibodies reacted strongly with the native ELI025 in P. insidiosum's culture medium. The detected ELI025 had two isoforms: glycosylated and non-glycosylated. ELI025 was not immunoreactive with sera from pythiosis patients. The region near the transcriptional start site of ELI025 contained conserved oomycete core promoter elements. In conclusion, ELI025 is a small, abundant, secreted glycoprotein that evades host antibody responses. ELI025 is a promising candidate for development of diagnostic and therapeutic targets for pythiosis.

  17. Acetaminophen modulates the transcriptional response to recombinant interferon-beta.

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    Aaron Farnsworth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-beta treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP, interferon-beta (IFN-beta or a combination of IFN-beta+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-beta. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IkappaBK/NF-kappaB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-beta+APAP relative to IFN-beta treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-beta treatment.

  18. HBV Bypasses the Innate Immune Response and Does Not Protect HCV From Antiviral Activity of Interferon.

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    Mutz, Pascal; Metz, Philippe; Lempp, Florian A; Bender, Silke; Qu, Bingqian; Schöneweis, Katrin; Seitz, Stefan; Tu, Thomas; Restuccia, Agnese; Frankish, Jamie; Dächert, Christopher; Schusser, Benjamin; Koschny, Ronald; Polychronidis, Georgios; Schemmer, Peter; Hoffmann, Katrin; Baumert, Thomas F; Binder, Marco; Urban, Stephan; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2018-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is sensitive to interferon (IFN)-based therapy, whereas hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is not. It is unclear whether HBV escapes detection by the IFN-mediated immune response or actively suppresses it. Moreover, little is known on how HBV and HCV influence each other in coinfected cells. We investigated interactions between HBV and the IFN-mediated immune response using HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes (PHHs). We analyzed the effects of HBV on HCV replication, and vice versa, at the single-cell level. PHHs were isolated from liver resection tissues from HBV-, HCV-, and human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients. Differentiated HepaRG cells overexpressing the HBV receptor sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (dHepaRGNTCP) and PHHs were infected with HBV. Huh7.5 cells were transfected with circular HBV DNA genomes resembling viral covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), and subsequently infected with HCV; this served as a model of HBV and HCV coinfection. Cells were incubated with IFN inducers, or IFNs, and antiviral response and viral replication were analyzed by immune fluorescence, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and flow cytometry. HBV infection of dHepaRGNTCP cells and PHHs neither activated nor inhibited signaling via pattern recognition receptors. Incubation of dHepaRGNTCP cells and PHHs with IFN had little effect on HBV replication or levels of cccDNA. HBV infection of these cells did not inhibit JAK-STAT signaling or up-regulation of IFN-stimulated genes. In coinfected cells, HBV did not prevent IFN-induced suppression of HCV replication. In dHepaRGNTCP cells and PHHs, HBV evades the induction of IFN and IFN-induced antiviral effects. HBV infection does not rescue HCV from the IFN-mediated response. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The type I interferon response during viral infections: a "SWOT" analysis.

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    Gaajetaan, Giel R; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2012-03-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a strong and crucial moderator for the control of viral infections. The strength of this system is illustrated by the fact that, despite some temporary discomfort like a common cold or diarrhea, most viral infections will not cause major harm to the healthy immunocompetent host. To achieve this, the immune system is equipped with a wide array of pattern recognition receptors and the subsequent coordinated type I IFN response orchestrated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). The production of type I IFN subtypes by dendritic cells (DCs), but also other cells is crucial for the execution of many antiviral processes. Despite this coordinated response, morbidity and mortality are still common in viral disease due to the ability of viruses to exploit the weaknesses of the immune system. Viruses successfully evade immunity and infection can result in aberrant immune responses. However, these weaknesses also open opportunities for improvement via clinical interventions as can be seen in current vaccination and antiviral treatment programs. The application of IFNs, Toll-like receptor ligands, DCs, and antiviral proteins is now being investigated to further limit viral infections. Unfortunately, a common threat during stimulation of immunity is the possible initiation or aggravation of autoimmunity. Also the translation from animal models to the human situation remains difficult. With a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats ("SWOT") analysis, we discuss the interaction between host and virus as well as (future) therapeutic options, related to the type I IFN system. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Kallikrein–Kinin System Suppresses Type I Interferon Responses: A Novel Pathway of Interferon Regulation

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    Alecia Seliga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Kallikrein–Kinin System (KKS, comprised of kallikreins (klks, bradykinins (BKs angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, and many other molecules, regulates a number of physiological processes, including inflammation, coagulation, angiogenesis, and control of blood pressure. In this report, we show that KKS regulates Type I IFN responses, thought to be important in lupus pathogenesis. We used CpG (TLR9 ligand, R848 (TLR7 ligand, or recombinant IFN-α to induce interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and proteins, and observed that this response was markedly diminished by BKs, klk1 (tissue kallikrein, or captopril (an ACE inhibitor. BKs significantly decreased the ISGs induced by TLRs in vitro and in vivo (in normal and lupus-prone mice, and in human PBMCs, especially the induction of Irf7 gene (p < 0.05, the master regulator of Type I IFNs. ISGs induced by IFN-α were also suppressed by the KKS. MHC Class I upregulation, a classic response to Type I IFNs, was reduced by BKs in murine dendritic cells (DCs. BKs decreased phosphorylation of STAT2 molecules that mediate IFN signaling. Among the secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines analyzed (IL-6, IL12p70, and CXCL10, the strongest suppressive effect was on CXCL10, a highly Type I IFN-dependent cytokine, upon CpG stimulation, both in normal and lupus-prone DCs. klks that break down into BKs, also suppressed CpG-induced ISGs in murine DCs. Captopril, a drug that inhibits ACE and increases BK, suppressed ISGs, both in mouse DCs and human PBMCs. The effects of BK were reversed with indomethacin (compound that inhibits production of PGE2, suggesting that BK suppression of IFN responses may be mediated via prostaglandins. These results highlight a novel regulatory mechanism in which members of the KKS control the Type I IFN response and suggest a role for modulators of IFNs in the pathogenesis of lupus and interferonopathies.

  1. Interferon Response and Viral Evasion by Members of the Family Rhabdoviridae

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    Matthias J. Schnell; Elizabeth J. Faul; Douglas S. Lyles

    2009-01-01

    Like many animal viruses, those of the Rhabdoviridae family, are able to antagonize the type I interferon response and cause disease in mammalian hosts. Though these negative-stranded RNA viruses are very simple and code for as few as five proteins, they have been seen to completely abrogate the type I interferon response early in infection. In this review, we will discuss the viral organization and type I interferon evasion of rhabdoviruses, focusing on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and r...

  2. Response of interferon alone and with ribavirin inpatients of chronic hepatitis C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niaz, A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to compare the response of interferon alone and interferon plus ribavirin in patients of chronic hepatitis C. Results: At completion of treatment HCV-RNA levels in serum were not detectable in 15 of 20 (75%) patients who received interferon alpha and ribavirin combination therapy as compared to 10 of 20 (50%) patients who received interferon alpha alone. Only 1 patient became HCV RNA negative in the control group. Normalization of ALT concentration and histologic response was proportionate to the virological response. Conclusion: Combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin is more effective than treatment with interferon alone for minimizing viral load, improving ALT levels and histology. (author)

  3. The interferon response to intracellular DNA: why so many receptors?

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    Unterholzner, Leonie

    2013-11-01

    The detection of intracellular DNA has emerged to be a key event in the innate immune response to viruses and intracellular bacteria, and during conditions of sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. One of the consequences of the detection of DNA as a 'stranger' and a 'danger' signal is the production of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Much work has been dedicated to the elucidation of the signalling cascades that activate this DNA-induced gene expression programme. However, while many proteins have been proposed to act as sensors for intracellular DNA in recent years, none has been met with universal acceptance, and a theory linking all the recent observations is, as yet, lacking. This review presents the evidence for the various interferon-inducing DNA receptors proposed to date, and examines the hypotheses that might explain why so many different receptors appear to be involved in the innate immune recognition of intracellular DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. TREX1 Knockdown Induces an Interferon Response to HIV that Delays Viral Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Lee Adam Wheeler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite their antiviral effect, the in vivo effect of interferons on HIV transmission is difficult to predict, because interferons also activate and recruit HIV-susceptible cells to sites of infection. HIV does not normally induce type I interferons in infected cells, but does if TREX1 is knocked down. Here, we investigated the effect of topical TREX1 knockdown and local interferon production on HIV transmission in human cervicovaginal explants and humanized mice. In explants in which TREX1 was knocked down, HIV induced interferons, which blocked infection. In humanized mice, even though TREX1 knockdown increased infiltrating immune cells, it delayed viral replication for 3–4 weeks. Similarly intravaginal application of type I interferons the day before HIV infection induced interferon responsive genes, reduced inflammation, and decreased viral replication. However, intravenous interferon enhanced inflammation and infection. Thus, in models of human sexual transmission, a localized interferon response inhibits HIV transmission but systemic interferons do not.

  5. [Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma: paradoxical response to interferon eyedrops].

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    Mata, E; Conesa, E; Castro, M; Martínez, L; de Pablo, C; González, M L

    2014-07-01

    A 67 year-old male seen for a longstanding corneal-conjunctival tumor. topical interferon α2b (IFN-α2b) 10 U/ml. A significant increase in lesion size was observed after 8 weeks. A surgical excision with cryotherapy was then performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. At this time the patient was found to have a positive HIV serology. Conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a pre-cancerous lesion of the ocular surface. Medical treatment of CIN is essentially with IFN-α2b due to its antiviral/antitumor properties. In patients with HIV, treatment response could be paradoxical. We recommend serology for HIV before treatment with topical IFN-α2b. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Evasion of interferon responses by Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Christopher F; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2009-09-01

    The filoviruses, Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), cause frequently lethal viral hemorrhagic fever. These infections induce potent cytokine production, yet these host responses fail to prevent systemic virus replication. Consistent with this, filoviruses have been found to encode proteins VP35 and VP24 that block host interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta production and inhibit signaling downstream of the IFN-alpha/beta and the IFN-gamma receptors, respectively. VP35, which is a component of the viral nucleocapsid complex and plays an essential role in viral RNA synthesis, acts as a pseudosubstrate for the cellular kinases IKK-epsilon and TBK-1, which phosphorylate and activate interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7). VP35 also promotes SUMOylation of IRF-7, repressing IFN gene transcription. In addition, VP35 is a dsRNA-binding protein, and mutations that disrupt dsRNA binding impair VP35 IFN-antagonist activity while leaving its RNA replication functions intact. The phenotypes of recombinant EBOV bearing mutant VP35s unable to inhibit IFN-alpha/beta demonstrate that VP35 IFN-antagonist activity is critical for full virulence of these lethal pathogens. The structure of the VP35 dsRNA-binding domain, which has recently become available, is expected to provide insight into how VP35 IFN-antagonist and dsRNA-binding functions are related. The EBOV VP24 protein inhibits IFN signaling through an interaction with select host cell karyopherin-alpha proteins, preventing the nuclear import of otherwise activated STAT1. It remains to be determined to what extent VP24 may also modulate the nuclear import of other host cell factors and to what extent this may influence the outcome of infection. Notably, the Marburg virus VP24 protein does not detectably block STAT1 nuclear import, and, unlike EBOV, MARV infection inhibits STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation. Thus, despite their similarities, there are fundamental differences by which

  7. Evasion of the Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response by Filoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington B. Cárdenas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV, the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  8. Expression of interferon regulatory factor 4 in chronic myeloid leukemia: correlation with response to interferon alfa therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Hochhaus, A; König-Merediz, S A; Brendel, C; Proba, J; Hoppe, G J; Wittig, B; Ehninger, G; Hehlmann, R; Neubauer, A

    2000-10-01

    Mice experiments have established an important role for interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members in hematopoiesis. We wanted to study the expression of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in various hematologic disorders, especially chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and its association with response to interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) treatment in CML. Blood samples from various hematopoietic cell lines, different leukemia patients (70 CML, 29 acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 10 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia [CMMoL], 10 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 10 chronic lymphoid leukemia patients), and 33 healthy volunteers were monitored for IRF4 expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Then, with a focus on CML, the IRF4 level was determined in sorted cell subpopulations from CML patients and healthy volunteers and in in vitro-stimulated CML cells. Furthermore, IRF4 expression was compared in the CML samples taken before IFN-alpha therapy and in 47 additional CML samples taken during IFN-alpha therapy. IRF4 expression was then correlated with cytogenetic response to IFN-alpha. IRF4 expression was significantly impaired in CML, AML, and CMMoL samples. The downregulation of IRF4 in CML samples was predominantly found in T cells. In CML patients during IFN-alpha therapy, a significant increase in IRF4 levels was detected, and this was also observed in sorted T cells from CML patients. The increase seen during IFN-alpha therapy was not due to different blood counts. In regard to the cytogenetic response with IFN-alpha, a good response was associated with high IRF4 expression. IRF4 expression is downregulated in T cells of CML patients, and its increase is associated with a good response to IFN-alpha therapy. These data suggest IRF4 expression as a useful marker to monitor, if not predict, response to IFN-alpha in CML.

  9. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. TNF blockade induces a dysregulated type I interferon response without autoimmunity in paradoxical psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Curdin; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Mylonas, Alessio; Belkhodja, Cyrine; Demaria, Olivier; Navarini, Alexander A; Lapointe, Anne-Karine; French, Lars E; Vernez, Maxime; Gilliet, Michel

    2018-01-02

    Although anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are highly effective in the treatment of psoriasis, 2-5% of treated patients develop psoriasis-like skin lesions called paradoxical psoriasis. The pathogenesis of this side effect and its distinction from classical psoriasis remain unknown. Here we show that skin lesions from patients with paradoxical psoriasis are characterized by a selective overexpression of type I interferons, dermal accumulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), and reduced T-cell numbers, when compared to classical psoriasis. Anti-TNF treatment prolongs type I interferon production by pDCs through inhibition of their maturation. The resulting type I interferon overexpression is responsible for the skin phenotype of paradoxical psoriasis, which, unlike classical psoriasis, is independent of T cells. These findings indicate that paradoxical psoriasis represents an ongoing overactive innate inflammatory process, driven by pDC-derived type I interferon that does not lead to T-cell autoimmunity.

  11. Loss of prion protein induces a primed state of type I interferon-responsive genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malachin, Giulia; Reiten, Malin R.; Salvesen, Øyvind

    2017-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been extensively studied because of its pivotal role in prion diseases; however, its functions remain incompletely understood. A unique line of goats has been identified that carries a nonsense mutation that abolishes synthesis of PrPC. In these animals, the Pr...... genotypes. About 70% of these were classified as interferon-responsive genes. In goats without PrPC, the majority of type I interferon-responsive genes were in a primed, modestly upregulated state, with fold changes ranging from 1.4 to 3.7. Among these were ISG15, DDX58 (RIG-1), MX1, MX2, OAS1, OAS2...... and DRAM1, all of which have important roles in pathogen defense, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunomodulation and DNA damage response. Our data suggest that PrPC contributes to the fine-tuning of resting state PBMCs expression level of type I interferon-responsive genes. The molecular mechanism...

  12. Enhanced gamma interferon responses of mouse spleen cells following immunotherapy for tuberculosis relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Olga; Vilaplana, Cristina; Guirado, Evelyn; Díaz, Jorge; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-11-01

    Gamma interferon responses of spleen cells in mice were examined during postchemotherapy relapse of intraperitoneally induced latent tuberculous infection. The mycobacterial extract RUTI, which prevented the relapse, significantly enhanced the immune responses to secreted and structural recombinant mycobacterial antigens, suggesting that RUTI-mediated protection was mediated by activated T cells.

  13. Spitting Image: Tick Saliva Assists the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease in Evading Host Skin's Innate Immune Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted through ticks. Inhibition of host skin's innate immune response might be instrumental to both tick feeding and B. burgdorferi transmission. The article by Marchal et al. describes how tick saliva suppresses B.

  14. IRF3 and type I interferons fuel a fatal response to myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kevin R; Aguirre, Aaron D; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Sun, Yuan; Roh, Jason D; Ng, Richard P; Kohler, Rainer H; Arlauckas, Sean P; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Savol, Andrej; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Kelly, Mark; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Mitchison, Timothy; Libby, Peter; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and type I interferons (IFNs) protect against infections and cancer, but excessive IRF3 activation and type I IFN production cause autoinflammatory conditions such as Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and STING-associated vasculopathy of infancy (SAVI). Myocardial infarction (MI) elicits inflammation, but the dominant molecular drivers of MI-associated inflammation remain unclear. Here we show that ischemic cell death and uptake of cell debris by macrophages in the heart fuel a fatal response to MI by activating IRF3 and type I IFN production. In mice, single-cell RNA-seq analysis of 4,215 leukocytes isolated from infarcted and non-infarcted hearts showed that MI provokes activation of an IRF3-interferon axis in a distinct population of interferon-inducible cells (IFNICs) that were classified as cardiac macrophages. Mice genetically deficient in cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), its adaptor STING, IRF3, or the type I IFN receptor IFNAR exhibited impaired interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression and, in the case of mice deficient in IRF3 or IFNAR, improved survival after MI as compared to controls. Interruption of IRF3-dependent signaling resulted in decreased cardiac expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration of the heart, as well as in attenuated ventricular dilation and improved cardiac function. Similarly, treatment of mice with an IFNAR-neutralizing antibody after MI ablated the interferon response and improved left ventricular dysfunction and survival. These results identify IRF3 and the type I IFN response as a potential therapeutic target for post-MI cardioprotection.

  15. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Bjerrum, O W; Pallisgaard, N

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the JAK2 V617F allele burden during disease evolution and ongoing myelosuppressive treatment is likely to be implemented in the future clinical setting. Interferon alpha has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of both chronic myeloid leukemia and the Philadelphia chromos...... with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response....

  16. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Pallisgaard, N.; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  17. Modulation of SOCS protein expression influences the interferon responsiveness of human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Zimmerer, Jason M; Kreiner, Melanie; Trefry, John; Bill, Matthew A; Young, Gregory S; Becknell, Brian; Carson, William E III

    2010-01-01

    Endogenously produced interferons can regulate the growth of melanoma cells and are administered exogenously as therapeutic agents to patients with advanced cancer. We investigated the role of negative regulators of interferon signaling known as suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in mediating interferon-resistance in human melanoma cells. Basal and interferon-alpha (IFN-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-induced expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was evaluated by immunoblot analysis in a panel of n = 10 metastatic human melanoma cell lines, in human embryonic melanocytes (HEM), and radial or vertical growth phase melanoma cells. Over-expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins in melanoma cells was achieved using the PINCO retroviral vector, while siRNA were used to inhibit SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) was measured by intracellular flow cytometry and IFN-stimulated gene expression was measured by Real Time PCR. SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins were expressed at basal levels in melanocytes and in all melanoma cell lines examined. Expression of the SOCS1 and SOCS3 proteins was also enhanced following stimulation of a subset of cell lines with IFN-α or IFN-γ. Over-expression of SOCS proteins in melanoma cell lines led to significant inhibition of Tyr 701 -phosphorylated STAT1 (P-STAT1) and gene expression following stimulation with IFN-α (IFIT2, OAS-1, ISG-15) or IFN-γ (IRF1). Conversely, siRNA inhibition of SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in melanoma cells enhanced their responsiveness to interferon stimulation. These data demonstrate that SOCS proteins are expressed in human melanoma cell lines and their modulation can influence the responsiveness of melanoma cells to IFN-α and IFN-γ

  18. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-α/β and γ-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  19. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko, E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  20. Interferon-β Modulates Inflammatory Response in Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ping-Chang; Scofield, Barbara A; Yu, I-Chen; Chang, Fen-Lei; Ganea, Doina; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-08

    Stroke is a leading cause of death in the world. In >80% of strokes, the initial acute phase of ischemic injury is due to the occlusion of a blood vessel resulting in severe focal hypoperfusion, excitotoxicity, and oxidative damage. Interferon-β (IFNβ), a cytokine with immunomodulatory properties, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis for more than a decade. Its anti-inflammatory properties and well-characterized safety profile suggest that IFNβ has therapeutic potential for the treatment of ischemic stroke. We investigated the therapeutic effect of IFNβ in the mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion. We found that IFNβ not only reduced infarct size in ischemic brains but also lessened neurological deficits in ischemic stroke animals. Further, multiple molecular mechanisms by which IFNβ modulates ischemic brain inflammation were identified. IFNβ reduced central nervous system infiltration of monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, CD4(+) T cells, and γδ T cells; inhibited the production of inflammatory mediators; suppressed the expression of adhesion molecules on brain endothelial cells; and repressed microglia activation in the ischemic brain. Our results demonstrate that IFNβ exerts a protective effect against ischemic stroke through its anti-inflammatory properties and suggest that IFNβ is a potential therapeutic agent, targeting the reperfusion damage subsequent to the treatment with tissue plasminogen activator. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bum Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV actively evades host interferon (IFN responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP and poly(IC. The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity.

  2. Predictive value of early viriological response for sustained viriological response in chronic hepatitis c with conventional interferon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, A.; Umar, M.; Khaar, H.T.B.; Kulsoom, A.; Minhas, Z.; Ambreen, S.; Habib, N.; Mumtaz, W.; Habib, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis is a major public health problem in Pakistan due to its strong association with liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. In Pakistan, conventional interferon therapy along with Ribavirin is favoured especially in Government funded programs for treatment of Hepatitis C, over the more expensive Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin combination therapy as recommended by Pakistan society of Gastroenterology and GI endoscopy due to its favourable results observed in genotype 3 which is the dominant genotype of this region. Objective of our study was to assess the viriological responses with standard interferon therapy and to determine the predictive values of early viriological response (EVR) for Sustained Viriological Response (SVR) in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with standard interferon therapy. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on patients with chronic hepatitis C having received standard interferon and ribavirin therapy for six months. EVR and SVR were noted for analysis. Positive and negative predictive values of EVR on SVR were calculated. Results: Out of the total sample (N=3075), 1946 (63.3 percentage) patients were tested for EVR. 1386 (71.2 percentage) were positive while 560 (28.8 percentage) were negative while 516 (16.8 percentage) were tested for SVR. Two hundred and eighty-five (55.2 percentage) were positive while 231 (44.8 percentage) were negative. EVR and SVR tested were N=117. Positive predictive value of EVR on SVR was 67.1 percentage and negative predictive value was 65.8 percentage. Statistically significant association between EVR and SVR was determined with Chi square statistic of 11.8 (p-value <0.0001). Conclusion: EVR is a good predictor of response of patients to standard interferon and ribavirin therapy. In the absence of an EVR, it seems imperative to stop further treatment. Virilogical responses with conventional interferon therapy are comparable to those of pegylated interferon therapy so

  3. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  4. Human Papilloma Virus Infection Does Not Predict Response to Interferon Therapy in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Garg, Nisha; Nanji, Afshan; Joag, Madhura; Nuovo, Gerard; Palioura, Sotiria; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2015-11-01

    To identify the frequency of human papilloma virus (HPV) in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and to evaluate differences in clinical features and treatment response of tumors with positive versus negative HPV results. Retrospective case series. Twenty-seven patients with OSSN. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia specimens were analyzed for the presence of HPV. Clinical features and response to interferon were determined retrospectively and linked to the presence (versus absence) of HPV. Clinical characteristics of OSSN by HPV status. Twenty-one of 27 tumors (78%) demonstrated positive HPV results. The HPV genotypes identified included HPV-16 in 10 tumors (48%), HPV-31 in 5 tumors, HPV-33 in 1 tumor, HPV-35 in 2 tumors, HPV-51 in 2 tumors, and a novel HPV in 3 tumors (total of 23 tumors because 1 tumor had 3 identified genotypes). Tumors found in the superior limbus were more likely to show positive HPV results (48% vs. 0%; P=0.06, Fisher exact test). Tumors with positive HPV-16 results were larger (68 vs. 34 mm2; P=0.08, Mann-Whitney U test) and were more likely to have papillomatous morphologic features (50% vs. 12%; P=0.07, Fisher exact test) compared with tumors showing negative results for HPV-16. Human papilloma virus status was not found to be associated with response to interferon therapy (P=1.0, Fisher exact test). Metrics found to be associated with a nonfavorable response to interferon were male gender and tumors located in the superior conjunctivae. The presence of HPV in OSSN seems to be more common in lesions located in the nonexposed, superior limbus. Human papilloma virus presence does not seem to be required for a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  5. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays. Ot...

  6. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays...

  7. Gender effects on treatment response to interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, M; Koch-Henriksen, N; Laursen, B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gender appears to play a role in incidence and disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine whether male and female patients with MS respond differently to interferon-beta treatment in terms of reduction in relapse rates. METHODS: We included all....... Patients served as their own controls, and relapse rates were compared between NAb-negative and NAb-positive periods. RESULTS: NAbs significantly abrogated the interferon-beta treatment efficacy in both genders. The all-over women:men relapse rate ratio irrespective of NAb status was 1.47 (95%CI; 1.......28-1.68). In a generalized linear Poisson models analysis with relapse counts as response variable, the main effects NAbs, sex, age at treatment start and number of relapses in 2 years before treatment start were strongly significant, but the effect of NAbs on relapse rates did not differ significantly between men and women...

  8. Interferon-γ gene polymorphisms at +874T/A loci associated with response to treatment with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Norozian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a worldwide health problem, which associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Interferon-α and Ribavirin are only acceptable treatment regimen for these patients. These regimen are effective only on 50% of the patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to treatment with interferon gamma gene polymorphism in patients with hepatitis C. Materials and Methods: In this study, a cross - sectional study, response or lack of response to treatment in 78 patients treated with interferon gamma gene polymorphism were studied at Shiraz Namazi Hospital from 2011-2012 . DNA samples extract by salt (salting out and interferon gamma gene polymorphism (+874T/A IFN–gamma was evaluate with ARMS-PCR technique. Data were analyzed using EPI Info2000 and SPSS 16 software (chi-square test. Results: Results showed that 39 patients (50% out of 78 studied patients had TT alleles, 11 patients (1.14% had AA alleles and 28 patients (9.39% had TA alleles. 49 patients (62.82% responded to treatment. TT genotype and allele frequencies between the studied groups showed significant differencey (P=0.002. Conclusion: Interferon gamma is a key cytokine in the immune response against hepatitis C. Polymorphism in the interferon-gamma gene is (+874T/AIFN–gamma One of the most important factors interferes with treatment response in hepatitis C patients.

  9. Evader Interdiction and Collateral Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In network interdiction problems, evaders (hostile agents or data packets) are moving through a network towards their targets and we wish to choose sensor placement locations in order to intercept them before they reach their destinations. Sensor locations should be chosen economically, balancing security gains with cost, including the inconvenience sensors inflict upon innocent travelers. We give optimal sensor allocation algorithms for several classes of special graphs and hardness and optimal approximation results for general graphs, including for deterministic or Markov chain-based and oblivious or reactive evaders. In a similar-sounding but much different problem setting posed by [10] where the innocent travelers can also be reactive, we again give optimal algorithms for special cases and hardness and (essentially) optimal approximation results on general graphs.

  10. Glycosaminoglycans mediate retention of the poxvirus type I interferon binding protein at the cell surface to locally block interferon antiviral responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanuy, Imma; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of smallpox was accomplished 30 yr ago, but poxviral infections still represent a public health concern due to the potential release of variola virus or the emergence of zoonotic poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus. A critical determinant of poxvirus virulence is the inhibition of interferons (IFNs) by the virus-encoded type I IFN-binding protein (IFNα/βBP). This immunomodulatory protein is secreted and has the unique property of interacting with the cell surface in order to prevent IFN-mediated antiviral responses. However, the mechanism of its attachment to the cell surface remains unknown. Using surface plasmon resonance and cell-binding assays, we report that the IFNα/βBP from vaccinia virus, the smallpox vaccine, interacts with cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Analysis of the contribution of different regions of the protein to cell surface binding demonstrated that clusters of basic residues in the first immunoglobulin domain mediate GAG interactions. Furthermore, mutation of the GAG-interaction motifs does not affect its IFN-binding and -blocking capacity. Functional conservation of GAG-binding sites is demonstrated for the IFNα/βBP from variola and monkeypox viruses, extending our understanding of immune modulation by the most virulent human poxviruses. These results are relevant for the design of improved vaccines and intervention strategies.—Montanuy, I., Alejo, A., Alcami, A. Glycosaminoglycans mediate retention of the poxvirus type I interferon binding protein at the cell surface to locally block interferon antiviral responses. PMID:21372110

  11. The relationships between IFNL4 genotype, intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression and interferon treatment response differs in HCV-1 compared with HCV-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J A; Congiu, M; Bonanzinga, S; Sandhu, M K; Kia, Y H; Bell, S J; Nguyen, T; Iser, D M; Visvanathan, K; Sievert, W; Bowden, D S; Desmond, P V; Thompson, A J

    2015-08-01

    The biological mechanism underlying the association between IFNL4/IFNL3 polymorphism and peginterferon/ribavirin (PR) response in HCV-1 is thought to involve differential intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression. HCV-3 is more sensitive to PR, but there are no studies of the association between IFNL4 polymorphism, PR treatment response and liver interferon-stimulated gene expression in HCV-3. We evaluated the association between IFNL4/IFNL3 genotypes, PR treatment outcomes and intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression, according to HCV genotype. HCV-1 and HCV-3 patients who received PR therapy were identified. IFNL3 (rs12979860) and IFNL4 genotype (rs368234815) were determined. A second cohort with stored liver specimens was identified. Expression of ISGs was measured by rt-PCR. Two hundred and fifty-nine patients were identified: 55% HCV-1, 45% HCV-3. IFNL4 genotype frequency was TT/TT 44%, TT/ΔG 42% andΔG/ΔG 14%. Linkage disequilibrium with IFNL3 genotype was high (r(2) = 0.98). The association between IFNL4 genotype and PR response was attenuated in HCV-3 vs. HCV-1 (HCV-3: SVR 89% vs. 76% vs. 72% for TT/TT vs. TT/ΔG vs. ΔG/ΔG, P = 0.09; HCV-1: SVR: 82% vs. 29% vs. 24%, P < 0.001). Intrahepatic ISG expression was evaluated in 92 patients; 61% HCV-1. The association between IFNL4 genotype and liver ISG expression was significantly different for HCV-3 vs. HCV-1 (P-value for interaction = 0.046), with levels of interferon-stimulated gene expression being highest in HCV-1 patients who carried a poor-response IFNL4 genotype. The relationship between IFNL4 genotype and PR treatment response as well as intrahepatic interferon-stimulated gene expression differs between HCV-1 and HCV-3. These data suggest fundamental differences in host-virus interactions according to HCV genotype. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferonresponse in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment...... were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays...

  13. Irf3 polymorphism alters induction of interferon beta in response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Garifulin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic makeup of the host plays a significant role in the course and outcome of infection. Inbred strains of mice display a wide range of sensitivities to Listeria monocytogenes infection and thus serve as a good model for analysis of the effect of genetic polymorphism. The outcome of L. monocytogenes infection in mice is influenced by the ability of this bacterium to induce expression of interferon beta mRNA, encoded in mouse by the Ifnb1 (interferon beta 1, fibroblast gene. Mouse strains that lack components of the IFN beta signaling pathway are substantially more resistant to infection. We found that macrophages from the ByJ substrain of the common C57BL/6 inbred strain of mice are impaired in their ability to induce Ifnb1 expression in response to bacterial and viral infections. We mapped the locus that controls differential expression of Ifnb1 to a region on Chromosome 7 that includes interferon regulatory factor 3 (Irf3, which encodes a transcription factor responsible for early induction of Ifnb1 expression. In C57BL/6ByJ mice, Irf3 mRNA was inefficiently spliced, with a significant proportion of the transcripts retaining intron 5. Analysis of the Irf3 locus identified a single base-pair polymorphism and revealed that intron 5 of Irf3 is spliced by the atypical U12-type spliceosome. We found that the polymorphism disrupts a U12-type branchpoint and has a profound effect on the efficiency of splicing of Irf3. We demonstrate that a naturally occurring change in the splicing control element has a dramatic effect on the resistance to L. monocytogenes infection. Thus, the C57BL/6ByJ mouse strain serves as an example of how a mammalian host can counter bacterial virulence strategies by introducing subtle alteration of noncoding sequences.

  14. Interferon-Mediated Innate Immune Responses against Malaria Parasite Liver Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Miller

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-transmitted malaria parasites infect hepatocytes and asymptomatically replicate as liver stages. Using RNA sequencing, we show that a rodent malaria liver-stage infection stimulates a robust innate immune response including type I interferon (IFN and IFNγ pathways. Liver-stage infection is suppressed by these infection-engendered innate responses. This suppression was abrogated in mice deficient in IFNγ, the type I IFN α/β receptor (IFNAR, and interferon regulatory factor 3. Natural killer and CD49b+CD3+ natural killer T (NKT cells increased in the liver after a primary infection, and CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which secrete IFNγ, were critical in reducing liver-stage burden of a secondary infection. Lack of IFNAR signaling abrogated the increase in NKT cell numbers in the liver, showing a link between type I IFN signaling, cell recruitment, and subsequent parasite elimination. Our findings demonstrate innate immune sensing of malaria parasite liver-stage infection and that the ensuing innate responses can eliminate the parasite.

  15. Study on Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Titer and Specific Interferon Gamma Response Among Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Makvandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major problem for healthcare workers worldwide, and among them, dentists are at risk of acquiring HBV infection. The prevalence of HBV infection has been reported among the dentists in different regions of the world. Since none of the available drugs can clear HBV infection, the presence of effective immunity against HBV infection is important to prevent HBV infection. Objectives This study aimed at determining HBs antibody and specific HBV gamma interferon among the dentists, who received hepatitis B vaccine. Methods The blood samples were collected from 40 dentists, including 7 endodontics, 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologist, 4 periodontics, 11 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 6 implantologists, 3 orthodontics, 1 oral and maxillofacial pathologist, 2 esthetic and restorative dentists, and 4 doctors of dental surgery (DDS at from dental college of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran during December, 2013. Overall, 31 (77.5% dentists had already received 3 doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, and 9 (22.5% had received only two doses of the vaccine. Their sera were tested for HBsAb and anti-HBc-IgG by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. The lymphocyte of individuals was separated from their blood sample by Ficoll-Hypaque, cells were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS by centrifugation, and finally the pellet cells was resuspended in RPMI-1640 media. Separated cells were exposed to 2.5 µg of purified recombinant HBs antigen, and supernatants were collected after 72 hours and tested for detection of specific interferon γ level by ELISA test. Results Overall, 97.5% of dentists showed positive HBs antibody test results while 36 showed (90% positive test results for specific interferon γ against hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusions High coverage of 97.5% immune response against hepatitis B infection was found, indicating high efficacy of recombinant

  16. Effect of statins on clinical and molecular responses to intramuscular interferon beta-1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudick, R A; Pace, A; Rani, M R S; Hyde, R; Panzara, M; Appachi, S; Shrock, J; Maurer, S L; Calabresi, P A; Confavreux, C; Galetta, S L; Lublin, F D; Radue, E-W; Ransohoff, R M

    2009-06-09

    Findings from a small clinical study suggested that statins may counteract the therapeutic effects of interferon beta (IFNbeta) in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). We conducted a post hoc analysis of data from the Safety and Efficacy of Natalizumab in Combination With IFNbeta-1a in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (SENTINEL) study to determine the effects of statins on efficacy of IFNbeta. SENTINEL was a prospective trial of patients with RRMS treated with natalizumab (Tysabri, Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA) plus IM IFNbeta-1a (Avonex, Biogen Idec, Inc.) 30 microg compared with placebo plus IM IFNbeta-1a 30 microg. Clinical and MRI outcomes in patients treated with IM IFNbeta-1a only (no-statins group, n = 542) were compared with those of patients taking IM IFNbeta-1a and statins at doses used to treat hyperlipidemia (statins group, n = 40). No significant differences were observed between treatment groups in adjusted annualized relapse rate (p = 0.937), disability progression (p = 0.438), number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (p = 0.604), or number of new or enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions (p = 0.802) at 2 years. More patients in the statins group reported fatigue, extremity pain, muscle aches, and increases in hepatic transaminases compared with patients in the no-statins group. Statin treatment had no ex vivo or in vitro effect on induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Statin therapy does not appear to affect clinical effects of IM interferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis or the primary molecular response to interferon beta treatment.

  17. Differential Regulation of Interferon Responses by Ebola and Marburg Virus VP35 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Megan R.; Liu, Gai; Mire, Chad E.; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Luthra, Priya; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2016-02-11

    Suppression of innate immune responses during filoviral infection contributes to disease severity. Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses each encode a VP35 protein that suppresses RIG-I-like receptor signaling and interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production by several mechanisms, including direct binding to double stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we demonstrate that in cell culture, MARV infection results in a greater upregulation of IFN responses as compared to EBOV infection. This correlates with differences in the efficiencies by which EBOV and MARV VP35s antagonize RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, structural and biochemical studies suggest that differential recognition of RNA elements by the respective VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) rather than affinity for RNA by the respective VP35s is critical for this observation. Our studies reveal functional differences in EBOV versus MARV VP35 RNA binding that result in unexpected differences in the host response to deadly viral pathogens.

  18. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin; Owens, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in the formation of neuromyelitis optica lesions. Immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was injected intracerebrally with human complement to type I interferon receptor deficient and wildtype mice. Loss of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein was reduced in type I interferon receptor deficient mice brain. Our findings suggest that type I interferon signaling contributes to neuromyelitis optica pathogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and type I interferon in the immunological response against warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, D; Kurban, M; Abbas, O

    2017-12-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), and are involved in the pathogenesis of several cutaneous infectious (especially viral), inflammatory/autoimmune and neoplastic entities. Their role in the pathogenesis and regression of human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced skin lesions has not been well studied. To investigate pDC occurrence and activity in HPV-induced skin lesions, including inflamed and uninflamed warts as well as epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EDV)-associated lesions. In total 20 inflamed and 20 uninflamed HPV-induced skin lesions (including 7 EDV lesions) were retrieved from our database, and the tissue was immunohistochemically tested for pDC occurrence and activity using anti-BDCA-2 and anti-MxA antibodies, respectively. pDCs were present in all 20 inflamed warts and absent from all 20 uninflamed cases. MxA expression was also diffuse and strong in 75% (15/20) inflamed warts, but not in any of the uninflamed warts. pDCs constitute a central component of the inflammatory host response in inflamed warts, possibly contributing to their regression through production of type I interferons. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Critical role of constitutive type I interferon response in bronchial epithelial cell to influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C-Y Hsu

    Full Text Available Innate antiviral responses in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs provide the first line of defense against respiratory viral infection and the effectiveness of this response is critically dependent on the type I interferons (IFNs. However the importance of the antiviral responses in BECs during influenza infection is not well understood. We profiled the innate immune response to infection with H3N2 and H5N1 virus using Calu-3 cells and primary BECs to model proximal airway cells. The susceptibility of BECs to influenza infection was not solely dependent on the sialic acid-bearing glycoprotein, and antiviral responses that occurred after viral endocytosis was more important in limiting viral replication. The early antiviral response and apoptosis correlated with the ability to limit viral replication. Both viruses reduced RIG-I associated antiviral responses and subsequent induction of IFN-β. However it was found that there was constitutive release of IFN-β by BECs and this was critical in inducing late antiviral signaling via type I IFN receptors, and was crucial in limiting viral infection. This study characterizes anti-influenza virus responses in airway epithelial cells and shows that constitutive IFN-β release plays a more important role in initiating protective late IFN-stimulated responses during human influenza infection in bronchial epithelial cells.

  1. Response to standard interferon A2b and ribavirin combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C treatment naive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, S.M.K.; Muhammad, I.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C is now well established with conventional interferon or pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin. Peginterferon Alfa and Ribavirin for 6 to 12 months is currently approved initial therapy, which is expensive. Response of our patients to standard Interferon-alpha-2b and ribavirin for 24 weeks have been studied. The objective of this study was to asses Sustained Viral Response (SVR) with standard Interferon A2b and Ribavirin combination treatment in chronic Hepatitis C patients. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Quetta from Jan 2006 to Jun 2007. One hundred and three patients, with 20-60 years of age suffering from chronic Hepatitis C were selected on the basis of raised ALT, positive anti-HCV antibodies, evidence of viraemia by quantitative PCR for HCV RNA and liver biopsy. All patients were started on same brand of Interferon alpha-2b, 3 MIU subcutaneously, thrice weekly and oral Ribavirin (1,000-1,200 mg/day) for 24 weeks. End treatment response (ETR) after completion of treatment and SVR six months after ETR were recorded. Results: The 103 patients, 85 males and 18 females with mean age of 21-48 years completed the treatment for 24 weeks. Mean ALT was 96.17 (SD +- 49.98). End treatment response (ETR) was 89.3% (p=0.032). Sustained Viral Response after 6 months of treatment was 86.4% (p=0.034). Conclusion: Standard Interferon and Ribavirin had excellent SVR. It is effective as well as economical treatment in Chronic Hepatitis C patients. (author)

  2. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnsen, Lars; Christensen, Jeppe Romme; Ratzer, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for......-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.......Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used...... for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels...

  3. The immunomodulatory effects of interferon-gamma on mature B-lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, A; Carballido, J; Griffel, H; Hochkeppel, H K; Wetzel, G D

    1989-06-15

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) exerts a broad spectrum of activities which affect the responses of mature B-cells. It strongly inhibits B-cell activation, acts as a B-cell growth factor (BCGF), and also induces final differentiation to immunoglobulin (Ig) production. IFN-gamma is deeply involved in the differential control of isotype expression, as it enhances IgG2a production and suppresses both IgG1 and IgE production. Although it is now possible to draw a general scheme of the effects of IFN-gamma on B-cells, a number of paradoxical results still exist in the field. In this manuscript, different experimental systems are analyzed in an attempt to explain these apparent paradoxes.

  4. MicroRNA203a suppresses glioma tumorigenesis through an ATM-dependent interferon response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan He; Wang, Yinan; Sims, Michelle; Cai, Chun; He, Ping; Häcker, Hans; Yue, Junming; Cheng, Jinjun; Boop, Frederick A; Pfeffer, Lawrence M

    2017-12-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly and incurable brain tumor. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in regulating the cancer cell phenotype, the underlying mechanisms of how they regulate tumorigenesis are incompletely understood. We previously showed that miR-203a is expressed at relatively low levels in GBM patients, and ectopic miR-203a expression in GBM cell lines inhibited cell proliferation and migration, increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by interferon (IFN) or temozolomide in vitro , and inhibited GBM tumorigenesis in vivo . Here we show that ectopic expression of miR-203a in GBM cell lines promotes the IFN response pathway as evidenced by increased IFN production and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, and high basal tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple STAT proteins. Importantly, we identified that miR-203a directly suppressed the protein levels of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase that negatively regulates IFN production. We found that high ATM expression in GBM correlates with poor patient survival and that ATM expression is inversely correlated with miR-203a expression. Knockout of ATM expression and inhibition of ATM function in GBM cell lines inhibited cell proliferation and migration, increased sensitivity to apoptosis induced by therapeutic agents in vitro , and markedly suppressed GBM tumor growth and promoted animal survival. In contrast, restoring ATM levels in GBM cells ectopically expressing miR-203a increased tumorigenicity and decreased animal survival. Our study suggests that low miR-203a expression in GBM suppresses the interferon response through an ATM-dependent pathway.

  5. Transcriptional expression of type I interferon response genes and stability of housekeeping genes in the human endometrium and endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna L; Knudsen, Ulla B; Munk, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful chronic female disease defined by the presence of endometrial tissue implants in ectopic locations. The pathogenesis is much debated, and type I interferons could be involved. The expression of genes of the type I interferon response were profiled by a specific PCR Array...... of RNA obtained from ectopic and eutopic endometrium collected from 9 endometriosis patients and 9 healthy control women. Transcriptional expression levels of selected interferon-regulated and housekeeping genes were investigated by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Stably...... expressed housekeeping genes for valid normalization of transcriptional studies of endometrium and endometriosis have not yet been published. Here, seven housekeeping genes were evaluated for stability using the GeNorm and NormFinder software. A normalization factor based on HMBS, TBP, and YWHAZ expression...

  6. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF), we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by intraperitoneal treatment with recombinant rat interferon-gamma (rrIFN-gamma). Rats were treated either before or after intratracheal ch...

  7. Hepatitis E virus persists in the presence of a type III interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Li, Xinlei; Ambardekar, Charuta; Hu, Zhimin; Lhomme, Sébastien; Feng, Zongdi

    2017-05-01

    The RIG-I-like RNA helicase (RLR)-mediated interferon (IFN) response plays a pivotal role in the hepatic antiviral immunity. The hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) counter this response by encoding a viral protease that cleaves the mitochondria antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), a common signaling adaptor for RLRs. However, a third hepatotropic RNA virus, the hepatitis E virus (HEV), does not appear to encode a functional protease yet persists in infected cells. We investigated HEV-induced IFN responses in human hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. HEV infection resulted in persistent virus replication despite poor spread. This was companied by a type III IFN response that upregulated multiple IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but type I IFNs were barely detected. Blocking type III IFN production or signaling resulted in reduced ISG expression and enhanced HEV replication. Unlike HAV and HCV, HEV did not cleave MAVS; MAVS protein size, mitochondrial localization, and function remained unaltered in HEV-replicating cells. Depletion of MAVS or MDA5, and to a less extent RIG-I, also diminished IFN production and increased HEV replication. Furthermore, persistent activation of the JAK/STAT signaling rendered infected cells refractory to exogenous IFN treatment, and depletion of MAVS or the receptor for type III IFNs restored the IFN responsiveness. Collectively, these results indicate that unlike other hepatotropic RNA viruses, HEV does not target MAVS and its persistence is associated with continuous production of type III IFNs.

  8. Sustained virologic response to interferon-free therapies ameliorates HCV-induced portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandorfer, Mattias; Kozbial, Karin; Schwabl, Philipp; Freissmuth, Clarissa; Schwarzer, Rémy; Stern, Rafael; Chromy, David; Stättermayer, Albert Friedrich; Reiberger, Thomas; Beinhardt, Sandra; Sieghart, Wolfgang; Trauner, Michael; Hofer, Harald; Ferlitsch, Arnulf; Ferenci, Peter; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of sustained virologic response (SVR) to interferon (IFN)-free therapies on portal hypertension in patients with paired hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements. One hundred and four patients with portal hypertension (HVPG ⩾6mmHg) who underwent HVPG and liver stiffness measurement before IFN-free therapy (baseline [BL]) were retrospectively studied. Among 100 patients who achieved SVR, 60 patients underwent HVPG and transient elastography (TE) after antiviral therapy (follow-up [FU]). SVR to IFN-free therapies significantly decreased HVPG across all BL HVPG strata: 6-9mmHg (BL: 7.37±0.28 vs. FU: 5.11±0.38mmHg; -2.26±0.42mmHg; pportal hypertension across all BL HVPG strata. However, changes in HVPG seemed to be more heterogeneous among patients with BL HVPG of ⩾16mmHg and a HVPG decrease was less likely in patients with more advanced liver dysfunction. TE might be useful for the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension after SVR. We investigated the impact of curing hepatitis C using novel interferon-free treatments on portal hypertension, which drives the development of liver-related complications and mortality. Cure of hepatitis C decreased portal pressure, but a decrease was less likely among patients with more pronounced hepatic dysfunction. Transient elastography, which is commonly used for the non-invasive staging of liver disease, might identify patients without clinically significant portal hypertension after successful treatment. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in ...

  10. Hepatitis C Prevalence and Responses to Pegylated Interferon + Ribavirin Treatment Among Prisoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk ÖZGER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to identify the hepatitis C prevalence in prisoners and to share experiences of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN + ribavirin (RBV treatment. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted by assessing the records of prisoners between January 2014 and 2016, retrospectively. Patients in whom planned treatments were applied in a given time were determined and, virologic responses at the end of treatment and 6 months after treatment were evaluated. Chi-square test was used and a p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Among prisoners, the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV positivity rate was 7.82% and HCV-RNA positivity rate was 5.72%. The most common genotype was genotype 3a (66 of 99 patients. End-of-treatment and 6th month sustained virologic response rates were 84.6% and 80.5%, respectively. In genotype 3a group, end-of-treatment and 6th month sustained virologic response rates were found to be higher than other genotypes but not statistically significant. Conclusion: In our study, which assessed prisoners, the rate of HCV positivity was higher than hepatitis C in the general population in Turkey. In accordance with the literature, genotype 3 was the most common genotype among prisoners. Sustained virologic response rates obtained with peg-IFN+RBV treatment suggested that peg-IFN treatment should be used with current treatment combinations in prisoners infected with HCV genotype 3.

  11. Autonomous parvoviruses neither stimulate nor are inhibited by the type I interferon response in human normal or cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Andres, Wells; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2014-05-01

    Members of the genus Parvovirus are small, nonenveloped single-stranded DNA viruses that are nonpathogenic in humans but have potential utility as cancer therapeutics. Because the innate immune response to parvoviruses has received relatively little attention, we compared the response to parvoviruses to that of several other types of viruses in human cells. In normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes, vesicular stomatitis virus evoked robust beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. Cytomegalovirus, pseudorabies virus, and Sindbis virus all evoked a 2-log-unit or greater upregulation of IFN-β in glia; in contrast, LuIII and MVMp parvoviruses did not evoke a detectable IFN-β or interferon-stimulated gene (ISG; MX1, oligoadenylate synthetase [OAS], IFIT-1) response in the same cell types. The lack of response raised the question of whether parvoviral infection can be attenuated by IFN; interestingly, we found that IFN did not decrease parvovirus (MVMp, LuIII, and H-1) infectivity in normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes. The same was true in human cancers, including glioma, sarcoma, and melanoma. Similarly, IFN failed to attenuate transduction by the dependovirus vector adeno-associated virus type 2. Progeny production of parvoviruses was also unimpaired by IFN in both glioma and melanoma, whereas vesicular stomatitis virus replication was blocked. Sarcoma cells with upregulated IFN signaling that show high levels of resistance to other viruses showed strong infection by LuIII. Unlike many other oncolytic viruses, we found no evidence that impairment of innate immunity in cancer cells plays a role in the oncoselectivity of parvoviruses in human cells. Parvoviral resistance to the effects of IFN in cancer cells may constitute an advantage in the virotherapy of some tumors. Understanding the interactions between oncolytic viruses and the innate immune system will facilitate employing these viruses as therapeutic agents in cancer patients. The cancer

  12. Interferon alpha inhibits viral replication of a live-attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine preventing development of an adaptive immune response in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons, such as interferon alpha (IFNa), contribute to innate antiviral immunity by promoting production of antiviral mediators and are also involved in promoting an adaptive immune response. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most devastating and c...

  13. Clinical and molecular response to interferon-α therapy in essential thrombocythemia patients with CALR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Emmanuelle; Cassinat, Bruno; Chauveau, Aurélie; Dosquet, Christine; Giraudier, Stephane; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Yassin, Mohammed A; Al-Dewik, Nader; Carillo, Serge; Legouffe, Eric; Ugo, Valerie; Chomienne, Christine; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-10

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal disorders characterized by the presence of several gene mutations associated with particular hematologic parameters, clinical evolution, and prognosis. Few therapeutic options are available, among which interferon α (IFNα) presents interesting properties like the ability to induce hematologic responses (HRs) and molecular responses (MRs) in patients with JAK2 mutation. We report on the response to IFNα therapy in a cohort of 31 essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients with CALR mutations (mean follow-up of 11.8 years). HR was achieved in all patients. Median CALR mutant allelic burden (%CALR) significantly decreased from 41% at baseline to 26% after treatment, and 2 patients even achieved complete MR. In contrast, %CALR was not significantly modified in ET patients treated with hydroxyurea or aspirin only. Next-generation sequencing identified additional mutations in 6 patients (affecting TET2, ASXL1, IDH2, and TP53 genes). The presence of additional mutations was associated with poorer MR on CALR mutant clones, with only minor or no MRs in this subset of patients. Analysis of the evolution of the different variant allele frequencies showed that the mutated clones had a differential sensitivity to IFNα in a given patient, but no new mutation emerged during treatment. In all, this study shows that IFNα induces high rates of HRs and MRs in CALR-mutated ET, and that the presence of additional nondriver mutations may influence the MR to therapy. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  15. Interferon induction by adenoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beladi, I; Bakay, M; Pusztai, R; Mucsi, I; Tarodi, B [University Medical School, Szeged (Hungary). Inst. of Microbiology

    1979-02-01

    All human, simian, bovine and avian adenovirus types tested so far and the canine hepatitis virus induce interferon production in chick cells. This finding indicated this property to be characteristic for viruses belonging to the adenovirus group. Trypsin treatment, which had no effect upon the infectivity, diminished or eliminated the interferon-inducing abilities of crude adenoviruses, and thus the need for a trypsin-sensitive protein in interferon induction was suggested. T antigen and interferon were formed simultaneously in chick embryo fibroblast cells infected with human adenovirus type 12, and there-fore the adenovirus-specific T antigen was resitant to the action of endogenous interferon synthetized by the same cells. In chicks inoculated with human types, the appearance of interferon was biphasic: an 'early' and a 'late' interferon could be demonstrated with maximum titre 4 and 10 hr, respectively, after virus infection. In chicks infected with adenoviruses, first interferon production and then a decreased primary immune response to sheep red blood cells was observed. It was assumed that in adenovirus-infected chicks the interferon produced by viral stimulus resulted in a transient immunosuppression.

