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Sample records for european community respiratory

  1. Inhalation Incidents and Respiratory Health: Results From the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Olivieri, Mario; Kromhout, Hans; Norbäck, Dan; Radon, Katja; Torén, Kjell; van Sprundel, Marc; Villani, Simona; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhalation incidents are an important cause of acute respiratory symptoms, but little is known about how these incidents affect chronic respiratory health. Methods We assessed reported inhalation incidents among 3,763 European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) participants with and without cough, phlegm, asthma, wheezing or bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We then examined whether inhalation incidents during the 9-year ECRHS follow-up period were associated with a new onset of any of these respiratory outcomes among 2,809 participants who were free of all five outcomes at the time of the baseline ECRHS survey. Results Inhalation incidents were reported by 5% of participants, with higher percentages reported among individuals with asthma-related outcomes at the time of the baseline survey. Among participants without symptoms at baseline, our analyses generated non-statistically significant elevated estimates of the risk of cough, phlegm, asthma and wheezing and a non-statistically significant inverse estimate of the risk of bronchial hyperresponsiveness among participants who reported an inhalation incident compared to those without such an event reported. Discussion Our findings provide limited evidence of an association between inhalation incidents and asthma-related symptoms. These data could be affected by differences in the reporting of inhalation incidents according to symptom status at the time of the baseline survey; they should thus be interpreted with caution. PMID:18942122

  2. Changes in active and passive smoking in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, C; Kunzli, N; de Marco, R; Chinn, S; Jarvis, D; Svanes, C; Heinrich, J; Jogi, R; Gislason, T; Sunyer, J; Ackermann-Liebrich, U; Anto, JM; Cerveri, [No Value; Kerhof, M; Leynaert, B; Luczynska, C; Neukirch, F; Vermeire, P; Wjst, M; Burney, P

    The aim of the present investigation was to study changes and determinants for changes in active and passive smoking. The present study included 9,053 adults from 14 countries that participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II. The mean follow-up period was 8.8 yrs. Change in

  3. Respiratory symptoms in adults are related to impaired quality of life, regardless of asthma and COPD: results from the European community respiratory health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakke Per S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory symptoms are common in the general population, and their presence is related to Health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The objective was to describe the association of respiratory symptoms with HRQoL in subjects with and without asthma or COPD and to investigate the role of atopy, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR, and lung function in HRQoL. Methods The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS I and II provided data on HRQoL, lung function, respiratory symptoms, asthma, atopy, and BHR from 6009 subjects. Generic HRQoL was assessed through the physical component summary (PCS score and the mental component summary (MCS score of the SF-36. Factor analyses and linear regressions adjusted for age, gender, smoking, occupation, BMI, comorbidity, and study centre were conducted. Results Having breathlessness at rest in ECRHS II was associated with mean score (95% CI impairment in PCS of -8.05 (-11.18, -4.93. Impairment in MCS score in subjects waking up with chest tightness was -4.02 (-5.51, -2.52. The magnitude of HRQoL impairment associated with respiratory symptoms was similar for subjects with and without asthma/COPD. Adjustments for atopy, BHR, and lung function did not explain the association of respiratory symptoms and HRQoL in subjects without asthma and/or COPD. Conclusion Subjects with respiratory symptoms had poorer HRQoL; including subjects without a diagnosis of asthma or COPD. These findings suggest that respiratory symptoms in the absence of a medical diagnosis of asthma or COPD are by no means trivial, and that clarifying the nature and natural history of respiratory symptoms is a relevant challenge. Several community studies have estimated the prevalence of common respiratory symptoms like cough, dyspnoea, and wheeze in adults 123. Although the prevalence varies to a large degree between studies and geographical areas, respiratory symptoms are quite common. The prevalences of respiratory

  4. Housing characteristics, reported mold exposure, and asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zock, Jan-Paul; Jarvis, Deborah; Luczynska, Christina; Sunyer, Jordi; Burney, Peter

