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Sample records for evades interferon responses

  1. Henipaviruses Employ a Multifaceted Approach to Evade the Antiviral Interferon Response

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    Megan L. Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah virus, which constitute the genus Henipavirus, are zoonotic paramyxoviruses that have been associated with sporadic outbreaks of severe disease and mortality in humans since their emergence in the late 1990s. Similar to other paramyxoviruses, their ability to evade the host interferon (IFN response is conferred by the P gene. The henipavirus P gene encodes four proteins; the P, V, W and C proteins, which have all been described to inhibit the antiviral response. Further studies have revealed that these proteins have overlapping but unique properties which enable the virus to block multiple signaling pathways in the IFN response. The best characterized of these is the JAK-STAT signaling pathway which is targeted by the P, V and W proteins via an interaction with the transcription factor STAT1. In addition the V and W proteins can both limit virus-induced induction of IFN but they appear to do this via distinct mechanisms that rely on unique sequences in their C-terminal domains. The ability to generate recombinant Nipah viruses now gives us the opportunity to determine the precise role for each of these proteins and address their contribution to pathogenicity. Additionally, the question of whether these multiple anti-IFN strategies are all active in the different mammalian hosts for henipaviruses, particularly the fruit bat reservoir, warrants further exploration.

  2. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

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    Hoenen, Antje [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Gillespie, Leah [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Khromykh, Alexander [School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason, E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  3. Testing the ability of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus to evade the protective immune response induced in rainbow trout by DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepulveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    glycoprotein, the only surface protein of the VHSV, has been successful as an experimental prophylactic treatment against this disease, because it induces a strong innate (interferon) and adaptive (cellular and humoral) immune response. However, since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability......, this work aims to evaluate whether VHSV is able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination. Earlier studies have demonstrated that VHSV can evade the neutralizing effect of monoclonal antibodies by mutations in the glycoprotein gene. One approach of the present study is therefore...

  4. Staphylococcus aureus strategies to evade the host acquired immune response.

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    Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus aureus poses a significant public-health problem. Infection caused by S. aureus can manifest as acute or long-lasting persistent diseases that are often refractory to antibiotic and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To develop more effective strategies for preventing or treating these infections, it is crucial to understand why the immune response is incapable to eradicate the bacterium. When S. aureus first infect the host, there is a robust activation of the host innate immune responses. Generally, S. aureus can survive this initial interaction due to the expression of a wide array of virulence factors that interfere with the host innate immune defenses. After this initial interaction the acquired immune response is the arm of the host defenses that will try to clear the pathogen. However, S. aureus is capable of maintaining infection in the host even in the presence of a robust antigen-specific immune response. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying the ability of S. aureus to escape immune surveillance by the acquired immune response will help uncover potentially important targets for the development of immune-based adjunctive therapies and more efficient vaccines. There are several lines of evidence that lead us to believe that S. aureus can directly or indirectly disable the acquired immune response. This review will discuss the different immune evasion strategies used by S. aureus to modulate the different components of the acquired immune defenses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

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    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  6. Interferon Response and Viral Evasion by Members of the Family Rhabdoviridae

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    Matthias J. Schnell

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Like many animal viruses, those of the Rhabdoviridae family, are able to antagonize the type I interferon response and cause disease in mammalian hosts. Though these negative-stranded RNA viruses are very simple and code for as few as five proteins, they have been seen to completely abrogate the type I interferon response early in infection. In this review, we will discuss the viral organization and type I interferon evasion of rhabdoviruses, focusing on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and rabies virus (RABV. Despite their structural similarities, VSV and RABV have completely different mechanisms by which they avert the host immune response. VSV relies on the matrix protein to interfere with host gene transcription and nuclear export of anti-viral mRNAs. Alternatively, RABV uses its phosphoprotein to interfere with IRF-3 phosphorylation and STAT1 signaling. Understanding the virus-cell interactions and viral proteins necessary to evade the immune response is important in developing effective vaccines and therapeutics for this viral family.

  7. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

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    Pil Soo Sung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  8. Osteopontin as a marker for response to pegylated interferon Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteopontin as a marker for response to pegylated interferon Alpha-2b treatment in Chronic HCV Saudi patients. Yousri Mostafa Hussein, Ayman Alhazmi, Saad Alzahrani, Ahmad El-Askary, Abdulrahman Alghamdy, Eman Bayomy, Assmaa Selim, Mohammed Alghamdy ...

  9. Hepatitis C virus (HCV evades NKG2D-dependent NK cell responses through NS5A-mediated imbalance of inflammatory cytokines.

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    Damien Sène

    Full Text Available Understanding how hepatitis C virus (HCV induces and circumvents the host's natural killer (NK cell-mediated immunity is of critical importance in efforts to design effective therapeutics. We report here the decreased expression of the NKG2D activating receptor as a novel strategy adopted by HCV to evade NK-cell mediated responses. We show that chronic HCV infection is associated with expression of ligands for NKG2D, the MHC class I-related Chain (MIC molecules, on hepatocytes. However, NKG2D expression is downmodulated on circulating NK cells, and consequently NK cell-mediated cytotoxic capacity and interferon-γ production are impaired. Using an endotoxin-free recombinant NS5A protein, we show that NS5A stimulation of monocytes through Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4 promotes p38- and PI3 kinase-dependent IL-10 production, while inhibiting IL-12 production. In turn, IL-10 triggers secretion of TGFβ which downmodulates NKG2D expression on NK cells, leading to their impaired effector functions. Moreover, culture supernatants of HCV JFH1 replicating Huh-7.5.1 cells reproduce the effect of recombinant NS5A on NKG2D downmodulation. Exogenous IL-15 can antagonize the TGFβ effect and restore normal NKG2D expression on NK cells. We conclude that NKG2D-dependent NK cell functions are modulated during chronic HCV infection, and demonstrate that this alteration can be prevented by exogenous IL-15, which could represent a meaningful adjuvant for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Prediction of response to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

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    Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding interferon response factor (IRF)-5, IRF-8 and glypican-5 (GPC5) have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-β. We analysed whether SNPs in the IRF5, IRF8 and GPC5...... prospectively after the initiation of their first treatment with IFN-β. RESULTS: 62% of patients experienced relapses during the first 2 years of treatment, and 32% had disability progression during the first 5 years of treatment. Patients with a pretreatment annualized relapse rate >1 had an increased risk...

  11. Anti-tumorigenic effects of Type 1 interferon are subdued by integrated stress responses.

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    Bhattacharya, S; HuangFu, W-C; Dong, G; Qian, J; Baker, D P; Karar, J; Koumenis, C; Diehl, J A; Fuchs, S Y

    2013-09-05

    Viral and pharmacological inducers of protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) were shown to accelerate the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the IFNAR1 chain of the Type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor and to limit cell sensitivity to IFN. Here we report that hypoxia can elicit these effects in a PERK-dependent manner. The altered fate of IFNAR1 affected by signaling downstream of PERK depends on phosphorylation of eIF2α (eukaryotic translational initiation factor 2-α) and ensuing activation of p38α kinase. Activators of other eIF2α kinases such as PKR or GCN2 (general control nonrepressed-2) are also capable of eliminating IFNAR1 and blunting IFN responses. Modulation of constitutive PKR activity in human breast cancer cells stabilizes IFNAR1 and sensitizes these cells to IFNAR1-dependent anti-tumorigenic effects. Although downregulation of IFNAR1 and impaired IFNAR1 signaling can be elicited in response to amino-acid deficit, the knockdown of GCN2 in melanoma cells reverses these phenotypes. We propose that, in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment, activation of diverse eIF2α kinases followed by IFNAR1 downregulation enables multiple cellular components of tumor tissue to evade the direct and indirect anti-tumorigenic effects of Type 1 IFN.

  12. The type I interferon response during viral infections: a "SWOT" analysis.

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    Gaajetaan, Giel R; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2012-03-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a strong and crucial moderator for the control of viral infections. The strength of this system is illustrated by the fact that, despite some temporary discomfort like a common cold or diarrhea, most viral infections will not cause major harm to the healthy immunocompetent host. To achieve this, the immune system is equipped with a wide array of pattern recognition receptors and the subsequent coordinated type I IFN response orchestrated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). The production of type I IFN subtypes by dendritic cells (DCs), but also other cells is crucial for the execution of many antiviral processes. Despite this coordinated response, morbidity and mortality are still common in viral disease due to the ability of viruses to exploit the weaknesses of the immune system. Viruses successfully evade immunity and infection can result in aberrant immune responses. However, these weaknesses also open opportunities for improvement via clinical interventions as can be seen in current vaccination and antiviral treatment programs. The application of IFNs, Toll-like receptor ligands, DCs, and antiviral proteins is now being investigated to further limit viral infections. Unfortunately, a common threat during stimulation of immunity is the possible initiation or aggravation of autoimmunity. Also the translation from animal models to the human situation remains difficult. With a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats ("SWOT") analysis, we discuss the interaction between host and virus as well as (future) therapeutic options, related to the type I IFN system. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Modulation of human immune response by Echinococcus granulosus antigen B and its possible role in evading host defenses.

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    Riganò, R; Profumo, E; Bruschi, F; Carulli, G; Azzarà, A; Ioppolo, S; Buttari, B; Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2001-01-01

    By directly suppressing the function of certain immune cell subsets and by stimulating other cell populations related to immunopathology, parasite-derived substances play an important role in the chronic establishment of parasitic disease. Our objective was twofold: (i) to investigate further the role of Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (AgB) in the human early inflammatory response by determining its effect on polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) random migration, chemotaxis, and oxidative metabolism and (ii) to determine its action in acquired immunity by evaluating AgB and sheep hydatid fluid (SHF)-driven Th1 (gamma interferon [IFN-gamma] and interleukin 12 [IL-12]) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-13) cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 40 patients who had cured or stable or progressive cystic echinococcosis. AgB significantly inhibited PMN recruitment but left their random migration and oxidative metabolism unchanged. Patients' PBMC stimulated with AgB produced IL-4 and IL-13 but did not produce IL-12. They also produced significantly lower IFN-gamma concentrations than did PBMC stimulated with SHF (P = 10(-5)). AgB skewed the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratios towards a preferentially immunopathology-associated Th2 polarization, predominantly in patients with progressive disease. AgB-stimulated patients' PBMC also proliferated less than SHF-stimulated PBMC (P = 9 x 10(-3)). In vitro Th2 cytokine production was reflected in vivo by elevated specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG4 antibodies binding to AgB. These findings confirm that AgB plays a role in the escape from early immunity by inhibiting PMN chemotaxis. They also add new information on the host-parasite relationship, suggesting that AgB exploits the activation of T helper cells by eliciting a nonprotective Th2 cell response.

  14. Hõimupäevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Avatakse EKA Saamimaa uurimisreisi temaatikal põhinev näitus "Nelja tuule retk", ungari foto- ja etnograafi Laszlo Kunkovacsi fotonäitus "Ungari karjusekultuur". ERMis on avatud ülevaatenäitus "EKA soomeugri joonised ERMis". Hõimupäevade muusikaprojektidest, mis leiavad seekord aset koostöös "Jazzkaare" projektiga "Piirideta Põhjala"

  15. Unraveling the complexities of the interferon response during SARS-CoV infection

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    Lang, Anna; Baas, Tracey; Smits, Saskia L.; Katze, Michael G.; Osterhaus, Albert DME; Haagmans, Bart L.

    2009-01-01

    Viruses employ different strategies to circumvent the antiviral actions of the innate immune response. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a virus that causes severe lung damage, encodes an array of proteins able to inhibit induction and signaling of type-I interferons. However, recent studies have demonstrated that interferons are produced during SARS-CoV infection in humans and macaques. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of activated STAT1 and a range of interferon-stimulated genes could be demon...

  16. [Conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma: paradoxical response to interferon eyedrops].

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    Mata, E; Conesa, E; Castro, M; Martínez, L; de Pablo, C; González, M L

    2014-07-01

    A 67 year-old male seen for a longstanding corneal-conjunctival tumor. topical interferon α2b (IFN-α2b) 10 U/ml. A significant increase in lesion size was observed after 8 weeks. A surgical excision with cryotherapy was then performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. At this time the patient was found to have a positive HIV serology. Conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a pre-cancerous lesion of the ocular surface. Medical treatment of CIN is essentially with IFN-α2b due to its antiviral/antitumor properties. In patients with HIV, treatment response could be paradoxical. We recommend serology for HIV before treatment with topical IFN-α2b. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. HIV-1 evades virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses by targeting systemic and intestinal B cells via long-range intercellular conduits.

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    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A; Sullivan, John S; He, Bing; Shan, Meimei; Ball, Susan C; Dyer, Wayne B; Ketas, Thomas J; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Knowles, Daniel M; Chiu, April; Sanders, Rogier W; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Contact-dependent communication between immune cells generates protection but also facilitates viral spread. Here we found that macrophages formed long-range actin-propelled conduits in response to negative factor (Nef), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protein with immunosuppressive functions. Conduits attenuated immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) and IgA class switching in systemic and intestinal lymphoid follicles by shuttling Nef from infected macrophages to B cells through a guanine-exchange factor-dependent pathway involving the amino-terminal anchor, central core and carboxy-terminal flexible loop of Nef. By showing stronger virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses in patients with Nef-deficient virions, our data suggest that HIV-1 exploits intercellular 'highways' as a 'Trojan horse' to deliver Nef to B cells and evade humoral immunity systemically and at mucosal sites of entry.

  18. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays....... Other biomarkers such as interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10 (IP-10) may have potential for the diagnosis of latent TB infections. OBJECTIVES: To describe IP-10 concentrations and their association to TST and INF-gamma responses in children recently exposed to adults with smear-positive TB in Brazil...... and Nepal. METHODS:: Two surveys using the same design were undertaken to describe TST, INF-gamma, and IP-10 responses in 146 children in Nepal and 113 children in Brazil. RESULTS: The concordance of TST and QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube (QFT-IT) was high (kappa 0.73 in Brazil and 0.80 in Nepal). IP-10...

  19. Inflammatory signaling compromises cell responses to interferon alpha

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    HuangFu, Wei-Chun; Qian, Juan; Liu, Chengbao; Liu, Jianghuai; Lokshin, Anna E.; Baker, Darren P.; Rui, Hallgeir; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2011-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is widely used for treatment of melanoma and certain other malignancies. This cytokine as well as the related IFNβ exerts potent anti-tumorigenic effects; however, their efficacy in patients is often suboptimal. Here we report that inflammatory signaling impedes the effects of IFNα/β. Melanoma cells can secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines that inhibit cellular responses to IFNα/β via activating the ligand-independent pathway for the phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination and accelerated degradation of the IFNAR1 chain of Type I IFN receptor. Catalytic activity of the p38 protein kinase was required for IFNAR1 downregulation and inhibition of IFNα/β signaling induced by proinflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin 1 (IL-1). Activation of p38 kinase inversely correlated with protein levels of IFNAR1 in clinical melanoma specimens. Inhibition of p38 kinase augmented the inhibitory effects of IFNα/β on cell viability and growth in vitro and in vivo. The role of inflammation and p38 protein kinase in regulating cellular responses to IFNα/β in normal and tumor cells are discussed. PMID:21666722

  20. Genotype F of hepatitis B: response to interferon.

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    Venegas, Mauricio; Poniachik, Jaime; Fuster, Francisco; Hurtado, Carmen; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Brahm, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of HBV genotype diversity on interferon (IFN) therapy outcome in chronic hepatitis B patients has recently been highlighted. Data available for genotype F is poor. The aim of this work was to analyse the response of HBV genotype F to treatment with IFN. Additionally, response was analysed according to the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near to the IL28B gene. A total of 29 HBeAg-positive patients with chronic infection were included with a median age 47 (18-68) years. Of them, 27 were male. One patient was treated with standard IFN-α for 16 weeks, 6 patients received PEG-IFN-α2a 180 μg weekly for 24 weeks and 22 patients for 48 weeks. Response to treatment was defined as loss of HBeAg, anti-HBe seroconversion and decline of HBV DNA level to below 3 log of baseline (IU/ml) at the 6-month of follow-up. The SNPs rs12979860, rs12980275 and rs8099917 were studied by PCR-RFLP. The overall response was obtained in 18 (62%) patients, including one patient who was treated with standard IFN. Additionally, a total of 9 (31%) patients cleared HBsAg, with appearance of anti-HBs. The viral load was undetectable in all of these patients. The same IL28B variants associated with IFN response in HCV infections were also more frequently found in HBV patients compared with non-responders. Our study indicates that treatment with IFN is effective in patients with HBV genotype F.

  1. Role of Leptin and SOCS3 in Inhibiting the Type I Interferon Response During Obesity.

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    Terán-Cabanillas, Elí; Hernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Obesity provokes an imbalance in the immune system, including an aberrant type I interferon response during some viral infections and after TLR stimulation. SOCS3 overexpression and altered systemic leptin levels could be responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity and, eventually, significantly increase the risk of viral infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether SOCS3- and leptin-induced tolerance are responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity. SOCS3 overexpression in PBMCs from people with obesity was inhibited with the small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay, and leptin-induced tolerance was evaluated in PBMCs from non-obese volunte\\ers and U937 cells treated with TLR ligands. SOCS3, but not SOCS1, gene silencing via siRNA increased the type I interferon response in PBMCs obtained from people with obesity. On the other hand, leptin induced SOCS3 expression and inhibited type I interferons in PBMCs from healthy donors and in U937 monocytes stimulated with TLR ligands. Taken together, these results demonstrate that reduced type I interferon production in obesity is caused by SOCS3 overexpression as well as tolerance induced by leptin. Here, we demonstrate a key role of leptin and SOCS3 in inhibiting the type I interferon response during obesity.

  2. Intrahepatic mRNA levels of type I interferon receptor and interferon-stimulated genes in genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C. Association between IFNAR1 mRNA level and sustained response to interferon therapy.

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    Taniguchi, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Akira; Shimomura, Hiroyuki; Moriya, Akio; Yu, Piao Cheng; Umeoka, Fumi; Fujioka, Shin-ichi; Koide, Norio; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between pretreatment intrahepatic mRNA levels of interferon receptor and interferon-stimulated genes and response to interferon therapy for genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C. Forty-four patients with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C who underwent liver biopsy and then received interferon therapy participated in this study. Pretreatment intrahepatic mRNA levels of interferon receptor genes (IFNAR1, IFNAR2b, and IFNAR2c) and interferon-stimulated genes (OAS1 and PKR) were quantified by competitive polymerase chain reaction. In the genes examined, only IFNAR1 mRNA level was significantly higher in patients with sustained virological and biochemical response to interferon therapy versus those with nonsustained response (p IFNAR1 to IFNAR2 were also significantly higher in patients with sustained virological and biochemical response to IFN therapy (p IFNAR1 and mRNA ratio of IFNAR1 to IFNAR2 before treatment may be associated with a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Inhibitors of the interferon response enhance virus replication in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Stewart

    Full Text Available Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1 significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints or (ii mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV, Influenza Virus, traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV. In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications

  4. Spitting Image: Tick Saliva Assists the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease in Evading Host Skin's Innate Immune Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted through ticks. Inhibition of host skin's innate immune response might be instrumental to both tick feeding and B. burgdorferi transmission. The article by Marchal et al. describes how tick saliva suppresses B.

  5. Dopaminergic mechanisms of reduced basal ganglia responses to hedonic reward during interferon alfa administration.

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    Capuron, Lucile; Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Drake, Daniel F; Woolwine, Bobbi J; Spivey, James R; Crowe, Ronald J; Votaw, John R; Goodman, Mark M; Miller, Andrew H

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines or cytokine inducers can alter basal ganglia activity, including reducing responsiveness to rewarding stimuli that may be mediated by cytokine effects on dopamine function. To determine whether long-term administration of the inflammatory cytokine interferon alfa reduces the basal ganglia response to reward and whether such changes are associated with decreased presynaptic striatal dopamine function and altered behavior. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. Outpatient research unit and neuroimaging facilities at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Medically stable adults with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection eligible for interferon alfa treatment. Neural activity in the ventral striatum during a hedonic reward task as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging, uptake and turnover of radiolabeled fluorodopa F 18 (18F-dopa) in caudate and putamen using positron emission tomography, and interferon alfa-induced depression, anhedonia, fatigue, and neurotoxicity. Patients with HCV receiving interferon alfa for 4 to 6 weeks (n = 14) exhibited significantly reduced bilateral activation of the ventral striatum in the win vs lose condition of a gambling task compared with patients with HCV awaiting interferon alfa treatment (n = 14). Reduced activation of the ventral striatum was, in turn, significantly correlated with anhedonia, depression, and fatigue. In a separate longitudinal study, patients with HCV treated with interferon alfa for 4 to 6 weeks (n = 12) exhibited significantly increased 18F-dopa uptake and decreased 18F-dopa turnover in caudate and putamen and in the same ventral striatal regions identified in the functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Baseline and percentage change in 18F-dopa uptake and turnover were correlated with behavioral alterations, including depression, fatigue, and neurotoxicity, during interferon alfa administration. These data replicate and extend findings that inflammatory stimuli

  6. Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon (IFN) Responses by Inducing Degradation of Type I IFN Receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Pritzl, Curtis J; Fuchs, Serge Y; McDermott, Adrian B; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2015-12-16

    Influenza A virus (IAV) employs diverse strategies to circumvent type I interferon (IFN) responses, particularly by inhibiting the synthesis of type I IFNs. However, it is poorly understood if and how IAV regulates the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR)-mediated signaling mode. In this study, we demonstrate that IAV induces the degradation of IFNAR subunit 1 (IFNAR1) to attenuate the type I IFN-induced antiviral signaling pathway. Following infection, the level of IFNAR1 protein, but not mRNA, decreased. Indeed, IFNAR1 was phosphorylated and ubiquitinated by IAV infection, which resulted in IFNAR1 elimination. The transiently overexpressed IFNAR1 displayed antiviral activity by inhibiting virus replication. Importantly, the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of IAV was proved to trigger the ubiquitination of IFNAR1, diminishing the levels of IFNAR1. Further, influenza A viral HA1 subunit, but not HA2 subunit, downregulated IFNAR1. However, viral HA-mediated degradation of IFNAR1 was not caused by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. IAV HA robustly reduced cellular sensitivity to type I IFNs, suppressing the activation of STAT1/STAT2 and induction of IFN-stimulated antiviral proteins. Taken together, our findings suggest that IAV HA causes IFNAR1 degradation, which in turn helps the virus escape the powerful innate immune system. Thus, the research elucidated an influenza viral mechanism for eluding the IFNAR signaling pathway, which could provide new insights into the interplay between influenza virus and host innate immunity. Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and remains a major health concern. When triggered by influenza viral infection, host cells produce type I interferon (IFN) to block viral replication. Although IAV was shown to have diverse strategies to evade this powerful, IFN-mediated antiviral response, it is not well-defined if IAV manipulates the IFN receptor-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we

  7. Interdiction of a Markovian evader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Izraelevitz, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gutfraind, Alexander [CORNELL UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Network interdiction is a combinatorial optimization problem on an activity network arising in a number of important security-related applications. It is classically formulated as a bilevel maximin problem representing an 'interdictor' and an 'evader'. The evader tries to move from a source node to the target node along the shortest or safest path while the interdictor attempts to frustrate this motion by cutting edges or nodes. The interdiction objective is to find the optimal set of edges to cut given that there is a finite interdiction budget and the interdictor must move first. We reformulate the interdiction problem for stochastic evaders by introducing a model in which the evader follows a Markovian random walk guided by the least-cost path to the target. This model can represent incomplete knowledge about the evader and the graph as well as partial interdiction. We formulate the optimization problem for this model and show how, by exploiting topological ordering of the nodes, one can achieve an order-of-magnitude speedup in computing the objective function. We also introduce an evader-motion-based heuristic that can significantly improve solution quality by providing a global view of the network to approximation methods.

  8. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Pallisgaard, N.; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Reductions in the JAK2 V617F allele burden in patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a (Peg-IFN-2a) have been demonstrated, although follow-up was relatively short. We report here the first profound and sustained molecular responses......Quantitative assessment of the JAK2 V617F allele burden during disease evolution and ongoing myelosuppressive treatment is likely to be implemented in the future clinical setting. Interferon alpha has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of both chronic myeloid leukemia and the Philadelphia...... with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  9. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Bjerrum, O W; Pallisgaard, N

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the JAK2 V617F allele burden during disease evolution and ongoing myelosuppressive treatment is likely to be implemented in the future clinical setting. Interferon alpha has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of both chronic myeloid leukemia and the Philadelphia...... chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Reductions in the JAK2 V617F allele burden in patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a (Peg-IFN-2a) have been demonstrated, although follow-up was relatively short. We report here the first profound and sustained molecular responses...... with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response....

  10. Immune- and miRNA-response to recombinant interferon beta-1a: a biomarker evaluation study to guide the development of novel type I interferon- based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Martin; Hinze, Annette Viktoria; Mengel, Martin; Fuhrmann, Christine; Lüdenbach, Bastian; Zimmermann, Julian; Dykstra, Verena; Fimmers, Rolf; Viviani, Roberto; Stingl, Julia; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Müller, Marcus; Hartmann, Gunther; Coch, Christoph

    2015-09-22

    The innate immune receptor RIG-I detects viral RNA within the cytosol of infected cells. Activation of RIG-I leads to the induction of antiviral cytokines, in particular type I interferon, the inhibition of a T(H)17 response as well as to the suppression of tumor growth. Therefore, RIG-I is a promising drug target for the treatment of cancer as well as multiple sclerosis. A specific ligand for RIG-I is currently in preclinical testing. The first-in-human trial will need to be carefully designed to avoid an overshooting cytokine response. Therefore, the ResI study was set up to analyze the human immune response to standard treatment with recombinant interferon-beta to establish biomarkers for safety and efficacy of the upcoming first-in-human trial investigating the RIG-I ligand. ResI is a single center, prospective, open label, non-randomized phase I clinical trial. Three different cohorts (20 healthy volunteers, 20 patients with RRMS and ongoing interferon-beta treatment and 10 patients starting on interferon-beta) will receive standard interferon-beta-1a therapy for nine days. The study will be conducted according to the principles of the german medicinal products act, ICH-GCP, and the Declaration of Helsinki on the phase I unit of the Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology and in the Department of Neurology, both University Hospital Bonn. Interferon-beta-induced cytokine levels, surface marker on immune cells, mRNA- and miRNA-expression as well as psychometric response will be investigated as target variables. The ResI study will assess biomarkers in response to interferon-β treatment to guide the dose steps within the first-in-human trial with a newly developed RIG-I ligand. Thus, ResI is a biomarker study to enhance the safety of the clinical development of a first-in-class compound. The data can additionally be used for the development of other therapies based on type I interferon induction such as TLR ligands. Moreover, it will help to

  11. IFNγ influences type I interferon response and susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jenna L; Olson, Julie K

    2013-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease. Interestingly, TMEV infection of resistant mice deficient in IFNγ leads to a persistent virus infection in the CNS and development of demyelinating disease. We have previously shown that the innate immune response affects development of TMEV- induced demyelinating disease, thus we wanted to determine the role of IFNγ during the innate immune response. TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice had an altered innate immune response, including reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons. Administration of type I interferons, IFNα and IFNß, to TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response restored the expression of innate immune cytokines. Most importantly, administration of type I interferons to IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response decreased the virus load in the CNS and decreased development of demyelinating disease. Microglia are the CNS resident immune cells that express innate immune receptors. In TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice, microglia had reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, and administration of type I interferons to these mice restored the innate immune response by microglia. In the absence of IFNγ, microglia from TMEV-infected mice had reduced expression of some innate immune receptors and signaling molecules, especially IRF1. These results suggest that IFNγ plays an important role in the innate immune response to TMEV by enhancing the expression of innate immune cytokines

  12. Is a compromised interferon response an etiologic factor in Reye's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozee, K. R.; Lee, S. H.; Crocker, J. F.; Digout, S.; Arcinue, E.

    1982-01-01

    Young mice injected with sublethal doses of Toximul MP8, a typical commercial polyoxyethylene ether-based emulsifier, died more frequently when infected with encephalomyocarditis virus than did control mice. Lymphocytes taken from emulsifier-injected mice responded poorly to interferon induction, unlike lymphocytes from control animals. Interferon protected control mice against viral encephalomyocarditis, but such protection was not equally demonstrable in emulsifier-injected mice. These data suggest that the enhanced lethality of encephalomyocarditis virus in emulsifier-injected mice is associated with and perhaps caused by a compromised interferon response in these animals. Since these emulsifiers are commonly found in the environment in areas where forests are sprayed with pesticides, a group of children suffering from Reye's syndrome who lived in such areas was investigated. Blood samples were obtained from five children with influenza B-associated Reye's syndrome during their acute illness and during convalescence. Lymphocytes obtained from these samples and from peripheral blood samples from healthy children (controls) were induced to synthesize interferon by exposure to Newcastle disease virus. The lymphocytes from the convalescent patients and from the controls responded well to induction. However, the lymphocytes obtained from patients and from the controls responded well to induction. However, the lymphocytes obtained from patients during the acute phase of Reye's syndrome responded very poorly and produced significantly less interferon. PMID:6176306

  13. Unraveling the complexities of the interferon response during SARS-CoV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna); T. Baas (Tracey); S.L. Smits (Saskia); M.G. Katze (Michael); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractViruses employ different strategies to circumvent the antiviral actions of the innate immune response. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a virus that causes severe lung damage encodes an array of proteins able to inhibit induction and signaling of type-I interferons. However, recent studies

  14. How eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Valent, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes employ sophisticated mechanisms for evading host recognition. After host penetration, many fungi and oomycetes establish a biotrophic interaction. It is assumed that different strategies employed by these pathogens to avoid triggering host defence responses, including establishment of biotrophic interfacial layers between the pathogen and host, masking of invading hyphae and active suppression of host defence mechanisms, are essential for a biotrophic parasitic lifestyle. During the infection process, filamentous plant pathogens secrete various effectors, which are hypothesized to be involved in facilitating effective host infection. Live-cell imaging of fungi and oomycetes secreting fluorescently labeled effector proteins as well as functional characterization of the components of biotrophic interfaces have led to the recent progress in understanding how eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DMPD: The interferon-alpha/beta system in antiviral responses: a multimodal machineryof gene regulation by the IRF family of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11790540 The interferon-alpha/beta system in antiviral responses: a multimodal mach...l. 2002 Feb;14(1):111-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The interferon-alpha/beta system in antiviral responses: a multimoda...ion factors. PubmedID 11790540 Title The interferon-alpha/beta system in antiviral responses: a multimodal m

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bum Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV actively evades host interferon (IFN responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP and poly(IC. The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity.

  17. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of “blue eye disease”, causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β PMID:26546155

  18. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-02

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A null mutation in the gene encoding a type I interferon receptor component eliminates antiproliferative and antiviral responses to interferons alpha and beta and alters macrophage responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, S.Y.; Hertzog, P J; Holland, K A; Sumarsono, S H; Tymms, M J; Hamilton, J A; Whitty, G; Bertoncello, I.; Kola, I.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the in vivo role(s) of type I interferons (IFNs) and to determine the role of a component of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1) in mediating responses to these IFNs, we generated mice with a null mutation (-/-) in the IFNAR1 gene. Despite compelling evidence for modulation of cell proliferation and differentiation by type I IFNs, there were no gross signs of abnormal fetal development or morphological changes in adult IFNAR1-/- mice. However, abnormalities of hemopoietic cells were d...

  20. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  1. Differential expression of interferon responsive genes in rodent models of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Jozef

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE diseases are the deposition of a misfolded form of a host-encoded protein (PrPres, marked astrocytosis, microglial activation and spongiosis. The development of powerful gene based technologies has permitted increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to be demonstrated. However, due to the use of assays of differing sensitivities and typically the analysis of a single model system it remained unclear whether this was a general feature of these diseases or to what extent different model systems and routes of infection influenced the relative levels of expression. Similarly, it was not clear whether the elevated levels of cytokines observed in the brain were accompanied by similar increases in other tissues that accumulate PrPres, such as the spleen. Results The level of expression of the three interferon responsive genes, Eif2ak2, 2'5'-OAS, and Mx2, was measured in the brains of Syrian hamsters infected with scrapie 263K, VM mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy and C57BL/6 mice infected with the scrapie strain ME7. Glial fibrillary acidic expression confirmed the occurrence of astrocytosis in all models. When infected intracranially all three models showed a similar pattern of increased expression of the interferon responsive genes at the onset of clinical symptoms. At the terminal stage of the disease the level and pattern of expression of the three genes was mostly unchanged in the mouse models. In contrast, in hamsters infected by either the intracranial or intraperitoneal routes, both the level of expression and the expression of the three genes relative to one another was altered. Increased interferon responsive gene expression was not observed in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease or the spleens of C57BL/6 mice infected with ME7. Concurrent increases in TNFα, TNFR1, Fas/ApoI receptor, and caspase 8 expression in ME

  2. Human Papilloma Virus Infection Does Not Predict Response to Interferon Therapy in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Garg, Nisha; Nanji, Afshan; Joag, Madhura; Nuovo, Gerard; Palioura, Sotiria; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2015-11-01

    To identify the frequency of human papilloma virus (HPV) in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and to evaluate differences in clinical features and treatment response of tumors with positive versus negative HPV results. Retrospective case series. Twenty-seven patients with OSSN. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia specimens were analyzed for the presence of HPV. Clinical features and response to interferon were determined retrospectively and linked to the presence (versus absence) of HPV. Clinical characteristics of OSSN by HPV status. Twenty-one of 27 tumors (78%) demonstrated positive HPV results. The HPV genotypes identified included HPV-16 in 10 tumors (48%), HPV-31 in 5 tumors, HPV-33 in 1 tumor, HPV-35 in 2 tumors, HPV-51 in 2 tumors, and a novel HPV in 3 tumors (total of 23 tumors because 1 tumor had 3 identified genotypes). Tumors found in the superior limbus were more likely to show positive HPV results (48% vs. 0%; P=0.06, Fisher exact test). Tumors with positive HPV-16 results were larger (68 vs. 34 mm2; P=0.08, Mann-Whitney U test) and were more likely to have papillomatous morphologic features (50% vs. 12%; P=0.07, Fisher exact test) compared with tumors showing negative results for HPV-16. Human papilloma virus status was not found to be associated with response to interferon therapy (P=1.0, Fisher exact test). Metrics found to be associated with a nonfavorable response to interferon were male gender and tumors located in the superior conjunctivae. The presence of HPV in OSSN seems to be more common in lesions located in the nonexposed, superior limbus. Human papilloma virus presence does not seem to be required for a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  3. Osteopontin as a marker for response to pegylated interferon Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cite as: Hussein YM, Alhazmi A, Alzahrani S, El-Askary A, Alghamdy A, Bayomy E, Selim A, Alghamdy M. Osteopontin as a marker for response to ..... cytokine network. The Th1 immune response is involved in the development of inflammation in chronic hepatitis. C, and the hepatocytes infected with HCV are eradicated.

  4. A mutation in the interferon regulatory element of HBV may influence the response of interferon treatment in chronic hepatitis B patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A functional interferon regulatory element (IRE has been found in the EnhI/X promoter region of hepatitis B virus (HBV genome. The purpose of this study is to compare the gene order of responder and non-responder to interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB, so as to evaluate the relationship between IRE mutation and the response to interferon treatment for CHB patients. Results Synthetic therapeutic effect is divided into complete response (CR, partial response (PR and non-response (NR. Among the 62 cases included in this study, 40 cases (64.5% were in the response group (CR and PR and 22 (35.5% cases were in the NR group. Wild type sequence of HBV IRE TTTCACTTTC were found in 35 cases (56.5%, and five different IRE gene sequences. included TTTtACTTTC, TTTCAtTTTC, TTTtAtTTTC, TTTtACTTTt and cTTtACcTTC, were found in 22 cases (35.5%, 1 case (1.6%, 1 case (1.6%, 2 cases (3.2% and 1 case (1.6% respectively. There were 41.9%cases (26/62 with forth base C→T mutation, consisted of 32.5% (13/40 cases in response group and 59.1% (13/22 cases in NR group. Among the 35 cases with IRE sequences, there were 67.5% (27/40 cases in response group and 36.4% (8/22 in NR group, and the difference in IRE sequences between two groups was statistic significantly (P = 0.027. The result suggested that there is likely relationship between the forth base mutation (C→T of IRE region and the response of HBV to Interferon therapy, and this mutation may partially decrease the inhibition effect of interferon on HBV. Conclusion The forth base C→T mutation in IRE element of HBV may partially influence the response of Interferon treatment in CHB patients.

  5. A mutation in the interferon regulatory element of HBV may influence the response of interferon treatment in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jia-Jie; Chen, En-Qiang; Yang, Jia-Hong; Zhou, Tao-You; Liu, Li; Tang, Hong

    2012-01-10

    A functional interferon regulatory element (IRE) has been found in the EnhI/X promoter region of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome. The purpose of this study is to compare the gene order of responder and non-responder to interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), so as to evaluate the relationship between IRE mutation and the response to interferon treatment for CHB patients. Synthetic therapeutic effect is divided into complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and non-response (NR). Among the 62 cases included in this study, 40 cases (64.5%) were in the response group (CR and PR) and 22 (35.5%) cases were in the NR group. Wild type sequence of HBV IRE TTTCACTTTC were found in 35 cases (56.5%), and five different IRE gene sequences. included TTTtACTTTC, TTTCAtTTTC, TTTtAtTTTC, TTTtACTTTt and cTTtACcTTC, were found in 22 cases (35.5%), 1 case (1.6%), 1 case (1.6%), 2 cases (3.2%) and 1 case (1.6%) respectively. There were 41.9%cases (26/62) with forth base C→T mutation, consisted of 32.5% (13/40) cases in response group and 59.1% (13/22) cases in NR group. Among the 35 cases with IRE sequences, there were 67.5% (27/40) cases in response group and 36.4% (8/22) in NR group, and the difference in IRE sequences between two groups was statistic significantly (P = 0.027). The result suggested that there is likely relationship between the forth base mutation (C→T) of IRE region and the response of HBV to Interferon therapy, and this mutation may partially decrease the inhibition effect of interferon on HBV. The forth base C→T mutation in IRE element of HBV may partially influence the response of Interferon treatment in CHB patients.

  6. Evader Interdiction and Collateral Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In network interdiction problems, evaders (hostile agents or data packets) are moving through a network towards their targets and we wish to choose sensor placement locations in order to intercept them before they reach their destinations. Sensor locations should be chosen economically, balancing security gains with cost, including the inconvenience sensors inflict upon innocent travelers. We give optimal sensor allocation algorithms for several classes of special graphs and hardness and optimal approximation results for general graphs, including for deterministic or Markov chain-based and oblivious or reactive evaders. In a similar-sounding but much different problem setting posed by [10] where the innocent travelers can also be reactive, we again give optimal algorithms for special cases and hardness and (essentially) optimal approximation results on general graphs.

  7. Leptin responses to bovine interferon- α and insulin in cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To confirm the leptin response to insulin, mature adipocytes were isolated from abdominal adipose tissue of 3 cows and incubated for 24 h with insulin in vitro. Insulin stimulated leptin expression in dose dependent manner with peak expression at 100 nM concentration. These results, strongly postulate that leptin secretion ...

  8. The MEK Inhibitors Trametinib and Cobimetinib Induce a Type I Interferon Response in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lulli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MEK 1 and 2 have crucial roles in tumorigenesis, cell proliferation, and protection from apoptosis, and their inhibition is therefore an attractive therapeutic strategy in cancer. Orally available and highly selective MEK inhibitors have been developed and assessed in numerous clinical trials, either alone or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or other targeted agents. Of note, a complex picture of class-specific adverse effects associates with these drugs, frequently including inflammatory skin rash. Here, we investigated the response of normal human keratinocytes to the MEK inhibitors trametinib and cobimetinib, alone and in combination with the v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF inhibitors dabrafenib and vemurafenib, in terms of signal transduction and de novo gene expression. MEK inhibitors triggered enhanced expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1 and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1, and up-regulated the keratinocyte-specific type I interferon κ (IFN-κ, the anti-viral effectors interferon-induced tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT 1 and 2, and the pro-inflammatory chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 and the C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10, both at the mRNA and protein level. Impairment of IRF1 expression, or abrogation of STAT1 phosphorylation due to IFN-κ gene silencing, suppressed anti-viral and pro-inflammatory gene expression. These data suggest that, similar to what we observed for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR blockade, MEK inhibition activates a type I interferon response, which is now recognized as an effective anti-cancer response, in human epidermal keratinocytes.

  9. Interferon gamma, interferon-gamma-induced-protein 10, and tuberculin responses of children at high risk of tuberculosis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrucci, Roberta; Abu Amer, Nabil; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children in contact with adults with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are at risk for infection and disease progression, and chemoprophylaxis may reduce this risk. The identification of infection is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) release assays...

  10. Association of SNPs in interferon receptor genes in chronic hepatitis C with response to combined therapy of interferon and ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Heidari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus is one of the main reasons for chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Combination therapy with Interferon (peg-IFN-α and Ribavirin (RBV clear the virus more likely than the others. Different factors like virus and host characteristics influence on response to treatment. The most important viral factors include virus genotype and viral load; host factors like genetic, gender, race, age, weight and liver enzymes are also important. Previous studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in IFNR genes can regulate and influence on treatment with IFN. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between SNPs in IFN-α receptor (IFNAR1 & IFNAR2 genes among subjects affected with chronic hepatitis C, who have treated with IFN and RBV, and also relationship between HCV genotypes and response to combination antiviral therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were taken from whole blood of 61 patients affected with chronic hepatitis C who were treated with IFN and Ribavirin. Then, DNA was extracted from PBMCs and quality of DNA was assessed with Nanodrop finally two SNPs [Ex4-30G>C] and [Ivs1-4640 G>A] of IFN receptor genes (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 were measured by TaqMan Real-Time PCR in ABi Prism 7900 system. Also to confirm the response rate to therapy, RNA was extracted then RT PCR was performed and final product was studied with gel electrophoresis and UV spectroscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 18.0 for Windows. The analysis of results from TaqMan SNP Genotyping has been shown that two SNPs (Ex4-30G>C and Ivs1-4640 G>A of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 didn't show any relationship with response to combined therapy in subjects affected with chronic hepatitis C who have treated with peg-IFN-α and Ribavirin. 61 patients complete the treatment period. 54 patients (%88/5 of them responded to treatment and 7 patients (%11/5 did not. Research and data analysis have shown that

  11. Interaction of SARS and MERS Coronaviruses with the Antiviral Interferon Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, E; Thiel, V; Weber, F

    2016-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are the most severe coronavirus (CoV)-associated diseases in humans. The causative agents, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, are of zoonotic origin but may be transmitted to humans, causing severe and often fatal respiratory disease in their new host. The two coronaviruses are thought to encode an unusually large number of factors that allow them to thrive and replicate in the presence of efficient host defense mechanisms, especially the antiviral interferon system. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of the strategies that highly pathogenic coronaviruses employ to escape, dampen, or block the antiviral interferon response in human cells. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Gender effects on treatment response to interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, M; Koch-Henriksen, N; Laursen, B

    2014-01-01

    2033 patients with relapsing-remitting MS who started treatment with interferon-beta from 1996 to 2003, identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Treatment Register. We defined neutralizing antibody (NAb)-positive and NAb-negative periods in the single patient by the results of the NAb tests....... Patients served as their own controls, and relapse rates were compared between NAb-negative and NAb-positive periods. RESULTS: NAbs significantly abrogated the interferon-beta treatment efficacy in both genders. The all-over women:men relapse rate ratio irrespective of NAb status was 1.47 (95%CI; 1.......28-1.68). In a generalized linear Poisson models analysis with relapse counts as response variable, the main effects NAbs, sex, age at treatment start and number of relapses in 2 years before treatment start were strongly significant, but the effect of NAbs on relapse rates did not differ significantly between men and women...

  14. Bridging the species divide: transgenic mice humanized for type-I interferon response.

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    Daniel Harari

    Full Text Available We have generated transgenic mice that harbor humanized type I interferon receptors (IFNARs enabling the study of type I human interferons (Hu-IFN-Is in mice. These "HyBNAR" (Hybrid IFNAR mice encode transgenic variants of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 with the human extracellular domains being fused to transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of mouse sequence. B16F1 mouse melanoma cells harboring the HyBNAR construct specifically bound Hu-IFN-Is and were rendered sensitive to Hu-IFN-I stimulated anti-proliferation, STAT1 activation and activation of a prototypical IFN-I response gene (MX2. HyBNAR mice were crossed with a transgenic strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under the control of the IFN-responsive MX2 promoter (MX2-Luciferase. Both the HyBNAR and HyBNAR/MX2-Luciferase mice were responsive to all Hu-IFN-Is tested, inclusive of IFNα2A, IFNβ, and a human superagonist termed YNSα8. The mice displayed dose-dependent pharmacodynamic responses to Hu-IFN-I injection, as assessed by measuring the expression of IFN-responsive genes. Our studies also demonstrated a weak activation of endogenous mouse interferon response, especially after high dose administration of Hu-IFNs. In sharp contrast to data published for humans, our pharmacodynamic readouts demonstrate a very short-lived IFN-I response in mice, which is not enhanced by sub-cutaneous (SC injections in comparison to other administration routes. With algometric differences between humans and mice taken into account, the HyBNAR mice provides a convenient non-primate pre-clinical model to advance the study of human IFN-Is.

  15. Interferon-γ gene polymorphisms at +874T/A loci associated with response to treatment with hepatitis C virus

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    Hosein Norozian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a worldwide health problem, which associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Interferon-α and Ribavirin are only acceptable treatment regimen for these patients. These regimen are effective only on 50% of the patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to treatment with interferon gamma gene polymorphism in patients with hepatitis C. Materials and Methods: In this study, a cross - sectional study, response or lack of response to treatment in 78 patients treated with interferon gamma gene polymorphism were studied at Shiraz Namazi Hospital from 2011-2012 . DNA samples extract by salt (salting out and interferon gamma gene polymorphism (+874T/A IFN–gamma was evaluate with ARMS-PCR technique. Data were analyzed using EPI Info2000 and SPSS 16 software (chi-square test. Results: Results showed that 39 patients (50% out of 78 studied patients had TT alleles, 11 patients (1.14% had AA alleles and 28 patients (9.39% had TA alleles. 49 patients (62.82% responded to treatment. TT genotype and allele frequencies between the studied groups showed significant differencey (P=0.002. Conclusion: Interferon gamma is a key cytokine in the immune response against hepatitis C. Polymorphism in the interferon-gamma gene is (+874T/AIFN–gamma One of the most important factors interferes with treatment response in hepatitis C patients.

  16. The evolution of the major hepatitis C genotypes correlates with clinical response to interferon therapy.

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    Phillip S Pang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV require significantly different durations of therapy and achieve substantially different sustained virologic response rates to interferon-based therapies, depending on the HCV genotype with which they are infected. There currently exists no systematic framework that explains these genotype-specific response rates. Since humans are the only known natural hosts for HCV-a virus that is at least hundreds of years old-one possibility is that over the time frame of this relationship, HCV accumulated adaptive mutations that confer increasing resistance to the human immune system. Given that interferon therapy functions by triggering an immune response, we hypothesized that clinical response rates are a reflection of viral evolutionary adaptations to the immune system.We have performed the first phylogenetic analysis to include all available full-length HCV genomic sequences (n = 345. This resulted in a new cladogram of HCV. This tree establishes for the first time the relative evolutionary ages of the major HCV genotypes. The outcome data from prospective clinical trials that studied interferon and ribavirin therapy was then mapped onto this new tree. This mapping revealed a correlation between genotype-specific responses to therapy and respective genotype age. This correlation allows us to predict that genotypes 5 and 6, for which there currently are no published prospective trials, will likely have intermediate response rates, similar to genotype 3. Ancestral protein sequence reconstruction was also performed, which identified the HCV proteins E2 and NS5A as potential determinants of genotype-specific clinical outcome. Biochemical studies have independently identified these same two proteins as having genotype-specific abilities to inhibit the innate immune factor double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR.An evolutionary analysis of all available HCV genomes supports the hypothesis

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Driven AXL Expression Suppresses the Hepatic Type I Interferon Response.

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    Scott A Read

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is evolving rapidly with the development of novel direct acting antivirals (DAAs, however viral clearance remains intimately linked to the hepatic innate immune system. Patients demonstrating a high baseline activation of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs, termed interferon refractoriness, are less likely to mount a strong antiviral response and achieve viral clearance when placed on treatment. As a result, suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS 3 and other regulators of the IFN response have been identified as key candidates for the IFN refractory phenotype due to their regulatory role on the IFN response. AXL is a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as a key regulator of interferon (IFN signalling in myeloid cells of the immune system, but has not been examined in the context of chronic HCV infection. Here, we show that AXL is up-regulated following HCV infection, both in vitro and in vivo and is likely induced by type I/III IFNs and inflammatory signalling pathways. AXL inhibited type IFNα mediated ISG expression resulting in a decrease in its antiviral efficacy against HCV in vitro. Furthermore, patients possessing the favourable IFNL3 rs12979860 genotype associated with treatment response, showed lower AXL expression in the liver and a stronger induction of AXL in the blood, following their first dose of IFN. Together, these data suggest that elevated AXL expression in the liver may mediate an IFN-refractory phenotype characteristic of patients possessing the unfavourable rs12979860 genotype, which is associated with lower rates of viral clearance.

  18. Tissue-specific interferon alpha subtype response to SIV infection in brain, spleen, and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has been reported that HIV/SIV infection results in impaired IFNalpha responses in certain tissues. Using a pigtailed macaque SIV model, we examined the subtype response during acute infection in 3 tissues that are known to be infected with HIV/SIV, but whose IFNalpha subtype response has not been extensively studied: the brain, spleen, and lung. We found that the expression and regulation of specific subtypes occur in a tissue-specific manner. There was more limited IFNalpha subtype expression in the lung and brain, where predominantly macrophages are infected compared to the spleen, which contains both infected CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages. Understanding the IFNalpha subtype response in tissues known to be infected with HIV/SIV can help tailor adjunctive treatment regimens to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  19. The dinucleotide microsatellite polymorphism of the IFNAR1 gene promoter correlates with responsiveness of hepatitis C patients to interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Noriko; Mishiro, Shunji; Sugimoto, Masanobu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Michie; Hijikata, Minako; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2003-03-01

    We studied a possible correlation between the dinucleotide microsatellite polymorphism of the interferon alpha/beta receptor-1 gene (IFNAR1) and responsiveness of hepatitis C patients to interferon therapy. The length of GT-repeat (n of (GT)(n)) in the IFNAR1 promoter was determined in 157 patients, of whom 50 were responders and 107 were nonresponders to interferon. The genotypes 5/5 (i.e. homozygotes of (GT)(5)) and 5/14 (i.e. heterozygotes of (GT)(5) and (GT)(14)) were more frequently found in responders than in nonresponders: 80 versus 58%, P=0.008. Thus, determining (GT)(n) of the IFNAR1 promoter may help predict treatment outcome in patients treated with interferon alpha and/or beta. In addition, we sought for genetic polymorphism in the promoter region of the interferon alpha/beta receptor-2 gene (IFNAR2), and found single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at -134 and -75. But these SNPs did not show a clinical significance, as compared with the GT-repeat in IFNAR1, in the context of interferon responsiveness.

  20. Clinical response to interferon beta and glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis patients: a Brazilian cohort

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    Valéria Coelho Santa Rita Pereira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS are currently receiving treatment with interferon beta (IFNb and glatiramer acetate (GA. Identifying nonresponders patients is important to define therapy strategies. Several criteria for treatment response to IFNb and GA have been proposed. OBJECTIVE: It was to investigate the response to treatment with IFNb-1a, IFNb-1b and GA among relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients. METHODS: We analyzed treatment response to IFNb and GA in ninety-one RRMS patients followed for at least one year. Clinical response was established by clinical criteria based on relapses, disability progression or both. RESULTS: We observed a proportion of nonresponders, ranging from 3.3 to 42.9%, depending on the stringency of the criteria used. CONCLUSIONS: Our sample of Brazilian patients with MS has similarities when compared to other studies and there was no statistically significant difference regarding age, gender, ethnicity or disease duration between responders and nonresponders.

  1. Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism predicts initial response of chronic hepatitis B to interferon alfa

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    Ma Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to examine whether variation in interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism would predict the likelihood of sustain response of chronic hepatitis B to treatment with interferon alfa (IFN-α, the inheritance of 3 biallelic polymorphisms in the IL-10 gene promoter in patients with 52 chronic hepatitis B were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-bared techniques, restriction enzyme digestion or direct sequencing. The relationship to the outcome of antiviral therapy for chronic HBV infection was studied in 24 patients who had a virologically sustained response(SR and in 28 non-responder(NR to interferon alfa-2b and several IL-10 variants were more frequent among SR compared with NR. Carriage of the -592A allele, -592A/A genotype and -1082/-1819/-592 ATA haplotype was associated with SR. Our findings indicate that heterogeneity in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene has a role in determining the initial response of chronic hepatitis B to IFN-α therapy.

  2. Irf3 polymorphism alters induction of interferon beta in response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

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    Oleg Garifulin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic makeup of the host plays a significant role in the course and outcome of infection. Inbred strains of mice display a wide range of sensitivities to Listeria monocytogenes infection and thus serve as a good model for analysis of the effect of genetic polymorphism. The outcome of L. monocytogenes infection in mice is influenced by the ability of this bacterium to induce expression of interferon beta mRNA, encoded in mouse by the Ifnb1 (interferon beta 1, fibroblast gene. Mouse strains that lack components of the IFN beta signaling pathway are substantially more resistant to infection. We found that macrophages from the ByJ substrain of the common C57BL/6 inbred strain of mice are impaired in their ability to induce Ifnb1 expression in response to bacterial and viral infections. We mapped the locus that controls differential expression of Ifnb1 to a region on Chromosome 7 that includes interferon regulatory factor 3 (Irf3, which encodes a transcription factor responsible for early induction of Ifnb1 expression. In C57BL/6ByJ mice, Irf3 mRNA was inefficiently spliced, with a significant proportion of the transcripts retaining intron 5. Analysis of the Irf3 locus identified a single base-pair polymorphism and revealed that intron 5 of Irf3 is spliced by the atypical U12-type spliceosome. We found that the polymorphism disrupts a U12-type branchpoint and has a profound effect on the efficiency of splicing of Irf3. We demonstrate that a naturally occurring change in the splicing control element has a dramatic effect on the resistance to L. monocytogenes infection. Thus, the C57BL/6ByJ mouse strain serves as an example of how a mammalian host can counter bacterial virulence strategies by introducing subtle alteration of noncoding sequences.

  3. Sensing of HIV-1 Entry Triggers a Type I Interferon Response in Human Primary Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decalf, Jérémie; Desdouits, Marion; Rodrigues, Vasco; Gobert, François-Xavier; Gentili, Matteo; Marques-Ladeira, Santy; Chamontin, Célia; Mougel, Marylène; Cunha de Alencar, Bruna; Benaroch, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    Along with CD4(+) T lymphocytes, macrophages are a major cellular source of HIV-1 replication and a potential viral reservoir. Following entry and reverse transcription in macrophages, cloaking of the viral cDNA by the HIV-1 capsid limits its cytosolic detection, enabling efficient replication. However, whether incoming HIV-1 particles are sensed by macrophages prior to reverse transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that HIV-1 triggers a broad expression of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISG) in monocyte-derived macrophages within a few hours after infection. This response does not require viral reverse transcription or the presence of HIV-1 RNA within particles, but viral fusion is essential. This response is elicited by viruses carrying different envelope proteins and thus different receptors to proceed for viral entry. Expression of ISG in response to viral entry requires TBK1 activity and type I IFNs signaling. Remarkably, the ISG response is transient but affects subsequent viral spread. Together, our results shed light on an early step of HIV-1 sensing by macrophages at the level of entry, which confers an early protection through type I IFN signaling and has potential implications in controlling the infection.IMPORTANCE HIV infection is restricted to T lymphocytes and macrophages. HIV-1-infected macrophages are found in many tissues of infected patients, even under antiretroviral therapy, and are considered a viral reservoir. How HIV-1 is detected and what type of responses are elicited upon sensing remain in great part elusive. The kinetics and localization of the production of cytokines such as interferons in response to HIV is of critical importance to understanding how the infection and the immune response are established. Our study provides evidence that macrophages can detect HIV-1 as soon as it enters the cell. Interestingly, this sensing is independent of the presence of viral nucleic acids within the particles but requires their fusion

  4. Differential Regulation of Interferon Responses by Ebola and Marburg Virus VP35 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Megan R.; Liu, Gai; Mire, Chad E.; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Luthra, Priya; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2016-02-11

    Suppression of innate immune responses during filoviral infection contributes to disease severity. Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses each encode a VP35 protein that suppresses RIG-I-like receptor signaling and interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production by several mechanisms, including direct binding to double stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we demonstrate that in cell culture, MARV infection results in a greater upregulation of IFN responses as compared to EBOV infection. This correlates with differences in the efficiencies by which EBOV and MARV VP35s antagonize RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, structural and biochemical studies suggest that differential recognition of RNA elements by the respective VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) rather than affinity for RNA by the respective VP35s is critical for this observation. Our studies reveal functional differences in EBOV versus MARV VP35 RNA binding that result in unexpected differences in the host response to deadly viral pathogens.