  16. A paradox of transcriptional and functional innate interferon responses of human intestinal enteroids to enteric virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Kapil; Simon, Lukas M.; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Blutt, Sarah E.; Crawford, Sue E.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark; Conner, Margaret E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Estes, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding host?enteric virus interactions has been limited by the inability to culture nontransformed small intestinal epithelial cells and to infect animal models with human viruses. We report epithelial responses in human small intestinal enteroid cultures from different individuals following infection with human rotavirus (HRV), a model enteric pathogen. RNA-sequencing and functional assays revealed type III IFN as the dominant transcriptional response that activates interferon-stimula...

  17. The C protein of measles virus inhibits the type I interferon response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, Jessica A.; Bellini, William J.; Rota, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNα/β) are an important part of innate immunity to viral infections because they induce an antiviral response and limit viral replication until the adaptive response clears the infection. Since the nonstructural proteins of several paramyxoviruses inhibit the IFNα/β response, we chose to explore the role of the C protein of measles virus (MV) in such inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that the MV C protein may serve as a virulence factor, but its role in the pathogenesis of MV remains undefined. In the present study, a recombinant MV strain that does not express the C protein (MV C-) and its parental strain (Ed Tag) were used. Growth of MV C- was restricted in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HeLa cells, but in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFNα/β, MV C- produced titers that were equivalent to those of Ed Tag. In addition, expression of the MV C protein from plasmid DNA inhibited the production of an IFNα/β responsive reporter gene and, to a lesser extent, inhibited an IFNγ responsive reporter gene. The ability of the MV C protein to suppress the IFNα/β response was confirmed using a biologic assay. After IFNβ stimulation, HeLa cells infected with Ed Tag produced five-fold less IFNα/β than cells infected with MV C-. While the mechanism of inhibition remains unclear, these data suggest that the MV C protein plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MV by inhibiting IFNα/β signaling

  18. AIM2-Like Receptors Positively and Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response Induced by Cytosolic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakaya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosolic DNAs derived from retrotransposons serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that stimulate the induction of interferons (IFNs and other cytokines, leading to autoimmune disease. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is one PRR that senses retrotransposon DNA, activating type I IFN responses through the stimulator of IFN genes (STING. Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2-like receptors (ALRs have also been implicated in these pathways. Here we show that the mouse ALR IFI205 senses cytosolic retrotransposon DNA independently of cyclic GMP-AMP production. AIM2 antagonizes IFI205-mediated IFN induction activity by sequestering it from STING. We also found that the complement of genes located in the ALR locus in C57BL/6 and AIM2 knockout mice are different and unique, which has implications for interpretation of the sensing of pathogens in different mouse strains. Our data suggest that members of the ALR family are critical to the host IFN response to endogenous DNA.

  19. Interferon production and immune response induction in pathogenic rabies virus-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcovistz, R; Leal, E C; De Souza Matos, D C [Departamento de Immunologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Caixa Postal 926, 21045 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsiang, H [Service Rage, Istitut Pasteur, Paris (France)

    1994-08-01

    Pathogenic parental rabies virus strain CVS (challenge virus standard) and its apathogenic variant RV194-2 were shown to differ in their ability to induce interferon (IFN) and immune response of the host. After intracerebral inoculation. IFN and antibody production was higher in the RV194-2 virus-infected mice than in the CVS infection. The enhancement of 2-5A synthetase activity, an IFN-mediated enzyme marker, showed biochemical evidence that IFN is active in both apathogenic and pathogenic infections. On the other hand, spontaneous proliferation in vitro of thymocytes and splenocytes from CVS virus-infected mice was strongly inhibited in contrast to the RV194-2 infection. In the CVS infection, the thymocyte proliferation However, in the RV194-2 infection, the thymocyte proliferation was higher than of the splenocytes. These results suggest a better performance of T-cell response to the RV194-2 infection. This fact can be critical for an enhancement of antibody production in the apathogenic infection and subsequent virus clearance from the brain of RV194-2 virus-infected mice. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs., 32 refs.

  20. Hydroxychloroquine augments early virological response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in genotype-4 chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Gouda Kamel; Gad, Magdy Abdelmawgoud; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed Fahmy; Eid, Mahmoud Saied

    2016-12-01

    The therapeutic effect of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) alfa-2a combined with ribavirin (RBV) on chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients is low and further efforts are required to optimize this therapy for achievement of higher rates of virological response. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in combination with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin on early virological response (EVR) in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients. Naïve 120 Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection were divided into two groups. Group 1 have administered the standard of care therapy (pegylated interferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin) for 12 weeks, (n = 60). Group 2 have administered hydroxychloroquine plus standard of care therapy for 12 weeks, (n = 60). Therapeutics included hydroxychloroquine (200 mg) oral twice daily, peginterferon alfa-2a (160 μg) subcutaneous once weekly and oral weight-based ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/day). Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The percentage of early virological response was significantly more in patients given the triple therapy than in patients given the standard of care [54/60 (90%) vs. 43/60 (71.7%); P = 0.011; respectively]. Biochemical response at week 12 was also significantly higher in patients given the triple therapy compared with the standard of care [58/60 (96.7%) vs. 42/60 (70%); P hydroxychloroquine to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin improves the rate of early virological and biochemical responses in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients without an increase in adverse events. J. Med. Virol. 88:2170-2178, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Luthra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication.

  2. Interferon antagonist NSs of La Crosse virus triggers a DNA damage response-like degradation of transcribing RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Paul; Ruf, Marius; Blakqori, Gjon; Överby, Anna K; Heidemann, Martin; Eick, Dirk; Weber, Friedemann

    2011-02-04

    La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) is a mosquito-borne member of the negative-strand RNA virus family Bunyaviridae. We have previously shown that the virulence factor NSs of LACV is an efficient inhibitor of the antiviral type I interferon system. A recombinant virus unable to express NSs (rLACVdelNSs) strongly induced interferon transcription, whereas the corresponding wt virus (rLACV) suppressed it. Here, we show that interferon induction by rLACVdelNSs mainly occurs through the signaling pathway leading from the pattern recognition receptor RIG-I to the transcription factor IRF-3. NSs expressed by rLACV, however, acts downstream of IRF-3 by specifically blocking RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription. Further investigations revealed that NSs induces proteasomal degradation of the mammalian RNA polymerase II subunit RPB1. NSs thereby selectively targets RPB1 molecules of elongating RNA polymerase II complexes, the so-called IIo form. This phenotype has similarities to the cellular DNA damage response, and NSs was indeed found to transactivate the DNA damage response gene pak6. Moreover, NSs expressed by rLACV boosted serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, one of the earliest cellular reactions to damaged DNA. However, other DNA damage response markers such as up-regulation and serine 15 phosphorylation of p53 or serine 1524 phosphorylation of BRCA1 were not triggered by LACV infection. Collectively, our data indicate that the strong suppression of interferon induction by LACV NSs is based on a shutdown of RNA polymerase II transcription and that NSs achieves this by exploiting parts of the cellular DNA damage response pathway to degrade IIo-borne RPB1 subunits.

  3. Benefit of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assay in Prediction of Therapeutic Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) ...

  4. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra A. Tsuji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  5. Prediction of therapy response to interferon-alpha in chronic viral hepatitis-B by liver and hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caglar, M.; Sari, O.; Akcan, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) provides effective treatment in some patients with chronic hepatitis. The clarification of factors predictive of therapy response would be helpful in identifying patients who would benefit from treatment. In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver/spleen and Tc-99m-disofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy to predict therapy response to IFN in patients with chronic active hepatitis. The study group consisted of ten patients with chronic viral hepatitis B who were treated with 4.5 units of interferon alpha for 12 months. Prior to the start of the therapy, sulfur colloid scintigraphy was obtained by which the liver/spleen ratios were derived. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy was performed on a separate day and time-activity curves were generated from regions of interest drawn over the liver, heart and gall-bladder. The index of blood and liver clearance time was calculated. Histological grading and laboratory values were obtained for clinical correlation. Responders (n=6) to IFN were defined as those who improved clinically with normalized transaminase levels and had hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion. On sulfur colloid (SC) scintigraphy, the liver/spleen ratio of non-responders was significantly lower than responders (median values: 0.69 vs. 1.16, p=0.01) but on hepatobiliary scintigraphy no statistically significant parameters were found to predict response to interferon therapy. (author)

  6. AIM2-Like Receptors Positively and Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response Induced by Cytosolic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuki; Lilue, Jingtao; Stavrou, Spyridon; Moran, Eileen A; Ross, Susan R

    2017-07-05

    Cytosolic DNAs derived from retrotransposons serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that stimulate the induction of interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines, leading to autoimmune disease. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is one PRR that senses retrotransposon DNA, activating type I IFN responses through the stimulator of IFN genes (STING). Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-like receptors (ALRs) have also been implicated in these pathways. Here we show that the mouse ALR IFI205 senses cytosolic retrotransposon DNA independently of cyclic GMP-AMP production. AIM2 antagonizes IFI205-mediated IFN induction activity by sequestering it from STING. We also found that the complement of genes located in the ALR locus in C57BL/6 and AIM2 knockout mice are different and unique, which has implications for interpretation of the sensing of pathogens in different mouse strains. Our data suggest that members of the ALR family are critical to the host IFN response to endogenous DNA. IMPORTANCE Autoimmune diseases like Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and lupus erythematosus arise when cells of the immune system become activated and attack host cells and tissues. We found that DNA generated by endogenous retroviruses and retroelements in inbred mice and mouse cells is recognized by several host proteins found in macrophages that are members of the ALR family and that these proteins both suppress and activate the pathways leading to the generation of cytokines and IFNs. We also show that there is great genetic diversity between different inbred mouse strains in the ALR genes, which might contribute to differential susceptibility to autoimmunity. Understanding how immune cells become activated is important to the control of disease. Copyright © 2017 Nakaya et al.

  7. Genetic variants in the apoptosis gene BCL2L1 improve response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 3 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Weis, Nina; Ladelund, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation upstream of the apoptosis pathway has been associated with outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We investigated genetic polymorphisms in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway to assess their influence on sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon-α and ribav......Genetic variation upstream of the apoptosis pathway has been associated with outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We investigated genetic polymorphisms in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway to assess their influence on sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon...

  8. Canonical and Non-Canonical Aspects of JAK-STAT Signaling: Lessons from Interferons for Cytokine Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoros, Andrea; Platanitis, Ekaterini; Kernbauer-Hölzl, Elisabeth; Rosebrock, Felix; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction mediates cytokine responses. Canonical signaling is based on STAT tyrosine phosphorylation by activated JAKs. Downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors, activated JAKs cause the formation of the transcription factors IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), a heterotrimer of STAT1, STAT2 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits, and gamma interferon-activated factor (GAF), a STAT1 homodimer. In recent years, several deviations from this paradigm were reported. These include kinase-independent JAK functions as well as extra- and intranuclear activities of U-STATs without phosphotyrosines. Additionally, transcriptional control by STAT complexes resembling neither GAF nor ISGF3 contributes to transcriptome changes in IFN-treated cells. Our review summarizes the contribution of non-canonical JAK-STAT signaling to the innate antimicrobial immunity imparted by IFN. Moreover, we touch upon functions of IFN pathway proteins beyond the IFN response. These include metabolic functions of IRF9 as well as the regulation of natural killer cell activity by kinase-dead TYK2 and different phosphorylation isoforms of STAT1.

  9. Canonical and Non-Canonical Aspects of JAK–STAT Signaling: Lessons from Interferons for Cytokine Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoros, Andrea; Platanitis, Ekaterini; Kernbauer-Hölzl, Elisabeth; Rosebrock, Felix; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction mediates cytokine responses. Canonical signaling is based on STAT tyrosine phosphorylation by activated JAKs. Downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors, activated JAKs cause the formation of the transcription factors IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), a heterotrimer of STAT1, STAT2 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits, and gamma interferon-activated factor (GAF), a STAT1 homodimer. In recent years, several deviations from this paradigm were reported. These include kinase-independent JAK functions as well as extra- and intranuclear activities of U-STATs without phosphotyrosines. Additionally, transcriptional control by STAT complexes resembling neither GAF nor ISGF3 contributes to transcriptome changes in IFN-treated cells. Our review summarizes the contribution of non-canonical JAK–STAT signaling to the innate antimicrobial immunity imparted by IFN. Moreover, we touch upon functions of IFN pathway proteins beyond the IFN response. These include metabolic functions of IRF9 as well as the regulation of natural killer cell activity by kinase-dead TYK2 and different phosphorylation isoforms of STAT1. PMID:28184222

  10. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  11. Interferon-γ increases neuronal death in response to amyloid-β1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive impairment, the consequence of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately the death of neurons. The amyloid hypothesis proposes that neuronal damage results from the accumulation of insoluble, hydrophobic, fibrillar peptides such as amyloid-β1-42. These peptides activate enzymes resulting in a cascade of second messengers including prostaglandins and platelet-activating factor. Apoptosis of neurons is thought to follow as a consequence of the uncontrolled release of second messengers. Biochemical, histopathological and genetic studies suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a role in neurodegeneration during Alzheimer's disease. In the current study we examined the effects of interferon (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 on neurons. Methods Primary murine cortical or cerebellar neurons, or human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, were grown in vitro. Neurons were treated with cytokines prior to incubation with different neuronal insults. Cell survival, caspase-3 activity (a measure of apoptosis and prostaglandin production were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of cytokines on the levels of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 or phospholipase C γ-1. Results While none of the cytokines tested were directly neurotoxic, pre-treatment with IFN-γ sensitised neurons to the toxic effects of amyloid-β1-42 or HuPrP82-146 (a neurotoxic peptide found in prion diseases. The effects of IFN-γ were seen on cortical and cerebellar neurons, and on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. However, pre-treatment with IFN-γ did not affect the sensitivity to neurons treated with staurosporine or hydrogen peroxide. Pre-treatment with IFN-γ increased the levels of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 in SH-SY5Y cells and increased prostaglandin E2 production in response to amyloid-β1-42. Conclusion Treatment of neuronal cells

  12. Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses: divergent infection outcomes marked by similarities in induction and evasion of interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; Lemon, Stanley M

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses (HAV and HCV) are both positive-strand ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses with hepatotropic lifestyles. Despite several important differences, they share many biological and molecular features and similar genome replication schemes. Despite this, HAV infections are usually effectively controlled by the host with elimination of the virus, whereas HCV most often is able to establish lifelong persistent infection. The mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. The cellular helicases RIG-I and MDA5, and Toll-like receptor 3, are pattern recognition receptors that sense virus-derived RNAs within hepatocytes in the liver. Activation of these receptors leads to their interaction with specific adaptor proteins, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), respectively, which engage downstream kinases to activate two crucial transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). This results in the induction of interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes that ultimately establish an antiviral state. These signaling pathways are central to host antiviral defense and thus frequent targets for viral interference. Both HAV and HCV express proteases that target signal transduction through these pathways and that block the induction of IFNs upon sensing of viral RNA by these receptors. An understanding of the differences and similarities in the early innate immune responses to these infections is likely to provide important insights into the mechanism underlying the long-term persistence of HCV. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  13. Diminished interferon-gamma production and responsiveness after endotoxin administration to healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, Sebastiaan; Lauw, Fanny N.; Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-01-01

    To obtain insight in the capacity of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-tolerant host to produce interferon (IFN)-gamma and to respond to this cytokine, whole blood was obtained from healthy humans before and 4 h after intravenous injection of LPS (4 ng/kg) and stimulated ex vivo. LPS exposure in vivo

  14. Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Sustained Viral Response to Interferon and Ribavirin Therapy in Cirrhosis Secondary to Chronic Hepatitis C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhar, N.; Qureshi, M.U.; Niazi, T.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease secondary to hepatitis C who had achieved sustained virological response with Interferon and Ribavirin therapy. Study Design: Retrospective descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from January 2007 to January 2012. Methodology: Hepatitis C related chronic liver disease patients who were treated with interferon and ribavirin, after they achieved sustained virological response, they were followed for a mean of 42 A+- 17 months. During this time, development of hepatocellular carcinoma was ascertained. All underwent surveillance with alpha-feto-protein and ultrasonography every 6 months. Results: Out of the 58 patients who had achieved sustained virological response, 3 developed hepatocellular carcinoma after a mean follow-up of 38 A+- 14 months. It was multifocal in 2 cases and was single lesion in the 3rd. Two patients ultimately died, one with upper GI bleeding and the other with hepatic encephalopathy, while 3rd patient with single lesion is still surviving. Conclusion: Three out of 58 patients of hepatitis C related chronic liver disease developed hepatocellular carcinoma during follow-up in patients who had achieved sustained virological response. These patients need closer follow-up, for development of complications, even if they have achieved sustained viral response. (author)

  15. Potential for all-trans retinoic acid (tretinoin) to enhance interferon-alpha treatment response in chronic myelogenous leukemia, melanoma, myeloma and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Richard E

    2008-10-01

    This note mechanistically accounts for recent unexplained findings that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, also termed tretinoin) exerts an anti-viral effect against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically infected patients, in whom ATRA also showed synergy with interferon-alpha. How HCV replication was suppressed was unclear. Both effects of ATRA can be accounted for by ATRA's upregulation of RIG protein, an 18 kDa product of retinoic induced gene-1. Increased RIG then couples ATRA to increased Type 1 interferons' production. Details of this mechanism predict that ATRA will similarly augment interferon-a activity in treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, melanoma, myeloma and renal cell carcinoma and that the addition of ribavirin and/or bexarotene will each incrementally enhance interferon-a responses in these cancers.

  16. Interferon α subtypes in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Kathrin; Dickow, Julia; Dittmer, Ulf

    2018-02-13

    Type I interferons (IFN), which are immediately induced after most virus infections, are central for direct antiviral immunity and link innate and adaptive immune responses. However, several viruses have evolved strategies to evade the IFN response by preventing IFN induction or blocking IFN signaling pathways. Thus, therapeutic application of exogenous type I IFN or agonists inducing type I IFN responses are a considerable option for future immunotherapies against chronic viral infections. An important part of the type I IFN family are 12 IFNα subtypes, which all bind the same receptor, but significantly differ in their biological activities. Up to date only one IFNα subtype (IFNα2) is being used in clinical treatment against chronic virus infections, however its therapeutic success rate is rather limited, especially during Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Recent studies addressed the important question if other IFNα subtypes would be more potent against retroviral infections in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Indeed, very potent IFNα subtypes were defined and their antiviral and immunomodulatory properties were characterized. In this review we summarize the recent findings on the role of individual IFNα subtypes during HIV and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus infection. This includes their induction during HIV/SIV infection, their antiretroviral activity and the regulation of immune response against HIV by different IFNα subtypes. The findings might facilitate novel strategies for HIV cure or functional cure studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NOD2, RIP2 and IRF5 Play a Critical Role in the Type I Interferon Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaozhao; Fortune, Sarah M.; Coulombe, Francois; Behr, Marcel A.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Kelliher, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    While the recognition of microbial infection often occurs at the cell surface via Toll-like receptors, the cytosol of the cell is also under surveillance for microbial products that breach the cell membrane. An important outcome of cytosolic recognition is the induction of IFNα and IFNβ, which are critical mediators of immunity against both bacteria and viruses. Like many intracellular pathogens, a significant fraction of the transcriptional response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection depends on these type I interferons, but the recognition pathways responsible remain elusive. In this work, we demonstrate that intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis stimulates the cytosolic Nod2 pathway that responds to bacterial peptidoglycan, and this event requires membrane damage that is actively inflicted by the bacterium. Unexpectedly, this recognition triggers the expression of type I interferons in a Tbk1- and Irf5-dependent manner. This response is only partially impaired by the loss of Irf3 and therefore, differs fundamentally from those stimulated by bacterial DNA, which depend entirely on this transcription factor. This difference appears to result from the unusual peptidoglycan produced by mycobacteria, which we show is a uniquely potent agonist of the Nod2/Rip2/Irf5 pathway. Thus, the Nod2 system is specialized to recognize bacteria that actively perturb host membranes and is remarkably sensitive to mycobacteria, perhaps reflecting the strong evolutionary pressure exerted by these pathogens on the mammalian immune system. PMID:19578435

  18. Comparison of Tuberculin Skin Test result and interferon gamma response to human PPD in BCG scar positive and negative children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyahfar, Shirin; Karimi, Abdollah; Fahimzad, Alireza; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) result and interferon gamma response to human PPD (purified protein derivative), in scar positive and scar negative BCG-vaccinated children. Between August 2007 and May 2008 a total of 236 children aged 1-168 months (mean 21 months) admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran, were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Each patient was examined for BCG vaccine scar and tested with TST and human PPD-based Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA). Two hundred and twenty one cases out of 236 (44% female, 1-168 months, mean age 21 months) were scar positive of whom 95% TST result was negative. Human PPD-based IGRA was positive in 110 (49.8%), negative in 85 (38.4 %) and indeterminate in 26 (11.8%) of scar positive patients. Fifteen children (40% female, 1-156 months; mean age 42 months) were scar negative. All the scar negative cases were TST negative. Human PPD-based IGRA was positive in 10 (66.7%), negative in 4 (26.7%) and indeterminate in 1 (6.7%) of scar negative patients. Immune responsiveness to human PPD antigens in scar positive and negative children may not correspond with results of the Tuberculin Skin Test. Copyright © 2013 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mx Is Not Responsible for the Antiviral Activity of Interferon-α against Japanese Encephalitis Virus

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    Jing Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mx proteins are interferon (IFN-induced dynamin-like GTPases that are present in all vertebrates and inhibit the replication of myriad viruses. However, the role Mx proteins play in IFN-mediated suppression of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection is unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of Mx1 and Mx2 expression on the interferon-α (IFNα restriction of JEV replication. To evaluate whether the inhibitory activity of IFNα on JEV is dependent on Mx1 or Mx2, we knocked down Mx1 or Mx2 with siRNA in IFNα-treated PK-15 cells and BHK-21 cells, then challenged them with JEV; the production of progeny virus was assessed by plaque assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that depletion of Mx1 or Mx2 did not affect JEV restriction imposed by IFNα, although these two proteins were knocked down 66% and 79%, respectively. Accordingly, expression of exogenous Mx1 or Mx2 did not change the inhibitory activity of IFNα to JEV. In addition, even though virus-induced membranes were damaged by Brefeldin A (BFA, overexpressing porcine Mx1 or Mx2 did not inhibit JEV proliferation. We found that BFA inhibited JEV replication, not maturation, suggesting that BFA could be developed into a novel antiviral reagent. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that IFNα inhibits JEV infection by Mx-independent pathways.

  20. Analysis of tick-borne encephalitis virus-induced host responses in human cells of neuronal origin and interferon-mediated protection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Selinger, Martin; Wilkie, G. S.; Tong, L.; Gu, Q.; Schnettler, E.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Kohl, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 8 (2017), s. 2043-2060 ISSN 0022-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-03044S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : blood- brain -barrier * long noncoding RNAs * double-stranded-RNA * interferon * immune-response * gene-expression * stimulated genes * human astrocytes * viral-infection * protein * tick-borne encephalitis virus * neuronal cells * transcriptome analysis * host response * interferon Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Virology Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  1. Real-time whole-body visualization of Chikungunya Virus infection and host interferon response in zebrafish.

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    Nuno Palha

    Full Text Available Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging arbovirus that may cause severe disease, constitutes an important public health problem. Herein we describe a novel CHIKV infection model in zebrafish, where viral spread was live-imaged in the whole body up to cellular resolution. Infected cells emerged in various organs in one principal wave with a median appearance time of ∼14 hours post infection. Timing of infected cell death was organ dependent, leading to a shift of CHIKV localization towards the brain. As in mammals, CHIKV infection triggered a strong type-I interferon (IFN response, critical for survival. IFN was mainly expressed by neutrophils and hepatocytes. Cell type specific ablation experiments further demonstrated that neutrophils play a crucial, unexpected role in CHIKV containment. Altogether, our results show that the zebrafish represents a novel valuable model to dynamically visualize replication, pathogenesis and host responses to a human virus.

  2. Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 in chronic hepatitis C: Correlations with insulin resistance, histological features & sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Dana; Grigorescu, Mircea Dan; Radu, Corina; Suciu, Alina; Grigorescu, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    One of the multiple factors contributing to virological response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10). Its level reflects the status of interferon-stimulated genes, which in turn is associated with virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of serum IP-10 levels on sustained virological response (SVR) and the association of this parameter with insulin resistance (IR) and liver histology. Two hundred and three consecutive biopsy proven CHC patients were included in the study. Serum levels of IP-10 were determined using ELISA method. IR was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR). Histological features were assessed invasively by liver biopsy and noninvasively using FibroTest, ActiTest and SteatoTest. Predictive factors for SVR and their interrelations were assessed. A cut-off value for IP-10 of 392 pg/ml was obtained to discriminate between responders and non-responders. SVR was obtained in 107 patients (52.70%). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for SVR was 0.875 with a sensitivity of 91.6 per cent, specificity 74.7 per cent, positive predictive value 80.3 per cent and negative predictive value 88.7 per cent. Higher values of IP-10 were associated with increasing stages of fibrosis (P<0.01) and higher grades of inflammation (P=0.02, P=0.07) assessed morphologically and noninvasively through FibroTest and ActiTest. Significant steatosis and IR were also associated with increased levels of IP-10 (P=0.01 and P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, IP-10 levels and fibrosis stages were independently associated with SVR. Our findings showed that the assessment of serum IP-10 level could be a predictive factor for SVR and it was associated with fibrosis, necroinflammatory activity, significant steatosis and IR in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  3. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Paijo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages.

  4. Improvement of fatigue in multiple sclerosis by physical exercise is associated to modulation of systemic interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, Patricia; Almansa, Raquel; Neri, María José; Bermejo-Martin, Jesús Francisco; Archanco, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Téllez, Nieves

    2015-03-15

    Mechanisms underlying multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue and the causes of the beneficial effect of exercise on this symptom are not clarified. Our aim was to evaluate gene expression profiles in MS patients who improved their fatigue status after an exercise program and to compare them with healthy controls (HC). Gene expression in whole blood was profiled at baseline in 7 HC and also in 7 fatigued-MS patients. Patients underwent an exercise program for 6 months, and their fatigue status and gene expression profiles were again analyzed. MS patients showed a significant activation of genes participating in the systemic interferon response in comparison with HC that disappeared at the end of the program. Our results provide a biological basis for the observed benefit of exercise in MS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Potentiating day-old blood samples for detection of interferon-gamma responses following infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    time interval from blood sampling to culture. The objective of the study was to assess options for use of day-old blood samples for early-stage diagnosis of MAP infections. Bovine interleukin 12 (IL-12) can induce, and IL-10 reduce, IFN-γ production. Therefore, addition of IL-12 and anti-IL-10 could...... result in production of IFN-γ in samples previously exposed to MAP antigens. Whole blood samples were collected from heifers in a Danish dairy herd known to be infected with MAP. The samples were collected on three sample dates, and on each date the blood samples were stimulated with PPDj and recombinant......The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test measuring specific cell-mediated immune responses in whole blood can be used for diagnosis at an early stage of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. A major obstacle for the practical use of IFN-γ testing is the recommended maximum 8 hour...

  6. The role of interferon gamma release assays in the monitoring of response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Junaid; Pillay, Manormoney; Jeena, Prakash

    2014-09-01

    Successful control of childhood TB requires early diagnosis, effective chemotherapy and a method of evaluating the response to therapy. Identification of suitable biomarkers that predict the response to anti-TB therapy may allow the duration of treatment to be shortened. The majority of biomarker studies in paediatric TB have focused on the role of T cell-based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) in the diagnosis of either latent or active disease. Little has been published on the role of IGRAs in the monitoring response to therapy in children. We reviewed the available literature to ascertain the value of IGRAs in the monitoring of response to anti-TB therapy in children. We explored the results of the few studies that have investigated the role of IGRAs as markers of response to anti-TB treatment in children. We conclude that the role of IGRAs as surrogate markers appears promising. Robust clinical trials are, however, needed to entrench the value of IGRAs as surrogate biomarkers of response to anti-TB therapy in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of histopathology, cultivation of tissues and rectal contents, and interferon-gamma and serum antibody responses for the diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jensen, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    contents, and (3) examination of repeated blood samples for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and antibody responses. Tissue samples were taken from the small and large intestine and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes, and from the pharyngeal tonsil and other lymphoid nodes (retropharyngeal, mediastinal...

  8. Consistency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses in HIV-1-Infected Women during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasi R. Jonnalagadda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We determined the consistency of positive interferon-gamma (IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs to detect latent TB infection (LTBI over one-year postpartum in HIV-1-infected women. Methods. Women with positive IGRAs during pregnancy had four 3-monthly postpartum IGRAs. Postpartum change in magnitude of IFN-γ response was determined using linear mixed models. Results. Among 18 women with positive pregnancy IGRA, 15 (83% had a subsequent positive IGRA; 9 (50% were always positive, 3 (17% were always negative, and 6 (33% fluctuated between positive and negative IGRAs. Women with pregnancy IGRA IFN-γ >8 spot forming cells (SFCs/well were more likely to have consistent postpartum IGRA response (odds ratio: 10.0; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.9–117.0. Change in IFN-γ response over postpartum was 10.2 SFCs/well (95% CI: −1.5–21.8 SFCs/well. Conclusion. Pregnancy positive IGRAs were often maintained postpartum with increased consistency in women with higher baseline responses. There were modest increases in magnitude of IGRA responses postpartum.

  9. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of interferon gamma in response to natural Chlamydia infection in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Marina; Pavasovic, Ana; Prentis, Peter J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-09-25

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a key Th1 cytokine, with a principal role in the immune response against intracellular organisms such as Chlamydia. Along with being responsible for significant morbidity in human populations, Chlamydia is also responsible for wide spread infection and disease in many animal hosts, with reports that many Australian koala subpopulations are endemically infected. An understanding of the role played by IFNγ in koala chlamydial diseases is important for the establishment of better prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against chlamydial infection in this host. A limited number of IFNγ sequences have been published from marsupials and no immune reagents to measure expression have been developed. Through preliminary analysis of the koala transcriptome, we have identified the full coding sequence of the koala IFNγ gene. Transcripts were identified in spleen and lymph node tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that koala IFNγ is closely related to other marsupial IFNγ sequences and more distantly related to eutherian mammals. To begin to characterise the role of this important cytokine in the koala's response to chlamydial infection, we developed a quantitative real time PCR assay and applied it to a small cohort of koalas with and without active chlamydial disease, revealing significant differences in expression patterns between the groups. Description of the IFNγ sequence from the koala will not only assist in understanding this species' response to its most important pathogen but will also provide further insight into the evolution of the marsupial immune system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

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    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  11. Antiviral type I and type III interferon responses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  12. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock.

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    Sophie Joly

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production.

  13. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  14. In vivo functional requirement of the mouse Ifitm1 gene for germ cell development, interferon mediated immune response and somitogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Klymiuk

    Full Text Available The mammalian Interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (Ifitm1 gene was originally identified as a member of a gene family highly inducible by type I and type II interferons. Based on expression analyses, it was suggested to be required for normal primordial germ cell migration. The knockdown of Ifitm1 in mouse embryos provided evidence for a role in somitogenesis. We generated the first targeted knockin allele of the Ifitm1 gene to systematically reassess all inferred functions. Sperm motility and the fertility of male and female mutant mice are as in wild type littermates. Embryonic somites and the adult vertebral column appear normal in homozygous Ifitm1 knockout mice, demonstrating that Ifitm1 is not essential for normal segmentation of the paraxial mesoderm. Proportions of leucocyte subsets, including granulocytes, monocytes, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, and NKT-cells, are unchanged in mutant mice. Based on a normal immune response to Listeria monocytogenes infection, there is no evidence for a dysfunction in downstream IFNγ signaling in Ifitm1 mutant mice. Expression from the Ifitm1 locus from E8.5 to E14.5 is highly dynamic. In contrast, in adult mice, Ifitm1 expression is highly restricted and strong in the bronchial epithelium. Intriguingly, IFITM1 is highly overexpressed in tumor epithelia cells of human squamous cell carcinomas and in adenocarcinomas of NSCLC patients. These analyses underline the general importance of targeted in vivo studies for the functional annotation of the mammalian genome. The first comprehensive description of the Ifitm1 expression pattern provides a rational basis for the further examination of Ifitm1 gene functions. Based on our data, the fact that IFITM1 can function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation, and because the gene maps to chromosome band 11p15.5, previously associated with NSCLC, it is likely that IFITM1 in man has a key role in tumor formation.

  15. IN VITRO CELLULAR RESPONSE TO INTERFERON-α2 IN CHILDREN WITH INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS CAUSED BY EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS

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    L. M. Kurtasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to study in vitro response of blood leukocytes to IFNα2 in children with infectious mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, during the acute phase of disease. Patients and methods. Sixty-five children at the age of 4 to 6 years, being in acute phase of infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV were under study. The control group consisted of 36 healthy children. In vitro response of blood leukocytes to IFNα2 was determined by the original technique (L.M. Kurtasova et al., 2007. Chemiluminescence of the blood leukocytes was studied according to De Sole et al. (1989. Results. We observed that clinical condition of the children with EBV infection in acute phase of the disease was characterized by decreased ranges of blood leukocyte response to IFNα2, and dependence of the cellular response on the dose, as well as severity of the disease. In conclusion, these data suggest a need for individual strategy of interferon therapy for the children with infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus.

  16. Gradual development of the interferonresponse of swine to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection or vaccination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, William A.; Galeota, Judy; Osorio, Fernando A.; Husmann, Robert J.; Schnitzlein, William M.; Zuckermann, Federico A.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of swine with virulent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus induced a rapid, robust antibody response that comprised predominantly nonneutralizing antibodies and waned after approximately 3 months. In contrast, the initial onset of virus-specific interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting cells (SC) in the pig lymphocyte population remained at a fairly low level during this period and then increased gradually in frequency, plateauing at 6 months postinfection. A similar polarization of the host humoral and cellular immune responses was also observed in pigs immunized with a PRRS-modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. Even coadministration of an adjuvant that enhanced the immune response to a pseudorabies (PR) MLV vaccine failed to alter the induction of PRRS virus-specific IFN-γ SC (comprising predominately CD4/CD8α double positive memory T cells with a minority being typical CD4 - /CD8αβ + T cells) and the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, unlike inactivated PR virus, nonviable PRRS virus did not elicit virus-neutralizing antibody production. Presumably, an intrinsic property of this pathogen delays the development of the host IFN-γ response and preferentially stimulates the synthesis of antibodies incapable of neutralization

  17. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

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    Bruno Hernáez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection.

  18. Type I interferons as stimulators of DC-mediated cross-priming: impact on anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eSchiavoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells (APC present tumor-associated antigens (Ag on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8+ T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I, a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I -stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8+ T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  19. Pilot study of whole-blood gamma interferon response to the Vibrio cholerae toxin B subunit and resistance to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L; Paredes-Paredes, Mercedes; Aguirre-Garcia, M Magdalena; Rojas, Araceli; Gonzalez, Alexei; Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2010-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), which produces heat-labile toxin (LT), is a common cause of travelers' diarrhea (TD). The B subunit of ETEC LT is immunologically related to the B subunit of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT). In this pilot study we evaluated the whole-blood gamma interferon response to CT B in 17 U.S. adults traveling to Mexico. Only one of nine subjects who demonstrated a cellular immune response as determined by whole-blood gamma interferon production to CT B on arrival to Mexico developed diarrhea, whereas five of eight without a cellular response developed diarrhea. Markers of the cellular immune response to ETEC LT could help in identifying individuals immune to ETEC LT, and these markers deserve additional study.

  20. Type I interferon induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual requirement of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase and Toll-like receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Warrison A.; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2′3′-cGAMP and trigg...

  1. Optimal interdiction of unreactive Markovian evaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The network interdiction problem arises in a wide variety of areas including military logistics, infectious disease control and counter-terrorism. In the classical formulation one is given a weighted network G(N, E) and the task is to find b nodes (or edges) whose removal would maximally increase the least-cost path from a source node s to a target node r. In practical applications. G represenLs a transportation or activity network; node/edge removal is done by an agent, the 'interdictor' against another agent the 'evader' who wants to traverse G from s to t along the least-cost route. Our work is motivated by cases in which both agents have bounded rationality: e.g. when the authorities set up road blocks to catch bank robbers, neither party can plot its actions with full information about the other. We introduce a novel model of network interdiction in which the motion of (possibly) several evaders i. described by a Markov pr cess on G.We further suppose that the evaden; do not respond to interdiction decisions because of time, knowledge or computational constraint . We prove that this interdiction problem is NP-hard, like the classical formulation, but unlike the classical problem the objective function is submodular. This implies that the solution could be approximated within 1-lie using a greedy algorithm. Exploiting submodularity again. we demonstrate that a 'priority' (or 'lazy') evaluation algorithm can improve performance by orders of magnitude. Taken together, the results bring closer realistic solutions to the interdiction problem on global-scale networks.

  2. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interferon alpha therapy for hepatitis C: treatment completion and response rates among patients with substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftis Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs are at increased risk for hepatitis C viral infection (HCV, and few studies have explored their treatment responses empirically. The objective of this study was to assess interferon alpha therapy (IFN completion and response rates among patients with HCV who had a history of comorbid SUDs. More data is needed to inform treatment strategies and guidelines for these patients. Using a medical record database, information was retrospectively collected on 307,437 veterans seen in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 (VISN 20 of the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA between 1998 and 2003. For patients treated with any type of IFN (including regular or pegylated IFN or combination therapy (IFN and ribavirin who had a known HCV genotype, IFN completion and response rates were compared among patients with a history of SUD (SUD+ Group and patients without a history of SUD (SUD- Group. Results Odds ratio analyses revealed that compared with the SUD- Group, the SUD+ Group was equally likely to complete IFN therapy if they had genotypes 2 and 3 (73.1% vs. 68.0%, and if they had genotypes 1 and 4 (39.5% vs. 39.9%. Within the sample of all patients who began IFN therapy, the SUD- and SUD+ groups were similarly likely to achieve an end of treatment response (genotypes 2 and 3, 52.8% vs. 54.3%; genotypes 1 and 4, 24.5% vs. 24.8% and a sustained viral response (genotypes 2 and 3, 42.6% vs. 41.1%; genotypes 1 and 4: 16.0% vs. 22.3%. Conclusion Individuals with and without a history of SUD responded to antiviral therapy for HCV at similar rates. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients who have co-morbid SUD and HCV diagnoses can successfully complete a course of antiviral therapy.

  4. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Krzysztof; Graham, Christine M.; Moreira-Teixeira, Lucia; McNab, Finlay W.; Howes, Ashleigh; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT) and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/-) mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:26918359

  5. No Love Lost Between Viruses and Interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensterl, Volker; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Sen, Ganes C

    2015-11-01

    The interferon system protects mammals against virus infections. There are several types of interferons, which are characterized by their ability to inhibit virus replication and resultant pathogenesis by triggering both innate and cell-mediated immune responses. Virus infection is sensed by a variety of cellular pattern-recognition receptors and triggers the synthesis of interferons, which are secreted by the infected cells. In uninfected cells, cell surface receptors recognize the secreted interferons and activate intracellular signaling pathways that induce the expression of interferon-stimulated genes; the proteins encoded by these genes inhibit different stages of virus replication. To avoid extinction, almost all viruses have evolved mechanisms to defend themselves against the interferon system. Consequently, a dynamic equilibrium of survival is established between the virus and its host, an equilibrium that can be shifted to the host's favor by the use of exogenous interferon as a therapeutic antiviral agent.

  6. Temporal Regulation of Natural Killer T Cell Interferon Gamma Responses by β-Catenin-Dependent and -Independent Wnt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Jessica C; Jordan, Margaret A; Pitt, Lauren A; Meiners, Jana; Thanh-Tran, Thao; Tran, Le Son; Nguyen, Tam T K; Mittal, Deepak; Villani, Rehan; Steptoe, Raymond J; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Berzins, Stuart P; Baxter, Alan G; Godfrey, Dale I; Blumenthal, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are prominent innate-like lymphocytes in the liver with critical roles in immune responses during infection, cancer, and autoimmunity. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-4 are key cytokines rapidly produced by NKT cells upon recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). It has previously been reported that the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin regulates NKT cell differentiation and functionally biases NKT cell responses toward IL-4, at the expense of IFN-γ production. β-Catenin is not only a central effector of Wnt signaling but also contributes to other signaling networks. It is currently unknown whether Wnt ligands regulate NKT cell functions. We thus investigated how Wnt ligands and β-catenin activity shape liver NKT cell functions in vivo in response to the glycolipid antigen, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) using a mouse model. Pharmacologic targeting of β-catenin activity with ICG001, as well as myeloid-specific genetic ablation of Wntless (Wls) , to specifically target Wnt protein release by APCs, enhanced early IFN-γ responses. By contrast, within several hours of α-GalCer challenge, myeloid-specific Wls deficiency, as well as pharmacologic targeting of Wnt release using the small molecule inhibitor IWP-2 impaired α-GalCer-induced IFN-γ responses, independent of β-catenin activity. These data suggest that myeloid cell-derived Wnt ligands drive early Wnt/β-catenin signaling that curbs IFN-γ responses, but that, subsequently, Wnt ligands sustain IFN-γ expression independent of β-catenin activity. Our analyses in ICG001-treated mice confirmed a role for β-catenin activity in driving early IL-4 responses by liver NKT cells. However, neither pharmacologic nor genetic perturbation of Wnt production affected the IL-4 response, suggesting that IL-4 production by NKT cells in response to α-GalCer is not driven by released Wnt ligands. Collectively, these data reveal complex temporal

  7. Temporal Regulation of Natural Killer T Cell Interferon Gamma Responses by β-Catenin-Dependent and -Independent Wnt Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C. Kling

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are prominent innate-like lymphocytes in the liver with critical roles in immune responses during infection, cancer, and autoimmunity. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ and IL-4 are key cytokines rapidly produced by NKT cells upon recognition of glycolipid antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs. It has previously been reported that the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin regulates NKT cell differentiation and functionally biases NKT cell responses toward IL-4, at the expense of IFN-γ production. β-Catenin is not only a central effector of Wnt signaling but also contributes to other signaling networks. It is currently unknown whether Wnt ligands regulate NKT cell functions. We thus investigated how Wnt ligands and β-catenin activity shape liver NKT cell functions in vivo in response to the glycolipid antigen, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer using a mouse model. Pharmacologic targeting of β-catenin activity with ICG001, as well as myeloid-specific genetic ablation of Wntless (Wls, to specifically target Wnt protein release by APCs, enhanced early IFN-γ responses. By contrast, within several hours of α-GalCer challenge, myeloid-specific Wls deficiency, as well as pharmacologic targeting of Wnt release using the small molecule inhibitor IWP-2 impaired α-GalCer-induced IFN-γ responses, independent of β-catenin activity. These data suggest that myeloid cell-derived Wnt ligands drive early Wnt/β-catenin signaling that curbs IFN-γ responses, but that, subsequently, Wnt ligands sustain IFN-γ expression independent of β-catenin activity. Our analyses in ICG001-treated mice confirmed a role for β-catenin activity in driving early IL-4 responses by liver NKT cells. However, neither pharmacologic nor genetic perturbation of Wnt production affected the IL-4 response, suggesting that IL-4 production by NKT cells in response to α-GalCer is not driven by released Wnt ligands. Collectively, these data reveal

  8. Is serum neopterin level a marker of responsiveness to interferon beta-1a therapy in multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casoni, F; Merelli, E; Bedin, R; Sola, P; Bertolotto, A; Faglioni, P

    2004-01-01

    Interferon beta (INFbeta) may induce the expression of several proteins, including neopterin, considered a biological marker of INFbeta activity. The aim of this study was to determine the serum neopterin concentration at the beginning of, and during, IFNbeta-1a therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (r-r MS) patients, and to look for a possible correlation between protein synthesis and the clinical course of the disease. Thirteen r-r MS patients were treated with INFbeta-1a (i.m. 6 MIU/week) for 2 years. Blood samples for neopterin determinations were taken daily over a period of 1 week at the end of each 6 months of therapy, and tested for neutralizing antibodies (NABs). Neopterin levels peaked 24-48 h post-injection and returned to baseline after 120 h. After 1 year of therapy, four patients dropped out of the study because of progression of the disease: in these subjects a significant decrement of neopterin was observed. Neopterin baseline values were not found to decrease over the 2 years of therapy, and neopterin may be considered to be a useful marker of responsiveness to IFNbeta.

  9. Antigen-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses and Innate Cytokine Balance in TB-IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ceulemans, Ann; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS could be associated with an exaggerated immune response to TB-antigens. We compared the recovery of IFNγ responses to recall and TB-antigens and explored in vitro innate cytokine production in TB-IRIS patients. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-TB co-infected patients treated for TB before ART initiation, we compared 18 patients who developed TB-IRIS with 18 non-IRIS controls matched for age, sex and CD4 count. We analyzed IFNγ ELISpot responses to CMV, influenza, TB and LPS before ART and during TB-IRIS. CMV and LPS stimulated ELISpot supernatants were subsequently evaluated for production of IL-12p70, IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 by Luminex. Results Before ART, all responses were similar between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls. During TB-IRIS, IFNγ responses to TB and influenza antigens were comparable between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls, but responses to CMV and LPS remained significantly lower in TB-IRIS patients. Production of innate cytokines was similar between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls. However, upon LPS stimulation, IL-6/IL-10 and TNFα/IL-10 ratios were increased in TB-IRIS patients compared to non-IRIS controls. Conclusion TB-IRIS patients did not display excessive IFNγ responses to TB-antigens. In contrast, the reconstitution of CMV and LPS responses was delayed in the TB-IRIS group. For LPS, this was linked with a pro-inflammatory shift in the innate cytokine balance. These data are in support of a prominent role of the innate immune system in TB-IRIS. PMID:25415590

  10. Antigen-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses and Innate Cytokine Balance in TB-IRIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ceulemans, Ann; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc; Loembé, Marguerite Massinga; Mayanja, Harriet; Mascart, Francoise; van den Bergh, Rafael; Locht, Camille; Reiss, Peter; Cobelens, Frank; Ondoa, Pascale; Pakker, Nadine; Mugerwa, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS could be associated with an exaggerated immune response to TB-antigens. We compared the recovery of

  11. Muscle myeloid type I interferon gene expression may predict therapeutic responses to rituximab in myositis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Rayavarapu, Sree; Phadke, Aditi; Rider, Lisa G; Hoffman, Eric P; Miller, Frederick W

    2016-09-01

    To identify muscle gene expression patterns that predict rituximab responses and assess the effects of rituximab on muscle gene expression in PM and DM. In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanism of response and non-response to rituximab therapy, we performed Affymetrix gene expression array analyses on muscle biopsy specimens taken before and after rituximab therapy from eight PM and two DM patients in the Rituximab in Myositis study. We also analysed selected muscle-infiltrating cell phenotypes in these biopsies by immunohistochemical staining. Partek and Ingenuity pathway analyses assessed the gene pathways and networks. Myeloid type I IFN signature genes were expressed at higher levels at baseline in the skeletal muscle of rituximab responders than in non-responders, whereas classic non-myeloid IFN signature genes were expressed at higher levels in non-responders at baseline. Also, rituximab responders have a greater reduction of the myeloid and non-myeloid type I IFN signatures than non-responders. The decrease in the type I IFN signature following administration of rituximab may be associated with the decreases in muscle-infiltrating CD19(+) B cells and CD68(+) macrophages in responders. Our findings suggest that high levels of myeloid type I IFN gene expression in skeletal muscle predict responses to rituximab in PM/DM and that rituximab responders also have a greater decrease in the expression of these genes. These data add further evidence to recent studies defining the type I IFN signature as both a predictor of therapeutic responses and a biomarker of myositis disease activity. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf British Society for Rheumatology 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 inhibits transcription of IRF3 and IRF7 and suppresses induction of interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, Gretchen L.; Liu Renshui; Hahn, Angela M.; Shackelford, Julia; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 is essential for the induction of Type I interferons (IFN) and innate antiviral responses, and herpesviruses have evolved mechanisms to evade such responses. We previously reported that Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, an immediate-early (IE) protein, inhibits the function of IRF7, but the role of BRLF1, the other IE transactivator, in IRF regulation has not been examined. We now show that BRLF1 expression decreased induction of IFN-β, and reduced expression of IRF3 and IRF7; effects were dependent on N- and C-terminal regions of BRLF1 and its nuclear localization signal. Endogenous IRF3 and IRF7 RNA and protein levels were also decreased during cytolytic EBV infection. Finally, production of IFN-β was decreased during lytic EBV infection and was associated with increased susceptibility to superinfection with Sendai virus. These data suggest a new role for BRLF1 with the ability to evade host innate immune responses.

  13. The presence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies is associated with a negative response to combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matern Siegfried

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-organ-specific autoantibodies are found in a considerable number of anti-HCV positive patients. Previous studies investigated the clinical relevance of these antibodies in patients treated with interferon monotherapy, but not combination therapies. Methods Anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-mitochondrial, anti-neutrophil-cytoplasmatic and anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibodies were determined in 78 consecutive anti-HCV positive patients by indirect immunofluorescence. The presence of these antibodies was related to demographic variables and to the outcome of antiviral combination therapy with interferon-α and ribavirin in 65 patients. Results In our study, positivity for autoantibodies was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase levels and higher mean values for HCV-RNA (p Conclusions The absence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies might indicate a significantly higher chance for viral clearance in response to combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection. Therefore, despite of an overall higher treatment response, the addition of the immunomodulatory drug ribavirin could accentuate immunological differences that affect treatment outcome and might have been less obvious in earlier studies analysing interferon monotherapy.

  14. Benefit of hepatitis C virus core antigen assay in prediction of therapeutic response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hidetsugu; Higashimoto, Makiko; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2005-01-01

    A highly sensitive second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and first-phase kinetics between commercially available core antigen (Ag) assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag (Lumipulse-Ag), and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, version 2 (Amplicor M), to estimate the predictive benefit of a sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 44 genotype 1b patients treated with interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. HCV core Ag negativity could predict SVR on day 1 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 85.0%, accuracy = 86.4%), whereas RNA negativity could predict SVR on day 7 (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 87.2%, accuracy = 88.6%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core Ag or RNA on day 14 achieved SVR (specificity = 100%). The predictive accuracy on day 14 was higher by RNA negativity (93.2%) than that by core Ag negativity (75.0%). The combined predictive criterion of both viral load decline during the first 24 h and basal viral load was also predictive for SVR; the sensitivities of Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were 45.5 and 47.6%, respectively, and the specificity was 100%. Amplicor-M had better predictive accuracy than Lumipulse-Ag in 2-week disappearance tests because it had better sensitivity. On the other hand, estimates of kinetic parameters were similar regardless of the detection method. Although the correlations between Lumipulse-Ag and Amplicor-M were good both before and 24 h after IFN administration, HCV core Ag seemed to be relatively lower 24 h after IFN administration than before administration. Lumipulse-Ag seems to be useful for detecting the HCV concentration during IFN therapy; however, we still need to understand the characteristics of the assay.

  15. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  16. Interferon-γ and proliferation responses to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi proteins in patients with S. Typhi Bacteremia in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaullah Sheikh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is a human-restricted intracellular pathogen and the cause of typhoid fever. Cellular immune responses are required to control and clear Salmonella infection. Despite this, there are limited data on cellular immune responses in humans infected with wild type S. Typhi.For this work, we used an automated approach to purify a subset of S. Typhi proteins identified in previous antibody-based immuno-affinity screens and antigens known to be expressed in vivo, including StaF-putative fimbrial protein-STY0202, StbB-fimbrial chaperone-STY0372, CsgF-involved in curli production-STY1177, CsgD- putative regulatory protein-STY1179, OppA-periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein precursor-STY1304, PagC-outer membrane invasion protein-STY1878, and conserved hypothetical protein-STY2195; we also generated and analyzed a crude membrane preparation of S. Typhi (MP. In comparison to samples collected from uninfected Bangladeshi and North American participants, we detected significant interferonresponses in PBMCs stimulated with MP, StaF, StbB, CsgF, CsgD, OppA, STY2195, and PagC in patients bacteremic with S. Typhi in Bangladesh. The majority of interferon-γ expressing T cells were CD4 cells, although CD8 responses also occurred. We also assessed cellular proliferation responses in bacteremic patients, and confirmed increased responses in infected individuals to MP, StaF, STY2195, and PagC in convalescent compared to acute phase samples and compared to controls. StaF is a fimbrial protein homologous to E. coli YadK, and contains a Pfam motif thought to be involved in cellular adhesion. PagC is expressed in vivo under the control of the virulence-associated PhoP-regulon required for intra-macrophage survival of Salmonella. STY2195 is a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function.This is the first analysis of cellular immune responses to purified S. Typhi antigens in patients with typhoid fever. These results indicate

  17. Interferons: between structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bandurska

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a family of proteins that are released by a variety of cells in response to infections caused by viruses. Currently, we distinguish three types of interferons. They are classified based on the nucleotide sequence, interaction with specific receptors, chromosomal location, structure and physicochemical properties. The following interferons are classified as type I: α, β, ω, κ, ε, ζ, τ, δ, ν. They are recognized and bound by a receptor formed by two peptides, IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2. Representative of type II interferons is interferon-γ. It binds to a receptor composed of chains IFNGR-1 and IFNGR-2. The recently classified type III interferons comprise IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, and IFN-λ3. They act on receptors formed by λR1 IFN-and IL-10R2 subunits. A high level of antiviral protection is achieved by IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Antiviral activity of interferons is based on the induction and regulation of innate and acquired immune mechanisms. By binding to transmembrane receptors, IFN interacts with target cells mainly by activating the JAK/STAT, but also other signaling pathways. This leads to induction and activation of many antiviral agents, such as protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR, ribonuclease 2-5A pathway, and Mx proteins, as well as numerous apoptotic pathways. As a result of the protective effect of interferons, the virus binding to cells and viral particles penetration into cells is stopped, and the release of the nucleocapsid from an envelope is suppressed. Disruption of transcription and translation processes of the structural proteins prevents the formation of virions or budding of viruses, and as a result degradation of the viral mRNA; the started processes inhibit the chain synthesis of viral proteins and therefore further stimulate the immune system cells.