    2002-08-01

    The effects of home dampness and mold exposure on adult asthma are not clear. We aimed to investigate the associations between housing characteristics related to dampness, mold exposure, and house dust mite levels and adult asthma in 38 study centers from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Data about the present home, heating and ventilation systems, double glazing, floor covers, recent water damage, and mold exposure were obtained by means of an interviewer-led questionnaire. The associations between these factors and asthma, as defined on the basis of symptoms in the last year, and of bronchial responsiveness, as determined with methacholine challenge, were evaluated. Odds ratios (ORs) were obtained by using random-effects meta-analyses adjusted within study centers for sex, age group, and smoking status. Fitted carpets and rugs in the bedroom were related to fewer asthma symptoms and bronchial responsiveness (OR range, 0.69-0.91). This effect was consistent across centers and more pronounced among house dust mite-sensitized individuals. Reported mold exposure in the last year was associated with asthma symptoms and bronchial responsiveness (OR range, 1.14-1.44). This effect was homogeneous among centers and stronger in subjects sensitized to Cladosporium species. In centers with a higher prevalence of asthma, the prevalence of reported indoor mold exposure was also high. This association was observed for reported mold exposure by asthmatic subjects (Spearman r (s) = 0.46), as well as reported mold exposure by nonasthmatic subjects (r (s) = 0.54). Reported mold exposure was highest in older houses with recent water damage. We conclude that indoor mold growth has an adverse effect on adult asthma.

  5. Harmonisation of the acute respiratory infection reporting system in the Czech Republic with the European community networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyncl, J.; Paget, W.J.; Havlickova, M.; Kriz, B.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory virus activity is detected in Europe each winter, yet the precise timing and size of this activity is highly unpredictable. The impact of influenza infection and/or acute respiratory infection in European countries is continuously monitored through a variety of surveillance systems. All

  6. Population prevalence of asthma and its determinants based on European Community Respiratory Health Survey in the United Arab Emirates

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    Mahboub Bassam H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No population study has explored the population distribution of adult asthma in the United Arab Emirates (UAE. The objective is to estimate asthma prevalence in general population in UAE. Methods Using standard European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS questionnaires and tools, this is a cross-sectional assessment of a random sample of the population in established quotas of the seven Emirates in the UAE. We surveyed 1,220 participants, of which 63.2% were male, and 20.1% were UAE Nationals, with a mean (SD age of 32.9 (14.1 years. Results Prevalence of individual respiratory symptoms from the ECRHS screening questionnaire in all participants were generally ranging 8 - 10%, while participants 20-44 years presented lower prevalence in all symptoms (p Conclusion We conclude that asthma is common in the UAE, and gender differences are not observed in reported asthma symptoms in young adults. This being the first population based study exploring the prevalence of asthma and its determinants in the United Arab Emirates based on the ECRHS.

  7. THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY PRIORITY - THE SOCIAL POLICY

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    Gina Ignat

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At the level of European Union, starting from the necessity of insurance economic growth, social community law gradually developed, benefitting by sinuous construction, extremely complex, beingcontinuously transformed. Familiarization with the model of social community law prescribed by European Union represents not only a forward step in the process of harmonization with community law, but also an alignment in settlement of European Union, which finally establishes the modernization of the whole domestic law system.