  5. Study on Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Titer and Specific Interferon Gamma Response Among Dentists

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    Manoochehr Makvandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major problem for healthcare workers worldwide, and among them, dentists are at risk of acquiring HBV infection. The prevalence of HBV infection has been reported among the dentists in different regions of the world. Since none of the available drugs can clear HBV infection, the presence of effective immunity against HBV infection is important to prevent HBV infection. Objectives This study aimed at determining HBs antibody and specific HBV gamma interferon among the dentists, who received hepatitis B vaccine. Methods The blood samples were collected from 40 dentists, including 7 endodontics, 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologist, 4 periodontics, 11 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 6 implantologists, 3 orthodontics, 1 oral and maxillofacial pathologist, 2 esthetic and restorative dentists, and 4 doctors of dental surgery (DDS at from dental college of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran during December, 2013. Overall, 31 (77.5% dentists had already received 3 doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, and 9 (22.5% had received only two doses of the vaccine. Their sera were tested for HBsAb and anti-HBc-IgG by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. The lymphocyte of individuals was separated from their blood sample by Ficoll-Hypaque, cells were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS by centrifugation, and finally the pellet cells was resuspended in RPMI-1640 media. Separated cells were exposed to 2.5 µg of purified recombinant HBs antigen, and supernatants were collected after 72 hours and tested for detection of specific interferon γ level by ELISA test. Results Overall, 97.5% of dentists showed positive HBs antibody test results while 36 showed (90% positive test results for specific interferon γ against hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusions High coverage of 97.5% immune response against hepatitis B infection was found, indicating high efficacy of recombinant

  6. Type-I Interferon Responses: From Friend to Foe in the Battle against Chronic Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murira, Armstrong; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) have long been heralded as key contributors to effective antiviral responses. More widely understood in the context of acute viral infection, the role of this pleiotropic cytokine has been characterized as triggering antiviral states in cells and potentiating adaptive immune responses. Upon induction in the innate immune response, IFN-I triggers the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which upregulate the effector function of immune cells (e.g., dendritic cells, B cells, and T cells) toward successful resolution of infections. However, emerging lines of evidence reveal that viral persistence in the course of chronic infections could be driven by deleterious immunomodulatory effects upon sustained IFN-I expression. In this setting, elevation of IFN-I and ISGs is directly correlated to viral persistence and elevated viral loads. It is important to note that the correlation among IFN-I expression, ISGs, and viral persistence may be a cause or effect of chronic infection and this is an important distinction to make toward establishing the dichotomous nature of IFN-I responses. The aim of this mini review is to (i) summarize the interaction between IFN-I and downstream effector responses and therefore (ii) delineate the function of this cytokine on positive and negative immunoregulation in chronic infection. This is a significant consideration given the current therapeutic administration of IFN-I in chronic viral infections whose therapeutic significance is projected to continue despite emergence of increasingly efficacious antiviral regimens. Furthermore, elucidation of the interplay between virus and the antiviral response in the context of IFN-I will elucidate avenues toward more effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures against chronic viral infections.

  7. Type I interferon receptor in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may predict response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil + interferon therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenaga K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Yasuyuki Tomiyama1, Naoko Yoshioka1, Yoshiaki Yanai2,3, Tomoya Kawase1, Sohji Nishina1, Yuichi Hara1, Koji Yoshida1, Keiko Korenaga1, Masaaki Korenaga1, Keisuke Hino11Department of Hepatology and Pancreatology, Kawasaki Medical University, Kurashiki, Japan; 2Institute of Fujisaki, Hayashibara Biochemical Lab Inc, Okayama, Japan; 3Pharmaceutical Marketing Division, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Type 1 interferon alpha receptor 2 (IFNAR2 in the liver has been reported to be a predictive factor for the response to intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil (5-FU + systemic interferon (IFN-alpha combination therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We tested whether IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could predict the response to 5-FU + IFN.Methods: Predictive factors for survival and response to therapy were determined in 30 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent treatment with 5-FU + IFN. IFNAR2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured in 11 of the 30 patients.Results: With a mean number of 4.2 courses of combination therapy, one patient (3% showed a complete response, eight (27% showed partial responses, 13 (43% had stable disease, and eight (27% showed progressive disease. The median survival time of responders (complete response/partial response was 12.7 months and that of nonresponders (stable disease/progressive disease was 7.5 months. The one-year and two-year cumulative survival rates of responders and nonresponders were 87/69% and 40/11%, respectively (P = 0.019. Multivariate analysis identified response to therapy (P = 0.037 as the sole independent determinant of survival. The expression level of IFNAR2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was significantly (P = 0.012 higher in responders (6.5 ± 2.4 than in nonresponders (2.4 ± 0.6, even though no clinical factors were identified as being associated with the response to the combination

  8. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferonresponse in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment...... were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays...... and no worsening of disability. Each subset also had differential changes in cytokine levels after 3 months of IFN-β treatment. CONCLUSIONS: There is heterogeneity in the immunologic pathways of the RRMS population, which correlates with IFN-β response....

  9. Salmonella Suppresses the TRIF-Dependent Type I Interferon Response in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Katherine A.; Anderson, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica is an intracellular pathogen that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. Salmonella bacteria trigger an autophagic response in host cells upon infection but have evolved mechanisms for suppressing this response, thereby enhancing intracellular survival. We recently reported that S. enterica serovar Typhimurium actively recruits the host tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK) to the surface of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) (K. A. Owen et al., PLoS Pathog 10:e1004159, 2014). FAK then suppresses autophagy through activation of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway. In FAK−/− macrophages, bacteria are captured in autophagosomes and intracellular survival is attenuated. Here we show that the cell-autonomous bacterial suppression of autophagy also suppresses the broader innate immune response by inhibiting production of beta interferon (IFN-β). Induction of bacterial autophagy (xenophagy), but not autophagy alone, triggers IFN-β production through a pathway involving the adapter TRIF and endosomal Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4. Selective FAK knockout in macrophages resulted in rapid bacterial clearance from mucosal tissues after oral infection. Clearance correlated with increased IFN-β production by intestinal macrophages and with IFN-β-dependent induction of IFN-γ by intestinal NK cells. Blockade of either IFN-β or IFN-γ increased host susceptibility to infection, whereas experimental induction of IFN-β was protective. Thus, bacterial suppression of autophagy not only enhances cell-autonomous survival but also suppresses more-systemic innate immune responses by limiting type I and type II interferons. PMID:26884434

  10. IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 polymorphisms confer susceptibility to multiple sclerosis but not to interferon-beta treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Fedetz, Maria; Blanco, Eva; Fernández, Victoria E; Oliver, Begoña; León, Antonio; Pinto-Medel, Maria-Jesus; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Guerrero, Miguel; Luque, Gloria; Alcina, Antonio; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the role of three polymorphisms in the IFNAR1 (SNPs 18417 and -408) and IFNAR2 (SNP 11876) genes in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and in the IFNbeta treatment response in a group of 147 patients and 210 controls undergoing interferon therapy during the last 2 years. Only the 18417 and the 11876 SNPs showed an association with disease susceptibility (p=0.001 and 0.035, respectively) although no differential genotype distribution were observed between interferon responders and non-responder MS patients. No alteration of the expression level of IFNAR-1 was observed with respect to the -408 genotypes or to interferon treatment response. These data suggest a role for the IFNAR pathway in susceptibility to MS.

  11. Differential impact of interferon regulatory factor 7 in the initiation of the type I interferon response in the LCMV infected CNS versus the periphery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Fenger, Christina; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in regulating type I IFN genes and other genes participating in the early antiviral host response. To better understand the mechanisms involved in virus-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, we...... studied the influence of IRF1, -3, -7, and -9 on the transcriptional activity of key genes encoding antiviral host factors in the CNS of mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). A key finding is that neither IRF3 nor IRF7 is absolutely required for induction of a type I IFN response...... in the LCMV-infected CNS, whereas concurrent elimination of both factors markedly reduces the virus-induced host response. This is unlike the situation in the periphery, where deficiency of IRF7 almost eliminates the LCMV-induced production of the type I IFNs. This difference is seemingly related to the local...

  12. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Monocyte-derived interleukin-10 depresses the Bordetella pertussis- specific gamma interferon response in vaccinated infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirix, V; Verscheure, V; Goetghebuer, T; Hainaut, M; Debrie, A S; Locht, C; Mascart, F

    2009-12-01

    Antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) has been demonstrated to participate in protection against Bordetella pertussis infection. Circulating mononuclear cells from B. pertussis-infected and from pertussis-vaccinated infants secrete high amounts of IFN-gamma after in vitro stimulation by B. pertussis antigens, but with a large variation in the secreted IFN-gamma levels between individuals. We show here that the inhibition of the specific IFN-gamma response can be at least partially attributed to IL-10 secretion by monocytes. This IL-10 secretion was not associated with polymorphisms at positions -1082, -819, and -592 of the IL-10 gene promoter, suggesting that other genetic or environmental factors affect IL-10 expression and secretion.

  14. Histological response study of chronic viral hepatitis C patients treated with interferon alone or combined with ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Prado

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is often a progressive, fibrotic disease that can lead to cirrhosis and other complications. The recommended therapy is a combination of interferon and ribavirin. Besides its antiviral action, interferon is considered to have antifibrotic activity. We examined the outcome of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation in chronic hepatitis C patients who were non-responders to interferon. We made a case series, retrospective study, based on revision of medical records and reassessment of liver biopsies. For inclusion, patients should have been treated with interferon alone or combined with ribavirin, with no virological response (non responders and relapsers and had a liver biopsy before and after treatment. Histological evaluation included: i-outcome of fibrosis and necroinflammation; ii-annual fibrosis progression rate evaluation, before and after treatment. Seventy-five patients were included. Fifty-seven patients (76% did not show progression of fibrosis after treatment, compared to six (8% before treatment (p < 0.001. The mean annual fibrosis progression rate was significantly reduced after treatment (p = 0.036. Inflammatory activity improved in 19 patients (25.3%. The results support the hypothesis of an antifibrotic effect of interferon-based therapy, in non-responder patients. There was evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of treatment in some patients.

  15. Histological response study of chronic viral hepatitis C patients treated with interferon alone or combined with ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Kleber; Patzina, Rosely; Bergamaschi, Denise; Focaccia, Roberto

    2008-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is often a progressive, fibrotic disease that can lead to cirrhosis and other complications. The recommended therapy is a combination of interferon and ribavirin. Besides its antiviral action, interferon is considered to have antifibrotic activity. We examined the outcome of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation in chronic hepatitis C patients who were non-responders to interferon. We made a case series, retrospective study, based on revision of medical records and reassessment of liver biopsies. For inclusion, patients should have been treated with interferon alone or combined with ribavirin, with no virological response (non responders and relapsers) and had a liver biopsy before and after treatment. Histological evaluation included: i-outcome of fibrosis and necroinflammation; ii-annual fibrosis progression rate evaluation, before and after treatment. Seventy-five patients were included. Fifty-seven patients (76%) did not show progression of fibrosis after treatment, compared to six (8%) before treatment (p < 0.001). The mean annual fibrosis progression rate was significantly reduced after treatment (p = 0.036). Inflammatory activity improved in 19 patients (25.3%). The results support the hypothesis of an antifibrotic effect of interferon-based therapy, in non-responder patients. There was evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of treatment in some patients.

  16. Potentiating day-old blood samples for detection of interferon-gamma responses following infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test measuring specific cell-mediated immune responses in whole blood can be used for diagnosis at an early stage of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. A major obstacle for the practical use of IFN-γ testing is the recommended maximum 8 hour...

  17. Polymorphisms of innate pattern recognition receptors, response to interferon-beta and development of neutralizing antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Christian; Oturai, Annette Bang; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2010-01-01

    Interferon-beta therapy of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis involves repeated 'immunizations' with exogenous protein solutions. Innate pattern recognition receptors play an important role in immune responses towards foreign substances and may thus be related to treatment outcome....

  18. Cytokine responses and regulation of interferon-gamma release by human mononuclear cells to Aspergillus fumigatus and other filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, A.; Netea, M.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Gaustad, P.; Kullberg, B.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Abrahamsen, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the production of proinflammatory cytokines is important in host resistance to invasive aspergillosis. Knowledge of the host response towards other filamentous fungi is scarce, as most studies have focused on Aspergillus fumigatus. In addition, interferon-gamma

  19. Response to interferon-beta treatment in multiple sclerosis patients: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahurkar, S; Moldovan, M; Suppiah, V; Sorosina, M; Clarelli, F; Liberatore, G; Malhotra, S; Montalban, X; Antigüedad, A; Krupa, M; Jokubaitis, V G; McKay, F C; Gatt, P N; Fabis-Pedrini, M J; Martinelli, V; Comi, G; Lechner-Scott, J; Kermode, A G; Slee, M; Taylor, B V; Vandenbroeck, K; Comabella, M; Boneschi, F M; King, C

    2017-07-01

    Up to 50% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFN-β) treatment and determination of response requires lengthy clinical follow-up of up to 2 years. Response predictive genetic markers would significantly improve disease management. We aimed to identify IFN-β treatment response genetic marker(s) by performing a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS). The GWAS was carried out using data from 151 Australian MS patients from the ANZgene/WTCCC2 MS susceptibility GWAS (responder (R)=51, intermediate responders=24 and non-responders (NR)=76). Of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that were validated in an independent group of 479 IFN-β-treated MS patients from Australia, Spain and Italy (R=273 and NR=206), eight showed evidence of association with treatment response. Among the replicated associations, the strongest was observed for FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad; combined P-value 6.74 × 10-6) and followed by variants in GAPVD1 (GTPase activating protein and VPS9 domains 1; combined P-value 5.83 × 10-5) and near ZNF697 (combined P-value 8.15 × 10-5).

  20. Dicer and microRNA expression in multiple sclerosis and response to interferon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, William J; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Rho, Mina; Hojnacki, David; Ghazi, Rabia; Ramanathan, Murali; Tomasi, Thomas B

    2016-03-15

    Dysregulation of microRNA expression has been shown in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the mechanisms underlying these changes, their response to therapy and the impact of microRNA changes in MS are not completely understood. Dicer mediates the cleavage of precursor microRNAs to mature microRNAs and is dysregulated in multiple pathologies. Having shown that interferons regulate Dicer in vitro, we hypothesized that MS patient IFNβ1a treatment could potentially alter Dicer expression. Dicer mRNA and protein levels, as well as microRNA expression, were determined in MS patient and healthy control PBL. Acute responses to IFNβ1a were assessed in 50 patients. We found that Dicer protein but not mRNA levels decreases in MS patients while both are selectively induced in patients responding well to IFNβ1a. Potential microRNA biomarkers for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) and IFNβ1a response are described. Contrasts in Dicer and microRNA expression levels between patient populations may offer insight into mechanisms underlying disease courses and responses to IFNβ1a therapy. This work identifies Dicer regulation as both a potential mediator of MS pathology and a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CDK8 kinase phosphorylates transcription factor STAT1 to selectively regulate the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerek, Joanna; Poss, Zachary C; Steinparzer, Iris; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddäus; Mikulic, Ivana; Dölken, Lars; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Taatjes, Dylan J; Kovarik, Pavel

    2013-02-21

    Gene regulation by cytokine-activated transcription factors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family requires serine phosphorylation within the transactivation domain (TAD). STAT1 and STAT3 TAD phosphorylation occurs upon promoter binding by an unknown kinase. Here, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the Mediator complex phosphorylated regulatory sites within the TADs of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, including S727 within the STAT1 TAD in the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. We also observed a CDK8 requirement for IFN-γ-inducible antiviral responses. Microarray analyses revealed that CDK8-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation positively or negatively regulated over 40% of IFN-γ-responsive genes, and RNA polymerase II occupancy correlated with gene expression changes. This divergent regulation occurred despite similar CDK8 occupancy at both S727 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent genes. These data identify CDK8 as a key regulator of STAT1 and antiviral responses and suggest a general role for CDK8 in STAT-mediated transcription. As such, CDK8 represents a promising target for therapeutic manipulation of cytokine responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    in the formation of neuromyelitis optica lesions. Immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was injected intracerebrally with human complement to type I interferon receptor deficient and wildtype mice. Loss of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein was reduced in type I interferon receptor...

  3. Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 Links T-Cell Activation, Interferon Response, and Macrophage Activation in Chronic Kawasaki Disease Arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Anne H; Baker, Susan C; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Shulman, Stanford T; Yang, Amy; Arrollo, David; DeBerge, Matthew; Han, Shuling; Sibinga, Nicholas E S; Pink, Adam J; Thorp, Edward B

    2017-09-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is widely viewed as an acute arteritis. However, our pathologic studies show that chronic coronary arteritis can persist long after disease onset and is closely linked with arterial stenosis. Transcriptome profiling of acute KD arteritis tissues revealed upregulation of T lymphocyte, type I interferon, and allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF1) genes. We determined whether these immune responses persist in chronic KD arteritis, and we investigated the role of AIF1 in these responses. Gene expression in chronic KD and childhood control arteries was determined by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and arterial protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 small-interfering ribonucleic acid macrophage treatment was performed to investigate the role of AIF1 in macrophage and T lymphocyte activation. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 protein was highly expressed in stenotic KD arteries and colocalized with the macrophage marker CD68. T lymphocyte and interferon pathway genes were significantly upregulated in chronic KD coronary artery tissues. Alpha interferon-induced macrophage expression of CD80 and major histocompatibility complex class II was dependent on AIF1, and macrophage expression of AIF1 was required for antigen-specific T lymphocyte activation. Allograft inflammatory factor-1, originally identified in posttransplant arterial stenosis, is markedly upregulated in KD stenotic arterial tissues. T lymphocyte and type I interferon responses persist in chronic KD arteritis. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 may play multiple roles linking type I interferon response, macrophage activation, and antigen-specific T lymphocyte activation. These results suggest the likely importance of lymphocyte-myeloid cell cross-talk in the pathogenesis of KD arteritis and can inform selection of new immunotherapies for clinical trials in high-risk KD children.

  4. Human genome-wide RNAi screen identifies an essential role for inositol pyrophosphates in Type-I interferon response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyas Kudukkil Pulloor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The pattern recognition receptor RIG-I is critical for Type-I interferon production. However, the global regulation of RIG-I signaling is only partially understood. Using a human genome-wide RNAi-screen, we identified 226 novel regulatory proteins of RIG-I mediated interferon-β production. Furthermore, the screen identified a metabolic pathway that synthesizes the inositol pyrophosphate 1-IP7 as a previously unrecognized positive regulator of interferon production. Detailed genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrated that the kinase activities of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 (which convert IP5 to1-IP7 were critical for both interferon induction, and the control of cellular infection by Sendai and influenza A viruses. Conversely, ectopically expressed inositol pyrophosphate-hydrolases DIPPs attenuated interferon transcription. Mechanistic experiments in intact cells revealed that the expression of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 was needed for the phosphorylation and activation of IRF3, a transcription factor for interferon. The addition of purified individual inositol pyrophosphates to a cell free reconstituted RIG-I signaling assay further identified 1-IP7 as an essential component required for IRF3 activation. The inositol pyrophosphate may act by β-phosphoryl transfer, since its action was not recapitulated by a synthetic phosphonoacetate analogue of 1-IP7. This study thus identified several novel regulators of RIG-I, and a new role for inositol pyrophosphates in augmenting innate immune responses to viral infection that may have therapeutic applications.

  5. Interferon-gamma response of PBMC indicates productive pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegen, Bärbel; Saalmüller, Armin; Röttgen, Marlene; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim; Geldermann, Hermann; Reiner, Gerald; Pfaff, Eberhard; Büttner, Mathias

    2004-12-28

    In Chinese Meishan/German Landrace cross-bred swine F2 generation interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined directly ex vivo at different time points after survival of a virulent pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection. This reactivity was compared with the reactivity of naïve PBMC. Significant IFN-gamma production was determined in ELISA and ELISPOT only after in vitro PBMC re-stimulation with PRV and not with the closely related bovine herpesvirus BHV-1. The PRV-specific IFN-gamma secretion from re-stimulated PBMC showed high levels 6 days after infection, before the presence of serum antibodies, and it persisted at a high level over a 3 months period. The response of a group of eight piglets infected intranasally with PRV varied. Only two animals showed the expected typical fever response. PRV specific IFN-gamma production by PBMC clearly indicated that infection had occurred. Early significant IFN-gamma production by primed PBMC turned out to be a reliable and specific ex vivo marker for cellular response against productive PRV infection in swine before antibody formation.

  6. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae Induces Interferon Gamma Responses in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Children with Allergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, T A; Weaver, D; Chorny, V; Norowitz, Y M; Lent, D; Hammerschlag, M R; Joks, R; Kohlhoff, S

    2017-07-01

    Respiratory infections caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae have been associated with exacerbations of asthma. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is critical for maintaining immunity. We compared interferon (IFN)-γ responses in C. pneumoniae-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in paediatric patients ± asthma. Presence of C. pneumoniae was tested from asthma patients (N = 17) and non-asthmatic controls (N = 16) (PCR). PBMC were infected for 1 h ± C. pneumoniae AR-39 (MOI = 0.1) and cultured for 48 h. IFN-γ levels were measured in supernatants (ELISA). C. pneumoniae-IgG antibodies in serum were determined (MIF). All subjects tested negative for C. pneumoniae (PCR). C. pneumoniae-induced IFN-γ production in vitro was more prevalent in asthma compared with non-asthma; levels of IFN-γ were higher in asthma compared with non-asthma (P = 0.003). There was no association between recent respiratory infection and positive IFN-γ responses. These data show that C. pneumoniae modulates IFN-γ responses in patients with asthma, even in absence of active infection. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  8. Clinical and molecular response to interferon-α therapy in essential thrombocythemia patients with CALR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Emmanuelle; Cassinat, Bruno; Chauveau, Aurélie; Dosquet, Christine; Giraudier, Stephane; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Ianotto, Jean-Christophe; Yassin, Mohammed A; Al-Dewik, Nader; Carillo, Serge; Legouffe, Eric; Ugo, Valerie; Chomienne, Christine; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-10

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal disorders characterized by the presence of several gene mutations associated with particular hematologic parameters, clinical evolution, and prognosis. Few therapeutic options are available, among which interferon α (IFNα) presents interesting properties like the ability to induce hematologic responses (HRs) and molecular responses (MRs) in patients with JAK2 mutation. We report on the response to IFNα therapy in a cohort of 31 essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients with CALR mutations (mean follow-up of 11.8 years). HR was achieved in all patients. Median CALR mutant allelic burden (%CALR) significantly decreased from 41% at baseline to 26% after treatment, and 2 patients even achieved complete MR. In contrast, %CALR was not significantly modified in ET patients treated with hydroxyurea or aspirin only. Next-generation sequencing identified additional mutations in 6 patients (affecting TET2, ASXL1, IDH2, and TP53 genes). The presence of additional mutations was associated with poorer MR on CALR mutant clones, with only minor or no MRs in this subset of patients. Analysis of the evolution of the different variant allele frequencies showed that the mutated clones had a differential sensitivity to IFNα in a given patient, but no new mutation emerged during treatment. In all, this study shows that IFNα induces high rates of HRs and MRs in CALR-mutated ET, and that the presence of additional nondriver mutations may influence the MR to therapy. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. ATL response to arsenic/interferon therapy is triggered by SUMO/PML/RNF4-dependent Tax degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassouki, Zeina; Sahin, Umut; El Hajj, Hiba; Jollivet, Florence; Kfoury, Youmna; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Hermine, Olivier; de Thé, Hugues; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2015-01-15

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) Tax transactivator initiates transformation in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), a highly aggressive chemotherapy-resistant malignancy. The arsenic/interferon combination, which triggers degradation of the Tax oncoprotein, selectively induces apoptosis of ATL cell lines and has significant clinical activity in Tax-driven murine ATL or human patients. However, the role of Tax loss in ATL response is disputed, and the molecular mechanisms driving degradation remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that ATL-derived or HTLV-1-transformed cells are dependent on continuous Tax expression, suggesting that Tax degradation underlies clinical responses to the arsenic/interferon combination. The latter enforces promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation and partner protein recruitment. In arsenic/interferon-treated HTLV-1 transformed or ATL cells, Tax is recruited onto NBs and undergoes PML-dependent hyper-sumoylation by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)2/3 but not SUMO1, ubiquitination by RNF4, and proteasome-dependent degradation. Thus, the arsenic/interferon combination clears ATL through degradation of its Tax driver, and this regimen could have broader therapeutic value by promoting degradation of other pathogenic sumoylated proteins. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Memory T-cell response to rotavirus detected with a gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Robin M; Field, Jodie A; Caulfield, Michael J; Wang, Su; Joseph, Heather; Wooters, Melissa A; Green, Tina; Clark, H Fred; Krah, David; Smith, Jeffrey G

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of serum-neutralizing antibody and anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) are the current standard for assessing immune responses following rotavirus vaccination. However, there is ongoing debate as to whether antibody titers correlate with protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis. Children recovering from rotavirus gastroenteritis have increased gamma interferon release from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), suggesting that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) may play a role in viral clearance and protection from subsequent gastroenteritis. We have developed a gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for evaluation of CMI responses to rotavirus using frozen PBMCs obtained from healthy adults. Responses to three different rotavirus antigen types were analyzed-a peptide pool based on the human VP6 sequence; reassortant human:bovine vaccine strains; and cell culture-adapted (CCA) human G1, G2, G3, G4, and bovine (WC3) G6 strains. The reassortant strains consist of a bovine WC3 genome background expressing the human rotavirus surface proteins VP7 (G1, G2, G3, or G4) or VP4 (P1). Responses to titrations of the peptide pool as well as CCA and reassortant strains were assessed. Gamma interferon ELISPOT responses were similar for CCA and reassortant strains, whether live or UV inactivated, and when tested either individually or pooled. For most subjects, responses to the VP6 peptide pool positively correlated with responses to CCA and reassortant strains. Cell depletion studies indicate the memory responses detected with these frozen adult PBMCs were primarily due to the CD4+ T-cell population. This gamma interferon ELISPOT assay provides a new tool to apply in clinical studies for the characterization of natural or vaccine-induced CMI to rotavirus.

  11. HIV-1 evades virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses by targeting systemic and intestinal B cells via long-range intercellular conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A.; Sullivan, John S.; He, Bing; Shan, Meimei; Ball, Susan C.; Dyer, Wayne B.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Knowles, Daniel M.; Chiu, April; Sanders, Rogier W.; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Contact-dependent communication between immune cells generates protection but also facilitates viral spread. Here we found that macrophages formed long-range actin-propelled conduits in response to negative factor (Nef), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protein with immunosuppressive

  12. The C protein of measles virus inhibits the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Jessica A; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2003-10-25

    Type I interferons (IFNalpha/beta) are an important part of innate immunity to viral infections because they induce an antiviral response and limit viral replication until the adaptive response clears the infection. Since the nonstructural proteins of several paramyxoviruses inhibit the IFNalpha/beta response, we chose to explore the role of the C protein of measles virus (MV) in such inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that the MV C protein may serve as a virulence factor, but its role in the pathogenesis of MV remains undefined. In the present study, a recombinant MV strain that does not express the C protein (MV C-) and its parental strain (Ed Tag) were used. Growth of MV C- was restricted in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HeLa cells, but in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFNalpha/beta, MV C- produced titers that were equivalent to those of Ed Tag. In addition, expression of the MV C protein from plasmid DNA inhibited the production of an IFNalpha/beta responsive reporter gene and, to a lesser extent, inhibited an IFNgamma responsive reporter gene. The ability of the MV C protein to suppress the IFNalpha/beta response was confirmed using a biologic assay. After IFNbeta stimulation, HeLa cells infected with Ed Tag produced five-fold less IFNalpha/beta than cells infected with MV C-. While the mechanism of inhibition remains unclear, these data suggest that the MV C protein plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MV by inhibiting IFNalpha/beta signaling.

  13. A Novel BRISC-SHMT Complex Deubiquitinates IFNAR1 and Regulates Interferon Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Gupta, Vibhor; Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Katlinski, Kanstantsin; Wu, Junmin; Varghese, Bentley; Carbone, Christopher J.; Aressy, Bernadette; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub) chains represent a particular ubiquitin topology that mediates proteasome-independent signaling events. The deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) BRCC36 segregates into distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes that are specific for K63-Ub hydrolysis. RAP80 targets the five-member nuclear BRCC36 complex to K63-Ub chains at DNA double-strand breaks. The alternative four-member BRCC36 containing complex (BRISC) lacks a known targeting moiety. Here we identify Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) as a heretofore-unappreciated component that fulfills this function. SHMT directs BRISC activity at K63-Ub chains conjugated to the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1). BRISC-SHMT2 complexes localize to and deubiquitinate actively engaged IFNAR1, thus limiting its K63-Ub mediated internalization and lysosomal degradation. BRISC deficient cells and mice exhibit attenuated responses to IFN and are protected from IFN-associated immunopathology. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of DUB regulation, and suggest a therapeutic use of BRISC inhibitors for treating pathophysiologic processes driven by elevated IFN responses. PMID:24075985

  14. A BRISC-SHMT complex deubiquitinates IFNAR1 and regulates interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Gupta, Vibhor; Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Katlinski, Kanstantsin; Wu, Junmin; Varghese, Bentley; Carbone, Christopher J; Aressy, Bernadette; Fuchs, Serge Y; Greenberg, Roger A

    2013-10-17

    Lysine63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub) chains represent a particular ubiquitin topology that mediates proteasome-independent signaling events. The deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) BRCC36 segregates into distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes that are specific for K63-Ub hydrolysis. RAP80 targets the five-member nuclear BRCC36 complex to K63-Ub chains at DNA double-strand breaks. The alternative four-member BRCC36 containing complex (BRISC) lacks a known targeting moiety. Here, we identify serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) as a previously unappreciated component that fulfills this function. SHMT directs BRISC activity at K63-Ub chains conjugated to the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1). BRISC-SHMT2 complexes localize to and deubiquitinate actively engaged IFNAR1, thus limiting its K63-Ub-mediated internalization and lysosomal degradation. BRISC-deficient cells and mice exhibit attenuated responses to IFN and are protected from IFN-associated immunopathology. These studies reveal a mechanism of DUB regulation and suggest a therapeutic use of BRISC inhibitors for treating pathophysiological processes driven by elevated IFN responses. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetic reprogramming of the type III interferon response potentiates antiviral activity and suppresses tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type III interferon (IFN-λ exhibits potent antiviral activity similar to IFN-α/β, but in contrast to the ubiquitous expression of the IFN-α/β receptor, the IFN-λ receptor is restricted to cells of epithelial origin. Despite the importance of IFN-λ in tissue-specific antiviral immunity, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this confined receptor expression remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase (HDAC repression machinery mediates transcriptional silencing of the unique IFN-λ receptor subunit (IFNLR1 in a cell-type-specific manner. Importantly, HDAC inhibitors elevate receptor expression and restore sensitivity to IFN-λ in previously nonresponsive cells, thereby enhancing protection against viral pathogens. In addition, blocking HDAC activity renders nonresponsive cell types susceptible to the pro-apoptotic activity of IFN-λ, revealing the combination of HDAC inhibitors and IFN-λ to be a potential antitumor strategy. These results demonstrate that the type III IFN response may be therapeutically harnessed by epigenetic rewiring of the IFN-λ receptor expression program.

  16. A BRISC-SHMT Complex Deubiquitinates IFNAR1 and Regulates Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysine63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub chains represent a particular ubiquitin topology that mediates proteasome-independent signaling events. The deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB BRCC36 segregates into distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes that are specific for K63-Ub hydrolysis. RAP80 targets the five-member nuclear BRCC36 complex to K63-Ub chains at DNA double-strand breaks. The alternative four-member BRCC36 containing complex (BRISC lacks a known targeting moiety. Here, we identify serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT as a previously unappreciated component that fulfills this function. SHMT directs BRISC activity at K63-Ub chains conjugated to the type 1 interferon (IFN receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1. BRISC-SHMT2 complexes localize to and deubiquitinate actively engaged IFNAR1, thus limiting its K63-Ub-mediated internalization and lysosomal degradation. BRISC-deficient cells and mice exhibit attenuated responses to IFN and are protected from IFN-associated immunopathology. These studies reveal a mechanism of DUB regulation and suggest a therapeutic use of BRISC inhibitors for treating pathophysiological processes driven by elevated IFN responses.

  17. Viewpoint: factors involved in type I interferon responses during porcine virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Artur

    2012-07-15

    Since type I interferon (IFN-I) is considered a potent antiviral defence mechanism, it is not surprising that during evolution viruses have development of various mechanisms to counteract IFN-I induction or release. Despite this, certain virus infections are associated with very high levels of systemic IFN-I. One explanation for this observation is the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), which are able to produce high levels of IFN-I despite the presence of viral IFN-I antagonists. Examples of virus infection in pigs including classical swine fever virus, influenza virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and porcine circo virus type 2 highlight factors involved in controlling such responses and illustrate potential negative and positive effects for the host. Based on published data, we propose that in addition to the ability to activate pDC, the ability to spread systemically, and the tropism for lymphoid tissue also represent important factors contributing to strong systemic IFN-I responses during certain virus infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impaired type I and III interferon response to rhinovirus infection during pregnancy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Rebecca Louise; Gibson, Peter G; Murphy, Vanessa E; Wark, Peter A B

    2012-03-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are common ailments to all individuals and the human rhinoviruses (HRVs) cause most of these infections. Pregnant women have increased susceptibility and disease severity to viral infections like influenza and HRVs, as do asthmatics. Successful pregnancy requires immunological modulation to permit fetal tolerance. To determine whether pregnant women have reduced innate antiviral interferon (IFN) responses to HRV infection compared with non-pregnant women. An in vitro culture system was used, where peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood of 54 women, including 10 stable asthmatics who were pregnant and 10 who were not pregnant, 10 non-asthmatic women who were pregnant, 10 who were ≥6 months post partum and 10 who were not pregnant. Samples were also collected from four exacerbating pregnant asthmatics. PBMCs were cultured with HRV43 and HRV1B. The antiviral proteins IFNα and IFNλ were measured from culture supernatants by ELISA. Compared with healthy non-pregnant women, pregnant women had significantly reduced innate IFN responses to HRV infection (ppregnancy as observed when HRV was the inducing agent. Reduced antiviral IFNs during pregnancy and asthma provide an important mechanism for increased susceptibility, morbidity and mortality in pregnant women with respiratory viral infection.

  19. Optimal interdiction of unreactive Markovian evaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gutfraind, Alex [CORNELL UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    The interdiction problem arises in a variety of areas including military logistics, infectious disease control, and counter-terrorism. In the typical formulation of network interdiction. the task of the interdictor is to find a set of edges in a weighted network such that the removal of those edges would increase the cost to an evader of traveling on a path through the network. Our work is motivated by cases in which the evader has incomplete information about the network or lacks planning time or computational power, e.g. when authorities set up roadblocks to catch bank robbers, the criminals do not know all the roadblock locations or the best path to use for their escape. We introduce a model of network interdiction in which the motion of one or more evaders is described by Markov processes on a network and the evaders are assumed not to react to interdiction decisions. The interdiction objective is to find a node or set. of size at most B, that maximizes the probability of capturing the evaders. We prove that similar to the classical formulation this interdiction problem is NP-hard. But unlike the classical problem our interdiction problem is submodular and the optimal solution can be approximated within 1-lie using a greedy algorithm. Additionally. we exploit submodularity to introduce a priority evaluation strategy that speeds up the greedy algorithm by orders of magnitude. Taken together the results bring closer the goal of finding realistic solutions to the interdiction problem on global-scale networks.

  20. Tissue-Specific Interferon Alpha Subtype Response to SIV Infection in Brain, Spleen, and Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has bee...

  1. Type-I interferons mediate the neuroinflammatory response and neurotoxicity induced by rotenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Bevan S; Zhang, Moses; Brody, Kate M; Kirby, Francis J; Crack, Peter J; Taylor, Juliet M

    2017-04-01

    Evidence from post-mortem human brains, animal studies and cell culture models has implicated neuroinflammation in the aetiology of chronic neuropathologies including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Although the neuroinflammatory response is considered detrimental in contributing to these pathologies, the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. The type-I interferons (IFNs) have been well characterised in the periphery and are known to initiate/modulate the immune response. Recently, they have been implicated in ageing and we have also demonstrated increased type-I IFN expression in post-mortem human Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease brains. We hypothesise that the type-I IFNs are key drivers of the damaging, self-perpetuating pro-inflammatory response that contributes to these chronic neuropathologies. In support of this, we have recently confirmed in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease that mice lacking the type-I IFN receptor (IFNAR1), display an attenuated neuroinflammatory response with subsequent neuroprotection. To further investigate type-I IFN-mediated neuroinflammation and the specific CNS cell types involved, this study treated primary cultured wild-type and IFNAR1-/- neurons or mixed glia with the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Wild-type neurons and glia treated with 3 nM and 25 nM rotenone, respectively, exhibited a pro-inflammatory response, including increased type-I IFN expression that was attenuated in cells lacking IFNAR1. Reduced type-I IFN signalling in IFNAR1-/- neurons also conferred protection against caspase-3-mediated rotenone-induced cell death. Further, this reduced pro-inflammatory response in the IFNAR1-/- glia subsequently diminished their neurotoxic effects to wild-type neurons. In support of this, we confirmed that therapeutically targeting the type-I IFN glial response to rotenone through a specific IFNAR1 blocking monoclonal antibody was neuroprotective. Our data has confirmed that

  2. H-Ras Exerts Opposing Effects on Type I Interferon Responses Depending on Its Activation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guann-An; Lin, Yun-Ru; Chung, Hai-Ting; Hwang, Lih-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Using shRNA high-throughput screening, we identified H-Ras as a regulator of antiviral activity, whose depletion could enhance Sindbis virus replication. Further analyses indicated that depletion of H-Ras results in a robust increase in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and a decrease in Sendai virus (SeV)-induced retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling. Interestingly, however, ectopic expression of wild-type H-Ras results in a biphasic mode of RLR signaling regulation: while low-level expression of H-Ras enhances SeV-induced RLR signaling, high-level expression of H-Ras significantly inhibits this signaling. The inhibitory effects correlate with the activation status of H-Ras. As a result, oncogenic H-Ras, H-RasV12, strongly inhibits SeV-induced IFN-β promoter activity and type I interferon signaling. Conversely, the positive effects exerted by H-Ras on RLR signaling are independent of its signaling activity, as a constitutively inactive form of H-Ras, H-RasN17, also positively regulates RLR signaling. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that depletion of H-Ras reduces the formation of MAVS-TNF receptor-associated factor 3 signaling complexes. These results reveal that the H-Ras protein plays a role in promoting MAVS signalosome assembly in the mitochondria, whereas oncogenic H-Ras exerts a negative effect on type I IFN responses.

  3. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Luthra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication.

  4. Type I interferon responses are impaired in latently HIV infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganath, Nischal; Sandstrom, Teslin S; Fadel, Saleh; Côté, Sandra C; Angel, Jonathan B

    2016-09-09

    The latent HIV-1 reservoir represents the primary barrier to the eradication of HIV-1 infection. The design of novel reservoir-clearance strategies, however, is impeded in part by the inability to distinguish latently HIV-infected cells from uninfected cells. Significant impairment of the type I interferon (IFN-I) response is observed during productive HIV-1 infection. Although this remains poorly described in the context of latent HIV-1 infection, presence of potential defects may serve as a novel therapeutic target. Therefore, IFN-I pathways were characterized using two latently HIV-1-infected cell lines, U1 and OM10.1, in comparison to their respective uninfected parental U937 and HL60 cell lines. Constitutive expression and induction of important mediators of IFN-I signaling including IFNα/β cytokines, IFNAR1, MHC-I, ISG15, and PKR were evaluated following exogenous IFNα or poly(I:C) treatment. Differences in basal expression of IFNAR1, MHC-I, and PKR were observed between the latently HIV-1 infected and uninfected cell lines. In parallel, significant impairments in the induction of MHC-I, ISG15 and PKR, as well as secretion of IFNα/β cytokines were observed in response to appropriate exogenous stimulation within the two latently HIV-infected U1 and OM10.1 cells, relative to their HIV-uninfected parental cells. In comparison to the HIV-uninfected U937 and HL60 cell lines, widespread defects in IFN-I responsiveness were observed within the latently HIV-infected U1 and OM10.1 cells. These impairments represent novel therapeutic targets, which may be amenable to strategies currently employed in cancer therapy.

  5. Interferon Alpha in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy B. Niewold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pleiotropic cytokine interferon alpha is involved in multiple aspects of lupus etiology and pathogenesis. Interferon alpha is important under normal circumstances for antiviral responses and immune activation. However, heightened levels of serum interferon alpha and expression of interferon response genes are common in lupus patients. Lupus-associated autoantibodies can drive the production of interferon alpha and heightened levels of interferon interfere with immune regulation. Several genes in the pathways leading to interferon production or signaling are associated with risk for lupus. Clinical and cellular manifestations of excess interferon alpha in lupus combined with the genetic risk factors associated with interferon make this cytokine a rare bridge between genetic risk and phenotypic effects. Interferon alpha influences the clinical picture of lupus and may represent a therapeutic target. This paper provides an overview of the cellular, genetic, and clinical aspects of interferon alpha in lupus.

  6. Memory T-Cell Response to Rotavirus Detected with a Gamma Interferon Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufhold, Robin M.; Field, Jodie A.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Wang, Su; Joseph, Heather; Wooters, Melissa A.; Green, Tina; Clark, H. Fred; Krah, David; Smith, Jeffrey G.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of serum-neutralizing antibody and anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) are the current standard for assessing immune responses following rotavirus vaccination. However, there is ongoing debate as to whether antibody titers correlate with protection against rotavirus gastroenteritis. Children recovering from rotavirus gastroenteritis have increased gamma interferon release from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), suggesting that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) may ...

  7. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  8. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Anderson, Christine B; Seifried, Harold E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Howard, Michael T

    2015-08-06

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  9. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra A. Tsuji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  10. Genetic Variants in the Apoptosis Gene BCL2L1 Improve Response to Interferon-Based Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Weis, Nina; Ladelund, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation upstream of the apoptosis pathway has been associated with outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We investigated genetic polymorphisms in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway to assess their influence on sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon...

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Elicits a Type II Interferon-Like Host Cell Response That Depends on Activated STAT1 but Not Interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblach, Theresa; Grandel, Benedikt; Seiler, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a highly prevalent pathogen that, upon primary infection, establishes life-long persistence in all infected individuals. Acute hCMV infections cause a variety of diseases in humans with developmental or acquired immune deficits. In addition, persistent hCMV infection may contribute to various chronic disease conditions even in immunologically normal people. The pathogenesis of hCMV disease has been frequently linked to inflammatory host immune responses triggered by virus-infected cells. Moreover, hCMV infection activates numerous host genes many of which encode pro-inflammatory proteins. However, little is known about the relative contributions of individual viral gene products to these changes in cellular transcription. We systematically analyzed the effects of the hCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein, a major transcriptional activator and antagonist of type I interferon (IFN) signaling, on the human transcriptome. Following expression under conditions closely mimicking the situation during productive infection, IE1 elicits a global type II IFN-like host cell response. This response is dominated by the selective up-regulation of immune stimulatory genes normally controlled by IFN-γ and includes the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory chemokines. IE1-mediated induction of IFN-stimulated genes strictly depends on tyrosine-phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and correlates with the nuclear accumulation and sequence-specific binding of STAT1 to IFN-γ-responsive promoters. However, neither synthesis nor secretion of IFN-γ or other IFNs seems to be required for the IE1-dependent effects on cellular gene expression. Our results demonstrate that a single hCMV protein can trigger a pro-inflammatory host transcriptional response via an unexpected STAT1-dependent but IFN-independent mechanism and identify IE1 as a candidate determinant of hCMV pathogenicity. PMID:21533215

  12. Protective Role of Gamma Interferon during the Recall Response to Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Adrian; Bot, Simona; Bona, Constantin A.

    1998-01-01

    During secondary immune responses to influenza virus, virus-specific T memory cells are a major source of gamma interferon (IFN-γ). We assessed the contribution of IFN-γ to heterologous protection against the A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus of wild-type and IFN-γ−/− mice previously immunized with the A/HK/68 (H3N2) virus. The IFN-γ−/− mice displayed significantly reduced survival rates subsequent to a challenge with various doses of the A/WSN/33 virus. This was associated with an impaired ability of the IFN-γ−/− mice to completely clear the pulmonary virus by day 7 after the challenge, although significant reduction of the virus titers was noted. However, the IFN-γ−/− mice developed type A influenza virus cross-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) similar to the wild-type mice, as demonstrated by both cytotoxicity and a limiting-dilution assay for the estimation of CTL precursor frequency. The pulmonary recruitment of T cells in IFN-γ−/− mice was not dramatically affected, and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was similar to that of wild-type mice. The T cells from IFN-γ−/− mice did not display a significant switch toward a Th2 profile. Furthermore, the IFN-γ−/− mice retained the ability to mount significant titers of WSN and HK virus-specific hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. Together, these results are consistent with a protective role of IFN-γ during the heterologous response against influenza virus independently of the generation and local recruitment of cross-reactive CTLs. PMID:9658110

  13. Upregulation of Interferon-inducible and damage response pathways in chronic graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Frances T.; Memon, Sarfraz; Jin, Ping; Imanguli, Matin M.; Wang, Huan; Rehman, Najibah; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Rose, Jeremy; Mays, Jacqueline W.; Dhamala, Susan; Kapoor, Veena; Telford, William; Dickinson, John; Davis, Sean; Halverson, David; Naik, Haley B.; Baird, Kristin; Fowler, Daniel; Stroncek, David; Cowen, Edward W.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Although Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease (CGVHD) is the primary non-relapse complication of allogeneic transplantation, understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. To identify the main operant pathways across the spectrum of CGVHD, we analyzed gene expression in circulating monocytes, chosen as in situ systemic reporter cells. Microarrays identified two interrelated pathways: (1) Interferon-inducible genes and (2) innate receptors for cellular damage. Corroborating these with multiplex RNA quantitation, we found that multiple IFN-inducible genes (affecting lymphocyte trafficking, differentiation and antigen presentation) were concurrently upregulated in CGVHD monocytes compared to normal and nonCGVHD controls. IFN-inducible chemokines were elevated in both lichenoid and sclerotic CGHVD plasma and linked to CXCR3+ lymphocyte trafficking. Furthermore, the IFN-inducible genes CXCL10 and TNFSF13B (BAFF) levels were correlated at both the gene and plasma levels, implicating IFN-induction as a factor in elevated BAFF levels in CGVHD. In the second pathway, DAMP/PAMP receptor genes capable of inducing Type I IFN were upregulated. Type I IFN-inducible MxA was expressed in proportion to CGVHD activity in skin, mucosa and glands, and expression of TLR and RIG-1 receptor genes correlated with upregulation of Type I IFN-inducible genes in monocytes. Finally, in serial analyses following transplant, IFN-inducible and damage-response genes were upregulated in monocytes at CGVHD onset and declined upon therapy and resolution in both lichenoid and sclerotic CGVHD patients. This interlocking analysis of IFN-inducible genes, plasma analytes and tissue immunohistochemistry strongly supports a unifying hypothesis of induction of IFN by innate response to cellular damage as a mechanism for initiation and persistence of CGVHD. PMID:27694491

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism at exon 7 splice acceptor site of OAS1 gene determines response of hepatitis C virus patients to interferon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Awady, Mostafa K; Anany, Mohamed A; Esmat, Gamal; Zayed, Naglaa; Tabll, Ashraf A; Helmy, Amr; El Zayady, Abdel Rahman; Abdalla, Mohga S; Sharada, Hayat M; El Raziky, Maissa; El Akel, Wafaa; Abdalla, Shadia; Bader El Din, Noha G

    2011-05-01

    Response to interferon therapy and disease progression in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients differs among individuals, suggesting a possibility of a contribution of host genetic factors. 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), an important component of the innate immune system with a proven antiviral function, may therefore have a relationship with the response to interferon therapy and clinical course of HCV disease. Our aim was to determine the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at exon 7 splice acceptor site (SAS) of the OAS1 gene in relation to the interferon response and status of HCV infection. A 203 bp fragment containing exon 7 SAS was amplified in 70 HCV chronic patients and 50 healthy controls. SNP was examined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping method. Correlations of SNP genotypes with response to interferon and clinical status of patients were statistically analyzed. There was an increasing trend of response from AA to AG to GG genotypes (P = 0.007). Genotype AA was associated with non-response to interferon and higher degree of liver fibrosis (P = 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed this SNP as independent and a significant determinant of the outcome of interferon therapy (odds ratio 4.913 [95% confidence interval 1.365-8.2], P = 0.006). This is the first study to show a significant association between the functional SNP at exon 7 SAS of OAS1 gene and the viral response to interferon in chronic HCV patients. Patients with AA genotype were associated with progressive HCV disease and viral resistance to interferon therapy. This OAS SNP is a potential bio-marker to predict IFN response in chronic hepatitis C patients. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndongala Michel Lubaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m, VP35 (EBOV/VP35m or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from cytomegalovirus (CMV-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as

  16. MAPK Phosphatase 5 Expression Induced by Influenza and Other RNA Virus Infection Negatively Regulates IRF3 Activation and Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmy J. James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon system is essential for antiviral immune response and is a primary target of viral immune evasion strategies. Here, we show that virus infection induces the expression of MAPK phosphatase 5 (MKP5, a dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP, in host cells. Mice deficient in MKP5 were resistant to H1N1 influenza infection, which is associated with increased IRF3 activation and type I interferon expression in comparison with WT mice. Increased type I interferon responses were also observed in MKP5-deficient cells and animals upon other RNA virus infection, including vesicular stomatitis virus and sendai virus. These observations were attributed to the ability of MKP5 to interact with and dephosphorylate IRF3. Our study reveals a critical function of a DUSP in negative regulation of IRF3 activity and demonstrates a mechanism by which influenza and other RNA viruses inhibit type I interferon response in the host through MKP5.

  17. Skulptuuripäevad Pärnus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    4.-15. VIII Pärnus Vallikääru aasal 3. rahvusvahelised skulptuuripäevad "Pärnu positiivne märk". Osalevad Serge Samyn (Prantsusmaa), Kestutis Lanauskaټ (Leedu), Asa Hauksdottir (Island), Meeland Sepp, Toomas Kuusing, Toomas Altnurme, Rait Pärg (korraldaja). Lastele vanuses 7-15 avatud töötuba juhendab Eneken Maripuu

  18. Maakunsti päevad Rakveres

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    5.-10. VI Rakvere tammikus rahvusvahelised maakunsti päevad. Korraldaja Anne Kokkov. Rakvere muuseumis lõppes naivistliku kunstniku Berta Mändla näitus "Berta jutustab". Muuseumi teisi üritusi. Richard Sagritsa ateljees Karepal väljapanek kunstniku ja tema kaasaegsete loomingust.

  19. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James R; Quicke, Kendra M; Maddur, Mohan S; O'Neal, Justin T; McDonald, Circe E; Fedorova, Nadia B; Puri, Vinita; Shabman, Reed S; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  20. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Promotes Keratinocyte Differentiation in Response to Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Jennifer; Scholz, Glen M; Aw, Jiamin; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that the expression of the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) transcription factor in oral keratinocytes was stimulated by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Here, we have established that IRF6 promotes the differentiation of oral keratinocytes in response to P. gingivalis This was evidenced by the IRF6-dependent upregulation of specific markers of keratinocyte terminal differentiation (e.g., involucrin [IVL] and keratin 13 [KRT13]), together with additional transcriptional regulators of keratinocyte differentiation, including Grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3) and Ovo-like zinc finger 1 (OVOL1). We have previously established that the transactivator function of IRF6 is activated by receptor-interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4). Consistently, the silencing of RIPK4 inhibited the stimulation of IVL, KRT13, GRHL3, and OVOL1 gene expression. IRF6 was shown to also regulate the stimulation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1) gene expression by P. gingivalis, as well as that of small proline-rich proteins (e.g., SPRR1), which are covalently cross-linked by TGM1 to other proteins, including IVL, during cornification. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin (OCLN) was found to also be upregulated in an IRF6-dependent manner. IRF6 was demonstrated to be important for the barrier function of oral keratinocytes; specifically, silencing of IRF6 increased P. gingivalis-induced intercellular permeability and cell invasion. Taken together, our findings potentially position IRF6 as an important mediator of barrier defense against P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  2. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  3. Tetranychus evansi evades plant defence

    OpenAIRE

    Ataíde, Lívia Maria Silva

    2013-01-01

    Spider mites are known to induce or suppress plant defences. For instance, most strains of Tetranychus urticae induce plant defences regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathways and this response has been correlated with a reduction in their reproductive performance on tomato plants. In contrast, the red spider mite Tetranychus evansi suppresses the JA and SA defences and both spider mite species were found to perform much better on tomato leaves that were previously attac...

  4. Interferon-γ increases neuronal death in response to amyloid-β1-42

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    Williams Alun

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive impairment, the consequence of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately the death of neurons. The amyloid hypothesis proposes that neuronal damage results from the accumulation of insoluble, hydrophobic, fibrillar peptides such as amyloid-β1-42. These peptides activate enzymes resulting in a cascade of second messengers including prostaglandins and platelet-activating factor. Apoptosis of neurons is thought to follow as a consequence of the uncontrolled release of second messengers. Biochemical, histopathological and genetic studies suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a role in neurodegeneration during Alzheimer's disease. In the current study we examined the effects of interferon (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 on neurons. Methods Primary murine cortical or cerebellar neurons, or human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, were grown in vitro. Neurons were treated with cytokines prior to incubation with different neuronal insults. Cell survival, caspase-3 activity (a measure of apoptosis and prostaglandin production were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of cytokines on the levels of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 or phospholipase C γ-1. Results While none of the cytokines tested were directly neurotoxic, pre-treatment with IFN-γ sensitised neurons to the toxic effects of amyloid-β1-42 or HuPrP82-146 (a neurotoxic peptide found in prion diseases. The effects of IFN-γ were seen on cortical and cerebellar neurons, and on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. However, pre-treatment with IFN-γ did not affect the sensitivity to neurons treated with staurosporine or hydrogen peroxide. Pre-treatment with IFN-γ increased the levels of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 in SH-SY5Y cells and increased prostaglandin E2 production in response to amyloid-β1-42. Conclusion Treatment of neuronal cells

  5. Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses: divergent infection outcomes marked by similarities in induction and evasion of interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; Lemon, Stanley M

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses (HAV and HCV) are both positive-strand ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses with hepatotropic lifestyles. Despite several important differences, they share many biological and molecular features and similar genome replication schemes. Despite this, HAV infections are usually effectively controlled by the host with elimination of the virus, whereas HCV most often is able to establish lifelong persistent infection. The mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. The cellular helicases RIG-I and MDA5, and Toll-like receptor 3, are pattern recognition receptors that sense virus-derived RNAs within hepatocytes in the liver. Activation of these receptors leads to their interaction with specific adaptor proteins, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), respectively, which engage downstream kinases to activate two crucial transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). This results in the induction of interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes that ultimately establish an antiviral state. These signaling pathways are central to host antiviral defense and thus frequent targets for viral interference. Both HAV and HCV express proteases that target signal transduction through these pathways and that block the induction of IFNs upon sensing of viral RNA by these receptors. An understanding of the differences and similarities in the early innate immune responses to these infections is likely to provide important insights into the mechanism underlying the long-term persistence of HCV. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  6. The heme oxygenase 1 product biliverdin interferes with hepatitis C virus replication by increasing antiviral interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Elisabeth; El-Tantawy, Walid Hamdy; Ocker, Matthias; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lohmann, Volker; Hashemolhosseini, Said; Tiegs, Gisa; Sass, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    The anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic heme degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been shown recently to interfere with replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). We investigated the effect of HO-1 products carbon monoxide (CO), iron and biliverdin on HCV replication using the replicon cell lines Huh-5-15 and LucUbiNeo-ET, stably expressing HCV proteins NS3 through NS5B. Incubation of these cell lines in the presence of the CO donor methylene chloride transiently reduced HCV replication, whereas an increase of iron in cell culture by administration of FeCl(3) or iron-saturated lactoferrin did not interfere with HCV replication. Likewise, depletion of iron by deferoxamine during induction of HO-1 by cobalt-protoporphyrin IX did not restore HCV replication. The most prominent effect was observed after incubation of replicon cell lines in the presence of biliverdin. Biliverdin seems to interfere with HCV replication-mediated oxidative stress by inducing expression of antiviral interferons, such as interferon alpha2 and alpha17. The antioxidant biliverdin reduces HCV replication in vitro by triggering the antiviral interferon response and might improve HCV therapy in the future.

  7. Transcriptional expression of type I interferon response genes and stability of housekeeping genes in the human endometrium and endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna L; Knudsen, Ulla B; Munk, Torben

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a painful chronic female disease defined by the presence of endometrial tissue implants in ectopic locations. The pathogenesis is much debated, and type I interferons could be involved. The expression of genes of the type I interferon response were profiled by a specific PCR Array...... was suitable for normalization of qRT-PCR studies of eutopic vs. ectopic endometrium. In the endometrial cell lines HEC1A, HEC1B, Ishikawa, and RL95-2, HMBS and HPRT1 were most stably expressed. The interferon-specific PCR Array indicated significantly different expression of the genes BST2, COL16A1, HOXB2......, and ISG20 between the endometrial tissue types. However, by correctly normalized qRT-PCR, levels of BST2, COL16A1, and the highly type I IFN-stimulated genes ISG12A and 6-16 displayed insignificant variations. Conversely, HOXB2 and ISG20 transcriptions were significantly reduced in endometriosis lesions...

  8. Breakthrough disease during interferon-[beta] therapy in MS: No signs of impaired biologic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, D; Krakauer, M; Lund, H

    2010-01-01

    Disease activity is highly variable in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), both untreated and during interferon (IFN)-beta therapy. Breakthrough disease is often regarded as treatment failure; however, apart from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), no blood biomarkers have been established as reli...

  9. USP18-based negative feedback control is induced by type I and type III interferons and specifically inactivates interferon α response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique François-Newton

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN are cytokines that are rapidly secreted upon microbial infections and regulate all aspects of the immune response. In humans 15 type I IFN subtypes exist, of which IFN α2 and IFN β are used in the clinic for treatment of different pathologies. IFN α2 and IFN β are non redundant in their expression and in their potency to exert specific bioactivities. The more recently identified type III IFNs (3 IFN λ or IL-28/IL-29 bind an unrelated cell-type restricted receptor. Downstream of these two receptor complexes is a shared Jak/Stat pathway. Several mechanisms that contribute to the shut down of the IFN-induced signaling have been described at the molecular level. In particular, it has long been known that type I IFN induces the establishment of a desensitized state. In this work we asked how the IFN-induced desensitization integrates into the network built by the multiple type I IFN subtypes and type III IFNs. We show that priming of cells with either type I IFN or type III IFN interferes with the cell's ability to further respond to all IFN α subtypes. Importantly, primed cells are differentially desensitized in that they retain sensitivity to IFN β. We show that USP18 is necessary and sufficient to induce differential desensitization, by impairing the formation of functional binding sites for IFN α2. Our data highlight a new type of differential between IFNs α and IFN β and underline a cross-talk between type I and type III IFN. This cross-talk could shed light on the reported genetic variation in the IFN λ loci, which has been associated with persistence of hepatitis C virus and patient's response to IFN α2 therapy.