  18. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoly Toth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as

  19. Differential Impact of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 in Initiation of the Type I Interferon Response in the Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-Infected Central Nervous System versus the Periphery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Fenger, Christina; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2012-01-01

    in the LCMV-infected CNS, whereas concurrent elimination of both factors markedly reduces the virus-induced host response. This is unlike the situation in the periphery, where deficiency of IRF7 almost eliminates the LCMV-induced production of the type I IFNs. This difference is seemingly related to the local...... environment, as peripheral production of type I IFNs is severely reduced in intracerebrally (i.c.) infected IRF7-deficient mice, which undergo a combined infection of the CNS and peripheral organs, such as spleen and lymph nodes. Interestingly, despite the redundancy of IRF7 in initiating the type I IFN...

  20. Interferon alpha inhibits replication of a live-attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine preventing development of an adaptive immune response in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Eberle, Kirsten C; Hau, Samantha J; Buckley, Alexandra; Van Geelen, Albert; Montiel, Nestor A; Nicholson, Tracy; Lager, Kelly M

    2017-12-01

    Type I interferons, such as interferon alpha (IFN-α), contribute to innate antiviral immunity by promoting production of antiviral mediators and are also involved in promoting an adaptive immune response. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most devastating and costly viruses to the swine industry world-wide and has been shown to induce a meager IFN-α response. Previously we administered porcine IFN-α using a replication-defective adenovirus vector (Ad5-IFN-α) at the time of challenge with virulent PRRSV and demonstrated an increase in the number of virus-specific IFNγ secreting cells, indicating that the presence of IFN-α at the time of infection can alter the adaptive immune responses to PRRSV. In the current experiment, we explored the use of IFN-α as an adjuvant administered with live-attenuated PRRSV vaccine as a method to enhance immune response to the vaccine. Unlike the previous studies with fully virulent virus, one injection of the Ad5-IFN-α abolished replication of the vaccine virus and as a result there was no detectible adaptive immune response. Although IFN-α did not have the desired adjuvant effect, the results further highlight the use of IFN-α as a treatment for PRRSV infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The Specificity of Innate Immune Responses Is Enforced by Repression of Interferon Response Elements by NF-κB p50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christine S.; Feldman, Kristyn E.; Lee, James; Verma, Shilpi; Huang, De-Bin; Huynh, Kim; Chang, Mikyoung; Ponomarenko, Julia V.; Sun, Shao-Cong; Benedict, Chris A.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The specific binding of transcription factors to cognate sequence elements is thought to be critical for the generation of specific gene expression programs. Members of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factor families bind to the κB site and the IFN response element (IRE), respectively, of target genes, and they are activated in macrophages after exposure to pathogens. However, how these factors produce pathogen-specific inflammatory and immune responses remains poorly understood. Combining top-down and bottom-up systems biology approaches, we have identified the NF-κB p50 homodimer as a regulator of IRF responses. Unbiased genome-wide expression and biochemical and structural analyses revealed that the p50 homodimer repressed a subset of IFN-inducible genes through a previously uncharacterized subclass of guanine-rich IRE (G-IRE) sequences. Mathematical modeling predicted that the p50 homodimer might enforce the stimulus specificity of composite promoters. Indeed, the production of the antiviral regulator IFN-β was rendered stimulus-specific by the binding of the p50 homodimer to the G-IRE–containing IFNβ enhancer to suppress cytotoxic IFN signaling. Specifically, a deficiency in p50 resulted in the inappropriate production of IFN-β in response to bacterial DNA sensed by Toll-like receptor 9. This role for the NF-κB p50 homodimer in enforcing the specificity of the cellular response to pathogens by binding to a subset of IRE sequences alters our understanding of how the NF-κB and IRF signaling systems cooperate to regulate antimicrobial immunity. PMID:21343618

  2. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  3. End-of-Treatment-Response in Patients Treated for Hepatitis C Virus with Standard Interferon and Ribavirin Based on Viral Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, M. A.; Hussain, A. B.; Ghani, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the End-of-Treatment-Response (ETR) to standard interferon and ribavirin based regimen in patients of chronic hepatitis C and to compare the ETR response in low and high viral load groups. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Virology Department, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from March 2012 to May 2013. Methodology: Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection were included in the study. Pre-treatment viral load was determined by RoboGene Quantification kit. Based on viral load, the 400 patients were divided into two equal groups of low viral load (< 800,000 IU/ml) and high viral load (> 800,000 IU/ml). The patients were treated with standard interferon alpha (3 million units subcutaneously thrice weekly) and ribavirin (10.6 mg/kg body weight) for 6 months. ETR was measured using Sacace Biotechnologies Qualitative kit. Chi-square test was used to compare the ETR in the two viral load groups. P-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Out of 400 patients, 206 (51.5%) were males and 194 (48.5%) were females. Two hundred seventy (67.5%) patients achieved ETR and 130 (35.5%) failed to do so. In low viral load group, 145 (72.5%) patients achieved and 55 (27.5%) patients did not achieve ETR. In high viral load group, 123 (61.5%) patients achieved and 77 (38.5%) did not achieve ETR. The difference in ETR between low and high viral load groups was statistically significant (p=0.019). Conclusion: End-of-treatment-response in patients treated for hepatitis C virus with standard interferon and ribavirin was greater in patients with low viral load as compared to patients with high viral load. (author)

  4. Pulmonary Immune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Gamma Responses in HIV-Infected Individuals with Active Tuberculosis (TB in an Area of High TB Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buldeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data on the pulmonary immune-compartment interferon gamma (IFNγ response to M. tuberculosis, particularly in settings of high tuberculosis (TB prevalence and in HIV-coinfected individuals. This data is necessary to understand the diagnostic potential of commercially available interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs in both the pulmonary immune-compartment and peripheral blood. We used intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry to assess the IFNγ response to purified protein derivative (PPD and early secretory antigen 6 (ESAT6 in induced sputa (ISp and blood samples from HIV-infected, smear-negative, TB suspects. We found that individuals with active TB disease produced significantly less IFNγ in response to PPD in their induced sputa samples than individuals with non-active TB (control group. This difference was not reflected in the peripheral blood, even within the CD27− CD4+ memory T lymphocyte population. These findings suggest that progression to active TB disease may be associated with the loss of IFNγ secretion at the site of primary infection. Our findings highlight the importance of studying pulmonary immune-compartment M. tuberculosis specific responses to elucidate IFNγ secretion across the spectrum of TB disease.

  5. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2013-01-01

    Background Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+-dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...... urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells overexpressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 upregulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 overexpressing...

  6. TOX3 (TNRC9) Over Expression in Bladder Cancer Cells Decreases Cellular Proliferation and Triggers an Interferon-Like Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Mansilla Castaño, Francisco; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+ dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...... urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells over expressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 Overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 up regulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 over...

  7. Factors regulated by interferon gamma and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A contribute to responses that protect mice from Coccidioides immitis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woelk Christopher H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidioidomycosis results from airborne infections caused by either Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Both are pathogenic fungi that live in desert soil in the New World and can infect normal hosts, but most infections are self-limited. Disseminated infections occur in approximately 5% of cases and may prove fatal. Mouse models of the disease have identified strains that are resistant (e.g. DBA/2 or susceptible (e.g. C57BL/6 to these pathogens. However, the genetic and immunological basis for this difference has not been fully characterized. Results Microarray technology was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in lung tissue between resistant DBA/2 and sensitive C57BL/6 mice after infection with C. immitis. Differentially expressed genes were mapped onto biological pathways, gene ontologies, and protein interaction networks, which revealed that innate immune responses mediated by Type II interferon (i.e., IFNG and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1 contribute to the resistant phenotype. In addition, upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1A (HIF1A, possibly as part of a larger inflammatory response mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA, may also contribute to resistance. Microarray gene expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR for a subset of 12 genes, which revealed that IFNG HIF1A and TNFA, among others, were significantly differentially expressed between the two strains at day 14 post-infection. Conclusion These results confirm the finding that DBA/2 mice express more Type II interferon and interferon stimulated genes than genetically susceptible strains and suggest that differential expression of HIF1A may also play a role in protection.

  8. Interferons, properties and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schellekens (Huub); W. Weimar (Willem)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe main theme of this thesis is the clinical evaluation of interferon. From the biology of the interferon system and animal experiments it can be expected that exogenous interferon will exert its optimum effect when used to prevent acute infections or to modulate chronic

  9. Human plasmacytoid dentritic cells elicit a Type I Interferon response by sensing DNA via the cGAS-STING signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Christian; Fox, Mario; Tewary, Poonam; Steinhagen, Almut; Ellerkmann, Richard K; Klinman, Dennis; Baumgarten, Georg; Hornung, Veit; Steinhagen, Folkert

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a major source of type I interferon (IFN) and are important for host defense by sensing microbial DNA via TLR9. pDCs also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of IFN-driven autoimmune diseases. Yet, this autoimmune reaction is caused by the recognition of self-DNA and has been linked to TLR9-independent pathways. Increasing evidence suggests that the cytosolic DNA receptor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a critical component in the detection of pathogens and contributes to autoimmune diseases. It has been shown that binding of DNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP and the subsequent activation of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) adaptor to induce IFNs. Our results show that the cGAS-STING pathway is expressed and activated in human pDCs by cytosolic DNA leading to a robust type I IFN response. Direct activation of STING by cyclic dinucleotides including cGAMP also activated pDCs and knockdown of STING abolished this IFN response. These results suggest that pDCs sense cytosolic DNA and cyclic dinucleotides via the cGAS-STING pathway and that targeting this pathway could be of therapeutic interest. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Quantum Backaction Evading Measurement of Collective Mechanical Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockeloen-Korppi, C F; Damskägg, E; Pirkkalainen, J-M; Clerk, A A; Woolley, M J; Sillanpää, M A

    2016-09-30

    The standard quantum limit constrains the precision of an oscillator position measurement. It arises from a balance between the imprecision and the quantum backaction of the measurement. However, a measurement of only a single quadrature of the oscillator can evade the backaction and be made with arbitrary precision. Here we demonstrate quantum backaction evading measurements of a collective quadrature of two mechanical oscillators, both coupled to a common microwave cavity. The work allows for quantum state tomography of two mechanical oscillators, and provides a foundation for macroscopic mechanical entanglement and force sensing beyond conventional quantum limits.

  11. Stromal cells and osteoclasts are responsible for exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis in interferon-beta-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Teige, Ingrid; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical trials using interferon-beta (IFNbeta) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have shown conflicting results. We undertook this study to understand the mechanisms of IFNbeta in arthritis at a physiologic level. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in IFNbeta....... Differences in osteoclast maturation were determined in situ by histology of arthritic and naive paws and by in vitro maturation studies of naive bone marrow cells. The importance of IFNbeta-producing fibroblasts was determined by transferring fibroblasts into mice at the time of CIA immunization. RESULTS...

  12. how to evade the immune system?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HCV usually induces robust immune responses, but it frequently escapes the immune defense to establish persistent infection. The fact that HCV exists as an evolving quasispecies plays an important role in the selection of escape mutants. Furthermore, several viral proteins interfere with cellular functions, in particular, ...

  13. Täna algavad Eesti Muusika Päevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Muusika Päevade raames toimunud üritustest 21. aprillini: ERSO sümfooniakontserdist Estonia kontserdisaalis, Jüri Reinvere radiofoonilise ooperi "Vastaskallas" esiettekandest Tallinna Linnateatri Hobuveski saalis, kontserdist Kunstihoone Vabaduse väljakul (esitusel Urmas Sisaski uus "Tähistaeva tsükkel" - "Eesti rahvataevas"), lastekontserdist "Kodumaine viis" Estonia kontserdisaalis

  14. Ooperipäevad Saaremaal (II) / Tiiu Levald

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levald, Tiiu, 1940-

    2008-01-01

    21.-27. VII Saaremaa ooperipäevade raames toimunud üritustest - Carmen Tabori lavastatud Aino Kallase ja Tauno Pylkkäneni "Patseba Saaremaal" (esimene osa draama- ja teine ooperilavastus), Gershwini ooperist "Porgy ja Bess" ning 25. VII toimunud galakontserdist

  15. Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins of the innate immune response act as membrane organizers by influencing clathrin and v-ATPase localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Yin Shen; Roundy, Kirstin M; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2012-12-01

    The innate response interferon-inducible transmembrane (Ifitm) proteins have been characterized as influencing proliferation, signaling complexes and restricting virus infections. Treatment of cells lacking these proteins (IfitmDel) with IFN-β resulted in the loss of clathrin from membrane compartments and the inhibition of clathrin-mediated phagocytosis, suggesting a molecular interaction between clathrin and Ifitm proteins. The pH of endosomes of IfitmDel cells, with or without IFN activation, was neutralized, suggesting the function of the vacular ATPase proton pumps in such cells was compromised. Co-immunoprecipitation of Ifitm3 with Atp6v0b demonstrated a direct interaction between the Ifitm proteins and the v-ATPase. These data suggest that the Ifitm proteins help stabilize v-ATPase complexes in cellular membranes which, in turn, facilitates the appropriate subcellular localization of clathrin.

  16. Neutralizing antibodies explain the poor clinical response to Interferon beta in a small proportion of patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cefaro Luca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Interferon beta (IFNβ are reported to be associated with poor clinical response to therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. We aimed to quantify the contribution of NAbs to the sub-optimal response of IFNβ treatment. Methods We studied the prevalence of NAbs in MS patients grouped according to their clinical response to IFNβ during the treatment period. Patients were classified as: group A, developing ≥ 1 relapse after the first 6 months of therapy; group B, exhibiting confirmed disability progression after the first 6 months of therapy, with or without superimposed relapses; group C, presenting a stable disease course during therapy. A cytopathic effect assay tested the presence of NAbs in a cohort of ambulatory MS patients treated with one of the available IFNβ formulations for at least one year. NAbs positivity was defined as NAbs titre ≥ 20 TRU. Results Seventeen patients (12.1% were NAbs positive. NAbs positivity correlated with poorer clinical response (p Conclusion The majority of patients with poor clinical response are NAbs negative suggesting that NAbs explains only partially the sub-optimal response to IFNβ.

  17. Minimal residual disease and normalization of the bone marrow after long-term treatment with alpha-interferon2b in polycythemia vera. A report on molecular response patterns in seven patients in sustained complete hematological remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Møller, Michael Boe; de Stricker, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is characterized by the presence of the JAK2V617F mutation in virtually all patients. Several studies have shown that the JAK2V617F mutational load decreases during treatment with alpha-interferon 2. We report on molecular and histomorphological bone marrow responses in seven...

  18. Interferon-Stimulated Genes Are Transcriptionally Repressed by PR in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Katherine R; Goodman, Merit L; Singhal, Hari; Hall, Jade A; Li, Tianbao; Holloran, Sean M; Trinca, Gloria M; Gibson, Katelin A; Jin, Victor X; Greene, Geoffrey L; Hagan, Christy R

    2017-10-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) regulates transcriptional programs that drive proliferation, survival, and stem cell phenotypes. Although the role of native progesterone in the development of breast cancer remains controversial, PR clearly alters the transcriptome in breast tumors. This study identifies a class of genes, Interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs), potently downregulated by ligand-activated PR which have not been previously shown to be regulated by PR. Progestin-dependent transcriptional repression of ISGs was observed in breast cancer cell line models and human breast tumors. Ligand-independent regulation of ISGs was also observed, as basal transcript levels were markedly higher in cells with PR knockdown. PR repressed ISG transcription in response to IFN treatment, the canonical mechanism through which these genes are activated. Liganded PR is robustly recruited to enhancer regions of ISGs, and ISG transcriptional repression is dependent upon PR's ability to bind DNA. In response to PR activation, key regulatory transcription factors that are required for IFN-activated ISG transcription, STAT2 and IRF9, exhibit impaired recruitment to ISG promoter regions, correlating with PR/ligand-dependent ISG transcriptional repression. IFN activation is a critical early step in nascent tumor recognition and destruction through immunosurveillance. As the large majority of breast tumors are PR positive at the time of diagnosis, PR-dependent downregulation of IFN signaling may be a mechanism through which early PR-positive breast tumors evade the immune system and develop into clinically relevant tumors. Implications: This study highlights a novel transcriptional mechanism through which PR drives breast cancer development and potentially evades the immune system. Mol Cancer Res; 15(10); 1331-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles (DQB1 and DRB1 as Predictors for Response to Interferon Therapy in HCV Genotype 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Shaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens class II play an important role in immune response against HCV. We investigated whether HLA class II alleles influence susceptibility to HCV infection and response to interferon therapy. HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci were genotyped using PCR-SSO Luminex technology. According to our regimen, 41 (66% of patients achieved sustained virological response to combined treatment of IFN and ribavirin. Frequencies of DQB1*0313 allele and DRB1*04-DRB1*11, DQB1*0204-DQB1*0313, DQB1*0309-DQB1*0313, and DQB1*0313-DQB1*0319 haplotypes were significantly more frequent in nonresponders than in responders. In contrast, DQB1*02, DQB1*06, DRB1*13, and DRB1*15 alleles were significantly more frequent in responders than in nonresponders. Similarly, DRB1*1301, DRB1*1361, and DRB1*1369 alleles and DRB1*1301-DRB1*1328, DRB1*1301-DRB1*1361, DRB1*1301-DRB1*1369, DRB1*1328-DRB1*1361, and DRB1*1328-DRB1*1369 haplotypes were significantly found only in responders. Some alleles and linkages showed significantly different distributions between patient and healthy groups. These alleles may be used as predictors for response to treatment or to susceptibility to HCV infection in the Egyptian population.

  20. Oligoclonal CD8+ T-cell expansion in patients with chronic hepatitis C is associated with liver pathology and poor response to interferon-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfras, Burkhard J; Weidenbach, Hans; Beckh, Karl-Heinz; Kern, Peter; Möller, Peter; Adler, Guido; Mertens, Thomas; Boehm, Bernhard O

    2004-05-01

    The role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in liver injury with subsequent development of fibrosis and cirrhosis is poorly understood. To address this question, we performed a follow-up study including 27 chronically HCV-infected individuals. We determined clonality and phenotypes of circulating CD8(+) T cells employing TCRBV spectratyping. Antigen specificity was tested by rMHC-peptide tetramer staining and stimulation with recombinant HCV antigens. In addition, T-cell clonality and phenotypes were followed during the variable clinical response of interferon- (IFN) alpha treatment. We could demonstrate that CD8(+) T-cell expansions were significantly associated with liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Likewise, increased oligoclonality of circulating CD8(+) T cells in chronic HCV infection was identified as an indicator for poor clinical response to IFN-alpha therapy. Moreover, we also found that IFN-alpha therapy enhanced the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells towards a late differentiation phenotype (CD28(-) CD57(+)). In cases of virus elimination the disappearance of expanded terminally differentiated CD8(+) cells was observed. Thus, this study identifies an association of clonal expansions of circulating CD8(+) T cells with liver pathology and provides a possible explanation for the fact that response to IFN-alpha therapy diminishes with the duration of infection.

  1. The microRNA miR-29 controls innate and adaptive immune responses to intracellular bacterial infection by targeting interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng; Xu, Sheng; Liu, Xingguang; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Xiongfei; Liu, Mofang; Hua, Minmin; Li, Nan; Yao, Hangping; Cao, Xuetao

    2011-07-24

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) has a critical role in immune responses to intracellular bacterial infection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. However, whether miRNAs can directly target IFN-γ and regulate IFN-γ production post-transcriptionally remains unknown. Here we show that infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes or Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) downregulated miR-29 expression in IFN-γ-producing natural killer cells, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, miR-29 suppressed IFN-γ production by directly targeting IFN-γ mRNA. We developed mice with transgenic expression of a 'sponge' target to compete with endogenous miR-29 targets (GS29 mice). We found higher serum concentrations of IFN-γ and lower L. monocytogenes burdens in L. monocytogenes-infected GS29 mice than in their littermates. GS29 mice had enhanced T helper type 1 (T(H)1) responses and greater resistance to infection with BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, miR-29 suppresses immune responses to intracellular pathogens by targeting IFN-γ.

  2. Immunosenescent CD57+CD4+ T-cells Accumulate and Contribute to InterferonResponses in HIV Patients Responding Stably to ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals responding to antiretroviral therapy (ART after severe CD4+ T-cell depletion may retain low responses to recall antigens [eg: cytomegalovirus (CMV] and altered expression of T-cell co-stimulatory molecules consistent with immunosenescence. We investigated the capacity of phenotypically senescent cells to generate cytokines in HIV patients receiving long-term ART (n = 18 and in healthy controls (n = 10. Memory T-cells were assessed by interferon (IFN-γ ELISpot assay and flow cytometrically via IFN-γ or IL-2. Proportions of CD57brightCD28null CD4+ T-cells correlated with IFN-γ responses to CMV (p = 0.009 and anti-CD3 (p = 0.002 in HIV patients only. Proportions of CD57brightCD28null CD8+ T-cells and CD8+ T-cell IFN-γ responses to CMV peptides correlated in controls but not HIV patients. IL-2 was predominantly produced by CD28+T-cells from all donors, whereas IFN-γ was mostly produced by CD57+ T-cells. The findings provide evidence of an accumulation of immunosenescent T-cells able to make IFN-γ. This may influence the pathogenesis of secondary viral infections in HIV patients receiving ART.

  3. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannes Nils

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC. The present study demonstrates that the opsonising antibody titres mediating enhanced IFN-α responses in pDC were similar to neutralizing titres, when antigenically related viruses from the same serotype were employed. However, sera cross-reacted also with non-neutralized isolates of multiple serotypes, when tested in this assay. Both uncomplexed virus and immune complexed virus stimulated pDC via Toll-like receptor 7. An additional finding of potential importance for strain-specific differences in virulence and/or immunogenicity was that pDC activation by FMDV strongly differed between viral isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that opsonising antibodies can have a broader reactivity than neutralizing antibodies and may contribute to antiviral responses induced against antigenically distant viruses.

  4. Type I Interferon Reaction to Viral Infection in Interferon-Competent, Immortalized Cell Lines from the African Fruit Bat Eidolon helvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesold, Susanne E.; Ritz, Daniel; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Wollny, Robert; Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor M.; Kalko, Elisabeth K. V.; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A.

    2011-01-01

    Bats harbor several highly pathogenic zoonotic viruses including Rabies, Marburg, and henipaviruses, without overt clinical symptoms in the animals. It has been suspected that bats might have evolved particularly effective mechanisms to suppress viral replication. Here, we investigated interferon (IFN) response, -induction, -secretion and -signaling in epithelial-like cells of the relevant and abundant African fruit bat species, Eidolon helvum (E. helvum). Immortalized cell lines were generated; their potential to induce and react on IFN was confirmed, and biological assays were adapted to application in bat cell cultures, enabling comparison of landmark IFN properties with that of common mammalian cell lines. E. helvum cells were fully capable of reacting to viral and artificial IFN stimuli. E. helvum cells showed highest IFN mRNA induction, highly productive IFN protein secretion, and evidence of efficient IFN stimulated gene induction. In an Alphavirus infection model, O'nyong-nyong virus exhibited strong IFN induction but evaded the IFN response by translational rather than transcriptional shutoff, similar to other Alphavirus infections. These novel IFN-competent cell lines will allow comparative research on zoonotic, bat-borne viruses in order to model mechanisms of viral maintenance and emergence in bat reservoirs. PMID:22140523

  5. Interdependent and independent roles of type I interferons and IL-6 in innate immune, neuroinflammatory and sickness behaviour responses to systemic poly I:C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carol; Griffin, Éadaoin W; O'Loughlin, Elaine; Lyons, Aoife; Sherwin, Eoin; Ahmed, Suaad; Stevenson, Nigel J; Harkin, Andrew; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-08-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) are expressed in the brain during many inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions and have multiple effects on CNS function. IFN-I is readily induced in the brain by systemic administration of the viral mimetic, poly I:C (synthetic double-stranded RNA). We hypothesised that IFN-I contributes to systemically administered poly I:C-induced sickness behaviour, metabolic and neuroinflammatory changes. IFN-I receptor 1 deficient mice (IFNAR1(-/-)) displayed significantly attenuated poly I:C-induced hypothermia, hypoactivity and weight loss compared to WT C57BL/6 mice. This amelioration of sickness was associated with equivalent IL-1β and TNF-α responses but much reduced IL-6 responses in plasma, hypothalamus and hippocampus of IFNAR1(-/-) mice. IFN-β injection induced trivial IL-6 production and limited behavioural change and the poly I:C-induced IFN-β response did not preceed, and would not appear to mediate, IL-6 induction. Rather, IFNAR1(-/-) mice lack basal IFN-I activity, have lower STAT1 levels and show significantly lower levels of several inflammatory transcripts, including stat1. Basal IFN-I activity appears to play a facilitatory role in the full expression of the IL-6 response and activation of the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism pathway. The deficient IL-6 response in IFNAR1(-/-) mice partially explains the observed incomplete sickness behaviour response. Reconstitution of circulating IL-6 revealed that the role of IFNAR in burrowing activity is mediated via IL-6, while IFN-I and IL-6 have additive effects on hypoactivity, but the role of IFN-I in anorexia is independent of IL-6. Hence, we have demonstrated both interdependent and independent roles for IFN-I and IL-6 in systemic inflammation-induced changes in brain function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is pegylated interferon superior to interferon, with ribavarin, in chronic hepatitis C genotypes 2/3?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ijaz S Jamall; Shafaq Yusuf; Maimoona Azhar; Selene Jamall

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade,significant improvements have been made in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C(CHC),especially with the introduction of combined therapy using both interferon and ribavarin.The optimal dose and duration of treatment is still a matter of debate and,importantly,the efficacy of this combined treatment varies with the viral genotype responsible for infection.In general,patients infected with viral genotypes 2 or 3 more readily achieve a sustained viral response than those infected with viral genotype 1.The introduction of a pegylated version of interferon in the past decade has produced better clinical outcomes in patients infected with viral genotype 1.However,the published literature shows no improvement in clinical outcomes in patients infected with viral genotypes 2 or 3 when they are treated with pegylated interferon as opposed to nonpegylated interferon,both given in combination with ribavarin.This is significant because the cost of a 24-wk treatment with pegylated interferon in lessdeveloped countries is between six and 30 times greater than that of treatment with interferon.Thus,clinicians need to carefully consider the cost-versusbenefit of using pegylated interferon to treat CHC,particularly when there is no evidence for clinically measurable benefits in patients with genotypes 2 and 3 infections.

  7. Protein pathway activation associated with sustained virologic response in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younossi, Zobair M; Limongi, Dolores; Stepanova, Maria; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Afendy, Arian; Mehta, Rohini; Baranova, Ancha; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel

    2011-02-04

    Only half of chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN+RBV) achieve sustained virologic response) SVR. In addition to known factors, we postulated that activation of key protein signaling networks in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) may contribute to SVR due to inherent patient-specific basal immune cell signaling architecture. In this study, we included 92 patients with CH-C. PBMCs were collected while patients were not receiving treatment and used for phosphoprotein-based network profiling. Patients received a full course of PEG-IFN+RBV with overall SVR of 55%. From PBMC, protein lysates were extracted and then used for Reverse Phase Protein Microarray (RPMA) analysis, which quantitatively measured the levels of cytokines and activation levels of 25 key protein signaling molecules involved in immune cell regulation and interferon alpha signaling. Regression models for predicting SVR were generated by stepwise bidirectional selection. Both clinical-laboratory and RPMA parameters were used as predictor variables. Model accuracies were estimated using 10-fold cross-validation. Our results show that by comparing patients who achieved SVR to those who did not, phosphorylation levels of 6 proteins [AKT(T308), JAK1(Y1022/1023), p70 S6 Kinase (S371), PKC zeta/lambda(T410/403), TYK2(Y1054/1055), ZAP-70(Y319)/Syk(Y352)] and overall levels of 6 unmodified proteins [IL2, IL10, IL4, IL5, TNF-alpha, CD5L] were significantly different (P < 0.05). For SVR, the model based on a combination of clinical and proteome parameters was developed, with an AUC = 0.914, sensitivity of 92.16%, and specificity of 85.0%. This model included the following parameters: viral genotype, previous treatment status, BMI, phosphorylated states of STAT2, AKT, LCK, and TYK2 kinases as well as steady state levels of IL4, IL5, and TNF-alpha. In conclusion, SVR could be predicted by a combination of clinical, cytokine, and protein signaling

  8. Evaluation of immune responses in HIV infected patients with pleural tuberculosis by the QuantiFERON® TB-Gold interferon-gamma assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekabe Jacob M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous (TB pleuritis is difficult and better diagnostic tools are needed. New blood based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ tests are promising, but sensitivity could be low in HIV positive patients. The IFN-γ tests have not yet been validated for use in pleural fluid, a compartment with higher level of immune activation than in blood. Methods The QuantiFERON TB®-Gold (QFT-TB test was analysed in blood and pleural fluid from 34 patients presenting with clinically suspected pleural TB. Clinical data, HIV status and CD4 cell counts were recorded. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA analysis and TB culture were performed on pleural fluid. Results The patients were categorised as 'confirmed TB' (n = 12, 'probable TB' (n = 16 and 'non-TB' pleuritis (n = 6 based on TB culture results and clinical and biochemical criteria. The majority of the TB patients were HIV infected (82%. The QFT-TB in pleural fluid was positive in 27% and 56% of the 'confirmed TB' and 'probable TB' cases, respectively, whereas the corresponding sensitivities in blood were 58% and 83%. Indeterminate results in blood (25% were caused by low phytohemagglutinin (PHA = positive control IFN-γ responses, significantly lower in the TB patients as compared to the 'non-TB' cases (p = 0.02. Blood PHA responses correlated with CD4 cell count (r = 0.600, p = 0.028. In contrast, in pleural fluid indeterminate results (52% were caused by high Nil (negative control IFN-γ responses in both TB groups. Still, the Nil IFN-γ responses were lower than the TB antigen responses (p Conclusion The QFT-TB test in blood could contribute to the diagnosis of TB pleuritis in the HIV positive population. Still, the number of inconclusive results is too high to recommend the commercial QFT-TB test for routine use in pleural fluid in a TB/HIV endemic resource-limited setting.

  9. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 3a Hypervariable region 1 in patients achieved rapid virological response to alpha interferon and Ribavirin Combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badar Sadaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus roots a chronic liver disease. Currently approved treatment strategy includes administration of alpha interferon and ribavirin combined therapy for 24-48 weeks. One of the predictor of sustained virological response is an early virological response to treatment characterized as rapid response. Hyper variable region 1 (HVR1 of E2 protein is responsible for viral entry and acts as a target for neutralizing antibodies. Any mutation in this region would effect virus interaction with target cell and viral persistence. Methods Thirty one clones of six pre-treatment samples subjected to combination therapy were investigated. Three of the patients were rapid responders (R1, R2 and R3 and two were breakthrough responders (BT1 and BT2. Envelope 2 gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid substitution, frequency, composition and antigenic properties of HVR 1 of E2 protein were studied. Results In both rapid responders (R.R (14 amino acid sites and breakthrough responders (BT.R (13 amino acid sites half of the amino acid sites were either conserved or resistant to any physiochemical change due to amino acid substitution. It also indicated that average composition of hydrophilic and basic amino acids were comparatively lower in rapid responders than other samples affecting probable interaction of virus with target cells. A central non antigenic region was constant among the breakthrough responders but differed in length significantly among rapid responders reflecting the adaptive nature of HVR1 to the immune response. Conclusions We observed that although HVR1is quite variable region in HCV 3a patients responding differently to treatment it still maintains its physiochemical properties for its proper functioning and viability.

  10. Sequential combination of glucocorticosteroids and alfa interferon versus alfa interferon alone chronic hepatitis B. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, M T; Krogsgaard, K; Mathurin, P

    2000-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B has serious effects on morbidity and mortality. Alfa interferon has been shown to increase the rates of HBeAg-clearance as well as seroconversion to anti-HBe, but response rates are unsatisfactory. Glucocorticosteroid pretreatment may increase the response to alfa interferon....

  11. Bacteriophages use hypermodified nucleosides to evade host's defence systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Olsen, Nikoline S.; Carstens, Alexander Byth

    developed several strategies to evade these defence mechanisms. Ultimately, this led to the oldest and still running arms race - microorganisms vs. their molecular parasites. We here describe a remarkable new strategy used by the recently isolated Escherichia coli phage CAjan belonging to...... to investigate this mechanism in detail we have used several methods including direct plaque sequencing, restriction endonuclease analysis and CRISPR-Cas genome editing. Through generation of specific mutants, we were able to introduce a restriction sensitive phenotype in the CAjan bacteriophage providing new...

  12. Evading Lyth bound in models of quintessential inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Wali; Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Quintessential inflation refers to an attempt to unify inflation and late-time cosmic acceleration using a single scalar field. In this letter we consider two different classes of quintessential inflation, one of which is based upon a Lagrangian with non-canonical kinetic term k 2 (ϕ)∂ μ ϕ∂ μ ϕ and a steep exponential potential while the second class uses the concept of steep brane world inflation. We show that in both cases the Lyth bound can be evaded, despite the large tensor-to-scalar ratio of perturbations. The post-inflationary dynamics is consistent with nucleosynthesis constraint in these cases

  13. Gamma-interferon bioassay for detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle: kinetics of production and dose response in whole blood culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Sandeep; Das, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation with mycobacterium bovis PPD sensitised lymphocytes (whole blood or peripheral blood lymphocytes) results in release of gamma-interferon that can be detected by simple bioassay. The optimum concentration of bovine PPD was 20 μg ml and the optimum incubation period was 24 hr for maximum production of gamma-interferon in whole blood culture (128 units/ml) and peripheral blood culture (64 units/ml). (author)

  14. Immunological dynamics associated with rapid virological response during the early phase of type I interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Won; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yuri; Shin, Hyun Mu; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Min, Chan-Ki; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Lee, Won-Woo; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Cho, Nam-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play an important role in antiviral immunity as well as immunopathogenesis of diverse chronic viral infections. However, the precise mechanisms regulating the multifaceted effects of type I IFNs on the immune system and pathological inflammation still remain unclear. In order to assess the immunological dynamics associated with rapid viral clearance in chronic hepatitis C patients during the acute phase of type I IFN therapy, we analyzed multiple parameters of virological and immunological responses in a cohort of 59 Korean hepatitis C patients who received pegylated IFN-α and ribavirin (IFN/RBV). Most of the Korean patients had favorable alleles in the IFN-λ loci for responsiveness to IFN/RBV (i.e., C/C in rs12979860, T/T in rs8099917, and TT/TT in rs368234815). Rapid virological response (RVR) was determined mainly by the hepatitis C virus genotype. Among the cytokines analyzed, higher plasma levels of IL-17A and FGF were observed in non-RVR patients infected with viral genotype 1 and IP-10 was consistently elevated in RVR group infected with genotype 2 during the early phase of antiviral therapy. In addition, these three cytokines were correlated each other, suggesting a functional linkage of the cytokines in antiviral responses during IFN/RBV therapy. A low baseline frequencies of regulatory T cells and γδ T cells, but high level of group 2 innate lymphoid cells, in peripheral bloods were also significantly associated with the RVR group, implicating a potential role of the cellular immunity during the early phase of IFN/RBV therapy. Therefore, the immunological programs established by chronic hepatitis C and rapid disruption of the delicate balance by exogenous type I IFN might be associated with the subsequent virological outcomes in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  15. Identification of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) interferon regulatory factor 3 involved in antiviral immune response against fish RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Cai, Jia; OuYang, Zhengliang; Wei, Shina; Wei, Jingguang; Qin, Qiwei

    2015-02-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is an important transcription factor which regulates the expression of interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) following virus recognition. In this study, a novel IRF3 gene was cloned from grouper Epinephelus coioides (EcIRF3) and its effects against Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) was investigated. The full-length of EcIRF3 cDNA was composed of 2513 bp and encoded a polypeptide of 458 amino acids which shared 82% identity with European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). EcIRF3 contained three conserved domains including a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF associated domain (IAD) and a serine-rich domain. Expression profile analysis revealed that EcIRF3 was abundant in head kidney, kidney, spleen and gill. Upon different stimuli in vitro, the transcript of EcIRF3 was significantly up-regulated after RGNNV infection or treatment with polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). During SGIV infection, the increase of the EcIRF3 transcription was only detected at the late stage, suggesting that EcIRF3 was differently regulated by different stimuli. Immune fluorescence assay indicated that the fluorescence signal of EcIRF3 was increased significantly after infection with RGNNV or treatment with poly I:C, but moderately at the late stage of SGIV infection. Reporter gene assay showed that EcIRF3 activated zebrafish type I IFN and type III IFN promoter in vitro. The viral gene transcription and virus production of RGNNV were significantly decreased in EcIRF3 overexpressing cells. However, the ectopic expression of EcIRF3 did not affect the gene transcription and virus production of SGIV. Moreover, the mRNA expression levels of type I IFN and IFN-inducible genes (MxI, ISG15 and ISG56) were increased in RGNNV infected EcIRF3 overexpressing cells compared to empty vector transfected cells. Together, our results demonstrated that IFN immune response mediated by grouper IRF3 was

  16. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Phosphorylates DDX41 and Activates Its Binding of dsDNA and STING to Initiate Type 1 Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koon-Guan Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system senses cytosolic dsDNA and bacterial cyclic dinucleotides and initiates signaling via the adaptor STING to induce type 1 interferon (IFN response. We demonstrate here that BTK-deficient cells have impaired IFN-β production and TBK1/IRF3 activation when stimulated with agonists or infected with pathogens that activate STING signaling. BTK interacts with STING and DDX41 helicase. The kinase and SH3/SH2 interaction domains of BTK bind, respectively, the DEAD-box domain of DDX41 and transmembrane region of STING. BTK phosphorylates DDX41, and its kinase activities are critical for STING-mediated IFN-β production. We show that Tyr364 and Tyr414 of DDX41 are critical for its recognition of AT-rich DNA and binding to STING, and tandem mass spectrometry identifies Tyr414 as the BTK phosphorylation site. Modeling studies further indicate that phospho-Tyr414 strengthens DDX41’s interaction with STING. Hence, BTK plays a critical role in the activation of DDX41 helicase and STING signaling.

  17. Pegylated interferon and ribavirin promote early evolution of nonstructural 5A protein in individuals with hepatitis C who demonstrate a response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Yuan, He-Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Reeck, Amanda; Shelton, Janel; Attar, Nahid; Zhang, Song; Neumann, Avidan U; Carney, David S; Gale, Michael; Lee, William M

    2009-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) quasispecies diversity is more likely to affect early viral decline during treatment of hepatitis C than is having human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We evaluated the influence of HCV therapy on changes in the nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein. Fifteen patients with HCV genotype 1 infection with or without HIV infection were recruited for the present study, and the decrease in the HCV RNA level was measured at early time points. The evolution of HCV NS5A quasispecies within the first week was analyzed by comparing the clones observed at later times in the study with the baseline consensus sequence of individual patients. The response to therapy was defined as an early response (ER; ie, an HCV RNA level <615 IU/mL at week 4) or a slow response (SR; ie, a detectable HCV RNA level at week 4). HIV infection did not affect early viral kinetics. At baseline, lower diversity was seen in NS5A and in the amino and carboxyl termini of patients with an ER, compared with those with an SR. Rapid evolution of the NS5A genetic region occurred in patients with an ER (P = .01) but not in those with an SR (P = .73). The evolution was the result of an increase in the number of amino acid substitutions in the carboxyl region (P = .02) in patients with an ER. Selective pressure appears to result in more-marked changes in individuals with an ER than in those with an SR. The carboxyl terminus was subject to the most change and may be an important determinant of phenotypic resistance to interferon-based therapy.

  18. Identification of a Sjögren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SS is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analyses focusing on differentially expressed type I IFN-inducible transcripts identified through a transcriptome profiling study. Multiple cis-eQTLs were associated with transcript levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 peaking at rs10774671 (PeQTL = 6.05 × 10-14. Association of rs10774671 with SS susceptibility was identified and confirmed through meta-analysis of two independent cohorts (Pmeta = 2.59 × 10-9; odds ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.66-0.86. The risk allele of rs10774671 shifts splicing of OAS1 from production of the p46 isoform to multiple alternative transcripts, including p42, p48, and p44. We found that the isoforms were differentially expressed within each genotype in controls and patients with and without autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results showed that the three alternatively spliced isoforms lacked translational response to type I IFN stimulation. The p48 and p44 isoforms also had impaired protein expression governed by the 3' end of the transcripts. The SS risk allele of rs10774671 has been shown by others to be associated with reduced OAS1 enzymatic activity and ability to clear viral infections, as well as reduced responsiveness to IFN treatment. Our results establish OAS1 as a risk locus for SS and support a potential role for defective viral clearance due to altered IFN response as a genetic pathophysiological basis of this complex autoimmune disease.

  19. Identification of a Sjögren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Ice, John A.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Adrianto, Indra; Wang, Shaofeng; He, Bo; Grundahl, Kiely M.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bowman, Simon; Lester, Sue; Eriksson, Per; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Guthridge, Joel M.; Patel, Ketan; Adler, Adam J.; Farris, A. Darise; Brennan, Michael T.; Chodosh, James; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Weisman, Michael H.; Venuturupalli, Swamy; Wallace, Daniel J.; Hefner, Kimberly S.; Houston, Glen D.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Lewis, David M.; Radfar, Lida; Vista, Evan S.; Rohrer, Michael D.; Stone, Donald U.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Harley, John B.; James, Judith A.; Turner, Sean; Alevizos, Ilias; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Scofield, R. Hal; Kovats, Susan; Mariette, Xavier; Witte, Torsten; Rischmueller, Maureen; Omdal, Roald; Lessard, Christopher J.; Sivils, Kathy L.

    2017-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN) pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses focusing on differentially expressed type I IFN-inducible transcripts identified through a transcriptome profiling study. Multiple cis-eQTLs were associated with transcript levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) peaking at rs10774671 (PeQTL = 6.05 × 10−14). Association of rs10774671 with SS susceptibility was identified and confirmed through meta-analysis of two independent cohorts (Pmeta = 2.59 × 10−9; odds ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.66–0.86). The risk allele of rs10774671 shifts splicing of OAS1 from production of the p46 isoform to multiple alternative transcripts, including p42, p48, and p44. We found that the isoforms were differentially expressed within each genotype in controls and patients with and without autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results showed that the three alternatively spliced isoforms lacked translational response to type I IFN stimulation. The p48 and p44 isoforms also had impaired protein expression governed by the 3' end of the transcripts. The SS risk allele of rs10774671 has been shown by others to be associated with reduced OAS1 enzymatic activity and ability to clear viral infections, as well as reduced responsiveness to IFN treatment. Our results establish OAS1 as a risk locus for SS and support a potential role for defective viral clearance due to altered IFN response as a genetic pathophysiological basis of this complex autoimmune disease. PMID

  20. Optimization of interferon gamma ELISPOT assay to detect human cytomegalovirus specific T-cell responses in solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Davide; Saldan, Alda; Forner, Gabriella; Tinto, Daniel; Bianchin, Alice; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Assessing the CMV specific CMI in transplant subjects represents a promising strategy to determine the risk of infection on individual basis. In this study 61 adult CMV IgG seropositive solid organ transplant recipients were examined in order to improve the efficacy of CMI detection. For this purpose, pair-wise comparisons were conducted comparing positive control stimuli PWM and PMA/iono and CMV stimuli, pp65 peptide pool and whole CMV particle. Rosette pre-depletion of blood was also investigated for detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses using the IFN-g ELISPOT assay. In the time-points 30-180 days after transplantation, PMA/iono produced statistically significant higher responses compared to PWM, probably because PMA/iono activation pathway is independent from the effect of immunosuppressive drugs. The data showed that 11% of transplant patients displayed very low or undetectable responses to pp65 peptide pool antigen while having sustained high responses to whole CMV particle. In addition, in all the subjects analyzed, CMI responses to CMV particle produced a statistically significant higher number of spots compared to pp65 peptide pool antigen. Rosette pre-depletion of whole blood proved to be effective in detecting CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses similarly to flow cytometry. Taken together, the following recommendations are suggested to optimize the CMV-ELISPOT for transplantation settings: (1) use PMA/iono as positive control; (2) whole virus particle should be used to avoid peptide-related false negative responses; (3) a rosette pre-depletion step may be useful to detect CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José Manuel; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María Alma; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Wrobel, Boris; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-08-26

    We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  2. Genetic variability of hepatitis C virus before and after combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Cuevas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the selective forces acting on two hepatitis C virus genome regions previously postulated to be involved in the viral response to combined antiviral therapy. One includes the three hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein, and the other encompasses the PKR binding domain and the V3 domain in the NS5A region. We used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin for which samples were obtained before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were sequenced. These were used to detect general patterns of adaptation, to identify particular adaptation mechanisms and to analyze the patterns of evolutionary change in both genome regions. These analyses failed to detect a common adaptive mechanism for the lack of response to antiviral treatment in these patients. On the contrary, a wide range of situations were observed, from patients showing no positively selected sites to others with many, and with completely different topologies in the reconstructed phylogenetic trees. Altogether, these results suggest that viral strategies to evade selection pressure from the immune system and antiviral therapies do not result from a single mechanism and they are likely based on a range of different alternatives, in which several different changes, or their combination, along the HCV genome confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures.

  3. Distinct Effects of Type I and III Interferons on Enteric Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Ingle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key host cytokines in the innate immune response to viral infection, and recent work has identified unique roles for IFN subtypes in regulating different aspects of infection. Currently emerging is a common theme that type III IFNs are critical in localized control of infection at mucosal barrier sites, while type I IFNs are important for broad systemic control of infections. The intestine is a particular site of interest for exploring these effects, as in addition to being the port of entry for a multitude of pathogens, it is a complex tissue with a variety of cell types as well as the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Here we focus on the roles of type I and III IFNs in control of enteric viruses, discussing what is known about signaling downstream from these cytokines, including induction of specific IFN-stimulated genes. We review viral strategies to evade IFN responses, effects of IFNs on the intestine, interactions between IFNs and the microbiota, and briefly discuss the role of IFNs in controlling viral infections at other barrier sites. Enhanced understanding of the coordinate roles of IFNs in control of viral infections may facilitate development of antiviral therapeutic strategies; here we highlight potential avenues for future exploration.

  4. The TLR9 agonist MGN1703 triggers a potent type I interferon response in the sigmoid colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, A R; Abdel-Mohsen, M; Schleimann, M H

    2018-01-01

    to the change in integrated HIV DNA during MGN1703 treatment (P=0.020). In conclusion, MGN1703 induced a potent type I IFN response, without a concomitant general inflammatory response, in the intestines.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 02 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.59....... and infectious diseases), led us to investigate the impact of MGN1703 (Lefitolimod) on intestinal homeostasis and viral persistence in HIV-positive individuals. Colonic sigmoid biopsies were collected (baseline and week four) from 11 HIV+ individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, who received MGN1703...

  5. A paradox of transcriptional and functional innate interferon responses of human intestinal enteroids to enteric virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Kapil; Simon, Lukas M.; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Blutt, Sarah E.; Crawford, Sue E.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark; Conner, Margaret E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Estes, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium can limit enteric pathogens by producing antiviral cytokines, such as IFNs. Type I IFN (IFN-α/β) and type III IFN (IFN-λ) function at the epithelial level, and their respective efficacies depend on the specific pathogen and site of infection. However, the roles of type I and type III IFN in restricting human enteric viruses are poorly characterized as a result of the difficulties in cultivating these viruses in vitro and directly obtaining control and infected small intestinal human tissue. We infected nontransformed human intestinal enteroid cultures from multiple individuals with human rotavirus (HRV) and assessed the host epithelial response by using RNA-sequencing and functional assays. The dominant transcriptional pathway induced by HRV infection is a type III IFN-regulated response. Early after HRV infection, low levels of type III IFN protein activate IFN-stimulated genes. However, this endogenous response does not restrict HRV replication because replication-competent HRV antagonizes the type III IFN response at pre- and posttranscriptional levels. In contrast, exogenous IFN treatment restricts HRV replication, with type I IFN being more potent than type III IFN, suggesting that extraepithelial sources of type I IFN may be the critical IFN for limiting enteric virus replication in the human intestine. PMID:28069942

  6. The Brazilian comprehensive response to hepatitis C: from strategic thinking to access to interferon-free therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fabio; Santos, Melina Erica; Benzaken, Adele; Corrêa, Renato Girade; Cattapan, Elisa; Sereno, Leandro Soares; Naveira, Marcelo Contardo Moscoso

    2016-11-02

    Hepatitis C affects over 185 million people around the world. This silent disease is responsible for up to 700,000 deaths per year. Despite the scientific revolution in diagnosis and treatment, hepatitis C control remains a huge challenge due to the cost of effective medications. In response to the global outcry of hepatitis epidemic and the need to improve the nation's public health response, the Ministry of Health of Brazil revolutionized hepatitis C treatment by incorporating highly effective drugs that can be accessed through sustainable and universal means. This paper describes the unique process of implementing evidence-informed policy to respond to hepatitis C epidemic through the update of hepatitis C treatment in Brazil based on the estimate of disease prevalence, current international guidelines, and the cost-effectiveness impact in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Through a debate of an experience report, the authors underlie the strategic plan implemented according to the situation analysis that emphasized the need to improve its current response over a relatively short-term period. The comprehensive response is detailed comprising three main objectives: improve treatment outcomes by evaluating and incorporating new and effective medications at a sustainable price; elaborate on clinical guidelines to treat hepatitis C patients; and develop awareness and diagnosis campaigns targeted at the population of interest. In this scenario, Brazil was able to obtain an unprecedented discount for a high-medium income country; provided treatment to more than 7000 individuals in the last 2 months of 2015; and expects to treat 38,000 new patients in 2016. The remarkable process applied in Brazil was developed according to epidemiological data and scientific evidence, and it was motivated by the engagement of the country in the Sustainable Development Goals, which may inspire other developing countries to identify ways to achieve these goals by 2030.

  7. Toll-like receptors and interferon associated immune factors responses to spring viraemia of carp virus infection in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinxian; Li, Xiao Zheng; Zheng, Xiaocong; Jia, Peng; Wang, Jinjin; Yang, Xianle; Yu, Li; Shi, Xiujie; Tong, Guixiang; Liu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Pattern recognition receptor (PRR) toll-like receptors (TLRs), antiviral agent interferon (IFN) and the effector IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) play a fundamental role in the innate immune response against viruses among all vertebrate classes. Common carp is a host for spring viraemia of carp virus (Rhabdovirus carpio, SVCV), which belong to Rhabdoviridae family. The present in-vivo experiment was conducted to investigate the expression of these innate immune factors in early phase as well as during recovery of SVCV infection by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. A less lethal SVCV infection was generated in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and was sampled at 3, 6, 12 h post infection (hpi), 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post infection (dpi). At 3 hpi, the SVCV N gene was detected in all three fish and all three fish showed a relative fold increase of TLR2, TLR3 and TLR7, IFNa1, ISG15 and Vig1. Viral copies rapidly increased at 12 hpi then remained high until 5 dpi. When viral copy numbers were high, a higher expression of immune genes TLR2, TLR3, TLR7, IFNa1, IFNa2, IFNa1S, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF7, interleukin 1β (IL1β), IL6, IL10, ADAR, ISG15, Mx1, PKR and Vig1 were observed. Viral copies were gradually reduced in 5 to 10 dpi fish, and also the immune response was considerably reduced but remained elevated. A high degree of correlation was observed between immune genes and viral copy number in each of the sampled fish at 12 hpi. The quick and prolonged elevated expression of the immune genes indicates their crucial role in survival of host against SVCV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of Type I Interferons by Therapeutic Nanoparticle-Based Vaccination Is Indispensable to Reinforce Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cell Responses During Chronic Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuschke, Torben; Rotan, Olga; Bayer, Wibke; Kollenda, Sebastian; Dickow, Julia; Sutter, Kathrin; Hansen, Wiebke; Dittmer, Ulf; Lang, Karl S.; Epple, Matthias; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M.