  8. Clinical highlights from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

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    Nicolas Kahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the European Respiratory Society (ERS Clinical Assembly (Assembly 1 and its six respective groups (Groups 1.1–1.6 that were presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress in London, UK. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including clinical problems, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, interventional pulmonology, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, the newest research and actual data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  9. Inducible laryngeal obstruction: an official joint European Respiratory Society and European Laryngological Society statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Thomas; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Bucca, Caterina; Bush, Andrew; Cantarella, Giovanna; Friedrich, Gerhard; Herth, Felix J F; Hull, James H; Jung, Harald; Maat, Robert; Nordang, Leif; Remacle, Marc; Rasmussen, Niels; Wilson, Janet A; Heimdal, John-Helge

    2017-09-01

    Inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO) describes an inappropriate, transient, reversible narrowing of the larynx in response to external triggers. ILO is an important cause of a variety of respiratory symptoms and can mimic asthma. Current understanding of ILO has been hampered by imprecise nomenclature and variable approaches to assessment and management. A task force of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and European Laryngological Society (ELS) was thus set up to address this, and to identify research priorities.A literature search identified relevant articles published until June 2016, using all identifiable terms for ILO, although including only articles using laryngoscopy. In total, 172 out of 252 articles met the inclusion criteria, summarised in sections on diagnostic approach, aetiology, comorbidities, epidemiology and treatment. The consensus taxonomy published by ERS, ELS and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) in 2015 is used throughout this statement.We highlight the high prevalence of ILO and the clinical impact for those affected. Despite recent advances, most aspects of this condition unfortunately remain incompletely understood, precluding firm guidance. Specifically, validated diagnostic and treatment algorithms are yet to be established, and no randomised control studies were identified in this search; hence we also make recommendations for future research. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  10. The European hadron therapy community touches base

    CERN Multimedia

    Audrey Ballantine, Manuela Cirilli, Evangelia Dimovasili, Manjit Dosanjh, Seamus Hegarty

    2010-01-01

    The European hadron therapy community gathered in Stockholm from 3 to 5 September for the annual ENLIGHT workshops. Three of the four EC-funded projects born under the umbrella of ENLIGHT (see box) were discussed in the prestigious Nobel Forum at the Karolinska Institutet.   Souvenir photo from the ENLIGHT workshops On its second birthday, the PARTNER Initial Training Network was especially under the spotlight, as the European Commission conducted a formal project review bringing together the institutes, companies and young researchers involved. The 21 PARTNER researchers experienced the thrill of presenting their work in this privileged setting. During the coffee breaks, they joked about this being their only chance in life to speak in the Nobel Forum – but who knows what these brilliant young minds will achieve! They certainly impressed the European Commission’s Project Officer Gianluca Coluccio and Expert Reviewer Kaisa Hellevuo, who stated that PARTNER is a showcase proj...

  11. ACRYLAMIDE, FOOD AND EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES RECOMMENDATION

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    G. Carrabs

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The exposure, often deceitful, to the acrylamide has determined notable apprehension in many consumers, so much that the Committee of the European Communities has financed the project HEATOX and has emanated the recommendation 2007/331. It is ascertained that proposed strategies have not brought to great changes in the food process chains, and neither in the traditional catering and housewife, for which more incisive measures are wished.

  12. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Grigg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London.

  13. Key paediatric messages from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Everard, Mark; Hall, Graham; Karadag, Bülent; Priftis, Kostas; Roehr, Charles Christoph; Rottier, Bart L.; Midulla, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the Group Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight some of the most interesting abstracts presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress, which was held in London. PMID:28154820

  14. Photovoltaic pilot projects in the European community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, F. C.; Grassi, G.; Schnell, W.

    The paper presents proposals received for the construction of photovoltaic pilot plants as part of the Commission of the European Communities' second 4-year solar energy R and D program. The proposed plants range from 30 to 300 kWp and cover a variety of applications including rural electrification, water pumping, desalination, dairy farming, factories, hospitals, schools and vacation centers. Fifteen projects will be accepted with a total generating capacity of 1 MWp, with preference given to those projects involving the development of new techniques, components and systems.