  10. Anti-diabetic drugs, insulin and metformin, have no direct interaction with hepatitis C virus infection or anti-viral interferon response

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    Mohamad S. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with insulin resistance (IR and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Chronic HCV patients with IR and T2D appear to have a decreased response to the standard pegylated-interferon-alpha and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV anti-viral therapy. Insulin and metformin are anti-diabetic drugs regularly used in the clinic. A previous in vitro study has shown a negative effect of insulin on interferon signaling. In the clinic, adding metformin to PEG-IFN/RBV therapy was reported to increase the response rate in chronic HCV patients and it has been suggested this effect derives from an improved anti-viral action of interferon. The goal of this study was to further investigate the molecular insight of insulin and metformin interaction with HCV infection and the anti-viral action of interferon. We used two cell culture models of HCV infection. One is a sub-genomic model that assays viral replication through luciferase reporter gene expression. The other one is a full-length infectious model derived from the JFH1 genotype 2a isolate. We found that both insulin and metformin do not affect HCV infection. Insulin and metformin also do not influence the anti-viral potency of interferon. In addition, there is no direct interaction between these two drugs and interferon signaling. Our results do not confirm the previous laboratory observation that insulin interferes with interferon signaling and suggest that classical nutritional signaling through mTOR may be not involved in HCV replication. If metformin indeed can increase the response rate to interferon therapy in patients, our data indicate that this could be mediated via an indirect mechanisms.

  11. Brain and liver pathology, amyloid deposition, and interferon responses among older HIV-positive patients in the late HAART era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Isaac H; De Girolami, Umberto; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Misra, Vikas; Singer, Elyse J; Gabuzda, Dana

    2017-02-17

    HIV+ patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with suppressed viral loads have a low incidence of HIV-associated dementia, but increased prevalence of milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). These milder forms of HAND are often associated with minimal histological abnormalities, and their pathophysiology is unclear. Comorbidities, altered amyloid metabolism, accelerated brain aging, and activated interferon responses are suspected to play a role in HAND pathogenesis in HAART-treated persons. To investigate associations between liver disease, accelerated brain aging, and HAND in HIV+ patients in the late HAART era (2002-2015), we studied liver and brain autopsy tissues from 53 older subjects evaluated at UCLA and BWH using histopathological stains, a sensitive fluorescent amyloid stain (AmyloGlo), and targeted gene expression profiling (NanoString). The majority of HIV+ subjects (median age 56) were on HAART (89.3%) with last pre-mortem plasma viral load brain pathologies. AmyloGlo staining detected large amyloid deposits in only one HIV+ case (age 69 with Alzheimer's disease pathology) and two HIV- controls (ages 66 and 74). White matter from HIV+ cases vs. HIV- seronegative controls showed a trend (p = 0.06) towards increased interferon response gene expression (ISG15, MX1, IFIT1, IFIT2, and IFITM1). Gliosis and cerebrovascular disease, but not accelerated amyloid deposition, are common brain pathologies among older HIV+ patients in the late HAART era. Although HIV+ subjects had more cirrhosis, liver pathology was not associated with any consistent pattern of brain pathology. Cerebrovascular disease, interferon responses, and neuroinflammation are likely factors contributing to brain aging and HAND in older HIV+ patients on current HAART regimens.

  12. Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon (IFN) Responses by Inducing Degradation of Type I IFN Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Chuan; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Pritzl, Curtis J.; Fuchs, Serge Y.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) employs diverse strategies to circumvent type I interferon (IFN) responses, particularly by inhibiting the synthesis of type I IFNs. However, it is poorly understood if and how IAV regulates the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR)-mediated signaling mode. In this study, we demonstrate that IAV induces the degradation of IFNAR subunit 1 (IFNAR1) to attenuate the type I IFN-induced antiviral signaling pathway. Following infection, the level of IFNAR1 protein, but not mRNA, decre...

  13. Kinetic of Virologic Response to Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin in Children With Chronic Hepatitis C Predicts the Effect of Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Nebbia, Gabriella; Cananzi, Mara; Maccabruni, Anna; Zaramella, Marco; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Grisotto, Laura; Azzari, Chiara; Resti, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a global health problem. Although new, highly effective and safe direct-acting antivirals have been approved for adults, the only drugs currently registered for children are pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The timelines for the pediatric approval of the new treatment regimens are far off. Three phase II-III pediatric trials with direct-acting antivirals are recruiting, and the estimated dates of completion of these studies range between April 2018 and January 2023. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of on-treatment virologic response (VR) as predictor of sustained virologic response (SVR) in a cohort of Italian children with chronic hepatitis C and to establish possible stopping rules. Sixty-four children were enrolled (January 2012 to December 2015). SVR rate was 79.7% (51/64). VR at weeks 2 to 12 were shown to be robust predictors for the attainment of SVR. The positive predictive values of VR at weeks 8 and 12 were 98% and 92.7%, respectively. The negative predictive values at the same treatment weeks were 92.9% and 100%, indicating that no child who did not achieve VR at week 12 obtained SVR and that the likelihood of achieving SVR if still positive at week 8 was very low. Our results suggest for the first time that VR at week 8 could be considered a reliable predictor of SVR. Monitoring viral kinetics is useful for predicting the success of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy in children.

  14. Anti-tumorigenic effects of Type 1 interferon are subdued by integrated stress responses

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; HuangFu, Wei-Chun; Dong, Guangyu; Qian, Juan; Baker, Darren P.; Karar, Jayashree; Koumenis, Constantinos; Diehl, J. Alan; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2012-01-01

    Viral and pharmacologic inducers of PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) were shown to accelerate the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the IFNAR1 chain of the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor and to limit cell sensitivity to IFN. Here we report that hypoxia can elicit these effects in a PERK-dependent manner. The altered fate of IFNAR1 affected by signaling downstream of PERK depends on phosphorylation of eIF2α and ensuing activation of p38α kinase. Activators of other eIF2α kinases such as PKR ...

  15. Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma responsive to interferon alfa-2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Kavala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma is the most common type of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas with a predilection for the scalp, forehead, and trunk. Herein we report a case of primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma on the scalp of 72-year-old female. The diagnosis was made histopathologically, confirming the presence of centrocytes and centroblasts. Complete resolution was achieved following administration of subcutaneous interferon α-2a at a dose of 4.5 × 10 6 IU three times weekly for 3 months.

  16. Targeting interferon response genes sensitizes aromatase inhibitor resistant breast cancer cells to estrogen-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Joung; Lui, Asona; Ogony, Joshua; Jan, Rifat; Sims, Peter J; Lewis-Wambi, Joan

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen deprivation using aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is currently the standard of care for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Unfortunately, the majority of patients treated with AIs eventually develop resistance, inevitably resulting in patient relapse and, ultimately, death. The mechanism by which resistance occurs is still not completely known, however, recent studies suggest that impaired/defective interferon signaling might play a role. In the present study, we assessed the functional role of IFITM1 and PLSCR1; two well-known interferon response genes in AI resistance. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to assess mRNA and protein levels of IFITM1, PLSCR1, STAT1, STAT2, and IRF-7 in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C breast cancer cells and AI-sensitive MCF-7 and T47D cells. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was performed on tissue microarrays consisting of normal breast tissues, primary breast tumors, and AI-resistant recurrence tumors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantitate intracellular IFNα level. Neutralizing antibody was used to block type 1 interferon receptor IFNAR1 signaling. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown IFITM1, PLSCR1, STAT1, STAT2, IRF-7, and IFNα expression. We found that IFITM1 and PLSCR1 were constitutively overexpressed in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C breast cancer cells and AI-resistant tumors and that siRNA knockdown of IFITM1 significantly inhibited the ability of the resistant cells to proliferate, migrate, and invade. Interestingly, suppression of IFITM1 significantly enhanced estradiol-induced cell death in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C cells and markedly increased expression of p21, Bax, and Noxa in these cells. Significantly elevated level of IFNα was detected in AI-resistant MCF-7:5C cells compared to parental MCF-7 cells and suppression of IFNα dramatically reduced IFITM1, PLSCR1, p-STAT1, and p-STAT2 expression in the resistant cells. Lastly, neutralizing antibody

  17. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  18. Mx Is Not Responsible for the Antiviral Activity of Interferon-α against Japanese Encephalitis Virus

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    Jing Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mx proteins are interferon (IFN-induced dynamin-like GTPases that are present in all vertebrates and inhibit the replication of myriad viruses. However, the role Mx proteins play in IFN-mediated suppression of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection is unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of Mx1 and Mx2 expression on the interferon-α (IFNα restriction of JEV replication. To evaluate whether the inhibitory activity of IFNα on JEV is dependent on Mx1 or Mx2, we knocked down Mx1 or Mx2 with siRNA in IFNα-treated PK-15 cells and BHK-21 cells, then challenged them with JEV; the production of progeny virus was assessed by plaque assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that depletion of Mx1 or Mx2 did not affect JEV restriction imposed by IFNα, although these two proteins were knocked down 66% and 79%, respectively. Accordingly, expression of exogenous Mx1 or Mx2 did not change the inhibitory activity of IFNα to JEV. In addition, even though virus-induced membranes were damaged by Brefeldin A (BFA, overexpressing porcine Mx1 or Mx2 did not inhibit JEV proliferation. We found that BFA inhibited JEV replication, not maturation, suggesting that BFA could be developed into a novel antiviral reagent. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that IFNα inhibits JEV infection by Mx-independent pathways.

  19. Real-time whole-body visualization of Chikungunya Virus infection and host interferon response in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Palha

    Full Text Available Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging arbovirus that may cause severe disease, constitutes an important public health problem. Herein we describe a novel CHIKV infection model in zebrafish, where viral spread was live-imaged in the whole body up to cellular resolution. Infected cells emerged in various organs in one principal wave with a median appearance time of ∼14 hours post infection. Timing of infected cell death was organ dependent, leading to a shift of CHIKV localization towards the brain. As in mammals, CHIKV infection triggered a strong type-I interferon (IFN response, critical for survival. IFN was mainly expressed by neutrophils and hepatocytes. Cell type specific ablation experiments further demonstrated that neutrophils play a crucial, unexpected role in CHIKV containment. Altogether, our results show that the zebrafish represents a novel valuable model to dynamically visualize replication, pathogenesis and host responses to a human virus.

  20. The TLR9 agonist MGN1703 triggers a potent type I interferon response in the sigmoid colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, A R; Abdel-Mohsen, M; Schleimann, M H

    2017-01-01

    and infectious diseases), led us to investigate the impact of MGN1703 (Lefitolimod) on intestinal homeostasis and viral persistence in HIV-positive individuals. Colonic sigmoid biopsies were collected (baseline and week four) from 11 HIV+ individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, who received MGN1703...... (60 mg s.c.) twice weekly for 4 weeks in a single-arm, phase 1b/2a study. Within sigmoid mucosa, global transcriptomic analyses revealed 248 modulated genes (false discovery ratetype I interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes. MGN1703 increased the frequencies of cells exhibiting MX1 (P...... to the change in integrated HIV DNA during MGN1703 treatment (P=0.020). In conclusion, MGN1703 induced a potent type I IFN response, without a concomitant general inflammatory response, in the intestines.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 02 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.59....

  1. Retreatment of hepatitis C non-responsive to Interferon. A placebo controlled randomized trial of Ribavirin monotherapy versus combination therapy with Ribavirin and Interferon in 121 patients in the Benelux [ISRCTN53821378

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delwaide Jean

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine depends on unbiased selection of completed randomized controlled trials. For completeness it is important to publish all trials. This report describes the first large randomised controlled trial where combination therapy was compared to placebo therapy and to ribavirin monotherapy, which has not been published untill now. Methods One hundred and twenty one patients with chronic hepatitis C and elevated transaminases who did not respond to previous treatment with standard interferon monotherapy, were included from 16 centers in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg between 1992 and 1996. Patient poor-response characteristics were: genotype 1 (69%, HCV RNA above 2 × 106 copies/ml (55% and cirrhosis (38%. Patients were randomized to 6 months combination therapy with interferon alpha-2b (3 MU tiw and ribavirin (1000–1200 mg / day, 6 months ribavirin monotherapy (1000–1200 mg / day or 6 months ribavirin placebo. The study was double blinded for the ribavirin / placebo component. One patient did not fit the entry criteria, and 3 did not start. All 117 patients who received at least one dose of treatment were included in the intention to treat analysis. Results At the end of treatment, HCV RNA was undetectable in 35% of patients on combination therapy and in none of the patients treated with ribavirin monotherapy or placebo. The sustained virological response rate at 6 months after therapy was 15% for patients treated with interferon and ribavirin. During the 6 months treatment period 13% of patients on interferon ribavirin combination therapy, 13% of patients on ribavirin monotherapy and 11% of patients on placebo withdrew due to side effects or noncompliance. At 24 weeks of treatment the mean Hb level was 85% of the baseline value, which means a mean decrease from 9.1 mmol/l to 7.8 mmol/l. The Hb levels at the end of treatment were not significantly different from patients treated with ribavirin

  2. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  3. Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 in chronic hepatitis C: Correlations with insulin resistance, histological features & sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Dana; Grigorescu, Mircea Dan; Radu, Corina; Suciu, Alina; Grigorescu, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    One of the multiple factors contributing to virological response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10). Its level reflects the status of interferon-stimulated genes, which in turn is associated with virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of serum IP-10 levels on sustained virological response (SVR) and the association of this parameter with insulin resistance (IR) and liver histology. Two hundred and three consecutive biopsy proven CHC patients were included in the study. Serum levels of IP-10 were determined using ELISA method. IR was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR). Histological features were assessed invasively by liver biopsy and noninvasively using FibroTest, ActiTest and SteatoTest. Predictive factors for SVR and their interrelations were assessed. A cut-off value for IP-10 of 392 pg/ml was obtained to discriminate between responders and non-responders. SVR was obtained in 107 patients (52.70%). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for SVR was 0.875 with a sensitivity of 91.6 per cent, specificity 74.7 per cent, positive predictive value 80.3 per cent and negative predictive value 88.7 per cent. Higher values of IP-10 were associated with increasing stages of fibrosis (P<0.01) and higher grades of inflammation (P=0.02, P=0.07) assessed morphologically and noninvasively through FibroTest and ActiTest. Significant steatosis and IR were also associated with increased levels of IP-10 (P=0.01 and P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, IP-10 levels and fibrosis stages were independently associated with SVR. Our findings showed that the assessment of serum IP-10 level could be a predictive factor for SVR and it was associated with fibrosis, necroinflammatory activity, significant steatosis and IR in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  4. Exosome-mediated miR-146a transfer suppresses type I interferon response and facilitates EV71 infection.

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    Yuxuan Fu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells. Their roles in viral infections are beginning to be appreciated. Researches have shown that exosomes released from virus-infected cells contain a variety of viral and host cellular factors that are able to modulate recipient's cellular response and result in productive infection of the recipient host. Here, we showed that EV71 infection resulted in upregulated exosome secretion and differential packaging of the viral genomic RNA and miR-146a into exosomes. We provided evidence showing that miR-146a was preferentially enriched in exosomes while the viral RNA was not in infected cells. Moreover, the exosomes contained replication-competent EV71 RNA in complex with miR-146a, Ago2, and GW182 and could mediate EV71 transmission independent of virus-specific receptor. The exosomal viral RNA could be transferred to and replicate in a new target cell while the exosomal miR-146a suppressed type I interferon response in the target cell, thus facilitating the viral replication. Additionally, we found that the IFN-stimulated gene factors (ISGs, BST-2/tetherin, were involved in regulating EV71-induced upregulation of exosome secretion. Importantly, in vivo study showed that exosomal viral RNA exhibited differential tissue accumulation as compared to the free virus particles. Together, our findings provide evidence that exosomes secreted by EV71-infected cells selectively packaged high level miR-146a that can be functionally transferred to and facilitate exosomal EV71 RNA to replicate in the recipient cells by suppressing type I interferon response.

  5. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 links the steroid and interferon gamma response pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzakaki, Eleni; Spilianakis, Charalambos; Zika, Eleni; Kretsovali, Androniki; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    We show here that steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) is a coactivator of MHC class II genes that stimulates their interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and class II transactivator (CIITA)-mediated expression. SRC-1 interacts physically with the N-terminal activation domain of CIITA through two regions: one central [extending from amino acids (aa) 360-839] that contains the nuclear receptors binding region and one C-terminal (aa 1138-1441) that contains the activation domain 2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that SRC-1 recruitment on the class II promoter is enhanced upon IFNgamma stimulation. Most importantly, SRC-1 relieves the inhibitory action of estrogens on the IFNgamma-mediated induction of class II genes in transient transfection assays. We provide evidence that inhibition by estradiol is due to multiple events such as slightly reduced recruitment of CIITA and SRC-1 and severely inhibited assembly of the preinitiation complex.

  6. Methylprednisolone does not restore biological response in multiple sclerosis patients with neutralizing antibodies against interferon-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, D; Frederiksen, J L; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) appearing during treatment with Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) reduce or abolish bioactivity and therapeutic efficacy. Initial combination therapy with methylprednisolone (MP) may reduce the frequency of NAb positive patients. We hypothesized...... that MP treatment might also reduce NAb levels and re-establish IFN-beta bioactivity in patients already NAb+, who discontinue IFN-beta therapy. Methods: In a 6-month open-label trial, we compared monthly high-dose pulsed MP treatment in 38 Nab positive patients with 35 NAb+, MP-untreated control patients...... discontinuing any therapy or switching to glatiramer acetate. All patients were NAb+ with an absent in vivo response to IFN-beta. NAbs were measured using a cytopathic effect assay and expressed as neutralizing capacity (NC) in percentage of added IFN-beta. Bioactivity was expressed as in vivo Myxovirus...

  7. The loss of immunodominant epitopes affects interferon-γ production and lytic activity of the human influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); E.J. Verschuren (Esther); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A. Gruters (Rob); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study, we examined the effect of the loss of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*3501-restricted nucleoprotein (NP)418-426epitope on interferon (IFN)-γ-production and lytic activity of the human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in vitro. Extensive amino acid variation

  8. Comparison of histopathology, cultivation of tissues and rectal contents, and interferon-gamma and serum antibody responses for the diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jensen, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    contents, and (3) examination of repeated blood samples for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and antibody responses. Tissue samples were taken from the small and large intestine and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes, and from the pharyngeal tonsil and other lymphoid nodes (retropharyngeal, mediastinal...

  9. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of interferon gamma in response to natural Chlamydia infection in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Marina; Pavasovic, Ana; Prentis, Peter J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-09-25

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a key Th1 cytokine, with a principal role in the immune response against intracellular organisms such as Chlamydia. Along with being responsible for significant morbidity in human populations, Chlamydia is also responsible for wide spread infection and disease in many animal hosts, with reports that many Australian koala subpopulations are endemically infected. An understanding of the role played by IFNγ in koala chlamydial diseases is important for the establishment of better prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against chlamydial infection in this host. A limited number of IFNγ sequences have been published from marsupials and no immune reagents to measure expression have been developed. Through preliminary analysis of the koala transcriptome, we have identified the full coding sequence of the koala IFNγ gene. Transcripts were identified in spleen and lymph node tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that koala IFNγ is closely related to other marsupial IFNγ sequences and more distantly related to eutherian mammals. To begin to characterise the role of this important cytokine in the koala's response to chlamydial infection, we developed a quantitative real time PCR assay and applied it to a small cohort of koalas with and without active chlamydial disease, revealing significant differences in expression patterns between the groups. Description of the IFNγ sequence from the koala will not only assist in understanding this species' response to its most important pathogen but will also provide further insight into the evolution of the marsupial immune system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistently elevated T cell interferonresponses after treatment for latent tuberculosis infection among health care workers in India: a preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Mendiratta Deepak K; Dogra Sandeep; Joshi Rajnish; Pai Madhukar; Narang Pratibha; Dheda Keertan; Kalantri Shriprakash

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background T cell-based interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are novel tests for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). It has been suggested that T cell responses may be correlated with bacterial burden and, therefore, IGRAs may have a role in monitoring treatment response. We investigated IFN-γ responses to specific TB antigens among Indian health care workers (HCWs) before, and after LTBI preventive therapy. Methods In 2004, we established a cohort of HCWs who underwent tube...

  11. Gene Knockdown in Human Rhinovirus 1B Using 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs Results in the Reactivation of the Interferon Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang Cheng; Zhang, Qing; Pang, Li Li; Li, Dan Di; Jin, Miao; Li, Hui Ying; Xu, Zi Qian; Kong, Xiang Yu; Wang, Hong; Lu, Shan; Duan, Zhao Jun

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the knockdown efficiency of 2'-O-methylated (2'-OMe)-modified small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on human rhinovirus 1B (HRV1B) replication and the interferon response. Thus, 24 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs were designed to target HRV1B. The RNA levels of HRV1B, Toll-like receptor 3, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, retinoic acid inducible gene-I, and interferons were determined in HRV1B-infected HeLa and BEAS-2B epithelial cells transfected with 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs. The results revealed that all 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs interfered with the replication of HRV1B in a cell-specific and transfection efficiency-dependent manner. Viral activation of Toll-like receptor 3, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, retinoic acid inducible gene-I, and the interferon response was detected. In conclusion, the 2'-OMe-modified siRNAs used in this study could interfere with HRV1B replication, possibly leading to the reactivation of the interferon response. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  12. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

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    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  13. Chikungunya Virus: In Vitro Response to Combination Therapy With Ribavirin and Interferon Alfa 2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Karen M; Drusano, George L; D Argenio, David Z; Brown, Ashley N

    2016-10-15

    We evaluated the antiviral activities of ribavirin (RBV) and interferon (IFN) alfa as monotherapy and combination therapy against chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Vero cells were infected with CHIKV in the presence of RBV and/or IFN alfa, and viral production was quantified by plaque assay. A mathematical model was fit to the data to identify drug interactions for effect. We ran simulations using the best-fit model parameters to predict the antiviral activity associated with clinically relevant regimens of RBV and IFN alfa as combination therapy. The model predictions were validated using the hollow fiber infection model (HFIM) system. RBV and IFN alfa were effective against CHIKV as monotherapy at supraphysiological concentrations. However, RBV and IFN alfa were highly synergistic for antiviral effect when administered as combination therapy. Simulations with our mathematical model predicted that a standard clinical regimen of RBV plus IFN alfa would inhibit CHIKV burden by 2.5 log10 following 24 hours of treatment. In the HFIM system, RBV plus IFN alfa at clinical exposures resulted in a 2.1-log10 decrease in the CHIKV burden following 24 hours of therapy. These findings validate the prediction made by the mathematical model. These studies illustrate the promise of RBV plus IFN alfa as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of CHIKV infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Antiviral type I and type III interferon responses in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Kreit, Marguerite; Hermant, Pascale; Lardinois, Cécile; Michiels, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i) preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii) the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii) the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv) the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  15. IN VITRO CELLULAR RESPONSE TO INTERFERON-α2 IN CHILDREN WITH INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS CAUSED BY EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS

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    L. M. Kurtasova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to study in vitro response of blood leukocytes to IFNα2 in children with infectious mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, during the acute phase of disease. Patients and methods. Sixty-five children at the age of 4 to 6 years, being in acute phase of infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV were under study. The control group consisted of 36 healthy children. In vitro response of blood leukocytes to IFNα2 was determined by the original technique (L.M. Kurtasova et al., 2007. Chemiluminescence of the blood leukocytes was studied according to De Sole et al. (1989. Results. We observed that clinical condition of the children with EBV infection in acute phase of the disease was characterized by decreased ranges of blood leukocyte response to IFNα2, and dependence of the cellular response on the dose, as well as severity of the disease. In conclusion, these data suggest a need for individual strategy of interferon therapy for the children with infectious mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus.

  16. Interferon (IFN and Cellular Immune Response Evoked in RNA-Pattern Sensing During Infection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV

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    Masato Nakai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes but not dendritic cells (DCs, but DCs effectively mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes. Using gene-disrupted mice and hydrodynamic injection strategy, we found the MAVS pathway to be crucial for induction of type III interferons (IFNs in response to HCV in mouse. Human hepatocytes barely express TLR3 under non-infectious states, but frequently express it in HCV infection. Type I and III IFNs are induced upon stimulation with polyI:C, an analog of double-stranded (dsRNA. Activation of TLR3 and the TICAM-1 pathway, followed by DC-mediated activation of cellular immunity, is augmented during exposure to viral RNA. Although type III IFNs are released from replication-competent human hepatocytes, DC-mediated CTL proliferation and NK cell activation hardly occur in response to the released type III IFNs. Yet, type I IFNs and HCV-infected hepatocytes can induce maturation of DCs in either human or mouse origin. In addition, mouse CD8+ DCs mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes unless the TLR3/TICAM-1 pathway is blocked. We found the exosomes containing HCV RNA in the supernatant of the HCV-infected hepatocytes act as a source of TLR3-mediated DC maturation. Here we summarize our view on the mechanism by which DCs mature to induce NK and CTL in a status of HCV infection.

  17. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

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    Bruno Hernáez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection.

  18. Enterovirus 71 suppresses interferon responses by blocking Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling through inducing karyopherin-α1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyang; Sun, Menghuai; Yuan, Xinhui; Ji, Lianfu; Jin, Yu; Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng

    2017-06-16

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as one of the most important enteroviruses since the eradication of poliovirus, and it causes severe neurological symptoms for which no effective antiviral drugs are available. Type I interferons (IFN) α/β have been used clinically as antiviral therapy as the first line of defense against virus infections successfully for decades. However, treatment with type I interferons has not been effective in patients with EV71 infection. In this study, we found that in cells pretreated with IFN-β, EV71 infection could still lead to a cytopathic effect, and the viral replication was not affected. The mechanism by which EV71 antagonizes interferon signaling, however, has been controversial. Our study indicated that EV71 infection did not inhibit phosphorylation of STAT1/2 induced by IFN-β stimulation, but p-STAT1/2 transport into the nucleus was significantly blocked. We showed that EV71 infection reduced the formation of STAT/karyopherin-α1 (KPNA1) complex upon interferon stimulation and that the virus down-regulated the expression of KPNA1, a nuclear localization signal receptor for p-STAT1. Using specific caspase inhibitors and siRNA for caspase-3, we demonstrated that EV71 infection induced degradation of cellular KPNA1 in a caspase-3-dependent manner, which led to decreased induction of interferon-inducible genes and IFN response. Viral 2A and 3C proteases did not degrade KPNA1, inhibit the activity of ISRE or suppress the transcription of interferon-inducible genes induced by IFN-β. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which antiviral signaling is suppressed through degradation of KPNA1 by activated caspase-3 induced in an enteroviral infection. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Differential expression profiling of spleen microRNAs in response to two distinct type II interferons in Tetraodon nigroviridis.

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    Shibai Yi

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous, small non-coding RNAs approximately 18-26 nucleotides in length that regulate target gene expression at the post-transcription level. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ is a Th1 cytokine that is involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. We previously identified two IFN-γ genes in green-spotted puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis. To determine whether miRNAs participate in IFN-γ-related immune responses, T. nigroviridis spleen cells were treated with recombinant IFN-γ isoforms, and a Solexa high-throughput sequencing method was used to identify miRNAs. In total, 1,556, 1,538 and 1,573 miRNAs were found in the three samples, and differentially expressed miRNAs were determined. In total, 398 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ1 treatment, and 438 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ2 treatment; additionally, 403 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the treatment groups. Ten differentially expressed miRNAs were chosen for validation using qRT-PCR. Target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted, and GO and KEGG analyses were performed. This study provides basic knowledge regarding fish IFN-γ-induced miRNAs and offers clues for further studies into the mechanisms underlying fish IFN-γ-mediated immune responses.

  20. Ebolavirus protein VP24 interferes with innate immune responses by inhibiting interferon-λ1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Felix; Melén, Krister; Maljanen, Sari; Lundberg, Rickard; Jiang, Miao; Österlund, Pamela; Kakkola, Laura; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2017-09-01

    Ebolaviruses (EBOV) cause severe disease with a recent outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 leading to more than 28 000 cases and 11 300 fatalities. This emphasizes the urgent need for better knowledge on these highly pathogenic RNA viruses. Host innate immune responses play a key role in restricting the spread of a viral disease. In this study we systematically analyzed the effects of cloned EBOV genes on the main host immune response to RNA viruses: the activation of RIG-I pathway and type I and III interferon (IFN) gene expression. EBOV VP24, in addition of inhibiting IFN-induced antiviral responses, was found to efficiently inhibit type III IFN-λ1 gene expression. This inhibition was found to occur downstream of IRF3 activation and to be dependent on VP24 importin binding residues. These results emphasize the importance of VP24 in EBOV infection cycle, making VP24 as an excellent target for drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus interferon antagonist NS1 protein suppresses and skews the human T lymphocyte response.

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    Shirin Munir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV NS1 protein, an antagonist of host type I interferon (IFN-I production and signaling, has a suppressive effect on the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC that was only partly dependent on released IFN-I. Here we investigated whether NS1 affects the ability of DC to activate CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Human DC were infected with RSV deletion mutants lacking the NS1 and/or NS2 genes and assayed for the ability to activate autologous T cells in vitro, which were analyzed by multi-color flow cytometry. Deletion of the NS1, but not NS2, protein resulted in three major effects: (i an increased activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells that express CD103, a tissue homing integrin that directs CD8+ T cells to mucosal epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and triggers cytolytic activity; (ii an increased activation and proliferation of Th17 cells, which have recently been shown to have anti-viral effects and also indirectly attract neutrophils; and (iii decreased activation of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells--which are associated with enhanced RSV disease--and reduced proliferation of total CD4+ T cells. Except for total CD4+ T cell proliferation, none of the T cell effects appeared to be due to increased IFN-I signaling. In the infected DC, deletion of the NS1 and NS2 genes strongly up-regulated the expression of cytokines and other molecules involved in DC maturation. This was partly IFN-I-independent, and thus might account for the T cell effects. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the NS1 protein suppresses proliferation and activation of two of the protective cell populations (CD103+ CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells, and promotes proliferation and activation of Th2 cells that can enhance RSV disease.

  2. Neutralizing antibody responses against autologous and heterologous viruses in acute versus chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection: evidence for a constraint on the ability of HIV to completely evade neutralizing antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G; Schweighardt, Becky; Wrin, Terri; Galovich, Justin; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hunt, Peter; McCune, Joseph M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Petropoulos, Christos J; Hecht, Frederick M

    2006-06-01

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with the rapid development of neutralization escape mutations. The degree to which viral evolution persists in chronic infection has not been well characterized, nor is it clear if all patients develop high-level neutralization antibody escape. We therefore measured neutralizing antibody responses against autologous and heterologous viruses in a cohort of acutely and chronically infected subjects (n = 65). Neutralizing antibody responses against both autologous virus and heterologous viruses were lower among individuals with acute infection than among those with chronic infection. Among chronically infected individuals, there was a negative correlation between the level of neutralizing antibodies against autologous virus and the level of viremia. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between the level of neutralizing antibodies against a panel of heterologous viruses and the level of viremia. Viral evolution, as defined by the presence of higher neutralizing titers directed against earlier viruses than against contemporaneous viruses, was evident for subjects with recent infection but absent for those with chronic infection. In summary, neutralizing antibody responses against contemporaneous autologous viruses are absent in early HIV infection but can be detected at low levels in chronic infection, particularly among those controlling HIV in the absence of therapy. HIV replication either directly or indirectly drives the production of increasing levels of antibodies that cross-neutralize heterologous primary isolates. Collectively, these observations indicate that although HIV continuously drives the production of neutralizing antibodies, there may be limits to the capacity of the virus to evolve continuously in response to these antibodies. These observations also suggest that the neutralizing antibody response may contribute to the long-term control of HIV in some patients while protecting

  3. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anisakis pegreffii-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is mediated by gamma interferon in the absence of interleukin-4 receptor alpha responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Frank; Horsnell, William G C; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Lopata, Andreas L; Brombacher, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Infection with the fish parasite Anisakis following exposure to contaminated fish can lead to allergic reactions in humans. The present study examined the immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergic airway inflammation in mice after different routes of sensitization to Anisakis. Wild-type and interleukin-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Ralpha)-deficient BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with live or heat-killed Anisakis larvae or by intranasal administration of an Anisakis extract and were subsequently challenged intranasally with an Anisakis extract. Both routes of sensitization induced IL-4Ralpha-dependent allergic airway responses, whereas allergen-specific antibody responses developed only when mice were sensitized intraperitoneally. Intranasal sensitization induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in wild-type mice only, showing that AHR was IL-4/IL-13 dependent. Unexpectedly, infection with Anisakis larvae induced AHR in both wild-type and IL-4Ralpha-deficient mice. IL-4Ralpha-independent AHR was mediated by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), as evidenced by the fact that in vivo neutralization of IFN-gamma abrogated AHR. Together, these results demonstrate that both infection with larvae and inhalational exposure to Anisakis proteins are potent routes of allergic sensitization to Anisakis, explaining food- and work-related allergies in humans. Importantly for diagnosis, allergic airway inflammation can be independent of detectable Anisakis-specific antibodies. Moreover, depending on the route of sensitization, AHR can be induced either by IL-4/IL-13 or by IFN-gamma.

  5. Interferon alpha therapy for hepatitis C: treatment completion and response rates among patients with substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftis Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs are at increased risk for hepatitis C viral infection (HCV, and few studies have explored their treatment responses empirically. The objective of this study was to assess interferon alpha therapy (IFN completion and response rates among patients with HCV who had a history of comorbid SUDs. More data is needed to inform treatment strategies and guidelines for these patients. Using a medical record database, information was retrospectively collected on 307,437 veterans seen in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 (VISN 20 of the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA between 1998 and 2003. For patients treated with any type of IFN (including regular or pegylated IFN or combination therapy (IFN and ribavirin who had a known HCV genotype, IFN completion and response rates were compared among patients with a history of SUD (SUD+ Group and patients without a history of SUD (SUD- Group. Results Odds ratio analyses revealed that compared with the SUD- Group, the SUD+ Group was equally likely to complete IFN therapy if they had genotypes 2 and 3 (73.1% vs. 68.0%, and if they had genotypes 1 and 4 (39.5% vs. 39.9%. Within the sample of all patients who began IFN therapy, the SUD- and SUD+ groups were similarly likely to achieve an end of treatment response (genotypes 2 and 3, 52.8% vs. 54.3%; genotypes 1 and 4, 24.5% vs. 24.8% and a sustained viral response (genotypes 2 and 3, 42.6% vs. 41.1%; genotypes 1 and 4: 16.0% vs. 22.3%. Conclusion Individuals with and without a history of SUD responded to antiviral therapy for HCV at similar rates. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients who have co-morbid SUD and HCV diagnoses can successfully complete a course of antiviral therapy.

  6. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Krzysztof; Graham, Christine M.; Moreira-Teixeira, Lucia; McNab, Finlay W.; Howes, Ashleigh; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT) and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/-) mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:26918359

  7. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Pitt

    Full Text Available Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/- mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes.

  8. Neurobehavioral Effects of Interferon-α in Patients with Hepatitis-C: Symptom Dimensions and Responsiveness to Paroxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Marcia D; Liu, Shuling; Manatunga, Amita; Royster, Erica B; Raison, Charles L; Woolwine, Bobbi J; Demetrashvili, Marina F; Miller, Andrew H; Musselman, Dominique L

    2012-01-01

    In patients at high risk for recurrence of malignant melanoma, interferon-α (IFN-α), a stimulator of innate immunity, appears to induce distinct neurobehavioral symptom dimensions: a mood and anxiety syndrome, and a neurovegetative syndrome, of which the former is responsive to prophylactic administration of paroxetine. We sought to determine whether symptom dimensions (and treatment responsiveness) arise in patients with hepatitis C administered IFN-α and ribavirin. In a randomized, double-blind, 6-month study, 61 patients with hepatitis C eligible for therapy with IFN-α and ribavirin received the antidepressant paroxetine (n=28) or a placebo (n=33). Study medication began 2 weeks before IFN-α/ribavirin therapy. Neuropsychiatric assessments included the 10-item Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The items of the MADRS were grouped into depression, anxiety, cognitive dysfunction, and neurovegetative symptom dimensions, and analyzed using a mixed model. By 2 weeks of IFN-α/ribavirin therapy, all four dimensions increased, with the symptom dimensions of anxiety and cognitive dysfunction fluctuating and worsening, respectively, in both groups over time. The depression symptom dimension was significantly lower in the paroxetine treatment group (p=0.04); severity of the neurovegetative symptom dimension was similar in both groups. Similar to patients with malignant melanoma receiving high-dose IFN-α, the depression symptom dimension is more responsive to paroxetine treatment in individuals undergoing concomitant IFN-α/ribavirin therapy. However, the anxiety, cognitive dysfunction, and neurovegetative symptom dimensions appear less responsive to prophylactic paroxetine administration. Different neurobiologic pathways may contribute to the responsiveness of IFN-α-induced symptom dimensions to antidepressant treatment, requiring relevant psychopharmacologic strategies. PMID:22353759

  9. Minimal residual disease and normalization of the bone marrow after long-term treatment with alpha-interferon2b in polycythemia vera. A report on molecular response patterns in seven patients in sustained complete hematological remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Møller, Michael Boe; de Stricker, Karin

    2009-01-01

    PV patients with profound molecular responses during and after long-term treatment with alpha-interferon 2b. All patients obtained a major molecular response (MMR). Subsequently all patients discontinued alpha-interferon and sustained complete hematological remission with a follow-up period of median...... of histomorphological bone marrow features of PV. Finally, hematological remissions and major molecular responses can be sustained after discontinuation of long-term treatment with IFN2b....

  10. The interferon type I signature towards prediction of non-response to rituximab in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raterman, Hennie G; Vosslamber, Saskia; de Ridder, Sander; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten; van de Wiel, Mark; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Verweij, Cornelis L; Voskuyl, Alexandre E

    2012-04-27

    B cell depletion therapy is efficacious in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients failing on tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents. However, approximately 40% to 50% of rituximab (RTX) treated RA patients have a poor response. We investigated whether baseline gene expression levels can discriminate between clinical non-responders and responders to RTX. In 14 consecutive RA patients starting on RTX (test cohort), gene expression profiling on whole peripheral blood RNA was performed by Illumina® HumanHT beadchip microarrays. Supervised cluster analysis was used to identify genes expressed differentially at baseline between responders and non-responders based on both a difference in 28 joints disease activity score (ΔDAS28 wide microarray analysis revealed a marked variation in the peripheral blood cells between RA patients before the start of RTX treatment. Here, we demonstrated that only a cluster consisting of interferon (IFN) type I network genes, represented by a set of IFN type I response genes (IRGs), that is, LY6E, HERC5, IFI44L, ISG15, MxA, MxB, EPSTI1 and RSAD2, was associated with ΔDAS28 and EULAR response outcome (P = 0.0074 and P = 0.0599, respectively). Based on the eight IRGs an IFN-score was calculated that reached an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82 to separate non-responders from responders in an independent validation cohort of 26 patients using Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves analysis according to ΔDAS28 utility for the use of baseline IRG expression levels as a predictive biomarker for non-response to RTX in RA.

  11. Hepatic microRNA expression is associated with the response to interferon treatment of chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda Masahiko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV infection frequently induces chronic liver diseases. The current standard treatment for chronic hepatitis (CH C combines pegylated interferon (IFN and ribavirin, and is less than ideal due to undesirable effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by degrading or suppressing the translation of target mRNAs. In this study we administered the standard combination treatment to CHC patients. We then examined their miRNA expression profiles in order to identify the miRNAs that were associated with each patient's drug response. Methods 99 CHC patients with no anti-viral therapy history were enrolled. The expression level of 470 mature miRNAs found their biopsy specimen, obtained prior to the combination therapy, were quantified using microarray analysis. The miRNA expression pattern was classified based on the final virological response to the combination therapy. Monte Carlo Cross Validation (MCCV was used to validate the outcome of the prediction based on the miRNA expression profile. Results We found that the expression level of 9 miRNAs were significantly different in the sustained virological response (SVR and non-responder (NR groups. MCCV revealed an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 70.5%, 76.5% and 63.3% in SVR and non-SVR and 70.0%, 67.5%, and 73.7% in relapse (R and NR, respectively. Conclusions The hepatic miRNA expression pattern that exists in CHC patients before combination therapy is associated with their therapeutic outcome. This information can be utilized as a novel biomarker to predict drug response and can also be applied to developing novel anti-viral therapy for CHC patients.

  12. Modulation of the early immune response against viruses by a teleostean interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the role of a teleostean interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in the regulation of the fish immune system using Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, as a model. Fish were intramuscularly vaccinated with a recombinant plasmid expressing the Japanese flounder IRF-1 (JF IRF-1) under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate/early enhancer (CMV) promoter and were sampled at different days post-immunization. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) obtained from the JF IRF-1-vaccinated fish during the early stages post-vaccination had significantly elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) and higher acid phosphatase (AP) activity compared with the control groups. Moreover, supernatants of PBLs obtained from the IRF-1-vaccinated fish contained cytokine-like substances as shown by their protective effect against hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in two cell lines, hirame natural embryo (HINAE) cell line and epithelial papillosum of cyprini (EPC) cell line. Relative expression of an anti-viral gene, Mx was highest at the 7th day post-vaccination. Co-injection of JF IRF-1 with a DNA vaccine encoding the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of red seabream iridovirus (RSIV) resulted in elevated serum neutralization antibodies but was not significantly different from that in the fish vaccinated with the DNA vaccine alone. These results suggest that the JF IRF-1 modulates the early immune response in fish and is a potential candidate as genetic adjuvant for vaccination.

  13. AP-1 mediated transcriptional repression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 by recruitment of histone deacetylase 1 in response to interferon β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Mittelstadt

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is a 92 kDa zinc-dependant endopeptidase that degrades components of the extracellular matrix. Increased expression of MMP-9 is implicated in many pathological conditions including metastatic cancer, multiple sclerosis, and atherosclerosis. Although it has been widely noted that interferon-β (IFNβ downregulates both the basal and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA-induced MMP-9 expression at the transcriptional level, the molecular mechanism of this repression is poorly understood. In the present study we identify a novel mechanism for repression of MMP-9 transcription by IFNβ in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Using reporter assays with promoter deletion constructs we show that IFNβ's inhibitory effects require a region of the promoter between -154 and -72, which contains an AP-1 binding site. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP studies indicate that IFNβ increases histone deacetylase (HDAC-1 recruitment to the MMP-9 promoter and reduces histone H3 acetylation, in addition to reduced NF-κB recruitment. ChIP analysis shows that IFNβ induced HDAC1 recruitment to the MMP-9 promoter and IFNβ mediated transcriptional repression is lost when the AP-1 binding site is inactivated by a point mutation. Altogether, our results establish that the repression of MMP-9 transcription in response to IFNβ occurs by the recruitment of HDAC1 via the proximal AP-1 binding site.

  14. Perforin expression in T cells and virological response to PEG-interferon alpha2b in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portales, Pierre; Reynes, Jacques; Rouzier-Panis, Régine; Baillat, Vincent; Clot, Jacques; Corbeau, Pierre

    2003-03-07

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha), which is known to directly inhibit the HIV-1 replicative cycle and to increase the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), is being tested as an anti-HIV agent. As CTL play a major role in immune defence against HIV, we wanted to further characterize CTL activity and the effect of IFNalpha on it. We followed by flow cytometry the intracellular expression of the key mediator of cytotoxicity, perforin, in peripheral blood T cells of patients treated with IFNalpha. We observed that the percentage of T cells harbouring perforin was higher in infected subjects than in non-infected controls. Administration of IFNalpha2b attached to polyethylene glycol increased this perforin expression further and reduced viral load (P = 0.010). The increase in the percentage of T cells expressing perforin correlated with IFNalpha-induced decrease in viral load (r, 0.753; P = 0.003). In addition, the level of perforin expression before IFNalpha administration was inversely correlated with viral load remaining after IFNalpha administration (r, -0.647; P= 0.017). The pre-therapeutic percentage of perforin-positive T cells might be a predictive marker of the virological response to IFNalpha in HIV-1-infected patients.

  15. Characterization of the interferon gamma response to Lawsonia intracellularis using an equine proliferative enteropathy challenge (EPE) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, A E; Loynachan, A T; Bryant, U; Stills, H F; Adams, A A; Gebhart, C J; Pusterla, N; Horohov, D W

    2011-09-15

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the etiological agent of infectious intestinal hyperplasia for which several clinical diseases have been described including proliferative enteropathy (PE), intestinal adenomatosis, and ileitis. While initially recognized as the causative agent of PE in pigs, L. intracellularis is now viewed as an emerging cause of intestinal hyperplasia in a wide range of mammalian species, including horses. Equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE) has been reported worldwide though definitive diagnosis is difficult and the epidemiology of the disease remains poorly understood. Weanlings, in particular, appear to be most at risk for infection, though the reasons for their particular susceptibility is unknown. Using an infectious challenge model for EPE, we demonstrate that EPE, like porcine proliferative enteropathy, can exhibit three clinical forms: classical, subclinical and acute. Out of six pony weanlings, one developed signs of classic EPE, one developed acute EPE, and two developed subclinical EPE. Attempts to induce pharmacological stress through the use of dexamethasone failed to have any effect on outcome. Peripheral blood cells collected from those weanlings that developed clinical EPE exhibited decreased expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) following in vitro stimulation with L. intracellularis. By contrast, those weanlings that did not develop clinical disease generated a robust IFN-γ response. These results indicate IFN-γ likely plays a significant role in protection from disease caused by L. intracellularis in the equid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mast cells elicit proinflammatory but not type I interferon responses upon activation of TLRs by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Nicole; Rohde, Manfred; Geffers, Robert; Kröger, Andrea; Hauser, Hansjörg; Weiss, Siegfried; Gekara, Nelson O

    2010-05-11

    Balanced induction of proinflammatory and type I IFN responses upon activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) determines the outcome of microbial infections and the pathogenesis of autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases. Mast cells, key components of the innate immune system, are known for their debilitating role in allergy and autoimmunity. However, their role in antimicrobial host defenses is being acknowledged increasingly. How mast cells interact with microbes and the nature of responses triggered thereby is not well characterized. Here we show that in response to TLR activation by Gram-positive and -negative bacteria or their components, mast cells elicit proinflammatory but not type I IFN responses. We demonstrate that in mast cells, bound bacteria and TLR ligands remain trapped at the cell surface and do not undergo internalization, a prerequisite for type I IFN induction. Such cells, however, can elicit type I IFNs in response to vesicular stomatitis virus which accesses the cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I receptor. Although important for antiviral immunity, a strong I IFN response is known to contribute to pathogenesis of several bacterial pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. Interestingly, we observed that the mast cell-dependent neutrophil mobilization upon L. monocytogenes infection is highly impaired by IFN-beta. Thus, the fact that mast cells, although endowed with the capacity to elicit type I IFNs in response to viral infection, elicit only proinflammatory responses upon bacterial infection shows that mast cells, key effector cells of the innate immune system, are well adjusted for optimal antibacterial and antiviral responses.

  17. Pegylated interferon-alfa-2a induces complete hematologic and molecular responses with low toxicity in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Cassinat, Bruno; Chevret, Sylvie; Turlure, Pascal; Cambier, Nathalie; Roussel, Murielle; Bellucci, Sylvia; Grandchamp, Bernard; Chomienne, Christine; Fenaux, Pierre

    2008-10-15

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is a nonleukemogenic treatment of polycythemia vera (PV) able to induce cytogenetic remissions. Its use is limited by toxicity, leading to treatment discontinuation in approximately 20% of patients. We completed a phase 2 multicenter study of pegylated IFN-alpha-2a in 40 PV patients. Objectives included evaluation of efficacy, safety, and monitoring of residual disease using JAK2V617F quantification (%V617F). Median follow-up was 31.4 months. At 12 months, all 37 evaluable patients had hematologic response, including 94.6% complete responses (CRs). Only 3 patients (8%) had stopped treatment. After the first year, 35 patients remained in hematologic CR, including 5 who had stopped pegylated IFN-alpha-2a. Sequential samples for %V617F monitoring, available in 29 patients, showed %V617F decrease in 26 (89.6%). Median %V617F decreased from 45% before pegylated IFN-alpha-2a to 22.5%, 17.5%, 5%, and 3% after 12, 18, 24, and 36 months, respectively. Molecular CR (JAK2V617F undetectable) was achieved in 7 patients, lasting from 6(+) to 18(+) months, and persisted after pegylated IFN-alpha-2a discontinuation in 5. No vascular event was recorded. These results show that pegylated IFN-alpha-2a yields high rates of hematologic and molecular response in PV with limited toxicity, and could even eliminate the JAK2 mutated clone in selected cases. Available at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00241241.

  18. Interferon-γ Added During Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Stimulates Potent Th1 Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pestano Linda A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are increasingly prepared in vitro for use in immunotherapy trials. Mature DC express high levels of surface molecules needed for T cell activation and are superior at antigen-presentation than immature DC. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is one of several products known to induce DC maturation, and interferon (IFN-γ has been shown to enhance the activity of DC stimulated with certain maturation factors. In this study, we investigated the use of IFN-γ in combination with the powerful maturation agent, BCG. The treatment of immature DC with IFN-γ plus BCG led to the upregulation of CD54, CD80, and CD86 in comparison with BCG treatment alone. In MLR or recall immune responses, the addition of IFN-γ at the time of BCG-treatment did not increase the number of antigen-specific T cells but enhanced the development of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. In primary immune responses, on the other hand, BCG and IFN-γ co-treated DC stimulated higher proportions of specific T cells as well as IFN-γ secretion by these T cells. Thus the use of IFN-γ during BCG-induced DC maturation differentially affects the nature of recall versus naïve antigen-specific T-cell responses. IFN-γ co-treatment with BCG was found to induce IL-12 and, in some instances, inhibit IL-10 secretion by DC. These findings greatly enhance the potential of BCG-matured dendritic cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Durability of Response in Children Treated With Pegylated Interferon alfa [corrected] 2a ± Ribavirin for Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kathleen B; Molleston, Jean P; Jonas, Maureen M; Wen, Jessica; Murray, Karen F; Rosenthal, Philip; Gonzalez-Peralta, Regino P; Lobritto, Steven J; Mogul, Douglas; Pavlovic, Vedran; Warne, Charles; Wat, Cynthia; Thompson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    No long-term data have been published on the durability of response following pegylated interferon (PegIFN) treatment in children with chronic hepatitis C. This prospective, multicenter, long-term follow-up (LTFU) study aimed to assess long-term durability of sustained virological response (SVR), long-term safety and tolerability, and the association between IL28B genotype and treatment response, in children previously treated with PegIFN alfa-2a ± ribavirin (RBV) in the PEDS-C trial. A total of 93 patients were assessed for enrollment, and 38 enrolled in the study. Patients attended 2 study visits: 5 (mean 5.6, range 4.1-6.6) and 6 (6.6, 5.1-7.7) years after treatment cessation. Standardized medical history, physical examination, and laboratory testing were performed at these visits. Reminder telephone calls were conducted at 4 and 8 months after the initial visit. The LTFU cohort was the representative of the original PEDS-C cohort because both baseline and treatment characteristics were comparable. Of the 38 participants, 21 achieved SVR (responders) during the PEDS-C trial and 17 had not (nonresponders). All 21 responders maintained undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA during the LTFU (4.4-7.0 years after achieving SVR) in contrast to the nonresponders who demonstrated persistent viremia. IL28B CC genotype was associated with SVR (67% vs 30% in non-CC, P = 0.028). Long-term durability of SVR is excellent following PegIFN alfa-2a treatment in children with chronic hepatitis C; SVR is higher in those with IL28B CC versus non-CC.

  20. Toll-like receptor 7 governs interferon and inflammatory responses to rhinovirus and is suppressed by IL-5-induced lung eosinophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Hatchwell, Luke; Collison, Adam; Girkin, Jason; Parsons, Kristy; Li, Junyao; Zhang, Jie; Phipps, Simon; Knight, Darryl; Bartlett, Nathan W; Johnston, Sebastian L; Foster, Paul S; Wark, Peter A B; Mattes, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations represent a significant disease burden and are commonly caused by rhinovirus (RV), which is sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLR) such as TLR7. Some asthmatics have impaired interferon (IFN) responses to RV, but the underlying mechanisms of this clinically relevant observation are poorly understood. Objectives To investigate the importance of intact TLR7 signalling in vivo during RV exacerbation using mouse models of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways...

  1. Variants of genes implicated in type 1 interferon pathway and B-cell activation modulate the EULAR response to rituximab at 24 weeks in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Juge, Pierre-Antoine; Gazal, Steven; Constantin, Arnaud; Mariette, Xavier; Combe, Bernard; Tebib, Jacques; Dougados, Maxime; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loet, Xavier; Dieudé, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Background The type 1 interferon (IFN) pathway has been identified to potentially affect the response to rituximab (RTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which suggests the contribution of type 1 IFN pathway genes such as IFN regulatory factor 5 and 7 (IRF5 and IRF7), tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and osteopontin (SPP1). Our objective was to study functional variants of these IFN pathway genes as predictors of the European League Against Rh...

  2. Long noncoding RNA #32 contributes to antiviral responses by controlling interferon-stimulated gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Sugiyama, Masaya; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2016-09-13

    Despite the breadth of knowledge that exists regarding the function of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in biological phenomena, the role of lncRNAs in host antiviral responses is poorly understood. Here, we report that lncRNA#32 is associated with type I IFN signaling. The silencing of lncRNA#32 dramatically reduced the level of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, resulting in sensitivity to encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection. In contrast, the ectopic expression of lncRNA#32 significantly suppressed EMCV replication, suggesting that lncRNA#32 positively regulates the host antiviral response. We further demonstrated the suppressive function of lncRNA#32 in hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. lncRNA#32 bound to activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and regulated ISG expression. Our results reveal a role for lncRNA#32 in host antiviral responses.

  3. The Type I Interferon Response and Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Daniel; Wilcox, Douglas R; Longnecker, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen. HSV-1 infection is associated with a variety of diseases ranging from benign orolabial lesions to more serious and even life-threatening conditions such as herpes simplex keratitis and herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE is a rare occurrence among healthy adult individuals, but newborns are a particularly susceptible population. Type I IFN signaling has been identified as a crucial component of the innate immune response to the control of HSV-1 infection. In this study, we review the contribution of the type I IFN response to controlling HSV-1 infection, and differences in the early host response between adults and newborns that may contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection and central nervous system disease in newborns.

  4. An Approach to Detect Malicious Behaviors by Evading Stalling Code

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Dai; Xiaonan Liu; Chao You; Yichi Zhang; Jianmin Pang

    2012-01-01

    Since malwares contain stalling codes, malicious behaviors can’t be detected in emulated analysis environment. This paper proposes an approach to detect malicious behaviors by evade stalling codes. First, we executed a malware in the emulated analysis environment, and saved every executed instruction in a trace file; Second, we began to detect stalling codes with the trace file, and constructed stalling code evasive points; At last, we executed the malware again and evade stalling codes with ...

  5. PREDICTORS OF SUSTAINED RESPONSE TO INTERFERON-BASED THERAPY IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deian Jelev

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: IFN-based therapy induces long-term remission in ~20% of CHB-patients. Identification of predictors of treatment response can facilitate the clinical decision. Methods: 168 CHB-patients treated with IFN-based therapy were studied. Predictors of end-of-treatment response (ETR and sustained response (SR one-year post therapy were identified by non-parametric chi-square test and correlation analysis. Results: Low baseline HBV DNA (4xULN were independent predictors of ETR. Low viral load was stronger predictor than high ALT level. If both factors coexist the probability of ETR was 92%. In HBeAg-negative subjects SR correlates significantly with age below 40 years, evidence of early viral response at 3rd month, fibrosis stage F<3 (METAVIR and prolongation of treatment duration. HBeAg-seroconversion up to 6-month post-therapy was the strongest predictor of SR in HBeAg-positive patients.Conclusion: More favorable results could be achieved by pretreatment selection according to patients’ age, baseline viral load, ALT and liver fibrosis. Extension of IFN-treatment in responders may enhance the SR rate.

  6. Long term clinical outcome of chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virological response to interferon monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Veldt (Bart); S.W. Schalm (Solko); G. Saracco; N. Boyer; C. Camma; A. Bellobuono (Antonio); U. Hopf; I. Castillo; O. Weiland (Ola); F. Nevens (Frederik); B.E. Hansen (Bettina)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The key end point for treatment efficacy in chronic hepatitis C is absence of detectable virus at six months after treatment. However, the incidence of clinical events during long term follow up of patients with sustained virological response is still poorly

  7. Inflammatory response to Porphyromonas gingivalis partially requires interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Huang, Nasi; Gibson, Frank C

    2014-04-01

    Innate immune activation with expression of pro-inflammatory molecules such as TNF-α is a hallmark of the chronic inflammation associated with periodontal disease (PD). Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium associated with PD, engages TLRs and activates MyD88-dependent and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF)-dependent signaling pathways. IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 is activated in a TRIF-dependent manner and participates in production of cytokines such as TNF-α; however, little is known regarding IRF3 and the host response to PD pathogens. We speculated that IRF3 participates in the host inflammatory response to P. gingivalis. Our results show that bone marrow macrophages (MØ) from WT mice respond to P. gingivalis with activation and nuclear translocation of IRF3. Compared with WT, MØ from IRF3(-/-), TRIF(-/-), and TLR4(-/-) mice responded with reduced levels of TNF-α on P. gingivalis challenge. In addition, full expression of IL-6 and RANTES by MØ to P. gingivalis was dependent on IRF3. Lastly, employing MØ from IRF3(-/-) and IRF7(-/-) mice we observed a significant role for IRF3 and a modest role for IRF7 in the P. gingivalis-elicited TNF-α response. These studies identify a role for IRF3 in the inflammatory response by MØ to the periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis.