    2018-01-01

    T cell dysfunction and immunosuppression are characteristic for chronic viral infections and contribute to viral persistence. Overcoming these burdens is the goal of new therapeutic strategies to cure chronic infectious diseases. We recently described that therapeutic vaccination of chronic retrovirus infected mice with a calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticle (NP)-based vaccine carrier, functionalized with CpG and viral peptides is able to efficiently reactivate the CD8+ T cell response and improve the eradication of virus infected cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect were largely unclear. While type I interferons (IFNs I) are considered to drive T cell exhaustion by persistent immune activation during chronic viral infection, we here describe an indispensable role of IFN I induced by therapeutic vaccination to efficiently reinforce cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTL) and improve control of chronic retroviral infection. The induction of IFN I is CpG dependent and leads to significant IFN signaling indicated by upregulation of IFN stimulated genes. By vaccinating chronically retrovirus-infected mice lacking the IFN I receptor (IFNAR−/−) or by blocking IFN I signaling in vivo during therapeutic vaccination, we demonstrate that IFN I signaling is necessary to drive full reactivation of CTLs. Surprisingly, we also identified an impaired suppressive capability of regulatory T cells in the presence of IFNα, which implicates an important role for vaccine-induced IFNα in the regulation of the T cell response during chronic retroviral infection. Our data suggest that inducing IFN I signaling in conjunction with the presentation of viral antigens can reactivate immune functions and reduce viral loads in chronic infections. Therefore, we propose CaP NPs as potential therapeutic tool to treat chronic infections. PMID:29740425

  9. Induction of Type I Interferons by Therapeutic Nanoparticle-Based Vaccination Is Indispensable to Reinforce Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cell Responses During Chronic Retroviral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Knuschke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available T cell dysfunction and immunosuppression are characteristic for chronic viral infections and contribute to viral persistence. Overcoming these burdens is the goal of new therapeutic strategies to cure chronic infectious diseases. We recently described that therapeutic vaccination of chronic retrovirus infected mice with a calcium phosphate (CaP nanoparticle (NP-based vaccine carrier, functionalized with CpG and viral peptides is able to efficiently reactivate the CD8+ T cell response and improve the eradication of virus infected cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect were largely unclear. While type I interferons (IFNs I are considered to drive T cell exhaustion by persistent immune activation during chronic viral infection, we here describe an indispensable role of IFN I induced by therapeutic vaccination to efficiently reinforce cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTL and improve control of chronic retroviral infection. The induction of IFN I is CpG dependent and leads to significant IFN signaling indicated by upregulation of IFN stimulated genes. By vaccinating chronically retrovirus-infected mice lacking the IFN I receptor (IFNAR−/− or by blocking IFN I signaling in vivo during therapeutic vaccination, we demonstrate that IFN I signaling is necessary to drive full reactivation of CTLs. Surprisingly, we also identified an impaired suppressive capability of regulatory T cells in the presence of IFNα, which implicates an important role for vaccine-induced IFNα in the regulation of the T cell response during chronic retroviral infection. Our data suggest that inducing IFN I signaling in conjunction with the presentation of viral antigens can reactivate immune functions and reduce viral loads in chronic infections. Therefore, we propose CaP NPs as potential therapeutic tool to treat chronic infections.

  10. Circulating sCD14 is associated with virological response to pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT through the gut accounts for immune activation and CD4+ loss in HIV and may influence HCV disease progression in HIV/HCV co-infection. We asked whether increased MT and immune activation may hamper anti-HCV response in HIV/HCV patients.98 HIV/HCV patients who received pegylated-alpha-interferon (peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline MT (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, host response to MT (sCD14, CD38+HLA-DR+CD4+/CD8+, HCV genotype, severity of liver disease were assessed according to Early Virological Response (EVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL at week 12 of therapy or ≥2 log(10 reduction from baseline after 12 weeks of therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL 24 weeks after end of therapy. Mann-Whitney/Chi-square test and Pearson's correlation were used. Multivariable regression was performed to determine factors associated with EVR/SVR.71 patients displayed EVR; 41 SVR. Patients with HCV genotypes 1-4 and cirrhosis presented a trend to higher sCD14, compared to patients with genotypes 2-3 (p = 0.053 and no cirrhosis (p = 0.052. EVR and SVR patients showed lower levels of circulating sCD14 (p = 0.0001, p = 0.026, respectively, but similar T-cell activation compared to Non-EVR (Null Responders, NR and Non-SVR (N-SVR subjects. sCD14 resulted the main predictive factor of EVR (0.145 for each sCD14 unit more, 95%CI 0.031-0.688, p = 0.015. SVR was associated only with HCV genotypes 2-3 (AOR 0.022 for genotypes 1-4 vs 2-3, 95%CI 0.001-0.469, p = 0.014.In HIV/HCV patients sCD14 correlates with the severity of liver disease and predicts early response to peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin, suggesting MT-driven immune activation as pathway of HIV/HCV co-infection and response to therapy.

  11. Candidate Gene Study of TRAIL and TRAIL Receptors: Association with Response to Interferon Beta Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Órpez-Zafra, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Arnáiz, Carlos; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO) and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10−4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30). This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A), a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS. PMID:23658636

  12. Candidate gene study of TRAIL and TRAIL receptors: association with response to interferon beta therapy in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos López-Gómez

    Full Text Available TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10(-4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30. This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A, a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS.

  13. Combined therapy of interferon plus ribavirin promotes multiple adaptive solutions in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, José M; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; Olmo, Juan Del; Ortega, Enrique; González-Candelas, Fernando; Moya, Andrés

    2009-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) presents several regions involved potentially in evading antiviral treatment and host immune system. Two regions, known as PKR-BD and V3 domains, have been proposed to be involved in resistance to interferon. Additionally, hypervariable regions in the envelope E2 glycoprotein are also good candidates to participate in evasion from the immune system. In this study, we have used a cohort of 22 non-responder patients to combined therapy (interferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin) for which samples obtained just before initiation of therapy and after 6 or/and 12 months of treatment were available. A range of 25-100 clones per patient, genome region and time sample were obtained. The predominant amino acid sequences for each time sample and patient were determined. Next, the sequences of the PKR-BD and V3 domains and the hypervariable regions from different time samples were compared for each patient. The highest levels of variability were detected at the three hypervariable regions of the E2 protein and, to a lower extent, at the V3 domain of the NS5A protein. However, no clear patterns of adaptation to the host immune system or to antiviral treatment were detected. In summary, although high levels of variability are correlated to viral adaptive response, antiviral treatment does not seem to promote convergent adaptive changes. Consequently, other regions must be involved in evasion strategies likely based on a combination of multiple mechanisms, in which pools of changes along the HCV genome could confer viruses the ability to overcome strong selective pressures. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Radioprotective effect of interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.

    1984-12-18

    A cycle of experiments performed jointly with associations of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute reportedly demonstrated that interferons protect human cells cultivated in a test tube against the action of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Cells treated in advance with interferon not only survived irradiation but were almost totally protected against harmful effects of fast neutrons on the structure of chromosomes, according to the author. She mentions that the laboratory has also been studying effects produced on cells by compounds of heavy metals and other chemical compounds, including ones which cause breaks in the DNA molecule. Interferon's ability to protect cells against effects of chemical compounds has been studied in this connection. Another direction of the laboratory's work is research on interferon's effects on blood cells of persons suffering from certain hereditary diseases in which restorative processes of cells are impaired. The purpose of this is to develop courses of treatment which will not cause irreversible damages to chromosomes, the author explains. Interferon has been found to stimulate the reparation systems of cells in cases of Marfan's syndrome, for example.

  15. Acute hepatitis A virus infection is associated with a limited type I interferon response and persistence of intrahepatic viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanford, Robert E; Feng, Zongdi; Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Brasky, Kathleen M; Zhou, Yan; Yamane, Daisuke; Perelson, Alan S; Walker, Christopher M; Lemon, Stanley M

    2011-07-05

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an hepatotropic human picornavirus that is associated only with acute infection. Its pathogenesis is not well understood because there are few studies in animal models using modern methodologies. We characterized HAV infections in three chimpanzees, quantifying viral RNA by quantitative RT-PCR and examining critical aspects of the innate immune response including intrahepatic IFN-stimulated gene expression. We compared these infection profiles with similar studies of chimpanzees infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), an hepatotropic flavivirus that frequently causes persistent infection. Surprisingly, HAV-infected animals exhibited very limited induction of type I IFN-stimulated genes in the liver compared with chimpanzees with acute resolving HCV infection, despite similar levels of viremia and 100-fold greater quantities of viral RNA in the liver. Minimal IFN-stimulated gene 15 and IFIT1 responses peaked 1-2 wk after HAV challenge and then subsided despite continuing high hepatic viral RNA. An acute inflammatory response at 3-4 wk correlated with the appearance of virus-specific antibodies and apoptosis and proliferation of hepatocytes. Despite this, HAV RNA persisted in the liver for months, remaining present long after clearance from serum and feces and revealing dramatic differences in the kinetics of clearance in the three compartments. Viral RNA was detected in the liver for significantly longer (35 to >48 wk) than HCV RNA in animals with acute resolving HCV infection (10-20 wk). Collectively, these findings indicate that HAV is far stealthier than HCV early in the course of acute resolving infection. HAV infections represent a distinctly different paradigm in virus-host interactions within the liver.

  16. Circulating Interferon-λ3, Responsiveness to HBV Vaccination, and HBV/HCV Infections in Haemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja E. Grzegorzewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The IFN-λ3 gene (IFNL3 plays a role in HCV clearance. We investigated circulating IFN-λ3 and IFNL3 SNPs in haemodialysis patients who differed in their response to HBV vaccination and their HBV/HCV infection status. In 201 patients, plasma IFN-λ3 was determined using ELISA. IFNL3 SNPs (rs12979860, rs8099917 were genotyped using HRM analysis. Differences in IFN-λ3 levels were shown between responders and nonresponders to HBV vaccination and between HBsAg-positive patients and those who developed anti-HBs after infection and became HBsAg negative. HBV vaccine responders without HCV resolution revealed lower IFN-λ3 than noninfected responders. HBsAg/HCV RNA-positive subjects showed lower IFN-λ3 than patients positive only for HCV RNA or subjects who resolved both infections. Circulating IFN-λ3 correlated positively with anti-HBs and negatively with positive HCV RNA testing in the adjusted regression analyses. HBV vaccine nonresponders, HBsAg-positive patients, and subjects with replicating HCV composed a group with unfavourable outcomes. Responders to HBV vaccination, subjects who became HBsAg negative, and those who cleared HCV were analysed as having favourable outcomes. The latter showed higher IFN-λ3 but did not differ in distribution of IFNL3 SNPs compared with subjects with unfavourable outcomes. Higher IFN-λ3 concentrations are associated with response to HBV vaccination, self-limited HBV infection, and HCV resolution.

  17. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people with chronic ... severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications called ...

  18. Genetic variation in STAT4 predicts response to interferon-α therapy for hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Ke; Wu, Xiaopan; Qian, Ji; Ma, Xiao-Pin; Yang, Jingmin; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Runhua; Sun, Li; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Pengyin; Zhu, Xilin; Wu, Jia; Chen, Kangmei; Conran, Carly; Zheng, S Lilly; Lu, Daru; Yu, Long; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-04-01

    Interferon (IFN)-α is a first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients but only initiates a response in a minority of patients. A genetic variant, rs7574865 in STAT4, was recently reported to be associated with risk of developing CHB and hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma. We aimed to determine whether this variant is associated with the response to IFNα treatment for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive CHB patients. We studied 466 HBeAg-positive CHB patients who received either IFNα-2b (n = 224) or pegylated IFNα-2a (n = 242) therapy for 48 weeks and were followed for an additional 24 weeks. The rate of sustained virologic response (SVR), defined as HBeAg seroconversion along with hepatitis B virus DNA level rs7574865. After 48 weeks of treatment and 24 weeks off treatment, the SVR rates in the IFNα-2b and pegylated IFNα-2a therapy groups were 30.4% and 28.9%, respectively. Compared to the rs7574865 GT/TT genotype, the GG genotype (a risk factor of CHB and hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma) was significantly associated with a reduced SVR rate in both patients who received IFNα-2b therapy (21.1% versus 37.2%, P = 0.01) and those who received pegylated IFNα-2a therapy (18.0% versus 41.2%, P = 9.74 × 10(-5) ). In joint analysis of the 466 patients, the GG genotype was associated with an approximately half SVR rate compared to the GT/TT genotype (19.3% versus 39.1%, P = 4.15 × 10(-6) ). A multivariate logistic regression model including rs7574865 and clinical variables showed that rs7574865 was the most significant factor for the prediction of SVR. STAT4 rs7574865 is a reliable predictor of response to IFNα therapy for HBeAg-positive CHB patients and may be used for optimizing the treatment of CHB. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. The Rhoptry Proteins ROP18 and ROP5 Mediate Toxoplasma gondii Evasion of the Murine, But Not the Human, Interferon-Gamma Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedelman, Wendy; Gold, Daniel A.; Rosowski, Emily E.; Sprokholt, Joris K.; Lim, Daniel; Farid Arenas, Ailan; Melo, Mariane B.; Spooner, Eric; Yaffe, Michael B.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2012-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii secretes effector proteins into the host cell that manipulate the immune response allowing it to establish a chronic infection. Crosses between the types I, II and III strains, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, have identified several secreted effectors that determine strain differences in mouse virulence. The polymorphic rhoptry protein kinase ROP18 was recently shown to determine the difference in virulence between type I and III strains by phosphorylating and inactivating the interferon-γ (IFNγ)-induced immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) that promote killing by disrupting the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) in murine cells. The polymorphic pseudokinase ROP5 determines strain differences in virulence through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that ROP18 can only inhibit accumulation of the IRGs on the PVM of strains that also express virulent ROP5 alleles. In contrast, specific ROP5 alleles can reduce IRG coating even in the absence of ROP18 expression and can directly interact with one or more IRGs. We further show that the allelic combination of ROP18 and ROP5 also determines IRG evasion and virulence of strains belonging to other lineages besides types I, II and III. However, neither ROP18 nor ROP5 markedly affect survival in IFNγ-activated human cells, which lack the multitude of IRGs present in murine cells. These findings suggest that ROP18 and ROP5 have specifically evolved to block the IRGs and are unlikely to have effects in species that do not have the IRG system, such as humans. PMID:22761577

  20. Brief Report: Blockade of TANK-Binding Kinase 1/IKKɛ Inhibits Mutant Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING)-Mediated Inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémond, Marie-Louise; Uggenti, Carolina; Van Eyck, Lien; Melki, Isabelle; Bondet, Vincent; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Neven, Bénédicte; Rose, Yoann; Duffy, Darragh; Crow, Yanick J; Rodero, Mathieu P

    2017-07-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in TMEM173, encoding the stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) protein, underlie a novel type I interferonopathy that is minimally responsive to conventional immunosuppressive therapies and associated with high frequency of childhood morbidity and mortality. STING gain-of-function causes constitutive oversecretion of IFN. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of a TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1)/IKKɛ inhibitor (BX795) on secretion and signaling of IFN in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with mutations in STING. PBMCs from 4 patients with STING-associated disease were treated with BX795. The effect of BX795 on IFN pathways was assessed by Western blotting and an IFNβ reporter assay, as well as by quantification of IFNα in cell lysates, staining for STAT-1 phosphorylation, and measurement of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Treatment of PBMCs with BX795 inhibited the phosphorylation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and IFNβ promoter activity induced in HEK 293T cells by cyclic GMP-AMP or by genetic activation of STING. In vitro exposure to BX795 inhibited IFNα production in PBMCs of patients with STING-associated disease without affecting cell survival. In addition, BX795 decreased STAT-1 phosphorylation and ISG mRNA expression independent of IFNα blockade. These findings demonstrate the effect of BX795 on reducing type I IFN production and IFN signaling in cells from patients with gain-of-function mutations in STING. A combined inhibition of TBK-1 and IKKɛ therefore holds potential for the treatment of patients carrying STING mutations, and may also be relevant in other type I interferonopathies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoo, T.L.; Joshua, D.; Gibson, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interferons are soluble proteins produced naturally by cells in response to viruses. It has both anti-proliferative and immunomodulating properties and is one of the first examples of a biological response modifier use to treat the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma. Interferon has been used......-induction agent with other chemotherapy regimens, and as maintenance therapy after conventional chemotherapy or complete remission after autologous or allogeneic transplantation. Interferon as a single induction agent or co-induction agent with other chemotherapy agents appears only to have minimal benefit...... in myeloma. Its role as maintenance therapy in the plateau phase of myeloma also remains uncertain. More recently, the use of interferon must now compete with the "new drugs" - thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib in myeloma treatment. Will there be a future role of interferon in the treatment...

  2. Early interferon-γ production in human lymphocyte subsets in response to nontyphoidal Salmonella demonstrates inherent capacity in innate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonney S Nyirenda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae frequently cause life-threatening bacteremia in sub-Saharan Africa. Young children and HIV-infected adults are particularly susceptible. High case-fatality rates and increasing antibiotic resistance require new approaches to the management of this disease. Impaired cellular immunity caused by defects in the T helper 1 pathway lead to intracellular disease with Salmonella that can be countered by IFNγ administration. This report identifies the lymphocyte subsets that produce IFNγ early in Salmonella infection.Intracellular cytokine staining was used to identify IFNγ production in blood lymphocyte subsets of ten healthy adults with antibodies to Salmonella (as evidence of immunity to Salmonella, in response to stimulation with live and heat-killed preparations of the D23580 invasive African isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium. The absolute number of IFNγ-producing cells in innate, innate-like and adaptive lymphocyte subpopulations was determined.Early IFNγ production was found in the innate/innate-like lymphocyte subsets: γδ-T cells, NK cells and NK-like T cells. Significantly higher percentages of such cells produced IFNγ compared to adaptive αβ-T cells (Student's t test, P<0.001 and ≤0.02 for each innate subset compared, respectively, with CD4(+- and CD8(+-T cells. The absolute numbers of IFNγ-producing cells showed similar differences. The proportion of IFNγ-producing γδ-T cells, but not other lymphocytes, was significantly higher when stimulated with live compared with heat-killed bacteria (P<0.0001.Our findings indicate an inherent capacity of innate/innate-like lymphocyte subsets to produce IFNγ early in the response to Salmonella infection. This may serve to control intracellular infection and reduce the threat of extracellular spread of disease with bacteremia which becomes life-threatening in the absence of protective antibody. These innate cells may also help mitigate against the effect on IFN

  3. How type 1 fimbriae help Escherichia coli to evade extracellular antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Hosseini, Vahid; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Meier, Stefanie; Weber, Stefan S; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-05

    To survive antibiotics, bacteria use two different strategies: counteracting antibiotic effects by expression of resistance genes or evading their effects e.g. by persisting inside host cells. Since bacterial adhesins provide access to the shielded, intracellular niche and the adhesin type 1 fimbriae increases bacterial survival chances inside macrophages, we asked if fimbriae also influenced survival by antibiotic evasion. Combined gentamicin survival assays, flow cytometry, single cell microscopy and kinetic modeling of dose response curves showed that type 1 fimbriae increased the adhesion and internalization by macrophages. This was caused by strongly decreased off-rates and affected the number of intracellular bacteria but not the macrophage viability and morphology. Fimbriae thus promote antibiotic evasion which is particularly relevant in the context of chronic infections.

  4. Amniotic fluid stem cells with low γ-interferon response showed behavioral improvement in Parkinsonism rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs are multipotent stem cells that may be used in transplantation medicine. In this study, AFSCs established from amniocentesis were characterized on the basis of surface marker expression and differentiation potential. To further investigate the properties of AFSCs for translational applications, we examined the cell surface expression of human leukocyte antigens (HLA of these cells and estimated the therapeutic effect of AFSCs in parkinsonian rats. The expression profiles of HLA-II and transcription factors were compared between AFSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs following treatment with γ-IFN. We found that stimulation of AFSCs with γ-IFN prompted only a slight increase in the expression of HLA-Ia and HLA-E, and the rare HLA-II expression could also be observed in most AFSCs samples. Consequently, the expression of CIITA and RFX5 was weakly induced by γ-IFN stimulation of AFSCs compared to that of BMMSCs. In the transplantation test, Sprague Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the substantia nigra were used as a parkinsonian-animal model. Following the negative γ-IFN response AFSCs injection, apomorphine-induced rotation was reduced by 75% in AFSCs engrafted parkinsonian rats but was increased by 53% in the control group after 12-weeks post-transplantation. The implanted AFSCs were viable, and were able to migrate into the brain's circuitry and express specific proteins of dopamine neurons, such as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter. In conclusion, the relative insensitivity AFSCs to γ-IFN implies that AFSCs might have immune-tolerance in γ-IFN inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, the effective improvement of AFSCs transplantation for apomorphine-induced rotation paves the way for the clinical application in parkinsonian therapy.

  5. Use of an Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) to test T-cell responsiveness to soluble Leishmania infantum antigen in whole blood of dogs from endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, Lilia; El-Goulli, Amel F; Ben-Abid, Meriem; Gharbi, Mohamed; Ben-Sghaier, Ines; Boufaden, Imed; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2017-11-15

    Interferon-Gamma (IFN-γ) Release Assays (IGRAs) are easy tests that allow rapid screening of primed memory T-cells immunity in response to antigen. The aim of this study was to use IGRA to assess IFN-γ release in response to Soluble Leishmania infantum antigen (SLA) in whole blood of dogs living in endemic area of visceral leishmaniasis and to interpret IGRA results according to clinical examination, specific anti-Leishmania humoral response and presence of L. infantum DNA in blood. The study was carried out on 56 dogs living in greater Tunis area. Physical examination, quantitative serology and PCR on blood were used to characterize dogs' status in relation to Leishmania infection and disease. IGRA consisted on testing by ELISA for IFN-γ-secretion in whole blood after a 20-h challenge with SLA. PBS and Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulations were used as controls. Four groups of dogs were characterized: 31 were negative by both serology and PCR, two had doubtful serology, 10 presented no to mild clinical signs but low antibodies levels and 13 were affected by Canine Leishmaniasis (CanL). In seronegative dogs, IGRA was little contributory in 4 puppies (age dogs (median age=72months, IQR: 45-84 months) that didn't respond to PHA stimulation, IGRA was negative in 19 and positive in three animals with lymph node enlargement. In dogs with doubtful serology, IGRA was positive in one dog and negative in the other. In infected dogs with no to mild clinical signs, one dog exhibited high level of IFN-γ in absence of antigenic stimulation and all the other were positive by IGRA. CanL dogs showed variable IGRA results. Negative IGRAs (n=4) were shown in animals with the highest parasitic burden whereas positive IGRAs (n=5) were shown in dogs with negative PCR or low parasitic load. The 4 remaining dogs either didn't respond to PHA (n=2) or showed non-specific secretion in PBS tube (n=2). The results of this study showed that IGRA is a useful new tool that can assess

  6. Measurement of ex vivo ELISpot interferon-gamma recall responses to Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 and CSP in Ghanaian adults with natural exposure to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Harini; Kusi, Kwadwo A; Anum, Dorothy; Hollingdale, Michael R; Peters, Bjoern; Kim, Yohan; Tetteh, John K A; Ofori, Michael F; Gyan, Ben A; Koram, Kwadwo A; Huang, Jun; Belmonte, Maria; Banania, Jo Glenna; Dodoo, Daniel; Villasante, Eileen; Sedegah, Martha

    2016-02-01

    Malaria eradication requires a concerted approach involving all available control tools, and an effective vaccine would complement these efforts. An effective malaria vaccine should be able to induce protective immune responses in a genetically diverse population. Identification of immunodominant T cell epitopes will assist in determining if candidate vaccines will be immunogenic in malaria-endemic areas. This study therefore investigated whether class I-restricted T cell epitopes of two leading malaria vaccine antigens, Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1), could recall T cell interferonresponses from naturally exposed subjects using ex vivo ELISpot assays. Thirty-five subjects aged between 24 and 43 years were recruited from a malaria-endemic urban community of Ghana in 2011, and their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were tested in ELISpot IFN-γ assays against overlapping 15mer peptide pools spanning the entire CSP and AMA1 antigens, and 9-10mer peptide epitope mixtures that included previously identified and/or predicted human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class 1-restricted epitopes from same two antigens. For CSP, 26 % of subjects responded to at least one of the nine 15mer peptide pools whilst 17 % responded to at least one of the five 9-10mer HLA-restricted epitope mixtures. For AMA1, 63 % of subjects responded to at least one of the 12 AMA1 15mer peptide pools and 51 % responded to at least one of the six 9-10mer HLA-restricted epitope mixtures. Following analysis of data from the two sets of peptide pools, along with bioinformatics predictions of class I-restricted epitopes and the HLA supertypes expressed by a subset of study subjects, peptide pools that may contain epitopes recognized by multiple HLA supertypes were identified. Collectively, these results suggest that natural transmission elicits ELISpot IFN-γ activities to class 1-restricted epitopes that are largely HLA-promiscuous. These

  7. Characterization of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) and its expression in response to viral and bacterial challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaoyao; Qi, Chenchen; Shan, Shijuan; Zhang, Fumiao; Li, Hua; An, Liguo; Yang, Guiwen

    2016-06-27

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), one of the most economically valuable commercial farming fish species in China, is often infected by a variety of viruses. As the first line of defence against microbial pathogens, the innate immune system plays a crucial role in teleost fish, which are lower vertebrates. Interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a key molecule in antiviral immunity that regulating the expression of IFN and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is necessary to gain more insight into the common carp IFN system and the function of fish IRF5 in the antiviral and antibacterial response. In the present study, we characterized the cDNA and genomic sequence of the IRF5 gene in common carp, and analysed tissue distribution and expression profile of this gene in response to polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment. The common carp IRF5 (ccIRF5) gene is 5790 bp in length and is composed of 9 exons and 8 introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of ccIRF5 is 1554 bp, and encodes 517 amino acid protein. The putative ccIRF5 protein shares identity (65.4-90.0 %) with other fish IRF5s and contains a DNA binding domain (DBD), a middle region (MR), an IRF-associated domain (IAD), a virus activated domain (VAD) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) similar to those found in vertebrate IRF5. Phylogenetic analysis clustered ccIRF5 into the IRF5 subfamily with other vertebrate IRF5 and IRF6 genes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ccIRF5 mRNA was expressed in all examined tissues of healthy carps, with high levels observed in the gills and the brain. After poly I:C challenge, expression levels of ccIRF5, tumour-necrosis factor α (ccTNFα) and two IFN stimulated genes [ISGs (ccISG5 and ccPKR)] were up-regulated in seven immune-related tissues (liver, spleen, head kidney, foregut, hindgut, skin and gills). Furthermore, all four genes were up-regulated in vitro upon poly I:C and LPS challenges. Our findings suggest

  8. Radiotherapy plus cis-retinoic acid/interferon-α in cervical cancers: response and impact of cRA/IFN on tumor tissue oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensgen, Gabriele; Koehler, Uwe; Dunst, Juergen

    1997-01-01

    Background: We have evaluated the impact of 13-cis-retinoic acid plus interferon in combination with radiotherapy on response and on tumor oxygenation in a phase II-study. Materials and methods: From June 1995 through April 1996, thirty-four patients with squamous cell carcinoma FIGO IIB (N=8) and IIIB (N=26) of the cervix who were scheduled for definitive radiotherapy with curative intent received additional treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid (cRA, isotretinoin) plus interferon-α-2a (IFN-α-2a) as part of a phase-II-protocol at the Universities of Halle-Wittenberg (N=25), Leipzig (N=7) and Dresden (N=2). cRA/IFN-α-2a started 14 days prior to radiotherapy (1 mg per kilogramm body weight cRA orally daily plus 6x10 6 I.U. IFN-α-2a subcutaneously daily). After this induction period, standard radiotherapy was administered (external irradiation with 45Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8Gy plus HDR-brachytherapy with 5x7Gy). During radiotherapy, cRA/IFN-α-2a-treatment was continued with 50% of the daily doses. In 14 patients treated at the University of Halle-Wittenberg, tumor tissue pO 2 -measurements were performed prior to radiotherapy, at 20Gy, and at the end of radiotherapy with an Eppendorf-pO 2 -histograph. The oxygenation data of these patients were compared to 14 patients who had also pO 2 -measurements but had refused to participate in the cRA/IFN-α-2a-protocol and received radiotherapy alone during the same period. Results: All 8 patients with FIGO IIB tumors had a complete clinical remission 3 months after radiotherapy. In FIGO IIIB cancers, (19(26)) (73%) achieved a cCR, 5 (19%) had a PR and 2 died within six months after treatment due to intercurrent disease. The toxicity of cRA/IFN-α-2a was only mild to moderate (fever 43%, skin toxicity 36%, diarrhea 20%, elevation of liver enzymes 20%) with no grade (3(4)) toxicity. The 14 patients with cRA/IFN-α-2a-pretreatment prior to radiotherapy had significant higher median pO 2 -values in their tumors at the

  9. Identification of new sensitive biomarkers for the in vivo response to interferon-beta treatment in multiple sclerosis using DNA-array evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F.; Krakauer, M.; Hesse, D.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) occur in a proportion of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-beta. NAbs impair the effect of treatment. The biological effect of IFN-beta can be measured as the induction of the myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) molecule. However, other...

  10. Long term molecular responses in a cohort of Danish patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis treated with recombinant interferon alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauffer Larsen, Thomas; Iversen, Katrine F; Hansen, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years data has accumulated demonstrating the efficacy of recombinant interferon alpha2 (rIFN-alpha2) in the treatment of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We report on clinical and molecular data in the largest cohort of JAK2 V617F mutant MPN Danish patients (n=102) being...

  11. Identification of a Sj?gren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons

    OpenAIRE

    Li, He; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Ice, John A.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Adrianto, Indra; Rasmussen, Astrid; Wang, Shaofeng; He, Bo; Grundahl, Kiely M.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bowman, Simon; Lester, Sue; Eriksson, Per; Eloranta, Maija-Leena

    2017-01-01

    Sjogrens syndrome (SS) is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN) pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performe...

  12. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Singh

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human

  13. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  14. Specificity, cross-talk and adaptation in Interferon signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilman, Anton

    Innate immune system is the first line of defense of higher organisms against pathogens. It coordinates the behavior of millions of cells of multiple types, achieved through numerous signaling molecules. This talk focuses on the signaling specificity of a major class of signaling molecules - Type I Interferons - which are also used therapeutically in the treatment of a number of diseases, such as Hepatitis C, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. Puzzlingly, different Interferons act through the same cell surface receptor but have different effects on the target cells. They also exhibit a strange pattern of temporal cross-talk resulting in a serious clinical problem - loss of response to Interferon therapy. We combined mathematical modeling with quantitative experiments to develop a quantitative model of specificity and adaptation in the Interferon signaling pathway. The model resolves several outstanding experimental puzzles and directly affects the clinical use of Type I Interferons in treatment of viral hepatitis and other diseases.

  15. T-cell homeostasis in chronic HCV-infected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin or an interferon-free regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Birch, Carsten; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral has replaced pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin-based treatment in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. While interferon-α is immune modulating and causes lymphopenia, interferon-free regimens seem to be well-tolerated. This study aimed to compare T......-cell homeostasis before, during, and after HCV treatment with or without interferon-α in patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 20 patients with chronic HCV infection were treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin, and six patients were treated with an interferon-free regimen. All patients were...... compared to prior treatment values. Finally, a proportion of CD8+ effector memory was lower while proportion of apoptotic T cells was higher after sustained virologic response compared to prior treatment. Despite lymphopenia during interferon, alterations in T-cell homeostasis during treatment were...

  16. Parasitic Cape honeybee workers, Apis mellifera capensis, evade policing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen J.; Beekman, Madeleine; Wossler, Theresa C.; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2002-01-01

    Relocation of the Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, by bee-keepers from southern to northern South Africa in 1990 has caused widespread death of managed African honeybee, A. m. scutellata, colonies. Apis mellifera capensis worker bees are able to lay diploid, female eggs without mating by means of automictic thelytoky (meiosis followed by fusion of two meiotic products to restore egg diploidy), whereas workers of other honeybee subspecies are able to lay only haploid, male eggs. The A. m. capensis workers, which are parasitizing and killing A. m. scutellata colonies in northern South Africa, are the asexual offspring of a single, original worker in which the small amount of genetic variation observed is due to crossing over during meiosis (P. Kryger, personal communication). Here we elucidate two principal mechanisms underlying this parasitism. Parasitic A. m. capensis workers activate their ovaries in host colonies that have a queen present (queenright colonies), and they lay eggs that evade being killed by other workers (worker policing)-the normal fate of worker-laid eggs in colonies with a queen. This unique parasitism by workers is an instance in which a society is unable to control the selfish actions of its members.

  17. Morbillivirus control of the interferon response: relevance of STAT2 and mda5 but not STAT1 for canine distemper virus virulence in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, Nicholas; Gerhauser, Ingo; Goncalves, Christophe; Grabski, Elena; Döring, Marius; Kalinke, Ulrich; Anderson, Danielle E; Cattaneo, Roberto; von Messling, Veronika

    2014-03-01

    The V proteins of paramyxoviruses control the innate immune response. In particular, the V protein of the genus Morbillivirus interferes with the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT2, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (mda5) signaling pathways. To characterize the contributions of these pathways to canine distemper virus (CDV) pathogenesis, we took advantage of the knowledge about the mechanisms of interaction between the measles virus V protein with these key regulators of innate immunity. We generated recombinant CDVs with V proteins unable to properly interact with STAT1, STAT2, or mda5. A virus with combined STAT2 and mda5 deficiencies was also generated, and available wild-type and V-protein-knockout viruses were used as controls. Ferrets infected with wild-type and STAT1-blind viruses developed severe leukopenia and loss of lymphocyte proliferation activity and succumbed to the disease within 14 days. In contrast, animals infected with viruses with STAT2 or mda5 defect or both STAT2 and mda5 defects developed a mild self-limiting disease similar to that associated with the V-knockout virus. This study demonstrates the importance of interference with STAT2 and mda5 signaling for CDV immune evasion and provides a starting point for the development of morbillivirus vectors with reduced immunosuppressive properties. The V proteins of paramyxoviruses interfere with the recognition of the virus by the immune system of the host. For morbilliviruses, the V protein is known to interact with the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 and the melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (mda5), which are involved in interferon signaling. Here, we examined the contribution of each of these signaling pathways to the pathogenesis of the carnivore morbillivirus canine distemper virus. Using viruses selectively unable to interfere with the respective signaling pathway to infect ferrets, we found that

  18. FibroTest is an independent predictor of virologic response in chronic hepatitis C patients retreated with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in the EPIC³ program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynard, Thierry; Munteanu, Mona; Colombo, Massimo; Bruix, Jordi; Schiff, Eugene; Terg, Ruben; Flamm, Steven; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; Carrilho, Flair; Schmidt, Warren; Berg, Thomas; McGarrity, Thomas; Heathcote, E Jenny; Gonçales, Fernando; Diago, Moises; Craxi, Antonio; Silva, Marcelo; Boparai, Navdeep; Griffel, Louis; Burroughs, Margaret; Brass, Clifford; Albrecht, Janice

    2011-02-01

    EPIC-3 is a prospective, international study that has demonstrated the efficacy of PEG-IFN alfa-2b plus weight-based ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C and significant fibrosis who previously failed any interferon-alfa/ribavirin therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess FibroTest (FT), a validated non-invasive marker of fibrosis in treatment-naive patients, as a possible alternative to biopsy as the baseline predictor of subsequent early virologic (EVR) and sustained virologic response (SVR) in previously treated patients. Of 2312 patients enrolled, 1459 had an available baseline FT, biopsy, and complete data. Uni- (UV) and multi-variable (MV) analyses were performed using FT and biopsy. Baseline characteristics were similar as in the overall population; METAVIR stage: 28% F2, 29% F3, and 43% F4, previous relapsers 29%, previous PEG-IFN regimen 41%, high baseline viral load (BVL) 64%. 506 patients (35%) had undetectable HCV-RNA at TW12 (TW12neg), with 58% achieving SVR. The accuracy of FT was similar to that in naive patients: AUROC curve for the diagnosis of F4 vs F2=0.80 (p<0.00001). Five baseline factors were associated (p<0.001) with SVR in UV and MV analyses (odds ratio: UV/MV): fibrosis stage estimated using FT (4.5/5.9) or biopsy (1.5/1.6), genotype 2/3 (4.5/5.1), BVL (1.5/1.3), prior relapse (1.6/1.6), previous treatment with non-PEG-IFN (2.6/2.0). These same factors were associated (p ≤ 0.001) with EVR. Among patients TW12neg, two independent factors remained highly predictive of SVR by MV analysis (p ≤ 0.001): genotype 2/3 (odds ratio=2.9), fibrosis estimated with FT (4.3) or by biopsy (1.5). FibroTest at baseline is a possible non-invasive alternative to biopsy for the prediction of EVR at 12 weeks and SVR, in patients with previous failures and advanced fibrosis, retreated with PEG-IFN alfa-2b and ribavirin. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ribavirin Concentrations Do Not Predict Sustained Virological Response in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Ribavirin and Pegylated Interferon in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kovari

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is an essential component of most current hepatitis C (HCV treatment regimens and still standard of care in the combination with pegylated interferon (pegIFN to treat chronic HCV in resource limited settings. Study results in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are contradicting as to whether RBV concentration correlates with sustained virological response (SVR.We included 262 HCV treatment naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS participants treated with RBV and pegIFN between 01.01.2001-01.01.2010, 134 with HCV genotype (GT 1/4, and 128 with GT 2/3 infections. RBV levels were measured retrospectively in stored plasma samples obtained between HCV treatment week 4 and end of therapy. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between RBV concentration and SVR in GT 1/4 and GT 2/3 infections. The analyses were repeated stratified by treatment phase (week 4-12, 13-24, >24 and IL28B genotype (CC versus CT/TT.SVR rates were 35.1% in GT 1/4 and 70.3% in GT 2/3 infections. Overall, median RBV concentration was 2.0 mg/L in GT 1/4, and 1.9 mg/L in GT 2/3, and did not change significantly across treatment phases. Patients with SVR had similar RBV concentrations compared to patients without SVR in both HCV genotype groups. SVR was not associated with RBV levels ≥2.0 mg/L (GT 1/4, OR 1.19 [0.5-2.86]; GT 2/3, 1.94 [0.78-4.80] and ≥2.5 mg/L (GT 1/4, 1.56 [0.64-3.84]; GT 2/3 2.72 [0.85-8.73], regardless of treatment phase, and IL28B genotype.In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegIFN/RBV, therapeutic drug monitoring of RBV concentrations does not enhance the chance of HCV cure, regardless of HCV genotype, treatment phase and IL28B genotype.

  20. Protective Effect of Panax notoginseng Root Water Extract against Influenza A Virus Infection by Enhancing Antiviral Interferon-Mediated Immune Responses and Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Gi Choi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory illness caused by the influenza A virus, which causes economic losses and social disruption mainly by increasing hospitalization and mortality rates among the elderly and people with chronic diseases. Influenza vaccines are the most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza, but can be completely ineffective if there is an antigenic mismatch between the seasonal vaccine virus and the virus circulating in the community. In addition, influenza viruses resistant to antiviral drugs are emerging worldwide. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines and antiviral drugs against these viruses. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo analyses of the antiviral effect of Panax notoginseng root (PNR, which is used as an herbal medicine and nutritional supplement in Korea and China. We confirmed that PNR significantly prevented influenza virus infection in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. In addition, PNR pretreatment inhibited viral protein (PB1, PB2, HA, NA, M1, PA, M2, and NP and viral mRNA (NS1, HA, PB2, PA, NP, M1, and M2 expression. PNR pretreatment also increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6] and interferon (IFN-beta and the phosphorylation of type-I IFN-related proteins (TANK-binding kinase 1, STAT1, and IRF3 in vitro. In mice exposed to the influenza A H1N1 virus, PNR treatment decreased mortality by 90% and prevented weight loss (by approximately 10% compared with the findings in untreated animals. In addition, splenocytes from PNR-administered mice displayed significantly enhanced natural killer (NK cell activity against YAC-1 cells. Taking these findings together, PNR stimulates an antiviral response in murine macrophages and mice that protects against viral infection, which may be attributable to its ability to stimulate NK cell activity. Further investigations are needed to reveal the molecular

  1. POLYMORPHIC VARIANTS OF THE GENE OF INTERFERON LAMBDA 3 AND FEATURES OF IMMUNE RESPONSE IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Sentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the immune manifestations of the interferon-lambda 3 genepolymorphism in chronic viral hepatitis C, 110 Russian children (54 girls and 56 boys with chronic HCV infection aged from 3 to 17 years were examined. All children were on combined therapy (pegylated interferon + ribavirin. It was found that among the studied polymorphic variants of the IFN-λ 3 gene in children with chronic HCV infection, T allele of the marker rs12979860 is associated with infection and chronization of HCV. The T/T rs12979860 genotype of the IFN-λ3 gene is unfavorable for the course of chronic HCV infection due to low levels of activated T-lymphocytes, intactness of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and interferon-γ inducible protein IP-10. The revealed relation of the polymorphic variants of C/C + C/T locus rs12979860 of INF-λ3 gene with the expression of activated T-lymphocytes discloses the protective nature of these genotypes to the development of chronic HCV infection in children. 

  2. Interferon in lyssavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Martina; Finke, Stefan; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonosis still claiming more than 50 000 human deaths per year. Typically, human cases are due to infection with rabies virus, the prototype of the Lyssavirus genus, but sporadic cases of rabies-like encephalitis caused by other lyssaviruses have been reported. In contrast to rabies virus, which has an extremely broad host range including many terrestrial warm-blooded animals, rabies-related viruses are associated predominantly with bats and rarely infect terrestrial species. In spite of a very close genetic relationship of rabies and rabies-related viruses, the factors determining the limited host range of rabies-related viruses are not clear. In the past years the importance of viral countermeasures against the host type I interferon system for establishment of an infection became evident. The rabies virus phosphoprotein (P) has emerged as a critical factor required for paralysing the signalling cascades leading to transcriptional activation of interferon genes as well as interferon signalling pathways, thereby limiting expression of antiviral and immune stimulatory genes. Comparative studies would be of interest in order to determine whether differential abilities of the lyssavirus P proteins contribute to the restricted host range of lyssaviruses.

  3. Interferon alfa and ribavirin induced hair changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, S.; Taj, A.; Muhamud, T.H.; Iqbal, Z.; Yaqub, F.

    2007-01-01

    Combination therapy of Interferon alfa and ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C has well documented cutaneous adverse effects. Most interesting of these has been reported on hair physiology. This study was conducted to determine the frequency and pattern of adverse effects involving hair in patients receiving combination of interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. The study was conducted in Department of Dermatology, Division of Medicine Shaikh Zayed Hospital. Thirty Eight patients who completed treatment with interferon alfa (3 MIU subcutaneously thrice weekly) and 1200 mg ribavirin daily for 24 weeks were enrolled in this single-center study. The patient's response and examination finding particularly regarding involvement of hair was noted on a Proforma. Thirty Two out of thirty eight (84%) patients noted adverse effects involving hair. The most frequent was diffuse hair loss and occurred in 27 patients (71%). Hypertrichosis of eyelashes (trichomegaly) and eyebrows (synophyrs) was observed in 18 (47%) and 16 (42%) patients respectively. Graying of hair was noted in 4 patients (11%), while discoloration of moustache hair was seen in 2 patients (5%). Epilation at the site of subcutaneous injection was noted in 10 patients (26%). Alopecia areata was reported in 2 patients (5%). It is concluded that adverse effects involving hair are frequent and varied (hair loss to excess hair growth) during combination therapy with Interferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. (author)

  4. Bovine NK cells can produce gamma interferon in response to the secreted mycobacterial proteins ESAT-6 and MPP14 but not in response to MPB70

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ingrid; Boysen, P.; Kulberg, S.

    2005-01-01

    to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex-specific protein ESAT-6, MPP14 from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and purified protein derivative (PPD) from M. tuberculosis. In contrast, no response was induced by MPB70, which is another M. tuberculosis complex-specific secreted antigen. The production of IFN...

  5. Pärnus algavad homme Ungari kultuuripäevad / Teet Roossaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roossaar, Teet

    2005-01-01

    Ungari organist Miklos Teleki orelikontsertidest 3. sept. Eliisabeti kirikus ja 4. sept. Pärnu-Jaagupi kirikus ning Pärnu Linnaorkestri hooaja avakontserdist 4. sept. Pärnu kontserdimajas Ungari kultuuripäevade raames

  6. Linear Pursuit Differential Game under Phase Constraint on the State of Evader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar Rakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a linear pursuit differential game of one pursuer and one evader. Controls of the pursuer and evader are subjected to integral and geometric constraints, respectively. In addition, phase constraint is imposed on the state of evader, whereas pursuer moves throughout the space. We say that pursuit is completed, if inclusion y(t1-x(t1∈M is satisfied at some t1>0, where x(t and y(t are states of pursuer and evader, respectively, and M is terminal set. Conditions of completion of pursuit in the game from all initial points of players are obtained. Strategy of the pursuer is constructed so that the phase vector of the pursuer first is brought to a given set, and then pursuit is completed.

  7. XX rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad / Valdo Rüütelmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rüütelmaa, Valdo

    2009-01-01

    17. märtsist kuni 5. aprillini Eesti Muusika- ja Teatriakadeemias toimunud rahvusvahelistest 20. trompetipäevadest, mille raames toimus 5. aprillil konkurss "Trompetitalendid 2009" . Trompetipäevade korraldaja Aavo Otsaga

  8. Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 : Nädalajagu muusikat igale maitsele / Signe Tamberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamberg, Signe

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 muusikaprogrammis: 34. tudengilaulu võistlusest 29. apr. Tartu Sadamateatris, öölaulupeost 28. apr. Kassitoome orus, kontsertidest "Rokime!" 2. mail ja "Folgime" 3. mail Raekoja platsil

  9. Eesti Suusapäevad Jay Peak´is / Peeter Teedla ; fotod: Peeter Teedla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teedla, Peeter

    2006-01-01

    märtsikuu esimesel nädalalõpul idaranniku eestlaste suusapäevad, osavõtjaid 156, paljud perekondade ja väikeste lastega, organiseerijaks Kristin Raamot. Peeti murdmaasuusatamise - ja slaalomivõistlused

  10. Characteristics of the interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) and its expression in response to LCDV and poly I:C challenges in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guo-Bin; Lou, Hui-Min; Dong, Xian-Zhi; Liu, Qiu-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Cui

    2012-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key transcriptional mediator regulating expression of both type I interferons (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokines. In this study, the cDNA and genomic sequences of IRF5 were isolated from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The gene of Japanese flounder (Jf)IRF5 is 7326 bp long, contains 9 exons and 8 introns and encodes a putative protein of 472 amino acids. The predicted protein sequence shares 61.1-81.9% identity to fish IRF5 and possesses a DNA-binding domain (DBD), a middle region (MR), an IRF association domain (IAD), a virus activated domain (VAD) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conserved in all known IRF5s. Phylogenetic analysis clustered it into the teleost IRF5 subgroup within vertebrate IRF5 group. JfIRF5 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with higher levels observed in the gills and head kidney. Gene expression of JfIRF5 was analyzed over a 7-day time course in the gills, head kidney, spleen and muscle of Japanese flounders challenged with lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). The data showed that JfIRF5 expression was slightly up-regulated by LCDV, but its induction time was clearly moved up; in contrast, the induction upon poly I:C challenge started not earlier than day 2 post-injection and was stronger and more persistent with a later peak time in all four organs. The late and long-lasting inductive expression of JfIRF5 following poly I:C challenge suggests that it might be an interferon stimulated gene (ISG), the induction of which is driven by poly I:C-induced type I IFNs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms of regulation in the interferon factor 3 (IRF- 3) pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) plays a critical role in the host cell response to both bacterial and viral infection. IRF-3 is activated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic nucleic acid sensors, and serves to upregulate interferon beta and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), thereby providing a quick and effective response to infection. In this work, two novel mechanisms of regulation in the IRF-3 pathway are revealed. The first part of this thesis work shows that upon bindi...

  12. Cystic craniopharyngioma: intratumoral chemotherapy with alpha interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Alessandra Dastoli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the cystic craniopharyngiomas can be controlled with the use of intratumoral applications of interferon alpha. METHOD: Nineteen patients with the diagnosis of cystic craniopharyngioma were treated with intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha from January 2002 to April 2006. All patients underwent placement of an intracystic catheter connected to an Ommaya reservoir. Through this reservoir were made applications during chemotherapy cycles. Each cycle corresponded to application of 3,000,000 units of interferon alpha three times per week on alternate days totalizing 36,000,000 units. Response to treatment was evaluated by calculating the tumor volume on MRI control after one, three and six months after the end of each cycle. Patients who developed worsening of symptoms or who had insignificant reduction in tumor volume during follow-up underwent repeat cycle chemotherapy. RESULTS: Four patients received four cycles of chemotherapy, three patients received three cycles, six patients received two cycles and six patients received one. The lower percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 60% and the bigger reduction was 98.37%. Eleven patients had a reduction greater than 90%. Five patients had a tumor reduction between 75 and 90% and in three patients the tumors were reduced by less than 75%. No deaths occurred during treatment and side effects of interferon alpha were well tolerated. No treatment was discontinued. Follow-up after the last application ranged from one year and five months to three years and nine months. CONCLUSION: The intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha decreases the volume of cystic craniopharyngiomas and so far can be considered a new therapeutic alternative.

  13. Rapid virological response assessment by Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus assay for predicting sustained virological responses in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 treated with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-yuan Su

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The lower limits of virus detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA detection assays are continuously improving. We aimed to assess the utility of more precise definition of 4th week viral load [rapid virological response (RVR] in predicting sustained virological response (SVR in HCV genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin. Clinical data of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 patients were retrospectively collected from 2009 to 2014. Patients were grouped according to 4th week viral load as follows: undetectable (n = 90 and detectable but not quantifiable (< 12 IU/mL, n = 27. All patients received PEG-IFNα-2a or -2b and ribavirin for 24 weeks. Serum HCV RNA levels were measured by Abbott RealTime (ART; Abbott Molecular, Abbott Park, IL, USA HCV assay. SVR was 95.5% and 63% in the undetectable group and < 12 IU/mL group of 4th week viral load, respectively. The between-group difference in SVR was significant (p < 0.001. We determined 4th week viral load was independently associated with SVR (odds ratio = 19.28; p = 0.002 and a good predictor of SVR [area under the curve (AUC = 0.775; p = 0.001]. ART HCV assays had a stronger SVR predictive value in HCV genotype 1 patients, indicating that only the undetectable group of 4th week viral load patients measured by ART HCV assay should be considered for shorter treatment time (24 weeks with PEG-IFN and ribavirin.

  14. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagiri, Nalinikanth; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such “stealth” CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid-based nanotheranostic agents for multiplex, multimodal molecular imaging and therapy, as well as in other applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:24872705

  15. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Kayar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet’s disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon.

  16. Interferon induction in bovine and feline monolayer cultures by four bluetongue virus serotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Pearson, N J

    1982-01-01

    The interferon inducing ability of bluetongue viruses was studied in bovine and feline monolayer cultures inoculated with each of four bluetongue virus serotypes. Interferon was assayed by a plaque reduction method in monolayer cultures with vesicular stomatitis virus as challenge virus. Interferon was produced by bovine turbinate, Georgia bovine kidney, and Crandell feline kidney monolayer cultures in response to bluetongue virus serotypes 10, 11, 13 and 17. The antiviral substances produced...

  17. Ribavirin plus interferon versus interferon for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Gluud, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Standard therapy is ribavirin plus pegylated interferon to achieve undetectable level of virus in the blood, but the effect on clinical outcomes is controversial.......Hepatitis C is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Standard therapy is ribavirin plus pegylated interferon to achieve undetectable level of virus in the blood, but the effect on clinical outcomes is controversial....

  18. Efficacy of peg-interferon based treatment in patients with hepatitis C refractory to previous conventional interferon-based treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, S.; Devrajani, B.R.; Kalhoro, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of peg-interferon-based therapy in patients refractory to previous conventional interferon-based treatment and factors predicting sustained viral response (SVR). Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Unit IV, Liaquat University Hospital, Jamshoro, from July 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: This study included consecutive patients of hepatitis C who were previously treated with conventional interferon-based treatment for 6 months but were either non-responders, relapsed or had virologic breakthrough and stage = 2 with fibrosis on liver biopsy. All eligible patients were provided peg-interferon at the dosage of 180 mu g weekly with ribavirin thrice a day for 6 months. Sustained Viral Response (SVR) was defined as absence of HCV RNA at twenty four week after treatment. All data was processed on SPSS version 16. Results: Out of 450 patients enrolled in the study, 192 were excluded from the study on the basis of minimal fibrosis (stage 0 and 1). Two hundred and fifty eight patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 247 completed the course of peg-interferon treatment. One hundred and sixty one (62.4%) were males and 97 (37.6%) were females. The mean age was 39.9 +- 6.1 years, haemoglobin was 11.49 +- 2.45 g/dl, platelet count was 127.2 +- 50.6 10/sup 3/ /mm/sup 3/, ALT was 99 +- 65 IU/L. SVR was achieved in 84 (32.6%). The strong association was found between SVR and the pattern of response (p = 0. 001), degree of fibrosis and early viral response (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Peg-interferon based treatment is an effective and safe treatment option for patients refractory to conventional interferon-based treatment. (author)

  19. Resveratrol treatment reveals a novel role for HMGB1 in regulation of the type 1 interferon response in dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Nurhafiza; Chang, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Wu, Yan-Wei; Anderson, Robert; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chen, Chia-Ling; Ho, Tzong-Shiann; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-02-20

    Dengue is one of the most significant mosquito-borne virus diseases worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. This study sought to examine the antiviral activity of resveratrol (RESV), a phytoalexin secreted naturally by plants, against dengue virus (DENV) infection. Our data showed that RESV inhibits the translocation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a DNA binding protein that normally resides in the nucleus, into the cytoplasm and extracellular milieu. HMGB1 migrates out of the nucleus during DENV infection. This migration is inhibited by RESV treatment and is mediated by induction of Sirt1 which leads to the retention of HMGB1 in the nucleus and consequently helps in the increased production of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Nuclear HMGB1 was found to bind to the promoter region of the ISG and positively regulated the expression of ISG. The enhanced transcription of ISGs by nuclear HMGB1 thus contributes to the antiviral activity of RESV against DENV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that RESV antagonizes DENV replication and that nuclear HMGB1 plays a role in regulating ISG production.

  20. Macrophage-Lineage Cells Negatively Regulate the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool in Response to Interferon Gamma at Steady State and During Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Amanda; Zhang, Yubin; Thai, Vinh; Jones, Maura; Jordan, Michael B; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) resident macrophages (Mϕs) regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization; however, their impact on HSC function has not been investigated. We demonstrate that depletion of BM resident Mϕs increases HSC proliferation as well as the pool of quiescent HSCs. At the same time, during bacterial infection where BM resident Mϕs are selectively increased we observe a decrease in HSC numbers. Moreover, strategies that deplete or reduce Mϕs during infection prevent HSC loss and rescue HSC function. We previously found that the transient loss of HSCs during infection is interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-dependent. We now demonstrate that IFNγ signaling specifically in Mϕs is critical for both the diminished HSC pool and maintenance of BM resident Mϕs during infection. In addition to the IFNγ-dependent loss of BM HSC and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during infection, IFNγ reduced circulating HSPC numbers. Importantly, under infection conditions AMD3100 or G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization was impaired. Taken together, our data show that IFNγ acts on Mϕs, which are a negative regulator of the HSC pool, to drive the loss in BM and peripheral HSCs during infection. Our findings demonstrate that modulating BM resident Mϕ numbers can impact HSC function in vivo, which may be therapeutically useful for hematologic conditions and refinement of HSC transplantation protocols. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Strategies of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica to evade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the innate immune responses of intestinal epithelial cells ... metabolically active eukaryotic cells and display anti- bacterial activity ..... and TLR4 in inflammatory bowel disease; Infect. Immun. .... which contains a beta2 integrin motif; Mol. Biol.

  2. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Brum Ortigoza

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  3. Tumor inherent interferons: Impact on immune reactivity and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockwell, Natasha K; Parker, Belinda S

    2018-04-19

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, with sustained responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors reported in a number of malignancies. Such therapeutics are now being trialed in aggressive or advanced cancers that are heavily reliant on untargeted therapies, such as triple negative breast cancer. However, responses have been underwhelming to date and are very difficult to predict, leading to an inability to accurately weigh up the benefit-to-risk ratio for their implementation. The tumor immune microenvironment has been closely linked to immunotherapeutic response, with superior responses observed in patients with T cell-inflamed or 'hot' tumors. One class of cytokines, the type I interferons, are a major dictator of tumor immune infiltration and activation. Tumor cell inherent interferon signaling dramatically influences the immune microenvironment and the expression of immune checkpoint proteins, hence regulators and targets of this pathway are candidate biomarkers of immunotherapeutic response. In support of a link between IFN signaling and immunotherapeutic response, the combination of type I interferon inducers with checkpoint immunotherapy has recently been demonstrated critical for a sustained anti-tumor response in aggressive breast cancer models. Here we review evidence that links type I interferons with a hot tumor immune microenvironment, response to checkpoint inhibitors and reduced risk of metastasis that supports their use as biomarkers and therapeutics in oncology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Warrison A; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A; Dillard, Joseph P; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2016-06-14

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2'3'-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrison A. Andrade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC. Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, which produces 2′3′-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS−/− and TLR4−/− cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection.

  6. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotagiri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nalinikanth Kotagiri,1–4 Jin-Woo Kim1–31Bio/Nano Technology Laboratory, Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, 2Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 3Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 4Optical Radiology Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such "stealth" CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid

  7. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to feline interferon (fIFN)-γ as tools to evaluate cellular immune responses to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Kaku, Ayumi; Satomura, Megumi; Kohori, Michiyo; Noura, Kanako; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection has been recognised in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of FIP. To evaluate the importance of cellular immunity for FIPV infection, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against feline interferon (fIFN)-γ were first created to establish fIFN-γ detection systems using the MAbs. Six anti-fIFN-γ MAbs were created. Then, the difference in epitope which those MAbs recognise was demonstrated by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IFN-γ neutralisation tests. Detection systems for fIFN-γ (sandwich ELISA, ELISpot assay, and two-colour flow cytometry) were established using anti-fIFN-γ MAbs that recognise different epitopes. In all tests, fIFN-γ production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from cats experimentally infected with an FIPV isolate that did not develop the disease was significantly increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation in comparison with medium alone. Especially, CD8(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, but not CD4(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, were increased. In contrast, fIFN-γ production from PBMCs isolated from cats that had developed FIP and specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats was not increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation. These results suggest that cellular immunity plays an important role in preventing the development of FIP. Measurement of fIFN-γ production with the anti-fIFN-γ MAbs created in this study appeared to be useful in evaluating cellular immunity in cats. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Eesti muusika päevad - üks kord aastas, kõigile / Jelena Gandshu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gandshu, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Muusikateadlased Jelena Gandshu ja Gerhard Lock, heliloojad Age Hirv ja Liis Jürgens 3.-10. aprillini toimunud Eesti muusika päevade kontsertidest: kinos Sõprus "Sensatsioon!!!", Kultuuritehases Polymer "Cellissimo", Estonia kontserdisaalis ERSO "Sümfoonilised hääled", Tallinna raekojas Mihkel Poll ja Oliver Kuusik, Katariina kirikus PaukenfEst, Nigulistes Jüri Reinvere autorikontsert. Järgneb

  9. Eesti Muusika Päevad 2000 : ECPNMi juhatus Tallinnas / Consuelo Diez ; interv. Evelin Kõrvits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diez, Consuelo

    2000-01-01

    28.-30. apr. pidas Tallinnas aastakoosolekut ning külastas Eesti Muusika Päevade kontserte ECPNMi (European Conference of Promoters of New Music) juhatus. ECPNMi juhatuse liikmed räägivad uue muusika üritustest oma riikides, muljeid eesti muusika päevadelt

  10. Märtsipäevade valupisaraid peab lastele näitama / Anu Bollverk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bollverk, Anu

    2009-01-01

    1949. aasta märtsiküüditamisele pühendatud mälestuspäevast Koeru kultuurimajas ning sealse huviteatri poolt ette kantud Herbert Lasti näidendist "Valupisarais märtsipäevad" (lavastajad Herbert Last ja Uno Aav)

  11. Why Do Firms Evade Taxes? The Role of Information Sharing and Financial Sector Outreach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Lin, C.; Ma, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Informality is a wide-spread phenomenon across the globe. We show that firms in countries with better information sharing systems and greater financial sector outreach evade taxes to a lesser degree, an effect that is stronger for smaller firms, firms in smaller cities and towns, and firms in

  12. Role of interferon in resistance and immunity to protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Degee, A. L. W.; Mansfield, J. M.; Newsome, A. L.; Arnold, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Production of interferon (I) in response to protozoan infection, and the interferon-mediated inhibition of parasite replication were studied in order to determine if these effects may be related to immunologic-mediated resistance of the hosts. Two extracellular parasites-Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Naegleria fowlei were used. Upon infection with the trypanosome, only resistant strains of mice produced I. An early peak of alpha/beta I is followed by appearance of gamma I, which coincided with antibody production and a drop in parasitemia. In case of the amoeba, pretreatment of its suspension with alpha/beta I inhibits its replication in vitro, and appears to protect mice from the infection and the disease. It is proposed that production of interferon, with its regulatory effect on the immune responses, may play a major role in regulating the processes of protozoan-caused diseases.

  13. A molecular arms race between host innate antiviral response and emerging human coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lok-Yin Roy; Lui, Pak-Yin; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Coronaviruses have been closely related with mankind for thousands of years. Community-acquired human coronaviruses have long been recognized to cause common cold. However, zoonotic coronaviruses are now becoming more a global concern with the discovery of highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses causing severe respiratory diseases. Infections by these emerging human coronaviruses are characterized by less robust interferon production. Treatment of patients with recombinant interferon regimen promises beneficial outcomes, suggesting that compromised interferon expression might contribute at least partially to the severity of disease. The mechanisms by which coronaviruses evade host innate antiviral response are under intense investigations. This review focuses on the fierce arms race between host innate antiviral immunity and emerging human coronaviruses. Particularly, the host pathogen recognition receptors and the signal transduction pathways to mount an effective antiviral response against SARS and MERS coronavirus infection are discussed. On the other hand, the counter-measures evolved by SARS and MERS coronaviruses to circumvent host defense are also dissected. With a better understanding of the dynamic interaction between host and coronaviruses, it is hoped that insights on the pathogenesis of newly-identified highly pathogenic human coronaviruses and new strategies in antiviral development can be derived.

  14. Meta-analysis of mutations in the NS5A gene and hepatitis C virus resistance to interferon therapy: uniting discordant conclusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Janke; Spaan, Willy J. M.; Kroes, Aloys C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 1B responds poorly to treatment with interferon, in contrast to the more interferon-sensitive genotypes 2 and 3. Studies on combination therapy regimens with PEG-interferon and ribavirin report sustained response rates that generally do not exceed 50%, in contrast to

  15. Mechanisms by which Porphyromonas gingivalis evades innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Abdi

    Full Text Available The oral cavity is home to unique resident microbial communities whose interactions with host immunity are less frequently studied than those of the intestinal microbiome. We examined the stimulatory capacity and the interactions of two oral bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum, on Dendritic Cell (DC activation, comparing them to the effects of the well-studied intestinal microbe Escherichia coli (E. coli. Unlike F. nucleatum and E. coli, P. gingivalis failed to activate DCs, and in fact silenced DC responses induced by F. nucleatum or E. coli. We identified a variant strain of P. gingivalis (W50 that lacked this immunomodulatory activity. Using biochemical approaches and whole genome sequencing to compare the two substrains, we found a point mutation in the hagA gene. This protein is though to be involved in the alteration of the PorSS/gingipain pathway, which regulates protein secretion into the extracellular environment. A proteomic comparison of the secreted products of the two substrains revealed enzymatic differences corresponding to this phenotype. We found that P. gingivalis secretes gingipain(s that inactivate several key proinflammatory mediators made by DCs and/or T cells, but spare Interleukin-1 (IL-1 and GM-CSF, which can cause capillary leaks that serve as a source of the heme that P. gingivalis requires for its survival, and GM-CSF, which can cause epithelial-cell growth. Taken together, our results suggest that P. gingivalis has evolved potent mechanisms to modulate its virulence factors and dampen the innate immune response by selectively inactivating most proinflammatory cytokines.

  16. Positive regulation of humoral and innate immune responses induced by inactivated Avian Influenza Virus vaccine in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Fatma; Hassanin, Ola

    2015-12-01

    Avian Influenza (AI) vaccines are widely used for mammals and birds in a trial to eliminate the Avian Influenza virus (AIV) infection from the world. However and up till now the virus is still existed via modulation of its antigenic structure to evade the pressure of host immune responses. For a complete understanding of the immune responses following AI vaccination in chickens, the modulations of the chickens humoral immune responses and interferon-alpha signaling pathway, as a fundamental part of the innate immune responses, were investigated. In our study, we measured the humoral immune response using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests. In addition, chicken interferon-alpha pathway components was measured at RNA levels using Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) following one dose of inactivated H5N1 influenza vaccine at 14 days of age. In this study, the protective levels of humoral antibody responses were observed at 14, 21 and 28 days following immunization with inactivated (Re-1/H5N1) AI vaccine. In the chicken spleen cells, up regulation in the chicken interferon-alpha pathway components (MX1 & IRF7) was existed as early as 48 h post vaccination and remained until 28 days post vaccination at the endogenous state. However, after the recall with ex-vivo stimulation, the up regulation was more pronounced in the transcriptional factor (IRF7) compared to the antiviral gene (MX1) at 28 days post vaccination. So far, from our results it appears that the inactivated H5N1 vaccine can trigger the chicken interferon-alpha signaling pathway as well as it can elicit protective humoral antibody responses.

  17. Incubation of whole blood at 39°C augments gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-induced protein 10 and IFN-γ responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabye, Martine G; Ravn, Pernille; Johansen, Isik S

    2011-01-01

    A rarely challenged dogma in cell-mediated immune (CMI) assays is the incubation temperature, 37°C. Fever augments proinflammatory immune responses in vivo, and the aim of this study was to explore whether incubation at fever-range temperature could increase antigen-specific biomarker responses. We...

  18. Pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin for 14 versus 24 weeks in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 2 or 3 and rapid virological response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgard, Olav; Bjøro, Kristian; Larsen, Helmer Ring

    2008-01-01

    A recent nonrandomized pilot trial showed that hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients with genotype 2/3 and rapid virological response (RVR) had a 90% sustained virological response (SVR) rate after 14 weeks of treatment. We aimed to assess this concept in a randomized controlled trial. In the trial, 428...

  19. Analysis of the acute phase responses of Serum Amyloid A, Haptoglobin and Type 1 Interferon in cattle experimentally infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A series of challenge experiments were performed in order to investigate the acute phase responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle and possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers". The host response to infection was investigated through...... periods exceeding 28 days in order to determine the carrier-status of individual animals. The systemic host response to FMDV in infected animals was evaluated in comparison to similar measurements in sera from 6 mock-inoculated control animals.There was a significant increase in serum concentrations....... There was a statistically significant difference in the HP response between carriers and non-carriers with a lower response in the animals that subsequently developed into FMDV carriers. It was concluded that the induction of SAA, HP and type 1 IFN in serum can be used as markers of acute infection by FMDV in cattle....

  20. Differential expression of interferon-gamma and interferon-gamma-inducing cytokines in Thai patients with scrub typhus or leptospirosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chierakul, Wirongrong; de Fost, Maaike; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Limpaiboon, Roongreung; Dondorp, Arjen; White, Nicholas J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma plays an important role in the induction of a type 1 immune response against intracellular pathogens. We compared the plasma levels of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducing cytokines in adult Thai patients with scrub typhus, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia

  1. evad : [luuletused] / Philip Larkin ; inglise keelest tlk. Maarja Kangro

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Larkin, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Sisu: Päevad ; Mitte midagi öelda ; See olgu värss ; Uurimus lugemisharjumustest ; Hommage valitsusele ; Vesi ; Vajakud ; Viige üks koju lastele ; Jutt voodis ; Kõrged aknad ; Sa jätkad elu ; Kui. Orig.: Days ; Nothing to be said ; This be the verse ; A study of reading habits ; Homage to a government ; Water ; Wants ; Take one home for the kiddies ; Talking in bed ; High windows ; Continuing to live ; If

  2. DO PENALTIES AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES MAKE TAXPAYERS MORE COMPLIANT? THE VIEW OF AUSTRALIAN TAX EVADERS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Ken Devos

    2013-01-01

    The tax compliance literature indicates that many factors, including, economic, social, psychological and demographic, impact upon the compliance behaviour of individual taxpayers. This study explores the relationship, if any, that exists between selected tax compliance and demographic variables and the compliance behaviour of Australian individual tax evaders. The study employed a mixed method research approach comprising both a survey and interviews. The findings revealed that tax law enfor...

  3. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Livingston

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective: To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI population. Design: In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results: Sustained virologic response (SVR with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18 and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37. Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%, including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%, 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5% and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%. By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002, estimated duration of infection (p=0.034 and HCV genotype (p<0.0001. There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%. Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%. Conclusions: We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1.

  4. Role of IL-28B polymorphisms in virologic response to combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy in genotype 4 chronic HCV infected patients with and without cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Youssef Shaala

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In Egypt, where chronic HCV genotype 4 and schistosoma coinfection predominate, both schistosoma infection and cirrhosis are more potent than IL28B polymorphisms as strong baseline negative predictors of hepatitis C treatment response.

  5. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1

  6. Increased Th1, Th17 and pro-fibrotic responses in hepatitis C-infected patients are down-regulated after 12 weeks of treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Sousa, Maria Angeles; Almansa, Raquel; de la Fuente, Concha; Caro-Paton, Agustín; Ruiz, Lourdes; Sanchez-Antolín, Gloria; Gonzalez, Jose Manuel; Aller, Rocio; Alcaide, Noelia; Largo, Pilar; Resino, Salvador; de Lejarazu, Raul Ortiz; Bermejo-Martin, Jesus F

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The infection induces up-regulation of cytokine and chemokines commonly linked to the development of cellular and pro-inflammatory antiviral responses. The current standard in hepatitis C treatment consists of combination regimens of pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin. The impact of combined treatment in the host immune response is still poorly understood. In the present study, we profiled 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors involved in the innate and adaptive responses to the virus in the serum of 27 hepatitis C virus-infected patients, before and after 12 weeks of combined treatment, and compared them to 10 healthy controls. Hepatitis C virus infection induced not only the secretion of chemokines and cytokines participating in Th1 responses (MIP-1 alpha, IP-10, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IL-2), but also cytokines involved in the development of Th17 responses (IL-6, IL-8, IL-9 and IL-17) and two pro-fibrotic factors (FGF-b, VEGF). The most important increases included MIP-1 alpha (4.7-fold increase compared to the control group), TNF-alpha (3.0-fold), FGF-b (3.4-fold), VEGF (3.5-fold), IP-10 (3.6-fold), IL-17 (107.0-fold), IL-9 (7.5-fold), IL-12p70 (7.0-fold), IL-2 (5.6-fold) and IL-7 (5.6-fold). Combined treatment with pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin down-modulated the secretion of key Th1 and Th17 pro-inflammatory mediators, and pro-fibrotic growth factors as early as 12 weeks after treatment initiation. MIP-1 alpha, FGF-b, IL-17 decreased in a more dramatic manner in the group of responder patients than in the group of non-responders (fold-change in cEVR; fold-change in NcEVR): MIP-1 alpha (4.72;1.71), FGF-b (4.54;1.21), IL-17 (107.1;1.8). Correlation studies demonstrated that the decreases in the levels of these mediators were significantly associated with each other, pointing to a coordinated effect of the treatment on their secretion (r coefficient; p value): [ FGF

  7. Muusika : Jeremija nutulaulud palmipuudepühal. Jätkub "Musica Grande". Lihavõttetervitus Barcelonast. Rannap "Selges eesti helikeeles". Juba XIII trompetipäevad. III klavessiinipäevad / Jaan-Eik Tulve

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tulve, Jaan-Eik, 1967-

    2002-01-01

    Vox Clamantise kontsertidest Tartus ja Tallinnas. Jätkub sari "Musica Grande" kontsertidega Tartus ja Tallinnas pealkirjaga "Kontsertlik". Eestisse sõidab esinema üks Hispaania tippkoore Coral Cantiga Barcelonast. Rein Rannapi tänavusest suurprojektist, klaveriõhtust "Selges eesti helikeeles". 1. - 7. aprillini toimuvad EMA rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad. 4. - 7. aprillini korraldab Eesti Klavessiinisõprade Tsunft III klavessiinipäevad

  8. Systematic identification of anti-interferon function on hepatitis C virus genome reveals p7 as an immune evasion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hangfei; Chu, Virginia; Wu, Nicholas C; Chen, Zugen; Truong, Shawna; Brar, Gurpreet; Su, Sheng-Yao; Du, Yushen; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Olson, C Anders; Chen, Shu-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2017-02-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes mechanisms to evade the multilayered antiviral actions of the host immune system. Great progress has been made in elucidating the strategies HCV employs to down-regulate interferon (IFN) production, impede IFN signaling transduction, and impair IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, there is a limited understanding of the mechanisms governing how viral proteins counteract the antiviral functions of downstream IFN effectors due to the lack of an efficient approach to identify such interactions systematically. To study the mechanisms by which HCV antagonizes the IFN responses, we have developed a high-throughput profiling platform that enables mapping of HCV sequences critical for anti-IFN function at high resolution. Genome-wide profiling performed with a 15-nt insertion mutant library of HCV showed that mutations in the p7 region conferred high levels of IFN sensitivity, which could be alleviated by the expression of WT p7 protein. This finding suggests that p7 protein of HCV has an immune evasion function. By screening a liver-specific ISG library, we identified that IFI6-16 significantly inhibits the replication of p7 mutant viruses without affecting WT virus replication. In contrast, knockout of IFI6-16 reversed the IFN hypersensitivity of p7 mutant virus. In addition, p7 was found to be coimmunoprecipitated with IFI6-16 and to counteract the function of IFI6-16 by depolarizing the mitochondria potential. Our data suggest that p7 is a critical immune evasion protein that suppresses the antiviral IFN function by counteracting the function of IFI6-16.

  9. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deaton, M. K.; Dzimianski, J. V.; Daczkowski, C. M.; Whitney, G. K.; Mank, N. J.; Parham, M. M.; Bergeron, E.; Pegan, S. D.; Perlman, S.

    2016-07-13

    ABSTRACT

    The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another.

    IMPORTANCEViral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of

  10. Helper T Lymphocyte Response in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Intraepithelial Neoplasia Submitted to Immunotherapy with Pegylated Interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Antoniazi Michelin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy in cancer patients is a very promising treatment and the development of new protocols and the study of the mechanisms of regression is imperative. The objective of this study was to evaluate the production of cytokines in helper T (CD4+ lymphocytes during immunotherapy with pegylated IFN-α in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. We conducted a prospective study with 17 patients with CIN II-III using immunotherapy with pegylated IFN-α subcutaneouly weekly, and using flow cytometry we evaluated the peripheric CD4+ T lymphocytes. The results show that in the regression group the patients presented a significant increase in the amount of IFN-γ during the entire immunotherapy, compared with the group without a response. The amount of CD4+ T lymphocytes positive for IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β is significantly lower in patients with good clinical response. The results also demonstrate that patients with regression have a higher amount of intracellular TNF-α in CD4+ T lymphocytes before the start of treatment. Analyzing these data sets, it can be concluded that immunotherapy is a viable clinical treatment for patients with high-grade CIN and that the regression is dependent on the change in the immune response to a Th1 pattern.

  11. Interferon Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alajbegovic, Azra; Deljo, Dervis; Alajbegovic, Salem; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Todorovic, Ljubica; Tiric-Campara, Merita

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) differ: treatment of relapse, treatment slow the progression of the disease (immunomodulators and immunosuppression), and symptomatic treatment. The aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the application of interferon therapy in the treatment of MS-E: Process the disease, patients with multiple sclerosis who have passed the commission for multiple sclerosis at the Neurology Clinic of Clinical Center of Sarajevo University as a refere...

  12. Interferon-α-conditioned human monocytes combine a Th1-orienting attitude with the induction of autologous Th17 responses: role of IL-23 and IL-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano M Santini

    Full Text Available IFN-α exerts multiple effects leading to immune protection against pathogens and cancer as well to autoimmune reactions by acting on monocytes and dendritic cells. We analyzed the versatility of human monocytes conditioned by IFN-α towards dendritic cell differentiation (IFN-DC in shaping the autologous T-helper response. Priming of naïve CD4 T cells with autologous IFN-DC in the presence of either SEA or anti-CD3, resulted, in addition to a prominent expansion of CXCR3+ IFN-γ-producing CD4 Th1 cells, in the emergence of two distinct subsets of IL-17-producing CD4 T cells: i a predominant Th17 population selectively producing IL-17 and expressing CCR6; ii a minor Th1/Th17 population, producing both IL-17 and IFN-γ. After phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, IFN-DC induced Th17 cell expansion and IL-17 release. Notably, the use of neutralizing antibodies revealed that IL-23 was an essential cytokine in mediating Th17 cell development by IFN-DC. The demonstration of the IFN-DC-induced expansion of both Th1 and Th17 cell populations reveals the intrinsic plasticity of these DC in orienting the immune response and provides a mechanistic link between IFN-α and the onset of autoimmune phenomena, which have been correlated with both IL-17 production and exposure to IFN-α.

  13. Type 1 Diabetes and Interferon Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kan; Kawasaki, Eiji; Imagawa, Akihisa; Awata, Takuya; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Uchigata, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Shimada, Akira; Nakanishi, Koji; Makino, Hideichi; Maruyama, Taro; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Interferon therapy can trigger induction of several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. To assess the clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of type 1 diabetes induced by interferon therapy, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinical characteristics, anti-islet autoantibodies, and HLA-DR typing were examined in 91 patients for whom type 1 diabetes developed during or shortly after interferon therapy. RESULTS Median ...

  14. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ovine Interferon Tau Prevents Influenza Virus-Induced Lethality in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, V; Pascual, E; Avia, M; Rangel, G; de Molina, A; Alejo, A; Sevilla, N

    2016-01-06

    Ovine interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a unique type I interferon with low toxicity and a broad host range in vivo. We report the generation of a nonreplicative recombinant adenovirus expressing biologically active IFN-τ. Using the B6.A2G-Mx1 mouse model, we showed that single-dose intranasal administration of recombinant Ad5-IFN-τ can effectively prevent lethality and disease induced by highly virulent hv-PR8 influenza virus by activating the interferon response and preventing viral replication. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  16. Retinoic acid induces signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1, STAT2, and p48 expression in myeloid leukemia cells and enhances their responsiveness to interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, S; Ronni, T; Lehtonen, A; Sareneva, T; Melén, K; Nordling, S; Levy, D E; Julkunen, I

    1997-06-01

    IFNs are antiproliferative cytokines that have growth-inhibitory effects on various normal and malignant cells. Therefore, they have been used in the treatment of certain forms of cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia and hairy cell leukemia. However, there is little evidence that IFNs would be effective in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia, and molecular mechanisms underlying IFN unresponsiveness have not been clarified. Here we have studied the activation and induction of IFN-specific transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1, STAT2, and p48 in all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-differentiated myeloid leukemia cells using promyelocytic NB4, myeloblastic HL-60, and monoblastic U937 cells as model systems. These cells respond to ATRA by growth inhibition and differentiation. We show that in undifferentiated NB4 cells, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and MxB gene expression is not activated by IFN-alpha, possibly due to a relative lack of signaling molecules, especially p48 protein. However, during ATRA-induced differentiation, steady-state STAT1, STAT2, and especially p48 mRNA and corresponding protein levels were elevated both in NB4 and U937 cells, apparently correlating to an enhanced responsiveness of these cells to IFNs. ATRA treatment of NB4 cells sensitized them to IFN action as seen by increased IFN-gamma activation site DNA-binding activity or by efficient formation of IFN-alpha-specific ISGF3 complex and subsequent oligoadenylate synthetase and MxB gene expression. Lack of p48 expression could be one of the mechanisms of promyelocytic leukemia cell escape from growth-inhibitory effects of IFN-alpha.

  17. Antiviral Activity of Lambda Interferon in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Antje; Soubies, Sebastien; Härtle, Sonja; Schusser, Benjamin; Kaspers, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are essential components of the antiviral defense system of vertebrates. In mammals, functional receptors for type III IFN (lambda interferon [IFN-λ]) are found mainly on epithelial cells, and IFN-λ was demonstrated to play a crucial role in limiting viral infections of mucosal surfaces. To determine whether IFN-λ plays a similar role in birds, we produced recombinant chicken IFN-λ (chIFN-λ) and we used the replication-competent retroviral RCAS vector system to generate mosaic-transgenic chicken embryos that constitutively express chIFN-λ. We could demonstrate that chIFN-λ markedly inhibited replication of various virus strains, including highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, in ovo and in vivo, as well as in epithelium-rich tissue and cell culture systems. In contrast, chicken fibroblasts responded poorly to chIFN-λ. When applied in vivo to 3-week-old chickens, recombinant chIFN-λ strongly induced the IFN-responsive Mx gene in epithelium-rich organs, such as lungs, tracheas, and intestinal tracts. Correspondingly, these organs were found to express high transcript levels of the putative chIFN-λ receptor alpha chain (chIL28RA) gene. Transfection of chicken fibroblasts with a chIL28RA expression construct rendered these cells responsive to chIFN-λ treatment, indicating that receptor expression determines cell type specificity of IFN-λ action in chickens. Surprisingly, mosaic-transgenic chickens perished soon after hatching, demonstrating a detrimental effect of constitutive chIFN-λ expression. Our data highlight fundamental similarities between the IFN-λ systems of mammals and birds and suggest that type III IFN might play a role in defending mucosal surfaces against viral intruders in most if not all vertebrates. PMID:24371053

  18. Casein Kinase 1α Mediates the Degradation of Receptors for Type I and Type II Interferons Caused by Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan; Wolf, Jennifer J; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Studstill, Caleb J; Ma, Wenjun; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2018-04-01

    Although influenza A virus (IAV) evades cellular defense systems to effectively propagate in the host, the viral immune-evasive mechanisms are incompletely understood. Our recent data showed that hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV induces degradation of type I IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Here, we demonstrate that IAV HA induces degradation of type II IFN (IFN-γ) receptor 1 (IFNGR1), as well as IFNAR1, via casein kinase 1α (CK1α), resulting in the impairment of cellular responsiveness to both type I and II IFNs. IAV infection or transient HA expression induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1, whereas HA gene-deficient IAV failed to downregulate the receptors. IAV HA caused the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of IFNGR1, leading to the lysosome-dependent degradation of IFNGR1. Influenza viral HA strongly decreased cellular sensitivity to type II IFNs, as it suppressed the activation of STAT1 and the induction of IFN-γ-stimulated genes in response to exogenously supplied recombinant IFN-γ. Importantly, CK1α, but not p38 MAP kinase or protein kinase D2, was proven to be critical for HA-induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based knockdown of CK1α repressed the degradation processes of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1 triggered by IAV infection. Further, CK1α was shown to be pivotal for proficient replication of IAV. Collectively, the results suggest that IAV HA induces degradation of IFN receptors via CK1α, creating conditions favorable for viral propagation. Therefore, the study uncovers a new immune-evasive pathway of influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a grave threat to humans, causing seasonal and pandemic influenza. Upon infection, innate and adaptive immunity, such as the interferon (IFN) response, is induced to protect hosts against IAV infection. However, IAV seems to be equipped with tactics to evade the IFN-mediated antiviral responses, although the detailed

  19. Pasteurella pneumotropica evades the human complement system by acquisition of the complement regulators factor H and C4BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sahagún-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.

  20. Influence of Interferon-Alpha Combined with Chemo (Radio Therapy on Immunological Parameters in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Karakhanova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prognosis of patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas is particularly poor. A combination of chemotherapy with immunotherapy could be an option for treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to perform an immunomonitoring of 17 patients with pancreatic cancer from the CapRI-2 study, and tumor-bearing mice treated with combination of chemo (radio therapies with interferon-2α. Low doses of interferon-2α led to a decrease in total leukocyte and an increase in monocyte counts. Furthermore, we observed a positive effect of interferon-2α therapy on the dendritic cells and NK (natural killer cell activation immediately after the first injection. In addition, we recorded an increased amount of interferon-γ and IL-10 in the serum following the interferon-2α therapy. These data clearly demonstrate that pancreatic carcinoma patients also show an immunomodulatory response to interferon-2α therapy. Analysis of immunosuppressive cells in the Panc02 orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer revealed an accumulation of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells in spleens and tumors of the mice treated with interferon-2α and 5-fluorouracil. The direct effect of the drugs on myeloid-derived suppressor cells was also registered in vitro. These data expose the importance of immunosuppressive mechanisms induced by combined chemo-immunotherapy.

  1. The highly virulent variola and monkeypox viruses express secreted inhibitors of type I interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Marco, María del Mar; Alejo, Alí; Hudson, Paul; Damon, Inger K.; Alcami, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Variola virus (VARV) caused smallpox, one of the most devastating human diseases and the first to be eradicated, but its deliberate release represents a dangerous threat. Virulent orthopoxviruses infecting humans, such as monkeypox virus (MPXV), could fill the niche left by smallpox eradication and the cessation of vaccination. However, immunomodulatory activities and virulence determinants of VARV and MPXV remain largely unexplored. We report the molecular characterization of the VARV- and MPXV-secreted type I interferon-binding proteins, which interact with the cell surface after secretion and prevent type I interferon responses. The proteins expressed in the baculovirus system have been purified, and their interferon-binding properties characterized by surface plasmon resonance. The ability of these proteins to inhibit a broad range of interferons was investigated to identify potential adaptation to the human immune system. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Western blot and activity assays the expression of the type I interferon inhibitor during VARV and MPXV infections. These findings are relevant for the design of new vaccines and therapeutics to smallpox and emergent virulent orthopoxviruses because the type I interferon-binding protein is a major virulence factor in animal models, vaccination with this protein induces protective immunity, and its neutralization prevents disease progression.—Fernández de Marco, M. M., Alejo, A., Hudson, P., Damon, I. K., Alcami, A. The highly virulent variola and monkeypox viruses express secreted inhibitors of type I interferon. PMID:20019241

  2. High Level Antibody Response to Pandemic Influenza H1N1/09 Virus Is Associated With Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein-3 rs12252-CC in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Qin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The C allele of the interferon-induced transmembrane protein-3 (IFITM3 SNP rs12252, a common allele in South East Asia and China, is strongly associated with severe influenza infection. However, despite the high occurrence of rs12252-CC genotype in Chinese population (~25%, severe influenza infection is rare. The aim of study is to determine whether rs12252-CC individuals have pre-existing antibody responses to previous seasonal influenza infections.Cohort and Method: A total 99 young healthy volunteers (18–20 years were recruited and received an influenza seasonal Vaccination [A/Switzerland/9715293/2013(H3N2, A/California/7/2009 (pdm09H1N1 and B/Jeep/3073/2013-like virus (Flu-B]. Plasma and gDNA was isolated from each volunteer before, and 14, 28, 180, 360, and 540 days after vaccination. Additionally, 68 elderlies (>65 years were also recruited as a control group to compare the levels of antibodies at baseline between the young adults and the elderly. For each sample IFITM3 rs12252 genotype was determined and antibody levels in response to pdmH1N1, H3N2 and Influenza B infection were measured for each time point.Results: We found a significantly higher level of pre-existing antibodies to pandemic influenza H1N1/09 virus (pdm09H1N1 but not to H3N2 or FluB in CC donors in comparison with CT/TT donors prior to vaccination. No impact of IFITM3 genotype in boosting influenza specific antibodies in young adults within 1 year after receiving seasonal influenza vaccination was observed. In addition, there was no difference in pdm09H1N1 specific antibody levels observed in the elderly cohort between volunteers carrying different IFITM3 genotypes. Higher levels of antibodies to pdmH1N1 were observed in elderly CC carriers when compared to the young CC carriers, but this trend was not replicated in TT carriers.Conclusion:IFITM3-rs12252 CC carriers exhibit a high level of pre-existing immunity to pdm09H1N1 compared to TT carriers in the

  3. Interferon-α treatment in systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    classification need treatment. This review on interferon treatment in systemic mastocytosis documents an effect of this biological agent in some patients with mastocytosis. However, the place of interferon-a, as mono- or combination therapy, in the treatment algorithm may only be definitely established...

  4. Inflammation Activates the Interferon Signaling Pathways in Taste Bud Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Minliang; Brand, Joseph; Huang, Liquan

    2007-01-01

    Patients with viral and bacterial infections or other inflammatory illnesses often experience taste dysfunctions. The agents responsible for these taste disorders are thought to be related to infection-induced inflammation, but the mechanisms are not known. As a first step in characterizing the possible role of inflammation in taste disorders, we report here evidence for the presence of interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling pathways in taste bud cells. IFN receptors, particularly the IFN-γ rece...

  5. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  6. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Bethany A; Powers, Linda S; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A; Monick, Martha M; Maury, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  7. Opposing roles for interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3 and type I interferon signaling during plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami A Patel

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production.

  8. Studies on Brucella interferon: Chromatographic behaviour and purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet-Ucla, C.; Wietzerbin, J.; Falcoff, E.

    1980-01-01

    Interferon was induced by infecting mice with Brucella suis. Serum containing interferon activity was analyzed by chromatography on Concanavalin A-Sepharose and Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B columns. Antiviral activity was completely retained by the lectin column indicating that all the interferon molecules are glycosylated. The chromatographic behaviour of Brucella interferon on Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B show that, like other interferons, Brucella interferon displays hydrophobic properties. However, the hydrophobicity of the interferon molecule was masked in the crude preparation and was only detectable when purified Brucella interferon was used for chromatography. The antigenic properties of Brucella interferon provided the means for developing an affinity chromatographic method resulting in about 60.000 fold purification. As in the case of viral interferon, treatment of L cells with Brucella interferon induced specific enhanced in vitro phosphorylation of a 67.000 molecular weight protein after incubation of cell extracts with doublestranded RNA and [γ- 32 p]ATP. (auth.)

  9. The atherogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis evades circulating phagocytes by adhering to erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between periodontitis and coronary heart disease has been investigated intensively. A pathogenic role for the oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been suggested for both diseases. We examined whether complement activation by P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 allows...... the bacterium to adhere to human red blood cells (RBCs) and thereby evade attack by circulating phagocytes. On incubation with normal human serum, the P. gingivalis strain efficiently fixed complement component 3 (C3). Incubation of bacteria with washed whole blood cells suspended in autologous serum resulted...... in a dose- and time-dependent adherence to RBCs. The adherence required functionally intact complement receptor 1 (CR1; also called CD35) on the RBCs and significantly inhibited the uptake of P. gingivalis by neutrophils and B cells within 1 min of incubation (by 64% and 51%, respectively...

  10. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Miyamoto, Yuhei [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Yokoyama, Jun' ichi [Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa, Chiba (JP). Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)

    2012-04-15

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  11. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2012-04-01

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  12. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the type I interferon pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-02-15

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers host immune responses such as the production of type I interferons. Cytosolic DNA induces interferons through the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP-AMP, or cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced interferon-β in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and interferon-β induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP.

  13. Interferon-induced central retinal vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazir, L.; Husain, A.; Haroon, W.; Shaikh, M.I.; Mirza, S.A.; Khan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    A middle-aged lady presented with sudden onset of unilateral central retinal vein thrombosis after completing 6 months course of interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C infection. She had no risk factors and all her thrombophilia workup was normal, however, she was found to be dyslipidemic which may have contributed to atherosclerosis and predispose to thrombosis. Despite anticoagulation, her visual acuity deteriorated. This case illustrates the possibility of unpredictable visual complication of interferon. Frequent eye examination should be undertaken in patients having underlying risk factors like diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidemia undergoing interferon therapy. (author)

  14. Interferon-induced central retinal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazir, L; Husain, A; Haroon, W; Shaikh, M I; Mirza, S A; Khan, Z

    2012-11-15

    A middle-aged lady presented with sudden onset of unilateral central retinal vein thrombosis after completing 6 months course of interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C infection. She had no risk factors and all her thrombophilia workup was normal, however, she was found to be dyslipidemic which may have contributed to atherosclerosis and predispose to thrombosis. Despite anticoagulation, her visual acuity deteriorated. This case illustrates the possibility of unpredictable visual complication of interferon. Frequent eye examination should be undertaken in patients having underlying risk factors like diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidemia undergoing interferon therapy. (author)

  15. Effect of alpha interferon on glucose and alanine transport by rat renal brush border membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batuman, V.; Chadha, I.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the pathogenetic mechanisms of interferon nephrotoxicity, we studied the effect of recombinant interferon alfa-2b on the uptake of 14 C-D-glucose and 14 C-L-alanine by rat renal brush-border-membrane vesicles. Interferon significantly inhibited 20 sec. sodium-dependent and 5 and 10 min. equilibrium uptake of both glucose and alanine. The inhibitory effect was dose dependent with maximum effect achieved at interferon concentration of 5 x 10 -8 M in the uptake media. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations, IC 50 , of interferon on glucose uptake was 1.8 x 10 -8 M, and 5.4 x 10 -9 M on alanine uptake. Dixon plot analysis of uptake data was consistent with pure non-competitive inhibition. The inhibition constants, K i , 1.5 x 10 -8 M for glucose uptake, and 7.3 x 10 -9 M for alanine uptake, derived from Dixon plots were in close agreement with the IC 50 s calculated from the semilog dose response curves. These observations reveal that direct interactions at the proximal tubule cell membrane are involved in the pathogenesis of interferon nephrotoxicity, and that its mechanism of nephrotoxicity is similar to that of other low molecular weight proteins

  16. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes

  17. Lübecki filmipäevad 1999 ja Thomas Manni ekraniseering 1923 / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    1999-01-01

    4.-7. novembrini Lübeckis toimunud Põhjamaade filmipäevade 41. Nordische Filmtage huvitavamatest filmidest, nagu Thomas Manni "Buddenbrookide" ekraniseering 1923. aastast (režissöör Gerhard Lamprecht) ja Rasmus Gerlachi dokumentaal "Operaator Kaufman" Dziga Vertovist ja tema kahest, samuti kino alal tegutsenud vennast

  18. Is the use of IL28B genotype justified in the era of interferon-free treatments for hepatitis C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, several groups reported that interleukin-28B (IL28B) genotypes are associated with the response to peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a genome-wide association study, although the mechanism of this association is not yet well understood. However, in recent years, tremendous progress has been made in the treatment of HCV infection. In Japan, some patients infected with HCV have the IL28B major genotype, which may indicate a favorable response to interferon-including regimens; however, certain patients within this group are also interferon-intolerant or ineligible. In Japan, interferon-free 24-wk regimens of asunaprevir and daclatasvir are now available for HCV genotype 1b-infected patients who are interferon-intolerant or ineligible or previous treatment null-responders. The treatment response to interferon-free regimens appears better, regardless of IL28B genotype. Maybe other interferon-free regimens will widely be available soon. In conclusion, although some HCV-infected individuals have IL28B favorable alleles, importance of IL28B will be reduced with availability of oral interferon free regimen. PMID:26279979

  19. Interferon Lambda Genetics and Biology in Regulation of Viral Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Hemann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type III interferons, also known as interferon lambdas (IFNλs, are the most recent addition to the IFN family following their discovery in 2003. Initially, IFNλ was demonstrated to induce expression of interferon-stimulated genes and exert antiviral properties in a similar manner to type I IFNs. However, while IFNλ has been described to have largely overlapping expression and function with type I IFNs, it has become increasingly clear that type III IFNs also have distinct functions from type I IFNs. In contrast to type I IFNs, whose receptor is ubiquitously expressed, type III IFNs signal and function largely at barrier epithelial surfaces, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, as well as the blood–brain barrier. In further support of unique functions for type III IFNs, single nucleotide polymorphisms in IFNL genes in humans are strongly associated with outcomes to viral infection. These biological linkages have also been more directly supported by studies in mice highlighting roles of IFNλ in promoting antiviral immune responses. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of type III IFNs, and how their functions are similar to, and different from, type I IFN in various immune cell subtypes and viral infections.

  20. Laboratory evaluation of commercial interferon preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoub, B.D.; Lyons, S.F.; Crespi, M.; Chiu, M.-N.; Lomnitzer, R.

    1983-01-01

    The antiviral, antiproliferative and natural killer-cell (NKC) stimulatory activities of four commercial therapeutic interferon preparations were assayed in a laboratory. The antiviral and antiproliferative activities of each preparation were relatively similar, but an unexpectedly high NKC stimulatory activity was found in one of them. In-house determination of antiviral activity and evaluation of the antiproliferative and NKC stimulation potential of interferon preparations are essential before rational clinical trials of this agent are carried out

  1. The Role of Interferons in Inflammation and Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential physiological process, which enables survival during infection and maintains tissue homeostasis. Interferons (IFNs) and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are crucial for appropriate response to pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants in inflammatory response. The inflammasom is multiprotein complex, which initiates cleavage of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 into active forms. In addition, inflammasomes initiate pyroptotic cell death. In the present review, I summarize and analyze recent findings regarding the cross talk of IFNs and inflammasomes.

  2. The Role of Interferons in Inflammation and Inflammasome Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Kopitar-Jerala

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an essential physiological process, which enables survival during infection and maintains tissue homeostasis. Interferons (IFNs and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are crucial for appropriate response to pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants in inflammatory response. The inflammasom is multiprotein complex, which initiates cleavage of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 into active forms. In addition, inflammasomes initiate pyroptotic cell death. In the present review, I summarize and analyze recent findings regarding the cross talk of IFNs and inflammasomes.

  3. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B.; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation—the so-called standard quantum limit—on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational ‘drum’ mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  4. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S

    2017-07-12

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation-the so-called standard quantum limit-on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational 'drum' mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  5. Viral kinetics of hepatitis C virus RNA in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with 18 MU of interferon alpha daily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sentjens, Roel E.; Weegink, Christine J.; Beld, Marcel G.; Cooreman, Michel C.; Reesink, Henk W.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A rapid decrease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA is interferon (IFN) dose-dependent, and a 3-log decline of HCV-RNA is a strong predictor of sustained virological response. In this study, viral kinetics of HCV RNA in patients treated with 18 MU interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) daily for 2

  6. Alpha interferon therapy in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A L; Scheibel, E; Ingerslev, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    Following a survey among all Danish haemophiliac patients 49 HIV-negative patients with chronic hepatitis C were offered enrollment in a randomized controlled open label study comparing two different maintenance regimens following standard interferon-alpha-2b treatment. Dose modifications...... and biochemical response after 6 months of follow up. Overall, the individualized treatment regimen did not seem to offer any advantage over the fixed dose regimen. The response to alpha interferon treatment in Danish haemophiliac patients with chronic hepatitis C immediately after treatment is comparable...... and treatment discontinuation were based upon changes in transaminase levels. Forty-seven patients enrolled received 3 MU of alpha interferon thrice weekly (TIW) for 3 months. Twenty-six nonresponders had their dose increased to 6 MU TIW for an additional 3 months, while 21 responding patients continued on 3 MU...

  7. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy S E Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization.

  8. Interferon-free treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C and autoimmune liver disease: higher SVR rates with special precautions for deterioration of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Takahashi, Koji; Wu, Shuang; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Saito, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Kazufumi; Kiyono, Soichiro; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Imazeki, Fumio; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Kato, Naoya

    2018-02-20

    Interferon-free treatment can achieve higher sustained virological response (SVR) rates, even in patients in whom hepatitis C virus (HCV) could not be eradicated in the interferon treatment era. Immune restoration in the liver is occasionally associated with HCV infection. We examined the safety and effects of interferon-free regimens on HCV patients with autoimmune liver diseases. All 7 HCV patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) completed treatment and achieved SVR. Three patients took prednisolone (PSL) at baseline, and 3 did not take PSL during interferon-free treatment. In one HCV patient with AIH and cirrhosis, PSL were not administered at baseline, but she needed to take 40 mg/day PSL at week 8 for liver dysfunction. She also complained back pain and was diagnosed with vasospastic angina by coronary angiography at week 11. However, she completed interferon-free treatment. All 5 HCV patients with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) completed treatment and achieved SVR. Three of these HCV patients with PBC were treated with UDCA during interferon-free treatment. Interferon-free regimens could result in higher SVR rates in HCV patients with autoimmune liver diseases. As interferon-free treatment for HCV may have an effect on hepatic immunity and activity of the autoimmune liver diseases, careful attention should be paid to unexpected adverse events in their treatments. Total 12 patients with HCV and autoimmune liver diseases [7 AIH and PBC], who were treated with interferon-free regimens, were retrospectively analyzed.

  9. Interferon in chronic myeloid leukaemia: past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Guilhot, Joëlle

    2009-09-01

    Imatinib has revolutionized the therapy of chronic myeloid leukaemia. However the complete eradication of leukaemic stem cells is still a matter of discussion. Interferon (IFN) has been used in the past with success. However the proportion of patients who achieved sustained complete cytogenetic response was small. Recently, in addition to its direct antineoplastic effect and immunomodulatory activity, IFN has been shown to stimulate the quiescent leukaemic stem cells. Thus there is now a rational for combining Imatinib and IFN. Large prospective phase III trials are in good progress to demonstrate in humans the usefullness of a combination therapy using Imatinib and IFN.

  10. Tuberculin-purified protein derivative-, MPT-64-, and ESAT-6-stimulated gamma interferon responses in medical students before and after Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination and in patients with tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, P D; Stuart, R L; Grayson, M L

    1999-01-01

    QuantiFERON-TB (QIFN) (CSL Limited) is a whole-blood assay for the recognition of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. QIFN measures gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production when purified protein derivatives (PPDs) of mycobacteria are incubated with venous blood samples. The specificity...... of QIFN in medical students before and after BCG immunization was assessed, and sensitivity in patients with tuberculosis was assessed. Antigens were PPD derived from M. tuberculosis and two M. tuberculosis-specific proteins, ESAT-6 and MPT-64. Of 60 medical students, all of whom had 0-mm tuberculin skin...... tests (TSTs) at study entry, 58 (97%) were initially classified as negative for M. tuberculosis infection by PPD QIFN. Five months after BCG immunization, 7 of 54 students (13%) had a TST result of >/=10 mm and 11 of 54 students (20%) tested positive by PPD QIFN. ESAT-6- and MPT-64-stimulated IFN...

  11. Interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C.......To assess the efficacy and safety of interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C....

  12. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  13. Some biological properties of the human amniotic membrane interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. P. Ferreira

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic interferon was investigated to define the species specificity of its antiviral action and compare its anti-cellular and NK cell stimulating activities with those of other human interferons. The antiviral effect was titrated in bovine (RV-IAL and monkey (VERO cells. Amniotic interferon exhibited, in bovine cells, 5% of the activity seen in monkey cells, while alpha interferon displayed 200%. No effect was detected with either beta or gamma interferon in bovine cells. Daudi cells were exposed to different concentrations of various interferons and the cell numbers were determined. The anticellular effect of the amniotic interferon reached its peak on the third day of incubation. Results suggested a higher activity for alpha and gamma interferons and a lower activity for beta when compared to amniotic interferon. Using total mononuclear cells as effector cells and K 562 as target cell in a 51Cr release assay, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of amniotic interferon consistently stimulated NK cell activity in cells derived from several donors, the results indicating a higher level of activity with this interferon than with alpha and beta interferons.

  14. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudick, R.A.; Stuart, W.H.; Calabresi, P.A.; Confavreux, C.; Galetta, S.L.; Radue, E.W.; Lublin, F.D.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Wynn, D.R.; Lynn, F.; Panzara, M.A.; Sandrock, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is used to modify the course of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Despite interferon beta therapy, many patients have relapses. Natalizumab, an alpha4 integrin antagonist, appeared to be safe and effective alone and when added to interferon beta-1a in preliminary studies.

  15. Salmonella Typhi Colonization Provokes Extensive Transcriptional Changes Aimed at Evading Host Mucosal Immune Defense During Early Infection of Human Intestinal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Nickerson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Commensal microorganisms influence a variety of host functions in the gut, including immune response, glucose homeostasis, metabolic pathways and oxidative stress, among others. This study describes how Salmonella Typhi, the pathogen responsible for typhoid fever, uses similar strategies to escape immune defense responses and survive within its human host. To elucidate the early mechanisms of typhoid fever, we performed studies using healthy human intestinal tissue samples and “mini-guts,” organoids grown from intestinal tissue taken from biopsy specimens. We analyzed gene expression changes in human intestinal specimens and bacterial cells both separately and after colonization. Our results showed mechanistic strategies that S. Typhi uses to rearrange the cellular machinery of the host cytoskeleton to successfully invade the intestinal epithelium, promote polarized cytokine release and evade immune system activation by downregulating genes involved in antigen sampling and presentation during infection. This work adds novel information regarding S. Typhi infection pathogenesis in humans, by replicating work shown in traditional cell models, and providing new data that can be applied to future vaccine development strategies. Keywords: Typhoid fever, Salmonella, Snapwell™ system, Human tissue, Terminal ileum, Immune system, Innate immunity, Immune evasion, Host-pathogen interaction, Vaccine development, Intestinal organoids, Organoid monolayer

  16. Comparison of two interferon-gamma assays and tuberculin skin test for tracing tuberculosis contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arend, Sandra M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; Leyten, Eliane M. S.; Bouwman, John J. M.; Franken, Willeke P. J.; Koster, Ben F. P. J.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; van Houte, Arend-Jan; Bossink, Ailko W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) has low specificity. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) and T-SPOT.TB are based on interferon (IFN)-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. A novel in-tube format of QFT-G (QFT-GIT) offers logistical advantages. To compare TST, QFT-GIT, and T-SPOT.TB

  17. Use of the johnin PPD interferon-gamma assay in control of bovine paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Mikkelsen, Heidi; Grell, Susanne N.