  8. Interferon-Beta Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Patients Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells for Immune Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Trinschek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by imbalanced immune regulatory networks, and MS patient-derived T effector cells are inefficiently suppressed through regulatory T cells (Treg, a phenomenon known as Treg resistance. In the current study we investigated T cell function in MS patients before and after interferon-beta therapy. We compared cytokine profile, responsiveness for Treg-mediated suppression ex vivo and evaluated reactivity of T cells in vivo using a humanized mouse model. We found that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of therapy-naive MS patients were resistant to Treg-mediated suppression. Treg resistance is associated with an augmented IL-6 production, enhanced IL-6 receptor expression, and increased PKB/c-Akt phosphorylation. These parameters as well as responsiveness of T cells to Treg-mediated suppression were restored after interferon-beta therapy of MS patients. Following transfer into immunodeficient mice, MS T cells induced a lethal graft versus host disease (GvHD and in contrast to T cells of healthy volunteers, this aggressive T cell response could not be controlled by Treg, but was abolished by anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies. However, magnitude and lethality of GvHD induced by MS T cells was significantly decreased after interferon-beta therapy and the reaction was prevented by Treg activation in vivo. Our data reveals that interferon-beta therapy improves the immunoregulation of autoaggressive T effector cells in MS patients by changing the IL-6 signal transduction pathway, thus restoring their sensitivity to Treg-mediated suppression.

  9. Incubation of whole blood at 39°C augments gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-induced protein 10 and IFN-γ responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabye, Martine G; Ravn, Pernille; Johansen, Isik S

    2011-01-01

    compared CMI responses following incubation of whole blood at 37°C and 39°C. Whole blood was obtained from (i) 34 healthy subjects whose blood was incubated with TB10.4 antigen, present in the Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine and many environmental mycobacteria; (ii) 8 TB patients and 8...... controls incubated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens in the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-IT); and (iii) from both groups incubated with a T cell mitogen. T cell responses (gamma interferon [IFN-γ]) and responses from antigen-presenting cells (IFN-γ-induced protein 10 [IP-10]) were...

  10. The presence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies is associated with a negative response to combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

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    Matern Siegfried

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-organ-specific autoantibodies are found in a considerable number of anti-HCV positive patients. Previous studies investigated the clinical relevance of these antibodies in patients treated with interferon monotherapy, but not combination therapies. Methods Anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-mitochondrial, anti-neutrophil-cytoplasmatic and anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibodies were determined in 78 consecutive anti-HCV positive patients by indirect immunofluorescence. The presence of these antibodies was related to demographic variables and to the outcome of antiviral combination therapy with interferon-α and ribavirin in 65 patients. Results In our study, positivity for autoantibodies was associated with higher alanine aminotransferase levels and higher mean values for HCV-RNA (p Conclusions The absence of non-organ-specific autoantibodies might indicate a significantly higher chance for viral clearance in response to combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection. Therefore, despite of an overall higher treatment response, the addition of the immunomodulatory drug ribavirin could accentuate immunological differences that affect treatment outcome and might have been less obvious in earlier studies analysing interferon monotherapy.

  11. Lack of Innate Interferon Responses during SARS Coronavirus Infection in a Vaccination and Reinfection Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Mark J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Leon, Alberto J.; Cameron, Cheryl M.; Ran, Longsi; Xu, Luoling; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Danesh, Ali; Fang, Yuan; Li, Qianjun; Anderson, Austin; Couch, Ronald C.; Paquette, Stephane G.; Fomukong, Ndingsa G.; Kistner, Otfried; Lauchart, Manfred; Rowe, Thomas; Harrod, Kevin S.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Kelvin, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In terms of its highly pathogenic nature, there remains a significant need to further define the immune pathology of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, as well as identify correlates of immunity to help develop vaccines for severe coronaviral infections. Here we use a SARS-CoV infection-reinfection ferret model and a functional genomics approach to gain insight into SARS immunopathogenesis and to identify correlates of immune protection during SARS-CoV-challenge in ferrets previously infected with SARS-CoV or immunized with a SARS virus vaccine. We identified gene expression signatures in the lungs of ferrets associated with primary immune responses to SARS-CoV infection and in ferrets that received an identical second inoculum. Acute SARS-CoV infection prompted coordinated innate immune responses that were dominated by antiviral IFN response gene (IRG) expression. Reinfected ferrets, however, lacked the integrated expression of IRGs that was prevalent during acute infection. The expression of specific IRGs was also absent upon challenge in ferrets immunized with an inactivated, Al(OH)3-adjuvanted whole virus SARS vaccine candidate that protected them against SARS-CoV infection in the lungs. Lack of IFN-mediated immune enhancement in infected ferrets that were previously inoculated with, or vaccinated against, SARS-CoV revealed 9 IRG correlates of protective immunity. This data provides insight into the molecular pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and SARS-like-CoV infections and is an important resource for the development of CoV antiviral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:23029269

  12. Interferon-Alpha Promotes Th1 Response and Epithelial Apoptosis via Inflammasome Activation in Human Intestinal MucosaSummary

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    Anne Jarry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound & Aims: Several lines of investigation suggest that interferon (IFN alpha can alter human intestinal mucosa homeostasis. These include the endogenous production of IFN alpha in celiac disease or inflammatory bowel diseases, as well as the occurrence of intestinal side effects of exogenous IFN alpha used as a therapeutic tool. Here, we present an ex vivo translational approach to investigate the effects of IFN alpha on the human normal intestinal mucosa, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human normal colonic mucosa explants were cultured in the presence or absence of IFN alpha 2a. Epithelial homeostasis was assessed using the immunohistochemical marker of apoptosis M30. The Wnt inhibitor Dickkopf-Homolog-1 (DKK1 was assayed in the supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activation of the inflammasome (caspase-1/interleukin [IL]18 and of a Th1 response was determined by in situ detection of active caspase-1, as well as by measurement of mature IL18 production and the prototype Th1 cytokine IFN gamma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, mechanistic studies were performed using the specific caspase-1 inhibitor Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (YVAD-FMK, IL18-binding protein, neutralizing anti–IFN gamma, and anti-DKK1 antibodies. Results: IFN alpha 2a elicited a rapid (24 hours disruption of surface and crypt colonic epithelial cells via apoptosis that was variable in intensity among the 20 individuals studied. This apoptotic effect was dependent on the initiation of an IFN gamma response elicited by resident T box expressed in T cells–positive lamina propria cells. Both apoptosis and Th1 response were subordinated to active caspase-1 and IL18 production. Finally, neutralization of IFN gamma–induced DKK1 partially protected against IFN alpha–induced epithelial apoptosis. Conclusions: By using an ex vivo model, we show an interindividual heterogeneity of IFN alpha effects

  13. Experimental neosporosis in bulls: parasite detection in semen and blood and specific antibody and interferon-gamma responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Martínez, E; Ferre, I; Martínez, A; Osoro, K; Mateos-Sanz, A; Del-Pozo, I; Aduriz, G; Tamargo, C; Hidalgo, C O; Ortega-Mora, L M

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the presence of Neospora caninum in semen and blood, and the development of specific antibody and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses in experimentally infected bulls. Eight bulls were intravenously infected with 10(8) live N. caninum tachyzoites of NC-1 isolate. The presence of N. caninum in semen and blood was assessed using a nested-PCR procedure. PCR-positive semen samples were bioassayed using a BALB/c nu/nu mouse model. Specific anti-N. caninum antibody and IFN-gamma responses were also examined. In parallel, eight seronegative bulls were studied as non-infected controls. All bulls were monitored for 26 weeks. All eight experimentally infected bulls showed N. caninum DNA in their semen and/or blood samples at some time during the course of the study. Parasite load in semen ranged from 0.1 to 14.5 parasites/ml (mean 6.0). N. caninum could not be detected in BALB/c nu/nu mice inoculated with PCR-positive semen samples. A significant increase in mean serum specific IgM antibody response to N. caninum was detected between 10 and 28 days post-infection (p.i.). Serum specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2 antibody levels in experimentally infected bulls were significantly different after 21, 10, and 14 days p.i. as compared to controls, respectively. Specific anti-N. caninum IgG were detected in seminal plasma from infected bulls and values obtained were different from controls after 25 days p.i. Mean specific IFN-gamma responses in experimentally infected bulls were significantly higher than controls 3 days p.i. This is the first study to report the presence of N. caninum DNA in the semen and blood of experimentally infected bulls. Our observations indicate an intermittent presence of N. caninum in low numbers in semen and associated with chronic stage of the infection. This study is also the first to report the detection of anti-N. caninum IgG in seminal plasma of experimentally infected bulls.

  14. Canine keratinocytes upregulate type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines in response to poly(dA:dT) but not to canine papillomavirus

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    Luff, Jennifer A.; Yuan, Hang; Suter, Maja M.; Müller, Eliane J.; Schlegel, Richard; Moore, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PV) are double stranded (ds) DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells within the skin or mucosa, most often causing benign neoplasms that spontaneously regress. The immune system plays a key role in the defense against PVs. Since these viruses infect keratinocytes, we wanted to investigate the role of the keratinocyte in initiating an immune response to canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) in the dog. Keratinocytes express a variety of pattern recognition receptors (PRR) to distinguish different cutaneous pathogens and initiate an immune response. We examined the mRNA expression patterns for several recently described cytosolic nucleic acid sensing PRRs in canine monolayer keratinocyte cultures using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Unstimulated normal cells were found to express mRNA for melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA5), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), DNA-dependent activation of interferon regulatory factors, leucine rich repeat flightless interacting protein 1, and interferon inducible gene 16 (IFI16), as well as their adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, interferon-β promoter stimulator 1, and endoplasmic reticulum-resident transmembrane protein stimulator of interferon genes. When stimulated with synthetic dsDNA [poly(dA:dT)] or dsRNA [poly(I:C)], keratinocytes responded with increased mRNA expression levels for interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-β, RIG-I, IFI16, and MDA5. There was no detectable increase in mRNA expression, however, in keratinocytes infected with CPV-2. Furthermore, CPV-2-infected keratinocytes stimulated with poly(dA:dT) and poly(I:C) showed similar mRNA expression levels for these gene products when compared with expression levels in uninfected cells. These results suggest that although canine keratinocytes contain functional PRRs that can recognize and respond to dsDNA and dsRNA ligands, they do not appear to recognize or

  15. Sustained response to combination therapy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C and thrombocytopenia secondary to alpha-interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sáenz, M; Rojas, M; Piñar, A; Salas, E; Rebollo, J; Carmona, I; Herrerías-Esteban, J M; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-05-01

    Recent data suggest that hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection may induce a significant autoimmune reaction to platelets, but the mechanism is unknown. Many patients with chronic hepatitis C, in fact, have high levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) and HCV-RNA is present in the platelets of 100% of those patients with thrombocytopenia and high PAIgG levels. Hepatitis C virus infection has been associated with the development of thrombocytopenic purpura, sometimes triggered during interferon (IFN) therapy. In such cases, the treatment of the underlying disease is a difficult problem to solve. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C, who developed life-threatening thrombocytopenic purpura after a prolonged course of IFN-alpha2b over a 4-year period. Treatment with anti-immunoglobulin gammaglobulin (Polyglobin; Química Farmaceutica Bayer, Barcelona, Spain) had a transient effect on the platelet count, but prolonged therapy with prednisone was necessary for definitive relief of the haematological complication. Two years later, the patient was treated with combined therapy, including ribavirin (1200 mg/day) and IFN-alpha2b (5 mU, t.i.w.) for 12 months. This therapy induced a sustained response, both biochemical and virological, without haematological complications. This observation suggests that ribavirin may be of benefit in the treatment of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, preventing the harmful effect of IFN-alpha but also allowing both drugs to be combined so as to increase the probability of sustained remission of the liver disease.

  16. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

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    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  17. Type 1 Interferons Suppress Accelerated Osteoclastogenesis and Prevent Loss of Bone Mass During Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Pneumocystis Lung Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkison, Michelle; Gauss, Katherine; Ran, Yanchao; Searles, Steve; Taylor, David; Meissner, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection causes loss of CD4+ T cells and type 1 interferon (IFN)–producing and IFN-responsive dendritic cells, resulting in immunodeficiencies and susceptibility to opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis. Osteoporosis and bone marrow failure are additional unexplained complications in HIV-positive patients and patients with AIDS, respectively. We recently demonstrated that mice that lack lymphocytes and IFN a/b receptor (IFrag−/−) develop bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection, whereas lymphocyte-deficient, IFN α/β receptor–competent mice (RAG−/−) had normal hematopoiesis. Interestingly, infected IFrag−/− mice also exhibited bone fragility, suggesting loss of bone mass. We quantified bone changes and evaluated the potential connection between progressing bone fragility and bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection in IFrag−/− mice. We found that Pneumocystis infection accelerated osteoclastogenesis as bone marrow failure progressed. This finding was consistent with induction of osteoclastogenic factors, including receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand and the proapoptotic factor tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, in conjunction with their shared decoy receptor osteoprotegerin, in the bone marrow of infected IFrag−/− mice. Deregulation of this axis has also been observed in HIV-positive individuals. Biphosphonate treatment of IFrag−/− mice prevented bone loss and protected loss of hematopoietic precursor cells that maintained activity in vitro but did not prevent loss of mature neutrophils. Together, these data show that bone loss and bone marrow failure are partially linked, which suggests that the deregulation of the receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin/tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand axis may connect the two phenotypes in our model. PMID:22626807

  18. Interferon-γ and proliferation responses to Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi proteins in patients with S. Typhi Bacteremia in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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    Alaullah Sheikh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi is a human-restricted intracellular pathogen and the cause of typhoid fever. Cellular immune responses are required to control and clear Salmonella infection. Despite this, there are limited data on cellular immune responses in humans infected with wild type S. Typhi.For this work, we used an automated approach to purify a subset of S. Typhi proteins identified in previous antibody-based immuno-affinity screens and antigens known to be expressed in vivo, including StaF-putative fimbrial protein-STY0202, StbB-fimbrial chaperone-STY0372, CsgF-involved in curli production-STY1177, CsgD- putative regulatory protein-STY1179, OppA-periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein precursor-STY1304, PagC-outer membrane invasion protein-STY1878, and conserved hypothetical protein-STY2195; we also generated and analyzed a crude membrane preparation of S. Typhi (MP. In comparison to samples collected from uninfected Bangladeshi and North American participants, we detected significant interferonresponses in PBMCs stimulated with MP, StaF, StbB, CsgF, CsgD, OppA, STY2195, and PagC in patients bacteremic with S. Typhi in Bangladesh. The majority of interferon-γ expressing T cells were CD4 cells, although CD8 responses also occurred. We also assessed cellular proliferation responses in bacteremic patients, and confirmed increased responses in infected individuals to MP, StaF, STY2195, and PagC in convalescent compared to acute phase samples and compared to controls. StaF is a fimbrial protein homologous to E. coli YadK, and contains a Pfam motif thought to be involved in cellular adhesion. PagC is expressed in vivo under the control of the virulence-associated PhoP-regulon required for intra-macrophage survival of Salmonella. STY2195 is a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function.This is the first analysis of cellular immune responses to purified S. Typhi antigens in patients with typhoid fever. These results indicate

  19. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

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    Karoly Toth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as

  20. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  1. Effect of aging, glucose level, and HIV viral load on response to treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in HIV/HCV co-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, Paola; Maida, Ivana; Cattelan, Anna Maria; Pontali, Emanuele; Angeli, Elena; Giralda, Mariarosaria; Verucchi, Gabriella; Caputo, Antonietta; Iannacone, Claudio; Puoti, Massimo; Carosi, Giampiero

    2015-02-01

    This was a post-hoc analysis of the Optimized Pegylated interferons Efficacy and anti-Retroviral Approach (OPERA) study, originally designed to document routine clinical and treatment data in HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV). The aim of this study was to define the impact of several variables, such as age, glucose metabolism, and HIV viral load, on PEG-IFN/RBV treatment outcomes, in HIV/HCV coinfected women. Female subjects from the OPERA database were retrospectively evaluated and factors associated with sustained virological response (SVR) were assessed and compared to the male population by logistic regression analysis. At baseline, clinical and demographic data were collected. Patients were then administered with PEG-IFN/RBV therapy for 48 weeks. After a 24-week follow-up period, SVR was evaluated. A total of 1523 patients were enrolled in 98 centers across Italy, 1284 of whom were IFN therapy naïve and were included in the post-hoc analysis. In the female group, factors associated with SVR were the presence of HCV genotype 2,3 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=6.87, pHIV-RNA (AOR=1.47, p=0.033) but not glucose level (AOR=1.0, p=0.95) predicted SVR. Findings from the present study demonstrate that several factors may be predictive of SVR when pegylated interferon plus ribavirin is used (i.e., age, gender, HIV viral load and HCV genotype) that need to be carefully considered prior to therapeutic intervention, since they may hinder successful therapy. Use of PEG-IFN/RBV with novel direct antiviral agents will likely be still maintained until less expensive and effective interferon-free strategies become available.

  2. Interferon-lambda4 genetic polymorphism is associated with the therapy response for hepatitis C virus recurrence after a living donor liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, H; Motomura, T; Matsumoto, Y; Harimoto, N; Ikegami, T; Yoshizumi, T; Soejima, Y; Shirabe, K; Fukuhara, T; Maehara, Y

    2014-06-01

    The standard therapy against hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence postliver transplantation includes interferon (IFN)α and ribavirin. IFNL4 ss469415590 polymorphism has been reported as a novel predictor of the response to IFN therapy for chronic HCV infection. We examined the impact of IFNL4 polymorphism on the responsiveness to IFN therapy after liver transplantation. Tissue specimens were collected from 80 HCV-infected recipients and 78 liver donors, and their IFNL4 ss469415590 genotype, hepatic IFNL4 and interferon-stimulated genes' mRNA expression levels were examined. The association of the polymorphism and expression levels in terms of the IFN therapy response to HCV recurrence was analysed. Most individuals who had rs8099917 risk alleles also had ss469415590 risk alleles (R(2) = 0.9). Sustained virological response (SVR) rates were higher in both liver graft recipients and transplants with ss469415590 TT/TT alleles than in those with the risk ΔG allele (P = 0.003 and P = 0.005, respectively). In recipients with ss469415590 TT/TT, IFNL4 TT mRNA levels showed no significant differences between livers of patients who responded to therapy and those who did not (P = 0.4). In recipients with the risk ΔG allele, IFNL4 ΔG mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in SVR patients than in non-SVR patients (P = 0.02). Hepatic interferon stimulable genes and IFNL4 mRNA expression were correlated. Our findings suggest that analysing the ss469415590 genotype and IFNL4 ΔG expression provides a novel prediction strategy for the possible response to IFN therapy after liver transplantation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Stromal cells and osteoclasts are responsible for exacerbated collagen-induced arthritis in interferon-beta-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Teige, Ingrid; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical trials using interferon-beta (IFNbeta) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have shown conflicting results. We undertook this study to understand the mechanisms of IFNbeta in arthritis at a physiologic level. METHODS: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in IFNbeta...

  4. Processing of genome 5' termini as a strategy of negative-strand RNA viruses to avoid RIG-I-dependent interferon induction.

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    Matthias Habjan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity is critically dependent on the rapid production of interferon in response to intruding viruses. The intracellular pathogen recognition receptors RIG-I and MDA5 are essential for interferon induction by viral RNAs containing 5' triphosphates or double-stranded structures, respectively. Viruses with a negative-stranded RNA genome are an important group of pathogens causing emerging and re-emerging diseases. We investigated the ability of genomic RNAs from substantial representatives of this virus group to induce interferon via RIG-I or MDA5. RNAs isolated from particles of Ebola virus, Nipah virus, Lassa virus, and Rift Valley fever virus strongly activated the interferon-beta promoter. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that interferon induction depended on RIG-I, but not MDA5, and phosphatase treatment revealed a requirement for the RNA 5' triphosphate group. In contrast, genomic RNAs of Hantaan virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and Borna disease virus did not trigger interferon induction. Sensitivity of these RNAs to a 5' monophosphate-specific exonuclease indicates that the RIG-I-activating 5' triphosphate group was removed post-transcriptionally by a viral function. Consequently, RIG-I is unable to bind the RNAs of Hantaan virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and Borna disease virus. These results establish RIG-I as a major intracellular recognition receptor for the genome of most negative-strand RNA viruses and define the cleavage of triphosphates at the RNA 5' end as a strategy of viruses to evade the innate immune response.

  5. Processing of Genome 5′ Termini as a Strategy of Negative-Strand RNA Viruses to Avoid RIG-I-Dependent Interferon Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjan, Matthias; Andersson, Ida; Klingström, Jonas; Schümann, Michael; Martin, Arnold; Zimmermann, Petra; Wagner, Valentina; Pichlmair, Andreas; Schneider, Urs; Mühlberger, Elke; Mirazimi, Ali; Weber, Friedemann

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity is critically dependent on the rapid production of interferon in response to intruding viruses. The intracellular pathogen recognition receptors RIG-I and MDA5 are essential for interferon induction by viral RNAs containing 5′ triphosphates or double-stranded structures, respectively. Viruses with a negative-stranded RNA genome are an important group of pathogens causing emerging and re-emerging diseases. We investigated the ability of genomic RNAs from substantial representatives of this virus group to induce interferon via RIG-I or MDA5. RNAs isolated from particles of Ebola virus, Nipah virus, Lassa virus, and Rift Valley fever virus strongly activated the interferon-beta promoter. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that interferon induction depended on RIG-I, but not MDA5, and phosphatase treatment revealed a requirement for the RNA 5′ triphosphate group. In contrast, genomic RNAs of Hantaan virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and Borna disease virus did not trigger interferon induction. Sensitivity of these RNAs to a 5′ monophosphate-specific exonuclease indicates that the RIG-I-activating 5′ triphosphate group was removed post-transcriptionally by a viral function. Consequently, RIG-I is unable to bind the RNAs of Hantaan virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and Borna disease virus. These results establish RIG-I as a major intracellular recognition receptor for the genome of most negative-strand RNA viruses and define the cleavage of triphosphates at the RNA 5′ end as a strategy of viruses to evade the innate immune response. PMID:18446221

  6. Differential interferon- gamma production characterizes the cytokine responses to Leishmania and Mycobacterium leprae antigens in concomitant mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and lepromatous leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Denise S; Azeredo-Coutinho, Rilza B G; Schubach, Armando; Conceição-Silva, Fátima; Baptista, Cibele; Moreira, João S; Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2005-01-15

    Tegumentary leishmaniasis and leprosy display similar spectra of disease phenotypes, which are dependent on cell-mediated immunity to specific antigens. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis and lepromatous leprosy represent the anergic end of the spectrum, whereas mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and tuberculoid leprosy are associated with marked antigen-specific cellular immune response. We characterized and compared the cell-mediated response to Leishmania and Mycobacterium leprae antigens in a patient with an intriguing association of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with lepromatous leprosy, which are at opposite ends of the immunopathological spectra of these diseases. This was done by performance of skin tests and by assessment of the cell proliferation and cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Strong skin-test reactions and PBMC proliferation were observed in response to Leishmania antigens but not to M. leprae antigens. The stimulation of PBMCs with Leishmania and M. leprae antigens induced comparable levels of tumor necrosis factor- alpha , interleukin-5, and interleukin-10. However, the interferon- gamma response to Leishmania antigens was remarkably high, and that to M. leprae antigens was almost nil. We found that concomitant leprosy and tegumentary leishmaniasis can produce opposite polar forms associated, respectively, with absent or exaggerated cell-mediated immune responses to each pathogen. This suggests that independent mechanisms influence the clinical outcome of each infection. Moreover, interferon- gamma appears to play a major role in the clinical expression of these intracellular infections.

  7. A genetic validation study reveals a role of vitamin D metabolism in the response to interferon-alfa-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C.

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    Christian M Lange

    Full Text Available To perform a comprehensive study on the relationship between vitamin D metabolism and the response to interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C.Associations between a functionally relevant polymorphism in the gene encoding the vitamin D 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1-1260 rs10877012 and the response to treatment with pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin were determined in 701 patients with chronic hepatitis C. In addition, associations between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3 (25[OH]D(3 and treatment outcome were analysed. CYP27B1-1260 rs10877012 was found to be an independent predictor of sustained virologic response (SVR in patients with poor-response IL28B genotypes (15% difference in SVR for rs10877012 genotype AA vs. CC, p = 0.02, OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.061-2.188, but not in patients with favourable IL28B genotype. Patients with chronic hepatitis C showed a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (25[OH]D(3<20 ng/mL during all seasons, but 25(OHD(3 serum levels were not associated with treatment outcome.Our study suggests a role of bioactive vitamin D (1,25[OH](2D(3, calcitriol in the response to treatment of chronic hepatitis C. However, serum concentration of the calcitriol precursor 25(OHD(3 is not a suitable predictor of treatment outcome.

  8. Sequences in the interferon sensitivity-determining region and core region of hepatitis C virus impact pretreatment prediction of response to PEG-interferon plus ribavirin: data mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Iwasaki, Manabu; Sakamoto, Minoru; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Tamori, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Izumi, Namiki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the significance of viral factors for pretreatment prediction of sustained virological response to pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) therapy for chronic hepatitis C using data mining analysis. Substitutions in the IFN sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) and at position 70 of the HCV core region (Core70) were determined in 505 patients with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C treated with PEG-IFN plus RBV. Data mining analysis was used to build a predictive model of sustained virological response in patients selected randomly (n = 304). The reproducibility of the model was validated in the remaining 201 patients. Substitutions in ISDR (odds ratio = 9.92, P predicted sustained virological response independent of other covariates. The decision-tree model revealed that the rate of sustained virological response was highest (83%) in patients with two or more substitutions in ISDR. The overall rate of sustained virological response was 44% in patients with a low number of substitutions in ISDR (0-1) but was 83% in selected subgroups of younger patients (<60 years), wild-type sequence at Core70, and higher level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (≥ 120 mg/dl). Reproducibility of the model was validated (r(2) = 0.94, P < 0.001). In conclusion, substitutions in ISDR and Core70 of HCV are significant predictors of response to PEG-IFN plus RBV therapy. A decision-tree model that includes these viral factors as predictors could identify patients with a high probability of sustained virological response. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. An IRF-3-, IRF-5-, and IRF-7-Independent Pathway of Dengue Viral Resistance Utilizes IRF-1 to Stimulate Type I and II Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron F. Carlin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-regulatory factors (IRFs are a family of transcription factors (TFs that translate viral recognition into antiviral responses, including type I interferon (IFN production. Dengue virus (DENV and other clinically important flaviviruses are suppressed by type I IFN. While mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1−/− succumb to DENV infection, we found that mice deficient in three transcription factors controlling type I IFN production (Irf3−/− Irf5−/− Irf7−/− triple knockout [TKO] survive DENV challenge. DENV infection of TKO mice resulted in minimal type I IFN production but a robust type II IFN (IFN-γ response. Using loss-of-function approaches for various molecules, we demonstrate that the IRF-3-, IRF-5-, IRF-7-independent pathway predominantly utilizes IFN-γ and, to a lesser degree, type I IFNs. This pathway signals via IRF-1 to stimulate interleukin-12 (IL-12 production and IFN-γ response. These results reveal a key antiviral role for IRF-1 by activating both type I and II IFN responses during DENV infection.

  10. Pulmonary Immune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Gamma Responses in HIV-Infected Individuals with Active Tuberculosis (TB in an Area of High TB Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buldeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data on the pulmonary immune-compartment interferon gamma (IFNγ response to M. tuberculosis, particularly in settings of high tuberculosis (TB prevalence and in HIV-coinfected individuals. This data is necessary to understand the diagnostic potential of commercially available interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs in both the pulmonary immune-compartment and peripheral blood. We used intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry to assess the IFNγ response to purified protein derivative (PPD and early secretory antigen 6 (ESAT6 in induced sputa (ISp and blood samples from HIV-infected, smear-negative, TB suspects. We found that individuals with active TB disease produced significantly less IFNγ in response to PPD in their induced sputa samples than individuals with non-active TB (control group. This difference was not reflected in the peripheral blood, even within the CD27− CD4+ memory T lymphocyte population. These findings suggest that progression to active TB disease may be associated with the loss of IFNγ secretion at the site of primary infection. Our findings highlight the importance of studying pulmonary immune-compartment M. tuberculosis specific responses to elucidate IFNγ secretion across the spectrum of TB disease.

  11. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) shapes both innate and CD8(+) T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, James D; Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Cho, Hyelim; Suthar, Mehul S; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN)-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/-) mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV) infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/-) cells and mice. IRF-1(-/-) mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/-) macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/-) fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+) T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+) T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/-) mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1 shapes both innate and CD8(+ T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Brien

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/- mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/- cells and mice. IRF-1(-/- mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/- macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/- fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+ T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+ T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/- mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+ T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+ T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell response.

  13. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  14. In vivo blockade of gamma interferon affects the influenza virus-induced humoral and the local cellular immune response in lung tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarth, N.; Kelso, A

    1996-01-01

    Influenza virus infection induces the local production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) by T cells and non-T cells in the respiratory tract. To elucidate the possible functions of this cytokine, the humoral and local cellular immune responses to influenza virus were studied in BALB/c mice with or without in vivo neutralization of IFN-gamma by using monoclonal antibodies. Neutralization of IFN-gamma led to a significant reduction in virus-specific titers of immunoglobulins G2a and G3 in serum b...

  15. Analysis of the acute phase responses of Serum Amyloid A, Haptoglobin and Type 1 Interferon in cattle experimentally infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A series of challenge experiments were performed in order to investigate the acute phase responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle and possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers". The host response to infection was investigated through....... There was a statistically significant difference in the HP response between carriers and non-carriers with a lower response in the animals that subsequently developed into FMDV carriers. It was concluded that the induction of SAA, HP and type 1 IFN in serum can be used as markers of acute infection by FMDV in cattle....... measurements of the concentrations of the acute phase proteins (APPs) serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (HP), as well as the bioactivity of type 1 interferon (IFN) in serum of infected animals. Results were based on measurements from a total of 36 infected animals of which 24 were kept for observational...

  16. [24 weeks treatment with pegylated interferon alfa plus ribavirin may be possible in genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients with rapid virological response who have low pretreatment viremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Soo; Kang, Hyoun Gu; Seo, Jeong Ah; Jung, Eun Uk; Lee, Sang Heon; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Youn Jae; Seol, Sang Yong

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 is a combination of pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin over a 48 weeks period. It is unclear if 24 weeks treatment is possible for patients showing a rapid virological response (RVR) without compromising the sustained virological response (SVR) in Korea. Between June 2005 and September 2008, among patients chronically infected with the HCV genotype 1 who were treated with pegylated interferon alfa subcutaneously once weekly plus ribavirin based on body weight, 55 patients who had low pretreatment viral load (<600,000 IU/mL) and RVR were enrolled. A total of 55 patients were divided into 24 weeks treatment group (n=29) and the standard treatment group (n=26). The HCV RNA was quantitatively assessed before treatment, and after 12 weeks of treatment, and also qualitatively assessed after 4 weeks of treatment, at end of treatment (24 weeks), and 24 weeks after end of treatment. RVR was defined as undetectable HCV RNA at the 4 weeks of treatment. Among the 55 patients, SVR was achieved in 100% (29/29) of the patients in 24 weeks treatment and 96.2% (25/26) of the patients in the standard treatment (p=0.473). HCV genotype 1 infected patients with a low baseline HCV RNA concentration who become HCV RNA negative at week 4 may be treated for 24 weeks without compromising sustained virological response. However, an additional trial will be needed to optimize the treatment duration.

  17. Factors regulated by interferon gamma and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A contribute to responses that protect mice from Coccidioides immitis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Coccidioidomycosis results from airborne infections caused by either Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Both are pathogenic fungi that live in desert soil in the New World and can infect normal hosts, but most infections are self-limited. Disseminated infections occur in approximately 5% of cases and may prove fatal. Mouse models of the disease have identified strains that are resistant (e.g. DBA/2) or susceptible (e.g. C57BL/6) to these pathogens. However, the genetic and immunological basis for this difference has not been fully characterized. Results Microarray technology was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in lung tissue between resistant DBA/2 and sensitive C57BL/6 mice after infection with C. immitis. Differentially expressed genes were mapped onto biological pathways, gene ontologies, and protein interaction networks, which revealed that innate immune responses mediated by Type II interferon (i.e., IFNG) and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) contribute to the resistant phenotype. In addition, upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1A (HIF1A), possibly as part of a larger inflammatory response mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), may also contribute to resistance. Microarray gene expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR for a subset of 12 genes, which revealed that IFNG HIF1A and TNFA, among others, were significantly differentially expressed between the two strains at day 14 post-infection. Conclusion These results confirm the finding that DBA/2 mice express more Type II interferon and interferon stimulated genes than genetically susceptible strains and suggest that differential expression of HIF1A may also play a role in protection. PMID:23006927

  18. Factors regulated by interferon gamma and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A contribute to responses that protect mice from Coccidioides immitis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woelk Christopher H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidioidomycosis results from airborne infections caused by either Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Both are pathogenic fungi that live in desert soil in the New World and can infect normal hosts, but most infections are self-limited. Disseminated infections occur in approximately 5% of cases and may prove fatal. Mouse models of the disease have identified strains that are resistant (e.g. DBA/2 or susceptible (e.g. C57BL/6 to these pathogens. However, the genetic and immunological basis for this difference has not been fully characterized. Results Microarray technology was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in lung tissue between resistant DBA/2 and sensitive C57BL/6 mice after infection with C. immitis. Differentially expressed genes were mapped onto biological pathways, gene ontologies, and protein interaction networks, which revealed that innate immune responses mediated by Type II interferon (i.e., IFNG and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1 contribute to the resistant phenotype. In addition, upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1A (HIF1A, possibly as part of a larger inflammatory response mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA, may also contribute to resistance. Microarray gene expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR for a subset of 12 genes, which revealed that IFNG HIF1A and TNFA, among others, were significantly differentially expressed between the two strains at day 14 post-infection. Conclusion These results confirm the finding that DBA/2 mice express more Type II interferon and interferon stimulated genes than genetically susceptible strains and suggest that differential expression of HIF1A may also play a role in protection.

  19. Factors regulated by interferon gamma and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A contribute to responses that protect mice from Coccidioides immitis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, Christopher H; Zhang, Jin X; Walls, Lorraine; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Singhania, Akul; Kirkland, Theo N; Fierer, Joshua

    2012-09-24

    Coccidioidomycosis results from airborne infections caused by either Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Both are pathogenic fungi that live in desert soil in the New World and can infect normal hosts, but most infections are self-limited. Disseminated infections occur in approximately 5% of cases and may prove fatal. Mouse models of the disease have identified strains that are resistant (e.g. DBA/2) or susceptible (e.g. C57BL/6) to these pathogens. However, the genetic and immunological basis for this difference has not been fully characterized. Microarray technology was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in lung tissue between resistant DBA/2 and sensitive C57BL/6 mice after infection with C. immitis. Differentially expressed genes were mapped onto biological pathways, gene ontologies, and protein interaction networks, which revealed that innate immune responses mediated by Type II interferon (i.e., IFNG) and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) contribute to the resistant phenotype. In addition, upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1A (HIF1A), possibly as part of a larger inflammatory response mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), may also contribute to resistance. Microarray gene expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR for a subset of 12 genes, which revealed that IFNG HIF1A and TNFA, among others, were significantly differentially expressed between the two strains at day 14 post-infection. These results confirm the finding that DBA/2 mice express more Type II interferon and interferon stimulated genes than genetically susceptible strains and suggest that differential expression of HIF1A may also play a role in protection.

  20. Lentiviral vectors encoding short hairpin RNAs efficiently transduce and knockdown LINGO-1 but induce an interferon response and cytotoxicity in central nervous system neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Thomas H; Foster, Edmund; Dawes, John M; Hindges, Robert; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Moon, Lawrence D F

    2012-05-01

    Knocking down neuronal LINGO-1 using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) might enhance axon regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors have great potential as a therapeutic delivery system for CNS injuries. However, recent studies have revealed that shRNAs can induce an interferon response resulting in off-target effects and cytotoxicity. CNS neurones were transduced with integration-deficient lentiviral vectors in vitro. The transcriptional effect of shRNA expression was analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction and northern blots were used to assess shRNA production. Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced CNS neurones and knocked down LINGO-1 mRNA in vitro. However, an increase in cell death was observed when lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA were applied or when high vector concentrations were used. We demonstrate that high doses of vector or the use of vectors encoding shRNAs can induce an up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes (2',5'-oligoadenylate synthase 1 and protein kinase R although not myxovirus resistance 1) and a down-regulation of off-target genes (including p75(NTR) and Nogo receptor 1). Furthermore, the northern blot demonstrated that these negative consequences occur even when lentiviral vectors express low levels of shRNAs. Taken together, these results may explain why neurite outgrowth was not enhanced on an inhibitory substrate following transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA targeting LINGO-1. These findings highlight the importance of including appropriate controls to verify silencing specificity and the requirement to check for an interferon response when conducting RNA interference experiments. However, the potential benefits that RNA interference and viral vectors offer to gene-based therapies to CNS injuries cannot be overlooked and demand further investigation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lentiviral vectors encoding shRNAs efficiently transduce and knockdown LINGO-1 but induce an interferon response and cytotoxicity in CNS neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Thomas H.; Foster, Edmund; Dawes, John M.; Hindges, Robert; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J.; Moon, Lawrence D.F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knocking down neuronal LINGO-1 using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) might enhance axon regeneration in the CNS. Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors have great potential as a therapeutic delivery system for CNS injuries. However, recent studies have revealed that shRNAs can induce an interferon response resulting in off-target effects and cytotoxicity. Methods CNS neurons were transduced with integration-deficient lentiviral vectors in vitro. The transcriptional effect of shRNA expression was analysed using qRT-PCR and northern blots were used to assess shRNA production. Results Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors efficiently transduced CNS neurons and knocked down LINGO-1 mRNA in vitro. However, an increase in cell death was observed when lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA were applied or when high vector concentrations were used. We demonstrate that high doses of vector or the use of vectors encoding shRNAs can induce an up-regulation of interferon stimulated genes (OAS1 and PKR) and a down-regulation of off- target genes (including p75NTR and NgR1). Furthermore, the northern blot demonstrated that these negative consequences occur even when lentiviral vectors express low levels of shRNAs. Together, these results may explain why neurite outgrowth was not enhanced on an inhibitory substrate after transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding an shRNA targeting LINGO-1. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of including appropriate controls to verify silencing specificity and the requirement to check for an interferon response when conducting RNA interference experiments. However, the potential benefits that RNA interference and viral vectors offer to gene-based therapies to CNS injuries cannot be overlooked and demand further investigation. PMID:22499506

  2. Täna algavad Eesti Muusika Päevad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Muusika Päevade raames toimunud üritustest 21. aprillini: ERSO sümfooniakontserdist Estonia kontserdisaalis, Jüri Reinvere radiofoonilise ooperi "Vastaskallas" esiettekandest Tallinna Linnateatri Hobuveski saalis, kontserdist Kunstihoone Vabaduse väljakul (esitusel Urmas Sisaski uus "Tähistaeva tsükkel" - "Eesti rahvataevas"), lastekontserdist "Kodumaine viis" Estonia kontserdisaalis

  3. Type I Interferon response in olfactory bulb, the site of tick-borne flavivirus accumulation, is primarily regulated by IPS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhade, Chaitanya; Zegenhagen, Loreen; Weber, Elvira; Nair, Sharmila; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Spanier, Julia; Gekara, Nelson O; Kröger, Andrea; Överby, Anna K

    2016-01-27

    Although type I interferons (IFNs)-key effectors of antiviral innate immunity are known to be induced via different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), the cellular source and the relative contribution of different PRRs in host protection against viral infection is often unclear. IPS-1 is a downstream adaptor for retinoid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor signaling. In this study, we investigate the relative contribution of IPS-1 in the innate immune response in the different brain regions during infection with tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a flavivirus that causes a variety of severe symptoms like hemorrhagic fevers, encephalitis, and meningitis in the human host. IPS-1 knockout mice were infected with TBEV/Langat virus (LGTV), and viral burden in the peripheral and the central nervous systems, type I IFN induction, brain infiltrating cells, and inflammatory response was analyzed. We show that IPS-1 is indispensable for controlling TBEV and LGTV infections in the peripheral and central nervous system. Our data indicate that IPS-1 regulates neuropathogenicity in mice. IFN response is differentially regulated in distinct regions of the central nervous system (CNS) influencing viral tropism, as LGTV replication was mainly restricted to olfactory bulb in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast to the other brain regions, IFN upregulation in the olfactory bulb was dependent on IPS-1 signaling. IPS-1 regulates basal levels of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) like viperin and IRF-1 which contributes to the establishment of early viral replication which inhibits STAT1 activation. This diminishes the antiviral response even in the presence of high IFN-β levels. Consequently, the absence of IPS-1 causes uncontrolled virus replication, in turn resulting in apoptosis, activation of microglia and astrocytes, elevated proinflammatory response, and recruitment of inflammatory cells into the CNS. We show that LGTV replication is restricted to the olfactory

  4. Interferon Gamma in Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kima, Peter E.; Soong, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that is caused by parasites of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania are further classified into several complexes, each of which can engage in distinct interactions with mammalian hosts resulting in differing disease presentations. It is therefore not unexpected that host immune responses to Leishmania are variable. The induction of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and response to it in these infections has received considerable attention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of some of the host responses during Leishmania infections that are regulated by IFN-γ. In addition, studies that explore the nature of parasite-derived molecular mediators that might affect the host response to IFN-γ are also discussed. PMID:23801993

  5. Impact of IL28B and OAS gene family polymorphisms on interferon treatment response in Caucasian children chronically infected with hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Zaleśna, Agnieszka; Pilarczyk, Małgorzata; Rajewski, Paweł; Halota, Waldemar; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2016-11-07

    To investigate the impact of IL28B and OAS gene polymorphisms on interferon treatment responses in children with chronic hepatitis B. We enrolled 52 children (between the ages of 4 and 18) with hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB), who were treated with pegylated interferon alfa for 48 wk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the OAS1 (rs1131476), OAS2 (rs1293747), OAS3 (rs2072136), OASL (rs10849829) and IL28B (rs12979860, rs12980275 and rs8099917) genes were studied to examine their associations with responses to IFN treatment in paediatric patients. We adopted two criteria for the therapeutic response, achieving an hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level < 2000 IU/mL and normalization of ALT activity (< 40 IU/L). To perform the analyses, we compared the patients in terms of achieving a partial response (PR) and a complete response (CR) upon measurement at the 24-wk post-treatment follow-up. The PR and CR rates were 80.8% and 42.3%, respectively. Factors such as age, gender and liver histology had no impact on the type of response (partial or complete). A statistically significant relationship between higher baseline HBV DNA and ALT activity levels and lower rates of PR and CR was shown (P < 0.05). The allele association analysis revealed that only the IL-28B rs12979860 (C vs T) and IL28B rs12980275 (A vs G) markers significantly affected the achievement of PR (P = 0.021, OR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.2-9.2 and P = 0.014, OR = 3.7, 95%CI: 1.3-10.1, respectively). However, in the genotype analysis, only IL-28B rs12980275 was significantly associated with PR (AA vs AG-GG, P = 0.014, OR = 10.9, 95%CI: 1.3-93.9). The association analysis for CR showed that the TT genotype of IL28B rs12979860 was present only in the no-CR group (P = 0.033) and the AA genotype of OASL rs10849829 was significantly more frequent in the no-CR group (P = 0.044, OR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.07-0.88). The haplotype analysis revealed significant associations between PR and CR and OAS haplotype (P = 0

  6. Association of TRIM22 with the type 1 interferon response and viral control during primary HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Ravesh; Gaiha Gaurav; Werner Lise; McKim Kevin; Mlisana Koleka; Luban Jeremy; Walker Bruce D; Karim Salim S Abdool; Brass Abraham L; Ndung'u Thumbi; CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection Study Team

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of the tripartite interaction motif (TRIM) family of E3 ligases but the contribution of these antiviral factors to HIV pathogenesis is not completely understood. We hypothesized that the increased expression of select type 1 IFN and TRIM isoforms is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of HIV 1 acquisition and viral control during primary HIV 1 infection. We measured IFN a IFN ß myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) human TRIM5a (huTR...

  7. Association of TRIM22 with the Type 1 Interferon Response and Viral Control during Primary HIV-1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ravesh; Gaiha, Gaurav; Werner, Lise; McKim, Kevin; Mlisana, Koleka; Luban, Jeremy; Bruce D. Walker; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Brass, Abraham L; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of the tripartite interaction motif (TRIM) family of E3 ligases, but the contribution of these antiviral factors to HIV pathogenesis is not completely understood. We hypothesized that the increased expression of select type 1 IFN and TRIM isoforms is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of HIV-1 acquisition and viral control during primary HIV-1 infection. We measured IFN-α, IFN-β, myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA), human TRIM5α (...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus evades CD4+ T cell responses in lytic cycle through BZLF1-mediated downregulation of CD74 and the cooperation of vBcl-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Zuo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Evasion of immune T cell responses is crucial for viruses to establish persistence in the infected host. Immune evasion mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in the context of MHC-I antigen presentation have been well studied. In contrast, viral interference with MHC-II antigen presentation is less well understood, not only for EBV but also for other persistent viruses. Here we show that the EBV encoded BZLF1 can interfere with recognition by immune CD4+ effector T cells. This impaired T cell recognition occurred in the absence of a reduction in the expression of surface MHC-II, but correlated with a marked downregulation of surface CD74 on the target cells. Furthermore, impaired CD4+ T cell recognition was also observed with target cells where CD74 expression was downregulated by shRNA-mediated inhibition. BZLF1 downregulated surface CD74 via a post-transcriptional mechanism distinct from its previously reported effect on the CIITA promoter. In addition to being a chaperone for MHC-II αβ dimers, CD74 also functions as a surface receptor for macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and enhances cell survival through transcriptional upregulation of Bcl-2 family members. The immune-evasion function of BZLF1 therefore comes at a cost of induced toxicity. However, during EBV lytic cycle induced by BZLF1 expression, this toxicity can be overcome by expression of the vBcl-2, BHRF1, at an early stage of lytic infection. We conclude that by inhibiting apoptosis, the vBcl-2 not only maintains cell viability to allow sufficient time for synthesis and accumulation of infectious virus progeny, but also enables BZLF1 to effect its immune evasion function.

  9. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoo, T.L.; Joshua, D.; Gibson, J.

    2011-01-01

    in myeloma. Its role as maintenance therapy in the plateau phase of myeloma also remains uncertain. More recently, the use of interferon must now compete with the "new drugs" - thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib in myeloma treatment. Will there be a future role of interferon in the treatment......Interferons are soluble proteins produced naturally by cells in response to viruses. It has both anti-proliferative and immunomodulating properties and is one of the first examples of a biological response modifier use to treat the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma. Interferon has been used...... of multiple myeloma or will interferon be resigned to the history books remains to be seen....

  10. Impaired Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)–Specific InterferonResponses in Individuals With HIV Who Acquire HCV Infection: Correlation With CD4+ T-Cell Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Dore, Gregory J.; Matthews, Gail; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D.; White, Peter A.; Kaldor, John M.; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Ffrench, Rosemary A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies examining the effect of coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the HCV-specific immune response in acute HCV infection are limited. This study directly compared acute HCV-specific T-cell responses and cytokine profiles between 20 HIV/HCV-coinfected and 20 HCV-monoinfected subjects, enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC), using HCV peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and multiplex in vitro cytokine production assays. HIV/HCV coinfection had a detrimental effect on the HCV-specific cytokine production in acute HCV infection, particularly on HCV-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ) production (magnitude P = .004; breadth P = .046), which correlated with peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts (ρ = 0.605; P = .005) but not with detectable HIV viremia (ρ = 0.152; P = .534). PMID:22949308

  11. Impaired hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific interferonresponses in individuals with HIV who acquire HCV infection: correlation with CD4(+) T-cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D; White, Peter A; Kaldor, John M; Lloyd, Andrew R; Ffrench, Rosemary A

    2012-11-15

    Studies examining the effect of coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the HCV-specific immune response in acute HCV infection are limited. This study directly compared acute HCV-specific T-cell responses and cytokine profiles between 20 HIV/HCV-coinfected and 20 HCV-monoinfected subjects, enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC), using HCV peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and multiplex in vitro cytokine production assays. HIV/HCV coinfection had a detrimental effect on the HCV-specific cytokine production in acute HCV infection, particularly on HCV-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ) production (magnitude P = .004; breadth P = .046), which correlated with peripheral CD4(+) T-cell counts (ρ = 0.605; P = .005) but not with detectable HIV viremia (ρ = 0.152; P = .534).

  12. Interferon-alpha receptor 1 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with response to interferon-alpha therapy of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.B. Massirer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN-alpha receptor mRNA expression in liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C has been shown to be a response to IFN-alpha therapy. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the expression of mRNA for subunit 1 of the IFN-alpha receptor (IFNAR1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC is associated with the response to IFN-alpha in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Thirty patients with positive anti-HCV and HCV-RNA, and abnormal levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum were selected and treated with IFN-alpha2b for one year. Those with HBV or HIV infection, or using alcohol were not included. Thirteen discontinued the treatment and were not evaluated. The IFN-alpha response was monitored on the basis of alanine aminotransferase level and positivity for HCV-RNA in serum. IFNAR1-mRNA expression in PBMC was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction before and during the first three months of therapy. The results are reported as IFNAR1-mRNA/ß-actin-mRNA ratio (mean ± SD. Before treatment, responder patients had significantly higher IFNAR1-mRNA expression in PBMC (0.67 ± 0.15; N = 5; P < 0.05 compared to non-responders (0.35 ± 0.17; N = 12 and controls (0.30 ± 0.16; N = 9. Moreover, IFNAR1-mRNA levels were significantly reduced after 3 months of treatment in responders, whereas there were no differences in IFNAR1 expression in non-responders during IFN-alpha therapy. Basal IFNAR1-mRNA expression was not correlated with the serum level of alanine and aspartate aminotransferases or the presence of cirrhosis. The present results suggest that IFNAR1-mRNA expression in PBMC is associated with IFN-alpha response to hepatitis C and may be useful for monitoring therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  13. Autophagy, TGF-β, and SMAD-2/3 Signaling Regulates InterferonResponse in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infected Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Swechha M; Shil, Niraj K; Bose, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a lung tropic virus causing severe airway diseases including bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants, children, and immuno-compromised individuals. RSV triggers transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production from lung epithelial cells and TGF-β facilitates RSV infection of these cells. However, it is still unknown whether RSV infected myeloid cells like macrophages produce TGF-β and the role of TGF-β if any during RSV infection of these cells. Our study revealed that RSV infected macrophages produce TGF-β and as a consequence these cells activate TGF-β dependent SMAD-2/3 signaling pathway. Further mechanistic studies illustrated a role of autophagy in triggering TGF-β production from RSV infected macrophages. In an effort to elucidate the role of TGF-β and SMAD-2/3 signaling during RSV infection, we surprisingly unfolded the requirement of TGF-β-SMAD2/3 signaling in conferring optimal innate immune antiviral response during RSV infection of macrophages. Type-I interferon (e.g., interferon-β or IFN-β) is a critical host factor regulating innate immune antiviral response during RSV infection. Our study revealed that loss of TGF-β-SMAD2/3 signaling pathway in RSV infected macrophages led to diminished expression and production of IFN-β. Inhibiting autophagy in RSV infected macrophages also resulted in reduced production of IFN-β. Thus, our studies have unfolded the requirement of autophagy-TGF-β-SMAD2/3 signaling network for optimal innate immune antiviral response during RSV infection of macrophages.

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals a major impact of JAK protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2 on the expression of interferon-responsive and metabolic genes

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    Kovarik Pavel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2, a central component of Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signaling, has major effects on innate immunity and inflammation. Mice lacking Tyk2 are resistant to endotoxin shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and Tyk2 deficient macrophages fail to efficiently induce interferon α/β after LPS treatment. However, how Tyk2 globally regulates transcription of downstream target genes remains unknown. Here we examine the regulatory role of Tyk2 in basal and inflammatory transcription by comparing gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from Tyk2 mutant and wildtype control mice that were either kept untreated or exposed to LPS for six hours. Results Untreated Tyk2-deficient macrophages exhibited reduced expression of immune response genes relative to wildtype, in particular those that contain interferon response elements (IRF/ISRE, whereas metabolic genes showed higher expression. Upon LPS challenge, IFN-inducible genes (including those with an IRF/ISRE transcription factor binding-site were strongly upregulated in both Tyk2 mutant and wildtype cells and reached similar expression levels. In contrast, metabolic gene expression was strongly decreased in wildtype cells upon LPS treatment, while in Tyk2 mutant cells the expression of these genes remained relatively unchanged, which exaggerated differences already present at the basal level. We also identified several 5'UR transcription factor binding-sites and 3'UTR regulatory elements that were differentially induced between Tyk2 deficient and wildtype macrophages and that have not previously been implicated in immunity. Conclusions Although Tyk2 is essential for the full LPS response, its function is mainly required for baseline expression but not LPS-induced upregulation of IFN-inducible genes. Moreover, Tyk2 function is critical for the downregulation of metabolic genes upon immune challenge, in particular

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals a major impact of JAK protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) on the expression of interferon-responsive and metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Flatt, Thomas; Fuhrmann, Bernd; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Wallner, Barbara; Stiefvater, Rita; Kovarik, Pavel; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias

    2010-03-25

    Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), a central component of Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling, has major effects on innate immunity and inflammation. Mice lacking Tyk2 are resistant to endotoxin shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Tyk2 deficient macrophages fail to efficiently induce interferon alpha/beta after LPS treatment. However, how Tyk2 globally regulates transcription of downstream target genes remains unknown. Here we examine the regulatory role of Tyk2 in basal and inflammatory transcription by comparing gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from Tyk2 mutant and wildtype control mice that were either kept untreated or exposed to LPS for six hours. Untreated Tyk2-deficient macrophages exhibited reduced expression of immune response genes relative to wildtype, in particular those that contain interferon response elements (IRF/ISRE), whereas metabolic genes showed higher expression. Upon LPS challenge, IFN-inducible genes (including those with an IRF/ISRE transcription factor binding-site) were strongly upregulated in both Tyk2 mutant and wildtype cells and reached similar expression levels. In contrast, metabolic gene expression was strongly decreased in wildtype cells upon LPS treatment, while in Tyk2 mutant cells the expression of these genes remained relatively unchanged, which exaggerated differences already present at the basal level. We also identified several 5'UR transcription factor binding-sites and 3'UTR regulatory elements that were differentially induced between Tyk2 deficient and wildtype macrophages and that have not previously been implicated in immunity. Although Tyk2 is essential for the full LPS response, its function is mainly required for baseline expression but not LPS-induced upregulation of IFN-inducible genes. Moreover, Tyk2 function is critical for the downregulation of metabolic genes upon immune challenge, in particular genes involved in lipid metabolism. Together, our

  16. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2013-01-01

    cell extracts with an artificial “GAS”-DNA element resulted in an enrichment of the GAS containing DNA-sequence, providing evidence for a potential interaction of TOX3 with the GAS-sequence of STAT1. Conclusions These results provide evidence for an alternative activation of the downstream interferon...... and pathways altered upon TOX3 dysregulation using a cell line model. Methods We performed microarray transcript profiling of biopsies and validated the data with RTqPCR. We used cell line models for overexpression and siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3. Pathway analysis was applied for target gene...... identification and immunoprecipitation studies were used for DNA binding studies. Results Microarray transcript profiling of 89 bladder biopsies showed a significant upregulation of TOX3 (p

  17. Change in the responsiveness of interferon-stimulated genes during early pregnancy in cows with Borna virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Tadashi; Okamura, Taku; Ando, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Katsuro

    2016-11-14

    Borna disease virus is a neurotropic pathogen and infects the central nervous system. This virus infected a variety of animal species including cows. The most of cows infected with Borna disease virus 1 (BoDV-1) exhibit subclinical infection without any neurological symptoms throughout their lifetime. We previously reported on the low conception rates in-seropositive cows. Interferon-τ (IFN-τ) plays an important role in stable fertilization, and is produced from the fetal side following embryo growth at 15-40 days of pregnancy. IFN-τ induces the expression of interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) 15 and Mx2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To understand the embryo growth and maternal reaction during early pregnancy in cows with BoDV-1 infection, we aimed to assess the gene expression of ISG15 and Mx2 from PBMCs in BoDV-1-seropositive cows. None of the cows showed any clinical and neurological symptoms. Among the cows that conceived, the expressions of the ISG15 and Mx2 genes were greater in the BoDV-1-seropositive cows than in the BoDV-1-seronegative cows; the difference was significant between the cows that conceived and those that did not (P < 0.05). The expression of ISG15 and Mx2 genes during early pregnancy significantly increased in the BoDV-1-seropositive cows and may be important for the maintenance of stable pregnancy in BoDV-1-infected cows. In contrast, the gene expression levels of ISG15 and Mx2 did not significantly increase during early pregnancy in BoDV-1-seronegative cows. Thus, BoDV-1 infection may lead to instability in the maintenance of early pregnancy by interfering with INF-τ production.

  18. Neutralizing antibodies explain the poor clinical response to Interferon beta in a small proportion of patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cefaro Luca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Interferon beta (IFNβ are reported to be associated with poor clinical response to therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. We aimed to quantify the contribution of NAbs to the sub-optimal response of IFNβ treatment. Methods We studied the prevalence of NAbs in MS patients grouped according to their clinical response to IFNβ during the treatment period. Patients were classified as: group A, developing ≥ 1 relapse after the first 6 months of therapy; group B, exhibiting confirmed disability progression after the first 6 months of therapy, with or without superimposed relapses; group C, presenting a stable disease course during therapy. A cytopathic effect assay tested the presence of NAbs in a cohort of ambulatory MS patients treated with one of the available IFNβ formulations for at least one year. NAbs positivity was defined as NAbs titre ≥ 20 TRU. Results Seventeen patients (12.1% were NAbs positive. NAbs positivity correlated with poorer clinical response (p Conclusion The majority of patients with poor clinical response are NAbs negative suggesting that NAbs explains only partially the sub-optimal response to IFNβ.

  19. Variants of genes implicated in type 1 interferon pathway and B-cell activation modulate the EULAR response to rituximab at 24 weeks in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge, Pierre-Antoine; Gazal, Steven; Constantin, Arnaud; Mariette, Xavier; Combe, Bernard; Tebib, Jacques; Dougados, Maxime; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loet, Xavier; Dieudé, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The type 1 interferon (IFN) pathway has been identified to potentially affect the response to rituximab (RTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which suggests the contribution of type 1 IFN pathway genes such as IFN regulatory factor 5 and 7 (IRF5 and IRF7), tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and osteopontin (SPP1). Our objective was to study functional variants of these IFN pathway genes as predictors of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response to RTX for RA at week 24 (W24). Logistic regression analysis with a stepwise multivariate model adjusted for sex, age and DAS28-CRP (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with C reactive protein) in 115 patients from the SMART randomised studywas used to analyse the association between the candidate variants and W24 EULAR response. Because the variant TNFSF13B rs9514828 was previously found associated with RTX response in the same population, it was included in the analysis. The combination of IRF5 rs2004640, SPP1 rs9138 and TNFSF13B rs9514828 was strongly associated with good/moderate EULAR response to RTX at W24: p=9.34×10(-6), OR 11.37 (95% CI 4.03 to 35.28), positive predictive value 91% and negative predictive value 54%. Our results support the contribution of the IRF5, SPP1 and TNFSF13B genotypic combination in the response to RTX for RA at W24.