    2012-01-01

    Although the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay for measurements of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to paratuberculosis PPD (johnin) has been available for close to 20 years, the assay has not yet emerged as the long desired test to identify infected animals at an early time point. Among other...

  18. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  19. Chronic myeloid leukemia and interferon-alpha : a study of complete cytogenetic responders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifazi, F; de Vivo, A; Rosti, G; Guilhot, F; Guilhot, J; Trabacchi, E; Hehlmann, R; Hochhaus, A; Shepherd, PCA; Steegmann, JL; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Thaler, J; Simonsson, B; Louwagie, A; Reiffers, J; Mahon, FX; Montefusco, E; Alimena, G; Hasford, J; Richards, S; Saglio, G; Testoni, N; Martinelli, G; Tura, S; Baccarani, M

    2001-01-01

    Achieving a complete cytogenetic response (CCgR) is a major target in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CIVIL) with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), but CCgRs are rare. The mean CCgR rate is 13%, in a range of 5% to 33%. A collaborative study of 9 European Union countries has led to the

  20. Interferon lambda 4 signals via the IFNλ receptor to regulate antiviral activity against HCV and coronaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamming, Ole Jensen; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa; Vieyres, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    The IFNL4 gene is a recently discovered type III interferon, which in a significant fraction of the human population harbours a frameshift mutation abolishing the IFNλ4 ORF. The expression of IFNλ4 is correlated with both poor spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and poor response to ...

  1. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J; Zhang, Lifan; Ding, Bo; Lunney, Joan K; Liu, Bang; Jiang, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes. This family contains a cluster of duplicated loci. Most mammals have IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and IFIT5; however, bird, marsupial, frog and fish have only IFIT5. Regardless of species, IFIT5 is always adjacent to SLC16A12. IFIT family genes are predominantly induced by type I and type III interferons and are regulated by the pattern recognition and the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. IFIT family proteins are involved in many processes in response to viral infection. However, some viruses can escape the antiviral functions of the IFIT family by suppressing IFIT family genes expression or methylation of 5' cap of viral molecules. In addition, the variants of IFIT family genes could significantly influence the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy. We believe that our current review provides a comprehensive picture for the community to understand the structure and function of IFIT family genes in response to pathogens in human, as well as in animals.

  2. Interferon Lambda: A New Sword in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasfar, Ahmed; Abushahba, Walid; Balan, Murugabaskar; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the interferon-lambda (IFN-λ) family has considerably contributed to our understanding of the role of interferon not only in viral infections but also in cancer. IFN-λ proteins belong to the new type III IFN group. Type III IFN is structurally similar to type II IFN (IFN-γ) but functionally identical to type I IFN (IFN-α/β). However, in contrast to type I or type II IFNs, the response to type III IFN is highly cell-type specific. Only epithelial-like cells and to a lesser extent some immune cells respond to IFN-λ. This particular pattern of response is controlled by the differential expression of the IFN-λ receptor, which, in contrast to IFN-α, should result in limited side effects in patients. Recently, we and other groups have shown in several animal models a potent antitumor role of IFN-λ that will open a new challenging era for the current IFN therapy. PMID:22190970

  3. [Pegylation and interferons in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Centonze

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pegylation is a procedure used for drug development since the 1970s and consists of the conjugation of a polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG to a drug. PEG has shown to be safe and effective in improving the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of drugs. Recently, a 20 kDa linear chain of PEG was conjugated to interferon beta-1a with the aim to offer a new treatment option to relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients. Due to a prolonged bioavailability, this new drug can be administered less frequently (every two weeks than the other interferons beta available, thus allowing to hypothesize a better adherence to the treatment, which, in turn, should result in better clinical and economic outcomes. A phase III clinical trial has proven its effectiveness compared to placebo in RRMS patients, as well as a safety profile comparable to that found in other interferon beta preparations. The immunogenicity of this new molecule is < 1%, thus minimizing the suppression or reduction of interferon beta biological activity that could come from the development of Neutralizing Antibodies (NAbs. [Article in Italian

  4. Interferon alpha association with neuromyelitis optica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Voss, Anne; Steenstrup, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN- α ) has immunoregulatory functions in autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to determine occurrence and clinical consequences of IFN- α in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients. Thirty-six NMO and 41 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from a population...

  5. Interferons in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are implicated as an important component of the innate immune system influencing viral infections, inflammation, and immune surveillance. We review here the complex biological activity of IFNs in the central nervous system (CNS) and associated glial–immune interactions...

  6. Type I Interferon in the Pathogenesis of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have applied insights from studies of the innate immune response to define type I interferon (IFN-I), with IFN-α the dominant mediator, as central to the pathogenesis of this prototype systemic autoimmune disease. Genetic association data identify regulators of nucleic acid degradation and components of TLR-independent, endosomal TLR-dependent, and IFN-I signaling pathways as contributors to lupus disease susceptibility. Together with a gene expression signature characterized by IFNI-induced gene transcripts in lupus blood and tissue, those data support the conclusion that many of the immunologic and pathologic features of this disease are a consequence of a persistent self-directed immune reaction driven by IFN-I and mimicking a sustained anti-virus response. This expanding knowledge of the role of IFN-I and the innate immune response suggests candidate therapeutic targets that are being tested in lupus patients. PMID:24907379

  7. Effects of Interferon Therapy on Heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, A. W. K.; Ali, S. A.; Nisar, S.; Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Around 185 million people are suffering from HCV infection all over the world, out of which 10 million people are residing in Pakistan. 4.7 percent (2-14 percent by different studies) of Pakistanis are suffering from this deadly disease. Interferon+Ribavarin IFN/RIB is the mainstay of treatment for this infection. Various cardiovascular adverse reactions have been reported of this therapy. We conducted this study at Punjab Institute of cardiology to look for the cardiac safety of interferon therapy in our population. Methods: We studied HCV infected patients planned for interferon therapy between 21st of November 2012 to 20th of August 2014. Echocardiography was performed before, during and after the completion of therapy. Pegylated interferon once a week plus ribavirin therapy was given to the patients. Patients received 16-40 injections of pegylated interferon depending upon the decision of hepatologist. Patients with prior structural heart disease, patients who did not start the treatment or patients who did not turn up on follow up were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 102 patients planned to have interferon therapy were screened echocardiographically. One patient died after 5 injections due to infection (a non-cardiac cause). 46 patients completed the treatment and the follow up. None of the patients had any acute cardiac event. All patients had normal biventricular systolic function at the end of study. None of the patients had significant valvular heart disease or pulmonary hypertension. Reversal of E/A ratio or E/A ratio>2, parameters of diastolic dysfunction and mild pericardial effusion were noted in a statistically significant number of patients. Conclusion: Interferon therapy for HCV infection is cardiac safe in patients who have structurally normal heart. Female patients have propensity of adverse events like severe diastolic dysfunction and mild pericardial

  8. Literature systematic review on the ophthalmological side effects of interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferons alpha and beta have been used worldwide for a few decades, altering the natural history of several severe diseases including hepatitis C, cancer and immune-mediated conditions such as multiple sclerosis. The adverse events profile of interferons is well established, but only isolated reports of ophthalmological complications of interferon therapy have been published. The objective of this study was to carry out a literature systematic review on the subject, bringing to light the need for careful ophthalmological monitoring of patients undergoing interferon treatment. Nearly 500 cases of ophthalmological complications related to interferon have been reported. The most frequent findings were soft exudates, hemorrhages and retina ischemia.

  9. Similarities of cellular receptors for interferon and cortisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipic, B.; Schauer, P.; Likar, M.

    1977-01-01

    Cellular receptors are molecules located on the cell membrane. Their function is to bind different molecules to the cell surface. These molecules can penetrate into the cytoplasm and trigger cellular changes. One kind of such bound molecules are interferons and corticosteroids. Until very recently very little was known about interferon's receptors on the cell surface, mechanisms of interferon's binding to them or about kinetics of such binding. On the basis of results published elsewhere and on the basis of experimental results, the authors suggest: receptors for interferon and cortisol are glycoproteins located on the cell surface, in analogy with PHA receptors they are chemically sialoglycoproteins, binding kinetics of cortisol and interferon is similar, interferon and cortisol compete for cellular receptors, binding of cortisol or interferon is dependent on allosteric configuration of receptor molecules. (author)

  10. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell interferon-α production to R-848 stimulation is decreased in male infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer P; Zhang, Lei; Madera, Rachel F; Woda, Marcia; Libraty, Daniel H

    2012-07-06

    Sex differences in response to microbial infections, especially viral ones, may be associated with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated responses by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). In this study, we identified sex differences in human infant pDC interferon-α production following challenge with the TLR7/8 agonist R-848. Male pDC responses were significantly lower than those of females during early infancy. This difference may be attributed to the androgen surge experienced by males during the early infancy period. Pretreatment of human pDCs with dihydrotestosterone produced a significant reduction in interferon-α production following R-848 challenge. Androgen-mediated regulation of pDC TLR7-driven innate immune responses may contribute to the observed sex differences in response to infections during early infancy.

  11. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell interferon-α production to R-848 stimulation is decreased in male infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jennifer P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex differences in response to microbial infections, especially viral ones, may be associated with Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated responses by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Results In this study, we identified sex differences in human infant pDC interferon-α production following challenge with the TLR7/8 agonist R-848. Male pDC responses were significantly lower than those of females during early infancy. This difference may be attributed to the androgen surge experienced by males during the early infancy period. Pretreatment of human pDCs with dihydrotestosterone produced a significant reduction in interferon-α production following R-848 challenge. Conclusions Androgen-mediated regulation of pDC TLR7-driven innate immune responses may contribute to the observed sex differences in response to infections during early infancy.

  12. Dampened STING-Dependent Interferon Activation in Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiazheng; Li, Yang; Shen, Xurui; Goh, Geraldine; Zhu, Yan; Cui, Jie; Wang, Lin-Fa; Shi, Zheng-Li; Zhou, Peng

    2018-03-14

    Compared with terrestrial mammals, bats have a longer lifespan and greater capacity to co-exist with a variety of viruses. In addition to cytosolic DNA generated by these viral infections, the metabolic demands of flight cause DNA damage and the release of self-DNA into the cytoplasm. However, whether bats have an altered DNA sensing/defense system to balance high cytosolic DNA levels remains an open question. We demonstrate that bats have a dampened interferon response due to the replacement of the highly conserved serine residue (S358) in STING, an essential adaptor protein in multiple DNA sensing pathways. Reversing this mutation by introducing S358 restored STING functionality, resulting in interferon activation and virus inhibition. Combined with previous reports on bat-specific changes of other DNA sensors such as TLR9, IFI16, and AIM2, our findings shed light on bat adaptation to flight, their long lifespan, and their unique capacity to serve as a virus reservoir. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evading the top-quark mass bound at the Fermilab Tevatron: New signals for the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyaya, B.; Nandi, S.

    1991-01-01

    If an SU(2)-singlet charge-2/3 quark exists, current data allow a wide range for the parameters of the 4x4 mixing matrix in which the usual ''hard-lepton'' signal of the top quark is suppressed. For a light Higgs boson, the top quark decays predominantly via the flavor-changing Yukawa interaction, thus evading the Fermilab Tevatron bounds on its mass. For a heavier Higgs boson, flavor-changing neutral-current decays become important, giving rise to anomalous Z-pair production, testable at the upgraded Tevetron, at the CERN Large Hardon Collider, and at the Superconducting Super Collider

  14. Immune activation in multiple sclerosis and interferon-beta therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The PhD dissertation emanated from the Danish MS Research Centre, Rigshosptalet, Copenhagen. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS. Inflammatory responses by T helper (Th)-lymphocytes are characterised by distinct cytokine expression profiles. In MS, activated Th1...... of inflammation or secondary lymphatic organs. Chemokine receptors are differentially expressed in T cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, indicating their role for in T-cell-recruitment to the CNS. Interferon (IFN)-beta is a first-line treatment for MS. The mechanism of action is unclear, but probably includes...... changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine secretion, and trafficking. The aim of the studies was to shed more light on T-cell immunology in MS and IFN-beta treatment, as well as identifying putative biomarkers of treatment response and/or disease activity. In one study we identified a Th-cell subset...

  15. Functional Characterization of Canine Interferon-Lambda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhui; Xu, Lei; Ren, Liqian; Qu, Hongren; Li, Jing; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we provide the first comprehensive annotation of canine interferon-λ (CaIFN-λ, type III IFN). Phylogenetic analysis based on genomic sequences indicated that CaIFN-λ is located in the same branch with Swine IFN-λ1 (SwIFN-λ), Bat IFN-λ1 (BaIFN-λ), and human IFN-λ1 (HuIFN-λ1). CaIFN-λ was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to further investigate the biological activity in vitro. The recombinant CaIFN-λ (rCaIFN-λ) displayed potent antiviral activity on both homologous and heterologous animal cells in terms of inhibiting the replication of the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), canine parvovirus, and influenza virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1), respectively. In addition, we also found that rCaIFN-λ exhibits a significant antiproliferative response against A72 canine tumor cells and MDCK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CaIFN-λ activated the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. To evaluate the expression of CaIFN-λ induced by virus and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) induced by rCaIFN-λ in the MDCK cells, we measured the relative mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and ISGs (ISG15, Mx1, and 2′5′-OAS) by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the mRNA level of CaIFN-λ and the ISGs significantly increased after treating the MDCK cells with viruses and rCaIFN-λ protein, respectively. Finally, to evaluate the binding activity of rCaIFN-λ to its receptor, we expressed the extracellular domain of the canine IFN-λ receptor 1 (CaIFN-λR1-EC) and determined the binding activity via ELISA. Our results demonstrated that rCaIFN-λ bound tightly to recombinant CaIFN-λR1-EC (rCaIFN-λR1-EC). PMID:24950142

  16. Interferon Lambda: Modulating Immunity in Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Egli, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interferon lambdas (IFN-λs; IFNL1-4) modulate immunity in the context of infections and autoimmune diseases, through a network of induced genes. IFN-λs act by binding to the heterodimeric IFN-λ receptor (IFNLR), activating a STAT phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascade. Thereby hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes are induced, which modulate various immune functions via complex forward and feedback loops. When compared to the well-characterized IFN-α signaling cascade, three important differences have been discovered. First, the IFNLR is not ubiquitously expressed: in particular, immune cells show significant variation in the expression levels of and susceptibilities to IFN-λs. Second, the binding affinities of individual IFN-λs to the IFNLR varies greatly and are generally lower compared to the binding affinities of IFN-α to its receptor. Finally, genetic variation in the form of a series of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to genes involved in the IFN-λ signaling cascade has been described and associated with the clinical course and treatment outcomes of hepatitis B and C virus infection. The clinical impact of IFN-λ signaling and the SNP variations may, however, reach far beyond viral hepatitis. Recent publications show important roles for IFN-λs in a broad range of viral infections such as human T-cell leukemia type-1 virus, rotaviruses, and influenza virus. IFN-λ also potentially modulates the course of bacterial colonization and infections as shown for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Although the immunological processes involved in controlling viral and bacterial infections are distinct, IFN-λs may interfere at various levels: as an innate immune cytokine with direct antiviral effects; or as a modulator of IFN-α-induced signaling via the suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 inhibitory feedback loops. In addition, the modulation of adaptive immune functions via macrophage

  17. Interferon lambda inhibits dengue virus replication in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Ocampo, Helen K; Flores-Alonso, Juan C; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora H; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2015-09-28

    In viral disease, infection is controlled at the cellular level by type I interferon (IFN-I), but dengue virus (DENV) has the ability to inhibit this response. Type III interferon, also known as lambda IFN (IFN-III or IFN-λ), is a complementary pathway to the antiviral response by IFN-I. This work analyzed the IFN-λ (IFN-III) mediated antiviral response against DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) infection. Dengue fever patients were sampled to determine their IFN-λ levels by ELISA. To study the IFN-λ response during DENV infection we selected the epithelial cell line C33-A, and we demonstrated that it is permissive to DENV-2 infection. The effect of IFN-λ on virus replication was determined in these cells, in parallel to the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS), genes measured by RT-qPCR. We found increased (~1.8 times) serological IFN-λ in dengue fever patients compared to healthy blood donors. IFN-λ inhibited DENV-2 replication in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. The reduction of viral titer corresponded with increased ISG mRNA levels (MX1 and OAS1), with the highest inhibition occurring at ISG's peak expression. Presence of IFN-negative regulators, SOCS1 and SOCS3, during DENV-2 infection was associated with reduced IFN-λ1 expression. Evidence described here suggests that IFN-λ is a good candidate inhibitor of viral replication in dengue infection. Mechanisms for the cellular and organismal interplay between DENV and IFN- λ need to be further studied as they could provide insights into strategies to treat this disease. Furthermore, we report a novel epithelial model to study dengue infection in vitro.

  18. Interferon production and signaling pathways are antagonized during henipavirus infection of fruit bat cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena R Virtue

    Full Text Available Bats are natural reservoirs for a spectrum of infectious zoonotic diseases including the recently emerged henipaviruses (Hendra and Nipah viruses. Henipaviruses have been observed both naturally and experimentally to cause serious and often fatal disease in many different mammal species, including humans. Interestingly, infection of the flying fox with henipaviruses occurs in the absence of clinical disease. The extreme variation in the disease pattern between humans and bats has led to an investigation into the effects of henipavirus infection on the innate immune response in bat cell lines. We report that henipavirus infection does not result in the induction of interferon expression, and the viruses also inhibit interferon signaling. We also confirm that the interferon production and signaling block in bat cells is not due to differing viral protein expression levels between human and bat hosts. This information, in addition to the known lack of clinical signs in bats following henipavirus infection, suggests that bats control henipavirus infection by an as yet unidentified mechanism, not via the interferon response. This is the first report of henipavirus infection in bat cells specifically investigating aspects of the innate immune system.

  19. Noncanonical Effects of IRF9 in Intestinal Inflammation: More than Type I and Type III Interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Majoros, Andrea; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Strobl, Birgit; Stockinger, Silvia; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor with its Stat1, Stat2, and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits is employed for transcriptional responses downstream of receptors for type I interferons (IFN-I) that include IFN-α and IFN-β and type III interferons (IFN-III), also called IFN-λ. Here, we show in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that IRF9 deficiency protects animals, whereas the combined loss of IFN-I and IFN-III receptors worsens their condition. We explain the different phenotypes by demonstrating a function of IRF9 in a noncanonical transcriptional complex with Stat1, apart from IFN-I and IFN-III signaling. Together, Stat1 and IRF9 produce a proinflammatory activity that overrides the benefits of the IFN-III response on intestinal epithelial cells. Our results further suggest that the CXCL10 chemokine gene is an important mediator of this proinflammatory activity. We thus establish IFN-λ as a potentially anticolitogenic cytokine and propose an important role for IRF9 as a component of noncanonical Stat complexes in the development of colitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Japanese encephalitis virus non-coding RNA inhibits activation of interferon by blocking nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ruey-Yi; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Chen, Yen-Lin; Liu, Shu-Fan; Tsai, Yi-Jer; Lin, Yun-Tong; Chen, Yi-Shiuan; Fan, Yi-Hsin

    2013-09-27

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) plays a critical role in modulating a broad range of diseases. All arthropod-borne flaviviruses produce short fragment ncRNA (sfRNA) collinear with highly conserved regions of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in the viral genome. We show that the molar ratio of sfRNA to genomic RNA in Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) persistently infected cells is greater than that in acutely infected cells, indicating an sfRNA role in establishing persistent infection. Transfecting excess quantities of sfRNA into JEV-infected cells reduced interferon-β (IFN-β) promoter activity by 57% and IFN-β mRNA levels by 52%, compared to mock-transfected cells. Transfection of sfRNA into JEV-infected cells also reduced phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3), the IFN-β upstream regulator, and blocked roughly 30% of IRF-3 nuclear localization. Furthermore, JEV-infected sfRNA transfected cells produced 23% less IFN-β-stimulated apoptosis than mock-transfected groups did. Taken together, these results suggest that sfRNA plays a role against host-cell antiviral responses, prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis, and thus contributes to viral persistence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oromucosal Administration of Interferon to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred W. Beilharz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing dogma is that, to be systemically effective, interferon-alpha (IFNα must be administered in sufficiently high doses to yield functional blood concentrations. Such an approach to IFNa therapy has proven effective in some instances, but high-dose parenteral IFNα therapy has the disadvantage of causing significant adverse events. Mounting evidence suggests that IFNα delivered into the oral cavity in low doses interacts with the oral mucosa in a unique manner to induce systemic host defense mechanisms without IFNα actually entering the circulation, thus reducing the potential for toxic side effects. A better understanding of the applications and potential benefits of this treatment modality are under active investigation. This paper provides a review of the relevant literature on the clinical use of the oromucosal route of administration of interferon, with an emphasis on the treatment of influenza.

  2. Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of Interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Tovey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are class II cytokines that are key components of the innate immune response to virus infection. Three IFN sub-families, type I, II, and III IFNs have been identified in man, Recombinant analogues of type I IFNs, in particular IFNα2 and IFNβ1, have found wide application for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and remitting relapsing multiple sclerosis respectively. Type II IFN, or IFN gamma, is used principally for the treatment of chronic granulomatous disease, while the recently discovered type III IFNs, also known as IFN lambda or IL-28/29, are currently being evaluated for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis. IFNs are in general well tolerated and the most common adverse events observed with IFNα or IFNβ therapy are “flu-like” symptoms such as fever, headache, chills, and myalgia. Prolonged treatment is associated with more serious adverse events including leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, increased hepatic transaminases, and neuropsychiatric effects. Type I IFNs bind to high-affinity cell surface receptors, composed of two transmembrane polypeptides IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, resulting in activation of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2, phosphorylation and activation of the latent cytoplasmic signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT1 and STAT2, formation of a transcription complex together with IRF9, and activation of a specific set of genes that encode the effector molecules responsible for mediating the biological activities of type I IFNs. Systemic administration of type I IFN results in activation of IFN receptors present on essentially all types of nucleated cells, including neurons and hematopoietic stem cells, in addition to target cells. This may well explain the wide spectrum of IFN associated toxicities. Recent reports suggest that certain polymorphisms in type I IFN signaling molecules are associated with IFN-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic hepatitis C. IFN

  3. Dissecting interferon-induced transcriptional programs in human peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Waddell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles.We used human cDNA microarrays to (1 compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons alpha, beta, omega and gamma, IL12 and TNFalpha; and (2 characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes to IFNgamma stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNgamma and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFalpha stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNgamma, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings.

  4. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  5. Effectiveness of interferon-beta and temozolomide combination therapy against temozolomide-refractory recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arai Hajime

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant gliomas recur even after extensive surgery and chemo-radiotherapy. Although a relatively novel chemotherapeutic agent, temozolomide (TMZ, has demonstrated promising activity against recurrent glioma, the effects last only a few months and drug resistance develops thereafter in most cases. Induction of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT in tumors is considered to be responsible for resistance to TMZ. Interferon-beta has been reported to suppress MGMT in an experimental glioma model. Here we report a patient with TMZ-refractory anaplastic astrocytoma (AA who was treated successfully with a combination of interferon-beta and TMZ. Case presentation A patient with recurrent AA after radiation-chemotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy was treated with TMZ. After 6 cycles, the tumor became refractory to TMZ, and the patient was treated with interferon-beta at 3 × 106 international units/body, followed by 5 consecutive days of 200 mg/m2 TMZ in cycles of 28 days. After the second cycle the tumor decreased in size by 50% (PR. The tumor showed further shrinkage after 8 months and the patient's KPS improved from 70% to 100%. The immunohistochemical study of the initial tumor specimen confirmed positive MGMT protein expression. Conclusion It is considered that interferon-beta pre-administration increased the TMZ sensitivity of the glioma, which had been refractory to TMZ monotherapy.

  6. Antiviral activity of ovine interferon tau 4 against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, Jayaramaiah; Park, Sun Young; Cho, Eun-Ju; Kim, Chungsu; Ko, Young-Joon; Tark, Dongseob; Kim, Su-Mi; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Hyang-Sim

    2017-07-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important disease in most parts of the world and new therapeutic agents are needed to protect the animals before vaccination can trigger the host immune response. Although several interferons have been used for their antiviral activities against Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), ovine interferon tau 4 (OvIFN-τ4), with a broad-spectrum of action, cross-species antiviral activity, and lower incidence of toxicity in comparison to other type І interferons, has not yet been evaluated for this indication. This is the first study to evaluate the antiviral activity of OvIFN-τ4 against various strains of FMDV. The effective anti-cytopathic concentration of OvIFN-τ4 and its effectiveness pre- and post-infection with FMDV were tested in vitro in LFBK cells. In vivo activity of OvIFN-τ4 was then confirmed in a mouse model of infection. OvIFN-τ4 at a concentration of 500 ng, protected mice until 5days post-FMDV challenge and provided 90% protection for 10 days following FMDV challenge. These results suggest that OvIFN-τ4 could be used as an alternative to other interferons or antiviral agents at the time of FMD outbreak. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Interferon treatment of neuroendocrine tumour xenografts as monitored by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvin, A.; Oeberg, K.; Lindgren, P.G.; Lundkvist, M.; Wilander, E.; Ericsson, A.; Hemmingsson, A.

    1994-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-differentiated colonic carcinoma cell line (LCC-18) was transplanted to 29 nude mice (Balb/c). The purpose of the present study was to establish an animal model that would allow monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of changes induced by interferon (IFN) therapy and to evaluate whether the therapeutic response, as expressed by changes in MR signal characteristics and tumour proliferative activity, could be modulated by different IFN dosages. IFN did not seem to have any obvious antiproliferative effect on the LCC-18 tumour cell line transplanted to nude mice and no convincing treatment-related changes in rho values or T1 and T2 relaxation values were observed. The animal model was probably unsuitable for demonstration of IFN effects. (orig.)

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus mechanisms to interfere with type 1 interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family that consists of viruses with nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. Infection by these viruses triggers the innate antiviral response of the host, mainly type I interferon (IFN). Essentially all other viruses of this family produce IFN suppressor functions by co-transcriptional RNA editing. In contrast, RSV has evolved two unique nonstructural proteins, NS1 and NS2, to effectively serve this purpose. Together, NS1 and NS2 degrade or sequester multiple signaling proteins that affect both IFN induction and IFN effector functions. While the mechanism of action of NS1 and NS2 is a subject of active research, their effect on adaptive immunity is also being recognized. In this review, we discuss various aspects of NS1 and NS2 function with implications for vaccine design.

  9. Targeting Interferon Regulatory Factor for Cardiometabolic Diseases: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxing; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    The pathological activation of innate immune system may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members, which are the major transcription factors in innate immune signaling, are implicated in cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this review is to summary the current knowledge of the biological functions of IRFs in innate immune responses and immune cell development, and highlight our contemporary understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of IRFs in metabolic diseases, cardiovascular remodeling, and stroke. IRFs are the essential regulators of cardiometabolic diseases via immune-dependent and - independent manners. IRFs signaling is the promising target to manage the initiation and progression of cardiometabolic disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Interferon-Lambda: A Potent Regulator of Intestinal Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Baldridge, Megan T

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-lambda (IFN-λ) is a recently described cytokine found to be of critical importance in innate immune regulation of intestinal viruses. Endogenous IFN-λ has potent antiviral effects and has been shown to control multiple intestinal viruses and may represent a factor that contributes to human variability in response to infection. Importantly, recombinant IFN-λ has therapeutic potential against enteric viral infections, many of which lack other effective treatments. In this mini-review, we describe recent advances regarding IFN-λ-mediated regulation of enteric viruses with important clinical relevance including rotavirus, reovirus, and norovirus. We also briefly discuss IFN-λ interactions with other cytokines important in the intestine, and how IFN-λ may play a role in regulation of intestinal viruses by the commensal microbiome. Finally, we indicate currently outstanding questions regarding IFN-λ control of enteric infections that remain to be explored to enhance our understanding of this important immune molecule.

  11. Interferon synthesis in mouse peritoneal cells damaged by x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolgay, E; T' alas, M

    1976-01-01

    NDV-induced interferon of peritoneal cells of irradiated (x-rays, 400 R) and control mice was investigated in vitro. Irradiation or treatment with hydroxyurea (10(-5) M) and mitomycin C (25 microng/ml) did not change interferon synthesis in spite of an 80 to 90% inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation. Increased doses of mitomycin C and treatment with actinomycin D and puromycin blocked interferon production. De novo interferon synthesis occurred in cells with damaged replicative activity of DNA caused by irradiation or by treatment with antimetabolites.

  12. ATM supports gammaherpesvirus replication by attenuating type I interferon pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Eric J; Stoltz, Kyle P; Ledwith, Mitchell; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2017-10-01

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase participates in multiple networks, including DNA damage response, oxidative stress, and mitophagy. ATM also supports replication of diverse DNA and RNA viruses. Gammaherpesviruses are prevalent cancer-associated viruses that benefit from ATM expression during replication. This proviral role of ATM had been ascribed to its signaling within the DNA damage response network; other functions of ATM have not been considered. In this study increased type I interferon (IFN) responses were observed in ATM deficient gammaherpesvirus-infected macrophages. Using a mouse model that combines ATM and type I IFN receptor deficiencies we show that increased type I IFN response in the absence of ATM fully accounts for the proviral role of ATM during gammaherpesvirus replication. Further, increased type I IFN response rendered ATM deficient macrophages more susceptible to antiviral effects of type II IFN. This study identifies attenuation of type I IFN responses as the primary mechanism underlying proviral function of ATM during gammaherpesvirus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interferon beta and vitamin D synergize to induce immunoregulatory receptors on peripheral blood monocytes of multiple sclerosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Waschbisch

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT 3 and 4 are inhibitory receptors that modulate immune responses. Their expression has been reported to be affected by interferon, offering a possible mechanism by which this cytokine exerts its therapeutic effect in multiple sclerosis, a condition thought to involve excessive immune activity. To investigate this possibility, we measured expression of ILT3 and ILT4 on immune cells from multiple sclerosis patients, and in post-mortem brain tissue. We also studied the ability of interferon beta, alone or in combination with vitamin D, to induce upregulation of these receptors in vitro, and compared expression levels between interferon-treated and untreated multiple sclerosis patients. In vitro interferon beta treatment led to a robust upregulation of ILT3 and ILT4 on monocytes, and dihydroxyvitamin D3 increased expression of ILT3 but not ILT4. ILT3 was abundant in demyelinating lesions in postmortem brain, and expression on monocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid was higher than in peripheral blood, suggesting that the central nervous system milieu induces ILT3, or that ILT3 positive monocytes preferentially enter the brain. Our data are consistent with involvement of ILT3 and ILT4 in the modulation of immune responsiveness in multiple sclerosis by both interferon and vitamin D.

  14. Deregulation of Interferon Signaling in Malignant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas C. Platanias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are a family of cytokines with potent antiproliferative, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties. Much has been learned about IFNs and IFN-activated signaling cascades over the last 50 years. Due to their potent antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo, recombinant IFNs have been used extensively over the years, alone or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of various malignancies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on IFN signaling components and pathways that are deregulated in human malignancies. The relevance of deregulation of IFN signaling pathways in defective innate immune surveillance and tumorigenesis are discussed.

  15. Enveloped viruses disable innate immune responses in dendritic cells by direct activation of TAM receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Zagórska, Anna; Lew, Erin D; Shrestha, Bimmi; Rothlin, Carla V; Naughton, John; Diamond, Michael S; Lemke, Greg; Young, John A T

    2013-08-14

    Upon activation by the ligands Gas6 and Protein S, Tyro3/Axl/Mer (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinases promote phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells and downregulate immune responses initiated by Toll-like receptors and type I interferons (IFNs). Many enveloped viruses display the phospholipid phosphatidylserine on their membranes, through which they bind Gas6 and Protein S and engage TAM receptors. We find that ligand-coated viruses activate TAM receptors on dendritic cells (DCs), dampen type I IFN signaling, and thereby evade host immunity and promote infection. Upon virus challenge, TAM-deficient DCs display type I IFN responses that are elevated in comparison to wild-type cells. As a consequence, TAM-deficient DCs are relatively resistant to infection by flaviviruses and pseudotyped retroviruses, but infection can be restored with neutralizing type I IFN antibodies. Correspondingly, a TAM kinase inhibitor antagonizes the infection of wild-type DCs. Thus, TAM receptors are engaged by viruses in order to attenuate type I IFN signaling and represent potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal failure after treatment with interferon alpha 2b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeloffzen, WWH; Hospers, GAP; De Vries, EGE; Navis, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Although there has been considerable experience with interferons in the treatment of malignancy and viral illnesses, acute renal failure as a side-effect of interferon treatment has rarely been reported. We present the case of a patient who developed acute on chronic renal failure 16 months after

  17. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  18. Zika virus inhibits type‐I interferon production and downstream signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anil; Hou, Shangmei; Airo, Adriana M; Limonta, Daniel; Mancinelli, Valeria; Branton, William; Power, Christopher; Hobman, Tom C

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito‐borne pathogen that is associated with Guillain–Barré syndrome in adults and microcephaly and other neurological defects in newborns. Despite being declared an international emergency by the World Health Organization, comparatively little is known about its biology. Here, we investigate the strategies employed by the virus to suppress the host antiviral response. We observe that once established, Zika virus infection is impervious to interferon treatment sug...

  19. Place of Interferon-γ Assay for Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapey, Emmanuelle; Wallon, Martine; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Piarroux, Renaud; Peyron, François

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis relies mainly on serology. When results are doubtful, pediatricians have difficulties with respect to treatment. We report interferonresponses after the stimulation of blood by Toxoplasma gondii antigen in 17 infected infants and 80 infants free of infection. Sensitivity and specificity were 93.75% (95% confidence interval: 67%-99%) and 98.75% (95% confidence interval: 92%-99%), respectively.

  20. Sequence diversity of hepatitis C virus 6a within the extended interferon sensitivity-determining region correlates with interferon-alpha/ribavirin treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel X M; Chan, Paul K S; Zhang, Tiejun; Tully, Damien C; Tam, John S

    2010-10-01

    Studies on the association between sequence variability of the interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of hepatitis C virus and the outcome of treatment have reached conflicting results. In this study, 25 patients infected with HCV 6a who had received interferon-alpha/ribavirin combination treatment were analyzed for the sequence variations. 14 of them had the full genome sequences obtained from a previous study, whereas the other 11 samples were sequenced for the extended ISDR (eISDR). This eISDR fragment covers 192 bp (64 amino acids) upstream and 201 bp (67 amino acids) downstream from the ISDR previously defined for HCV 1b. The comparison between interferon-alpha resistance and response groups for the amino acid mutations located in the full genome (6 and 8 patients respectively) as well as the mutations located in the eISDR (10 and 15 patients respectively) showed that the mutations I2160V, I2256V, V2292I (Pc) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thymoquinone Suppresses IRF-3-Mediated Expression of Type I Interferons via Suppression of TBK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Aziz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 is known to have a critical role in viral and bacterial innate immune responses by regulating the production of type I interferon (IFN. Thymoquinone (TQ is a compound derived from black cumin (Nigella sativa L. and is known to regulate immune responses by affecting transcription factors associated with inflammation, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and activator protein-1 (AP-1. However, the role of TQ in the IRF-3 signaling pathway has not been elucidated. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of TQ-dependent regulation of enzymes in IRF-3 signaling pathways using the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cell line. TQ decreased mRNA expression of the interferon genes IFN-α and IFN-β in these cells. This inhibition was due to its suppression of the transcriptional activation of IRF-3, as shown by inhibition of IRF-3 PRD (III-I luciferase activity as well as the phosphorylation pattern of IRF-3 in the immunoblotting experiment. Moreover, TQ targeted the autophosphorylation of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1, an upstream key enzyme responsible for IRF-3 activation. Taken together, these findings suggest that TQ can downregulate IRF-3 activation via inhibition of TBK1, which would subsequently decrease the production of type I IFN. TQ also regulated IRF-3, one of the inflammatory transcription factors, providing a novel insight into its anti-inflammatory activities.

  2. Pseudomonas syringae evades host immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, Michiel J C; van Dijken, Anja J H; Bardoel, Bart W; Seidl, Michael F; van der Ent, Sjoerd; van Strijp, Jos A G; Pieterse, Corné M J

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of

  3. Pseudomonas syringae evades host Immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, M.J.C.; Van Dijken, A.J.H.; Bardoel, B.W.; Seidl, M.F; Van der Ent, S.; Van Strijp, J.A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of

  4. Therapeutic effectiveness of biosimilar standard interferon versus pegylated interferon for chronic hepatitis C genotypes 2 or 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gonzalez Vigani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN and standard interferon (IFN play a significant role in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Biosimilar standard IFN is widely available in Brazil for the treatment of HCV infection genotypes 2 or 3, but its efficacy compared to Peg-IFN is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To compare the sustained virological response (SVR rates following treatment with biosimilar standard IFN plus ribavirin (RBV versus Peg-IFN plus RBV in patients with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 infection. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted in patients with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 infection treated with biosimilar standard IFN plus RBV or with Peg-IFN plus RBV. SVR rates of the two treatments were compared. RESULTS: From January 2005 to December 2010, 172 patients with a mean age of 44 +/- 9.3 years were included. There were eight (4.7% patients with HCV genotype 2 infections. One hundred fourteen (66.3% were treated with biosimilar standard IFN plus RBV, whist 58 (33.7% patients were treated with Peg-IFN plus RBV. Between the two groups, there were no significant differences regarding age, gender, glucose level, platelet count, hepatic necroinflammatory grade, and hepatic fibrosis stage. Overall, 59.3% (102/172 patients had SVR. In patients treated with Peg-IFN plus RBV, 79.3% (46/58 had SVR compared to 49.1% (56/114 among those treated with biosimilar standard IFN plus RBV (p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: In patients with HCV genotypes 2 or 3 infection, a higher SVR was observed in patients receiving Peg-IFN plus RBV related to patients treated with biosimilar standard IFN plus RBV.

  5. Interferon-¿ production by human T cells and natural killer cells in vitro in response to antigens from the two intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Hviid, L; Kharazmi, A

    1997-01-01

    protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and Leishmania antigens. It was found that IFN-gamma was produced in response to both PPD and Leishmania stimulant by T cells in the cultures. Activation of IFN-gamma producing natural killer (NK) cells was demonstrated only in some cultures, and only...

  6. Concurrent autoimmune hepatitis and grave's disease in hepatitis C during pegylated interferon α-2a and ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikudanathan, Guru V; Ahmad, Imad; Israel, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Classical interferon-α has been shown to be associated with the development of a variety of autoimmune disorders. A 34-year-old white woman with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who was treated with pegylated interferon α-2a and ribavirin, developed Grave's disease and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) at 32 and 44 weeks, respectively, following initiation of the therapy. The diagnosis of AIH was made based on the new development of anti-smooth muscle antibodies, anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and liver biopsy findings. It was confirmed by positive response to steroid challenge and was assessed according to the international AIH scoring system. Based on the previous case reports, we review the existing literature. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple autoimmune disorders during interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis.

  7. Muusikamaailm : Arvo Pärdi uus teos. Telemanni päevad Magdeburgis. Uus orkester Soomes. Ingvar Lidholm 80. Auhindu ja preemiaid / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2001-01-01

    21. veebr. tuli Oxfordis maailmaesiettekandele A. Pärdi teos "Littlemore Tractus". Telemanni päevade raames toimuvast rahvusvahelisest kammeransamblite konkursist Magdeburgis. O. Mustonen asutas Helsingis uue orkestri. Lühidalt I.Lidholmi tegevusest ja loomingust. P. Norgaardile ja H. von Manen'ile antud autasust ja preemiast

  8. Muusikamaailm : Festivalil Schwetzingenis. Ellingtoni sajandi tähistamine. Linz saab uue ooperimaja. Isaac Stern viiulita Saksamaal. Muusikapäevad Luksemburgis / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    1999-01-01

    30. apr.-7. juunini toimuvast muusikafestivalist Schwetzingenis. D. Ellingtoni 100. sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest maailmas. Valmis Linzi uue ooperimaja planeering. I. Stern juhatas kümnepäevast seminari Kölni Kõrgema Muusikakooli juures. Rahvusvahelise Nüüdismuusika Ühingu (ISCM) iga-aastased maailma muusikapäevad toimuvad 2000. aastal Luksemburgis

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded miR-US25-1-5p Attenuates CD147/EMMPRIN-Mediated Early Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular receptor-mediated signaling pathways play critical roles during the initial immune response to Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection. However, the involvement of type-I transmembrane glycoprotein CD147/EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer in the antiviral response to HCMV infection is still unknown. Here, we demonstrated the specific knockdown of CD147 significantly decreased HCMV-induced activation of NF-κB and Interferon-beta (IFN-β, which contribute to the cellular antiviral responses. Next, we confirmed that HCMV-encoded miR-US25-1-5p could target the 3′ UTR (Untranslated Region of CD147 mRNA, and thus facilitate HCMV lytic propagation at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI. The expression and secretion of Cyclophilin A (sCyPA, as a ligand for CD147 and a proinflammatory cytokine, were up-regulated in response to HCMV stimuli. Finally, we confirmed that CD147 mediated HCMV-triggered antiviral signaling via the sCyPA-CD147-ERK (extracellular regulated protein kinases/NF-κB axis signaling pathway. These findings reveal an important HCMV mechanism for evading antiviral innate immunity through its encoded microRNA by targeting transmembrane glycoprotein CD147, and a potential cause of HCMV inflammatory disorders due to the secretion of proinflammatory cytokine CyPA.

  10. Evolution of Soybean mosaic virus-G7 molecularly cloned genome in Rsv1-genotype soybean results in emergence of a mutant capable of evading Rsv1-mediated recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajimorad, M.R.; Eggenberger, A.L.; Hill, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Plant resistance (R) genes direct recognition of pathogens harboring matching avirluent signals leading to activation of defense responses. It has long been hypothesized that under selection pressure the infidelity of RNA virus replication together with large population size and short generation times results in emergence of mutants capable of evading R-mediated recognition. In this study, the Rsv1/Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) pathosystem was used to investigate this hypothesis. In soybean line PI 96983 (Rsv1), the progeny of molecularly cloned SMV strain G7 (pSMV-G7) provokes a lethal systemic hypersensitive response (LSHR) with up regulation of a defense-associated gene transcript (PR-1). Serial passages of a large population of the progeny in PI 96983 resulted in emergence of a mutant population (vSMV-G7d), incapable of provoking either Rsv1-mediated LSHR or PR-1 protein gene transcript up regulation. An infectious clone of the mutant (pSMV-G7d) was synthesized whose sequences were very similar but not identical to the vSMV-G7d population; however, it displayed a similar phenotype. The genome of pSMV-G7d differs from parental pSMV-G7 by 17 substitutions, of which 10 are translationally silent. The seven amino acid substitutions in deduced sequences of pSMV-G7d differ from that of pSMV-G7 by one each in P1 proteinase, helper component-proteinase, and coat protein, respectively, and by four in P3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in which experimental evolution of a molecularly cloned plant RNA virus resulted in emergence of a mutant capable of evading an R-mediated recognition

  11. Temporary increase in serum beta 2-microglobulin during treatment with interferon-alpha for AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R.; Bakker, P. J.; Reiss, P.; Hoek, F. J.; Lange, J. M.; Goudsmit, J.; Veenhof, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) levels were determined in the serum of 24 patients treated with high-dose human recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) for AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma. There was a significant increase in serum beta 2-M levels, irrespective of the response to treatment.

  12. Parainfluenza virus 3 blocks antiviral mediators downstream of the interferon lambda receptor by modulating stat1 phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramyxoviruses are known to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production, however there is a lack of information regarding the type III IFN response during infection. Type III IFNs signal through a unique heterodimeric receptor, the IFN-'R1/IL-10R2, which is primarily expressed by epithelial cells. ...

  13. Human B cells fail to secrete type I interferons upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Anna M; Sun, Chenglong; Landman, Sanne L; Oosenbrug, Timo; Koppejan, Hester J; Kwakkenbos, Mark J; Hoeben, Rob C; Paludan, Søren R; Ressing, Maaike E

    2017-11-01

    Most cells are believed to be capable of producing type I interferons (IFN I) as part of an innate immune response against, for instance, viral infections. In macrophages, IFN I is potently induced upon cytoplasmic exposure to foreign nucleic acids. Infection of these cells with herpesviruses leads to triggering of the DNA sensors interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS). Thereby, the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and the downstream molecules TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) are sequentially activated culminating in IFN I secretion. Human gamma-herpesviruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), exploit B cells as a reservoir for persistent infection. In this study, we investigated whether human B cells, similar to macrophages, engage the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway to induce an innate immune response. We found that the B cells fail to secrete IFN I upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure, although they express the DNA sensors cGAS and IFI16 and the signaling components TBK1 and IRF3. In primary human B lymphocytes and EBV-negative B cell lines, this deficiency is explained by a lack of detectable levels of the central adaptor protein STING. In contrast, EBV-transformed B cell lines did express STING, yet both these lines as well as STING-reconstituted EBV-negative B cells did not produce IFN I upon dsDNA or cGAMP stimulation. Our combined data show that the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway is dysfunctional in human B cells. This exemplifies that certain cell types cannot induce IFN I in response to cytoplasmic DNA exposure providing a potential niche for viral persistence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  15. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  16. Central Role of ULK1 in Type I Interferon Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Saleiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide evidence that the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1 is activated during engagement of the type I interferon (IFN receptor (IFNR. Our studies demonstrate that the function of ULK1 is required for gene transcription mediated via IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE and IFNγ activation site (GAS elements and controls expression of key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We identify ULK1 as an upstream regulator of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and establish that the regulatory effects of ULK1 on ISG expression are mediated possibly by engagement of the p38 MAPK pathway. Importantly, we demonstrate that ULK1 is essential for antiproliferative responses and type I IFN-induced antineoplastic effects against malignant erythroid precursors from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Together, these data reveal a role for ULK1 as a key mediator of type I IFNR-generated signals that control gene transcription and induction of antineoplastic responses.

  17. The Peculiar Characteristics of Fish Type I Interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Boudinot

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral type I interferons (IFNs have been discovered in fish. Genomic studies revealed their considerable number in many species; some genes encode secreted and non-secreted isoforms. Based on cysteine motifs, fish type I IFNs fall in two subgroups, which use two different receptors. Mammalian type I IFN genes are intronless while type III have introns; in fish, all have introns, but structurally, both subgroups belong to type I. Type I IFNs likely appeared early in vertebrates as intron containing genes, and evolved in parallel in tetrapods and fishes. The diversity of their repertoires in fish and mammals is likely a convergent feature, selected as a response to the variety of viral strategies. Several alternative nomenclatures have been established for different taxonomic fish groups, calling for a unified system. The specific functions of each type I gene remains poorly understood, as well as their interactions in antiviral responses. However, distinct induction pathways, kinetics of response, and tissue specificity indicate that fish type I likely are highly specialized, especially in groups where they are numerous such as salmonids or cyprinids. Unravelling their functional integration constitutes the next challenge to understand how these cytokines evolved to orchestrate antiviral innate immunity in vertebrates.

  18. HVR-1 quasispecies modifications occur early and are correlated to initial but not sustained response in HCV-infected patients treated with pegylated- or standard-interferon and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Isabella; Lo Iacono, Oreste; Di Stefano, Rosa; Cappiello, Giuseppina; Girardi, Enrico; Longo, Roberta; Ferraro, Donatella; Antonucci, Giorgio; Di Marco, Vito; Solmone, Mariacarmela; Craxì, Antonio; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria R

    2004-05-01

    HVR-1 quasispecies composition and evolution were investigated in patients chronically infected with genotype 1b HCV, treated with PEG-IFN alpha 2b or STD-IFN alpha 2b plus RBV. HVR-1 heterogeneity was assessed by calculating nucleotidic complexity, diversity, synonymous (S) and non-synonymous (NS) substitutions at baseline, after 4 weeks of therapy (T1) and at follow-up (T18). Evolution of viral quasispecies was analysed by constructing phylogenetic trees. No correlation of baseline viremia with heterogeneity was observed. Nucleotidic complexity was lower in patients showing early virological response, and tended to be inversely correlated to viral load decline at 4 weeks of treatment. In the majority of SR, profound changes of quasispecies composition occurred during 4 weeks of treatment, while in NR virtually no major changes of pre-therapy variants were observed. Relapse showed both patterns of quasispecies evolution. Virus quasispecies after follow-up was similar to that found at T1 in both Relapsers and NR patients. Baseline parameters of HVR-1 heterogeneity seem to be involved in the early response to treatment, and early response is associated with profound variations in the HVR-1 quasispecies. Viral quasispecies surviving early therapeutic pressure are most likely able to give rise to either virus rebound or persistence at T18.

  19. Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis: differences and similarities to evade the innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Athayde Couto Falcão

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Visceral Leishmaniasis is a severe form of the disease, caused by Leishmania infantum in the New World. Patients present an anergic immune response that favors parasite establishment and spreading through tissues like bone marrow and liver. On the other hand, Leishmania braziliensis causes localized cutaneous lesions, which can be self healing in some individuals. Interactions between host and parasite are essential to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. In this context, dendritic cells (DCs act as essential bridges that connect innate and adaptive immune responses. In this way, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of these two Leishmania species, in some aspects of human dendritic cells biology to better understanding of the evasion mechanisms of Leishmania from host innate immune response. To do so, DCs were obtained from monocytes from whole peripheral blood’s healthy volunteers donors and infected with L. infantum or L. braziliensis for 24 hours. We observed similar rates of infection (around 40% as well as parasite burden for both Leishmania species. Concerning surface molecules, we observed that both parasites induced CD86 expression when DCs were infected for 24h. On the other hand, we detected a lower surface expression of CD209 in the presence of both L. braziliensis and L. infantum, but only the last one promoted the survival of dendritic cells after 24 hours. Therefore, DCs infected by both Leishmania species showed a higher expression of CD86 and a decrease of CD209 expression, suggesting that both enter DCs through CD209 molecule. However, only L. infantum had the ability to inhibit DC apoptotic death, as an evasion mechanism that enables its spreading to organs like bone marrow and liver. Lastly, L. braziliensis was more silent parasite, once it did not inhibit DC apoptosis in our in vitro model.

  20. Pseudomonas syringae evades host Immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    OpenAIRE

    Pel, M.J.C.; Van Dijken, A.J.H.; Bardoel, B.W.; Seidl, M.F; Van der Ent, S.; Van Strijp, J.A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of bacterial species. In addition, we investigated the role of AprA in virulence of the bacterial plant athogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA knockout mutant was significantl...

  1. Antitumoral action of interferons and interleukins in combination with radiotherapy. Pt. I. Immunologic basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herskind, C.; Fleckenstein, K.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Lohr, J.; Li Chuan-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Method: the cellular immune response toward tumor cells is reviewed. The role of cytokines in antigen presentation and activation of effector cells and their interactions with radiation are described. Preclinical strategies of the antitumor action of cytokines are presented and discussed based on the induction of IFN-γ by IL-12. Results: recent advances in immunology have demonstrated the importance of local interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC) and effector cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and T-lymphocytes for an effective immune reaction against tumors. Interferons stimulate such interactions, while IL-2 plays a central role in the activation of NK cells and T-lymphocytes. The interactions between APC and effector cells are suppressed by many tumors but can be stimulated by irradiation. Since systemic application of interferons is quite toxic, present strategies aim at local expression, e.g., the induction of IFN-γ expression in Th1 cells by IL-12. (orig.) [de

  2. Demodex canis targets TLRs to evade host immunity and induce canine demodicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, P; Nigam, R; Choudhury, S; Singh, S K; Yadav, B; Kumar, D; Garg, S K

    2018-03-01

    Widespread incidence of Demodex mites throughout the mammalian class and occasional serious and fatal outcomes in dogs warrant an insight into the host-parasite interface especially. Therefore, this study was aimed to unravel the interplay between innate immune response and canine demodicosis. The dogs diagnosed to have natural clinical demodicosis were allocated into two groups; dogs with localized demodicosis (LD) and with generalized demodicosis (GD). The expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2, 4 and 6 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these dogs was quantified by real-time PCR. Significantly increased TLR2 gene expression, while significantly diminished TLR4 and TLR6 gene expressions were observed in demodicosed dogs (LD and GD) as compared with the healthy ones. Even the expression of TLR2 gene was found to differ significantly between the dogs with LD and GD. Therefore, it can be inferred that clinical demodicosis in dogs is coupled with an up-regulation of TLR2 and down-regulation of TLR4 and TLR6 gene expressions. Overexpression of TLR2 gene might be responsible for Demodex-induced clinical manifestations, while TLR4 and TLR6 gene down-regulations could be the paramount strategy of Demodex mites to elude the host-immune interface. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Autoimmunity in children with chronic hepatitis C treated with interferon alpha and ribavirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora-Gebka, Magdalena; Liberek, Anna; Bako, Wanda; Raczkowska-Kozak, Janina; Sikorska-Wisniewska, Grazyna; Korzon, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The role of interferon alpha or the virus itself in the pathogenesis and the risk of autoimmunological disorders in patients infected with HCV, still remain unknown, especially in children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of autoantibodies and the risk of autoimmunological disorders in children with chronic hepatitis C, treated with interferon alpha and ribavirin in the Department of Paediatrics, Paediatric Gastroenterology and Oncology in Gdansk. In the studied group of 12 patients, in 4 cases autoantibodies were present in low titers prior to the treatment and they had no prognostic value for the response to the therapy or the risk of autoimmunological disorders. Positive response for the treatment was achieved in 4 cases; in 3 cases indications for discontinuation of the therapy were established. During the therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin, in 2 children elevation of serum titers of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) (> 1:640) with normal gammaglobulin levels was noted. In none of the children autoimmunological disorders were observed.