  20. Interferon-¿ production by human T cells and natural killer cells in vitro in response to antigens from the two intracellular pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K; Hviid, L; Kharazmi, A

    1997-01-01

    Acquired resistance to both mycobacteria and Leishmania is primarily mediated by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), which triggers mechanisms leading to the death of the microorganism in macrophages. In this study, cell activation and IFN-gamma production was investigated in human peripheral blood...... mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals previously sensitized to tuberculin and without known exposure to Leishmania parasites. Immune staining for intracellular IFN-gamma and surface markers allowed flow cytometric identification of the cellular sources of IFN-gamma in cell cultures incubated with purified...... protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and Leishmania antigens. It was found that IFN-gamma was produced in response to both PPD and Leishmania stimulant by T cells in the cultures. Activation of IFN-gamma producing natural killer (NK) cells was demonstrated only in some cultures, and only...

  1. A study of best positive predictors for sustained virologic response to interferon alpha plus ribavirin therapy in naive chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazuddin Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the rate of sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with interferon alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. Methods A retrospective review of patients data collected at this Centre from 2001 to 2007 was performed. Out of 731 consecutive patients 400 patients that fulfilled the study criteria were evaluated and subsequently treated with a combination of interferon alpha 2b (3 MU subcutaneously three injections weekly and ribavirin (800–1200 mg orally daily. Treatment were administered for either 24 weeks or 48 weeks and patients were followed for an additional 6 months thereafter. End of the treatment response (ETR, SVR and side effects were recorded. Results Out of 400 patients, 394 completed the entire treatment course and six patients discontinued treatment at month 2. Over 67% responded at the end of treatment and 16% suffered relapse. Among all treated patients, 47.6% males and 56.7% females had sustained viral response with a total combined sustained viral response rate of 50.5%. Rapid response was seen in 46.5% patients. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, slow virological responders (adjusted OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.9–3.7], HCV genotype 1&4 (adjusted OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.7–3.5], pre-treatment viral load > 0.2 MIU/mL (adjusted OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.8–4.2], Panjabi ethnic group (adjusted OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0–3.2] and Age > 40 years (adjusted OR 1.5 [95% CI 0.9–2.4] were independent risk factors for non response. Side effects were usual and tolerable and only 1.5% discontinued the treatment. Conclusion The best positive predictor for SVR in this country are: rapid virologic response, HCV genotype 2 & 3, age

  2. Modulation of antiviral immune responses by exogenous cytokines: effects of tumour necrosis factor-α interleukin-1 α, interleukin-2 and interferon-γ on the immunogenicity of an inactivated rabies vaccine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.E.C.J. Schijns; I.J.Th.M. Claassen (Ivo); A.A. Vermeulen; M.C. Horzinek; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn vivo administration of exogenous cytokines may influence elicited immune responses, and hence may change the efficacy of a vaccine. We investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma

  3. Analysis of the PKR-eIF2alpha phosphorylation homology domain (PePHD) of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 in HIV-coinfected patients by ultra-deep pyrosequencing and its relationship to responses to pegylated interferon-ribavirin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcic, F; Sede, M; Moretti, F; Westergaard, G; Vazquez, M; Laufer, N; Quarleri, J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is among the greatest challenges facing public health worldwide. In this population, the response to hepatitis C therapy by treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PEG-IFN+RBV) is lower than in HCV-monoinfected patients, particularly in those infected by HCV genotype 1. A PKR/eIF-2α phosphorylation homology domain (PePHD) within the E2 protein has been found to interact with PKR and inhibit PKR in vitro, suggesting a possible mechanism for HCV to evade the antiviral effects of IFN. The aim of this work was to analyze the amino acid conservation in the HCV-E2-PePHD and quasispecies diversity among HCV-HIV-coinfected patients exhibiting sustained virological response, non-response, or partial response with viral relapse to PEG-IFN+RBV by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. For this purpose, HCV-E2-PePHD PCR products were generated and sequenced directly for four patients with a sustained response, seven patients with no virological response, and four patients with viral relapse before and after treatment with PEG-IFN+RBV. HCV-E2-PePHD amino acid sequences were obtained for isolates from serum collected before and during treatment (24 h, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks). Quasispecies analysis of the HCV-E2-PePHD and flanking genomic regions was performed using 454/Roche pyrosequencing, analyzing 39,364 sequence reads in total. The HCV-E2-PePHD sequence at the amino acid and nucleotide level was highly conserved among HCV genotype 1 strains, irrespective of the PEG-IFN+RBV response. This high degree of amino acid conservation and sporadic mutations in the HCV-E2-PePHD domain do not appear to be associated with treatment outcome. The HCV-E2-PePHD sequence before or during treatment cannot be used to predict reliably the outcome of treatment in patients coinfected with HCV genotype 1 and HIV.

  4. ITPA Genotypes Predict Anemia but Do Not Affect Virological Response with Interferon-Free Faldaprevir, Deleobuvir, and Ribavirin for HCV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Asselah

    Full Text Available Whether inosine triphosphatase (ITPA gene polymorphisms predict anemia during interferon-free therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected patients is unknown. We examined the relationship between two ITPA polymorphisms, anemia, and sustained virological response 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12 in patients receiving the NS3/4A protease inhibitor faldaprevir, the non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor deleobuvir, and ribavirin.HCV genotype 1-infected, treatment-naïve patients (N = 362 were randomized and treated in one of five treatment arms with faldaprevir and deleobuvir with or without ribavirin. Two ITPA polymorphisms (rs1127354 and rs6051702 were genotyped and defined as ITPA-deficient (rs1127354 AA or AC; rs6051702 CC or CA or ITPA-non-deficient (rs1127354 CC; rs6051702 AA according to their association with ITPA deficiency. Baseline and on-treatment variables associated with anemia and SVR12 were identified using logistic regression.In the pooled ribavirin-containing arms, 10.1% (32/316 of patients experienced on-treatment hemoglobin <10 g/dL, and 32.6% (103/316 experienced on-treatment hemoglobin <10 g/dL or a change from baseline ≥3.5 g/dL. Of the latter group, 99% (102/103 had the ITPA-non-deficient rs1127354 genotype. Other variables associated with on-treatment hemoglobin <10 g/dL or a decrease ≥3.5 g/dL were age, baseline hemoglobin, rs6051702 genotype, and plasma ribavirin concentration. In a multivariate analysis, high plasma ribavirin concentration, low baseline hemoglobin, HCV genotype 1b, and IL28B genotype CC were associated with higher SVR12.The ITPA rs1127354 CC and rs6051702 AA genotypes may predict ribavirin-induced anemia during treatment with interferon-free, ribavirin-containing regimens. With this interferon-free regimen, SVR was associated with ribavirin levels, but not with anemia or ITPA genotypes.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01132313.

  5. Associations between responses to interferon therapy and genetic variation in interleukin-28B and the core region of hepatitis C virus genotype 3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keiichi; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-08-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of interleukin-28B (IL-28B) and mutations in the core region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b have been associated with response to interferon (IFN) therapy. However, whether this IL-28B SNP affects responses to INF therapy for HCV genotype 3a is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate whether this IL-28B SNP (rs8099917) and specific missense mutations in the HCV core region affect the response to IFN therapy for HCV genotype 3a. Patients (n = 19; median age 44.5) infected with HCV genotype 3a who received IFN therapy were studied. Of the 19 patients, 12 (63.1%) achieved sustained virological response. Of those 12 patients, 11 had the TT genotype (11/16; 68.7%), and one had the TG genotype (1/3; 33.3%). The difference in the sustained virological response rate between IL-28B genotype groups was not significant (P = 0.5232). HCV core region was well conserved; however, polymorphisms at position 72 were identified. Of the 19 HCV samples; 15 carried a glutamic acid at position 72, and these were defined as E type; the others (4/19) were defined as non-E type. Notably, there was a significant difference in the sustained virological response rate between E type and non-E-type; 12 of the 15 patients with E-type achieved sustained virological response, but none of the four patients with non-E-type achieved sustained virological response (P = 0.009). A glutamic acid at position 72 in the core region of HCV genotype 3a was associated with a good response to IFN therapy. J. Med. Virol. 87:1361-1367, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Involvement of MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p in poor virologic response to interferon-based combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Tsubota

    Full Text Available Despite advances in chronic hepatitis C treatment, a proportion of patients respond poorly to treatment. This study aimed to explore hepatic mRNA and microRNA signatures involved in hepatitis C treatment resistance. Global hepatic mRNA and microRNA expression profiles were compared using microarray data between treatment responses. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated the gene signatures from 130 patients who were infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and treated with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. The correlation between mRNA and microRNA was evaluated using in silico analysis and in vitro siRNA and microRNA inhibition/overexpression experiments. Multivariate regression analysis identified that the independent variables IL28B SNP rs8099917, hsa-miR-122-5p, hsa-miR-17-5p, and MAP3K8 were significantly associated with a poor virologic response. MAP3K8 and miR-17-5p expression were inversely correlated with treatment response. Furthermore, miR-17-5p repressed HCV production by targeting MAP3K8. Collectively, the data suggest that several molecules and the inverse correlation between mRNA and microRNA contributed to a host genetic refractory hepatitis C treatment response.

  7. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  8. Type I interferon reaction to viral infection in interferon-competent, immortalized cell lines from the African fruit bat Eidolon helvum.

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    Susanne E Biesold

    Full Text Available Bats harbor several highly pathogenic zoonotic viruses including Rabies, Marburg, and henipaviruses, without overt clinical symptoms in the animals. It has been suspected that bats might have evolved particularly effective mechanisms to suppress viral replication. Here, we investigated interferon (IFN response, -induction, -secretion and -signaling in epithelial-like cells of the relevant and abundant African fruit bat species, Eidolon helvum (E. helvum. Immortalized cell lines were generated; their potential to induce and react on IFN was confirmed, and biological assays were adapted to application in bat cell cultures, enabling comparison of landmark IFN properties with that of common mammalian cell lines. E. helvum cells were fully capable of reacting to viral and artificial IFN stimuli. E. helvum cells showed highest IFN mRNA induction, highly productive IFN protein secretion, and evidence of efficient IFN stimulated gene induction. In an Alphavirus infection model, O'nyong-nyong virus exhibited strong IFN induction but evaded the IFN response by translational rather than transcriptional shutoff, similar to other Alphavirus infections. These novel IFN-competent cell lines will allow comparative research on zoonotic, bat-borne viruses in order to model mechanisms of viral maintenance and emergence in bat reservoirs.

  9. The differential interferon responses of two strains of Stat1-deficient mice do not alter susceptibility to HSV-1 and VSV in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenell, Sarah; Chen, Yufei; Parker, Zachary M; Leib, David A

    2014-02-01

    Stat1 is a pivotal transcription factor for generation of the interferon (IFN)-dependent antiviral response. Two Stat1 knockout mouse lines have been previously generated, one deleted the N-terminal domain (ΔNTD) and one in the DNA-binding domain (ΔDBD). These widely-used strains are assumed interchangeable, and both are highly susceptible to various pathogens. In this study, primary cells derived from ΔNTD mice were shown to be significantly more responsive to IFN, and established an antiviral state with greater efficiency than cells derived from ΔDBD mice, following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus and herpes simplex virus type-1. Also, while mice from both strains succumbed rapidly and equally to virus infection, ΔDBD mice supported significantly higher replication in brains and livers than ΔNTD mice. Endpoint-type experimental comparisons of these mouse strains are therefore misleading in failing to indicate important differences in virus replication and innate response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunosenescent CD57+CD4+ T-cells Accumulate and Contribute to InterferonResponses in HIV Patients Responding Stably to ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals responding to antiretroviral therapy (ART after severe CD4+ T-cell depletion may retain low responses to recall antigens [eg: cytomegalovirus (CMV] and altered expression of T-cell co-stimulatory molecules consistent with immunosenescence. We investigated the capacity of phenotypically senescent cells to generate cytokines in HIV patients receiving long-term ART (n = 18 and in healthy controls (n = 10. Memory T-cells were assessed by interferon (IFN-γ ELISpot assay and flow cytometrically via IFN-γ or IL-2. Proportions of CD57brightCD28null CD4+ T-cells correlated with IFN-γ responses to CMV (p = 0.009 and anti-CD3 (p = 0.002 in HIV patients only. Proportions of CD57brightCD28null CD8+ T-cells and CD8+ T-cell IFN-γ responses to CMV peptides correlated in controls but not HIV patients. IL-2 was predominantly produced by CD28+T-cells from all donors, whereas IFN-γ was mostly produced by CD57+ T-cells. The findings provide evidence of an accumulation of immunosenescent T-cells able to make IFN-γ. This may influence the pathogenesis of secondary viral infections in HIV patients receiving ART.

  11. Plasma interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 levels are associated with early, but not sustained virological response during treatment of acute or early chronic HCV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan J Feld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High plasma levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10 have been shown to be associated with impaired treatment response in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Whether IP-10 levels predict treatment in acute HCV infection is unknown. METHODS: Patients with acute or early chronic HCV infection from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC cohort were evaluated. Baseline and on-treatment plasma IP-10 levels were measured by ELISA. IL28B genotype was determined by sequencing. RESULTS: Overall, 74 HCV mono-infected and 35 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were treated in ATAHC, of whom 89 were adherent to therapy and were included for analysis. IP-10 levels correlated with HCV RNA levels at baseline (r = 0.48, P600 pg/mL achieved RVR. There was no association with IP-10 levels and early virological response (EVR or sustained virological response (SVR. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline IP-10 levels are associated with early viral kinetics but not ultimate treatment outcome in acute HCV infection. Given previous data showing that patients with high baseline IP-10 are unlikely to spontaneously clear acute HCV infection, they should be prioritized for early antiviral therapy.

  12. Lethal monkeypox virus infection of CAST/EiJ mice is associated with a deficient gamma interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Patricia L; Americo, Jeffrey L; Moss, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is endemic in Africa, where it causes disease in humans resembling smallpox. A recent importation of MPXV-infected animals into the United States raises the possibility of global spread. Rodents comprise the major reservoir of MPXV, and a variety of such animals, even those native to North America, are susceptible. In contrast, common inbred strains of mice, including BALB/c and C57BL/6, are greatly resistant to MPXV. However, several inbred strains of mice derived from wild mice, including CAST/EiJ, exhibit morbidity and mortality at relatively low inoculums of MPXV. Elucidating the basis for the susceptibility of CAST/EiJ mice could contribute to an understanding of MPXV pathogenicity and host defense mechanisms and enhance the value of this mouse strain as a model system for evaluation of therapeutics and vaccines. Here we compared virus dissemination and induced cytokine production in CAST/EiJ mice to those in the resistant BALB/c strain. Following intranasal infection, robust virus replication occurred in the lungs of both strains, although a relatively higher inoculum was required for BALB/c. However, while spread to other internal organs was rapid and efficient in CAST/EiJ mice, the virus was largely restricted to the lungs in BALB/c mice. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and CCL5 were induced in lungs of BALB/c mice concomitant with virus replication but not in CAST/EiJ mice. The importance of IFN-γ in protection against MPXV disease was demonstrated by the intranasal administration of the mouse cytokine to CAST/EiJ mice and the resulting protection against MPXV. Furthermore, C57BL/6 mice with inactivation of the IFN-γ gene or the IFN-γ receptor gene exhibited enhanced sensitivity to MPXV.

  13. FOSL1 Inhibits Type I Interferon Responses to Malaria and Viral Infections by Blocking TBK1 and TRAF3/TRIF Interactions

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    Baowei Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune response plays a critical role in controlling invading pathogens, but such an immune response must be tightly regulated. Insufficient or overactivated immune responses may lead to harmful or even fatal consequences. To dissect the complex host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying innate immune responses to infections, here we investigate the role of FOS-like antigen 1 (FOSL1 in regulating the host type I interferon (IFN-I response to malaria parasite and viral infections. FOSL1 is known as a component of a transcription factor but was recently implicated in regulating the IFN-I response to malaria parasite infection. Here we show that FOSL1 can act as a negative regulator of IFN-I signaling. Upon stimulation with poly(I:C, malaria parasite-infected red blood cells (iRBCs, or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, FOSL1 “translocated” from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it inhibited the interactions between TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3, TIR domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β (TRIF, and Tank-binding kinase 1 (TBK1 via impairing K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF3 and TRIF. Importantly, FOSL1 knockout chimeric mice had lower levels of malaria parasitemia or VSV titers in peripheral blood and decreased mortality compared with wild-type (WT mice. Thus, our findings have identified a new role for FOSL1 in negatively regulating the host IFN-I response to malaria and viral infections and have identified a potential drug target for controlling malaria and other diseases.

  14. Monokine induced by interferon gamma and IFN-gamma response to a fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 and CFP-10 in Brazilian tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Clarice; Meijgaarden, Krista E; Garcia, Daniely; Franken, Kees L M C; Klein, Michèl R; Kolk, Arend J; Oliveira, Sérgio C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2006-01-01

    IFN-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 have been proposed as specific markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG/CXCL9) has been shown to be expressed by IFN-gamma stimulated mononuclear cells and to attract activated T-cells through the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Since MIG is induced early in the response to IFN-gamma, measuring MIG may provide an interesting marker to assess downstream IFN-gamma induced responses, in contrast to assays that mainly focus on quantifying production of IFN-gamma per se. We, therefore, investigated MIG and IFN-gamma responses to a fusion protein of ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and compared responses to the conserved mycobacterial antigen 85B (Ag85B) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of M. tuberculosis, in 29 BCG vaccine controls and 24 TB patients. IFN-gamma secreting cells were determined by ELISPOT, and MIG production was measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. Production of MIG in response to ESAT-6/CFP-10, Ag85B and PPD correlated overall with increased numbers of IFN-gamma secreting cells (r=0.55, PCFP-10 or PPD (PCFP-10 or PPD. We conclude that MIG production correlates significantly with enhanced T-cell IFN-gamma production induced by M. tuberculosis-specific antigens ESAT-6/CFP-10. These results point to MIG as a potential novel biomarker that may be helpful in assessing downstream responses induced by IFN-gamma in TB.

  15. Influence of vitamin D-related gene polymorphisms (CYP27B and VDR on the response to interferon/ribavirin therapy in chronic hepatitis C.

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    Elena García-Martín

    Full Text Available Vitamin D exerts immunomodulatory effects on the host response against infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV. This study was performed to assess the putative influence of polymorphisms in vitamin D-related genes on the response to antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC.Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CYP27B-1260 gene promoter (rs10877012AC and in vitamin D receptor (VDR gene rs2228570TC, rs1544410CT, rs7975232AC and rs731236AT were analyzed in a cohort of 238 Caucasian CHC patients treated with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN plus ribavirin (RBV. Multivariate analyses were performed to exclude confounding effects of well-known baseline predictors of response to therapy (HCV genotype and load, IL28B genotype, age, and GGT and serum cholesterol.Three SNPs at the VDR gene (rs1544410, rs7975232 and rs731236 were in strong linkage disequilibrium, with the CCA haplotype predicting therapeutic failure [Odds ratio 2.743; (95% C.I. 1.313-5.731, p = 0.007]. The carrier state of the VDR rs2228570 T allele was inversely related to the probability of therapeutic failure [Odds ratio 0.438; 95 C.I. (0.204-0.882, p = 0.021]. No relation existed between CYP27B-1260 rs10877012 polymorphism and response to therapy. The area under the operating curve (AUROC based on the model including all variables significantly related to the response to therapy was 0.846 (95% confidence interval = 0.793-0.899.VDR gene polymorphisms are independently related to the response to Peg-IFN+RBV therapy in chronic hepatitis C and could be used as complementary biomarkers of response when included in a prediction algorithm in association with demographic, virologic, biochemical and genetic traits.

  16. Interdependent and independent roles of type I interferons and IL-6 in innate immune, neuroinflammatory and sickness behaviour responses to systemic poly I:C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carol; Griffin, Éadaoin W.; O’Loughlin, Elaine; Lyons, Aoife; Sherwin, Eoin; Ahmed, Suaad; Stevenson, Nigel J; Harkin, Andrew; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) are expressed in the brain during many inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions and have multiple effects on CNS function. IFN-I is readily induced in the brain by systemic administration of the viral mimetic, poly I:C (synthetic double-stranded RNA). We hypothesised that IFN-I contributes to systemically administered poly I:C-induced sickness behaviour, metabolic and neuroinflammatory changes. IFN-I receptor 1 deficient mice (IFNAR1−/−) displayed significantly attenuated poly I:C-induced hypothermia, hypoactivity and weight loss compared to WT C57BL/6 mice. This amelioration of sickness was associated with equivalent IL-1β and TNF-α responses but much reduced IL-6 responses in plasma, hypothalamus and hippocampus of IFNAR1−/− mice. IFN-β injection induced trivial IL-6 production and limited behavioural change and the poly I:C-induced IFN-β response did not preceed, and would not appear to mediate, IL-6 induction. Rather, IFNAR1−/− mice lack basal IFN-I activity, have lower STAT1 levels and show significantly lower levels of several inflammatory transcripts, including stat1. Basal IFN-I activity appears to play a facilitatory role in the full expression of the IL-6 response and activation of the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism pathway. The deficient IL-6 response in IFNAR1−/− mice partially explains the observed incomplete sickness behaviour response. Reconstitution of circulating IL-6 revealed that the role of IFNAR in burrowing activity is mediated via IL-6, while IFN-I and IL-6 have additive effects on hypoactivity, but the role of IFN-I in anorexia is independent of IL-6. Hence, we have demonstrated both interdependent and independent roles for IFN-I and IL-6 in systemic inflammation-induced changes in brain function. PMID:25900439

  17. Interdependent and independent roles of type I interferons and IL-6 in innate immune, neuroinflammatory and sickness behaviour responses to systemic poly I:C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Carol; Griffin, Éadaoin W; O'Loughlin, Elaine; Lyons, Aoife; Sherwin, Eoin; Ahmed, Suaad; Stevenson, Nigel J; Harkin, Andrew; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-08-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) are expressed in the brain during many inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions and have multiple effects on CNS function. IFN-I is readily induced in the brain by systemic administration of the viral mimetic, poly I:C (synthetic double-stranded RNA). We hypothesised that IFN-I contributes to systemically administered poly I:C-induced sickness behaviour, metabolic and neuroinflammatory changes. IFN-I receptor 1 deficient mice (IFNAR1(-/-)) displayed significantly attenuated poly I:C-induced hypothermia, hypoactivity and weight loss compared to WT C57BL/6 mice. This amelioration of sickness was associated with equivalent IL-1β and TNF-α responses but much reduced IL-6 responses in plasma, hypothalamus and hippocampus of IFNAR1(-/-) mice. IFN-β injection induced trivial IL-6 production and limited behavioural change and the poly I:C-induced IFN-β response did not preceed, and would not appear to mediate, IL-6 induction. Rather, IFNAR1(-/-) mice lack basal IFN-I activity, have lower STAT1 levels and show significantly lower levels of several inflammatory transcripts, including stat1. Basal IFN-I activity appears to play a facilitatory role in the full expression of the IL-6 response and activation of the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism pathway. The deficient IL-6 response in IFNAR1(-/-) mice partially explains the observed incomplete sickness behaviour response. Reconstitution of circulating IL-6 revealed that the role of IFNAR in burrowing activity is mediated via IL-6, while IFN-I and IL-6 have additive effects on hypoactivity, but the role of IFN-I in anorexia is independent of IL-6. Hence, we have demonstrated both interdependent and independent roles for IFN-I and IL-6 in systemic inflammation-induced changes in brain function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Type I Interferon Gene Response Is Increased in Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis and Correlates with Autoantibody Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Bastián-Hernandez, Yadira; Macias-Segura, Noe; Santiago-Algarra, David; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose D; Alemán-Navarro, Ana L; Martínez-Tejada, Pedro; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Garcia-De Lira, Yolanda; Olguín-Calderón, Diana; Trouw, Leendert A; Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory debilitating disease that affects the joints in the early and productive phases of an individual's life. Several cytokines have been linked to the disease pathogenesis and are known to contribute to the inflammatory state characteristic of RA. The participation of type I interferon (IFN) in the pathogenesis of the disease has been already described as well as the identity of the genes that are regulated by this molecule, which are collectively known as the type I IFN signature. These genes have several functions associated with apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, protein degradation, Th2 cell induction, B cell proliferation, etc. This article evaluated the expression of several genes of the IFN signature in different stages of disease and their correlation with the levels of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) anticarbamylated protein (Anti-CarP) antibodies. Samples from individuals with early and established RA, high-risk individuals (ACPA+ and ACPA-), and healthy controls were recruited at "Unidad de Artritis y Rheumatismo" (Rheumatism and Arthritis Unit) in Guadalajara Jalisco Mexico. Determinations of ACPA were made with Eurodiagnostica ACPA plus kit. Anti-CarP determinations were made according to previously described protocols. RNA was isolated, and purity and integrity were determined according to RNA integrity number >6. Gene expression analysis was made by RT-qPCR using specific primers for mRNAs of the type I IFN signature. Relative gene expression was calculated according to Livak and Schmitgen. Significant differences in gene expression were identified when comparing the different groups for MXA and MXB (P < 0.05), also when comparing established RA and ACPA- in both IFIT 1 and G15. An increased expression of ISG15 was identified (P < 0.05), and a clear tendency toward increase was identified for HERC5. EPSTRI1, IFI6, and IFI35 were found to be elevated in the chronic/established RA and

  19. Pegylated Interferon α-2a Triggers NK-Cell Functionality and Specific T-Cell Responses in Patients with Chronic HBV Infection without HBsAg Seroconversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bruder Costa

    Full Text Available Pegylated interferon α-2a (Peg-IFN-α represents a therapeutic alternative to the prolonged use of nucleos(tide analog (NA in chronic hepatitis B (CHB infection. The mechanisms leading to a positive clinical outcome remain unclear. As immune responses are critical for virus control, we investigated the effects of Peg-IFN-α on both innate and adaptive immunity, and related it to the clinical evolution. The phenotypic and functional features of the dendritic cells (DCs, natural killer (NK cells and HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells were analyzed in HBeAg-negative CHB patients treated for 48-weeks with NA alone or together with Peg-IFN-α, before, during and up to 2-years after therapy. Peg-IFN-α induced an early activation of DCs, a potent expansion of the CD56bright NK subset, and enhanced the activation and functionality of the CD56dim NK subset. Peg-IFN-α triggered an increase in the frequencies of Th1- and Th17-oriented HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells. Peg-IFN-α reversed the unresponsiveness of patients to a specific stimulation. Most of the parameters returned to baseline after the stop of Peg-IFN-α therapy. Peg-IFN-α impacts both innate and adaptive immunity, overcoming dysfunctional immune responses in CHB patients. These modulations were not associated with seroconversion, which questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment.

  20. CD8 T Cells in Innate Immune Responses: Using STAT4-Dependent but Antigen-Independent Pathways to Gamma Interferon during Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ramirez, Jenny E.; Tarrio, Margarite L.; Kim, Kwangsin; Demers, Delia A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ), with antimicrobial and immunoregulatory functions, can be produced by T cells following stimulation through their T cell receptors (TCRs) for antigen. The innate cytokines type 1 IFNs and interleukin-12 (IL-12) can also stimulate IFN-γ production by natural killer (NK) but not naive T cells. High basal expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4), used by type 1 IFN and IL-12 to induce IFN-γ as well as CD25, contributes to the NK cell responses. During acute viral infections, antigen-specific CD8 T cells are stimulated to express elevated STAT4 and respond to the innate factors with IFN-γ production. Little is known about the requirements for cytokine compared to TCR stimulation. Primary infections of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) demonstrated that although the elicited antigen-specific CD8 T cells acquired STAT4-dependent innate cytokine responsiveness for IFN-γ and CD25 induction ex vivo, TCR stimulation induced these through STAT4-independent pathways. During secondary infections, LCMV-immune CD8 T cells had STAT4-dependent IFN-γ expression at times of innate cytokine induction but subsequently expanded through STAT4-independent pathways. At times of innate cytokine responses during infection with the antigen-distinct murine cytomegalovirus virus (MCMV), NK and LCMV-immune CD8 T cells both had activation of pSTAT4 and IFN-γ. The T cell IFN-γ response was STAT4 and IL-12 dependent, but antigen-dependent expansion was absent. By dissecting requirements for STAT4 and antigen, this work provides novel insights into the endogenous regulation of cytokine and proliferative responses and demonstrates conditioning of innate immunity by experience. PMID:25336459

  1. Evaluation of immune responses in HIV infected patients with pleural tuberculosis by the QuantiFERON® TB-Gold interferon-gamma assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekabe Jacob M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous (TB pleuritis is difficult and better diagnostic tools are needed. New blood based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ tests are promising, but sensitivity could be low in HIV positive patients. The IFN-γ tests have not yet been validated for use in pleural fluid, a compartment with higher level of immune activation than in blood. Methods The QuantiFERON TB®-Gold (QFT-TB test was analysed in blood and pleural fluid from 34 patients presenting with clinically suspected pleural TB. Clinical data, HIV status and CD4 cell counts were recorded. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA analysis and TB culture were performed on pleural fluid. Results The patients were categorised as 'confirmed TB' (n = 12, 'probable TB' (n = 16 and 'non-TB' pleuritis (n = 6 based on TB culture results and clinical and biochemical criteria. The majority of the TB patients were HIV infected (82%. The QFT-TB in pleural fluid was positive in 27% and 56% of the 'confirmed TB' and 'probable TB' cases, respectively, whereas the corresponding sensitivities in blood were 58% and 83%. Indeterminate results in blood (25% were caused by low phytohemagglutinin (PHA = positive control IFN-γ responses, significantly lower in the TB patients as compared to the 'non-TB' cases (p = 0.02. Blood PHA responses correlated with CD4 cell count (r = 0.600, p = 0.028. In contrast, in pleural fluid indeterminate results (52% were caused by high Nil (negative control IFN-γ responses in both TB groups. Still, the Nil IFN-γ responses were lower than the TB antigen responses (p Conclusion The QFT-TB test in blood could contribute to the diagnosis of TB pleuritis in the HIV positive population. Still, the number of inconclusive results is too high to recommend the commercial QFT-TB test for routine use in pleural fluid in a TB/HIV endemic resource-limited setting.

  2. Synergetic responses after administration of interleukin-2 and Interferon-alpha combined with gamma knife radiosurgery in a patient with multiple lung and brain metastases: a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takada, Toshihiko; Yamada, Yoshiteru; Uno, Masahiro; Komeda, Hisao; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    ...). Initially, Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy was started for lung metastases. About 40 days after surgery, head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain metastases, and therefore gamma knife radiosurgery(GKS) was performed...

  3. The RAS/Raf1/MEK/ERK signaling pathway facilitates VSV-mediated oncolysis: implication for the defective interferon response in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noser, Josh A; Mael, Amber A; Sakuma, Ryuta; Ohmine, Seiga; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick Wk; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2007-08-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can replicate in malignant cells more efficiently than in normal cells. Although the selective replication appears to be caused by defects in the interferon (IFN) system in malignant cells, the mechanisms which render these cells less responsive to IFN remain poorly understood. Here we present evidence that an activated RAS/Raf1/MEK/ERK pathway plays a critical role in the defects. NIH 3T3 or human primary cells stably expressing active RAS or Raf1 were rapidly killed by VSV. Although IFNalpha treatment no longer protected the RAS- or Raf1-overexpressing cells from VSV infection, responsiveness to IFNalpha was restored following treatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126. Similarly, human cancer-derived cell lines became more responsive to IFNalpha in conjunction with U0126 treatment. Intriguingly, dual treatment with both IFNalpha and U0126 severely reduced the levels of viral RNAs in the infected cells. Moreover, cancer cells showed defects in inducing an IFNalpha-responsive factor, MxA, which is known to block VSV RNA synthesis, and U0126 restored the MxA expression. Our observations suggest that activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling leads to the defect in IFNalpha-mediated upregulation of MxA protein, which facilitates VSV oncolysis. In view of the fact that 30% of all cancers have constitutive activation of the RAS/Raf1/MEK/ERK pathway, VSV would be an ideal oncolytic virus for targeting such cancers.

  4. Differential Gamma Interferon- and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Driven Cytokine Response Distinguishes Acute Infection of a Metatherian Host with Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Shannon L.; Phalen, David N.; McAllan, Bronwyn M.; O'Meally, Denis; McAllister, Milton M.; Ellis, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum (both Apicomplexa) are closely related cyst-forming coccidian parasites that differ significantly in their host ranges and ability to cause disease. Unlike eutherian mammals, Australian marsupials (metatherian mammals) have long been thought to be highly susceptible to toxoplasmosis and neosporosis because of their historical isolation from the parasites. In this study, the carnivorous fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) was used as a disease model to investigate the immune response and susceptibility to infection of an Australian marsupial to T. gondii and N. caninum. The disease outcome was more severe in N. caninum-infected dunnarts than in T. gondii-infected dunnarts, as shown by the severity of clinical and histopathological features of disease and higher tissue parasite burdens in the tissues evaluated. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of spleens from infected dunnarts and mitogen-stimulated dunnart splenocytes was used to define the cytokine repertoires. Changes in mRNA expression during the time course of infection were measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) for key Th1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]), Th2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4] and IL-6), and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines. The results show qualitative differences in cytokine responses by the fat-tailed dunnart to infection with N. caninum and T. gondii. Dunnarts infected with T. gondii were capable of mounting a more effective Th1 immune response than those infected with N. caninum, indicating the role of the immune response in the outcome scenarios of parasite infection in this marsupial mammal. PMID:28348050

  5. Sequential combination of glucocorticosteroids and alfa interferon versus alfa interferon alone for HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, M T; Krogsgaard, K; Mathurin, P

    2005-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B has serious effects on morbidity and mortality. Alfa interferon has been shown to increase the rates of HBeAg-clearance as well as seroconversion to anti-HBe, but response rates are unsatisfactory. Glucocorticosteroid pretreatment may increase the response to alfa interferon....

  6. Sequential combination of glucocorticosteroids and alfa interferon versus alfa interferon alone for HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, M T; Krogsgaard, K; Mathurin, P

    2002-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B has serious effects on morbidity and mortality. Alfa interferon has been shown to increase the rates of HBeAg-clearance as well as seroconversion to anti-HBe, but response rates are unsatisfactory. Glucocorticosteroid pretreatment may increase the response to alfa interferon....

  7. Modulation of interferon-gamma response to QuantiFERON-TB-plus detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active and latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruccioli, Elisa; Vanini, Valentina; Chiacchio, Teresa; Cirillo, Daniela M; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Goletti, Delia

    2016-12-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ-release assays (IGRAs) are designed for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) infection. The new IGRA called QuantiFERON-TB Plus (QFT-Plus) is based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detection of IFN-γ following Myobacterium tuberculosis-antigen stimulation with TB1 and TB2 antigens. TB1 elicits a cell-mediated immune response by CD4 T cells and TB2 elicits a response from both CD4 and CD8 T cells. Here, we characterized variations IFN-γ release detected by ELISA to QFT-IT and QFT-Plus in patients with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI) at baseline and during or after specific treatment (follow-up). We studied seven patients with active TB and 10 patients with LTBI at baseline and during treatment either for active disease or preventive therapy. IFN-γ release detected by ELISA to QFT-IT and QFT-Plus was concomitantly evaluated over time. Statistical analysis was performed using a nonparametrical test for a paired dataset (Wilcoxon test). All participants responded to the mitogen, with all active-TB patients responding to QFT-IT or QFT-Plus at baseline. The responses did not change over time either qualitatively (number of responders) or quantitatively (IFN-γ release evaluated as IU/mL). Among the LTBI group, although all participants responded to both QFT-IT and QFT-Plus and the responses did not change over time, the quantitative responses to QFT-Plus showed a different trend. Specifically, response to TB2 was significantly lower at follow-up as compared with that observed at baseline (p=0.004), whereas the response to TB1 was not significantly different (p=0.16). To our knowledge, this is the first report characterizing IFN-γ responses to QFT-Plus antigens in participants with active TB and LTBI over time. The data need to be confirmed in larger settings; however, we showed that monitoring IFN-γ release in response to TB2 can be used to evaluate preventive therapy immune changes. This can be useful also as a tool for public

  8. Back-action Evading Measurements of a Nanomechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndukum, Tchefor; Rocheleau, Tristan; Schwab, Keith

    2010-03-01

    By driving a 5GHz superconducting, co-planar waveguide (CPW) resonator coupled to a radio-frequency nanomechanical resonator with both red and blue-detuned, phase coherent microwave signals, we have demonstrated amplifier noise back-action evading (BAE) detection of one quadrature of nanomechanical motion. With this quantum non-demolition (QND) scheme we have shown precise measurements of a single motional quadrature with additive measurement noise of 4 times the zero point amplitude, and a reduction in sensitivity to injected measurement noise of a factor of 43 in comparison to a single tone, non-BAE measurement. By increasing the CPW frequency to 7.5GHz, quadrupling the coupling strength and improving the (internal) quality factor of the CPW, we expect to be able to demonstrate sensitivity to one quadrature with additive measurement noise below the zero-point level, a necessary ingredient to produce and measure squeezed states of motion.

  9. Back action evading quantum limited measurements of a nanomechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndukum, Tchefor; Rocheleau, Tristan; Hertzberg, Jared; Schwab, Keith

    2009-03-01

    By driving a 5GHz superconducting, co-planar waveguide (CPW) resonator coupled to a radio-frequency nanomechanical resonator with both red- and blue-detuned, phase coherent microwave signals, we demonstrate amplifier noise back action evading(BAE) detection of one quadrature of nanomechanical motion. With this method we show precise measurements of a single motional quadrature with additive measurement noise of 4 times the zero point amplitude, and a reduction in sensitivity to injected measurement noise of a factor of 43 in comparison to a single tone, non-BAE measurement. We have also found a parametric instability which limits the coupling strength possible in our device, which will be described elsewhere. With straightforward improvements to the microwave resonator, we expect to be able to demonstrate sensitivity to one quadrature with additive measurement noise below the zero-point level, a necessary ingredient to produce and measure squeezed states of motion.

  10. Distinct Effects of Type I and III Interferons on Enteric Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Ingle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key host cytokines in the innate immune response to viral infection, and recent work has identified unique roles for IFN subtypes in regulating different aspects of infection. Currently emerging is a common theme that type III IFNs are critical in localized control of infection at mucosal barrier sites, while type I IFNs are important for broad systemic control of infections. The intestine is a particular site of interest for exploring these effects, as in addition to being the port of entry for a multitude of pathogens, it is a complex tissue with a variety of cell types as well as the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Here we focus on the roles of type I and III IFNs in control of enteric viruses, discussing what is known about signaling downstream from these cytokines, including induction of specific IFN-stimulated genes. We review viral strategies to evade IFN responses, effects of IFNs on the intestine, interactions between IFNs and the microbiota, and briefly discuss the role of IFNs in controlling viral infections at other barrier sites. Enhanced understanding of the coordinate roles of IFNs in control of viral infections may facilitate development of antiviral therapeutic strategies; here we highlight potential avenues for future exploration.

  11. Expression of interferon gamma in the brain of cats with natural Borna disease virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensman, Jonas Johansson; Ilbäck, Carolina; Hjertström, Elina; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Gustavsson, Malin Hagberg; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Ström-Holst, Bodil; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Anna-Lena; Berg, Mikael

    2011-05-15

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic, negative-stranded RNA virus, which causes a non-suppurative meningoencephalomyelitis in a wide range of animals. In cats, BDV infection leads to staggering disease. In spite of a vigorous immune response the virus persists in the central nervous system (CNS) in both experimentally and naturally infected animals. Since the CNS is vulnerable to cytotoxic effects mediated via NK-cells and cytotoxic T-cells, other non-cytolytic mechanisms such as the interferon (IFN) system is favourable for viral clearance. In this study, IFN-γ expression in the brain of cats with clinical signs of staggering disease (N=12) was compared to the expression in cats with no signs of this disease (N=7) by quantitative RT-PCR. The IFN-γ expression was normalised against the expression of three reference genes (HPRT, RPS7, YWHAZ). Cats with staggering disease had significantly higher expression of IFN-γ compared to the control cats (p-value ≤ 0.001). There was no significant difference of the IFN-γ expression in BDV-positive (N=7) and -negative (N=5) cats having clinical signs of staggering disease. However, as BDV-RNA still could be detected, despite an intense IFN-γ expression, BDV needs to have mechanisms to evade this antiviral immune response of the host, to be able to persist. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Type I interferon (IFN alpha) acts directly on human memory CD4+ T cells altering their response to antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kathleen M E; Lauder, Sarah; Rees, Ian W; Gallimore, Awen M; Godkin, Andrew J

    2009-09-01

    Despite its use widely as a therapeutic agent, and proposed use as vaccine adjuvant, the effect of IFNalpha on T cell function is poorly understood. As a pleiotropic innate cytokine produced rapidly in response to pathogens, it is well placed to impinge on specific immune responses. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of IFNalpha on the function of human memory CD4(+) T cells using the recall Ags purified protein derivative, tetanus toxoid, and hemagglutinin. IFNalpha administered either in vivo or added exogenously in vitro tended to enhance proliferative responses of purified protein derivative-specific T cells in marked contrast to the other cognate populations whose responses were often diminished. Purifying the memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells confirmed IFNalpha acted directly on these cells and not via an intermediate. The T cells could be divided into two broad categories depending on how IFNalpha effected their responses to cognate Ag: 1) enhanced proliferation and a striking increase in IFNgamma-production compared with smaller increases in IL-10 (increased ratio of IFNgamma:IL-10), and 2) neutral or diminished proliferation coupled with a smaller increase in IFNgamma relative to the increase in IL-10 (reduced IFNgamma:IL-10 ratio). IFNalpha has a role in modifying memory T cell responses when they are exposed to cognate Ag and may be important in vaccination strategies designed to augment particular Th memory responses.

  13. Factors regarding increase of platelet counts in chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virological response to interferon-Relation to serum thrombopoietin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagura, Michiyasu; Tanaka, Akihisa; Tokita, Hajime; Kamitsukasa, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideharu

    2005-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is frequently found in patients with chronic liver disease, and associated with advanced fibrosis stage and with decreased liver function. Serum thrombopoietin (TPO) levels also decrease as the disease progresses from mild fibrosis to cirrhosis. On the other hand, platelet counts increase associated with improvement of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon (IFN) therapy. Then, we studied if the increase of platelet counts in SVR associate with elevated TPO production or a reduction of spleen size. Liver fibrosis, spleen size, serum TPO levels, albumin, zinc turbidity test (ZTT), platelet counts were compared in fifteen CH-C patients with SVR before and after IFN therapy. Albumin increased from 4.2+/-0.3 to 4.3+/-0.3g/dl (p=0.067), ZTT decreased from 17.7+/-5.9 to 8.9+/-3.9K-U (psize was measured by ultrasonography, and the spleen index was calculated by multiplication of the long and short axes from hilus, which decreased from 14.6+/-5.0 to 10+/-3.1 (preduction of spleen size and increased serum TPO levels associated with improvement of fibrosis after IFN therapy.

  14. Genetic Variants in the Apoptosis Gene BCL2L1 Improve Response to Interferon-Based Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Nygaard Clausen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation upstream of the apoptosis pathway has been associated with outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. We investigated genetic polymorphisms in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway to assess their influence on sustained virological response (SVR to pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV treatment of HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infections. We conducted a candidate gene association study in a prospective cohort of 201 chronic HCV-infected individuals undergoing treatment with pegIFN/RBV. Differences between groups were compared in logistic regression adjusted for age, HCV viral load and interleukin 28B genotypes. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in the B-cell lymphoma 2-like 1 (BCL2L1 gene were significantly associated with SVR. SVR rates were significantly higher for carriers of the beneficial rs1484994 CC genotypes. In multivariate logistic regression, the rs1484994 SNP combined CC + TC genotypes were associated with a 3.4 higher odds ratio (OR in SVR for the HCV genotype 3 (p = 0.02. The effect estimate was similar for genotype 1, but the association did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, anti-apoptotic SNPs in the BCL2L1 gene were predictive of SVR to pegIFN/RBV treatment in HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infected individuals. These SNPs may be used in prediction of SVR, but further studies are needed.

  15. The Absence of Interferon-β Promotor Stimulator-1 (IPS-1) Predisposes to Bronchiolitis and Asthma-like Pathology in Response to Pneumoviral Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jennifer; Lynch, Jason P; Loh, Zhixuan; Zhang, Vivian; Werder, Rhiannon B; Spann, Kirsten; Phipps, Simon

    2017-05-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-bronchiolitis is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality and a risk factor for subsequent asthma. We showed previously that toll-like receptor (TLR)7 in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is critical for protection against bronchiolitis and asthma in mice infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), the mouse homolog of RSV. This lack of redundancy was unexpected as interferon-β promotor stimulator-1 (IPS-1) signalling, downstream of RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) and not TLR7 activation, contributes to host defence in hRSV-inoculated adult mice. To further clarify the role of IPS-1 signalling, we inoculated IPS-1(-/-) and WT mice with PVM in early-life, and again in later-life, to model the association between bronchiolitis and asthma. IPS-1 deficiency predisposed to severe PVM bronchiolitis, characterised by neutrophilic inflammation and necroptotic airway epithelial cell death, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and IL-33 release, and downstream type-2 inflammation. Secondary infection induced an eosinophilic asthma-like pathophysiology in IPS-1(-/-) but not WT mice. Mechanistically, we identified that IPS-1 is necessary for pDC recruitment, IFN-α production and viral control. Our findings suggest that TLR7 and RLR signalling work collaboratively to optimally control the host response to pneumovirus infection thereby protecting against viral bronchiolitis and subsequent asthma.

  16. Long term molecular responses in a cohort of Danish patients with essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis treated with recombinant interferon alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauffer Larsen, Thomas; Iversen, Katrine F; Hansen, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years data has accumulated demonstrating the efficacy of recombinant interferon alpha2 (rIFN-alpha2) in the treatment of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We report on clinical and molecular data in the largest cohort of JAK2 V617F mutant MPN Danish patients (n=102) being...... in JAK2 V617F allele burden with a median reduction from baseline of 59% (95% c.i. 50-73%, range 3-99%). A decline in JAK2 V617F allele burden was recorded in both ET (median 24-10% (95% c.i.: 8-16%), and PV (median 59-35% (95% c.i.: 17-33%). Patients with the lowest pre-treatment JAK2 V617F allele...... burdens tend to achieve the most favourable responses on long term treatment with rIFN-alpha2. Eleven patients (10%) had deep molecular remissions with ≤ 2% JAK2 V617F mutant DNA. Finally, long term treatment with rIFN-alpha2 was associated with a very low thrombosis rate. Our observations are supportive...

  17. Identification of a Sjögren's syndrome susceptibility locus at OAS1 that influences isoform switching, protein expression, and responsiveness to type I interferons.

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    He Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SS is a common, autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Patients frequently develop serious complications including lymphoma, pulmonary dysfunction, neuropathy, vasculitis, and debilitating fatigue. Dysregulation of type I interferon (IFN pathway is a prominent feature of SS and is correlated with increased autoantibody titers and disease severity. To identify genetic determinants of IFN pathway dysregulation in SS, we performed cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analyses focusing on differentially expressed type I IFN-inducible transcripts identified through a transcriptome profiling study. Multiple cis-eQTLs were associated with transcript levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1 peaking at rs10774671 (PeQTL = 6.05 × 10-14. Association of rs10774671 with SS susceptibility was identified and confirmed through meta-analysis of two independent cohorts (Pmeta = 2.59 × 10-9; odds ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.66-0.86. The risk allele of rs10774671 shifts splicing of OAS1 from production of the p46 isoform to multiple alternative transcripts, including p42, p48, and p44. We found that the isoforms were differentially expressed within each genotype in controls and patients with and without autoantibodies. Furthermore, our results showed that the three alternatively spliced isoforms lacked translational response to type I IFN stimulation. The p48 and p44 isoforms also had impaired protein expression governed by the 3' end of the transcripts. The SS risk allele of rs10774671 has been shown by others to be associated with reduced OAS1 enzymatic activity and ability to clear viral infections, as well as reduced responsiveness to IFN treatment. Our results establish OAS1 as a risk locus for SS and support a potential role for defective viral clearance due to altered IFN response as a genetic pathophysiological basis of this complex autoimmune disease.

  18. Recent advances in the anti-HCV mechanisms of interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menghao Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN in combination with ribavirin has been the standard of care (SOC for chronic hepatitis C for the past few decades. Although the current SOC lacks the desired efficacy, and 4 new direct-acting antiviral agents have been recently approved, interferons are still likely to remain the cornerstone of therapy for some time. Moreover, as an important cytokine system of innate immunity, host interferon signaling provides a powerful antiviral response. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which HCV infection controls interferon production, and how interferons, in turn, trigger anti-HCV activities as well as control the outcome of HCV infection remain to be clarified. In this report, we review current progress in understanding the mechanisms of IFN against HCV, and also summarize the knowledge of induction of interferon signaling by HCV infection.

  19. Intact interferonresponse against Coxiella burnetii by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic Q fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffelen, T; Textoris, J; Bleeker-Rovers, C P; Ben Amara, A; van der Meer, J W M; Netea, M G; Mege, J-L; van Deuren, M; van de Vosse, E

    2017-03-01

    Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii, an intracellular bacterium that infects phagocytes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the C. burnetii-induced IFN-γ response is defective in chronic Q fever patients. IFN-γ was measured in supernatants of C. burnetii-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 17 chronic Q fever patients and 17 healthy individuals. To assess IFN-γ responses, expression profiles of IFN-γ-induced genes in C. burnetii-stimulated PBMCs were studied in six patients and four healthy individuals. Neopterin was measured in PBMC supernatants (of eight patients and four healthy individuals) and in sera (of 21 patients and 11 healthy individuals). In a genetic association study, polymorphisms in genes involved in the Th1-cytokine response were analysed in a cohort of 139 chronic Q fever patients and a cohort of 220 control individuals with previous exposition to C. burnetii. IFN-γ production by C. burnetii-stimulated PBMCs from chronic Q fever patients was significantly higher than in healthy controls. Many IFN-γ response genes were strongly upregulated in PBMCs of patients. Neopterin levels were significantly higher in PBMC supernatants and sera of patients. The IL12B polymorphisms rs3212227 and rs2853694 were associated with chronic Q fever. IFN-γ production, as well as the response to IFN-γ, is intact in chronic Q fever patients, and even higher than in healthy individuals. Polymorphisms in the IL-12p40 gene are associated with chronic Q fever. Thus, a deficiency in IFN-γ responses does not explain the failure to clear the infection. The genetic data suggest, however, that the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway does play a role. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment decreases the inflammatory response in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Rygaard, J

    1996-01-01

    polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) (> or = 90%) surrounding the alginate beads like in CF. This could be caused by a Th2-like response. In contrast, a complete shift to a chronic-type inflammation dominated by mononuclear leucocytes (> or = 90% lymphocytes and plasma cells) and granulomas was observed in both rr...

  1. Circulating sCD14 is associated with virological response to pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

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    Giulia Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT through the gut accounts for immune activation and CD4+ loss in HIV and may influence HCV disease progression in HIV/HCV co-infection. We asked whether increased MT and immune activation may hamper anti-HCV response in HIV/HCV patients.98 HIV/HCV patients who received pegylated-alpha-interferon (peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline MT (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, host response to MT (sCD14, CD38+HLA-DR+CD4+/CD8+, HCV genotype, severity of liver disease were assessed according to Early Virological Response (EVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL at week 12 of therapy or ≥2 log(10 reduction from baseline after 12 weeks of therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL 24 weeks after end of therapy. Mann-Whitney/Chi-square test and Pearson's correlation were used. Multivariable regression was performed to determine factors associated with EVR/SVR.71 patients displayed EVR; 41 SVR. Patients with HCV genotypes 1-4 and cirrhosis presented a trend to higher sCD14, compared to patients with genotypes 2-3 (p = 0.053 and no cirrhosis (p = 0.052. EVR and SVR patients showed lower levels of circulating sCD14 (p = 0.0001, p = 0.026, respectively, but similar T-cell activation compared to Non-EVR (Null Responders, NR and Non-SVR (N-SVR subjects. sCD14 resulted the main predictive factor of EVR (0.145 for each sCD14 unit more, 95%CI 0.031-0.688, p = 0.015. SVR was associated only with HCV genotypes 2-3 (AOR 0.022 for genotypes 1-4 vs 2-3, 95%CI 0.001-0.469, p = 0.014.In HIV/HCV patients sCD14 correlates with the severity of liver disease and predicts early response to peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin, suggesting MT-driven immune activation as pathway of HIV/HCV co-infection and response to therapy.

  2. The vitamin D receptor gene bAt (CCA) haplotype impairs the response to pegylated-interferon/ribavirin-based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Katharina; Mertens, Joachim C; Schmitt, Johannes; Iwata, Rika; Stieger, Bruno; Frei, Pascal; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bischoff Ferrari, Heike A; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Müllhaupt, Beat; Geier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection is a major cause of end-stage liver disease. Therapy outcome is influenced by 25-OH vitamin D deficiency. To further address this observation, our study investigates the impact of the vitamin D receptor (NR1I1) haplotype and combined effects of plasma vitamin D levels in a well-described cohort of hepatitis C patients. A total of 155 chronic hepatitis C patients were recruited from the Swiss Hepatitis C Cohort Study for NR1I1 genotyping and plasma 25-OH vitamin D level measurement. NR1I1 genotype data and combined effects of plasma 25-OH vitamin D level were analysed regarding therapy response (sustained virological response). A strong association was observed between therapy non-response and the NR1I1 CCA (bAt) haplotype consisting of rs1544410 (BsmI) C, rs7975232 (ApaI) C and rs731236 (TaqI) A alleles. Of the HCV patients carrying the CCA haplotype, 50.3% were non-responders (odds ratio [OR] 1.69, 95% CI 1.07, 2.67; P=0.028). A similar association was observed for the combinational CCCCAA genotype (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.36, 6.37; P=0.007). The combinational CCCCAA genotype was confirmed as an independent risk factor for non-response in multivariate analysis (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.07, 5.87; P=0.034). Analysing combined effects, a significant impact of low 25-OH vitamin D levels on sustained virological response were only seen in patients with the unfavourable NR1I1 CCA (bAt) haplotype (OR for non-SVR 3.55; 95% CI 1.005, 12.57; P=0.049). NR1I1 vitamin D receptor polymorphisms influence response to pegylated-interferon/ribavirin-based therapy in chronic hepatitis C and exert an additive genetic predisposition to previously described low 25-OH vitamin D serum levels.

  3. Quantification of interferon signaling in avian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the type I interferon (IFN) response is an essential defense mechanism against invading pathogens such as viruses. This chapter describes two protocols to quantify activation of the chicken IFN response through analysis of gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR and by

  4. Functional limitations of plasmacytoid dendritic cells limit type I interferon, T cell responses and virus control in early life.

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    Elodie Belnoue

    Full Text Available Infant mortality from viral infection remains a major global health concern: viruses causing acute infections in immunologically mature hosts often follow a more severe course in early life, with prolonged or persistent viral replication. Similarly, the WE strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-WE causes acute self-limiting infection in adult mice but follows a protracted course in infant animals, in which LCMV-specific CD8⁺ T cells fail to expand and control infection. By disrupting type I IFNs signaling in adult mice or providing IFN-α supplementation to infant mice, we show here that the impaired early life T cell responses and viral control result from limited early type I IFN responses. We postulated that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC, which have been identified as one major source of immediate-early IFN-I, may not exert adult-like function in vivo in the early life microenvironment. We tested this hypothesis by studying pDC functions in vivo during LCMV infection and identified a coordinated downregulation of infant pDC maturation, activation and function: despite an adult-like in vitro activation capacity of infant pDCs, the expression of the E2-2 pDC master regulator (and of critical downstream antiviral genes such as MyD88, TLR7/TLR9, NF-κB, IRF7 and IRF8 is downregulated in vivo at baseline and during LCMV infection. A similar pattern was observed in response to ssRNA polyU, a model ligand of the TLR7 viral sensor. This suggests that the limited T cell-mediated defense against early life viral infections is largely attributable to / regulated by infant pDC responses and provides incentives for novel strategies to supplement or stimulate immediate-early IFN-α responses.

  5. Octamer-binding factor 6 (Oct-6/Pou3f1) is induced by interferon and contributes to dsRNA-mediated transcriptional responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Octamer-binding factor 6 (Oct-6, Pou3f1, SCIP, Tst-1) is a transcription factor of the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family. POU proteins regulate key developmental processes and have been identified from a diverse range of species. Oct-6 expression is described to be confined to the developing brain, Schwann cells, oligodendrocyte precursors, testes, and skin. Its function is primarily characterised in Schwann cells, where it is required for correctly timed transition to the myelinating state. In the present study, we report that Oct-6 is an interferon (IFN)-inducible protein and show for the first time expression in murine fibroblasts and macrophages. Results Oct-6 was induced by type I and type II IFN, but not by interleukin-6. Induction of Oct-6 after IFNβ treatment was mainly dependent on signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1) and partially on tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2). Chromatin immunopreciptitation experiments revealed binding of Stat1 to the Oct-6 promoter in a region around 500 bp upstream of the transcription start site, a region different from the downstream regulatory element involved in Schwann cell-specific Oct-6 expression. Oct-6 was also induced by dsRNA treatment and during viral infections, in both cases via autocrine/paracrine actions of IFNα/β. Using microarray and RT-qPCR, we furthermore show that Oct-6 is involved in the regulation of transcriptional responses to dsRNA, in particular in the gene regulation of serine/threonine protein kinase 40 (Stk40) and U7 snRNA-associated Sm-like protein Lsm10 (Lsm10). Conclusion Our data show that Oct-6 expression is not as restricted as previously assumed. Induction of Oct-6 by IFNs and viruses in at least two different cell types, and involvement of Oct-6 in gene regulation after dsRNA treatment, suggest novel functions of Oct-6 in innate immune responses. PMID:20687925

  6. CYTOKINE RESPONSE ASSOCIATED WITH HEPATITIS C VIRUS CLEARANCE IN HIV COINFECTED PATIENTS INITIATING PEG INTERFERON- BASED THERAPY.