  4. Absence of MxA induction by interferon beta in patients with MS reflects complete loss of bioactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, D.; Sellebjerg, F.; Sorensen, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) appearing during treatment with interferon (IFN) beta reduce or in high concentrations abolish bioactivity and therapeutic efficacy. In vivo MxA induction by IFNbeta is used as a marker of biologic response....... Lack of MxA in vivo response in patients with multiple sclerosis with NAbs is a reliable marker of a completely blocked biologic response to IFNbeta, with no indication of residual bioactivity Udgivelsesdato: 2009/8/4...

  5. Virus genetic variations and evade from immune system, the present influenza challenges: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Shahsavandi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The spread of influenza viruses in multiple bird and mammalian species is a worldwide serious threat to human and animal populations' health and raise major concern for ongoing pandemic in humans. Direct transmission of the avian viruses which have sialic acid specific receptors similar to human influenza viruses are a warning to the emergence of a new mutant strain that is likely to share molecular determinants to facilitate their replication in human host. So the emerge virus can be transmitted easily through person to person. The genetic variations of the influenza viruses, emerge and re-emerge of new antigenic variants, and transmission of avian influenza viruses to human may raise wide threat to public health and control of pandemic influenza. Vaccination, chemoprophylaxis with specific antiviral drugs, and personal protective non-pharmacological measures are tools to treat influenza virus infection. The emergence of drug resistant strains of influenza viruses under drug selective pressure and their limited efficacy in severe cases of influenza infections highlight the need to development of new therapies with alternative modes. In recent years several studies have been progressed to introduce components to be act at different stages of the viral life cycle with broad spectrum reactivity against mammalian and bird influenza subtypes. A wide variety of different antiviral strategies include inhibition of virus entry, blocking of viral replication or targeting of cellular signaling pathways have been explored. The current inactivated influenza vaccines are eliciting only B-cell responses. Application of the vaccines has been limited due to the emergence of the new virus antigenic variants. In recent decade development of gene vaccines by targeting various influenza virus proteins have been interested because significant potential for induction of both humoral and cell mediated immunity responses. Enhanced and directed immune responses to

  6. Structure-based redesign of lysostaphin yields potent antistaphylococcal enzymes that evade immune cell surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Blazanovic

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infections exert a tremendous burden on the health-care system, and the threat of drug-resistant strains continues to grow. The bacteriolytic enzyme lysostaphin is a potent antistaphylococcal agent with proven efficacy against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains; however, the enzyme's own bacterial origins cause undesirable immunogenicity and pose a barrier to clinical translation. Here, we deimmunized lysostaphin using a computationally guided process that optimizes sets of mutations to delete immunogenic T cell epitopes without disrupting protein function. In vitro analyses showed the methods to be both efficient and effective, producing seven different deimmunized designs exhibiting high function and reduced immunogenic potential. Two deimmunized candidates elicited greatly suppressed proliferative responses in splenocytes from humanized mice, while at the same time the variants maintained wild-type efficacy in a staphylococcal pneumonia model. Overall, the deimmunized enzymes represent promising leads in the battle against S. aureus.

  7. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: is 'evading apoptosis' a hallmark of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2011-08-01

    Conventional wisdom has long held that once a cancer cell has developed it will inevitably progress to clinical disease. Updating this paradigm, it has more recently become apparent that the tumor interacts with its microenvironment and that some environmental bottlenecks, such as the angiogenic switch, must be overcome for the tumor to progress. In parallel, attraction has been drawn to the concept that there is a minority population of cells - the cancer stem cells - bestowed with the exclusive ability to self-renew and regenerate the tumor. With therapeutic targeting issues at stake, much attention has shifted to the identification of cancer stem cells, the thinking being that the remaining non-stem population, already fated to die, will play a negligible role in tumor development. In fact, the newly appreciated importance of intercellular interactions in cancer development also extends in a unique and unexpected way to interactions between the stem and non-stem compartments of the tumor. Here we discuss recent findings drawn from a hybrid mathematical-cellular automaton model that simulates growth of a heterogeneous solid tumor comprised of cancer stem cells and non-stem cancer cells. The model shows how the introduction of cell fate heterogeneity paradoxically influences the tumor growth dynamic in response to apoptosis, to reveal yet another bottleneck to tumor progression potentially exploitable for disease control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Barriers to treatment of failed or interferon ineligible patients in the era of DAA: single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Il Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Interferon-based treatment is not appropriate for a large number of patients with chronic hepatitis C for various medical and social reasons. Newly developed directly acting antivirals (DAAs have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C without severe adverse effects and have achieved a sustained viral response (SVR rate of 80-90% with short treatment duration. We were interested to determine whether all patients who failed to respond to or were ineligible for interferon-based therapy could be treated with DAAs. Methods Medical records of patients with positive serum anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV or HCV RNA between January 2009 and December 2013 were reviewed. Demographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected for analysis. Results A total of 876 patients were positive for both anti-HCV and HCV RNA. Of these, 244 patients were eligible for interferon, although this was associated with relapse in 39 (16% of patients. In total, 130 patients stopped interferon therapy (67% adverse effects, 28% non-adherent, 4% malignancy, 1% alcohol abuse and 502 patients were ineligible (66% medical contraindications, 25% non-adherent, 5% socioeconomic problems. Among 671 patients who were ineligible for or failed to respond to interferon therapy, more than 186 (27.7% could not be treated with DAA due to financial, social, or cancer-related conditions. Conclusions Newly developed DAAs are a promising treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C who are ineligible for or failed to respond to interferon-based therapy. Nevertheless, not all chronic hepatitis C patients can be treated with DAAs due to various reasons.

  9. Cooperative option of pursuit game with two pursuers and one evader. A strong stability of division variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor D. Shiryayev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article deals with a simple differential game on the plane of pursuit with two consistently active players and one evader E; the game is considered in the form of the characteristic function. Materials and Methods: The geometric constructions and methods are used for solving the problem. The security zone of the escapee is bounded by the Apollonius circle, the pursuit team uses a strategy of parallel approach. Results: A method of finding the optimal players strategies and the optimal players’ trajectory is proposed. The way of forming the characteristic function is provided. All the variety of division is considered as a solution. However, the use of the results of cooperative theory of differential games is impossible without solving the problems associated with the specifics of differential equations of motion. Foremost, it is the problem of dynamic stability of optimality principles. The article introduces an auxiliary function of making the redistribution of winnings in time, keeping his total winnings throughout the game. The dynamic stability of the cooperative solution is determined with the help of this function. Strong dynamic stability of the entire set of solutions is shown. Discussion and Conclusions: The obtained results are consistent with similar research of other authors. Further research in this field can be used in the development of methods for “regularization” of optimality principles, for which the condition of dynamic stability is always fulfilled.

  10. Escape and evade control policies for ensuring the physical security of nonholonomic, ground-based, unattended mobile sensor nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-06-01

    In order to realize the wide-scale deployment of high-endurance, unattended mobile sensing technologies, it is vital to ensure the self-preservation of the sensing assets. Deployed mobile sensor nodes face a variety of physical security threats including theft, vandalism and physical damage. Unattended mobile sensor nodes must be able to respond to these threats with control policies that facilitate escape and evasion to a low-risk state. In this work the Precision Immobilization Technique (PIT) problem has been considered. The PIT maneuver is a technique that a pursuing, car-like vehicle can use to force a fleeing vehicle to abruptly turn ninety degrees to the direction of travel. The abrupt change in direction generally causes the fleeing driver to lose control and stop. The PIT maneuver was originally developed by law enforcement to end vehicular pursuits in a manner that minimizes damage to the persons and property involved. It is easy to imagine that unattended autonomous convoys could be targets of this type of action by adversarial agents. This effort focused on developing control policies unattended mobile sensor nodes could employ to escape, evade and recover from PIT-maneuver-like attacks. The development of these control policies involved both simulation as well as small-scale experimental testing. The goal of this work is to be a step toward ensuring the physical security of unattended sensor node assets.

  11. The p75 neurotrophin receptor evades the endolysosomal route in neuronal cells, favouring multivesicular bodies specialised for exosomal release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Claudia A.; Lazo, Oscal M.; Galleguillos, Carolina; Parraguez, Jose I.; Lopez-Verrilli, Maria A.; Cabeza, Carolina; Leon, Luisa; Saeed, Uzma; Retamal, Claudio; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Carter, Bruce D.; Court, Felipe A.; Bronfman, Francisca C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75, also known as NGFR) is a multifaceted signalling receptor that regulates neuronal physiology, including neurite outgrowth, and survival and death decisions. A key cellular aspect regulating neurotrophin signalling is the intracellular trafficking of their receptors; however, the post-endocytic trafficking of p75 is poorly defined. We used sympathetic neurons and rat PC12 cells to study the mechanism of internalisation and post-endocytic trafficking of p75. We found that p75 internalisation depended on the clathrin adaptor protein AP2 and on dynamin. More surprisingly, p75 evaded the lysosomal route at the level of the early endosome, instead accumulating in two different types of endosomes, Rab11-positive endosomes and multivesicular bodies (MVBs) positive for CD63, a marker of the exosomal pathway. Consistently, depolarisation by KCl induced the liberation of previously endocytosed full-length p75 into the extracellular medium in exosomes. Thus, p75 defines a subpopulation of MVBs that does not mature to lysosomes and is available for exosomal release by neuronal cells. PMID:24569882

  12. Immunological role of CD4+CD28null T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and interferon-gamma in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease: relation to disease severity and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAlfy, Mohsen Saleh; Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ebeid, Fatma Soliman ElSayed; Eissa, Deena Samir; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Mohammed, Yasser Hassan; Ahmed, Manar Elsayed; Saad, Aya Sayed

    2018-06-20

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with alterations in immune phenotypes. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes have pro-inflammatory functions and are linked to vascular diseases. To assess the percentage of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NK), and IFN-gamma levels, we compared 40 children and adolescents with SCD with 40 healthy controls and evaluated their relation to disease severity and response to therapy. Patients with SCD steady state were studied, focusing on history of frequent vaso-occlusive crisis, hydroxyurea therapy, and IFN-gamma levels. Analysis of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes and NK cells was done by flow cytometry. Liver and cardiac iron overload were assessed. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes, NK cells, and IFN-gamma levels were significantly higher in patients than controls. Patients with history of frequent vaso-occlusive crisis and those with vascular complications had higher percentage of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes and IFN-gamma while levels were significantly lower among hydroxyurea-treated patients. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes were positively correlated to transfusional iron input while these cells and IFN-gamma were negatively correlated to cardiac T2* and duration of hydroxyurea therapy. NK cells were correlated to HbS and indirect bilirubin. Increased expression of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes highlights their role in immune dysfunction and pathophysiology of SCD complications.

  13. Pseudomonas Evades Immune Recognition of Flagellin in Both Mammals and Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoel, Bart W.; van der Ent, Sjoerd; Pel, Michiel J. C.; Tommassen, Jan; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The building blocks of bacterial flagella, flagellin monomers, are potent stimulators of host innate immune systems. Recognition of flagellin monomers occurs by flagellin-specific pattern-recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) in mammals and flagellin-sensitive 2 (FLS2) in plants. Activation of these immune systems via flagellin leads eventually to elimination of the bacterium from the host. In order to prevent immune activation and thus favor survival in the host, bacteria secrete many proteins that hamper such recognition. In our search for Toll like receptor (TLR) antagonists, we screened bacterial supernatants and identified alkaline protease (AprA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a TLR5 signaling inhibitor as evidenced by a marked reduction in IL-8 production and NF-κB activation. AprA effectively degrades the TLR5 ligand monomeric flagellin, while polymeric flagellin (involved in bacterial motility) and TLR5 itself resist degradation. The natural occurring alkaline protease inhibitor AprI of P. aeruginosa blocked flagellin degradation by AprA. P. aeruginosa aprA mutants induced an over 100-fold enhanced activation of TLR5 signaling, because they fail to degrade excess monomeric flagellin in their environment. Interestingly, AprA also prevents flagellin-mediated immune responses (such as growth inhibition and callose deposition) in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This was due to decreased activation of the receptor FLS2 and clearly demonstrated by delayed stomatal closure with live bacteria in plants. Thus, by degrading the ligand for TLR5 and FLS2, P. aeruginosa escapes recognition by the innate immune systems of both mammals and plants. PMID:21901099

  14. Pseudomonas evades immune recognition of flagellin in both mammals and plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W Bardoel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The building blocks of bacterial flagella, flagellin monomers, are potent stimulators of host innate immune systems. Recognition of flagellin monomers occurs by flagellin-specific pattern-recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5 in mammals and flagellin-sensitive 2 (FLS2 in plants. Activation of these immune systems via flagellin leads eventually to elimination of the bacterium from the host. In order to prevent immune activation and thus favor survival in the host, bacteria secrete many proteins that hamper such recognition. In our search for Toll like receptor (TLR antagonists, we screened bacterial supernatants and identified alkaline protease (AprA of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a TLR5 signaling inhibitor as evidenced by a marked reduction in IL-8 production and NF-κB activation. AprA effectively degrades the TLR5 ligand monomeric flagellin, while polymeric flagellin (involved in bacterial motility and TLR5 itself resist degradation. The natural occurring alkaline protease inhibitor AprI of P. aeruginosa blocked flagellin degradation by AprA. P. aeruginosa aprA mutants induced an over 100-fold enhanced activation of TLR5 signaling, because they fail to degrade excess monomeric flagellin in their environment. Interestingly, AprA also prevents flagellin-mediated immune responses (such as growth inhibition and callose deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. This was due to decreased activation of the receptor FLS2 and clearly demonstrated by delayed stomatal closure with live bacteria in plants. Thus, by degrading the ligand for TLR5 and FLS2, P. aeruginosa escapes recognition by the innate immune systems of both mammals and plants.

  15. Pseudomonas syringae evades host immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pel, Michiel J C; van Dijken, Anja J H; Bardoel, Bart W; Seidl, Michael F; van der Ent, Sjoerd; van Strijp, Jos A G; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of bacterial species. In addition, we investigated the role of AprA in virulence of the bacterial plant pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA knockout mutant was significantly less virulent on both tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, infiltration of A. thaliana Col-0 leaves with DC3000 ΔaprA evoked a significantly higher level of expression of the defense-related genes FRK1 and PR-1 than did wild-type DC3000. In the flagellin receptor mutant fls2, pathogen virulence and defense-related gene activation did not differ between DC3000 and DC3000 ΔaprA. Together, these results suggest that AprA of DC3000 is important for evasion of recognition by the FLS2 receptor, allowing wild-type DC3000 to be more virulent on its host plant than AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA. To provide further evidence for the role of DC3000 AprA in host immune evasion, we overexpressed the AprA inhibitory peptide AprI of DC3000 in A. thaliana to counteract the immune evasive capacity of DC3000 AprA. Ectopic expression of aprI in A. thaliana resulted in an enhanced level of resistance against wild-type DC3000, while the already elevated level of resistance against DC3000 ΔaprA remained unchanged. Together, these results indicate that evasion of host immunity by the alkaline protease AprA is important for full virulence of strain DC3000 and likely acts by preventing flagellin monomers from being recognized by its cognate immune receptor.

  16. Proliferative and antiproliferative effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell lines derived from cervical and ovarian malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutch, D.G.; Massad, L.S.; Kao, M.S.; Collins, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Four human cell lines derived from cervical carcinomas (ME-180, SiHa, HT-3, and MS751) and three human cell lines derived from ovarian carcinomas (SK-OV-3, Caov-3, and NIH:OVCAR-3) were analyzed in vitro to determine the effect of recombinant interferon-gamma and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth and survival. The effects of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth were measured after 24 and 72 hours of incubation by the incorporation of chromium 51. The results of this analysis showed that all seven cell lines were resistant to the antiproliferative action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, that the growth of most cell lines was inhibited by interferon-gamma by 72 hours of incubation, and that after 72 hours of incubation all cell lines demonstrated a synergistic antiproliferative response to the combination of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, the effects of these cytokines on cell growth were found to differ among cell lines and varied with the concentration and the duration of incubation. The growth of one cell line (Caov-3) was stimulated by both tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma. These results suggest that the clinical effects of these cytokines on the growth of gynecologic cancers may be more complex than previously supposed

  17. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication and regulates interferon production in mouse myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruonan Zhang

    Full Text Available SAMHD1 restricts the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses in human myeloid and resting CD4(+ T cells and that is counteracted in SIV and HIV-2 by the Vpx accessory protein. The protein is a phosphohydrolase that lowers the concentration of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTP, blocking reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding SAMHD1 are associated with Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by increased type-I interferon production. SAMHD1 is conserved in mammals but its role in restricting virus replication and controlling interferon production in non-primate species is not well understood. We show that SAMHD1 is catalytically active and expressed at high levels in mouse spleen, lymph nodes, thymus and lung. siRNA knock-down of SAMHD1 in bone marrow-derived macrophages increased their susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. shRNA knock-down of SAMHD1 in the murine monocytic cell-line RAW264.7 increased its susceptibility to HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus and increased the levels of the dNTP pool. In addition, SAMHD1 knock-down in RAW264.7 cells induced the production of type-I interferon and several interferon-stimulated genes, modeling the situation in Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome. Our findings suggest that the role of SAMHD1 in restricting viruses is conserved in the mouse. The RAW264.7 cell-line serves as a useful tool to study the antiviral and innate immune response functions of SAMHD1.

  18. Pegylated interferon alpha-2a and ribavirin combination therapy in HCV liver transplant recipients. Experience of 7 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Speranta; Gheorghe, Liana; Hrehoret, Doina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel

    2008-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) related cirrhosis represents the leading indication for liver transplantation (LT) worldwide and HCV reinfection is the rule among transplant recipients. Combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin is the treatment of choice for established recurrent hepatitis C. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of pegylated interferon alpha-2a and ribavirin in LT recipients with histological recurrence of hepatitis C. Seven LT recipients with chronic hepatitis C recurrence were treated with peginterferon alpha-2a with an initial intended dose of 180 microg/week and an intended dose of ribavirin 800-1000 mg/day for at least 12 months and followed-up for at least 24 weeks. Early virological response rate was 57.1%. Three patients (42.8%) had end of treatment virological response and all had also sustained viral response (SVR). Five patients had end of treatment biological response, out of which 4 had also sustained biochemical response. Three patients had both SVR and sustained biochemical response. Four patients had end of treatment histological response, out of which 3 patients had also SVR. Cytopenia was the most common adverse event: anemia (57.1%), leucopenia/neutropenia (71.4%), thrombocytopenia (42.8%). Combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin can be safely and successfully used in liver transplant recipients.

  19. Fluoxetine regulates cell growth inhibition of interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Min; Yu, Bu-Chin; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Sun, Hung-Yu; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Su, Hui-Chen; Yen, Shu-Yang; Lai, Hsin-Wen; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Young, Kung-Chia; Tsao, Chiung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Fluoxetine, a well-known anti-depression agent, may act as a chemosensitizer to assist and promote cancer therapy. However, how fluoxetine regulates cellular signaling to enhance cellular responses against tumor cell growth remains unclear. In the present study, addition of fluoxetine promoted growth inhibition of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in human bladder carcinoma cells but not in normal uroepithelial cells through lessening the IFN-α-induced apoptosis but switching to cause G1 arrest, and maintaining the IFN-α-mediated reduction in G2/M phase. Activations and signal transducer and transactivator (STAT)-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were involved in this process. Chemical inhibitions of STAT-1 or PPAR-α partially rescued bladder carcinoma cells from IFN-α-mediated growth inhibition via blockades of G1 arrest, cyclin D1 reduction, p53 downregulation and p27 upregulation in the presence of fluoxetine. However, the functions of both proteins were not involved in the control of fluoxetine over apoptosis and maintained the declined G2/M phase of IFN-α. These results indicated that activation of PPAR-α and STAT-1 participated, at least in part, in growth inhibition of IFN-α in the presence of fluoxetine.

  20. Interferon Gamma in African Trypanosome Infections: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Liu, Gongguan; Shi, Meiqing

    2017-01-01

    African trypanosomes cause fatal infections in both humans and livestock. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) plays an essential role in resistance to African trypanosomes. However, increasing evidence suggests that IFN-γ, when excessively synthesized, also induces immunopathology, enhancing susceptibility to the infection. Thus, production of IFN-γ must be tightly regulated during infections with African trypanosomes to ensure that a robust immune response is elicited without tissue destruction. Early studies have shown that secretion of IFN-γ is downregulated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). More recently, IL-27 has been identified as a negative regulator of IFN-γ production during African trypanosome infections. In this review, we discuss the current state of our understanding of the role of IFN-γ in African trypanosome infections. We have focused on the cellular source of IFN-γ, its beneficial and detrimental effects, and mechanisms involved in regulation of its production, highlighting some recent advances and offering some perspectives on future directions.

  1. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  2. Role of interferon in lymphocyte recruitment into the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issekutz, T.B.; Stoltz, J.M.; Webster, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Large numbers of lymphocytes are recruited from the blood into sites of cutaneous DTH reactions. Our goal was to investigate the factors controlling this recruitment. 111 In-labeled peritoneal exudate lymphocytes were injected iv and the accumulation of these cells in skin sites injected with a variety of stimuli, was used to measure lymphocyte recruitment in rats. Large numbers of lymphocytes migrated into vaccinia- and KLH-injected sites in sensitized animals, but only into the viral and not the KLH lesions in non-immune animals. Lymphocytes also migrated efficiently into sites injected with the alpha-interferon (IFN) inducers, uv-inactivated vaccinia virus and poly I:C, as well as into sites injected with IFN. In each case there was a dose-response relationship. Analysis of the kinetics of lymphocyte recruitment demonstrated that the peak rate of migration occurred most rapidly after the injection of IFN, later after poly I:C, and was slowest to be reached after vaccinia virus. Rabbit anti-IFN blocked the recruitment of lymphocytes by uv-inactivated vaccinia and by IFN. Histologically, all of these sites demonstrated a dense mononuclear cell infiltrate in the dermis. It is suggested that IFN may be an important mediator in the recruitment of lymphocytes into inflammatory reactions

  3. Uudised : Üheteistkümnendad trompetipäevad. Eesti Muusikanõukogus. Tüüri "Motus I" Londonis / Kadri Ruudi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruudi, Kadri

    2000-01-01

    4.-15. apr. toimuvad EMA XI trompetipäevad. 14.-19. märtsil viibis Eestis IMC asepresident F. Müller-Heuser, 22. märtsil toimus EMN juhatuse koosolek. 19. märtsil andis Londoni South Bank Centre'is kontserdi P. Carneiro, kes tõi Inglismaal esiettekandele ka E.-S. Tüüri teose "Motus I"

  4. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  5. Interferon Alpha Association with Neuromyelitis Optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Asgari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α has immunoregulatory functions in autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to determine occurrence and clinical consequences of IFN-α in neuromyelitis optica (NMO patients. Thirty-six NMO and 41 multiple sclerosis (MS patients from a population-based retrospective case series were included. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score and MRI findings determined disease activity. Linear regression was used to assess the effects of the level of IFN-α on disability (EDSS. IFN-α was determined by sensitive ELISA assays. IFN-α was detectable in sera from 9/36 NMO patients, significantly more often than in the MS group (2/41 (P=0.0197. A higher frequency of IFN-α was observed in NMO patients with acute relapse compared to NMO patients in remission (P<0.001 and compared to the MS patients with relapse (P=0.010. In NMO patients, the levels of IFN-α were significantly associated with EDSS (P=0.0062. It may be concluded that IFN-α was detectable in a subgroup of NMO patients. Association of IFN-α levels with clinical disease activity and severity suggests a role for IFN-α in disease perpetuation and may provide a plausible explanation for a negative effect of IFN-1 treatment in NMO patients.

  6. How Ebola virus counters the interferon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, A; Pöhlmann, S

    2012-09-01

    Zoonotic transmission of Ebola virus (EBOV) to humans causes a severe haemorrhagic fever in afflicted individuals with high case-fatality rates. Neither vaccines nor therapeutics are at present available to combat EBOV infection, making the virus a potential threat to public health. To devise antiviral strategies, it is important to understand which components of the immune system could be effective against EBOV infection. The interferon (IFN) system constitutes a key innate defence against viral infections and prevents development of lethal disease in mice infected with EBOV strains not adapted to this host. Recent research revealed that expression of the host cell IFN-inducible transmembrane proteins 1-3 (IFITM1-3) and tetherin is induced by IFN and restricts EBOV infection, at least in cell culture model systems. IFITMs, tetherin and other effector molecules of the IFN system could thus pose a potent barrier against EBOV spread in humans. However, EBOV interferes with signalling events required for human cells to express these proteins. Here, we will review the strategies employed by EBOV to fight the IFN system, and we will discuss how IFITM proteins and tetherin inhibit EBOV infection. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei Evades Nramp1 (Slc11a1- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Killing in Macrophages and Exhibits Nramp1-Dependent Virulence Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerachat Muangsombut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial survival in macrophages can be affected by the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1; also known as solute carrier family 11 member a1 or Slc11a1 which localizes to phagosome membranes and transports divalent cations, including iron. Little is known about the role of Nramp1 in Burkholderia infection, in particular whether this differs for pathogenic species like Burkholderia pseudomallei causing melioidosis or non-pathogenic species like Burkholderia thailandensis. Here we show that transfected macrophages stably expressing wild-type Nramp1 (Nramp1+ control the net replication of B. thailandensis, but not B. pseudomallei. Control of B. thailandensis was associated with increased cytokine responses, and could be abrogated by blocking NADPH oxidase-mediated production of reactive oxygen species but not by blocking generation of reactive nitrogen species. The inability of Nramp1+ macrophages to control B. pseudomallei was associated with rapid escape of bacteria from phagosomes, as indicated by decreased co-localization with LAMP1 compared to B. thailandensis. A B. pseudomallei bipB mutant impaired in escape from phagosomes was controlled to a greater extent than the parent strain in Nramp1+ macrophages, but was also attenuated in Nramp1− cells. Consistent with reduced escape from phagosomes, B. thailandensis formed fewer multinucleated giant cells in Nramp1+ macrophages at later time points compared to B. pseudomallei. B. pseudomallei exhibited elevated transcription of virulence-associated genes of Type VI Secretion System cluster 1 (T6SS-1, the Bsa Type III Secretion System (T3SS-3 and the bimA gene required for actin-based motility in Nramp1+ macrophages. Nramp1+ macrophages were found to contain decreased iron levels that may impact on expression of such genes. Our data show that B. pseudomallei is able to evade Nramp1- and NADPH oxidase-mediated killing in macrophages and that expression of virulence

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galia Ramírez-Toloza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68, T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP, trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF, C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT. Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs. All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP, alternative (AP or lectin pathways (LP. Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host

  9. EST: Evading Scientific Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeremy

    2001-01-01

    Examines chemical engineering students' attitudes to text and other parts of English language textbooks. A questionnaire was administered to a group of undergraduates. Results reveal one way students get around the problem of textbook reading. (Author/VWL)

  10. Evading the Boomerang Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Moreira, Solon; Reichstein, Toke

    2017-01-01

    Technology licensing agreements potentially can create future appropriability problems. Drawing on the appropriability literature, we argue that the inclusion of a grant-back clause in technology licensing agreements is an attempt to balance the gains from and protection of the focal firms’ techn...

  11. Evading the CKM Hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the presence of intrinsic charm in the hadrons' light-cone wave functions, even at a few percent level, provides new, competitive decay mechanisms for B decays which are nominally CKM-suppressed. For example, the weak decays of the B-meson to two-body exclusive states consisting of strange plus light hadrons, such as B → π K, are expected to be dominated by penguin contributions since the tree-level b → s u bar u decay is CKM suppressed However, higher Fock states in the B wave function containing charm quark pairs can mediate the decay via a CKM-favored b → s cbar c tree-level transition. Such intrinsic charm contributions can be phenomenologically significant. Since they mimic the amplitude structure of ''charming'' penguin contributions, charming penguins need not be penguins at all

  12. Leptin responses to bovine interferon- α and insulin in cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ... IFN- α injection produced a rapid increase in glucose and insulin levels but leptin levels did not show any alteration after the injection. ... Insulin levels rapidly increased in the blood and consequently a significant decrease in blood glucose level was recorded.

  13. Constitutively Active MAVS Inhibits HIV-1 Replication via Type I Interferon Secretion and Induction of HIV-1 Restriction Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Gupta

    Full Text Available Type I interferon is known to inhibit HIV-1 replication through the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISG, including a number of HIV-1 restriction factors. To better understand interferon-mediated HIV-1 restriction, we constructed a constitutively active form of the RIG-I adapter protein MAVS. Constitutive MAVS was generated by fusion of full length MAVS to a truncated form of the Epstein Barr virus protein LMP1 (ΔLMP1. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells contained high levels of type I interferons and inhibited HIV replication in both TZM-bl and primary human CD4+ T cells. Supernatant from ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells also inhibited replication of VSV-G pseudotyped single cycle SIV in TZM-bl cells, suggesting restriction was post-entry and common to both HIV and SIV. Gene array analysis of ΔLMP1-MAVS-transfected 293T cells and trans-activated CD4+ T cells showed significant upregulation of ISG, including previously characterized HIV restriction factors Viperin, Tetherin, MxB, and ISG56. Interferon blockade studies implicated interferon-beta in this response. In addition to direct viral inhibition, ΔLMP1-MAVS markedly enhanced secretion of IFN-β and IL-12p70 by dendritic cells and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells. Based on this immunostimulatory activity, an adenoviral vector (Ad5 expressing ΔLMP1-MAVS was tested as a molecular adjuvant in an HIV vaccine mouse model. Ad5-Gag antigen combined with Ad5-ΔLMP1-MAVS enhanced control of vaccinia-gag replication in a mouse challenge model, with 4/5 animals showing undetectable virus following challenge. Overall, ΔLMP1-MAVS is a promising reagent to inhibit HIV-1 replication in infected tissues and enhance vaccine-mediated immune responses, while avoiding toxicity associated with systemic type I interferon administration.

  14. Randomized trial of interferon-alpha plus ursodeoxycholic acid versus interferon plus placebo in patients with chronic hepatitis C resistant to interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poupon, R. E.; Bonnand, A. M.; Queneau, P. E.; Trépo, C.; Zarski, J. P. A.; Vetter, D.; Raabe, J. J.; Thieffin, G.; Larrey, D.; Grangé, J. D.; Capron, J. P.; Serfaty, L.; Chrétien, Y.; St Marc Girardin, M. F.; Mathiex-Fortunet, H.; Zafrani, E. S.; Guéchot, J.; Beuers, U.; Paumgartner, G.; Poupon, R.

    2000-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) could potentiate the effect of interferon (IFN) in patients with chronic hepatitis C resistant to IFN. We compared the efficacy of IFN with that of a combination of IFN and UDCA. Patients were randomized to receive UDCA (13-15 mg/kg/day) (n = 47) or placebo (n = 44) plus

  15. Pyrogenicity of interferon and its inducer in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, S J; Lin, M T

    1988-03-01

    The effects of intracerebral administration of interferon (IFN) or its inducer polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) on thermoregulatory responses were assessed in conscious rabbits. Administration of IFN (10(2)-10(6) IU) or poly I:C (0.012-12 micrograms) into the preoptic anterior hypothalamus or the third cerebral ventricle caused a dose-dependent fever in rabbits at three ambient temperatures (Ta) tested. In the cold (Ta = 8 degrees C), the fever was due to increased metabolism, whereas in the heat (Ta = 32 degrees C) the fever was due to a reduction in respiratory evaporative heat loss and ear skin blood flow. At the moderate environmental temperature (Ta = 22 degrees C), the fever was due to increased metabolism and cutaneous vasoconstriction. Compared with the febrile responses induced by cerebroventricular route injection of IFN or poly I:C, the hypothalamic route of injection required a much lower dose of IFN or poly I:C to produce a similar fever. Furthermore, the fever induced by intrahypothalamic injection of IFN or poly I:C was reduced by pretreatment of animals with a systemic dose of indomethacin (an inhibitor of all prostaglandins formation) or cycloheximide (an inhibitor of protein synthesis). The data indicate that IFN or its inducer may act through the endogenous release of a prostaglandin or a protein factor of an unknown chemical nature in the preoptic anterior hypothalamic region to induce fever in rabbits. The fever induced by IFN or its inducer is brought about by a decrease in heat loss and/or an increase in heat production in rabbits.

  16. Bilateral Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Developed under Interferon Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Selcukbiricik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Interferon is a glycoprotein produced by assigned cells of immune system. It has been used in many different diseases. Although flu-like syndrome, myalgia, rash, hypotension, thrombocytopenia and peripheral neuropathy due to interferon use are encountered frequently, ocular side effects are rare, generally mild and transient. Case Report. 47-year-old female patient, presented with a mass lesion in right renal pelvis. Right radical nephrectomy was applied and the histopathological examination was consistent with papillary renal cell carcinoma. Interferon alpha treatment was started subcutaneously at the dose of 5 MIU/3 times in a week. Four weeks after the interferon therapy, suddenly bilateral visual loss developed. We discussed the diagnosis, followup, and treatment of the patient who developed irreversible ischemic optic neuropathy and had no previous known primary systemic disease to cause this condition. Conclusion. We suggest that patients should be screened for risk factors causing optic ischemic neuropathy, before interferon therapy. Although there was no adequate information in the literature for the followup, patients should be monitorized before, 1 month after, and 2 months after the treatment. And if there is no complication, we suggest that they should be followed up at 3-month intervals.

  17. In vitro anti-proliferative effect of interferon alpha in solid tumors: A potential predicative test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchsberger, N.; Kubes, M.; Kontsek, P.; Borecky, L.; Hornak, M.; Silvanova; Godal, A.; Svec, J.

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro test for the anti-proliferative effect of human leukocyte interferon (IFN-alpha) was performed in primary cultures of tumor cells obtained from 32 patients with either malignant melanoma (13), renal carcinoma (4) or bladder carcinoma (15). Our results demonstrated activity of IFN in all three groups of solid tumors. However, appreciable differences in sensitivity to anti-proliferative effect of IFN between individual tumors of the same type were found. The potential of this anti-proliferative test for prediction of treatment response in IFN-therapy is discussed. (author)

  18. The N-terminus of Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus NSs protein is essential for interferon antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    Van Knippenberg, Ingeborg Christine; Carlton-Smith, Charles; Elliott, Richard Michael

    2010-01-01

    This work is supported by UK MRC and BBRC Bunyamwera virus NSs protein is involved in the inhibition of cellular transcription and the interferon (IFN) response, and it interacts with the Med8 component of Mediator. A spontaneous mutant of a recombinant NSs-deleted Bunyamwera virus (rBUNdelNSs2) was identified and characterized. This mutant virus, termed mBUNNSs22, expresses a 21 aa N-terminally truncated form of NSs. Like rBUNdelNSs2, mBUNNSs22 is attenuated in IFN-deficient cells, and to...

  19. Interferon therapy of acute respiratory viral infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    within the age limit and corresponded to the temperature response. Analyzing the dynamics of clinical symptoms of acute respiratory viral infection in both groups, it should be noted that there was a persistent tendency to lower body temperature in patients, both in the main and control groups. However, in the group of patients receiving Laferobionum®, the decrease in the temperature curve occurred faster, its normalization was noted already on the 4th day of therapy in 100 % of patients, whereas in the control group on the 4th day of the disease the body temperature remained subfebrile in 12 (28.6 %, on the 5th day — in 2 (4.8 % children. Complete blood count in children of the main and control groups at the beginning of the disease showed leukopenia of varying severity, relative lymphocytosis, and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. On the 5th day of therapy in patients of the main group, the number of leukocytes was normalized, the relative lymphocytosis persisted against the background of a decrease in ESR. While in the control group, the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood remained lower with an elevated level of ESR. During the whole period of observation, the presence and nature of possible complications of acute respiratory viral infection was assessed. The total duration of the observation period was 14 days. During the observation period, no complications were detected in any of the patients in the main or control groups. During the time of the clinical trial, no adverse reactions were recorded that could be associated with the administration of Laferobionum®. There were no cases of exacerbation of existing chronic diseases in the children of the main group, while 1 (2.4 % person from the control group had exacerbation of chronic tonsillitis. Evaluation of the effectiveness of therapy with the drug was carried out on the 5th day of treatment. Since one of the effectiveness criteria was the absence of clinical signs of the disease at the

  20. Stability of human interferon-beta 1: oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is inactive but is reactivated by monomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, J; Yamazaki, S; Kawaguchi, K; Kimura, S; Shimizu, H

    1989-10-05

    Human interferon-beta 1 is extremely stable is a low ionic strength solution of pH 2 such as 10 mM HCl at 37 degrees C. However, the presence of 0.15 M NaCl led to a remarkable loss of antiviral activity. The molecular-sieve high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that, whereas completely active human interferon-beta 1 eluted as a 25 kDa species (monomeric form), the inactivated preparation eluted primarily as a 90 kDa species (oligomeric form). The specific activity (units per mg protein) of the oligomeric form was approx. 10% of that of the monomeric form. This observation shows that oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is apparently in an inactive form. When the oligomeric eluate was resolved by polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), it appeared to be monomeric under non-reducing conditions. Monomerization of the oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 by treatment with 1% SDS, fully regenerated its antiviral activity. These results suggest that the inactivation of the human interferon-beta 1 preparation was caused by its oligomerization via hydrophobic interactions without the formation of intermolecular disulphide bonds. These oligomers can be dissociated by SDS to restore biological activity.

  1. Interferons and their potential in the treatment of ocular inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Mackensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Friederike Mackensen,1 Regina Max,2 Matthias D Becker31Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Interdisciplinary Uveitis Center, University of Heidelberg, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Triemli Hospital Zürich, SwitzerlandAbstract: Since their discovery in the 1950s interferons have been the scope of investigation in many diseases as therapeutic as well as pathogenetic factors. We know they have immune stimulatory and immune regulatory effects. This apparently counter-intuitive mechanism can be summarized as immunomodulatory action and seems to be very effective in a number of ocular inflammatory diseases. We review the current knowledge of interferons in immunity and autoimmunity and show their use in clinical ophthalmologic practice.Keywords: interferon, uveitis, treatment, inflammation

  2. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by IRF3 promotes replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Dhar, Jayeeta; Goswami, Ramansu; Sen, Ganes C; Barik, Sailen

    2015-03-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against microbial insult. The transcription factor, IRF3, is needed by mammalian cells to mount innate immune responses against many microbes, especially viruses. IRF3 remains inactive in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells; upon virus infection, it gets phosphorylated and then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to the promoters of antiviral genes and induces their expression. Such genes include type I interferons (IFNs) as well as Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs). IRF3-/- cells support enhanced replication of many viruses and therefore, the corresponding mice are highly susceptible to viral pathogenesis. Here, we provide evidence for an unexpected pro-microbial role of IRF3: the replication of the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, was significantly impaired in IRF3-/- cells. In exploring whether the transcriptional activity of IRF3 was important for its pro-parasitic function, we found that ISGs induced by parasite-activated IRF3 were indeed essential, whereas type I interferons were not important. To delineate the signaling pathway that activates IRF3 in response to parasite infection, we used genetically modified human and mouse cells. The pro-parasitic signaling pathway, which we termed PISA (Parasite-IRF3 Signaling Activation), activated IRF3 without any involvement of the Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor pathways, thereby ruling out a role of parasite-derived RNA species in activating PISA. Instead, PISA needed the presence of cGAS, STING, TBK1 and IRF3, indicating the necessity of DNA-triggered signaling. To evaluate the physiological significance of our in vitro findings, IRF3-/- mice were challenged with parasite infection and their morbidity and mortality were measured. Unlike WT mice, the IRF3-/- mice did not support replication of the parasite and were resistant to pathogenesis caused by it. Our results revealed a new paradigm in which the antiviral host factor, IRF3, plays a cell

  3. Type I interferon and pattern recognition receptor signaling following particulate matter inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdely Aaron

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welding, a process that generates an aerosol containing gases and metal-rich particulates, induces adverse physiological effects including inflammation, immunosuppression and cardiovascular dysfunction. This study utilized microarray technology and subsequent pathway analysis as an exploratory search for markers/mechanisms of in vivo systemic effects following inhalation. Mice were exposed by inhalation to gas metal arc – stainless steel (GMA-SS welding fume at 40 mg/m3 for 3 hr/d for 10 d and sacrificed 4 hr, 14 d and 28 d post-exposure. Whole blood cells, aorta and lung were harvested for global gene expression analysis with subsequent Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR. Serum was collected for protein profiling. Results The novel finding was a dominant type I interferon signaling network with the transcription factor Irf7 as a central component maintained through 28 d. Remarkably, these effects showed consistency across all tissues indicating a systemic type I interferon response that was complemented by changes in serum proteins (decreased MMP-9, CRP and increased VCAM1, oncostatin M, IP-10. In addition, pulmonary expression of interferon α and β and Irf7 specific pattern recognition receptors (PRR and signaling molecules (Ddx58, Ifih1, Dhx58, ISGF3 were induced, an effect that showed specificity when compared to other inflammatory exposures. Also, a canonical pathway indicated a coordinated response of multiple PRR and associated signaling molecules (Tlr7, Tlr2, Clec7a, Nlrp3, Myd88 to inhalation of GMA-SS. Conclusion This methodological approach has the potential to identify consistent, prominent and/or novel pathways and provides insight into mechanisms that contribute to pulmonary and systemic effects following toxicant exposure.

  4. Interferon-γ inhibits ghrelin expression and secretion via a somatostatin-mediated mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Døssing, Kristina B V; Aabakke, Anna JM

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if and how the proinflammatory cytokine interferon ¿ (IFN¿) affects ghrelin expression in mice.......To investigate if and how the proinflammatory cytokine interferon ¿ (IFN¿) affects ghrelin expression in mice....

  5. Interferon-γ inhibits ghrelin expression and secretion via a somatostatin-mediated mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Døssing, Kristina B V; Aabakke, Anna JM

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if and how the proinflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ) affects ghrelin expression in mice.......To investigate if and how the proinflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ) affects ghrelin expression in mice....

  6. Effectiveness of interferon-[beta], ACNU, and radiation therapy in pediatric patients with brainstem glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Jun; Mizuno, Masaaki; Sugita, Kenichiro [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Kito, Akira

    1992-12-01

    Sixteen pediatric patients with brainstem glioma were treated with a combination of interferon-[beta], 1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)-methyl -3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride (ACNU), and radiation therapy (IAR therapy). All patients received 1-1.5 million IU/day of interferon-[beta] intravenously for 1 week of each 6-week cycle. In addition, ACNU (2-3 mg/kg) was given on the 2nd day of each cycle. Conventional focal irradiation (1.5-2 Gy/day for 5 days to a total dosage of 40-60 Gy) was administered beginning on day 3. Patients underwent at least two 6-week cycles. Adverse effects included nausea, vomiting, and myelosuppression, but were mild and transient. Response to treatment was evaluated by the reduction in tumor size measured on postcontrast computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance images. Responses occurred in 10 of 11 patients with the intrinsic type of brainstem glioma, including three complete and seven partial responses. Two of the five patients with exophytic type gliomas partially responded. The median survival was 15.7 months, a remarkable improvement over the natural course of this disease. These results indicate that IAR therapy is a useful primary treatment for pediatric patients with brainstem gliomas. (author).

  7. Conjunctival papilloma caused by human papillomavirus type 11 treated with systemic interferon in a five-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okan, Gökhan; Ayan, Inci; Karslioğlu, Safak; Altiok, Ender; Yenmiş, Güven; Vural, Gürcan

    2010-01-01

    Conjunctival papilloma is a benign tumor of the conjunctival mucosa. In childhood, papilloma represents 7-10% of conjunctival tumors. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6 and HPV-11 are the major HPV types responsible for conjunctival lesions. A five-year-old boy with a two-year history of conjunctival papilloma caused by HPV type 11 treated with systemic interferon alpha is reported and the literature is reviewed.

  8. Treatment profile of hepatitis C patients - a comparison of interferon alpha 2a and 2b treatment regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, S.; Rajper, J.; Nafay, S.; Imran, K.; Khan, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the side effects, cost, end treatment response (ETR) and Sustained viral response (SVR) with combination therapy of either interferon alpha 2a or 2b in combination with Ribavarin. Study Design: Randomized Control Clinical Trial (RCCT). Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Sarwar Zuberi Liver Centre (SZLC), Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK), from May 2004 to July 2009. Methodology: Patients positive for qualitative HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotype 3 were included. Patients with decompensated cirrhosis, severe depressive illness, autoimmune hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, pregnancy, heart failure, uncontrolled diabetes, obstructive pulmonary disease, children less than three years and patients who had previously received treatment were excluded. Single blind randomization using computerized randomization list was done and patients divided into groups A and B, those requiring treatment were given injection Interferon 3 million units (MU) subcutaneously (SC) three times/week and Ribavarin 1000 mg per day (weight greater or equal to 75kg) and 1200 mg/day (weight > 75kg) orally with either interferon alpha 2a (group A; FDA approved products) or alpha 2b (group B; non FDA approved product). Demographics, side effects, ETR and SVR were noted. ETR was defined as absence of virus at the end of treatment and SVR was taken as absence of HCV RNA at 6 months after completion of treatment. Results: There were a total 310 patients with mean age of 34.07 +- 9.38 years including 52.4% males, (n=162). Majority of the patients were from North Pakistan. There were 155 patients each in group A and group B respectively. The cost of treatment for interferon alpha for a single patient for 6 months was Rs 60,000, while for Interferon alpha 2b was Rs 30,000. Side effects (fever initially, followed by fatigue, headache, musculoskeletal pain, depression, alopecia, insomnia, and anorexia) were more prominent in group B when compared

  9. Evaluation of Gamma Interferon and Antibody Tuberculosis Tests in Alpacas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Tom; Clifford, Derek; Dexter, Ian; Brewer, Jacky; Smith, Noel; Waring, Laura; Crawshaw, Tim; Gillgan, Steve; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Lawrence, John; Clarke, John; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Vordermeier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance of cell-based and antibody blood tests for the antemortem diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in South American camelids (SAC). The sensitivity and specificity of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay, two lateral flow rapid antibody tests (Stat-Pak and Dual Path Platform [DPP]), and two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody tests (Idexx and Enferplex) were determined using diseased alpacas from Mycobacterium bovis culture-confirmed breakdown herds and TB-free alpacas from geographical areas with no history of bovine TB, respectively. Our results show that while the sensitivities of the IFN-γ and antibody tests were similar (range of 57.7% to 66.7%), the specificity of the IFN-γ test (89.1%) was lower than those of any of the antibody tests (range of 96.4% to 97.4%). This lower specificity of the IFN-γ test was at least in part due to undisclosed Mycobacterium microti infection in the TB-free cohort, which stimulates a positive purified protein derivative (PPD) response. The sensitivity of infection detection could be increased by combining two antibody tests, but even the use of all four antibody tests failed to detect all diseased alpacas. These antibody-negative alpacas were IFN-γ positive. We found that the maximum sensitivity could be achieved only by the combination of the IFN-γ test with two antibody tests in a “test package,” although this resulted in decreased specificity. The data from this evaluation of tests with defined sensitivity and specificity provide potential options for antemortem screening of SAC for TB in herd breakdown situations and could also find application in movement testing and tracing investigations. PMID:22914362

  10. Superiority of Interferon-Free Regimens for Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younossi, Zobair M.; Stepanova, Maria; Esteban, Rafael; Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sulkowski, Mark; Henry, Linda; Nader, Fatema; Cable, Rebecca; Afendy, Mariam; Hunt, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as quality of life and work productivity are important for measuring patient's experience. We assessed PROs during and after treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Data were obtained from a phase 3 open label study of sofosbuvir and ribavirin (SOF + RBV) with and without interferon (IFN). Patients completed 4 PRO assessment instruments (SF-36, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy—Fatigue, Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire— HCV, Work Productivity and Activity—Specific Health Problem) before, during, and after treatment. A total of 533 patients with chronic HCV were enrolled; 28.9% treatment-naïve, 23.1% cirrhotic, 219 received IFN + SOF + RBV and 314 received IFN-free SOF + RBV. At baseline, there were no differences in PROs between the IFN-free and IFN-containing treatment arms (all P > 0.05). During treatment, patients receiving IFN + SOF + RBV had a substantial impairment in their PROs (up to −24.4% by treatment week 12, up to −8.3% at week 4 post-treatment). The PRO decrements seen in the SOF + RBV arm were smaller in magnitude (up to −7.1% by treatment week 12), and all returned to baseline or improved by post-treatment week 4. By 12 weeks after treatment cessation, patients who achieved sustained viral response-12 showed some improvement of PRO scores regardless of the regimen (up to +7.1%, P < 0.0001) or previous treatment experience. In multivariate analysis, the use of IFN was independently associated with lower PROs. IFN-based regimens have a profoundly negative impact to PROs. By contrast, the impact of RBV on these PROs is relatively modest. Achieving HCV cure is associated with improvement of most of the PRO scores. PMID:28207507

  11. Inflammation activates the interferon signaling pathways in taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Minliang; Brand, Joseph; Huang, Liquan

    2007-10-03

    Patients with viral and bacterial infections or other inflammatory illnesses often experience taste dysfunctions. The agents responsible for these taste disorders are thought to be related to infection-induced inflammation, but the mechanisms are not known. As a first step in characterizing the possible role of inflammation in taste disorders, we report here evidence for the presence of interferon (IFN)-mediated signaling pathways in taste bud cells. IFN receptors, particularly the IFN-gamma receptor IFNGR1, are coexpressed with the taste cell-type markers neuronal cell adhesion molecule and alpha-gustducin, suggesting that both the taste receptor cells and synapse-forming cells in the taste bud can be stimulated by IFN. Incubation of taste bud-containing lingual epithelia with recombinant IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma triggered the IFN-mediated signaling cascades, resulting in the phosphorylation of the downstream STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 1) transcription factor. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid into mice, mimicking bacterial and viral infections, respectively, altered gene expression patterns in taste bud cells. Furthermore, the systemic administration of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma significantly increased the number of taste bud cells undergoing programmed cell death. These findings suggest that bacterial and viral infection-induced IFNs can act directly on taste bud cells, affecting their cellular function in taste transduction, and that IFN-induced apoptosis in taste buds may cause abnormal cell turnover and skew the representation of different taste bud cell types, leading to the development of taste disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing direct evidence that inflammation can affect taste buds through cytokine signaling pathways.

  12. Interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, P; Elia, G; Bonatti, A

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the Borrelia type, that affects about 300,000 people a year in the USA and 65,000 people a year in Europe. Borrelia infection, and Lyme disease, following occupational exposure has been frequently reported in USA, Europe and Asia. The manifestations of Lyme disease include erythema migrans (EM), arthritis, neuroborrelliosis (NB), and others. Cytokines and chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of Borrelia infection, and they are critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses, in particular of the induction of interferon (IFN)-γ and IFN-γ dependent chemokines. In EM high levels of T helper (Th) 1 cells chemoattranctants [monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP- 10), and IFN-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC)] have been shown. Synovial tissues and fluids of patients with Lyme Arthritis (LA) (overall with antibiotic-refractory LA) contained exceptionally high levels of Th1 chemoattractants and cytokines, particularly MIG and IFN-γ. In NB concentrations of IP-10 and I-TAC in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were significantly higher, suggesting that IP-10 and I-TAC create a chemokine gradient between the CSF and serum and recruite C-X-C chemokine receptor 3-expressing memory CD4+ T-cells into the CSF of these patients. A positive association between the disseminating capacity of B. burgdorferi and early type I IFN induction has also been shown. These results suggest that IFN-γ dependent chemokines are important biomarkers to monitor the progression and diffusion of the disease in patients with Borrelia infection; further larger studies are needed.

  13. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These proteins are essential for cell survival, and intuitively the ER must activate stress responses to evade immediate cell dysfunction as the cell processes lag behind. This review will discuss mainly the ER and its role in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of epidemiologically-relevant diseases, as well as updates on ...

  14. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086388 Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Ko....csml) Show Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. PubmedID 18086388 Title ...Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Authors K

  15. Interferon gamma peptidomimetic targeted to interstitial myofibroblasts attenuates renal fibrosis after unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poosti, Fariba; Bansal, Ruchi; Yazdani, Saleh; Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Poelstra, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis cannot be adequately treated since anti-fibrotic treatment is lacking. Interferon-gamma is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with anti-fibrotic properties. Clinical use of interferon-gamma is hampered due to inflammation-mediated systemic side effects. We used an interferon-gamma

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma after alpha-interferon treatment for HIV-negative T ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although interferon was successful in controlling the lymphoma the clinical course was complicated by the rapid development of aggressive, fatal Kaposi's sarcoma shortly after cessation of interferon treatment. It is suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of interferon therapy (or the T -cell lymphoma or both) may have ...