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    Truong Tam Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment against hepatitis C virus (HCV infection based on peginterferon-a (pegIFNa and ribavirin induces important changes on cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective: Immune response to pegIFNa-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods: Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19 and non-responders (NR, n=11.  Results: High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10 and MCP-1 (CCL-2 were associated with poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNa-ribavirin therapy increased CD8+ T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1b, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1 but only six cytokines in NR (IL-1b, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin. Highest rise in MIP-1b and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively, whereas a decrease of IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052. Conclusions: Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNa-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1b and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNa- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV.

  7. Candidate Gene Study of TRAIL and TRAIL Receptors: Association with Response to Interferon Beta Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Órpez-Zafra, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Arnáiz, Carlos; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO) and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10−4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30). This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A), a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS. PMID:23658636

  8. Type I Interferons Function as Autocrine and Paracrine Factors to Induce Autotaxin in Response to TLR Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jianwen; Guan, Ming; Zhao, Zhenwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important phospholipid mediator in inflammation and immunity. However, the mechanism of LPA regulation during inflammatory response is largely unknown. Autotaxin (ATX) is the key enzyme to produce extracellular LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In this study, we found that ATX was induced in monocytic THP-1 cells by TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TLR9 ligand CpG oligonucleotide, and TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), respectively. The ATX induction by TLR ligand was abolished by the neutralizing antibody against IFN-β or the knockdown of IFNAR1, indicating that type I IFN autocrine loop is responsible for the ATX induction upon TLR activation. Both IFN-β and IFN-α were able to induce ATX expression via the JAK-STAT and PI3K-AKT pathways but with different time-dependent manners. The ATX induction by IFN-β was dramatically enhanced by IFN-γ, which had no significant effect on ATX expression alone, suggesting a synergy effect between type I and type II IFNs in ATX induction. Extracellular LPA levels were significantly increased when THP-1 cells were treated with IFN-α/β or TLR ligands. In addition, the type I IFN-mediated ATX induction was identified in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) stimulated with LPS or poly(I:C), and IFN-α/β could induce ATX expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and monocytes isolated form blood samples. These results suggest that, in response to TLR activation, ATX is induced through a type I INF autocrine-paracrine loop to enhance LPA generation. PMID:26313906

  9. Type I Interferons Function as Autocrine and Paracrine Factors to Induce Autotaxin in Response to TLR Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Song

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is an important phospholipid mediator in inflammation and immunity. However, the mechanism of LPA regulation during inflammatory response is largely unknown. Autotaxin (ATX is the key enzyme to produce extracellular LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. In this study, we found that ATX was induced in monocytic THP-1 cells by TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR9 ligand CpG oligonucleotide, and TLR3 ligand poly(I:C, respectively. The ATX induction by TLR ligand was abolished by the neutralizing antibody against IFN-β or the knockdown of IFNAR1, indicating that type I IFN autocrine loop is responsible for the ATX induction upon TLR activation. Both IFN-β and IFN-α were able to induce ATX expression via the JAK-STAT and PI3K-AKT pathways but with different time-dependent manners. The ATX induction by IFN-β was dramatically enhanced by IFN-γ, which had no significant effect on ATX expression alone, suggesting a synergy effect between type I and type II IFNs in ATX induction. Extracellular LPA levels were significantly increased when THP-1 cells were treated with IFN-α/β or TLR ligands. In addition, the type I IFN-mediated ATX induction was identified in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs stimulated with LPS or poly(I:C, and IFN-α/β could induce ATX expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and monocytes isolated form blood samples. These results suggest that, in response to TLR activation, ATX is induced through a type I INF autocrine-paracrine loop to enhance LPA generation.

  10. Benznidazole Therapy Modulates Interferon-γ and M2 Muscarinic Receptor Autoantibody Responses in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrullis, Romina A.; Moscatelli, Guillermo F.; Moroni, Samanta; Volta, Bibiana J.; Cardoni, Rita L.; Altcheh, Jaime M.; Corral, Ricardo S.; Freilij, Héctor L.; Petray, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The presence of autoantibodies with adrenergic and cholinergic activity, capable of triggering neurotransmitter receptor-mediated effects, has been associated with pathogenesis in T. cruzi-infected hosts. The goal of this study was to investigate the production of anti-M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibodies (Anti-M2R AAbs) as well as the IFN-γ profile in children at the early stage of Chagas disease, and to examine whether trypanocidal chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) could modify both response patterns. Methods This study comprised 30 T. cruzi-infected children (mean age: 13.8 years) and 19 uninfected controls (mean age: 12.7 years). Infected patients were treated with BZ and followed-up. Blood samples collected at diagnosis-T0, end of treatment-T1, and six months later-T2 were analysed by ELISA for detection of Anti-M2R AAbs and circulating levels of IFN-γ. Results At T0, anti-M2R AAbs were demonstrated in 56.7% of T. cruzi-infected patients, whereas uninfected controls were 100% negative. The average age of Anti-M2R AAbs+ patients was higher than that from negative population. Infected children also displayed significantly stronger serum IFN-γ responses than controls. Upon BZ treatment, a significant linear decreasing trend in Anti-M2R AAb reactivity was recorded throughout the follow-up, with 29.7–88.1% decrease at T2. IFN-γ circulating levels also declined by T2. Conclusion Anti-M2R AAbs and IFN-γ raise early during chagasic infection in children and are downmodulated by BZ therapy. These findings reinforce the usefulness of early BZ treatment not only to eliminate the parasite but also to reduce potentially pathogenic immune responses. PMID:22066031

  11. Benzonidazole therapy modulates interferon-γ and M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibody responses in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected children.

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    Romina A Cutrullis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The presence of autoantibodies with adrenergic and cholinergic activity, capable of triggering neurotransmitter receptor-mediated effects, has been associated with pathogenesis in T. cruzi-infected hosts. The goal of this study was to investigate the production of anti-M2 muscarinic receptor autoantibodies (Anti-M2R AAbs as well as the IFN-γ profile in children at the early stage of Chagas disease, and to examine whether trypanocidal chemotherapy with benzonidazole (BZ could modify both response patterns. METHODS: This study comprised 30 T. cruzi-infected children (mean age: 13.8 years and 19 uninfected controls (mean age: 12.7 years. Infected patients were treated with BZ and followed-up. Blood samples collected at diagnosis-T0, end of treatment-T1, and six months later-T2 were analysed by ELISA for detection of Anti-M2R AAbs and circulating levels of IFN-γ. RESULTS: At T0, anti-M2R AAbs were demonstrated in 56.7% of T. cruzi-infected patients, whereas uninfected controls were 100% negative. The average age of Anti-M2R AAbs(+ patients was higher than that from negative population. Infected children also displayed significantly stronger serum IFN-γ responses than controls. Upon BZ treatment, a significant linear decreasing trend in Anti-M2R AAb reactivity was recorded throughout the follow-up, with 29.7-88.1% decrease at T2. IFN-γ circulating levels also declined by T2. CONCLUSION: Anti-M2R AAbs and IFN-γ raise early during chagasic infection in children and are downmodulated by BZ therapy. These findings reinforce the usefulness of early BZ treatment not only to eliminate the parasite but also to reduce potentially pathogenic immune responses.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus and Interleukin-28B polymorphism in the prediction of response to interferon therapy in hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Abdullah, Dina; Osman, Ahmed; El-Rouby, Mahmoud N; Zayed, Naglaa; Esmat, Gamal; Elakel, Wafaa; Hafez, Hanan Abdel

    2015-01-01

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), viral and host factors are known to be predictors for anti-viral therapy. IL-28B genotype strongly influences treatment outcome, while Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) co-infection could accelerate the course of chronic HCV infection. This study was conducted to assess whether EBV co-infection adds to the predictive value of IL-28B. A total of 105 patients with chronic HCV were classified according to their response to treatment into two groups: 38 sustained virological responders (SVRs) and 67 nonresponders (NRs). Collected sera at baseline and follow-up (FUP) were used for assessing EBV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the expression of EBV genes (BNLF-1, BZLF-1, and EBER-2) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Collected peripheral blood was used for detecting IL-28B rs.12979860 single-nucleotide polymorphism. Regarding IL-28B genotype frequencies, a significant difference (p=0.003) was observed between SVRs (C/C=51.4%, C/T=48.6%, T/T=0%) and NRs (C/C=25%, C/T=55%, T/T=20%). On assessing EBV infection at baseline and FUP, it was found that 61% and 55% were positive, respectively, with no significant difference between SVRs and NRs. As for anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) antibodies, the NRs had significantly higher baseline anti-VCA immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels than SVRs (p=0.01). While FUP anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG reported a significant decline within SVR patients (p=0.02), neither baseline nor FUP anti-VCA IgG levels showed a statistically significant viral response. Finally, on comparing EBV markers with CC versus CT and TT genotypes, it was found that FUP anti-VCA IgG levels were significantly increased in CC genotype (p=0.003). Interleukin-28B polymorphism could be a possible predictor of response to pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy (PEG-IFN/RBV). Furthermore, co-infection with EBV did not affect the response to IFN-based therapy in HCV-infected patients. Copyright © 2015

  13. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo.

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    Upkar S Gill

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are 'primed' with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(tides (sequential NUC therapy, an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB.

  14. Circulating Interferon-λ3, Responsiveness to HBV Vaccination, and HBV/HCV Infections in Haemodialysis Patients

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    Alicja E. Grzegorzewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The IFN-λ3 gene (IFNL3 plays a role in HCV clearance. We investigated circulating IFN-λ3 and IFNL3 SNPs in haemodialysis patients who differed in their response to HBV vaccination and their HBV/HCV infection status. In 201 patients, plasma IFN-λ3 was determined using ELISA. IFNL3 SNPs (rs12979860, rs8099917 were genotyped using HRM analysis. Differences in IFN-λ3 levels were shown between responders and nonresponders to HBV vaccination and between HBsAg-positive patients and those who developed anti-HBs after infection and became HBsAg negative. HBV vaccine responders without HCV resolution revealed lower IFN-λ3 than noninfected responders. HBsAg/HCV RNA-positive subjects showed lower IFN-λ3 than patients positive only for HCV RNA or subjects who resolved both infections. Circulating IFN-λ3 correlated positively with anti-HBs and negatively with positive HCV RNA testing in the adjusted regression analyses. HBV vaccine nonresponders, HBsAg-positive patients, and subjects with replicating HCV composed a group with unfavourable outcomes. Responders to HBV vaccination, subjects who became HBsAg negative, and those who cleared HCV were analysed as having favourable outcomes. The latter showed higher IFN-λ3 but did not differ in distribution of IFNL3 SNPs compared with subjects with unfavourable outcomes. Higher IFN-λ3 concentrations are associated with response to HBV vaccination, self-limited HBV infection, and HCV resolution.

  15. Exploiting hepatitis C virus activation of NFkappaB to deliver HCV-responsive expression of interferons alpha and gamma.

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    Matskevich, A A; Strayer, D S

    2003-10-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) may lead to liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment for HCV includes high systemic doses of interferonalpha (IFNalpha), which is effective in less than half of patients and may have severe side effects. We designed conditional IFNalpha and IFNgamma expression constructs to be triggered by HCV-induced activation of NFkappaB, and delivered these using highly efficient recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors. NFkappaB activates the HIV-1NL4-3 long terminal repeat (HIVLTR) as a promoter, which accounts for the conditional transgene expression. Human hepatocyte lines and primary rat hepatocytes (PRH) were transduced with SV[HIVLTR](IFN) vectors, and transfected with HCV cDNA. Production of human and murine IFNalpha and IFNgamma in cytosol and culture supernatants was measured. HCV activated the HIVLTR to produce and secrete IFNs, and did so largely through the NFkappaB binding sites of the HIVLTR. Levels of IFNs secreted, and the magnitude of induction in response to HCV, were greater in hepatocyte lines than in primary cultured hepatocytes. However, even in the latter, supernatant IFNalpha concentrations achieved by this approach were similar to therapeutic serum concentrations sought in systemic IFNalpha-treated patients. In coculture studies, secreted IFNalpha activated its cognate response elements in untransduced cells, suggesting that its potential inhibitory effects on HCV may not be limited to transduced cells. Although HCV replication in culture is difficult to assess, HCV-induced IFNalpha production demonstrably reduced HCV transcription. Conditional expression of IFNs within the liver may represent an attractive approach to therapy of severe chronic HCV infection that could avoid the side effects of systemic treatment regimens.

  16. The rhoptry proteins ROP18 and ROP5 mediate Toxoplasma gondii evasion of the murine, but not the human, interferon-gamma response.

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    Wendy Niedelman

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii secretes effector proteins into the host cell that manipulate the immune response allowing it to establish a chronic infection. Crosses between the types I, II and III strains, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, have identified several secreted effectors that determine strain differences in mouse virulence. The polymorphic rhoptry protein kinase ROP18 was recently shown to determine the difference in virulence between type I and III strains by phosphorylating and inactivating the interferon-γ (IFNγ-induced immunity-related GTPases (IRGs that promote killing by disrupting the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM in murine cells. The polymorphic pseudokinase ROP5 determines strain differences in virulence through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that ROP18 can only inhibit accumulation of the IRGs on the PVM of strains that also express virulent ROP5 alleles. In contrast, specific ROP5 alleles can reduce IRG coating even in the absence of ROP18 expression and can directly interact with one or more IRGs. We further show that the allelic combination of ROP18 and ROP5 also determines IRG evasion and virulence of strains belonging to other lineages besides types I, II and III. However, neither ROP18 nor ROP5 markedly affect survival in IFNγ-activated human cells, which lack the multitude of IRGs present in murine cells. These findings suggest that ROP18 and ROP5 have specifically evolved to block the IRGs and are unlikely to have effects in species that do not have the IRG system, such as humans.

  17. Broadening CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cell Responses against Hepatitis C Virus by Vaccination with NS3 Overlapping Peptide Panels in Cross-Priming Liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filskov, Jonathan; Mikkelsen, Marianne; Hansen, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of effective drugs to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, a vaccine would be the only means to substantially reduce the worldwide disease burden. An incomplete understanding of how HCV interacts with its human host and evades immune surveillance...... and was as potent a CD8+ T cell inducer as an adenovirus-vectored vaccine expressing NS3. Importantly, the cellular responses are dominated by multifunctional T cells, such as gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive (TNF-α+) coproducers, and displayed cytotoxic capacity in mice...

  18. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    The interferon (IFN) response to viral pathogens is critical for host survival. In humans and mouse models, defects in IFN responses can result in lethal herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, usually from encephalitis. Although rare, HSV-1 can also cause fulminant hepatic failure, which is often fatal. Although herpes simplex encephalitis has been extensively studied, HSV-1 generalized infections and subsequent acute liver failure are less well understood. We previously demonstrated that IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice are exquisitely susceptible to liver infection following corneal infection with HSV-1. In this study, we used bone marrow chimeras of IFN-αβγR(-/-) (AG129) and wild-type (WT; 129SvEv) mice to probe the underlying IFN-dependent mechanisms that control HSV-1 pathogenesis. After infection, WT mice with either IFN-αβγR(-/-) or WT marrow exhibited comparable survival, while IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice with WT marrow had a significant survival advantage over their counterparts with IFN-αβγR(-/-) marrow. Furthermore, using bioluminescent imaging to maximize data acquisition, we showed that the transfer of IFN-competent hematopoietic cells controlled HSV-1 replication and damage in the livers of IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice. Consistent with this, the inability of IFN-αβγR(-/-) immune cells to control liver infection in IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice manifested as profoundly elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, indicative of severe liver damage. In contrast, IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice receiving WT marrow exhibited only modest elevations of AST and ALT levels. These studies indicate that IFN responsiveness of the immune system is a major determinant of viral tropism and damage during visceral HSV infections. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is an incurable viral infection with the most significant morbidity and mortality occurring in neonates and patients with compromised immune systems. Severe pathologies from HSV include the

  19. Characterization of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) and its expression in response to viral and bacterial challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaoyao; Qi, Chenchen; Shan, Shijuan; Zhang, Fumiao; Li, Hua; An, Liguo; Yang, Guiwen

    2016-06-27

    Common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), one of the most economically valuable commercial farming fish species in China, is often infected by a variety of viruses. As the first line of defence against microbial pathogens, the innate immune system plays a crucial role in teleost fish, which are lower vertebrates. Interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a key molecule in antiviral immunity that regulating the expression of IFN and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is necessary to gain more insight into the common carp IFN system and the function of fish IRF5 in the antiviral and antibacterial response. In the present study, we characterized the cDNA and genomic sequence of the IRF5 gene in common carp, and analysed tissue distribution and expression profile of this gene in response to polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment. The common carp IRF5 (ccIRF5) gene is 5790 bp in length and is composed of 9 exons and 8 introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of ccIRF5 is 1554 bp, and encodes 517 amino acid protein. The putative ccIRF5 protein shares identity (65.4-90.0 %) with other fish IRF5s and contains a DNA binding domain (DBD), a middle region (MR), an IRF-associated domain (IAD), a virus activated domain (VAD) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) similar to those found in vertebrate IRF5. Phylogenetic analysis clustered ccIRF5 into the IRF5 subfamily with other vertebrate IRF5 and IRF6 genes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ccIRF5 mRNA was expressed in all examined tissues of healthy carps, with high levels observed in the gills and the brain. After poly I:C challenge, expression levels of ccIRF5, tumour-necrosis factor α (ccTNFα) and two IFN stimulated genes [ISGs (ccISG5 and ccPKR)] were up-regulated in seven immune-related tissues (liver, spleen, head kidney, foregut, hindgut, skin and gills). Furthermore, all four genes were up-regulated in vitro upon poly I:C and LPS challenges. Our findings suggest

  20. Cytosolic 5'-triphosphate ended viral leader transcript of measles virus as activator of the RIG I-mediated interferon response.

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    Sébastien Plumet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Double stranded RNA (dsRNA is widely accepted as an RNA motif recognized as a danger signal by the cellular sentries. However, the biology of non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses, or Mononegavirales, is hardly compatible with the production of such dsRNA. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During measles virus infection, the IFN-beta gene transcription was found to be paralleled by the virus transcription, but not by the virus replication. Since the expression of every individual viral mRNA failed to activate the IFN-beta gene, we postulated the involvement of the leader RNA, which is a small not capped and not polyadenylated RNA firstly transcribed by Mononegavirales. The measles virus leader RNA, synthesized both in vitro and in vivo, was efficient in inducing the IFN-beta expression, provided that it was delivered into the cytosol as a 5'-trisphosphate ended RNA. The use of a human cell line expressing a debilitated RIG-I molecule, together with overexpression studies of wild type RIG-I, showed that the IFN-beta induction by virus infection or by leader RNA required RIG-I to be functional. RIG-I binds to leader RNA independently from being 5-trisphosphate ended; while a point mutant, Q299A, predicted to establish contacts with the RNA, fails to bind to leader RNA. Since the 5'-triphosphate is required for optimal RIG-I activation but not for leader RNA binding, our data support that RIG-I is activated upon recognition of the 5'-triphosphate RNA end. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RIG-I is proposed to recognize Mononegavirales transcription, which occurs in the cytosol, while scanning cytosolic RNAs, and to trigger an IFN response when encountering a free 5'-triphosphate RNA resulting from a mislocated transcription activity, which is therefore considered as the hallmark of a foreign invader.

  1. Amniotic fluid stem cells with low γ-interferon response showed behavioral improvement in Parkinsonism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Ho, Tsung-Yen; Wu, Mei-Ling; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Tsai, Ming-Song

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) are multipotent stem cells that may be used in transplantation medicine. In this study, AFSCs established from amniocentesis were characterized on the basis of surface marker expression and differentiation potential. To further investigate the properties of AFSCs for translational applications, we examined the cell surface expression of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) of these cells and estimated the therapeutic effect of AFSCs in parkinsonian rats. The expression profiles of HLA-II and transcription factors were compared between AFSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) following treatment with γ-IFN. We found that stimulation of AFSCs with γ-IFN prompted only a slight increase in the expression of HLA-Ia and HLA-E, and the rare HLA-II expression could also be observed in most AFSCs samples. Consequently, the expression of CIITA and RFX5 was weakly induced by γ-IFN stimulation of AFSCs compared to that of BMMSCs. In the transplantation test, Sprague Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the substantia nigra were used as a parkinsonian-animal model. Following the negative γ-IFN response AFSCs injection, apomorphine-induced rotation was reduced by 75% in AFSCs engrafted parkinsonian rats but was increased by 53% in the control group after 12-weeks post-transplantation. The implanted AFSCs were viable, and were able to migrate into the brain's circuitry and express specific proteins of dopamine neurons, such as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter. In conclusion, the relative insensitivity AFSCs to γ-IFN implies that AFSCs might have immune-tolerance in γ-IFN inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, the effective improvement of AFSCs transplantation for apomorphine-induced rotation paves the way for the clinical application in parkinsonian therapy.

  2. Amniotic fluid stem cells with low γ-interferon response showed behavioral improvement in Parkinsonism rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs are multipotent stem cells that may be used in transplantation medicine. In this study, AFSCs established from amniocentesis were characterized on the basis of surface marker expression and differentiation potential. To further investigate the properties of AFSCs for translational applications, we examined the cell surface expression of human leukocyte antigens (HLA of these cells and estimated the therapeutic effect of AFSCs in parkinsonian rats. The expression profiles of HLA-II and transcription factors were compared between AFSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs following treatment with γ-IFN. We found that stimulation of AFSCs with γ-IFN prompted only a slight increase in the expression of HLA-Ia and HLA-E, and the rare HLA-II expression could also be observed in most AFSCs samples. Consequently, the expression of CIITA and RFX5 was weakly induced by γ-IFN stimulation of AFSCs compared to that of BMMSCs. In the transplantation test, Sprague Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning of the substantia nigra were used as a parkinsonian-animal model. Following the negative γ-IFN response AFSCs injection, apomorphine-induced rotation was reduced by 75% in AFSCs engrafted parkinsonian rats but was increased by 53% in the control group after 12-weeks post-transplantation. The implanted AFSCs were viable, and were able to migrate into the brain's circuitry and express specific proteins of dopamine neurons, such as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter. In conclusion, the relative insensitivity AFSCs to γ-IFN implies that AFSCs might have immune-tolerance in γ-IFN inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, the effective improvement of AFSCs transplantation for apomorphine-induced rotation paves the way for the clinical application in parkinsonian therapy.

  3. Different Expression of Interferon-Stimulated Genes in Response to HIV-1 Infection in Dendritic Cells Based on Their Maturation State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Esther; Bermejo, Mercedes; Diez-Fuertes, Francisco; Mangeot, Isabelle; González, Nuria; Coiras, Mayte; Jiménez Tormo, Laura; García-Perez, Javier; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Le Grand, Roger; Alcamí, José

    2017-04-15

    . This represents a breakthrough in the understanding of the restriction to HIV-1 infection of DCs. The results show that infection of DCs by HIV-1 reprograms their gene expression pattern. In immature cells, productive HIV-1 infection activates interferon-related genes involved in the control of viral replication, thus inducing an antiviral state in surrounding cells. Paradoxically, restriction of HIV-1 by SAMHD1 would result in lack of sensing and IFN activation, thus favoring initial HIV-1 escape from the innate immune response. In mature DCs, restrictive infection results in HIV-1 sensing and induction of ISGs, in particular CXCR3-binding chemokines, which could favor the transmission of HIV to lymphocytes. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic DC reprograming by HIV-1 infection favors viral escape and dissemination, thus increasing HIV-1 virulence. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Contrasting responses to interferon β-1b treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: Does baseline interleukin- 12p35 messenger RNA predict the efficacy of treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxel van-Dezaire, A.H.H.; Trigt van-Hoff, S.C.J.; Killestein, J.; Schrijver, H.M.; Houwelingen, J.C. van; Polman, C.H.; Nagelkerken, L.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β treatment is effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) via an as yet unidentified mechanism. In the present study, we investigated whether the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding the interleukin (IL)-12 subunits p40 and p35, IL-12 receptor chains, IL-18,

  5. Pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin for 14 versus 24 weeks in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 2 or 3 and rapid virological response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgard, Olav; Bjøro, Kristian; Larsen, Helmer Ring

    2008-01-01

    treatment-naïve HCV RNA-positive patients with genotype 2 or 3 were enrolled. Patients with RVR were randomized to 14 (group A) or 24 (group B) weeks of treatment. Patients were treated with pegylated interferon alpha-2b (1.5 microg/kg) subcutaneously weekly and ribavirin (800-1400 mg) orally daily...

  6. Interferon Gamma-1b Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interferon gamma-1b injection is used to reduce the frequency and severity of serious infections in people with chronic ... severe, malignant osteopetrosis (an inherited bone disease). Interferon gamma-1b is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C and their influence on response to treatment with Pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabri Milotka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thirty to 50% of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC have one or more extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of EHMs and to investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon (Peg­IFN­α­2a plus ribavirin therapy in patients with HCV­related EHMs. Methods. The study included 280 patients suffering from CHC and treated with Peg­IFN­α­2a and ribavirin. The patients were divided in two groups according to presence or absence of EHMs. We evaluated virological response to antiviral therapy. Results. One or more EHMs were found among 27.9% of patients. Most frequently they had rheumatoid factor in serum (12.5%, organ­nonspecific antibodies ANA and AGMA (12.4%, thyroid hormone disorders (9.3%, vasculitis (5.7%, diabetes mellitus (4.65%, glomerulonephritis (0.71%, and porphyria cutanea tarda (0.36%. Among the patients with EHMs there was 52.6% of females vs. 30.2% of females in the group of patients without EHMs (p=0.001. HCV genotypes 1 and 4 had 85.9% patients with EHMs vs. 58.4% of patients without EHMs (p=0.000. Progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis were more frequently recorded in the EHM group of patients (32% vs. 23.2%, but without statistically significant difference (p=0.532. Serious adverse events of Peg­IFN­α­2a and ribavirin were statistically significantly recorded among the patients with EHMs (46.1% vs. 12.9%; p=0.000. Sustained virological response among the patients with and without EHMs rated 56.9% and 70.8% respectively (p=0.125. Conclusion. Patients with CHC and EHMs treated with combined Peg­IFN­α­2a and ribavirin experience handling difficulties, more often have serious adverse events, while successful outcome is achieved in about 50% of patients.

  8. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

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    Interferon alfa-2b injection is used to treat a number of conditions.Interferon alfa-2b injection is used alone or in combination ... Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL; a slow-growing blood cancer). Interferon alfa-2b is in a class of medications called ...

  9. The conserved Cockayne syndrome B-piggyBac fusion protein (CSB-PGBD3) affects DNA repair and induces both interferon-like and innate antiviral responses in CSB-null cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Arnold D; Gray, Lucas T; Pavelitz, Thomas; Newman, John C; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Weiner, Alan M

    2012-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a segmental progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF-like ATPase required for transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Over 43Mya before marmosets diverged from humans, a piggyBac3 (PGBD3) transposable element integrated into intron 5 of the CSB gene. As a result, primate CSB genes now generate both CSB protein and a conserved CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in which the first 5 exons of CSB are alternatively spliced to the PGBD3 transposase. Using a host cell reactivation assay, we show that the fusion protein inhibits TCR of oxidative damage but facilitates TCR of UV damage. We also show by microarray analysis that expression of the fusion protein alone in CSB-null UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) cells induces an interferon-like response that resembles both the innate antiviral response and the prolonged interferon response normally maintained by unphosphorylated STAT1 (U-STAT1); moreover, as might be expected based on conservation of the fusion protein, this potentially cytotoxic interferon-like response is largely reversed by coexpression of functional CSB protein. Interestingly, expression of CSB and the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein together, but neither alone, upregulates the insulin growth factor binding protein IGFBP5 and downregulates IGFBP7, suggesting that the fusion protein may also confer a metabolic advantage, perhaps in the presence of DNA damage. Finally, we show that the fusion protein binds in vitro to members of a dispersed family of 900 internally deleted piggyBac elements known as MER85s, providing a potential mechanism by which the fusion protein could exert widespread effects on gene expression. Our data suggest that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein is important in both health and disease, and could play a role in Cockayne syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus: role of type I interferon signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Shah, Nirav R; Murphy, Andrea M; Hastie, Eric; Mukherjee, Pinku; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-02-05

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy takes advantage of common cancer characteristics, such as defective type I interferon (IFN) signaling, to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells with viruses. Our recent study (Murphy et al., 2012. J. Virol. 86, 3073-87) found human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells were highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and suggested at least some resistant cell lines retained functional type I IFN responses. Here we examine cellular responses to infection by the oncolytic VSV recombinant VSV-ΔM51-GFP by analyzing a panel of 11 human PDA cell lines for expression of 33 genes associated with type I IFN pathways. Although all cell lines sensed infection by VSV-ΔM51-GFP and most activated IFN-α and β expression, only resistant cell lines displayed constitutive high-level expression of the IFN-stimulated antiviral genes MxA and OAS. Inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling decreased levels of MxA and OAS and increased VSV infection, replication and oncolysis, further implicating IFN responses in resistance. Unlike VSV, vaccinia and herpes simplex virus infectivity and killing of PDA cells was independent of the type I IFN signaling profile, possibly because these two viruses are better equipped to evade type I IFN responses. Our study demonstrates heterogeneity in the type I IFN signaling status of PDA cells and suggests MxA and OAS as potential biomarkers for PDA resistance to VSV and other OVs sensitive to type I IFN responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune Responses to HCV and Other Hepatitis Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Hyung; Rehermann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Summary Five human hepatitis viruses cause most acute and chronic liver disease worldwide. Over the past 25 years hepatitis C virus (HCV) in particular has received much interest because of its ability to persist in most immunocompetent adults and the lack of a protective vaccine. Here we examine innate and adaptive immune responses to HCV infection. Although HCV activates an innate immune response, it employs an elaborate set of mechanisms to evade interferon (IFN)-based antiviral immunity. By comparing innate and adaptive immune responses to HCV with those to hepatitis A and B viruses, we suggest that prolonged innate immune activation impairs the development of successful adaptive immune responses. Comparative immunology furthermore provides insights into the maintenance of immune protection. We conclude by discussing prospects for an HCV vaccine and future research needs for the hepatitis viruses. PMID:24439265

  12. Close, but no cigar: certain cigars are pseudo-cigarettes designed to evade regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnevo, Cristine D; Hrywna, Mary; Giovenco, Daniel P; Miller Lo, Erin J; O'Connor, Richard J

    2017-05-01

    An abundance of evidence suggests that the tobacco industry's response to increased regulation imposed on cigarettes has been the development of little cigars and filtered cigars which are tobacco products that are merely cigarettes in disguise. Emphasising these products' physical attributes, the tobacco industry has offered cigar products to its consumers as pseudo-cigarettes. For decades, tobacco manufacturers' response to increased cigarette regulation and taxation has been to exploit policy loopholes by offering these little cigars and filtered cigars pseudo-cigarettes that are exempted from this regulatory oversight. As a result, in spite of increased regulations and taxes on cigarettes, smokers can purchase cigars that are almost physically indistinguishable from their cigarettes at a lower cost. This commentary describes the recent evolution of the cigar market in response to federal regulation, and highlights historical cigar industry attempts to evade taxation, capitalise on product features that are off-limits to cigarettes, and capture the shrinking market of cigarette smokers. We present the case that little cigars and filtered cigars, differing very little physically from cigarettes, are products deserving the same regulatory scrutiny. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Sissejuhatus Tubinasse : Marianne Kõrveri "Äraoldud päevade summa" / Tõnu Karjatse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karjatse, Tõnu

    2005-01-01

    Muusikaline dokumentaalfilm "Äraoldud päevade summa" helilooja Eduard Tubinast : stsenarist ja tekstide autor Jüri Reinvere : režissöör Marianne Kõrver : Exitfilm - Eesti Televisioon - SVT (Rootsi)

  14. Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 : Nädalajagu muusikat igale maitsele / Signe Tamberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tamberg, Signe

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Kevadpäevad 2008 muusikaprogrammis: 34. tudengilaulu võistlusest 29. apr. Tartu Sadamateatris, öölaulupeost 28. apr. Kassitoome orus, kontsertidest "Rokime!" 2. mail ja "Folgime" 3. mail Raekoja platsil

  15. Linear Pursuit Differential Game under Phase Constraint on the State of Evader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar Rakhmanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a linear pursuit differential game of one pursuer and one evader. Controls of the pursuer and evader are subjected to integral and geometric constraints, respectively. In addition, phase constraint is imposed on the state of evader, whereas pursuer moves throughout the space. We say that pursuit is completed, if inclusion y(t1-x(t1∈M is satisfied at some t1>0, where x(t and y(t are states of pursuer and evader, respectively, and M is terminal set. Conditions of completion of pursuit in the game from all initial points of players are obtained. Strategy of the pursuer is constructed so that the phase vector of the pursuer first is brought to a given set, and then pursuit is completed.

  16. Uudised : Voices of Europe tuleb Pärdi teosega. Puhkpillipäevad Võrus / Ingrid Peek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peek, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    1. sept. Tallinnas Kaarli kirikus toimuvast kontserdist, kus tuleb ettekandele Pärdi teos "Which was the son of...". 15. aug. avatakse Võrus V noorte puhkpillimängijate suvekool ja Võru vaskpillipäevad

  17. Eesti Suusapäevad Jay Peak´is / Peeter Teedla ; fotod: Peeter Teedla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teedla, Peeter

    2006-01-01

    märtsikuu esimesel nädalalõpul idaranniku eestlaste suusapäevad, osavõtjaid 156, paljud perekondade ja väikeste lastega, organiseerijaks Kristin Raamot. Peeti murdmaasuusatamise - ja slaalomivõistlused

  18. Optimized logic rules reveal interferon-γ-induced modes regulated by histone deacetylases and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Twisk, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P; Thakar, Juilee

    2017-05-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is critical for activating innate and adaptive immunity against tumours and intracellular pathogens. Interferon-γ is secreted at the fetal-maternal interface in pregnant women and mice. The outer layer of the placenta in contact with maternal blood is composed of semi-allogeneic trophoblast cells, which constitute the fetal component of the fetal-maternal interface. The simultaneous presence of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ and trophoblast cells at the fetal-maternal interface appears to represent an immunological paradox, for trophoblastic responses to IFN-γ could potentially lead to activation of maternal immunity and subsequent attack of the placenta. However, our previous studies demonstrate that IFN-γ responsive gene (IRG) expression is negatively regulated in human and mouse trophoblast cells. In human cytotrophoblast and trophoblast-derived choriocarcinoma cells, janus kinase signalling is blocked by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), whereas in mouse trophoblast, histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibit IRG expression. Here, we used genome-wide transcriptional profiling to investigate the collective roles of PTPs and HDACs on regulation of IRG expression in human choriocarcinoma cells. Logic-rules were optimized to derive regulatory modes governing gene expression patterns observed upon different combinations of treatment with PTP and HDAC inhibitors. The results demonstrate that IRGs can be divided into several categories in human choriocarcinoma cells, each of which is subject to distinct mechanisms of repression. Hence, the regulatory modes identified in this study suggest that human trophoblast and choriocarcinoma cells may evade the potentially deleterious consequences of exposure to IFN-γ by using several overlapping mechanisms to block IRG expression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Protective Effect of Panax notoginseng Root Water Extract against Influenza A Virus Infection by Enhancing Antiviral Interferon-Mediated Immune Responses and Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Gi Choi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory illness caused by the influenza A virus, which causes economic losses and social disruption mainly by increasing hospitalization and mortality rates among the elderly and people with chronic diseases. Influenza vaccines are the most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza, but can be completely ineffective if there is an antigenic mismatch between the seasonal vaccine virus and the virus circulating in the community. In addition, influenza viruses resistant to antiviral drugs are emerging worldwide. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines and antiviral drugs against these viruses. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo analyses of the antiviral effect of Panax notoginseng root (PNR, which is used as an herbal medicine and nutritional supplement in Korea and China. We confirmed that PNR significantly prevented influenza virus infection in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. In addition, PNR pretreatment inhibited viral protein (PB1, PB2, HA, NA, M1, PA, M2, and NP and viral mRNA (NS1, HA, PB2, PA, NP, M1, and M2 expression. PNR pretreatment also increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6] and interferon (IFN-beta and the phosphorylation of type-I IFN-related proteins (TANK-binding kinase 1, STAT1, and IRF3 in vitro. In mice exposed to the influenza A H1N1 virus, PNR treatment decreased mortality by 90% and prevented weight loss (by approximately 10% compared with the findings in untreated animals. In addition, splenocytes from PNR-administered mice displayed significantly enhanced natural killer (NK cell activity against YAC-1 cells. Taking these findings together, PNR stimulates an antiviral response in murine macrophages and mice that protects against viral infection, which may be attributable to its ability to stimulate NK cell activity. Further investigations are needed to reveal the molecular

  20. Ribavirin Concentrations Do Not Predict Sustained Virological Response in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Ribavirin and Pegylated Interferon in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kovari

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is an essential component of most current hepatitis C (HCV treatment regimens and still standard of care in the combination with pegylated interferon (pegIFN to treat chronic HCV in resource limited settings. Study results in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are contradicting as to whether RBV concentration correlates with sustained virological response (SVR.We included 262 HCV treatment naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS participants treated with RBV and pegIFN between 01.01.2001-01.01.2010, 134 with HCV genotype (GT 1/4, and 128 with GT 2/3 infections. RBV levels were measured retrospectively in stored plasma samples obtained between HCV treatment week 4 and end of therapy. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between RBV concentration and SVR in GT 1/4 and GT 2/3 infections. The analyses were repeated stratified by treatment phase (week 4-12, 13-24, >24 and IL28B genotype (CC versus CT/TT.SVR rates were 35.1% in GT 1/4 and 70.3% in GT 2/3 infections. Overall, median RBV concentration was 2.0 mg/L in GT 1/4, and 1.9 mg/L in GT 2/3, and did not change significantly across treatment phases. Patients with SVR had similar RBV concentrations compared to patients without SVR in both HCV genotype groups. SVR was not associated with RBV levels ≥2.0 mg/L (GT 1/4, OR 1.19 [0.5-2.86]; GT 2/3, 1.94 [0.78-4.80] and ≥2.5 mg/L (GT 1/4, 1.56 [0.64-3.84]; GT 2/3 2.72 [0.85-8.73], regardless of treatment phase, and IL28B genotype.In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegIFN/RBV, therapeutic drug monitoring of RBV concentrations does not enhance the chance of HCV cure, regardless of HCV genotype, treatment phase and IL28B genotype.

  1. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines - but not interferon-β - produced in response to HSV-2 in primary human genital epithelial cells are associated with viral replication and the presence of the virion host shutoff protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Mossman, Karen L; Kaushic, Charu

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether viral replication or viral components that subvert innate responses in other cells, specifically the virion host shutoff (VHS) protein, play a role in determining primary genital epithelial cell (GEC) innate antiviral responses. Cultures of primary female GECs were exposed to wildtype (WT), VHS-deleted (vhsB), or UV-inactivated HSV-2. Antiviral pathway induction was evaluated by measuring nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation by immunofluorescent microscopy. Proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and interferon (IFN) were measured by Luminex or ELISA. Biological activity of IFN-β was evaluated via VSV-GFP bioassay, by blocking secreted IFN-β with neutralizing antibodies and by measuring interferon-stimulated genes by RT-PCR. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were upregulated in primary GECs in response to replication-competent HSV-2, but suppressed in the presence of the VHS protein. In contrast, upregulation of IFN-β depended on viral replication, but was not affected by VHS. However, the IFN-β produced was biologically active and reduced the viral burden. Viral factors such as replication and the presence of the VHS protein play important roles in regulating innate antiviral responses against HSV-2 from primary GECs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. IL28B and IL10R-1087 polymorphisms are protective for chronic genotype 1 HCV infection and predictors of response to interferon-based therapy in an East-Central European cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella; Tornai, István; Szalay, Ferenc; Várszegi, Dalma; Fráter, Edit; Papp, Mária; Lengyel, Gabriella; Fehér, János; Varga, Márta; Gervain, Judit; Schuller, János; Nemes, Zsuzsanna; Péterfi, Zoltán; Tusnádi, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in IL28B and IL10R are associated with sustained virological response (SVR) in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with pegilated interferon plus ribavirin (P/R). The present study extends our earlier investigations on a large East-Central European cohort. The allele frequencies of IL28B and IL10R in genotype 1 HCV infection were compared with that of healthy controls for the purpose of examining the relationsh...

  3. Interferon Beta-1a Improves Urinary Symptoms, Reduces Proviral Load, and Modifies the Immune Response in a Patient with HAM/TSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Davi Tanajura; Sundberg, Michael; Passos, Lúcia; Muniz, André Luiz; Santos, Silvane

    2012-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the known causative agent of a chronic neurologic condition known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although several therapies have been evaluated for HAM/TSP, none have been approved for use in humans. In this paper, we describe a 55-year-old female patient with HAM/TSP who was treated with interferon beta-1a. This patient, in comparison to 20 female patients with HAM/TSP who were not treated, showed improvement in urinary symptoms over four years of therapy, as well as a reduction in HTLV-1 proviral load and serum cytokine levels typically observed in HAM/TSP. This improved outcome merits further controlled studies on the use and efficacy of interferon beta-1a as a therapy for HAM/TSP.

  4. [Case of law-evading herbs poisoning that induced shock and myocardial damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Minoru; Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Miyazaki, Dai; Okamori, Satoshi; Akuzawa, Hisashi; Yuasa, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Law-evading herbs may induce poisoning symptoms, especially when they contain synthetic cannabinoids. However, their detailed pharmacological effects have not yet been clarified. Some reports have previously described symptoms of poisoning, but only a few reports have so far described shock and myocardial damage (MD). We experienced a case of shock and MD in a patient who had smoked law-evading herbs. A 61-year-old male presented at an emergency department 8 hours after smoking law-evading herbs (Rush Trip, High Men Monster) with chest pain. A vasopressor agent was administered to treat shock and antiarrhythmic drugs were administered due to ventricular arrhythmia. The contents of the law-evading herbs were unknown, so an in-hospital follow-up was conducted to treat the patient's symptoms. The follow-up blood test showed an increased level of cardiac enzymes, which thereafter demonstrated a spontaneous remission. The systemic conditions tended to improve and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the 5th hospital day. The contents of the law-evading herbs in question were thereafter,analyzed, and synthetic cannabinoids (JWH-210, JWH-081 and JWH-122) as well as caffeine were detected. The cause for the poisoning symptoms were suspected to be the presence of synthetic cannabinoids and caffeine. Such law-evading herbs may contain synthetic cannabinoids and caffeine which both may induce shock and MD.

  5. Casein kinase 1α mediates degradation of receptors for type I and type II interferons caused by hemagglutinin of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan; Wolf, Jennifer J; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Studstill, Caleb J; Ma, Wenjun; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2018-01-17

    Although influenza A virus (IAV) evades cellular defense systems to effectively propagate in the host, the viral immune evasive mechanisms are incompletely understood. Our recent data showed that hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV induces degradation of type I IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Here, we demonstrate that IAV HA induces degradation of type II IFN (IFN-γ) receptor 1 (IFNGR1) as well as IFNAR1 via casein kinase 1α (CK1α), resulting in the impairment of cellular responsiveness to both type I and II IFNs. IAV infection or transient HA expression induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1, whereas HA gene-deficient IAV failed to downregulate the receptors. IAV HA caused the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of IFNGR1, leading to the lysosome-dependent degradation of IFNGR1. Influenza viral HA strongly decreased cellular sensitivity to type II IFNs, as it suppressed the activation of STAT1 and the induction of IFN-γ-stimulated genes in response to exogenously supplied recombinant IFN-γ. Importantly, CK1α, but not p38 MAP kinase or protein kinase D2, was proven to be critical for HA-induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α or siRNA-based knockdown of CK1α repressed the degradation process of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1 triggered by IAV infection. Further, CK1α was shown to be pivotal for proficient replication of IAV. Collectively, the results suggest that IAV HA induces degradation of IFN receptors via CK1α, creating a condition favorable for viral propagation. Therefore, the study uncovers a new immune evasive pathway of influenza virus.IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a grave threat to humans by causing seasonal and pandemic influenza. Upon infection, the innate and adaptive immunity such as the interferon (IFN) response is induced to protect hosts against IAV infection. However, IAV seems to be equipped with tactics to evade the IFN-mediated antiviral responses. Yet, the detailed mechanisms need to be elucidated

  6. POLYMORPHIC VARIANTS OF THE GENE OF INTERFERON LAMBDA 3 AND FEATURES OF IMMUNE RESPONSE IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Sentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the immune manifestations of the interferon-lambda 3 genepolymorphism in chronic viral hepatitis C, 110 Russian children (54 girls and 56 boys with chronic HCV infection aged from 3 to 17 years were examined. All children were on combined therapy (pegylated interferon + ribavirin. It was found that among the studied polymorphic variants of the IFN-λ 3 gene in children with chronic HCV infection, T allele of the marker rs12979860 is associated with infection and chronization of HCV. The T/T rs12979860 genotype of the IFN-λ3 gene is unfavorable for the course of chronic HCV infection due to low levels of activated T-lymphocytes, intactness of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and interferon-γ inducible protein IP-10. The revealed relation of the polymorphic variants of C/C + C/T locus rs12979860 of INF-λ3 gene with the expression of activated T-lymphocytes discloses the protective nature of these genotypes to the development of chronic HCV infection in children. 

  7. Blood Interferon Signatures Putatively Link Lack of Protection Conferred by the RTS,S Recombinant Malaria Vaccine to an Antigen-specific IgE Response [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Progress has been made in recent years with the development of vaccines that could pave the way towards protection of hundreds of millions of exposed individuals. Here we used a modular repertoire approach to re-analyze a publically available microarray blood transcriptome dataset monitoring the response to malaria vaccination. We report the seminal identification of interferon signatures in the blood of subjects on days 1, 3 and 14 following administration of the third dose of the RTS,S recombinant malaria vaccine. These signatures at day 1 correlate with protection, and at days 3 and 14 to susceptibility to subsequent challenge of study subjects with live parasites. In addition we putatively link the decreased abundance of interferon-inducible transcripts observed at days 3 and 14 post-vaccination with the elicitation of an antigen-specific IgE response in a subset of vaccine recipients that failed to be protected by the RTS,S vaccine. Furthermore, profiling of antigen-specific levels of IgE in a Mozambican cohort of malaria-exposed children vaccinated with RTS,S identified an association between elevated baseline IgE levels and subsequent development of naturally acquired malaria infection during follow up. Taken together these findings warrant further investigation of the role of antigen-specific IgE in conferring susceptibility to malaria infection.

  8. Stealth nanotubes: strategies of shielding carbon nanotubes to evade opsonization and improve biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagiri, Nalinikanth; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been in the limelight for their potential role in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as in tissue engineering. Before these medical applications can be realized, there is a need to address issues like opsonization, phagocytosis by macrophages, and sequestration to the liver and spleen for eventual elimination from the body; along with equally important issues such as aqueous solubility, dispersion, biocompatibility, and biofunctionalization. CNTs have not been shown to be able to evade such biological obstacles, which include their nonspecific attachments to cells and other biological components in the bloodstream, before reaching target tissues and cells in vivo. This will eventually determine their longevity in circulation and clearance rate from the body. This review article discusses the current status, challenges, practical strategies, and implementations of coating CNTs with biocompatible and opsonin-resistant moieties, rendering CNTs transparent to opsonins and deceiving the innate immune response to make believe that the CNTs are not foreign. A holistic approach to the development of such “stealth” CNTs is presented, which encompasses not only several biophysicochemical factors that are not limited to surface treatment of CNTs, but also extraneous biological factors such as the protein corona formation that inevitably controls the in vivo fate of the particles. This review also discusses the present and potential applications, along with the future directions, of CNTs and their hybrid-based nanotheranostic agents for multiplex, multimodal molecular imaging and therapy, as well as in other applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:24872705

  9. Evading plant immunity: feedback control of the T3SS in Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark; Buck, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Microbes are responsible for over 10% of the global yield losses in staple crops such as wheat, rice, and maize. Understanding the decision-making strategies that enable bacterial plant pathogens to evade the host immune system and cause disease is essential for managing their ever growing threat to food security. Many utilise the needle-like type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress plant immunity, by injecting effector proteins that inhibit eukaryotic signalling pathways into the host cell cytoplasm. Plants can in turn evolve resistance to specific pathogens via recognition and blocking of the T3SS effectors, so leading to an ongoing co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between pathogen and host pairs. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL co-ordinates the expression of the T3SS regulon in the leaf-dwelling Pseudomonas syringae and similar pathogens. Recently, we showed that association of HrpL with a target promoter directly adjacent to the hrpL gene imposes negative autogenous control on its own expression level due to overlapping regulatory elements. Our results suggest that by down-regulating T3SS function, this fine-tuning mechanism enables P. syringae to minimise effector-mediated elicitation of plant immunity. PMID:28435841

  10. Immune responses to live and inactivated Nocardia seriolae and protective effect of recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN γ) against nocardiosis in ginbuna crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sukanta Kumar; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2014-08-01

    Looking into the fact that substantial mortality and morbidity is associated with intracellular Gram +ve bacterium, Nocardia seriolae infection, an effective vaccine against this pathogen is necessary to control the significant losses in aquaculture practices. Therefore, an attempt was made to evaluate the effect of live (sub-lethal) and inactivated (antigenic form) N. seriolae on cellular and humoral immunity in ginbuna crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii as well as the therapeutic potency of recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN γ) against N. seriolae infection. Effect of live and inactivated N. seriolae immunisation on the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, CD8α(+) T cells and surface Ig M(+) cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, spleen, head kidney and trunk kidney of ginbuna was studied after 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th and 30th day post immunisation. The percentage of CD8α(+) T cells in spleen and head kidney of ginbuna was significantly higher at 3rd day post immunisation. Similarly, surface Ig M(+) cells level was found to increase in both live and inactivated N. seriolae immunised groups. On the contrary, high percentage of CD4(+) T cells was observed in live N. seriolae immunised group in both the head and trunk kidneys at 30th day post immunisation. The humoral immune response to live and inactivated N. seriolae immunised ginbuna showed high antibody titre at 15th day post immunisation but the level declined subsequently in both the immunised groups. On challenge with virulent N. seriolae (1.2 × 10(8) CFU/ml), the relative percent survival was 62.5 and 75 in live and inactivated N. seriolae immunised groups, respectively. Furthermore, we have also studied the therapeutic potency of rIFN γ and found the possible involvement of IFN γ in resistance mechanism in fish. Administration of rIFN γ into ginbuna (at 10 μg/fish) one day before challenge study was found to protect ginbuna. The relative percent survival of ginbuna was 43.75 and 60 when

  11. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-? is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J; Kratzke, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-? (VSV-IFN?) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFN? against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFN?. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFN? were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resi...

  12. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C and their influence on response to treatment with Pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin

    OpenAIRE

    Fabri Milotka; Ružić Maja; Lendak Dajana; Preveden Tomislav; Fabri Izabela; Petrić Vedrana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Thirty to 50% of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) have one or more extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of EHMs and to investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon (Peg­IFN)­α­2a plus ribavirin therapy in patients with HCV­related EHMs. Methods. The study included 280 patients suffering from CHC and treated with Peg­IFN­α­2a and ribavirin. The patients were divided...

  13. Interferon Production by Nonviral Stimuli of Microbial Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngner, Julius S.

    1970-01-01

    An increasing number of nonviral materials of microbial origin has been reported to stimulate the production of interferon in cell cultures and (or) in animals. These materials include (a) gram-negative bacteria or the endotoxins prepared from their cell walls, (b) other microorganisms such as Rickettsiae, Bedsoniae, Protozoa, and (c) fungal products such as a mannan from Candida and various antibiotics which act as protein synthesis inhibitors, e.g., glutarimide antibiotics and tenuazonic acid. A summary is presented of the current state of knowledge about interferon production in animals by the most thoroughly studied nonviral substance of microbial origin, bacterial endotoxin. Further evidence is presented which clearly distinguishes the "endotoxin-type" of interferon response in animals from the response seen after the injection of virus. The data suggest that the release of preformed interferon from the tissues occurs in animals injected with endotoxin. On the other hand, interferon produced in response to the injection of virus is newly synthesized protein. While the exact chemical structure of the component of bacterial endotoxin responsible for interferon release has not yet been elucidated, it is clear that the lipid portion of the lipopolysaccharide, rather than the O-specific polysaccharide side chains or the core polysaccharide, is the active moiety. PMID:19873672

  14. Inhibition of STAT Pathway Impairs Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Effect of Interferon Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Juan Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT pathway plays an important role in antiviral efficacy of interferon alpha (IFN-α. IFN-α is the main therapeutic against hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. We explored effects of IFN-α on HCV replication and antiviral gene expression by targeting STAT. Methods: In response to IFN-α, STAT status, HCV replication, and antiviral gene expression were analyzed in human hepatoma Huh7.5.1 cells before and after cell culture-derived HCV infection. Results: IFN-α treatment induced expression and phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 in Huh7.5.1 cells. Pretreatment of Huh7.5.1 cells with a mAb to IFN alpha receptor (IFNAR 2 decreased IFN-α-dependent phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2, whereas pretreatment with an IFNAR1 mAb increased such phosphorylation, suggesting that IFNAR mediates IFN-α-triggered STAT signaling. During HCV infection, STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation could be rescued by IFN-α and IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 was impaired. Inhibition of STAT pathway by Jak inhibitor I significantly enhanced HCV RNA replication and viral protein expression. Antiviral genes coding for IFN regulatory factor 9 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 were up-regulated by IFN-α during HCV infection but such up-regulation was abrogated by Jak inhibitor I. Conclusion: These results establish that activation of STAT pathway is essential for anti-HCV efficacy of IFN-α. Impairment of IFN-α-triggered STAT signaling by HCV may account for evading IFN-α response.

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauber, Chris; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    4 could be a tissue-specific regulation of an unknown subset of genes. To address both tissue and subtype specificity in the interferon response, we treated primary human hepatocytes and airway epithelial cells with IFNα, IFNλ3 or IFNλ4 and assessed interferon mediated gene regulation using...... genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium....

  16. The close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by real-time mapping shear wave elastography and the presence of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with a sustained virological response to interferon for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yasuharu; Taira, Jun-Ichi; Okada, Mayumi; Ando, Mayumi; Sano, Takatomo; Miyata, Yuhki; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Nakamura, Ikuo; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2015-07-01

    Some patients develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CH-C). The aim of this study was to examine the linkage between liver elasticity and the presence/absence of HCC in patients after SVR. We enrolled 42 patients who underwent real-time mapping shear wave elastography (SWE) after SVR to interferon therapy for CH-C. Of the 42 patients, six had HCC and 36 did not. We retrospectively compared the elasticity modulus and other clinical parameters between patients with and without HCC. Elasticity modulus measured by SWE, age, and serum albumin was significantly different between patients with and without HCC. Age, Fibrosis-4 index, serum gamma-globulin, total protein, and albumin levels were significantly correlated with the elasticity modulus. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves of elasticity modulus, gamma-globulin, and age for the presence of HCC were 0.963, 0.888, and 0.778, respectively. In patients with an elasticity modulus ≥6.5 kPa, both sensitivity and specificity for the presence of HCC were 83.3 %. The study demonstrated the close linkage between the elasticity modulus measured by SWE and the presence of HCC in patients after SVR.

  17. Cystic craniopharyngioma: intratumoral chemotherapy with alpha interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Alessandra Dastoli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the cystic craniopharyngiomas can be controlled with the use of intratumoral applications of interferon alpha. METHOD: Nineteen patients with the diagnosis of cystic craniopharyngioma were treated with intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha from January 2002 to April 2006. All patients underwent placement of an intracystic catheter connected to an Ommaya reservoir. Through this reservoir were made applications during chemotherapy cycles. Each cycle corresponded to application of 3,000,000 units of interferon alpha three times per week on alternate days totalizing 36,000,000 units. Response to treatment was evaluated by calculating the tumor volume on MRI control after one, three and six months after the end of each cycle. Patients who developed worsening of symptoms or who had insignificant reduction in tumor volume during follow-up underwent repeat cycle chemotherapy. RESULTS: Four patients received four cycles of chemotherapy, three patients received three cycles, six patients received two cycles and six patients received one. The lower percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 60% and the bigger reduction was 98.37%. Eleven patients had a reduction greater than 90%. Five patients had a tumor reduction between 75 and 90% and in three patients the tumors were reduced by less than 75%. No deaths occurred during treatment and side effects of interferon alpha were well tolerated. No treatment was discontinued. Follow-up after the last application ranged from one year and five months to three years and nine months. CONCLUSION: The intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha decreases the volume of cystic craniopharyngiomas and so far can be considered a new therapeutic alternative.

  18. An Investigation Into Australian Personal Tax Evaders - Their Attitudes Towards Compliance And The Penalties For Non-Compliance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ken Devos

    2009-01-01

    .... This study investigates the relationship that exists between selected tax compliance variables and the attitudes and behaviour of Australian personal 'tax evaders' towards compliance and the penalties...

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaul Karim

    Full Text Available Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity for sustained periods of time. To understand the mechanisms underlying hrHPV's capacity to evade immunity, we studied PRR signaling in non, newly, and persistently hrHPV-infected keratinocytes. We found that active infection with hrHPV hampered the relay of signals downstream of the PRRs to the nucleus, thereby affecting the production of type-I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This suppression was shown to depend on hrHPV-induced expression of the cellular protein ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1 in keratinocytes. UCHL1 accomplished this by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3 K63 poly-ubiquitination which lead to lower levels of TRAF3 bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 and a reduced phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3. Furthermore, UCHL1 mediated the degradation of the NF-kappa-B essential modulator with as result the suppression of p65 phosphorylation and canonical NF-κB signaling. We conclude that hrHPV exploits the cellular protein UCHL1 to evade host innate immunity by suppressing PRR-induced keratinocyte-mediated production of interferons, cytokines and chemokines, which normally results in the attraction and activation of an adaptive immune response. This identifies UCHL1 as a negative regulator of PRR-induced immune responses and consequently its virus-increased expression as a strategy for hrHPV to persist.

  20. T-cell homeostasis in chronic HCV-infected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin or an interferon-free regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Birch, Carsten; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2015-01-01

    -cell homeostasis before, during, and after HCV treatment with or without interferon-α in patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 20 patients with chronic HCV infection were treated with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin, and six patients were treated with an interferon-free regimen. All patients were...... compared to prior treatment values. Finally, a proportion of CD8+ effector memory was lower while proportion of apoptotic T cells was higher after sustained virologic response compared to prior treatment. Despite lymphopenia during interferon, alterations in T-cell homeostasis during treatment were...

  1. Response to treatment with interferon-alfa in patients with chronic hepatitis C and high titers of -M2, -M4 and -M8 antimitochondrial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Palma, G; Sánchez Cuenca, J M; Olaso, V; Pina, R; Urquijo, J J; López Viedma, B; Bustamante, M; Berenguer, M; Berenguer, J

    1999-03-01

    The prevalence of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in chronic hepatitis C is 2%; titers of AMA are usually low ( 1:160). to undertake a preliminary analysis of the submitochondrial profile of AMA in three patients with chronic hepatitis C and positive AMA titers (> 1:160). we determined antibodies to submitochondrial particles (subtypes) -M2, -M4 and -M8 by ELISA, complement binding (CB) and western immunoblotting with Immunoblot-M2 or WIB-M2 (immunoreactive bands). two patients were positive for mitochondrial subtypes by ELISA (IgG/IgM subclass) and CB (ELISA M2 470/365 in patient 1 and 600/1370 in patient 2; M4 490/1200 in patient 2. CB M2 1:128, M4 1:64, M8 1:64 in patient 1, M2 1:128 in patient 2). Immunoreactive epitopes (bands) were detected with WIB-M2 for 70, 56, 51, 45 and 36-kDa molecules. Interferon-alfa treatment was unsuccessful, with biochemical exacerbation of cholestasis. In contrast, the patient with no submitochondrial particles according to ELISA, CB and WIB-M2 results responded favorable to this drug. these preliminary results suggest that analyses to detect antibodies to submitochondrial particles (-M2, -M4 and -M8 subtypes) and -M2-immunoreactive epitopes in patients with chronic hepatitis C and AMA titers > 1:160 facilitates the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis, and establishes a contraindication for treatment with interferon-alfa despite the presence of HCV infection.

  2. Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Schwab, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 xzp. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion.

  3. Eesti Muusika Päevad 2000 : ECPNMi juhatus Tallinnas / Consuelo Diez ; interv. Evelin Kõrvits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diez, Consuelo

    2000-01-01

    28.-30. apr. pidas Tallinnas aastakoosolekut ning külastas Eesti Muusika Päevade kontserte ECPNMi (European Conference of Promoters of New Music) juhatus. ECPNMi juhatuse liikmed räägivad uue muusika üritustest oma riikides, muljeid eesti muusika päevadelt

  4. Märtsipäevade valupisaraid peab lastele näitama / Anu Bollverk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bollverk, Anu

    2009-01-01

    1949. aasta märtsiküüditamisele pühendatud mälestuspäevast Koeru kultuurimajas ning sealse huviteatri poolt ette kantud Herbert Lasti näidendist "Valupisarais märtsipäevad" (lavastajad Herbert Last ja Uno Aav)

  5. Eesti muusika päevad - üks kord aastas, kõigile / Jelena Gandshu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gandshu, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Muusikateadlased Jelena Gandshu ja Gerhard Lock, heliloojad Age Hirv ja Liis Jürgens 3.-10. aprillini toimunud Eesti muusika päevade kontsertidest: kinos Sõprus "Sensatsioon!!!", Kultuuritehases Polymer "Cellissimo", Estonia kontserdisaalis ERSO "Sümfoonilised hääled", Tallinna raekojas Mihkel Poll ja Oliver Kuusik, Katariina kirikus PaukenfEst, Nigulistes Jüri Reinvere autorikontsert. Järgneb

  6. Matemaatikaõpetajate pidupäevad Tartus / Viia Keeru, Tiit Lepmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Keeru, Viia

    2009-01-01

    36. matemaatikaõpetajate päevadest, mis pühendati professor Olaf Prinitsa 85. sünniaastapäevale. Päevade lõpus selgusid tänavused professor G. Rägo nimelise medali laureaadid, kelle seas olid ka TLÜ Haapsalu Kolledži lektor Sirje Piht ja TLÜ matemaatika didaktika dotsent Madis Lepik

  7. Nüüdismuusika päevad pakuvad põnevat kuulamist

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Pärnu nüüdismuusika päevade "Muusika ja arhitektuur" raames 20. jaan. esinevad loengutega Endla teatri sammassaalis arhitektid Veronika Valk ja Leonhard Lapin ning muusikateadlased Gerhard Lock ja Jaan Ross. Toivo Tulevi autorikontserdist Agape keskuses

  8. Strategies of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica to evade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecules expressed by the pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba histolytica but weakly expressed or absent from the non-pathogenic ameoba Entamoeba dispar could be used by intestinal epithelial cells to discriminate between the two species and to initiate an appropriate inflammatory response. Among the possible ...

  9. Hepatitis B virus evades innate immunity of hepatocytes but activates cytokine production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoming; Xia, Yuchen; Serti, Elisavet; Block, Peter Daniel; Chung, Michelle; Chayama, Kazuaki; Rehermann, Barbara; Liang, T Jake

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes specifically and causes immune-mediated liver damage. How HBV interacts with the innate immunity at the early phase of infection, either with hepatocytes or other cells in the liver, remains controversial. To address this question, we utilized various human cell-culture models and humanized Alb-uPA/SCID mice. All these models were unable to mount an interferon (IFN) response despite robust HBV replication. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the lack of IFN response, we examined whether HBV actively inhibits innate immune functions of hepatocytes. By treating HBV-infected cells with known inducers of the IFN signaling pathway, we observed no alteration of either sensing or downstream IFN response by HBV. We showed that the DNA innate sensing pathways are poorly active in hepatocytes, consistent with muted innate immune recognition of HBV. Upon exposure to high-level HBV, human macrophages could be activated with increased inflammatory cytokine expressions. HBV behaves like a "stealth" virus and is not sensed by, nor actively interferes with, the intrinsic innate immunity of infected hepatocytes. Macrophages are capable of sensing HBV, but require exposure to high HBV titers, potentially explaining the long "window period" during acute infection and HBV's propensity to chronic infection. (Hepatology 2017;66:1779-1793). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Kayar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet’s disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon.

  11. The impact of interleukin 28b gene polymorphism on the virological response to combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy in chronic HCV genotype 4 infected egyptian patients using data mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Marwa; Fouad, Rabab; Mabrouk, Mahassen; El-Akel, Wafaa; Awad, Abu Bakr; Salama, Rabab; Elnegouly, Mayada; Shaker, Olfat

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HCV represents one of the common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide with Egypt having the highest prevalence, namely genotype 4. Interleukin IL-28B gene polymorphism has been shown to relate to HCV treatment response, mainly in genotype1. We aim to evaluate the predictive power of the rs12979860 IL28B SNP and its protein for treatment response in genotype 4 Egyptian patients by regression analysis and decision tree analysis. The study included 263 chronic HCV Egyptian patients receiving peg-interferon and ribavirin therapy. Patients were classified into 3 groups; non responders (83patients), relapsers (76patients) and sustained virological responders (104 patients). Serum IL 28 B was performed, DNA was extracted and analyzed by direct sequencing of the SNP rs 12979860 of IL28B gene. CT, CC and TT represented 56 %, 25 % and 19% of the patients, respectively. Absence of C allele (TT genotype) was significantly correlated with the early failure of response while CC was associated with sustained virological response. The decision tree showed that baseline alpha fetoprotein (AFP ≤ 2.68 ng/ml) was the variable of initial split (the strongest predictor of response) confirmed by regression analysis. Patients with TT genotype had the highest probability of failure of response. Absence of the C allele was significantly associated with failure of response. The presence of C allele was associated with a favorable outcome. AFP is a strong baseline predictor of HCV treatment response. A decision tree model is useful for predicting the probability of response to therapy.

  12. HSV-1 targets lymphatic vessels in the eye and draining lymph node of mice leading to edema in the absence of a functional type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher D; Cohen, Alex; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2013-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induces new lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) in the cornea via expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by virally infected epithelial cells. Here, we extend this observation to demonstrate the selective targeting of corneal lymphatics by HSV-1 in the absence of functional type I interferon (IFN) pathway. Specifically, we examined the impact of HSV-1 replication on angiogenesis using type I IFN receptor deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice. HSV-1-induced lymphatic and blood vessel growth into the cornea proper was time-dependent in immunocompetent animals. In contrast, there was an initial robust growth of lymphatic vessels into the cornea of HSV-1-infected CD118(-/-)mice, but such vessels disappeared by day 5 postinfection. The loss was selective as blood vessel integrity remained intact. Magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy analysis of the draining lymph nodes of CD118(-/-) mice revealed extensive edema and loss of lymphatics compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a loss of lymphatic vessels in CD118(-/-) mice, HSV-1 infection resulted in epithelial thinning associated with geographic lesions and edema within the cornea, which is consistent with a loss of lymphatic vasculature. These results underscore the key role functional type I IFN pathway plays in the maintenance of structural integrity within the cornea in addition to the anti-viral characteristics often ascribed to the type I IFN cytokine family. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kratzke, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC. PMID:26431376

  14. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R; Jacobson, Blake A; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E; Dash, Alexander S; Kratzke, Andrea K; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; Kratzke, Robert A

    2015-10-20

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC.

  15. Macrophage-Lineage Cells Negatively Regulate the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Pool in Response to Interferon Gamma at Steady State and During Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Amanda; Zhang, Yubin; Thai, Vinh; Jones, Maura; Jordan, Michael B; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2015-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) resident macrophages (Mϕs) regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization; however, their impact on HSC function has not been investigated. We demonstrate that depletion of BM resident Mϕs increases HSC proliferation as well as the pool of quiescent HSCs. At the same time, during bacterial infection where BM resident Mϕs are selectively increased we observe a decrease in HSC numbers. Moreover, strategies that deplete or reduce Mϕs during infection prevent HSC loss and rescue HSC function. We previously found that the transient loss of HSCs during infection is interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-dependent. We now demonstrate that IFNγ signaling specifically in Mϕs is critical for both the diminished HSC pool and maintenance of BM resident Mϕs during infection. In addition to the IFNγ-dependent loss of BM HSC and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during infection, IFNγ reduced circulating HSPC numbers. Importantly, under infection conditions AMD3100 or G-CSF-induced stem cell mobilization was impaired. Taken together, our data show that IFNγ acts on Mϕs, which are a negative regulator of the HSC pool, to drive the loss in BM and peripheral HSCs during infection. Our findings demonstrate that modulating BM resident Mϕ numbers can impact HSC function in vivo, which may be therapeutically useful for hematologic conditions and refinement of HSC transplantation protocols. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Interferon-gamma released from omental adipose tissue of insulin-resistant humans alters adipocyte phenotype and impairs response to insulin and adiponectin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, J M; Zhang, J-G; Bandala-Sanchez, E; Naselli, G; Liu, R; Ritchie, M; Smyth, G K; O'Brien, P E; Harrison, L C

    2017-12-01

    Inflammatory factors derived from adipose tissue have been implicated in mediating insulin resistance in obesity. We sought to identify these using explanted human adipose tissue exposed to innate and adaptive immune stimuli. Subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant donors was cultured in the presence of macrophage and T-cell stimuli, and the conditioned medium tested for its ability to inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes. The nature of the inhibitory factor in conditioned medium was characterized physicochemically, inferred by gene microarray analysis and confirmed by antibody neutralization. Conditioned medium from omental adipose tissue exposed to a combination of macrophage- and T-cell stimuli inhibited insulin action and adiponectin secretion in SGBS adipocytes. This effect was associated with a pronounced change in adipocyte morphology, characterized by a decreased number of lipid droplets of increased size. The bioactivity of conditioned medium was abolished by trypsin treatment and had a molecular weight of 46 kDa by gel filtration. SGBS adipocytes exposed to a bioactive medium expressed multiple gene transcripts regulated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Recombinant human IFN-γ recapitulated the effects of the bioactive medium and neutralizing antibody against IFN-γ but not other candidate factors abrogated medium bioactivity. IFN-γ released from inflamed omental adipose tissue may contribute to the metabolic abnormalities seen in human obesity.

  17. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  18. Mechanisms by which Porphyromonas gingivalis evades innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Kaveh; Chen, Tsute; Klein, Brian A; Tai, Albert K; Coursen, Jill; Liu, Xiangdong; Skinner, Jeff; Periasamy, Saravanan; Choi, Youngnim; Kessler, Benedikt M; Palmer, Robert J; Gittis, Apostolos; Matzinger, Polly; Duncan, Margaret J; Singh, Nevil J

    2017-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to unique resident microbial communities whose interactions with host immunity are less frequently studied than those of the intestinal microbiome. We examined the stimulatory capacity and the interactions of two oral bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), on Dendritic Cell (DC) activation, comparing them to the effects of the well-studied intestinal microbe Escherichia coli (E. coli). Unlike F. nucleatum and E. coli, P. gingivalis failed to activate DCs, and in fact silenced DC responses induced by F. nucleatum or E. coli. We identified a variant strain of P. gingivalis (W50) that lacked this immunomodulatory activity. Using biochemical approaches and whole genome sequencing to compare the two substrains, we found a point mutation in the hagA gene. This protein is though to be involved in the alteration of the PorSS/gingipain pathway, which regulates protein secretion into the extracellular environment. A proteomic comparison of the secreted products of the two substrains revealed enzymatic differences corresponding to this phenotype. We found that P. gingivalis secretes gingipain(s) that inactivate several key proinflammatory mediators made by DCs and/or T cells, but spare Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and GM-CSF, which can cause capillary leaks that serve as a source of the heme that P. gingivalis requires for its survival, and GM-CSF, which can cause epithelial-cell growth. Taken together, our results suggest that P. gingivalis has evolved potent mechanisms to modulate its virulence factors and dampen the innate immune response by selectively inactivating most proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Rhadinoviral interferon regulatory factor homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F

    2017-07-26

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is a gammaherpesvirus and the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The KSHV genome contains genes for a unique group of proteins with homology to cellular interferon regulatory factors, termed viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs). This review will give an overview over the oncogenic, antiapoptotic and immunomodulatory characteristics of KSHV and related vIRFs.

  20. Evaluation of the single cervical skin test and interferon gamma responses to detect Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle in a herd co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seva, Juan; Sanes, Jose M; Ramis, Guillermo; Mas, Alberto; Quereda, Juan J; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Villar, David; Pallares, Francisco J

    2014-06-25

    This study reports the performance of the single intradermal tuberculin (SIT) test and the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay for Mycobacterium bovis in a cattle herd with high prevalence of paratuberculosis (PTB). A total of 58/350 animals were selected for necropsy based on one or more of the following criteria: positive to SIT, IFN-γ, a breeding cow that seroconverted to PTB and showed signs compatible with a wasting disease. Infection status was determined by post mortem diagnostic tests that included histopathology examination, mycobacterial cultures and PCR identification for M. bovis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). In 7/58 animals primary tuberculosis (TB) lesions, affecting only the retropharyngeal and/or mediastinal lymph nodes, were found; 3/7 animals were found SIT positive. PTB was confirmed in 35/58 animals, of which 30 had seroconverted and 14 had typical clinical signs. 45/58 animals were IFN-γ(+) using the most stringent criterion (cut-off point ≥ 0.05); however, IFN-γ test was only positive in 33 animals when using a higher threshold (cut-off point ≥ 0.1). Three animals co-infected also showed extensive TB and diffuse PTB lesions. These results show that the combined use of SIT and IFN-γ, as interpreted using official guidelines, detected all confirmed cases of TB. Individually, the sensitivity of the SIT was inadequate to diagnose TB-positive animals with an advanced stage of PTB. The large number of IFN-γ(+) animals with no visible TB lesion could be due, in part, to some protection conferred by prior infection with MAP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interferon gamma-inducible protein 10: a predictive marker of successful treatment response in hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeremski, Marija; Markatou, Marianthi; Brown, Queenie B; Dorante, Gary; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Talal, Andrew H

    2007-07-01

    Elevated pretreatment interferon (IFN) gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) levels are a marker of treatment nonresponse in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected patients. We undertook this study to determine if IP-10 is a marker of treatment outcome in HCV/HIV-coinfected patients. Nineteen HCV/HIV-coinfected patients were treated with weight-based pegylated (PEG) IFNalpha-2b (1.5 microg/kg) once weekly plus weight-based ribavirin (1000 or 1200 mg) daily for up to 48 weeks. Plasma IP-10, monokine induced by IFNgamma/CXCL9 (Mig), and IFN-inducible T-cell alpha-chemoattractant/CXCL11 (I-TAC) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on samples obtained frequently during the first 3 PEG-IFN doses and throughout treatment. Median pretreatment plasma IP-10 (interquartile range [IQR]) levels were significantly lower in virological responders (n=6) at 217 (IQR: 181-301) pg/mL compared with nonresponders (n=13) at 900 (IQR: 628-2048) pg/mL (P=0.002), whereas pretreatment Mig and I-TAC levels did not differ significantly. Plasma IP-10 levels of 400 pg/mL before treatment and on days 7 and 14 could be used to identify likely coinfected PEG-IFN/ribavirin nonresponders. PEG-IFN-induced elevations in IP-10 were greater in virological responders than in nonresponders (approximately 10-fold vs. approximately 4-fold) after the first PEG-IFN dose. IP-10 may be a biomarker of HCV treatment outcome in difficult-to-treat HCV/HIV-coinfected patients.

  2. evad : [luuletused] / Philip Larkin ; inglise keelest tlk. Maarja Kangro

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Larkin, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Sisu: Päevad ; Mitte midagi öelda ; See olgu värss ; Uurimus lugemisharjumustest ; Hommage valitsusele ; Vesi ; Vajakud ; Viige üks koju lastele ; Jutt voodis ; Kõrged aknad ; Sa jätkad elu ; Kui. Orig.: Days ; Nothing to be said ; This be the verse ; A study of reading habits ; Homage to a government ; Water ; Wants ; Take one home for the kiddies ; Talking in bed ; High windows ; Continuing to live ; If

  3. DO PENALTIES AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES MAKE TAXPAYERS MORE COMPLIANT? THE VIEW OF AUSTRALIAN TAX EVADERS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Ken Devos

    2013-01-01

    The tax compliance literature indicates that many factors, including, economic, social, psychological and demographic, impact upon the compliance behaviour of individual taxpayers. This study explores the relationship, if any, that exists between selected tax compliance and demographic variables and the compliance behaviour of Australian individual tax evaders. The study employed a mixed method research approach comprising both a survey and interviews. The findings revealed that tax law enfor...

  4. Two recombinant human interferon-beta 1a pharmaceutical preparations produce a similar transcriptional response determined using whole genome microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prync, A E Sterin; Yankilevich, P; Barrero, P R; Bello, R; Marangunich, L; Vidal, A; Criscuolo, M; Benasayag, L; Famulari, A L; Domínguez, R O; Kauffman, M A; Diez, R A

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant human interferon-beta (IFN-b) is a well-established treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). The regulatory process for marketing authorization of biosimilars is currently under debate in certain countries. In the EU, EMEA has clearly defined the process including overarching and product-specific guidelines, which includes clinical testing. Biosimilarity needs to be based on comparability criteria, including at least molecular characterization, biological activity relevant for the therapeutic effect and relative bioavailability ("bioequivalence"). In the case of such complex diseases as MS, where the effect of treatment is not so directly measurable, in vitro tools can provide additional data to support comparability. Genomic microarrays assays might be useful to compare multisource biopharmaceuticals. The aim of the present study was to compare the pharmacodynamic genomic effects (in terms of transcriptional regulation) of two recombinant human IFN-I(2)1a preparations on lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients using a whole genome microarray assay. We performed an ex vivo whole genome expression profiling of the effect of two preparations of IFN-I(2)1a on non-adherent mononuclears from five relapsing-remitting MS patients analyzing microarrays (CodeLink Human Whole Genome). Patients blood was drawn, PBMCs isolated and cultured in three different conditions: culture medium (control), 1,000 U/ml of IFN-I(2)1a (BLA- (STOFERON, Bio Sidus) and 1,000 U/ml of IFN-I(2)1a (REBIF, Serono) RNA was purified from non-adherent cells (mostly lymphocytes), amplified and hybridized. Raw data were generated by CodeLink proprietary software. Data normalization, quality control and analysis of differential gene expression between treatments were done using linear model for microarray data. Functional annotation analysis of IFN-I(2)1a MS treatment transcription was done using DAVID. Out of the approximately 45,000 human sequences examined, no evidence of differential

  5. Effects of parental smoking on interferon gamma production in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebow, Gina; Sherrill, Duane L; Lohman, I Carla; Stern, Debra A; Wright, Anne L; Martinez, Fernando D; Halonen, Marilyn; Guerra, Stefano

    2008-06-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke is associated with several negative health outcomes in children, including an increased susceptibility to infections. One of the postulated mechanisms for these effects is the impairment of the immune system function and/or development. Yet, it remains unknown whether cumulative exposure to parental smoking is associated with altered immune responses in childhood and whether these effects are independent of in utero exposure to maternal smoking. In a population-based birth cohort, we sought to determine the relation of parental smoking, as assessed prospectively since pregnancy, to the child's interferon gamma and interleukin 4 production at 11 years of age. We used data on 512 children and their parents from the Tucson Children's Respiratory Study cohort. Information on maternal and paternal smoking was collected prospectively by questionnaire, and pack-years for mother, father, and both parents combined were assessed prospectively between the prenatal period and year 11. At age 11 years, children's interferon gamma and interleukin 4 production from mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured. Children of parents who smoked between the prenatal period and year 11 were more likely to be in lower quartiles of interferon gamma production than children of nonsmoking parents. In addition, maternal, paternal, and parental pack-years showed significant inverse dose-response relationships with interferon gamma production in the child. These dose-response relationships with interferon gamma remained significant for both paternal and parental pack-years among children of mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy, suggesting the existence of specific postnatal effects of environmental tobacco smoke exposure. In contrast, no significant effects of parental smoking were found on interleukin 4 production. Interferon gamma responses of school-aged children are impacted by parental smoking.

  6. Muusika : Jeremija nutulaulud palmipuudepühal. Jätkub "Musica Grande". Lihavõttetervitus Barcelonast. Rannap "Selges eesti helikeeles". Juba XIII trompetipäevad. III klavessiinipäevad / Jaan-Eik Tulve

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tulve, Jaan-Eik, 1967-

    2002-01-01

    Vox Clamantise kontsertidest Tartus ja Tallinnas. Jätkub sari "Musica Grande" kontsertidega Tartus ja Tallinnas pealkirjaga "Kontsertlik". Eestisse sõidab esinema üks Hispaania tippkoore Coral Cantiga Barcelonast. Rein Rannapi tänavusest suurprojektist, klaveriõhtust "Selges eesti helikeeles". 1. - 7. aprillini toimuvad EMA rahvusvahelised trompetipäevad. 4. - 7. aprillini korraldab Eesti Klavessiinisõprade Tsunft III klavessiinipäevad

  7. [Update on the use of interferons in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauta, V M

    1995-01-01

    Discovered by Isaac and Lindemann as a substance able to induce a biological interference among viruses and host cells, interferon appeared to include three main antigenic classes: alpha, beta and gamma. There is a large variety of actions exhibited by different types of interferon and among them it is possible to distinguish an antiviral, antineoplastic, immunomodulatory or hormonal activity. Many years ago, the antiviral action seemed to be relative to some cellular membrane disorders, but later other mechanisms were stressed. Among them, it is worth describing the transcription and transduction of antiviral proteins like the oligoadenilsinthetase and proteinphosphokinase, able to cause the viral RNA breackage. The antineoplastic action is exerted by direct and indirect mechanisms. Direct mechanisms include an antiproliferative activity and the induction to cellular differentiation whereas the indirect ones involve the enhancement on tumor cell surfaces of some tumor associated antigens included in the I class of MHC system. The immunomodulatory action is exerted by the stimulation of macrophages, T cells and Killer cells cytotoxic activity. The list of viral diseases sensitive to interferon treatment includes condiloma acuminata, herpes zoster, chronic B and C hepatitis and Kaposi sarcoma AIDS-related. High proportions of overall response rate were observed among interferon treated patients with condiloma acuminata (80-100%). The use of interferon in the treatment of herpes zoster achieved good results regarding a shorter duration of the time spent to induce the chest pains and cutaneous symptoms disappearance when compared with that relative to other antiviral drugs. Results obtained in the treatment of chronic B and C hepatitis regard the disappearance of viral replication serological markers and the improvement of histological and enzymatic pattern. The effectiveness of interferon in the therapy of Kaposi sarcoma is demonstrated by the reduction of cutaneous

  8. Hashimoto encephalopathy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Koskinas, John; Tzannos, Konstatinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Mailis, Antonis; Tolis, George; Hadziyannis, Stephanos

    2005-10-01

    To report an instance of Hashimoto encephalopathy probably resulting from pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. A 36-year-old woman with a 10-year history of autoimmune thyroiditis presented with symptoms and signs consistent with Hashimoto encephalopathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare autoimmune condition that occurs in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and high titers of antithyroid antibodies. It is characterized by a variety of nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein level, and abnormal brain imaging and electroencephalogram. Prompt response to corticosteroids is observed in most cases. As of August 29, 2005, this is the first report of such an association. An objective causality assessment revealed that the Hashimoto encephalopathy was probably caused by the patient's medications. Hashimoto encephalopathy may rarely be triggered by interferon alfa therapy in susceptible patients.

  9. Parkinsonism in Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Treated With Interferons: Case Reports and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Kirk J; Krawitt, Edward L; Hamill, Robert W; Boyd, James T

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a set of cytokines that activate antiviral responses by the body's immune cells and have been a mainstay of treatment of hepatitis C. Well-known neuropsychiatric effects of interferons include depression, irritability, and impaired concentration. A condition reported rarely in association with this treatment is parkinsonism. We report 2 patients who developed parkinsonism in conjunction with treatment of hepatitis C with alpha interferons. The first is a 51-year-old man who developed intermittent rest and postural tremor during treatment with pegylated interferon alpha ribavirin, and amantadine, with resolution of the symptoms after completing a 36-week course. Similar tremor recurred 3 years later with progressive parkinsonism, compatible with Parkinson disease (PD). The second patient is a 71-year-old man who developed postural tremor 8 weeks into a regimen of consensus interferon. Tremor resolved at completion of 48 weeks of interferon. Pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin were started 2 years later because of lack of sustained virologic response. At 24 weeks of treatment, postural tremor returned along with features and a progressive course compatible with PD. Thus, both patients presented here developed (rest and/or postural) tremor during interferon therapy followed by delayed onset of parkinsonism. We identified 10 other cases in the literature of parkinsonism/PD associated with interferon administration. This report reviews the clinical presentation and potential pathophysiological mechanisms and recommends that physicians who prescribe interferon be vigilant for symptoms of PD in their patients.

  10. Production of inflammatory mediators and extracellular traps by carp macrophages and neutrophils in response to lipopolysaccharide and/or interferon-¿2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijanowski, L.; Scheer, M.H.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Chadzinska, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and macrophages are crucial for the innate immune response against infections. They migrate into the focus of inflammation, where they efficiently bind, engulf and kill bacteria by proteolytic enzymes, antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS)

  11. Systematic identification of anti-interferon function on hepatitis C virus genome reveals p7 as an immune evasion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hangfei; Chu, Virginia; Wu, Nicholas C; Chen, Zugen; Truong, Shawna; Brar, Gurpreet; Su, Sheng-Yao; Du, Yushen; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Olson, C Anders; Chen, Shu-Hua; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2017-02-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes mechanisms to evade the multilayered antiviral actions of the host immune system. Great progress has been made in elucidating the strategies HCV employs to down-regulate interferon (IFN) production, impede IFN signaling transduction, and impair IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, there is a limited understanding of the mechanisms governing how viral proteins counteract the antiviral functions of downstream IFN effectors due to the lack of an efficient approach to identify such interactions systematically. To study the mechanisms by which HCV antagonizes the IFN responses, we have developed a high-throughput profiling platform that enables mapping of HCV sequences critical for anti-IFN function at high resolution. Genome-wide profiling performed with a 15-nt insertion mutant library of HCV showed that mutations in the p7 region conferred high levels of IFN sensitivity, which could be alleviated by the expression of WT p7 protein. This finding suggests that p7 protein of HCV has an immune evasion function. By screening a liver-specific ISG library, we identified that IFI6-16 significantly inhibits the replication of p7 mutant viruses without affecting WT virus replication. In contrast, knockout of IFI6-16 reversed the IFN hypersensitivity of p7 mutant virus. In addition, p7 was found to be coimmunoprecipitated with IFI6-16 and to counteract the function of IFI6-16 by depolarizing the mitochondria potential. Our data suggest that p7 is a critical immune evasion protein that suppresses the antiviral IFN function by counteracting the function of IFI6-16.

  12. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deaton, M. K.; Dzimianski, J. V.; Daczkowski, C. M.; Whitney, G. K.; Mank, N. J.; Parham, M. M.; Bergeron, E.; Pegan, S. D.; Perlman, S.

    2016-07-13

    ABSTRACT

    The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another.

    IMPORTANCEViral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of

  13. Results of interferon-based treatments in Alaska Native and American Indian population with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Livingston

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been few reports of hepatitis C virus (HCV treatment results with interferon-based regimens in indigenous populations. Objective: To determine interferon-based treatment outcome among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI population. Design: In an outcomes study of 1,379 AN/AI persons with chronic HCV infection from 1995 through 2013, we examined treatment results of 189 persons treated with standard interferon, interferon plus ribavirin, pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and triple therapy with a protease inhibitor. For individuals treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, the effect of patient characteristics on response was also examined. Results: Sustained virologic response (SVR with standard interferon was 16.7% (3/18 and with standard interferon and ribavirin was 29.7% (11/37. Of 119 persons treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, 61 achieved SVR (51.3%, including 10 of 46 with genotype 1 (21.7%, 38 of 51 with genotype 2 (74.5% and 13 of 22 with genotype 3 (59.1%. By multivariate analysis, SVR in the pegylated interferon group was associated with female sex (p=0.002, estimated duration of infection (p=0.034 and HCV genotype (p<0.0001. There was a high discontinuation rate due to side effects in those treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 (52.2%. Seven of 15 genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir or boceprevir achieved SVR (46.7%. Conclusions: We had success with pegylated interferon-based treatment of AN/AI people with genotypes 2 and 3. However, there were low SVR and high discontinuation rates for those with genotype 1.

  14. CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGIC GROUNDS FOR LOCAL INTERFERON USE IN ACUTE VIRAL INFECTION TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Zakharova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Broad spectrum of antiviral activity of interferons lays grounds to its use in complex therapy of acute viral infections. It has been shown that antiviral and antibacterial interferon activity reveals itself while used both systematically and locally. Clinical efficacy of locally applied viferon is accompanied by nasal mucosa cytokine status changes, as has been shown in nasal swabs. There has been shown dependency of local immune response on the age, severity of the disease, clinical forms of respiratory syndrome, bacterial complications, if present, intensity and characteristics of viral contamination against the background of viferon treatment. Key words: acute respiratory viral disease, interferon, cell immunity, humoral immunity, interferon status, cytokine status, recombinant α-interferon, immunocorrection. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 117–123.

  15. Treatment of indolent primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas with subcutaneous interferon-alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Terhorst, Dorothea; Humme, Daniel; Beyer, Marc

    2014-04-01

    Interferon-alfa is used in the treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (PCBCL). Therapy with interferon-alfa has thus far been reported solely in case reports and small case series, mostly describing intralesional use. We sought to evaluate efficacy, response rate, time to response, duration of response, and safety of subcutaneously administered interferon-alfa for the treatment of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis of patients given the diagnosis of PCBCL and treated with interferon-alfa subcutaneously at a tertiary referral center. Fifteen patients with indolent subtypes of PCBCL were identified. The overall response rate was 66.7%; all responding patients went into complete remission. Response was not significantly associated with the maximum tolerated dose. Within the median follow-up time of 40 months, 90% of the responders experienced a relapse; median duration of response was 15.5 months. Adverse events were predominantly mild and in no case led to cessation of therapy. Retrospective nature of the analysis and small number of patients because of scarcity of the disease are limitations. Treatment of indolent PCBCL with subcutaneously injected interferon-alfa demonstrated good response rates and tolerability. Response was not dose dependent. Relapses were observed in nearly all responding patients raising the question of interferon-alfa maintenance therapy in PCBCL. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Rhoptry Proteins ROP18 and ROP5 Mediate Toxoplasma gondii Evasion of the Murine, But Not the Human, Interferon-Gamma Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedelman, W.; Gold, D.A.; Rosowski, E.E.; Sprokholt, J.K.; Lim, D.; Arenas, A.F.; Melo, M.B.; Spooner, E.; Yaffe, M.B.; Saeij, J.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii secretes effector proteins into the host cell that manipulate the immune response allowing it to establish a chronic infection. Crosses between the types I, II and III strains, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, have identified

  17. FimH adhesin of type 1 fimbriae is a potent inducer of innate antimicrobial responses which requires TLR4 and type 1 interferon signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Ashkar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Components of bacteria have been shown to induce innate antiviral immunity via Toll-like receptors (TLRs. We have recently shown that FimH, the adhesin portion of type 1 fimbria, can induce the innate immune system via TLR4. Here we report that FimH induces potent in vitro and in vivo innate antimicrobial responses. FimH induced an innate antiviral state in murine macrophage and primary MEFs which was correlated with IFN-beta production. Moreover, FimH induced the innate antiviral responses in cells from wild type, but not from MyD88(-/-, Trif(-/-, IFN-alpha/betaR(-/- or IRF3(-/- mice. Vaginal delivery of FimH, but not LPS, completely protected wild type, but not MyD88(-/-, IFN-alpha/betaR(-/-, IRF3(-/- or TLR4(-/- mice from subsequent genital HSV-2 challenge. The FimH-induced innate antiviral immunity correlated with the production of IFN-beta, but not IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. To examine whether FimH plays a role in innate immune induction in the context of a natural infection, the innate immune responses to wild type uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC and a FimH null mutant were examined in the urinary tract of C57Bl/6 (B6 mice and TLR4-deficient mice. While UPEC expressing FimH induced a robust polymorphonuclear response in B6, but not TLR4(-/- mice, mutant bacteria lacking FimH did not. In addition, the presence of TLR4 was essential for innate control of and protection against UPEC. Our results demonstrate that FimH is a potent inducer of innate antimicrobial responses and signals differently, from that of LPS, via TLR4 at mucosal surfaces. Our studies suggest that FimH can potentially be used as an innate microbicide against mucosal pathogens.

  18. [Alpha-interferon and mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debien, C; De Chouly De Lenclave, M B; Foutrein, P; Bailly, D

    2001-01-01

    The interferon alpha stands as a reference both in oncology and virology. But its efficiency is limited by frequent somatic as well as neuropsychic side effects. As a matter of fact, the reduction or the ending of a chemotherapy treatment come chiefly from the psychiatric complications caused by the use of interferon. For about 30% of patients, various psychic disorders are noticed: personality disorders, mood disorders, anxiety states, suicidal tendencies, manic and psychotic symptoms. We thus propose a review which shall be completed by a discussion on wether the interferon is responsible or not of the appearance of the described mental disorders. We shall conclude with a synthesis of the proposed practical management when confronted with such disorders. Psychiatric complications under interferon-Alpha. The appearance of psychiatric complications caused by interferon has been the subject of many publications. They have also raised the question of the toxicity mechanism which is still misunderstood today. This toxicity appears to be dose-dependent with variations depending on the daily dose given, the mode of administration, the combination with other chemotherapy treatments, the concomitance with a cerebral radiotherapy or a medical history of psychiatric disorders. Most of these effects occur after three weeks of treatment but non specific neuropsychic symptoms can be observed earlier. Non specific symptoms. They appear early but are difficult to detect, though they bring together a whole lot of clinical signs: asthenia, irritability, psychomotor slowdown, depressive mood or even a real "subsyndromic" depressive syndrome, anorexia, decline of the libido, concentration and attention problems, dizzy spells and headaches. Some authors have described intense and fluctuating of personality, mixing anxiety, irritability and disorder of drive control. Depression. Depression is the most frequently found psychiatric pathology in studies but the real frequency of clear

  19. Small RNA-mediated Cry toxin silencing allows Bacillus thuringiensis to evade Caenorhabditis elegans avoidance behavioral defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Luo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Ni; Guo, Suxia; Zheng, Jinshui; Chen, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Pathogen avoidance behavior protects animal hosts against microbial pathogens. Pathogens have evolved specific strategies during coevolution in response to such host defenses. However, these strategies for combatting host avoidance behavioral defenses remain poorly understood. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans and its bacterial pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis as a model and determined that small RNA (sRNA)-mediated Cry toxin silencing allowed pathogens to evade host avoidance behavioral defenses. The B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1518, which encodes three nematicidal cry genes, is highly toxic to C. elegans. However, the expression of the most potent toxin, Cry5Ba, was silenced in this strain when YBT-1518 was outside the host. Cry5Ba silencing was due to the sRNA BtsR1, which bound to the RBS site of the cry5Ba transcript via direct base pairing and inhibited Cry5Ba expression. Upon ingestion by C. elegans, Cry5Ba was expressed in vivo by strain YBT-1518. Cry5Ba silencing may allow B. thuringiensis to avoid nematode behavioral defenses and then express toxins once ingested to kill the host and gain a survival advantage. Our work describes a novel model of sRNA-mediated regulation to aid pathogens in combating host avoidance behavioral defenses. PMID:29069426

  20. Pasteurella pneumotropica evades the human complement system by acquisition of the complement regulators factor H and C4BP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sahagún-Ruiz

    Full Text Available Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections.

  1. Interferon regulatory factor signaling in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Bharati; Song, Su; Li, Dan; Barnes, Betsy J

    2017-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) play critical roles in pathogen-induced innate immune responses and the subsequent induction of adaptive immune response. Dysregulation of IRF signaling is therefore thought to contribute to autoimmune disease pathogenesis. Indeed, numerous murine in vivo studies have documented protection from or enhanced susceptibility to particular autoimmune diseases in Irf-deficient mice. What has been lacking, however, is replication of these in vivo observations in primary immune cells from patients with autoimmune disease. These types of studies are essential as the majority of in vivo data support a protective role for IRFs in Irf-deficient mice, yet IRFs are often found to be overexpressed in patient immune cells. A significant body of work is beginning to emerge from both of these areas of study - mouse and human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. West Nile Virus NS1 Antagonizes Interferon Beta Production by Targeting RIG-I and MDA5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Lei; Ye, Han-Qing; Liu, Si-Qing; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Li, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Pei-Yong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-09-15

    antagonizes the induction of interferon beta (IFN-β) by interacting with and degrading retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5), which are crucial viral sensors in the host innate immune system. Further experiments suggested that NS1-mediated inhibition of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway involves inhibition of RIG-I K63-linked polyubiquitination and that the proteasome plays a role in RIG-I degradation. This study provides new insights into the regulation of WNV NS1 in the RLR signaling pathway and reveals a novel mechanism by which WNV evades the host innate immune response. The novel findings may guide us to discover new therapeutic targets and develop effective vaccines for WNV infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Fine Tuning of a Type 1 Interferon Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Urin

    Full Text Available Type I interferons are multi-potent cytokines that serve as first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens, posses immunomudolatory functions and elicit a growth inhibitory response. In recent years it has been shown that interferons are also detrimental, for example in lupus, AIDS, tuberculosis and cognitive decline, highlighted the need to develop interferon antagonists. We have previously developed the antagonist IFN-1ant, with much reduced binding to the IFNAR1 receptor and enhanced binding to IFNAR2. Here, we further tune the IFN-1ant by producing three additional antagonists based on IFN-1ant but with altered activity profiles. We show that in all three cases the antiproliferative activity of interferons is blocked and the induction of gene transcription of immunomudolatory and antiproliferative associated genes are substantially decreased. Conversely, each of the new antagonists elicits a different degree of antiviral response, STAT phosphorylation and related gene induction. Two of the new antagonists promote decreased activity in relation to the original IFN-1ant, while one of them promotes increased activity. As we do not know the exact causes of the detrimental effects of IFNs, the four antagonists that were produced and analyzed provide the opportunity to investigate the extent of antagonistic and agonistic activity optimal for a given condition.

  4. PREDICTORS OF SUSTAINED VIROLOGICAL RESPONSE (SVR TO PEGYLATED INTERFERON ALPHA (PEG-IFN α AND RIBAVIRIN (RBV IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C INFECTED WITH GENOTYPE 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasimir Antonov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The combined PEG-IFN alpha and RBV therapy achieved SVR in 40 - 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Identification of virological and host paramemeters predicting SVR will be useful to tailor therapy. Methods: 71 patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection were treated with PEG-IFN alpha2a and RBV for 12 months. Predictors of SVR were analyzed by using nonparametric correlation test. Results: SVR was found in 57 / 71 of subjects (80,3%. The significant differences in baseline level of HCV RNA, sex, age, baseline ALT and present of liver cirrhosis between the patients with or without SVR were not found. Correlation was not proved between SVR and all these factors when they were analyzed separately. High correlation was found between serum levels of HCV RNA at the end of 3-th month therapy (Early Virological Response and SVR (r=0,759; p=0,011.Conclusion: The viral response during the first 3 months of PEG-IFN alpha and RBV therapy is the strongest independent predictor among the all baseline viral and host predictive factors for achieving of SVR.

  5. Expression of interferon receptor genes (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA) in the liver may predict outcome after interferon therapy in patients with chronic genotype 2a or 2b hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, K; Tanaka, K; Saito, S; Kitamura, T; Kondo, M; Sakaguchi, T; Morimoto, M; Sekihara, H

    1998-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a or 2b is associated with a favorable outcome after interferon therapy. However, 19% to 33% of patients do not respond to therapy. We investigated whether interferon receptor gene (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA) expression in the liver before interferon therapy predicts long-term response to therapy in patients with genotype 2a or 2b HCV infection. Twenty-seven patients who subsequently received interferon-alpha therapy underwent liver biopsies before interferon therapy. Hepatic IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA were determined using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. Twenty (74%) patients responded to interferon therapy, while the remaining seven (26%) patients were nonresponders. The expression rates of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA in the liver were significantly higher in responders than nonresponders (p IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 mRNA predicted complete response to interferon treatment, with a positive predictive value of 100%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that IFNAR1 and/or IFNAR2 mRNA expression was the only significant predictor of the effectiveness of IFN therapy (p = 0.0002). We conclude that expression of interferon receptor genes in the liver is a useful index for predicting the long-term efficacy of interferon therapy in patients with chronic genotype 2a or 2b HCV infection.

  6. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C in non-responsive patients with pegylated interferon associated with ribavirin and thalidomide: report of six cases of total remission Tratamento de hepatite C crônica em pacientes não respondedores, com a associação interferon peguilado, ribavirina e talidomida: Relato de seis casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Montani Caseiro

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is an important public health issue worldwide. It is estimated that over 170 million people are infected with the virus. The present study reports six cases in which patients did not respond to combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. However, after the addition of thalidomide to the therapy, the patients presented negative RNA PCR. The use of thalidomide combined with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for the treatment of hepatitis C is described here for the first time in the related literature.A infecção pelo vírus da Hepatite C (HCV representa um importante problema de saúde pública no mundo, estima-se que mais de 170 milhões de pessoas estejam infectadas. Relatamos o encontro de 6 pacientes não respondedores à associação de Interferon Peguilado e Ribavirina que negativaram seu PCRRNA após a associação com talidomida. Trata-se do primeiro relato desta associação no tratamento da hepatite C encontrado na literatura.

  7. Treatment Extension of Pegylated Interferon Alpha and Ribavirin Does Not Improve SVR in Patients with Genotypes 2/3 without Rapid Virological Response (OPTEX Trial: A Prospective, Randomized, Two-Arm, Multicentre Phase IV Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Heidrich

    Full Text Available Although sofosbuvir has been approved for patients with genotypes 2/3 (G2/3, many parts of the world still consider pegylated Interferon alpha (P and ribavirin (R as standard of care for G2/3. Patients with rapid virological response (RVR show response rates >80%. However, SVR (sustained virological response in non-RVR patients is not satisfactory. Longer treatment duration may be required but evidence from prospective trials are lacking. A total of 1006 chronic HCV genotype 2/3 patients treated with P/R were recruited into a German HepNet multicenter screening registry. Of those, only 226 patients were still HCV RNA positive at week 4 (non-RVR. Non-RVR patients with ongoing response after 24 weeks P-2b/R qualified for OPTEX, a randomized trial investigating treatment extension of additional 24 weeks (total 48 weeks, Group A or additional 12 weeks (total 36 weeks, group B of 1.5 μg/kg P-2b and 800-1400 mg R. Due to the low number of patients without RVR, the number of 150 anticipated study patients was not met and only 99 non-RVR patients (n=50 Group A, n=49 Group B could be enrolled into the OPTEX trial. Baseline factors did not differ between groups. Sixteen patients had G2 and 83 patients G3. Based on the ITT (intention-to-treat analysis, 68% [55%; 81%] in Group A and 57% [43%; 71%] in Group B achieved SVR (p= 0.31. The primary endpoint of better SVR rates in Group A compared to a historical control group (SVR 70% was not met. In conclusion, approximately 23% of G2/3 patients did not achieve RVR in a real world setting. However, subsequent recruitment in a treatment-extension study was difficult. Prolonged therapy beyond 24 weeks did not result in higher SVR compared to a historical control group.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00803309.

  8. Study of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in paracoccidioidomycosis: cytopathology and alveolar macrophage function in response to gamma interferon; comparison with blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvi, Sueli A; Soares, Angela M V C; Peraçoli, Maria Terezinha S; Franco, Marcelo; Ruiz, Raul L; Marcondes-Machado, Jussara; Fecchio, Denise; Mattos, Maria C I; Mendes, Rinaldo P

    2003-12-01

    Patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) present marked involvement of the lungs during the course of the mycosis. The purpose of this work was to obtain bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from these patients to study the cytopathology, TNF levels and the oxidative and fungicidal response of alveolar macrophages (AMs) to in vitro incubation with recombinant IFN-gamma. To compare the lung and blood compartments, these determinations were also made in plasma and blood monocytes (BMs) obtained from the same patients. The cytopathology of BAL fluid revealed a predominance of macrophages, but with the presence of neutrophil exudation, and rare lymphocytes and epithelioid and giant cells. Comparison of the oxidative status and fungicidal activity of AMs and circulating BMs demonstrated that both cell types are highly activated for these two functions when compared to control cells. However, TNF levels were higher in BAL fluid than in plasma. The possible mechanisms involved in the hyperresponsiveness of cells from PCM patients are discussed.

  9. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  10. Genotype-Associated Differential NKG2D Expression on CD56+CD3+ Lymphocytes Predicts Response to Pegylated-Interferon/Ribavirin Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Po-sung; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Usui, Shingo; Wakayama, Yuko; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Wakita, Takaji; Hibi, Toshifumi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infections are significantly more difficult to eradicate with PEG-IFN/ribavirin therapy, compared to HCV genotype 2. The aim of this work is to investigate the difference of immunological impairments underlying this phenomenon. Pre-treatment NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes and CD56+CD3- NK cells from cases of chronic hepatitis C were analyzed and assessed by treatment effect. Two strains of HCV were used to co-incubate with immune cells in vitro. NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes, but not NK cells, was significantly impaired in genotype 1 infection, compared to genotype 2. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors were co-incubated with TNS2J1, a genotype 1b/2a chimera strain, or with JFH1, a genotype 2a strain, genotype-specific decrease of NKG2D on CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes, but not NK cells, was observed. Pre-treatment NKG2D expression on peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes significantly correlated with reduction in serum HCV RNA levels from week 0 to week 4, and predicted treatment response. Ex vivo stimulation of peripheral CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes showed NKG2D expression-correlated IFN-γ production. In conclusion, Decreased NKG2D expression on CD56+CD3+ lymphocytes in chronic HCV genotype 1 infection predicts inferior treatment response to PEG-IFN/ribavirin therapy compared to genotype 2.

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Pregenomic RNA Is Present in Virions in Plasma and Is Associated With a Response to Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a and Nucleos(t)ide Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, L; Kootstra, Neeltje A; van Dort, Karel A; Takkenberg, R Bart; Reesink, Hendrik W; Zaaijer, Hans L

    2016-01-15

    Treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA production but does not affect the synthesis of the RNA pregenome or HBV messenger RNA. Whether HBV RNA-containing particles continue to be secreted into the bloodstream remains controversial. We developed a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to quantify the HBV RNA load in a supernatant of NA-treated HepG2-2.2.15 cells and in plasma specimens from 20 patients with CHB who were receiving NA therapy and 86 patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa (Peg-IFN) and adefovir. Treatment of HepG2-2.2.15 cells with NAs for 9 days reduced HBV DNA levels (by 1.98 log10 copies/mL), whereas HBV RNA levels increased (by 0.47 log10 copies/mL; P < .05). During long-term NA treatment of patients with CHB, HBV RNA levels remained higher than HBV DNA levels. Peg-IFN-based treatment induced a stronger decrease in the HBV RNA load than NA monotherapy, and this decline was more pronounced in responders than in nonresponders. In HBV e antigen-negative patients, a lower baseline plasma HBV RNA level was independently associated with response to Peg-IFN and adefovir (odds ratio, 0.44; P = .019). Immunoprecipitation with HBV core antigen-specific antibodies after removal of the HBV surface antigen envelope demonstrated the association of plasma HBV RNA with virions. HBV RNA is present in virions in plasma specimens from patients with CHB. HBV RNA levels vary significantly from those of established viral markers during antiviral treatment, which highlights its potential as an independent marker in the evaluation of patients with CHB. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Long-incubation-time gamma interferon release assays in response to purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and/or CFP-10 for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, K; Mouchet, F; Dirix, V; De Schutter, I; Jotzo, K; Verscheure, V; Geurts, P; Singh, M; Van Vooren, J P; Mascart, F

    2014-02-01

    The diagnosis of childhood active tuberculosis (aTB) and latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection (LTBI) remains a challenge, and the replacement of tuberculin skin tests (TST) with commercialized gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRA) is not currently recommended. Two hundred sixty-six children between 1 month and 15 years of age, 214 of whom were at risk of recent M. tuberculosis infection and 51 who were included as controls, were prospectively enrolled in our study. According to the results of a clinical evaluation, TST, chest X ray, and microbiological assessment, each children was classified as noninfected, having LTBI, or having aTB. Long-incubation-time purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6, and CFP-10 IGRA were performed and evaluated for their accuracy in correctly classifying the children. Whereas both TST and PPD IGRA were suboptimal for detecting aTB, combining the CFP-10 IGRA with a TST or with a PPD IGRA allowed us to detect all the children with aTB with a specificity of 96% for children who were positive for the CFP-10 IGRA. Moreover, the combination of the CFP-10 IGRA and PPD IGRA detected 96% of children who were eventually classified as having LTBI, but a strong IFN-γ response to CFP-10 (defined as >500 pg/ml) was highly suggestive of aTB, at least among the children who were CFP-10 IGRA and PPD IGRA should help clinicians to quickly identify aTB or LTBI in young children.

  13. A novel stimulator of interferon gene (STING) from Larimichthys crocea and their involvement in immune response to ectoparasite Cryptocaryon irritans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Bing; Wang, Jun; Mao, Yong; Chen, Ruan-Ni; Su, Yong-Quan; Chen, Jia; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Zheng, Wei-Qiang

    2017-12-01

    The marine white spot disease caused by protozoan ectoparasite Cryptocaryon irritans is a severe problem to the large yellow croaker farming industry. To understand the molecular immune mechanisms and improve its immune capacity are particular important. STING, one of the important second messengers in innate immune response process, plays pivotal roles in defensing against different pathogenic microorganisms. Many reports have pointed that STING could not only combine the uncovered dsDNA, ssDNA directly in the cytoplasm from the pathogens or biology itself, but it also could recognize cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP). Based on the STING sequence, a variant of the L. crocea STING (termed LcSTING2) was found by accident. RACE was used to clone the full-length cDNA of LcSTING2 which contained a 5'- UTR of 154 bp, a 3'-UTR of 592 bp and an ORF of 1227 bp encoding 408 amino acids. The predicted protein molecular weight (Mw) was 45.83 KDa and the estimated theoretical isoelectric point (pI) was 6.24. The deduced protein of LcSTING2 contains no signal peptide. One transmembrane motif (TM) in the N-terminal region, a TMEM173 domain and five putative motifs (RXR) found in resident endoplasmic reticulum proteins were also conserved. According to the partial genomic sequence, the unknown sequences were amplified, it contained 6 exons and 5 introns, and all the exon-intron boundaries were in accordance with classical GT-AG rule (GT/intron/AG). The similarity shared with fishes was higher than other high vertebrates. qRT-PCR results showed that LcSTING (two variants) distributed in all examined tissues, and it was the most abundant in gill. After challenged by C. irritans, LcSTING mRNA only appeared instantaneous up-regulation during the infective stage of theronts in the head kidney and was also up-regulated during the whole infectious cycle of C. irritans in the liver, which implied LcSTING gene was likely to be

  14. Mechanism of Interferon Uptake in Parental and Somatic Monkey-Mouse Hybrid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chany, C.; Grégoire, A.; Vignal, M.; Lemaitre-Moncuit, J.; Brown, P.; Besançon, F.; Suarez, H.; Cassingena, R.

    1973-01-01

    Dose-response curves of interferons in different sensitive cells are regularly sigmoidal. In somatic monkey-mouse hybrid cells, however, a significant decrease in the slope of the curve for primate interferon was observed, while the dose-response effect was unaltered for mouse interferon. High concentrations of primate interferon were 10- to 100-times less effective in hybrid clones than in parental monkey CV-1 cells; at low concentrations the antiviral effect was 10- to 20-times higher in hybrid clones than in the parental cells. The receptor(s) for primate interferon located on the cell membrane was destroyed by trypsin but not by EDTA. Similarly, acid pH inactivated these receptor sites. We, thus, postulate that the antiviral effect is, at least partially, related to the amount of interferon taken up by the cells. Uptake could be conditioned by active cooperation of two cell-specific factors: a receptor and an activator. The activator might be missing or inactivated for primate interferon in the hybrid cells. We suggest that the putative antiviral protein is not cell-species specific, and that information for its synthesis in the hybrid cells might be located on a mouse rather than a monkey chromosome. PMID:4346894

  15. Interleukin-12 augments a Th1-type immune response manifested as lymphocyte proliferation and interferon gamma production in Leishmania infantum-infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss-Ayali, Dalit; Baneth, Gad; Shor, Sharon; Okano, Fumiyoshi; Jaffe, Charles L

    2005-01-01

    The dog is the major reservoir for human visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum. Interleukin-12 is considered to have an essential role in the development of both innate and adaptive immunity to Leishmania spp. and other intracellular pathogens. This study focused on the influence of IL-12 in experimental and natural canine visceral leishmaniasis. Responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to IL-12, interleukin-10 and Leishmania soluble antigen were evaluated in L. infantum experimentally infected oligosymptomatic beagles, uninfected beagles, naturally infected polysymptomatic dogs, and their matched uninfected controls. Leishmania soluble antigen induced strong peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation both in experimentally infected dogs (median stimulation index [SI]=15.01), and in naturally infected dogs (SI=8.86), but not by cells from the control groups. IL-12 addition further enhanced cell proliferation in naturally (SI=14.95), but not in experimentally infected animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from experimentally infected dogs were able to produce significant amounts of IFN-gamma (3.39 ng/ml) upon LSA stimulation, but no such production was detected in cells from naturally infected or control animals. Interestingly, addition of IL-12 reversed the inhibitory effect of LSA on IFN-gamma production by cells from polysymptomatic naturally infected dogs and the uninfected beagles (4.84 and 7.45 ng/ml, respectively), and further increased IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from experimentally infected oligosymptomatic dogs (29.28 ng/ml). IFN-gamma mRNA expression correlated well with IFN-gamma production. Addition of IL-10 to Leishmania soluble antigen stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells inhibited proliferation and IFN-gamma production in experimentally infected dogs. Thus, the ability of IL-12 to augment IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dogs with experimental or

  16. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

    OpenAIRE

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at...

  17. Tuberculin-purified protein derivative-, MPT-64-, and ESAT-6-stimulated gamma interferon responses in medical students before and after Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination and in patients with tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, P D; Stuart, R L; Grayson, M L

    1999-01-01

    QuantiFERON-TB (QIFN) (CSL Limited) is a whole-blood assay for the recognition of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. QIFN measures gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production when purified protein derivatives (PPDs) of mycobacteria are incubated with venous blood samples. The specificity...

  18. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Suzannah J; Foster, Toshana L; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J D; Wilson, Sam J

    2017-04-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4(+) T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4(+) T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission.IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope gene

  19. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  20. Analysis of sequences of hepatitis C virus NS5A genotype 1 in HIV-coinfected patients with a null response to nitazoxanide or peg-interferon plus ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sede, M; Laufer, N; Ojeda, D; Gun, A; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2013-09-01

    Even though new drugs have been approved for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the risk of drug-drug interactions and concern about overlapping toxicities has hindered the development of studies in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Traditional treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (peg-IFN + RBV) is very expensive and has a low rate of sustained virological response in coinfected patients, especially if they are infected with HCV genotype 1. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a drug that is being evaluated for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, both in HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Understanding the NTZ resistance mechanism could allow the development of resistance to be minimized and would expand the treatment options, mainly in special populations such as HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Similarly to IFN, NTZ increases the activity of the cellular protein kinase activated by double-stranded RNA (PKR), a key kinase in the innate antiviral response. In order to elucidate whether sequence heterogeneity in the PKR-binding domain of HCV NS5A genotype 1 could influence the antiviral activity of either NTZ monotherapy or peg-IFN + RBV, baseline and end-of-therapy plasma samples from two groups of eleven non-responder HIV/HCV-coinfected patients that had received NTZ or peg-IFN + RBV were studied. Most of the HCV NS5A sequences examined at the end of therapy did not change from the baseline, even after 30 days course of antiviral therapy. An extensive comparison of HCV NS5A genotype 1 and 4 sequences from the database with reported IFN therapy outcome was performed in order to infer their phylogenetic relationships. The HCV genotype 1 NS5A nucleotide sequences from therapy-non-responder patients were intermingled amongst those from the database, irrespective of their IFN-therapy outcome. When comparing NS5A-PKRBD amino acid sequences, significant differences were observed in genotype 4, but not in genotype 1 (p  0

  1. A hot L1 retrotransposon evades somatic repression and initiates human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma C.; Gardner, Eugene J.; Masood, Ashiq; Chuang, Nelson T.; Vertino, Paula M.; Devine, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Although human LINE-1 (L1) elements are actively mobilized in many cancers, a role for somatic L1 retrotransposition in tumor initiation has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we identify a novel somatic L1 insertion in the APC tumor suppressor gene that provided us with a unique opportunity to determine whether such insertions can actually initiate colorectal cancer (CRC), and if so, how this might occur. Our data support a model whereby a hot L1 source element on Chromosome 17 of the patient's genome evaded somatic repression in normal colon tissues and thereby initiated CRC by mutating the APC gene. This insertion worked together with a point mutation in the second APC allele to initiate tumorigenesis through the classic two-hit CRC pathway. We also show that L1 source profiles vary considerably depending on the ancestry of an individual, and that population-specific hot L1 elements represent a novel form of cancer risk. PMID:27197217

  2. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Miyamoto, Yuhei [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Yokoyama, Jun' ichi [Tokyo Univ. (JP). Research Center for the Early Universe (RESCEU); Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa, Chiba (JP). Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU)

    2012-04-15

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales where any artificial particle accelerators cannot reach. Although one of the most promising tools is the cosmic microwave background, the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that one may not hope to detect its signatures in the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by delaying the onset of the scaling regime. We also show that this scenario is naturally realized in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition is governed by the Hubble induced mass.