  17. DMPD: Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16095970 Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to Tolls. Jefferies CA, Fit...zgerald KA. Trends Mol Med. 2005 Sep;11(9):403-11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Interferon gene regulation: not all roads... lead to Tolls. PubmedID 16095970 Title Interferon gene regulation: not all roads lead to

  18. Regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly in two patients with hepatitis-C-related liver cirrhosis after interferon and ribavirin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Jae Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of hepatitis C: transition from interferon-based therapies to direct-acting antiviral agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanaa M Kamal1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Hepatology, Gastroenterology and Tropical Medicine, Ain Shams Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt, 2Department of Medicine, Salman Bin Abdul Aziz College of Medicine, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV has emerged as a major viral pandemic over the past two decades, infecting 170 million individuals, which equates to approximately 3% of the world's population. The prevalence of HCV varies according to geographic region, being highest in developing countries such as Egypt. HCV has a high tendency to induce chronic progressive liver damage in the form of hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, or liver cancer. To date, there is no vaccine against HCV infection. Combination therapy comprising PEGylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin has been the standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C for more than a decade. However, many patients still do not respond to therapy or develop adverse events. Recently, direct antiviral agents such as protease inhibitors, polymerase inhibitors, or NS5A inhibitors have been used to augment PEGylated interferon and ribavirin, resulting in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. However, most clinical trials have focused on assessing the efficacy and safety of direct antiviral agents in patients with genotype 1, and the response of other HCV genotypes has not been elucidated. Moreover, the prohibitive costs of such triple therapies will limit their use in patients in developing countries where most of the HCV infection exists. Understanding the host and viral factors associated with viral clearance is necessary for individualizing therapy to maximize sustained virologic response rates, prevent progression to liver disease, and increase the overall benefits of therapy with respect to its costs. Genome wide studies have shown significant associations between a set of polymorphisms in the region of the interleukin-28B (IL

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → FMDV L pro inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-α1/β mRNA expression. → L pro inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter. → L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. → L pro inhibits IFN-α1/β promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. → The ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not necessary to inhibit IFN-α1/β activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L pro ) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-β (IFN-β) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-α1/β expression caused by L pro was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-α/β. Furthermore, overexpression of L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L pro mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-κB, L pro also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  1. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  2. 5HT(4) agonists inhibit interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II and B7 costimulatory molecules expression on cultured astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, Esther M.; Wilczak, Nadine; Wilschut, Jan C.; Glazenburg, Lisa; Chesik, Daniel; Kroese, Frans G. M.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    A failure of tight control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes may play a role in the development of autoimmune responses in multiple sclerosis. The 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonists cisapride and prucalopride, at concentrations between 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M, reduced interferon-gamma-induced

  3. The type I interferon signature in leukocyte subsets from peripheral blood of patients with early arthritis: a major contribution by granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tamarah D.; Lübbers, Joyce; Turk, Samina; Vosslamber, Saskia; Mantel, Elise; Bontkes, Hetty J.; van der Laken, Conny J.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2016-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) signature in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has shown clinical relevance in relation to disease onset and therapeutic response. Identification of the cell type(s) contributing to this IFN signature could provide insight into the signature's functional consequences. The aim of

  4. Plasma membrane Toll-like receptor activation increases bacterial uptake but abrogates endosomal Lactobacillus acidophilus induction of interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Louise; Welsby, Iain; Lund, Lisbeth Drozd

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a potent interferon-β (IFN-β) response in dendritic cells (DCs) by a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -dependent mechanism, in turn leading to strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) production. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of different types of endocyt...

  5. C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells have a dysfunctional antiviral RNA interference response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug E Brackney

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes rely on RNA interference (RNAi as their primary defense against viral infections. To this end, the combination of RNAi and invertebrate cell culture systems has become an invaluable tool in studying virus-vector interactions. Nevertheless, a recent study failed to detect an active RNAi response to West Nile virus (WNV infection in C6/36 (Aedes albopictus cells, a mosquito cell line frequently used to study arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses. Therefore, we sought to determine if WNV actively evades the host's RNAi response or if C6/36 cells have a dysfunctional RNAi pathway. C6/36 and Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells were infected with WNV (Flaviviridae, Sindbis virus (SINV, Togaviridae and La Crosse virus (LACV, Bunyaviridae and total RNA recovered from cell lysates. Small RNA (sRNA libraries were constructed and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. In S2 cells, virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs from all three viruses were predominantly 21 nt in length, a hallmark of the RNAi pathway. However, in C6/36 cells, viRNAs were primarily 17 nt in length from WNV infected cells and 26-27 nt in length in SINV and LACV infected cells. Furthermore, the origin (positive or negative viral strand and distribution (position along viral genome of S2 cell generated viRNA populations was consistent with previously published studies, but the profile of sRNAs isolated from C6/36 cells was altered. In total, these results suggest that C6/36 cells lack a functional antiviral RNAi response. These findings are analogous to the type-I interferon deficiency described in Vero (African green monkey kidney cells and suggest that C6/36 cells may fail to accurately model mosquito-arbovirus interactions at the molecular level.

  6. Effects of Interferon-α/β on HBV Replication Determined by Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Chen, Wen-ling; Ou, Jing-hsiung James

    2011-01-01

    Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β) are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low. PMID:21829354

  7. Dexamethasone, all trans retinoic acid and interferon alpha 2a in patients with refractory multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés, A; Rosas, A; Huerta-Guzmán, J; Talavera, A; Cleto, S

    1999-02-01

    Few effective regimen are available for patients with refractory multiple myeloma (RMM). Generally, responses are scarce and disease free survival is very short. We developed a new therapeutic option in these patients using dexamethasone (40 mg/m2, i.v., daily, days 1 to 4), all-trans retinoic acid (45 mg/m2, po, daily, days 5 to 14) and interferon alpha 2a (9.0 MU, daily, subcutaneously, days 5 to 14). The treatment was administered every 21 days for 6 cycles. In a pilot study, 12 patients, heavily treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy and in some cases with interferon, were allocated to receive the afore mentioned treatment. Response was observed in 10 patients (83%). With a median follow-up of 36.1 months (range 27 to 41), seven patients remain alive and disease-free without any treatment. Two patients were failures and have died due to tumor progression. Toxicity was mild and all patients received treatment according to the planned doses of drugs. The use of biological modifiers in combination with dexamethasone offer a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with refractory multiple myeloma. More studies are warranted to define the role of this type of treatment.

  8. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Bierne

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues.

  9. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-a) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-a compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  10. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 expressed in stably ... The representing 26 kDa protein band of IFN-λ2 was detected by SDS-PAGE and ... The antiproliferative activity of hIFN-λ2 was determined by MTT assay.

  11. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  12. Interferon-gamma treatment kinetics among patients with active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is essential for defence against Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, levels in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) and changes during treatment have not been documented in our tuberculosis patients in Nigeria, hence this study has been carried out. Objective: To determine variations, ...

  13. Interferon α treatment of molluscum contagiosum in immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Hourihane, J.; Hodges, E.; Smith, J.; Keefe, M.; Jones, A.; Connett, G.

    1999-01-01

    A sister (aged 6 years) and brother (aged 8 years) presented four months apart with severe molluscum contagiosum. Both children demonstrated clinical and laboratory evidence of combined immunodeficiency. The extent of skin involvement by molluscum contagiosum precluded conventional treatment as well as intralesional interferon α (IFNα). Both subjects responded well to subcutaneous IFNα.



  14. Guarding the frontiers: the biology of type III interferons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wack, Andreas; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa; Hartmann, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) or IFN-λs regulate a similar set of genes as type I IFNs, but whereas type I IFNs act globally, IFN-λs primarily target mucosal epithelial cells and protect them against the frequent viral attacks that are typical for barrier tissues. IFN-λs thereby help to maintain...

  15. Newer Clinical Strategies for Combining Interferon and Cytotoxic Agents Against Solid Tumours and Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Wadler

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of interferons in the treatment of cancer continues to evolve. Despite limited single agent activity against solid tumours, interferons now appear to have an important role as modulators of the activity of a variety of cytotoxic drugs. Clinical benefits have been observed for combinations of interferons and alkylating agents against low grade lymphomas, interferons and dacarbazine against malignant melanoma, and interferons and 5-fluorouracil against gastrointestinal and genitourinary malignancies. Further progress will depend on a grealer understanding of the biology of the interaction.

  16. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is a Cytosolic DNA Sensor that Activates the Type-I Interferon Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers the host immune responses such as the production of type-I interferons (IFN). Cytosolic DNA induces IFN through the production of cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced IFNβ in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and IFNβ induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP. PMID:23258413

  17. Application of interferon modulators to overcome partial resistance of human ovarian cancers to VSV-GP oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we described an oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus variant pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, VSV-GP, which was highly effective in glioblastoma. Here, we tested its potency for the treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Effective oncolytic activity of VSV-GP could be demonstrated in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts in mice; however, remission was temporary in most mice. Analysis of the innate immune response revealed that ovarian cancer cell lines were able to respond to and produce type I interferon, inducing an antiviral state upon virus infection. This is in stark contrast to published data for other cancer cell lines, which were mostly found to be interferon incompetent. We showed that in vitro this antiviral state could be reverted by combining VSV-GP with the JAK1/2-inhibitor ruxolitinib. In addition, for the first time, we report the in vivo enhancement of oncolytic virus treatment by ruxolitinib, both in subcutaneous as well as in orthotopic xenograft mouse models, without causing significant additional toxicity. In conclusion, VSV-GP has the potential to be a potent and safe oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer, especially when combined with an inhibitor of the interferon response.

  18. Randomized study of initial treatment with radiationter dot MCNU or radiationter dot MCNUter dot interferon-. beta. for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiya, Katsuzo; Uozumi, Tohru; Kurisu, Kaoru (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1990-02-01

    The efficacy of radiation{center dot}MCNU (MR group) or radiation{center dot}MCNU{center dot}interferon-{beta} (IMR group) for malignant glioma was studied by a randomized trial at numerous medical facilities. MR group was irradiated with 50{approx}60 Gy and intravenously injected with 2 mg/kg of MCNU on the initial day of irradiation and 6 weeks later. IMR group was also given intravenous administration of interferon-{beta} at the dose of 2x10{sup 6}IU/m{sup 2} for 5 serial-days every eight weeks. There was no difference in background between the two groups. The response rate in MR group and IMR group was 44.4% (4/9) and 30.0% (3/10), respectively, showing no significant difference. The resected tumor volume before the start of these regimens seemed to correlate the response to the treatment in both groups. The major toxicity was myelosuppression, especially using MCNU with interferon-{beta}. These results indicated that this combined therapy is effective for malignant glioma, and should be executed further trials and follow up study. (author).

  19. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions.Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings.Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  20. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Degang; Shui, Tiejun; Miranda, Jake W; Gilson, Danny J; Song, Zhengyu; Chen, Jia; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Jianyu; Yang, Jun; Jing, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions. Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg) cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings. Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  1. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wuqi; Kao, Wenping; Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway

  2. Interferon-alpha treatment of children with chronic hepatitis D virus infection: the Greek experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalekos, G N; Galanakis, E; Zervou, E; Tzoufi, M; Lapatsanis, P D; Tsianos, E V

    2000-01-01

    The therapeutic experience of interferon-alpha therapy against hepatitis D virus infection in affected children is rather limited. For this reason, we conducted a retrospective study (duration: 1991-1995) in order to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of interferon-alpha in children suffering from chronic hepatitis D in Northwestern Greece. Seven children who were found to be infected with HDV in a total of 324 children seropositive for hepatitis B virus infection during the 5-year period of the study were treated with interferon-alpha, 3 x 10(6) U/m2 body surface area, intramuscularly or subcutaneously, 3 times weekly for 1 year (after an informed consent obtained from their parents). Patients were assessed monthly by hematological serological and biochemical tests. Clinical progress, levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, hepatitis D ribonucleic acid (HDV-RNA) and hepatitis B deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV-DNA), seroconversion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and Hepatitis Be Antigen (HBeAg) and liver histology were used as response criteria. Posttreatment alanine transferase levels were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) but Immunoglobulin M and total anti-hepatitis D virus (anti-HDV) antibodies remained positive in all, while hepatitis D ribonucleic acid persisted positive in 4 cases. In addition, no seroconversion of HBsAg or HBeAg was noted and the liver histology progress was disappointing. Side effects including mild fever, arthralgias and malaise and reversible neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were common, but not particularly disturbing. Nevertheless, the children remained fully active on treatment, felt well and attended school. Initially 4 children had been below the 10th percentile for weight and height. All thrived during treatment and two crossed above the 10th percentile indicating height velocity and body mass index increase. The administration of regular interferon-alpha doses for treating children with chronic hepatitis D was safe as

  3. Induction of type I interferon signaling determines the relative pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Parker

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous success of S. aureus as a human pathogen has been explained primarily by its array of virulence factors that enable the organism to evade host immunity. Perhaps equally important, but less well understood, is the importance of the intensity of the host response in determining the extent of pathology induced by S. aureus infection, particularly in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We compared the pathogenesis of infection caused by two phylogenetically and epidemiologically distinct strains of S. aureus whose behavior in humans has been well characterized. Induction of the type I IFN cascade by strain 502A, due to a NOD2-IRF5 pathway, was the major factor in causing severe pneumonia and death in a murine model of pneumonia and was associated with autolysis and release of peptidogylcan. In contrast to USA300, 502A was readily eliminated from epithelial surfaces in vitro. Nonetheless, 502A caused significantly increased tissue damage due to the organisms that were able to invade systemically and trigger type I IFN responses, and this was ameliorated in Ifnar⁻/⁻ mice. The success of USA300 to cause invasive infection appears to depend upon its resistance to eradication from epithelial surfaces, but not production of specific toxins. Our studies illustrate the important and highly variable role of type I IFN signaling within a species and suggest that targeted immunomodulation of specific innate immune signaling cascades may be useful to prevent the excessive morbidity associated with S. aureus pneumonia.

  4. Interferon and ribavarin associated depression in hcv patients and role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, K.; Hussain, C.A.; Amer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of depression associated with antiviral therapy of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and effect of selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat these depressive symptoms. Type of Study: Observational Analytical study. Place of Study and Duration: The study was conducted at Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot Pakistan from February 2009 to July 2010. Subjects and Methods: All the patients in this study were suffering from HCV infection and were managed with Interferon (3 m.i.u. s/c thrice weekly) and Cap Ribavirin (400 mg bid) for six months. Patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Urdu Version and Beck's Depressive Inventory (BDI) Scores after twelve weeks of antiviral therapy. Depressed patients were managed with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for six weeks and again evaluated on HADS and BDI Scores. Response to SSRIs was defined as complete response, partial response and no response. Results: A total of 105 patients were studied out of which 75 were male and 30 were female with mean age 29.4 years. Out of these 54 (51.43%) patients developed depression and this tendency to develop depression was not related with the age and sex of the patients. The mean HADS and BDI scores before and after treatments with SSRIs were compared for significance and it was quite significant. There was not a single patient who did not show response to SSRIs. Conclusion: Depression is frequently associated with antiviral therapy of HCV RNA viraemia with interferon and SSRIs have proved an effective and safe remedy in these patients. (author)

  5. Human endogenous retrovirus expression is inversely related with the up-regulation of interferon-inducible genes in the skin of patients with lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marcelle Almeida de Sousa; Gavioli, Camila Fátima Biancardi; Pereira, Nátalli Zanete; de Carvalho, Gabriel Costa; Domingues, Rosana; Aoki, Valéria; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a common inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Reports of a common transactivation of quiescent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) support the connection of viruses to the disease. HERVs are ancient retroviral sequences in the human genome and their transcription is often deregulated in cancer and autoimmune diseases. We explored the transcriptional activity of HERV sequences as well as the antiviral restriction factor and interferon-inducible genes in the skin from LP patients and healthy control (HC) donors. The study included 13 skin biopsies from patients with LP and 12 controls. Real-time PCR assay identified significant decrease in the HERV-K gag and env mRNA expression levels in LP subjects, when compared to control group. The expressions of HERV-K18 and HERV-W env were also inhibited in the skin of LP patients. We observed a strong correlation between HERV-K gag with other HERV sequences, regardless the down-modulation of transcripts levels in LP group. In contrast, a significant up-regulation of the cytidine deaminase APOBEC 3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing), and the GTPase MxA (Myxovirus resistance A) mRNA expression level was identified in the LP skin specimens. Other transcript expressions, such as the master regulator of type I interferon-dependent immune responses, STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and IRF-7 (interferon regulatory factor 7), IFN-β and the inflammassome NALP3, had increased levels in LP, when compared to HC group. Our study suggests that interferon-inducible factors, in addition to their role in innate immunity against exogenous pathogens, contribute to the immune control of HERVs. Evaluation of the balance between HERV and interferon-inducible factor expression could possibly contribute to surveillance of inflammatory/malignant status of skin diseases.

  6. Strain differences in the somnogenic effects of interferon inducers in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, L A

    1996-12-01

    Increased slow-wave sleep accompanies influenza infection in C57BL/6 mice but not BALB/c mice. These strains of mice possess different alleles of the genetic lucus If-1, which codes for high (If-1h; C57BL/6) and low (If-1(1); BALB/c) production of interferon (IFN), a putative sleep-inducing cytokine. To evaluate the contribution of the If-1 gene to differences in murine sleep propensity, sleep patterns were evaluated in mice treated with the IFN inducers polyinosinic:polycytidilic acid (pIC) or Newcastle disease virus (NDV), with influenza virus, or with murine interferon (IFN-alpha) or IFN-alpha/beta. As compared with baseline values, C57BL/6 mice exhibited increased slow-wave sleep after all three challenges, but BALB/c mice did not. Congenic B6.C-H28c mice, which bear the BALB/c allele for low IFN production on the C57BL/6 genetic background, showed enhanced slow-wave sleep after influenza infection but not after NDV. Exogenous IFN did not enhance slow-wave sleep in either C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the If-1 allele may influence the somnogenic responsiveness of mice under some conditions but that additional mechanisms may contribute to sleep enhancement during infectious disease.

  7. The Role of Interferon Antagonist, Non-Structural Proteins in the Pathogenesis and Emergence of Arboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha S. Soldan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of factors favor the emergence and re-emergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses, including migration, climate change, intensified livestock production, an increasing volume of international trade and transportation, and changes to ecosystems (e.g., deforestation and loss of biodiversity. Consequently, arboviruses are distributed worldwide and represent over 30% of all emerging infectious diseases identified in the past decade. Although some arboviral infections go undetected or are associated with mild, flu-like symptoms, many are important human and veterinary pathogens causing serious illnesses such as arthritis, gastroenteritis, encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever and devastating economic loss as a consequence of lost productivity and high mortality rates among livestock. One of the most consistent molecular features of emerging arboviruses, in addition to their near exclusive use of RNA genomes, is the inclusion of viral, non-structural proteins that act as interferon antagonists. In this review, we describe these interferon antagonists and common strategies that arboviruses use to counter the host innate immune response. In addition, we discuss the complex interplay between host factors and viral determinants that are associated with virus emergence and re-emergence, and identify potential targets for vaccine and anti-viral therapies.

  8. Full Genome Sequence and sfRNA Interferon Antagonist Activity of Zika Virus from Recife, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Donald

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV in the Americas has transformed a previously obscure mosquito-transmitted arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family into a major public health concern. Little is currently known about the evolution and biology of ZIKV and the factors that contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Determining genomic sequences of clinical viral isolates and characterization of elements within these are an important prerequisite to advance our understanding of viral replicative processes and virus-host interactions.We obtained a ZIKV isolate from a patient who presented with classical ZIKV-associated symptoms, and used high throughput sequencing and other molecular biology approaches to determine its full genome sequence, including non-coding regions. Genome regions were characterized and compared to the sequences of other isolates where available. Furthermore, we identified a subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA in ZIKV-infected cells that has antagonist activity against RIG-I induced type I interferon induction, with a lesser effect on MDA-5 mediated action.The full-length genome sequence including non-coding regions of a South American ZIKV isolate from a patient with classical symptoms will support efforts to develop genetic tools for this virus. Detection of sfRNA that counteracts interferon responses is likely to be important for further understanding of pathogenesis and virus-host interactions.

  9. Frequency of thyroid disorders during interferon and ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, N.; Memon, A.; Memon, S.; Jaffri, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of thyroid dysfunction in response to combination of interferon and ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and HCV outcome. One hundred cases of CHC, proven by anti-HCV and HCV RNA-positive with baseline TSH, FT4 and FT3 within the normal reference range, who were treated with interferon alpha-2b (3 million unit subcutaneously three times per week) and oral ribavirin (1000-1200 mg per day) were included in this study. All patients were assessed for TSH, FT4, FT3 levels at 12 weeks and 24 weeks during therapy. Among the 100 patients, overt thyroid disease developed in 13 (13%) and sub-clinical thyroid disease in 5 (5%). Out of 13 patients of overt thyroid disorders, 11 (84.6%) had hypothyroidism and 02 (15.3%) hyperthyroidism. Four (80%) patients were of sub-clinical hypothyroidism and 01 (20%) patient was of sub-clinical hyperthyroidism. Overall, thyroid disorders developed in 18 (18%) both as overt and sub-clinical thyroid disorders. Ninety one (91%) patients became negative by HCV RNA. Treatment of HCV with IFN-alpha and ribavirin can be safely continued in patients with over and sub clinical hypothyroidism because thyroid disease responds well to treatment. (author)

  10. [Clinical benefit of HCV core antigen assay in patients receiving interferon and ribavirin combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Masahiko; Jokyu, Ritsuko; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2006-02-01

    A highly sensitive second generation HCV core antigen assay has recently been developed. We compared viral disappearance and kinetics data between commercially available core antigen assays, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag, and a quantitative HCV RNA PCR assay, Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor Test, Version 2 to estimate the predictive benefit of sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR in 59 patients treated with interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We found a good correlation between HCV core Ag and HCV RNA level regardless of genotype. Although the sensitivity of the core antigen assay was lower than PCR, the dynamic range was broader than that of the PCR assay, so that we did not need to dilute the samples in 59 patients. We detected serial decline of core Ag levels in 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days after interferon combination therapy. The decline of core antigen levels was significant in SVR patients compared to non-SVR as well as in genotype 2a, 2b patients compared to 1b. Core antigen-negative on day 1 could predict all 10 SVR patients (PPV = 100%), whereas RNA-negative could predict 22 SVR out of 25 on day 14 (PPV = 88.0%). None of the patients who had detectable serum core antigen on day 14 became SVR(NPV = 100%), although NPV was 91.2% on RNA negativity. An easy, simple, low cost new HCV core antigen detecting system seems to be useful for assessing and monitoring IFN treatment for HCV.

  11. Hepatitis C treatment outcomes using interferon- and ribavirin-based therapy in Kigali, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, David J; Taylor, Simone; Simango, Raulina; Kiromera, Athanase; Sebeza, Jackson; Baribwira, Cyprien; Musabeyezu, Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. This study was to determine HCV sustained virologic response(SVR) at 24 weeks in patients undergoing HCV therapy in Kigali, Rwanda. The paper presents data for all patients treated for HCV with ribavirin/interferon at King Faisal Hospital in Kigali, Rwanda, from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2014. There were 69 evaluable patients. HCV genotype 4(61%, 42/69) predominated. 24-week SVR was 70%(26/37) by per-protocol and 32%(26/69) by intention-to-treat analysis. HCV treatment in Rwanda is feasible. SVR with interferon/ribavirin was acceptable in the per-protocol analysis. Transition to newer direct acting antivirals is urgently needed in Rwanda and sub-Saharan Africa more generally to improve treatment outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Adaptation of enterovirus 71 to adult interferon deficient mice.

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    Elizabeth A Caine

    Full Text Available Non-polio enteroviruses, including enterovirus 71 (EV71, have caused severe and fatal cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD in the Asia-Pacific region. The development of a vaccine or antiviral against these pathogens has been hampered by the lack of a reliable small animal model. In this study, a mouse adapted EV71 strain was produced by conducting serial passages through A129 (α/β interferon (IFN receptor deficient and AG129 (α/β, γ IFN receptor deficient mice. A B2 sub genotype of EV71 was inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p. into neonatal AG129 mice and brain-harvested virus was subsequently passaged through 12 and 15 day-old A129 mice. When tested in 10 week-old AG129 mice, this adapted strain produced 100% lethality with clinical signs including limb paralysis, eye irritation, loss of balance, and death. This virus caused only 17% mortality in same age A129 mice, confirming that in the absence of a functional IFN response, adult AG129 mice are susceptible to infection by adapted EV71 isolates. Subsequent studies in adult AG129 and young A129 mice with the adapted EV71 virus examined the efficacy of an inactivated EV71 candidate vaccine and determined the role of humoral immunity in protection. Passive transfer of rabbit immune sera raised against the EV71 vaccine provided protection in a dose dependent manner in 15 day-old A129 mice. Intramuscular injections (i.m. in five week-old AG129 mice with the alum adjuvanted vaccine also provided protection against the mouse adapted homologous strain. No clinical signs of disease or mortality were observed in vaccinated animals, which received a prime-and-boost, whereas 71% of control animals were euthanized after exhibiting systemic clinical signs (P<0.05. The development of this animal model will facilitate studies on EV71 pathogenesis, antiviral testing, the evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates, and has the potential to establish correlates of protection

  13. Interferon-Inducible CD169/Siglec1 Attenuates Anti-HIV-1 Effects of Alpha Interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hisashi; Ramirez, Nora-Guadalupe Pina; Gibson, Gregory; Kline, Christopher; Watkins, Simon; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hallmark of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in vivo is chronic immune activation concomitant with type I interferon (IFN) production. Although type I IFN induces an antiviral state in many cell types, HIV-1 can replicate in vivo via mechanisms that have remained unclear. We have recently identified a type I IFN-inducible protein, CD169, as the HIV-1 attachment factor on dendritic cells (DCs) that can mediate robust infection of CD4+ T cells in trans. Since CD169 expression on macrophages is also induced by type I IFN, we hypothesized that type I IFN-inducible CD169 could facilitate productive HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells in cis and CD4+ T cells in trans and thus offset antiviral effects of type I IFN. In support of this hypothesis, infection of HIV-1 or murine leukemia virus Env (MLV-Env)-pseudotyped HIV-1 particles was enhanced in IFN-α-treated THP-1 monocytoid cells, and this enhancement was primarily dependent on CD169-mediated enhancement at the virus entry step, a phenomenon phenocopied in HIV-1 infections of IFN-α-treated primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Furthermore, expression of CD169, a marker of type I IFN-induced immune activation in vivo, was enhanced in lymph nodes from pigtailed macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) carrying HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT-SHIV), compared to uninfected macaques, and interestingly, there was extensive colocalization of p27gag and CD169, suggesting productive infection of CD169+ myeloid cells in vivo. While cell-free HIV-1 infection of IFN-α-treated CD4+ T cells was robustly decreased, initiation of infection in trans via coculture with CD169+ IFN-α-treated DCs restored infection, suggesting that HIV-1 exploits CD169 in cis and in trans to attenuate a type I IFN-induced antiviral state. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection in humans causes immune activation characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFN

  14. HVR-1 heterogeneity during treatment with telaprevir with or without pegylated interferon alfa-2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian M; Susser, Simone; Herrmann, Eva; Karey, Ursula; Kieffer, Tara L; Kwong, Ann D; Schinkel, Janke; Reesink, Henk W; Zeuzem, Stefan; Sarrazin, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    The extensive heterogeneity of the hypervariable region-1 (HVR-1) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) evidences the high genetic flexibility of HCV and was shown to be associated with virologic response to interferon-α-based therapies. However, the evolution of HVR-1 heterogeneity during treatment with directly acting antivirals has not been studied. Clonal sequence analysis of HVR-1 quasispecies in the serum of patients who were treated with telaprevir (3 × 750 mg/day) alone, telaprevir plus pegylated interferon-α-2a (pegIFN-α-2a), or pegIFN-α-2a plus placebo for 14 days was performed. HVR-1 heterogeneity, expressed as Shannon complexity and Hamming distance, was analyzed with virologic response and with the emergence of variants associated with resistance to telaprevir. HVR-1 heterogeneity at baseline was not associated with response to telaprevir-based therapy (Shannon complexity 0.34 vs. 0.55, p = 0.38; Hamming distance 0.15 vs. 0.23, p = 0.51; for patients with or without viral breakthrough, respectively). No significant changes in HVR-1 complexity were observed from baseline to day 4 of therapy in patients in whom a continued decline in HCV RNA was observed (Shannon complexity = 0.55 vs. 0.51, p = 0.67; Hamming distance = 0.23 vs. 0.25, p = 0.81, respectively). This was similar in patients with viral breakthrough associated with telaprevir-resistant variants (Shannon complexity = 0.34 vs. 0.42, p = 0.68; Hamming distance = 0.15 vs. 0.2, p = 0.50, at baseline and day 4, respectively). Baseline and on-treatment HVR-1 heterogeneity are not associated with early viral response to telaprevir-based therapy.

  15. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with 125 I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy

  16. Persistent interferon transgene expression by RNA interference-mediated silencing of interferon receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuki; Vikman, Elin; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ando, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2010-09-01

    The in vivo half-life of interferons (IFNs) is very short, and its extension would produce a better therapeutic outcome in IFN-based therapy. Delivery of IFN genes is one solution for providing a sustained supply. IFNs have a variety of functions, including the suppression of transgene expression, through interaction with IFN receptors (IFNRs). This suppression could prevent IFNs from being expressed from vectors delivered. Silencing the expression of IFNAR and IFNGR, the receptors for type I and II IFNs, respectively, in cells expressing IFNs may prolong transgene expression of IFNs. Mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells or mouse liver were selected as a site expressing IFNs (not a target for IFN gene therapy) and IFN-expressing plasmid DNA was delivered with or without small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IFNRs. Transfection of B16-BL6 cells with siRNA targeting IFNAR1 subunit (IFNAR1) resulted in the reduced expression of IFNAR on the cell surface. This silencing significantly increased the IFN-beta production in cells that were transfected with IFN-beta-expressing plasmid DNA. Similar results were obtained with the combination of IFN-gamma and IFNGR. Co-injection of IFN-beta-expressing plasmid DNA with siRNA targeting IFNAR1 into mice resulted in sustained plasma concentration of IFN-beta. These results provide experimental evidence that the RNAi-mediated silencing of IFNRs in cells expressing IFN, such as hepatocytes, is an effective approach for improving transgene expression of IFNs when their therapeutic target comprises cells other than those expressing IFNs.

  17. The effect of fermented milk on interferon production in malnourished children and in anorexia nervosa patients undergoing nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, B; Nova, E; Gómez, S; Samartín, S; Mouane, N; Lemtouni, A; Belaoui, H; Marcos, A

    2002-12-01

    For several years cytokine production has been associated with infections but it was not suspected that some types of food could also induce cytokines, even in a state of non-infection. Lactic bacteria can induce interferon (IFN) production in human healthy subjects, thus, a better protection against infections would be expected. Therefore, we planned to evaluate the effect of two diets including yoghurt or milk on IFN-gamma production during nutritional recovery in two different situations of malnutrition: (1) children with diarrhoea; and (2) patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Both the diet including yoghurt of that including milk seemed to increase IFN-gamma production at the end of nutritional recovery in the malnourished children with diarrhoea. The significance of interferon production and the lymphocyte subset increase should be explored to know if a better resistance against pathogens is related to them. Regulation of intestinal absorption and moderate stimulation of interferon production make the yoghurt-based diet a good choice in the nutritional care of children. In the same way, an increase in the IFN-gamma production was observed in AN patients consuming yoghurt. This increase of IFN-gamma production could be considered a biological marker to detect the effect of probiotics on the immune response, especially in the improvement of a deficient nutritional status.

  18. Hypothyroidism In Hepatitis C Patients On Pegylated Interferon Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Muhammad Asim; Mehmood, Asif; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Tayyab, Ghias Un Nabi; Haq Toor, Israr Ul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis has become a major health problem all over the world especially in the third world countries. The most common cause of chronic hepatitis in Pakistan is hepatitis C which can lead Toliver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In Pakistan Pegylated Interferon Alpha is still corner stone of therapy for chronic hepatitis C. One of the major side effects of this therapy is the development of thyroid dysfunction, i.e., hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. This study was done to assess the frequency of hypothyroidism in hepatitis C patients after three months of pegylated interferon therapy. This study was conducted from 1st October 2013 to 31st march 2014 at outpatients department (OPD) of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Lahore General Hospital Lahore. Descriptive case series study design was used. The sample of 200 patients was taken from the patients who visited OPD and fulfil the inclusion criteria of the study. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone level (TSH) was done before and after completion of three months therapy at centre for Nuclear Medicine (CENUM) laboratory, Mayo Hospital, Lahore by immune-radiometric assay (IRMA) and patients having TSH>4.0 mIU/L (normal range: 0.2-4.0 mIU/L) were considered hypothyroid. The mean age of the patients was 36.29±8.5 years. One hundred and twenty-three (61.5%) were male and 77 (38.5%) were female. After 3 months of interferon therapy, 163 (81.5%) patients were euthyroid and 37(18.5%) patients were having thyroid dysfunction. There were total 29 (14.5%) hypothyroid patients; 8 (27.6%) were male and 21 (72.4%) female. It is concluded from this study that frequency of hypothyroidism in patients with chronic hepatitis C was 14.5% after treatment with pegylated interferon therapy for 3 months. Female patients were more prone to develop hypothyroidism as compared to male patients.

  19. Peripheral Vasculitis, Intermediate Uveitis and Interferon Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Esgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. A 40-year-old female patient with a 12-year history of MS was admitted to our clinic with blurred vision and floaters in her right eye for about 1 month. Here, we share the findings and the management of intermediate uveitis and retinal periphlebitis in an MS case being treated with interferon beta-1a for 7 years.

  20. Early development of de novo hepatocellular carcinoma after direct-acting agent therapy: Comparison with pegylated interferon-based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, S H; Kwon, J H; Nam, S W; Kim, H Y; Kim, C W; You, C R; Choi, S W; Cho, S H; Han, J-Y; Song, D S; Chang, U I; Yang, J M; Lee, H L; Lee, S W; Han, N I; Kim, S-H; Song, M J; Hwang, S; Sung, P S; Jang, J W; Bae, S H; Choi, J Y; Yoon, S K

    2018-04-16

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C who achieve a sustained viral response after pegylated interferon therapy have a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the risk after treatment with direct-acting antivirals is unclear. We compared the rates of early development of hepatocellular carcinoma after direct-acting antivirals and after pegylated interferon therapy. We retrospectively analysed 785 patients with chronic hepatitis C who had no history of hepatocellular carcinoma (211 treated with pegylated interferon, 574 with direct-acting antivirals) and were followed up for at least 24 weeks after antiviral treatment. De novo hepatocellular carcinoma developed in 6 of 574 patients receiving direct-acting antivirals and in 1 of 211 patients receiving pegylated interferon. The cumulative incidence of early hepatocellular carcinoma development did not differ between the treatment groups either for the whole cohort (1.05% vs 0.47%, P = .298) or for those patients with Child-Pugh Class A cirrhosis (3.73% vs 2.94%, P = .827). Multivariate analysis indicated that alpha-fetoprotein level >9.5 ng/mL at the time of end-of-treatment response was the only independent risk factor for early development of hepatocellular carcinoma in all patients (P hepatocellular carcinoma did not differ between patients treated with pegylated interferon and those treated with direct-acting antivirals and was associated with the serum alpha-fetoprotein level at the time of end-of-treatment response. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Interferon alpha for the adjuvant treatment of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lens, Marko B; Pasquali, Sandro; Pilati, Pierluigi; Chiarion Sileni, Vanna

    2013-06-18

    Interferon alpha is the only agent approved for the postoperative adjuvant treatment of high-risk cutaneous melanoma. However, the survival advantage associated with this treatment is unclear, especially in terms of overall survival. Thus, adjuvant interferon is not universally considered a gold standard treatment by all oncologists. To assess the disease-free survival and overall survival effects of interferon alpha as adjuvant treatment for people with high-risk cutaneous melanoma. We searched the following databases up to August 2012: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2012, issue 8), MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), AMED (from 1985), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials databases in 2011, and proceedings of the ASCO annual meeting from 2000 to 2011. We checked the reference lists of selected articles for further references to relevant trials. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing interferon alpha to observation (or any other treatment) for the postoperative (adjuvant) treatment of patients with high-risk skin melanoma, that is, people with regional lymph node metastasis (American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM (tumour, lymph node, metastasis) stage III) undergoing radical lymph node dissection, or people without nodal disease but with primary tumour thickness greater than 1 mm (AJCC TNM stage II). Two authors extracted data, and a third author independently verified the extracted data. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR), which is the ratio of the risk of the event occurring in the treatment arm (adjuvant interferon) compared to the control arm (no adjuvant interferon). The survival data were either entered directly into Review Manager (RevMan) or extrapolated from Kaplan-Meier plots and then entered into RevMan. Based on the presence of between-study heterogeneity, we applied a fixed-effect or random-effects model for calculating the pooled estimates

  2. Interferon-alpha triggers B cell effector 1 (Be1 commitment.

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    Marie-Ghislaine de Goër de Herve

    Full Text Available B-cells can contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases not only through auto-antibody secretion but also via cytokine production. Therapeutic depletion of B-cells influences the functions and maintenance of various T-cell subsets. The mechanisms governing the functional heterogeneity of B-cell subsets as cytokine-producing cells are poorly understood. B-cells can differentiate into two functionally polarized effectors, one (B-effector-1-cells producing a Th-1-like cytokine pattern and the other (Be2 producing a Th-2-like pattern. IL-12 and IFN-γ play a key role in Be1 polarization, but the initial trigger of Be1 commitment is unclear. Type-I-interferons are produced early in the immune response and prime several processes involved in innate and adaptive responses. Here, we report that IFN-α triggers a signaling cascade in resting human naive B-cells, involving STAT4 and T-bet, two key IFN-γ gene imprinting factors. IFN-α primed naive B-cells for IFN-γ production and increased IFN-γ gene responsiveness to IL-12. IFN-γ continues this polarization by re-inducing T-bet and up-regulating IL-12Rβ2 expression. IFN-α and IFN-γ therefore pave the way for the action of IL-12. These results point to a coordinated action of IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-12 in Be1 polarization of naive B-cells, and may provide new insights into the mechanisms by which type-I-interferons favor autoimmunity.

  3. Assessment of Type I Interferon Signaling in Pediatric Inflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian I; Melki, Isabelle; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Briggs, Tracy A; Rodero, Mathieu P; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Oojageer, Anthony; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Belot, Alexandre; Bodemer, Christine; Quartier, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2017-02-01

    Increased type I interferon is considered relevant to the pathology of a number of monogenic and complex disorders spanning pediatric rheumatology, neurology, and dermatology. However, no test exists in routine clinical practice to identify enhanced interferon signaling, thus limiting the ability to diagnose and monitor treatment of these diseases. Here, we set out to investigate the use of an assay measuring the expression of a panel of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in children affected by a range of inflammatory diseases. A cohort study was conducted between 2011 and 2016 at the University of Manchester, UK, and the Institut Imagine, Paris, France. RNA PAXgene blood samples and clinical data were collected from controls and symptomatic patients with a genetically confirmed or clinically well-defined inflammatory phenotype. The expression of six ISGs was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the median fold change was used to calculate an interferon score (IS) for each subject compared to a previously derived panel of 29 controls (where +2 SD of the control data, an IS of >2.466, is considered as abnormal). Results were correlated with genetic and clinical data. Nine hundred ninety-two samples were analyzed from 630 individuals comprising symptomatic patients across 24 inflammatory genotypes/phenotypes, unaffected heterozygous carriers, and controls. A consistent upregulation of ISG expression was seen in 13 monogenic conditions (455 samples, 265 patients; median IS 10.73, interquartile range (IQR) 5.90-18.41), juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (78 samples, 55 patients; median IS 10.60, IQR 3.99-17.27), and juvenile dermatomyositis (101 samples, 59 patients; median IS 9.02, IQR 2.51-21.73) compared to controls (78 samples, 65 subjects; median IS 0.688, IQR 0.427-1.196), heterozygous mutation carriers (89 samples, 76 subjects; median IS 0.862, IQR 0.493-1.942), and individuals with non-molecularly defined autoinflammation (89 samples, 69

  4. INTERFERON IN THE TREATMENT OF WOMEN INFECTED WITH HIGH-RISK HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

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    Кристина Владимировна Марочко

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. About 99 % of cervical cancer is caused by persistent infection with high-risk types of HPV. It can take over 10 years from the time of an initial human papillomavirus infection until a cervical cancer. In most cases, HPV infections are transient and go away within 1 year. There is evidence that cell mediated immune responses of the host, both systemic and local, are important determinants of the course of infection, thus, it is reasonable to use immunocorrective therapy. Many studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of interferon alpha in complex therapy of HPV infection. The aim – to determine the efficacy of interferon alpha-2b in reducing the viral load of high-risk HPV among infected women of reproductive age. Materials and methods. 60 high-risk HPV positive women were included in the study. Qualitative and quantitative determination of high-risk HPV (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 was carried out by PCR in real time. Patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 (n = 30 received alfa-interferon in the form of rectal suppositories; group 2 (n = 30 did not receive the drug. Control study was conducted 1 month later. The average age in group 1 was 31,7 ± 1,6 years, in group 2 – 35,0 ± 1,6 years (p = 0,08. In group 1 monoinfection diagnosed in 72,4 % of cases, mixed infection in 27,6 % of cases in group 2 – at 64,3 % and 35,7 %, respectively. Results. The average viral load was 3,5 ± 0,2 Lg (HPV on 105 cells in group 1 and 3,4 ± 0,3 in group 2 (p = 0,473. Сlinically significant viral load dominated in group 1 (41,4 %, insignificant viral load was dominated in group 2 (42,9 %. After 1 month the average viral load was 1,9 ± 0,3 Lg (HPV on 105 cells in group 1 and 2,8 ± 0,4 Lg in group 2 (р = 0,04. There were statistically significant difference in both groups before and after 1 month (p < 0

  5. Peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin: effective in patients with hepatitis C who failed interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynard, Thierry; Colombo, Massimo; Bruix, Jordi; Schiff, Eugene; Terg, Ruben; Flamm, Steven; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; Carrilho, Flair; Schmidt, Warren; Berg, Thomas; McGarrity, Thomas; Heathcote, E Jenny; Gonçales, Fernando; Diago, Moises; Craxi, Antonio; Silva, Marcelo; Bedossa, Pierre; Mukhopadhyay, Pabak; Griffel, Louis; Burroughs, Margaret; Brass, Clifford; Albrecht, Janice

    2009-05-01

    Treatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin produces a sustained virologic response (SVR) in approximately 60% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. Alternate options are needed for patients who relapse or do not respond to therapy. This prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study evaluated efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2b (1.5 microg/kg/wk) plus weight-based ribavirin (800-1400 mg/day) in 2333 chronic HCV-infected patients with significant fibrosis/cirrhosis whose previous interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy failed. Patients with undetectable HCV-RNA at treatment week (TW) 12 received 48 weeks of therapy; patients with detectable HCV-RNA at TW12 could enter maintenance studies at TW18; 188 patients with low/detectable HCV-RNA at TW12 continued therapy at the investigator's request. Overall, 22% of the patients attained SVR (56% with undetectable HCV-RNA and 12% with low/detectable HCV-RNA at TW12). SVR was better in relapsers (38%) than nonresponders (14%), regardless of previous treatment, and in patients previously treated with interferon-alfa/ribavirin (25%) than peginterferon alfa-ribavirin (17%). Predictors of response in patients with undetectable HCV-RNA at TW12 were genotype (2/3 vs 1, respectively; odds ratio [OR] 2.4; P 600,000 IU/mL; OR, 1.4; P = .0223). These factors plus previous treatment and response were overall predictors of SVR. Safety was similar among fibrosis groups. Peginterferon alfa-2b plus weight-based ribavirin is effective and safe in patients who failed interferon alfa/ribavirin therapy. Genotype, baseline viral load, and fibrosis stage were predictors of response.

  6. The E5 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 perturbs MHC class II antigen maturation in human foreskin keratinocytes treated with interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Benyue; Li Ping; Wang Exing; Brahmi, Zacharie; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Blum, Janice S.; Roman, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens are expressed on human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) following exposure to interferon gamma. The expression of MHC class II proteins on the cell surface may allow keratinocytes to function as antigen-presenting cells and induce a subsequent immune response to virus infection. Invariant chain (Ii) is a chaperone protein which plays an important role in the maturation of MHC class II molecules. The sequential degradation of Ii within acidic endocytic compartments is a key process required for the successful loading of antigenic peptide onto MHC class II molecules. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E5 can inhibit the acidification of late endosomes in HFKs, the E5 protein may be able to affect proper peptide loading onto the MHC class II molecule. To test this hypothesis, HFKs were infected with either control virus or a recombinant virus expressing HPV16 E5 and the infected cells were subsequently treated with interferon-γ. ELISAs revealed a decrease of MHC class II expression on the surface of E5-expressing cells compared with control virus-infected cells after interferon treatment. Western blot analysis showed that, in cells treated with interferon gamma, E5 could prevent the breakdown of Ii and block the formation of peptide-loaded, SDS-stable mature MHC class II dimers, correlating with diminished surface MHC class II expression. These data suggest that HPV16 E5 may be able to decrease immune recognition of infected keratinocytes via disruption of MHC class II protein function

  7. Identification of two auto-cleavage products of nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1) in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infected cells: nsp1 function as interferon antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Lawson, S.; Sun, Z.; Zhou, X.; Guan, X.; Christopher-Hennings, J.; Nelson, E.A.; Fang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp1 is predicted to be auto-cleaved from the replicase polyprotein into nsp1α and nsp1β subunits. In infected cells, we detected the actual existence of nsp1α and nsp1β. Cleavage sites between nsp1α/nsp1β and nsp1β/nsp2 were identified by protein microsequencing analysis. Time course study showed that nsp1α and nsp1β mainly localize into the cell nucleus after 10 h post infection. Further analysis revealed that both proteins dramatically inhibited IFN-β expression. The nsp1β was observed to significantly inhibit expression from an interferon-stimulated response element promoter after Sendai virus infection or interferon treatment. It was further determined to inhibit nuclear translocation of STAT1 in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that nsp1β has ability to inhibit both interferon synthesis and signaling, while nsp1α alone strongly inhibits interferon synthesis. These findings provide important insights into mechanisms of nsp1 in PRRSV pathogenesis and its impact in vaccine development.

  8. Mutations around interferon sensitivity-determining region: a pilot resistance report of hepatitis C virus 1b in a Hong Kong population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Chan, Paul Ks; Tam, John S

    2011-12-28

    To explore mutations around the interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) which are associated with the resistance of hepatitis C virus 1b (HCV-1b) to interferon-α treatment. Thirty-seven HCV-1b samples were obtained from Hong Kong patients who had completed the combined interferon-α/ribavirin treatment for more than one year with available response data. Nineteen of them were sustained virological responders, while 18 were non-responders. The amino acid sequences of the extended ISDR (eISDR) covering 64 amino acids upstream and 67 amino acids downstream from the previously reported ISDR were analyzed. One amino acid variation (I2268V, P = 0.023) was significantly correlated with treatment outcome in this pilot study with a limited number of patients, while two amino acid variations (R2260H, P = 0.05 and S2278T, P = 0.05) were weakly associated with treatment outcome. The extent of amino acid variations within the ISDR or eISDR was not correlated with treatment outcome as previously reported. Three amino acid mutations near but outside of ISDR may associate with interferon treatment resistance of HCV-1b patients in Hong Kong.

  9. PDL1 Signals through Conserved Sequence Motifs to Overcome Interferon-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gato-Cañas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available PDL1 blockade produces remarkable clinical responses, thought to occur by T cell reactivation through prevention of PDL1-PD1 T cell inhibitory interactions. Here, we find that PDL1 cell-intrinsic signaling protects cancer cells from interferon (IFN cytotoxicity and accelerates tumor progression. PDL1 inhibited IFN signal transduction through a conserved class of sequence motifs that mediate crosstalk with IFN signaling. Abrogation of PDL1 expression or antibody-mediated PDL1 blockade strongly sensitized cancer cells to IFN cytotoxicity through a STAT3/caspase-7-dependent pathway. Moreover, somatic mutations found in human carcinomas within these PDL1 sequence motifs disrupted motif regulation, resulting in PDL1 molecules with enhanced protective activities from type I and type II IFN cytotoxicity. Overall, our results reveal a mode of action of PDL1 in cancer cells as a first line of defense against IFN cytotoxicity.

  10. Detection of interferon alpha protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Decalf, Jérémie; Bondet, Vincent; Hunt, David; Rice, Gillian I; Werneke, Scott; McGlasson, Sarah L; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Barnerias, Christine; Bellon, Nathalia; Belot, Alexandre; Bodemer, Christine; Briggs, Tracy A; Desguerre, Isabelle; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Hully, Marie; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Melki, Isabelle; Meyts, Isabelle; Musset, Lucile; Pelzer, Nadine; Quartier, Pierre; Terwindt, Gisela M; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wiseman, Stewart; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Rose, Yoann; Neven, Bénédicte; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Albert, Matthew L; Rozenberg, Flore; Crow, Yanick J; Duffy, Darragh

    2017-05-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are essential mediators of antiviral responses. These cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), diabetes mellitus, and dermatomyositis, as well as monogenic type I interferonopathies. Despite a fundamental role in health and disease, the direct quantification of type I IFNs has been challenging. Using single-molecule array (Simoa) digital ELISA technology, we recorded attomolar concentrations of IFNα in healthy donors, viral infection, and complex and monogenic interferonopathies. IFNα protein correlated well with functional activity and IFN-stimulated gene expression. High circulating IFNα levels were associated with increased clinical severity in SLE patients, and a study of the cellular source of IFNα protein indicated disease-specific mechanisms. Measurement of IFNα attomolar concentrations by digital ELISA will enhance our understanding of IFN biology and potentially improve the diagnosis and stratification of pathologies associated with IFN dysregulation. © 2017 Rodero et al.

  11. Enhanced endogenous type I interferon cell-driven survival and inhibition of spontaneous apoptosis by Riluzole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achour, Ammar; M'Bika, Jean-Pierre; Biquard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), although effective in improving the survival of HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been able to reconstitute the adaptive immune response. We have described the use of novel chemical agents to restore T-cell survival/proliferation by inducing cytokine production. Due to its cationic amphiphilic structure, these molecules appear to enhance immune restoration. In this study, we investigated the action of Riluzole (2-amino-6-trifuromethoxybenzothiazole) in HIV-1 infection. Riluzole is able to increase (effective dose from 1 to 1000 nM) the cell-survival of T cells from HIV-1-infected patients and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. The immunomodulatory effect of riluzole-sensitized cells was ascribed to endogenous type I interferon (IFN) derived from monocytes. Riluzole might be used for restoring the cell survival of immunocompromised patients and eliminating latent infected cells upon HIV-1 reactivation

  12. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway

  13. Outcomes of Congenital Zika Disease Depend on Timing of Infection and Maternal-Fetal Interferon Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinling Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection during pregnancy in humans results in intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we found that fetus-derived type I interferon (IFN-I signaling can enhance anti-ZIKV responses and provide clinical benefits to the fetus. Because IFN-λ shares signaling cascades and antiviral functions with IFN-I, we investigated the in vivo effects of IFN-λ in ZIKV-infected pregnant mice. IFN-λ administration during mid-pregnancy reduced ZIKV burden in maternal and fetal organs and alleviated placental injuries and fetal demise. In addition, prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of IFN-λ1 in a human trophoblast line, as well as in primary human amniotic epithelial cells, greatly reduced the ZIKV burden. Our data highlight IFN-λ1 as a potential therapeutic useful for women at risk for congenital Zika disease.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis following interferon-beta treatment in a patient with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbjerg, Sara Maria; Tsakiri, Anna; Fredriksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system for which there is currently no cure. Interferon-beta-1-alpha is worldwide one of the most widely used treatments in multiple sclerosis. To our knowledge there is one previous reported case of rhabdomyolysis...... associated with Interferon-beta treatment. Case presentation We describe a 30 year old man with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis who developed rhabdomyolysis and increased creatine kinase following Interferon-beta-1-alpha therapy. After the medication was discontinued, the patient rapidly improved...... Interferon-beta-1-alpha therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis....

  15. Rhabdovirus evasion of the interferon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Martina; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    2009-09-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae contains important pathogens of humans, livestock, and crops, including the insect-transmitted vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the neurotropic rabies virus (RV), which is directly transmitted between mammals. In spite of a highly similar organization of RNA genomes, proteins, and virus particles, cell biology of VSV and RV is divergent in several aspects, particularly with respect to their interplay with the cellular host defense. While infection with both rhabdoviruses is recognized via viral triphosphate RNAs by the cytoplasmic RNA helicase/translocase RIG-I, the viral counteractions to limit the response are contrasting. VSV infection is characterized by a rapid general shutdown of host gene expression and severe cytopathic effects, due to multiple activities of the matrix (M) protein affecting host polymerase functions and mRNA nuclear export, and by rapid and high-level virus replication. In contrast, RV spread and transmission relies on preserving the integrity of host cells, particularly of