  3. Dynamic interplay between CXCL levels in chronic hepatitis C patients treated by interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Mohamed, Waleed S; Alam El-Din, Hanaa M; Shousha, Hend I; Zayed, Naglaa; Eldahshan, Dina H; Abdel-Aziz, Ashraf Omar

    2013-07-01

    Combined pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin therapy has sustained virological response (SVR) rates of 54% to 61%. Pretreatment predictors of SVR to interferon therapy have not been fully investigated yet. The current study assesses a group of chemokines that may predict treatment response in Egyptian patients with chronic HCV infection. CXCL5, CXCL9, CXCL11, CXCL12, CXCL 13, CXCL 16 chemokines and E-Cadherin were assayed in 57 chronic HCV patients' sera using quantitative ELISA plate method. All studied patients were scheduled for combined pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin therapy (32 patients received pegylated interferon α 2b, and 25 patients received pegylated interferon α 2a). Quantitative hepatitis C virus RNA was done by real time RT-PCR and HCV genotyping by INNOLIPAII. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in baseline HCV RNA levels between responders and non-responders to interferon. A statistically significant difference in CXCL13 (p = 0.017) and E-Cadherin levels (P = 0.041) was reported between responders and nonresponders at week 12. Significant correlations were found between changes in the CXCL13 levels and CXCL9, CXCL16, E-cadherin levels as well as between changes in E-cadherin levels and both CXCL16 and ALT levels that were maintained during follow up. Also, significant changes have been found in the serum levels of CXCL5, CXCL13, and CXCL16 with time (before pegylated interferon α 2 a and α 2 b therapy, and at weeks 12 and 24) with no significant difference in relation to interferon type and response to treatment. Serum levels of CXCL13 and E-Cadherin could be used as surrogate markers to predict response of combined PEG IFN-α/RBV therapy, especially at week 12. However, an extended study including larger number of patients is needed for validation of these findings. NCT01758939.

  4. Double Plant Homeodomain Fingers 2 (DPF2) Promotes the Immune Escape of Influenza Virus by Suppressing Beta Interferon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongjo; Lee, Jihye; Park, Ji Hoon; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-06-15

    The high mutation rates of the influenza virus genome facilitate the generation of viral escape mutants, rendering vaccines and drugs against influenza virus-encoded targets potentially ineffective. Therefore, we identified host cell determinants dispensable for the host but crucial for virus replication, with the goal of preventing viral escape and finding effective antivirals. To identify these host factors, we screened 2,732 human genes using RNA interference and focused on one of the identified host factors, the double plant homeodomain fingers 2 (DPF2/REQ) gene, for this study. We found that knockdown of DPF2 in cells infected with influenza virus resulted in decreased expression of viral proteins and RNA. Furthermore, production of progeny virus was reduced by two logs in the multiple-cycle growth kinetics assay. We also found that DPF2 was involved in the replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses. Because DPF2 plays a crucial role in the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, which negatively regulates type I interferon (IFN) induction, we examined the relationship between DPF2 and IFN responses during viral infection. The results showed that knockdown of DPF2 resulted in increased expression of IFN-β and induced phosphorylation of STAT1 in infected cells. In addition, high levels of several cytokines/chemokines (interleukin-8 [IL-8], IP-10, and IL-6) and antiviral proteins (MxA and ISG56) were produced by DPF2 knockdown cells. In conclusion, we identified a novel host factor, DPF2, that is required for influenza virus to evade the host immune response and that may serve as a potential antiviral target.IMPORTANCE Influenza virus is responsible for seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics and is an ongoing threat to public health worldwide. Influenza virus relies heavily on cellular factors to complete its life cycle. Here we identified a novel host factor, DPF2, which is involved in influenza virus infection. Our results showed that DPF2 plays a crucial

  5. Rice OsFLS2-Mediated Perception of Bacterial Flagellins Is Evaded by Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanzhi; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Huiqin; Liu, Lijuan; Lu, Fen; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Shiyong; Guo, Zejian; Bent, Andrew F; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial flagellins are often recognized by the receptor kinase FLAGELLIN SENSITIVE2 (FLS2) and activate MAMP-triggered immunity in dicotyledonous plants. However, the capacity of monocotyledonous rice to recognize flagellins of key rice pathogens and its biological relevance remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that ectopically expressed OsFLS2 in Arabidopsis senses the eliciting flg22 peptide and in vitro purified Acidovorax avenae (Aa) flagellin in an expression level-dependent manner, but does not recognize purified flagellins or derivative flg22(Xo) peptides of Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzae (Xoo) and oryzicola (Xoc). Consistently, the flg22 peptide and purified Aa flagellin, but not Xoo/Xoc flagellins, induce various immune responses such as defense gene induction and MAPK activation in rice. Perception of flagellin by rice does induce strong resistance to Xoo infection, as shown after pre-treatment of rice leaves with Aa flagellin. OsFLS2 was found to differ from AtFLS2 in its perception specificities or sensitivities to different flg22 sequences. In addition, post-translational modification of Xoc flagellin was altered by deletion of glycosyltransferase-encoding rbfC, but this had little effect on Xoc motility and rpfC mutation did not detectably reduce Xoc virulence on rice. Deletion of flagellin-encoding fliC from Xoo/Xoc blocked swimming motility but also did not significantly alter Xoo/Xoc virulence. These results suggest that Xoo/Xoc carry flg22-region amino acid changes that allow motility while evading the ancient flagellin detection system in rice, which retains recognition capacity for other bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tallinna Merepäevade turismikonverents käsitles mere ja linna kohtumispaiga arenguid ja arendamist / Ain Hinsberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hinsberg, Ain

    2013-01-01

    Tallinna Sadama, linnavalitsuse, Viking Line ja EHTE poolt 12. juulil Admiraliteedi basseiniääres Merepäevade paviljonis korraldatud konverentsist "Mere ja linna kohtumispaik kui linnaruum ja sihtkoht", kus esinesid Allan Kiil, Tiit Kask, Duncan Frazer Inglismaalt, Satu Lehtonen Soomest, Anu Hallik-Jürgenstein, Peeter Pere, Heikki Mäki, Evelyn Sepp ja Ahto Ader

  7. Formulation of a Cooperative-Confinement-Escape problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and formulate the Cooperative-Confinement-Escape (CCE) problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region, in which the defenders are moving on the circle with attempt to prevent possible escape of a single evader who is initially located inside the circle. The main contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we first provide an effective formulation of the CCE problem, which is an emphasis of this paper, with design of two nonlinear control strategies for the cooperative defenders and the adversarial evader, respectively. Particularly, we consider to include a proper interaction between each pair of the nearest-neighbor defenders, and an adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism in the strategies of the defenders to increase the chance of successful confinement. (2) For the first attempt on analyzing the CCE dynamics which is unavoidably strongly nonlinear, we analyze the minimum energy of the evader for possible escape. (3) For understanding of the behaviors of the system under different parameters, (i) we illustrate the effectiveness of the confinement strategy using the adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism, and (ii) the physical roles of the system parameters with respect to the system dynamics, some of which may be unexpected or not straightforward. A separate paper will be presented for systematic analysis of the agents' behaviors with respect to the large intervals of the parameter settings.

  8. Lübecki filmipäevad 1999 ja Thomas Manni ekraniseering 1923 / Lauri Kärk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kärk, Lauri, 1954-

    1999-01-01

    4.-7. novembrini Lübeckis toimunud Põhjamaade filmipäevade 41. Nordische Filmtage huvitavamatest filmidest, nagu Thomas Manni "Buddenbrookide" ekraniseering 1923. aastast (režissöör Gerhard Lamprecht) ja Rasmus Gerlachi dokumentaal "Operaator Kaufman" Dziga Vertovist ja tema kahest, samuti kino alal tegutsenud vennast

  9. Opposing roles for interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3 and type I interferon signaling during plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami A Patel

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production.

  10. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  11. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease inhibits the type I interferon signaling pathway through interaction with the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xingxing; Zheng, Yang; Yang, Yudong; Xing, Yaling; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-05-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) develops an antagonistic mechanism by which to evade the antiviral activities of interferon (IFN). Previous studies suggested that SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway, which would normally elicit a robust IFN response, but the mechanism(s) used by SARS PLpro to inhibit activation of the IRF3 pathway is not fully known. In this study, we uncovered a novel mechanism that may explain how SARS PLpro efficiently inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway. We found that expression of the membrane-anchored PLpro domain (PLpro-TM) from SARS-CoV inhibits STING/TBK1/IKKε-mediated activation of type I IFNs and disrupts the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3, which are activated by STING and TBK1. Meanwhile, we showed that PLpro-TM physically interacts with TRAF3, TBK1, IKKε, STING, and IRF3, the key components that assemble the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex for activation of IFN expression. However, the interaction between the components in STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex is disrupted by PLpro-TM. Furthermore, SARS PLpro-TM reduces the levels of ubiquitinated forms of RIG-I, STING, TRAF3, TBK1, and IRF3 in the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex. These results collectively point to a new mechanism used by SARS-CoV through which PLpro negatively regulates IRF3 activation by interaction with STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex, yielding a SARS-CoV countermeasure against host innate immunity.

  12. Cure of hepatitis C virus infection without interferon alfa: scientific basis and current clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David L

    2014-01-01

    Cure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is achievable without interferon alfa through the use of new direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs. In this era of interferon alfa-sparing therapy, however, interferon alfa sensitivity still matters, even as it turns out, if interferon alfa is not used. Inclusion of ribavirin in the treatment regimen remains a factor in treatment response, as does duration of treatment. HCV genotype and subtype remain relevant considerations in choosing a treatment regimen, and viral resistance may emerge when treatment fails. The potency and barrier to resistance of new DAAs and the use of appropriately designed interferon alfa-sparing combinations can overcome obstacles to cure posed by HCV resistance, interferon alfa resistance, and differences in response based on HCV genotype and subtype. Studies demonstrating the use of new DAAs to overcome these obstacles are discussed. This article summarizes a presentation by David L. Thomas, MD, MPH, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in New York, New York, in June 2013.

  13. [Gamma interferon: basics aspects, clinic significance and terapeutic uses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Espinosa, Dulce A; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2008-01-01

    Interferons are a family of pleiotropic cytokines, their name was assigned because of their anti-replicative viral activity. IFNgamma or immune type II interferon does not share receptors with the type I interferon, its structure is different and its gene is located in different chromosome, although its biologic effects are similar. Along of several years of research, it has been found that IFNgamma enhances the transcription of genes involved in immunomodulation, antiviral responses and antitumoral activities. Regarding to the immune system, IFNgamma increases the cytotoxic and phagocytic activity of macrophages and upregulates the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in dendritics cells and other antigen presenting cells. IFNgamma also promotes the development and differentiation of naive CD4+ T lymphocytes to Th1 helper subset. Indeed, this cytokine has a key role in the control of bacterial, micotic, viral and parasitic infections. Depending of the micro-environment, IFNgamma has a dual role as pro or anti inflammatory cytokine. Novel therapeutic strategies are currently being developed with the aim to enhance the immune response or replace IFNgamma gene abnormal expression with beneficial results in humans, being recombinant IFNgamma safe and well tolerated.

  14. IL28B and IL10R -1087 polymorphisms are protective for chronic genotype 1 HCV infection and predictors of response to interferon-based therapy in an East-Central European cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella; Tornai, István; Szalay, Ferenc; Várszegi, Dalma; Fráter, Edit; Papp, Mária; Lengyel, Gabriella; Fehér, János; Varga, Márta; Gervain, Judit; Schuller, János; Nemes, Zsuzsanna; Péterfi, Zoltán; Tusnádi, Anna; Hunyady, Béla; Haragh, Attila; Szinku, Zsolt; Vincze, Aron; Szereday, László; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Béla

    2014-01-08

    Previous studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in IL28B and IL10R are associated with sustained virological response (SVR) in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with pegilated interferon plus ribavirin (P/R). The present study extends our earlier investigations on a large East-Central European cohort. The allele frequencies of IL28B and IL10R in genotype 1 HCV infection were compared with that of healthy controls for the purpose of examining the relationship between the polymorphisms and the SVR to P/R treatment. A total of 748 chronic HCV1 infected patients (365 male, 383 female; 18-82 years) and 105 voluntary blood donors as controls were enrolled. Four hundred and twenty HCV patients were treated with P/R for 24-72 weeks, out of them 195 (46.4%) achieved SVR. The IL28 rs12979860 SNP was determined using Custom Taqman SNP Genotyping Assays. The IL10R -1087 (also known as IL10R -1082 (rs1800896) promoter region SNP was determined by RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The IL28B CC genotype occurred with lower frequency in HCV patients than in controls (26.1% vs 51.4%, p<0.001). P/R treated patients with the IL28B CC genotype achieved higher SVR rate, as compared to patients with CT (58.6% vs 40.8%, p=0.002). The prevalence of IL10R -1087 GG genotype was lower in patients than in controls (31.8 % vs 52.2%, p<0.001). Among patients achieving SVR, the IL10R -1087 GG genotype occurred with higher frequency than the AA (32.0% vs 17.4%, p=0.013). The IL28B T allele plus IL10R A allele combination was found with higher prevalence in patients than in controls (52% vs 20.7%, p<0.001). The IL28B CC plus IL10R A allele combination occurred with higher frequency among patients with SVR than in non-responders (21.3% vs 12.8%, p=0.026). Both the IL28B CC plus IL10R GG and the IL28B CC plus IL10R A allele combinations occurred with lower frequency in patients than in controls. In our HCV1 patients, both the IL28B CC and IL10R

  15. Are anti-interferon antibodies the cause of failure in: chronic HCV hepatitis treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alci Barone

    Full Text Available A follow-up study was made of 94 chronic hepatitis C patients at a hepatitis clinic in Brazil, after interferon alpha (IFN-alpha therapy, to determine the influence of anti-interferon antibodies on treatment outcome. Patients diagnosed as having chronic hepatitis C, confirmed by PCR (HCV RNA and liver biopsy, were treated with interferon alpha 2a or 2b for at least six months, and were followed up for 24 weeks after termination of treatment in order to assess biochemical, virological and clinical pathology responses. Only 6% of the 94 patients developed anti-IFN antibodies, 70% presented a biochemical response and 23% maintained a sustained virological response. Clinical evaluation revealed that in only 2 patients was there progression of fibrosis; the necro-inflammatory score indicated that 72% maintained the same activity, 12% had worsening necro-inflammatory activity, and the remaining 16% had decreased activity. There was no significant correlation of demographic and laboratory variables with levels of anti-interferon antibodies. Similarly, biochemical and virological responses were not influenced by anti-interferon antibodies. Multivariate analysis by logistic regression revealed that clinical pathological parameters, staging and necro-inflammatory activity did not influence the response to the virus.

  16. [The current situation of aggravated intoxication with "kiken" drugs (law-evading drugs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Akiko; Kashiura, Masahiro; Mikami, Manabu; Hamabe, Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    The intoxication caused by "kiken" drugs (law-evading drugs), such as synthetic cannabinoids, cathinones, and methoxetamine, has recently increased in Japan. We retrospectively examined the characteristics of patients poisoned with the "kiken" drugs. We included patients who presented at the emergency department at the Tokyo Metropolitan Bokutoh Hospital from January 2011 to December 2014. Eighteen patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2013 were included in the early period group and 10 patients admitted between January and December 2014 were categorized into the late period group. The number of the patients transported to our emergency department between 2011 and 2014 increased annually. Patients were mainly admitted between May and October 2014; no patients were admitted after November 2014. The patients' age, history of previous mental disease, habitual use, Triage DOA results, serum creatinine values on admission, and respiratory management differed significantly between the groups. However, the median serum creatinine values of both groups on admission were within the normal level. Patients poisoned with the "kiken" drugs showed more severe symptoms, higher rate of habitual use, and higher average age. The annual increase in the number of the patients observed thus far is expected to decrease in the future. Maintenance of the law and expansion of medical institutions that treat patients addicted to the "kiken" drugs are warranted.

  17. Quantum back-action-evading measurement of motion in a negative mass reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Christoffer B.; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Zeuthen, Emil; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Balabas, Mikhail; Jensen, Kasper; Schliesser, Albert; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random quantum back-action (QBA) perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. As a consequence of this randomness, and in accordance with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the QBA puts a limitation—the so-called standard quantum limit—on the precision of sensing of position, velocity and acceleration. Here we show that QBA on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator can be evaded if the measurement of motion is conducted in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator. The collective quantum measurement on this hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a vibrational ‘drum’ mode of a millimetre-sized dielectric membrane, and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes a negative-effective-mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to an oscillator with positive effective mass. The QBA is suppressed by -1.8 decibels in the negative-mass setting and enhanced by 2.4 decibels in the positive-mass case. This hybrid quantum system paves the way to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.

  18. Evading Quantum Mechanics: Engineering a Classical Subsystem within a Quantum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankei Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics is potentially advantageous for certain information-processing tasks, but its probabilistic nature and requirement of measurement backaction often limit the precision of conventional classical information-processing devices, such as sensors and atomic clocks. Here we show that, by engineering the dynamics of coupled quantum systems, it is possible to construct a subsystem that evades the measurement backaction of quantum mechanics, at all times of interest, and obeys any classical dynamics, linear or nonlinear, that we choose. We call such a system a quantum-mechanics-free subsystem (QMFS. All of the observables of a QMFS are quantum-nondemolition (QND observables; moreover, they are dynamical QND observables, thus demolishing the widely held belief that QND observables are constants of motion. QMFSs point to a new strategy for designing classical information-processing devices in regimes where quantum noise is detrimental, unifying previous approaches that employ QND observables, backaction evasion, and quantum noise cancellation. Potential applications include gravitational-wave detection, optomechanical-force sensing, atomic magnetometry, and classical computing. Demonstrations of dynamical QMFSs include the generation of broadband squeezed light for use in interferometric gravitational-wave detection, experiments using entangled atomic-spin ensembles, and implementations of the quantum Toffoli gate.

  19. Tratamento clínico do linfangioma com alfa-2a-interferon Treatment of lymphangioma with interferon-alpha-2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo J.S.P. de Souza

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever os resultados obtidos com o uso do alfa-2a-interferon no tratamento de pacientes pediátricos com linfangiomas irressecáveis ou refratários a outros tratamentos. MÉTODO: após revisão da literatura sobre a patogenia e os tratamentos disponíveis para os linfangiomas, utilizamos o alfa-2a-interferon na dosagem de 3 milhões de unidades/m2/dia, via subcutânea, para tratamento de pacientes que apresentavam lesões irressecáveis. Para avaliar o grau de resposta e os efeitos colaterais foram realizadas avaliações clínicas e laboratoriais periódicas. RESULTADOS: observamos que os 6 pacientes com linfangiomas irressecáveis que utilizaram alfa-2a-interferon obtiveram uma resposta clínica satisfatória associada a efeitos colaterais mínimos. Cinco destes evoluíram com regressão parcial de suas lesões e 1 com estabilização da doença. CONCLUSÃO: concluímos que o alfa-2a-interferon constitui uma das armas disponíveis para o tratamento dos linfangiomas inoperáveis na infância.OBJECTIVE: to describe the results of the use of alpha-2a-interferon in the treatment of inoperable childhood lymphangiomas refractory to other therapeutic management. METHOD: we reviewed the literature about pathogenic events and the treatments available for lymphangiomas. Based on that, we used alpha-2a-interferon at a dose of 3 million units/m2/day administered subcutaneously to patients with inoperable disease and no response to other treatments. We conducted periodic clinical and laboratory control to evaluate the response and the adverse reactions to alpha-2a-interferon administration. RESULTS: we observed that the 6 patients with inoperable lymphangiomas who used alpha-2a-interferon had a satisfactory clinical response associated with minimum adverse reactions. Of these patients, 5 had partial regression of their lesions, and 1 remained stable. CONCLUSION: alpha-2a-interferon may be one more available treatment for inoperable childhood

  20. Production of interferon in respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D

    1989-01-01

    Production of interferon alfa in vitro was significantly reduced during acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis but subsequently returned to normal. Nasopharyngeal and endotracheal interferon alfa were detected intermittently and in low concentrations. The degree of impairment of in vitro production and poor in vivo production of interferon alfa suggest the need for a therapeutic trial of nebulised or systemic interferon in acute bronchiolitis.

  1. Interferon induces up-regulation of Spi-1/PU.1 in human leukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, P; Delgado, M D; Richard, C; Moreau-Gachelin, F; León, J

    1997-11-26

    The human K562 cell line is derived from a chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis. Treatment of K562 cells with interferons alpha, beta or gamma resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation. Spi-1/PU.1 is a transcription factor of the Ets family which is required for normal hematopoyesis. We have found that spi-1 mRNA and protein as well as Spi-1-DNA binding activity increase after exposure of K562 cells to interferons. The increase in spi-1 expression ranged from 4- to 8-fold with the different interferons. K562 cells can be differentiated in vitro towards erythroid cells or monocyte-macrophage cells. Interestingly, the regulation of spi-1 by interferon-alpha depended on the differentiated phenotype of K562 cells: interferon-alpha failed to induce spi-1 in erythroid differentiated cells, whereas it induced spi-1 in monocyte-macrophage differentiated cells. The results suggest a role for Spi-1 in the cytostatic response to interferons.

  2. Emakeelepäevad Riias jätkuvad / Tõnu Karma ; fotod: M. Kulli ja Tõnu Karma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karma, Tõnu

    2003-01-01

    12. märtsil 1989. aastal emakeelepäeva tähistamisest Riias, korraldajaks Läti Eesti Selts, ja sama aasta juunis rahvaluulepäevade pidamist, millega tähistati Jakob Hurda 150. sünniaastapäeva, Kristjan Jaak Petersoni 200. sünniaastapäeva tähistamisest ja mälestuskivi püstitamisest Jakobi kalmistule

  3. Evasion from NK cell-mediated immune responses by HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Stephanie; Altfeld, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mostly owes its success to its ability to evade host immune responses. Understanding viral immune escape mechanisms is prerequisite to improve future HIV-1 vaccine design. This review focuses on the strategies that HIV-1 has evolved to evade recognition by natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:22626930

  4. Dengue Virus Evades AAV-Mediated Neutralizing Antibody Prophylaxis in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael J; Bailey, Varian K; Gutman, Martin J; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Silveira, Cassia G T; Maxwell, Helen S; Domingues, Aline; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Su, Qin; Newman, Ruchi M; Pack, Melissa; Martins, Mauricio A; Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Rakasz, Eva G; Allen, Todd M; Whitehead, Stephen S; Burton, Dennis R; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Kallas, Esper G; Watkins, David I

    2017-10-04

    Development of vaccines against mosquito-borne Flaviviruses is complicated by the occurrence of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), which can increase disease severity. Long-term delivery of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) has the potential to effectively block infection and represents an alternative to vaccination. The risk of ADE may be avoided by using prophylactic nAbs harboring amino acid mutations L234A and L235A (LALA) in the immunoglobulin G (IgG) constant region. Here, we used recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) to deliver the anti-dengue virus 3 (DENV3) nAb P3D05. While the administration of rAAV-P3D05-rhesus immunoglobulin G1 (rhIgG1)-LALA to rhesus macaques engendered DENV3-neutralizing activity in serum, it did not prevent infection. The emergence of viremia following DENV3 challenge was delayed by 3-6 days in the rAAV-treated group, and replicating virus contained the envelope mutation K64R. This neutralization-resistant variant was also confirmed by virus outgrowth experiments in vitro. By delivering P3D05 with unmutated Fc sequences, we further demonstrated that DENV3 also evaded wild-type nAb prophylaxis, and serum viral loads appeared to be higher in the presence of low levels of unmutated P3D05-rhIgG1. Our study shows that a vectored approach for long-term delivery of nAbs with the LALA mutations is promising, but prophylaxis using a single nAb is likely insufficient at preventing DENV infection and replication. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchita Selot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAVrh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold, migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27–64 fold in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  6. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selot, Ruchita; Arumugam, Sathyathithan; Mary, Bertin; Cheemadan, Sabna; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2017-01-01

    Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAV)rh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold), migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors) in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27-64 fold) in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  7. Differential Dynamics of CALR Mutant Allele Burden in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms during Interferon Alfa Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Lasse; Cordua, Sabrina; Holmström, Morten O

    2016-01-01

    for monitoring molecular responses during therapy. Interferon-α (IFN) selectively targets the malignant clone in a subset of MPN patients and can induce both haematological and molecular remissions in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the response to IFN in a cohort of 21 CALR...

  8. Association between apolipoprotein E epsilon4 and neuropsychiatric symptoms during interferon alpha treatment for chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochee, Peter A; Powell, Elizabeth E; Purdie, David M; Pandeya, Nirmala; Kelemen, Livia; Shorthouse, Claudia; Jonsson, Julie R; Kelly, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric complications are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C undergoing treatment with interferon alpha. These side effects include alterations of mood, cognition, and neuroendocrine function and are unpredictable. In a number of neurological disorders characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive dysfunction, inheritance of an apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele is associated with adverse neuropsychiatric outcomes. The authors present evidence that the APOE genotype may influence a patient's neuropsychiatric response to interferon alpha treatment. The inheritance of APOE genotypes was examined in 110 patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with interferon alpha. A retrospective investigation was conducted by assessing the rates of psychiatric referral and neuropsychiatric symptoms experienced during treatment along with other complaints indicating psychological distress. A highly statistically significant association was seen between APOE genotypes and interferon-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms. Patients with an epsilon4 allele were more likely to be referred to a psychiatrist and had more neuropsychiatric symptoms during antiviral treatment than those without an epsilon4 allele. Additionally, patients with an epsilon4 allele were more likely to experience irritability or anger and anxiety or other mood symptoms. These data demonstrate that an individual's APOE genotype may influence the neuropsychiatric response to antiviral therapy with interferon alpha. Prospective studies evaluating the importance of APOE in susceptibility to interferon alpha-induced neuropsychiatric complications are needed. Moreover, pathways involving APOE should be considered in understanding the pathophysiology of interferon alpha-induced neuropsychiatric complications.

  9. Thyrotoxicosis with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowndes, Sarah A; Asher, Ruth; Middleton, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    Despite adequate surgery, a diagnosis of stage III melanoma carries a high risk of relapse, and hence mortality. Interferon alfa is the only treatment that has currently been shown to alter the natural history of the disease, delaying relapse-free survival, particularly in patients with micrometastatic disease. There is also recent evidence of a prognostic advantage conferred by the development of autoimmune conditions in patients receiving adjuvant interferon therapy. We present the case of a 27-year-old woman with stage IIIa melanoma who was entered into the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer 18991 trial of 5-year adjuvant treatment with pegylated interferon (peginterferon) alfa-2b. The patient developed thyrotoxicosis 3 months after commencing treatment, which required treatment with propylthiouracil. The degree of thyrotoxicosis corresponded closely to the dose of peginterferon alfa-2b given. However, in this patient, the hyperthyroidism resolved spontaneously after 4 years when peginterferon treatment was still ongoing. Seven years following the initial diagnosis, the patient has not had disease relapse. Hyperthyroidism is less common than hypothyroidism as a consequence of interferon therapy, and this case is atypical in that it resolved spontaneously during interferon therapy but is in accordance with the recent evidence of a positive association between interferon-associated autoimmunity and prognosis.

  10. Parainfluenza Virus 3 Blocks Antiviral Mediators Downstream of the Interferon Lambda Receptor by Modulating Stat1 Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Kirsten C; McGill, Jodi L; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-12-30

    number of pathogens that contribute to the bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). As their name suggests, interferons (IFNs) are produced by cells to interfere with viral replication. Paramyxoviruses have previously been shown to block production and downstream signaling of type I IFNs. For the first time, it is shown here that PIV-3 can induce protective type III IFNs in epithelial cells, the primary site of PIV-3 infection. However, we found that PIV-3 modulates signaling pathways downstream of the type III IFN receptor to block production of several specific molecules that aid in a productive antiviral response. Importantly, this work expands our understanding of how PIV-3 effectively evades host innate immunity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Pegylated Interferon (Alone or With Ribavirin for Chronic Hepatitis C in Haemodialysis Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Espinosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hepatitis C virus infection remains prevalent among patients undergoing long-term haemodialysis and has a detrimental impact on survival in this population. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C in haemodialysis patients is still a challenge to clinicians. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of therapy with pegylated interferon, alone or combined with ribavirin, for chronic hepatitis C among patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, multicenter cohort trial with monotherapy (pegylated interferon (n=21 or combined antiviral therapy (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (n=5 for chronic hepatitis C in patients undergoing long-term haemodialysis. Results: Sustained virological response was obtained in eleven (42% patients. Seven (26.9% patients interrupted prematurely the antiviral treatment due to serious side-effects, the most frequent cause of treatment withdrawal being hematological (n=3. HCV RNA load was lower in responder than non-responder patients, 5.44 (3.45; 6.36 vs. 5.86 (4.61; 6.46 log10 copies/mL, even if the difference was not significant (P=0.099. Blood transfusion requirement was greater in patients on combined antiviral therapy than those on pegylated interferon alone, 100% (5/5 vs. 0% (0/21, P=0.0001. No difference in sustained viral response occurred between patients on combined antiviral therapy and those on pegylated interferon monotherapy [40% (2/5 vs. 42.8% (9/21, P=0.90]. Conclusions: Results from this study showed that pegylated interferon alone or with ribavirin is unsatisfactory in terms of efficacy and safety. Prospective trials based on interferon-free regimens (i.e., sofosbuvir plus ribavirin or sofosbuvir plus daclatasvir are under way in patients with hepatitis C receiving long-term hemodialysis.

  12. Recessive genetic deregulation abrogates c-myc suppression by interferon and is implicated in oncogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimchi, A.; Resnitzky, D.; Ber, R.; Gat, G.

    1988-07-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that many hematopoietic tumor cells are resistant to the inhibitory effects that interferon exerts on c-myc mRNA expression without losing other receptor-mediated intracellular responses. They report here that this partial resistance was overridden in two independent stable somatic cell hybrids prepared by fusion between sensitive and resistant cells. The c-myc mRNA transcribed from the active allele of the resistant parent cell was reduced by interferon within the context of the cell hybrid. It was therefore concluded that changes in the cis-acting sequences of c-myc were not involved in this type of relaxed regulation and that resistance resulted rather from inactivation or loss of postreceptor elements which operate in trans. The growth-stimulating effect that this genetic deregulation might have on cells was tested in experimental systems of cell differentiation in which an autocrine interferon is produced. For that purpose the authors isolated variant clones of M1 myeloid cells which were partially resistant to alpha and beta interferons and tested their growth behaviour during in vitro-induced differentiation. The resistant clones displayed higher proliferative activity on days 2 and 3 of differentiation than did the sensitive clones, which stopped proliferating. The loss of c-myc responses to the self-produced interferon disrupted the normal cessation of growth during differentiation and therefore might lead cells along the pathway of neoplasia.

  13. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here...... we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity...

  14. Management of chronic hepatitis C treatment failures: role of consensus interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan A Gonzalez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Stevan A Gonzalez1, Emmet B Keeffe21Division of Hepatology, Baylor Regional Transplant Institute, Baylor All Saints Medical Center, Fort Worth and Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: A significant proportion of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection who undergo antiviral therapy have persistent or recurrent viremia and fail to achieve a sustained virologic response (SVR. Factors associated with treatment failure include HCV genotype 1 infection, high serum HCV RNA levels, and advanced fibrosis. Consensus interferon (CIFN is a synthetic type I interferon derived from a consensus sequence of the most common amino acids found in naturally occurring alpha interferon subtypes. Several prospective clinical studies have demonstrated that CIFN may be a treatment option in patients who have failed prior interferonbased therapy, including those who have failed combination therapy with standard interferon or peginterferon plus ribavirin. Daily CIFN in combination with ribavirin may be an effective regimen in this setting; however, optimal dose and treatment duration of CIFN therapy have not been well established. Patients who achieve viral suppression during prior interferon-based therapy and those who do not have advanced fibrosis have a greater likelihood of achieving a SVR with CIFN retreatment. Individualized therapy targeting specific patient groups will be an important consideration in the successful management of prior treatment failures. Additional prospective studies are required in order to identify optimal treatment strategies for the use of CIFN in these patients.Keywords: consensus interferon, hepatitis C, interferon, nonresponder, relapser

  15. Interferon-induced depression: prevalence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalori, A; Pozzi, M; Bellia, V; Apale, P; Santamaria, G; Bordoni, T; Redaelli, A; Avolio, A; Parravicini, P; Pioltelli, P; Roffi, L

    2005-02-01

    Interferon-induced depression ranges from 0 to 50%. Interferon schedule and a history of psychiatric illnesses are not enough to predict who will develop symptoms and who will not. To assess the prevalence of depression during interferon therapy; to test whether Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory is useful in clinical practice for the early identification of patients at risk of depression; whether and how the depression can be cured. One hundred and eighty-five patients treated with interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Before therapy, all patients underwent a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and a clinical examination, specifically for the identification of depressive symptoms. Thirty-one patients developed a psychiatric disorder, 11 of them requiring treatment with anti-depressant drugs. Among the 18 patients with Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory positive tests, 16 developed a psychiatric disorder, 8 of them a severe disorder (sensitivity of 0.58; 0.73 for severe disorders). Among the 154 who did not develop psychiatric side effects, 152 had a negative Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (specificity: 0.99). Severe psychiatric disorders were successfully treated with anti-depressant drugs. Psychiatric side effects are easy to see during interferon therapy. A psychiatric evaluation should be considered on all patients before treatment. If depression develops, it should be treated aggressively, and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are the anti-depressants of choice.

  16. The human respiratory syncytial virus nonstructural protein 1 regulates type I and type II interferon pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Marcus L; Headlam, Madeleine J; Patel, Nirav B; Bukreyev, Alexander A; Buchholz, Ursula J; Dave, Keyur A; Norris, Emma L; Wright, Cassandra L; Spann, Kirsten M; Collins, Peter L; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2012-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial viruses encode a nonstructural protein (NS1) that interferes with type I and III interferon and other antiviral responses. Proteomic studies were conducted on human A549 type II alveolar epithelial cells and type I interferon-deficient Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cells) infected with wild-type and NS1-deficient clones of human respiratory syncytial virus to identify other potential pathway and molecular targets of NS1 interference. These analyses included two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and quantitative Western blotting. Surprisingly, NS1 was found to suppress the induction of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression in A549 cells and to a much lesser degree Vero cells in response to infection. Because SOD2 is not directly inducible by type I interferons, it served as a marker to probe the impact of NS1 on signaling of other cytokines known to induce SOD2 expression and/or indirect effects of type I interferon signaling. Deductive analysis of results obtained from cell infection and cytokine stimulation studies indicated that interferon-γ signaling was a potential target of NS1, possibly as a result of modulation of STAT1 levels. However, this was not sufficient to explain the magnitude of the impact of NS1 on SOD2 induction in A549 cells. Vero cell infection experiments indicated that NS1 targeted a component of the type I interferon response that does not directly induce SOD2 expression but is required to induce another initiator of SOD2 expression. STAT2 was ruled out as a target of NS1 interference using quantitative Western blot analysis of infected A549 cells, but data were obtained to indicate that STAT1 was one of a number of potential targets of NS1. A label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative approach is proposed as a means of more definitive identification of NS1 targets.

  17. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  18. Interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C.......To assess the efficacy and safety of interferon alfa with or without ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C....

  19. Interferon-alfa treatment of facial infantile haemangiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Hans C.; Illum, N.; Jensen, H.

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, haemangiomas of the face, infancy, Interferon alfa, eye at risk, amblyopia, induced refractive change, ultrasound imaging......ophthalmology, haemangiomas of the face, infancy, Interferon alfa, eye at risk, amblyopia, induced refractive change, ultrasound imaging...

  20. Combination of interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in relapsed or nonresponding chronic hepatitis C patients following interferon therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentius A. Lesmana

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty six patients (pts with chronic hepatitis C (CHC who reLapsed or non-responded following.interferon (IFN therapy were given lFN alfa-2b 3   MIU three times a week for 48 weeks in combination with Ribavirin 800-1000 mg daily 2I (80,8% of the 26.pts completed the study consisted of 12 relapsers and 9 non-responders. Five pts dropped out due to drug adverse events in three pts and non-drug related reason in the other two. In the relapsed group complete response, relapse and sustained response rates were obtained in 9/12(75%, 2/2 (16,5% and 7/12(58,3% pts respectively. In the non- responding group, these figures were 3/9 (33,3%, 1/9(I1,1%, and 2/9(22,2% pts, respectively. The most frequent adverse event was flu-like syndrome, which was found in 18 pts (85,7%. Combination therapy of IFN alfa-2b and ribavirin may induce sustained virological response in relapsed and non-responding CHC patients. This combination therapy is more effective for relapsers compared to for non-responders. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 214-8Keywords: Chronic hepatitis C, combination therapy, interferon, ribavirin

  1. Interferon-α treatment in systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis are rare, constitute a heterogeneous clinical entity and some may not require treatment until long after diagnosis. However, most patients who present with disabling symptoms, organ involvement and fulfill B or C findings as outlined in the 2008 WHO...... classification need treatment. This review on interferon treatment in systemic mastocytosis documents an effect of this biological agent in some patients with mastocytosis. However, the place of interferon-α, as mono- or combination therapy, in the treatment algorithm may only be definitely established...

  2. Interferon-α treatment in systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2011-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis are rare, constitute a heterogeneous clinical entity and some may not require treatment until long after diagnosis. However, most patients who present with disabling symptoms, organ involvement and fulfill B or C findings as outlined in the 2008 WHO...... classification need treatment. This review on interferon treatment in systemic mastocytosis documents an effect of this biological agent in some patients with mastocytosis. However, the place of interferon-a, as mono- or combination therapy, in the treatment algorithm may only be definitely established...

  3. Structural basis of a unique interferon-β signaling axis mediated via the receptor IFNAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Weerd, Nicole A; Vivian, Julian P; Nguyen, Thao K; Mangan, Niamh E; Gould, Jodee A; Braniff, Susie-Jane; Zaker-Tabrizi, Leyla; Fung, Ka Yee; Forster, Samuel C; Beddoe, Travis; Reid, Hugh H; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hertzog, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    Type I interferons are important in regulating immune responses to pathogens and tumors. All interferons are considered to signal via the heterodimeric IFNAR1-IFNAR2 complex, yet some subtypes such as interferon-β (IFN-β) can exhibit distinct functional properties, although the molecular basis of this is unclear. Here we demonstrate IFN-β can uniquely and specifically ligate to IFNAR1 in an IFNAR2-independent manner, and we provide the structural basis of the IFNAR1-IFN-β interaction. The IFNAR1-IFN-β complex transduced signals that modulated expression of a distinct set of genes independently of Jak-STAT pathways. Lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis was ameliorated in Ifnar1(-/-) mice but not Ifnar2(-/-) mice, suggesting that IFNAR1-IFN-β signaling is pathologically relevant. Thus, we provide a molecular basis for understanding specific functions of IFN-β.

  4. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  5. Expression of biologically active human interferon alpha 2 in aloe vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a system for transgenic expression of proteins in Aloe Vera. Using this approach we have generated plants expressing the human gene interferon alpha 2, IFNa2. IFNa2 is a small secreted cytokine that plays a vital role in regulating the body’s immune response to viral infections a...

  6. RAIDD Mediates TLR3 and IRF7 Driven Type i Interferon Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maney, S K; Xu, H C; Huang, J

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Viral infections represent a global health problem with the need for new viral therapies and better understanding of the immune response during infection. The most immediate and potent anti-viral defense mechanism is the production of type I interferon (IFN-I) which are activated...

  7. Adjuvant interferon-gamma immunotherapy in a patient with progressive cerebral Nocardia abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leentjens, Jenneke; Gresnigt, Mark S; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Kox, Matthijs; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Pickkers, Peter; Brouwer, Annemarie E; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-06-01

    Despite advances in medical care, mortality due to cerebral Nocardia abscesses remains unacceptably high. The case of a typical immunocompromised patient, who deteriorated clinically despite optimal antimicrobial treatment, is reported here. Adjuvant immunotherapy with interferon-gamma resulted in partial restoration of the immune response and a corresponding clinical and radiographic recovery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Type III Interferons Produced by Human Placental Trophoblasts Confer Protection against Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Avraham; Lennemann, Nicholas J; Ouyang, Yingshi; Bramley, John C; Morosky, Stefanie; Marques, Ernesto Torres De Azeved; Cherry, Sara; Sadovsky, Yoel; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-05-11

    During mammalian pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier between the maternal and fetal compartments. The recently observed association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy and fetal microcephaly and other anomalies suggests that ZIKV may bypass the placenta to reach the fetus. This led us to investigate ZIKV infection of primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), which are the barrier cells of the placenta. We discovered that PHT cells from full-term placentas are refractory to ZIKV infection. In addition, medium from uninfected PHT cells protects non-placental cells from ZIKV infection. PHT cells constitutively release the type III interferon (IFN) IFNλ1, which functions in both a paracrine and autocrine manner to protect trophoblast and non-trophoblast cells from ZIKV infection. Our data suggest that for ZIKV to access the fetal compartment, it must evade restriction by trophoblast-derived IFNλ1 and other trophoblast-specific antiviral factors and/or use alternative strategies to cross the placental barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. B Cells Producing Type I Interferon Modulate Macrophage Polarization in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Alan; Sakwa, Imme; Schierloh, Pablo; Colom, André; Mercier, Ingrid; Tailleux, Ludovic; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Al-Saati, Talal; Lang, Roland; Rehwinkel, Jan; Loxton, Andre G; Kaufmann, Stefan He; Anton-Leberre, Véronique; O'Garra, Anne; Del Carmen Sasiain, Maria; Gicquel, Brigitte; Fillatreau, Simon; Neyrolles, Olivier; Hudrisier, Denis

    2017-11-21

    In addition to their well-known function as antibody-producing cells, B lymphocytes can markedly influence the course of infectious or non-infectious diseases via antibody-independent mechanisms. In tuberculosis, B cells accumulate in lungs, yet their functional contribution to the host response remains poorly understood. To document the role of B cells in tuberculosis in an unbiased manner. We generated the transcriptome of B cells isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected mice, and validated the identified key pathways using in vitro and in vivo assays. The obtained data were substantiated using B cells from pleural effusion of tuberculosis patients. B cells isolated from Mtb-infected mice displayed a STAT1-centered signature, suggesting a role for interferons in B cell response to infection. B cells stimulated in vitro with Mtb produced type I interferon, via a mechanism involving the innate sensor STING, and antagonized by MyD88 signaling. In vivo, B cells expressed type I interferon in the lungs of Mtb-infected mice and, of clinical relevance, in pleural fluid from patients with tuberculosis. Type I interferon expression by B cells induced an altered polarization of macrophages towards a regulatory/anti-inflammatory profile in vitro. In vivo, increased provision of type I interferon by B cells in a murine model of B cell-restricted Myd88-deficiency correlated with an enhanced accumulation of regulatory/anti-inflammatory macrophages in Mtb infected lungs. Type I interferon produced by Mtb-stimulated B cells favors macrophage polarization towards a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phenotype during Mtb infection.

  10. Type I Interferon in the Pathogenesis of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have applied insights from studies of the innate immune response to define type I interferon (IFN-I), with IFN-α the dominant mediator, as central to the pathogenesis of this prototype systemic autoimmune disease. Genetic association data identify regulators of nucleic acid degradation and components of TLR-independent, endosomal TLR-dependent, and IFN-I signaling pathways as contributors to lupus disease susceptibility. Together with a gene expression signature characterized by IFNI-induced gene transcripts in lupus blood and tissue, those data support the conclusion that many of the immunologic and pathologic features of this disease are a consequence of a persistent self-directed immune reaction driven by IFN-I and mimicking a sustained anti-virus response. This expanding knowledge of the role of IFN-I and the innate immune response suggests candidate therapeutic targets that are being tested in lupus patients. PMID:24907379

  11. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  12. Interferon-γ links ultraviolet radiation to melanomagenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, M Raza; Davis, Sean; Noonan, Frances P; Graff-Cherry, Cari; Hawley, Teresa S; Walker, Robert L; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Fuchs, Elaine; Lyakh, Lyudmila; Young, Howard A; Hornyak, Thomas J; Arnheiter, Heinz; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Meltzer, Paul S; De Fabo, Edward C; Merlino, Glenn

    2011-01-27

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive and frequently chemoresistant cancer, the incidence of which continues to rise. Epidemiological studies show that the major aetiological melanoma risk factor is ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation, with the highest risk associated with intermittent burning doses, especially during childhood. We have experimentally validated these epidemiological findings using the hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor transgenic mouse model, which develops lesions in stages highly reminiscent of human melanoma with respect to biological, genetic and aetiological criteria, but only when irradiated as neonatal pups with UVB, not UVA. However, the mechanisms underlying UVB-initiated, neonatal-specific melanomagenesis remain largely unknown. Here we introduce a mouse model permitting fluorescence-aided melanocyte imaging and isolation following in vivo UV irradiation. We use expression profiling to show that activated neonatal skin melanocytes isolated following a melanomagenic UVB dose bear a distinct, persistent interferon response signature, including genes associated with immunoevasion. UVB-induced melanocyte activation, characterized by aberrant growth and migration, was abolished by antibody-mediated systemic blockade of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), but not type-I interferons. IFN-γ was produced by macrophages recruited to neonatal skin by UVB-induced ligands to the chemokine receptor Ccr2. Admixed recruited skin macrophages enhanced transplanted melanoma growth by inhibiting apoptosis; notably, IFN-γ blockade abolished macrophage-enhanced melanoma growth and survival. IFN-γ-producing macrophages were also identified in 70% of human melanomas examined. Our data reveal an unanticipated role for IFN-γ in promoting melanocytic cell survival/immunoevasion, identifying a novel candidate therapeutic target for a subset of melanoma patients.

  13. Laboratory evaluation of commercial interferon preparations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antiviral, antiproliferative and natural killer-cell. (NKC) stimulatory activities of four commercial the- rapeutic interferon preparations were assayed in our laboratory. The antiviral and antiproliferative activities of each preparation were relatively similar, but an unexpectedly high NKC stimulatory activity was foupd in one ...

  14. Neuropsychiatric Complications Associated with Interferon - Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Ireland. Abstract. Several adverse effects have been associated with interferon alpha 2b treatment and neuropsychiatric effects have also been commonly reported. Psychosis and mood disorders have been described in the literature. This case report is of a 30 year old man.

  15. Laboratory evaluation of commercial interferon preparations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiviral radio-immunoassay. This technique has been described in greater detail else- where. 7 The test is based on the quantitation by radio-immuno- assay of the reduction of growth of challenge Sindbis virus due to the protection of cells by the interferon samples. Briefly, confluent monolayers of Vero cells were grown in.

  16. Interferons in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are implicated as an important component of the innate immune system influencing viral infections, inflammation, and immune surveillance. We review here the complex biological activity of IFNs in the central nervous system (CNS) and associated glial–immune interactions...

  17. Neuropsychiatric Complications Associated with Interferon - Alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several adverse effects have been associated with interferon alpha 2b treatment and neuropsychiatric effects have also been commonly reported. Psychosis and mood disorders have been described in the literature. This case report is of a 30 year old man with malignant melanoma stage 3a who was receiving adjuvant ...

  18. [Pegylation and interferons in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Centonze

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pegylation is a procedure used for drug development since the 1970s and consists of the conjugation of a polyethylene glycol molecule (PEG to a drug. PEG has shown to be safe and effective in improving the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of drugs. Recently, a 20 kDa linear chain of PEG was conjugated to interferon beta-1a with the aim to offer a new treatment option to relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients. Due to a prolonged bioavailability, this new drug can be administered less frequently (every two weeks than the other interferons beta available, thus allowing to hypothesize a better adherence to the treatment, which, in turn, should result in better clinical and economic outcomes. A phase III clinical trial has proven its effectiveness compared to placebo in RRMS patients, as well as a safety profile comparable to that found in other interferon beta preparations. The immunogenicity of this new molecule is < 1%, thus minimizing the suppression or reduction of interferon beta biological activity that could come from the development of Neutralizing Antibodies (NAbs. [Article in Italian

  19. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

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    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  20. Literature systematic review on the ophthalmological side effects of interferons

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    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferons alpha and beta have been used worldwide for a few decades, altering the natural history of several severe diseases including hepatitis C, cancer and immune-mediated conditions such as multiple sclerosis. The adverse events profile of interferons is well established, but only isolated reports of ophthalmological complications of interferon therapy have been published. The objective of this study was to carry out a literature systematic review on the subject, bringing to light the need for careful ophthalmological monitoring of patients undergoing interferon treatment. Nearly 500 cases of ophthalmological complications related to interferon have been reported. The most frequent findings were soft exudates, hemorrhages and retina ischemia.

  1. Plasmids expressing interleukin-10 short hairpin RNA mediate IL-10 knockdown and enhance tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma expressions in response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charerntantanakul, Wasin; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2012-04-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been suggested to exploit interleukin-10 (IL-10) to suppress immune defense of infected pigs. The present study constructed plasmids encoding selected short hairpin RNA specific to porcine IL-10 mRNA (pIL-10sh) to knockdown IL-10 transcription and investigated the suppressive effect of PRRSV-induced IL-10 on various immune marker expressions. Naïve blood monocytes from eight PRRSV-seronegative pigs were transfected with pIL-10sh and pNeg (plasmid vector) prior to PRRSV inoculation and subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. The mRNA expressions of IL-10, IL-1β, IL-12p40, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interferon gamma (IFNγ), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), CD80, and CD86 were evaluated by real-time PCR. The IL-10, TNFα, and IFNγ protein productions were determined by ELISA. Compared with non-transfected monocyte control, transfection with selected pIL-10sh (pIL-10sh1), but not other pIL-10sh nor pNeg, significantly reduced IL-10 expression and significantly enhanced TNFα and IFNγ expressions. Slight increases in IL-1β, IL-12p40, CD80, and CD86 expressions were also observed. Neither pIL-10sh1 nor pNeg transfection affected TGFβ expression. Our results indicate that PRRSV does exploit IL-10 to suppress the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly TNFα and IFNγ, and co-stimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Extended interferon-alpha therapy accelerates telomere length loss in human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

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    Joel M O'Bryan

    Full Text Available Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes.Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8(+CD45RA(+CD57(+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8(+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index.Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined.

  3. Combination of interferon and dexamethasone in refractory multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, J F; Moro, M; Bladé, J; Guerras, L; Hernandez, J; Jimenez-Galindo, R; Ortega, F; Gonzalez, M

    1990-01-01

    The present pilot study was designed to analyse the efficacy and toxicity of the association of interferon (IFN) and dexamethasone (Dx) in 32 resistant and relapsed myeloma patients. Among the evaluable cases, 15 (68 per cent) responded to treatment (32 per cent achieved an objective response--OR--and 36 per cent a partial response--PR--), the 'remission' status lasting for more than one year in six of them. Moreover, four out of the seven OR patients showed a reduction in B.M. plasma cells to less than 5 per cent. Five out of 11 patients that were previously refractory to VBAD, that includes high dose dexamethasone (Dx), responded to IFN-Dx. The protocol was generally well tolerated with only four patients discontinuing therapy due to adverse effects. The present results show that the combination IFN + Dx is a promising therapeutic approach for patients with refractory myeloma.

  4. Interleukins, interferons, and establishment of pregnancy in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Daniel J; Lucy, Matthew C; D Geisert, Rodney

    2016-06-01

    Early pregnancy in mammals requires complex and highly orchestrated cellular and molecular interactions between specialized cells within the endometrium and the conceptus. Proinflammatory cytokines are small signaling proteins released by leukocytes that augment innate and adaptive immune responses. They are also released by the mammalian trophectoderm as the conceptus apposes the uterine surface for implantation. On approximately day 12 of development in pigs, the conceptus undergoes a rapid morphological transformation referred to as elongation while simultaneously releasing estrogens and a novel conceptus form of interleukin-1 beta (IL1β). Following elongation, pig conceptuses express interferon gamma (IFNγ) and, in lesser amounts, interferon delta (IFNδ). Significant IFN signaling takes place within the endometrium between day 14 and 18 of pregnancy as the conceptus intimately associates with the uterine epithelium. Based on studies carried out in pigs and other mammals, the combined spacio-temporal activities of conceptus estrogens, IL1β, and IFN set in motion a series of coordinated events that promote establishment of pregnancy. This is achieved through enhancement of conceptus development, uterine receptivity, maternal-fetal hemotropic exchange, and endometrial leukocyte function. These events require activation of specific signaling pathways within the uterine luminal epithelium, glandular epithelium, and stroma. Here, we review proinflammatory cytokine expression by pig conceptuses and the hypothesized actions of these molecules during establishment of pregnancy. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  5. Host defense against viral infection involves interferon mediated down-regulation of sterol biosynthesis.

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    Mathieu Blanc

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the protective role of inflammatory processes in modulating lipid metabolism in infection. Here we report an intimate link between the innate immune response to infection and regulation of the sterol metabolic network characterized by down-regulation of sterol biosynthesis by an interferon regulatory loop mechanism. In time-series experiments profiling genome-wide lipid-associated gene expression of macrophages, we show a selective and coordinated negative regulation of the complete sterol pathway upon viral infection or cytokine treatment with IFNγ or β but not TNF, IL1β, or IL6. Quantitative analysis at the protein level of selected sterol metabolic enzymes upon infection shows a similar level of suppression. Experimental testing of sterol metabolite levels using lipidomic-based measurements shows a reduction in metabolic output. On the basis of pharmacologic and RNAi inhibition of the sterol pathway we show augmented protection against viral infection, and in combination with metabolite rescue experiments, we identify the requirement of the mevalonate-isoprenoid branch of the sterol metabolic network in the protective response upon statin or IFNβ treatment. Conditioned media experiments from infected cells support an involvement of secreted type 1 interferon(s to be sufficient for reducing the sterol pathway upon infection. Moreover, we show that infection of primary macrophages containing a genetic knockout of the major type I interferon, IFNβ, leads to only a partial suppression of the sterol pathway, while genetic knockout of the receptor for all type I interferon family members, ifnar1, or associated signaling component, tyk2, completely abolishes the reduction of the sterol biosynthetic activity upon infection. Levels of the proteolytically cleaved nuclear forms of SREBP2, a key transcriptional regulator of sterol biosynthesis, are reduced upon infection and IFNβ treatment at both the protein and de novo

  6. Raised interferon-β, type 3 interferon and interferon-stimulated genes - evidence of innate immune activation in neutrophilic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J; Hilzendeger, C; Moermans, C; Schleich, F; Henket, M; Kebadze, T; Mallia, P; Edwards, M R; Johnston, S L; Louis, R

    2017-03-01

    Interferons play an important role in innate immunity. Previous studies report deficiency in virus induction of interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-β and IFN-λ in bronchial epithelial and bronchial lavage cells in atopic asthmatics. It is now recognized that asthma is a heterogeneous disease comprising different inflammatory phenotypes, some of which may involve innate immune activation in the absence of overt infection. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the severity of asthma or a specific cellular sputum pattern may be linked to evidence of innate immune activation. Here we investigate the expression of IFN-β, IFN-λ1 (IL-29), IFN-λ2/3 (IL-28A/B) and the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx1), oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and viperin in unstimulated sputum cells in 57 asthmatics (including 16 mild, 19 moderate and 22 severe asthma patients) and compared them with 19 healthy subjects. We observed increased expression of IFN-β, IFN-λ1/IL-29, OAS and viperin in asthmatics compared with healthy subjects, while IL-28 was not expressed in any group. The overexpression was restricted to neutrophilic asthmatics (sputum neutrophils ≥ 76%), while eosinophilic asthmatics (sputum eosinophils ≥ 3%) did not differ from healthy subjects or even showed a lower expression of Mx1. No difference in interferon or ISG expression was observed according to clinical asthma severity. Neutrophilic, but not eosinophilic, asthmatics display overexpression of IFN-β, IFN-λ1/IL-29 and ISGs in their sputum cells that may reflect ongoing innate immune activation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dissecting interferon-induced transcriptional programs in human peripheral blood cells.

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    Simon J Waddell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles.We used human cDNA microarrays to (1 compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons alpha, beta, omega and gamma, IL12 and TNFalpha; and (2 characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes to IFNgamma stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNgamma and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFalpha stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNgamma, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings.

  8. Sendai Virus Infection Induces Efficient Adaptive Immunity Independently of Type I Interferons

    OpenAIRE

    López, Carolina B.; Yount, Jacob S.; Hermesh, Tamar; Moran, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in response to virus infection involves the generation of Th1 cells, cytotoxic T cells, and antibodies. This type of immune response is crucial for the clearance of virus infection and for long-term protection against reinfection. Type I interferons (IFNs), the primary innate cytokines that control virus growth and spreading, can influence various aspects of adaptive immunity. The development of antiviral immunity depends on many viral and cellular factors, and the extent to...

  9. Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of