  15. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis : 1995 poll of members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; Schaad, UB

    Background. Among the lower respiratory tract infections during infancy requiring hospitalization, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is the most frequent disease entity. Nevertheless treatment remains controversial. Methods. A poll among the European Society for Paediatric Infectious

  16. An official American thoracic society/European respiratory society statement: Key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Spruit (Martijn); S.J. Singh (Sally); C. Garvey (Chris); R. Zu Wallack (Richard); L. Nici (Linda); C. Rochester (Carolyn); K. Hill (Kylie); A.E. Holland (Anne); S.C. Lareau (Suzanne); W.D.-C. Man (William); F. Pitta (Fabio); L. Sewell (Louise); J. Raskin (Jonathan); J. Bourbeau (Jean); R. Crouch (Rebecca); F.M.E. Franssen (Frits); R. Casaburi (Richard); J.H. Vercoulen (Jan); I. Vogiatzis (Ioannis); R.A.A.M. Gosselink (Rik); E.M. Clini (Enrico); T.W. Effing (Tanja); F. Maltais (François); J. van der Palen (Job); T. Troosters; D.J.A. Janssen (Daisy); E. Collins (Eileen); J. Garcia-Aymerich (Judith); D. Brooks (Dina); B.F. Fahy (Bonnie); M.A. Puhan (Milo); M. Hoogendoorn (Martine); R. Garrod (Rachel); A.M.W.J. Schols (Annemie); B. Carlin (Brian); R. Benzo (Roberto); P. Meek (Paula); M. Morgan (Mike); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); A.L. Ries (Andrew); B. Make (Barry); R.S. Goldstein (Roger); C.A. Dowson (Claire); J.L. Brozek (Jan); C.F. Donner (Claudio); E.F.M. Wouters (Emiel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of themanagement of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable

  17. ITER driver blanket, European Community design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simbolotti, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Zampaglione, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Ferrari, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Gallina, M. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Mazzone, G. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Nardi, C. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Petrizzi, L. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Rado, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Violante, V. (EURATOM-ENEA Association on Fusion Research, C.R.E., Frascati (Italy)); Daenner, W. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Lorenzetto, P. (NET Team, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)); Gierszewski, P. (CFFTP, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Gratt

    1993-07-01

    Depending on the final decision on the operation time of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the Driver Blanket might become a basic component of the machine with the main function of producing a significant fraction (close to 0.8) of the tritium required for the ITER operation, the remaining fraction being available from external supplies. The Driver Blanket is not required to provide reactor relevant performance in terms of tritium self-sufficiency. However, reactor relevant reliability and safety are mandatory requirements for this component in order not to significantly afftect the overall plant availability and to allow the ITER experimental program to be safely and successfully carried out. With the framework of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities (CDA, 1988-1990), a conceptual design of the ITER Driver Blanket has been carried out by ENEA Fusion Dept., in collaboration with ANSALDO S.p.A. and SRS S.r.l., and in close consultation with the NET Team and CFFTP (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project). Such a design has been selected as EC (European Community) reference design for the ITER Driver Blanket. The status of the design at the end of CDA is reported in the present paper. (orig.)

  18. European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants - 2010 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the perinatal management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), controversies still exist. We report the updated recommendations of a European panel of expert neonatologists who had developed consensus guidelines after critical examination of the most up-to-da...

  19. Issues in space segment regulation in the european community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Paul

    A major restructuring of the satellite communications market in the European Community has been set in motion with the advent of the European Commission's Satellite Green Paper. The first detailed proposals for Community legislation however, address mainly ground segment issues, such as type-approval of satellite equipment and the mutual recognition of licences. Space segment issues remain an important area for further reflection. This paper presents some background to these space segment issues within the context of the Community satellite communications policy.

  20. Information Policy in the European Community: Balancing Protection and Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillince, J. A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses European Community policy relating to information technology and the information industry. Topics addressed include the information services industry; transborder information flow, including electronic mail, data owner responsibility, and software piracy; digital data networks; electronic data interchange; telecommunications; information…

  1. A Legal Analysis of Safeguard Measures in the European Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Ma

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, the European Community imposed its first safeguard measure since the establishment of the WTO. And in 2003, it introduced two new regulations on safeguard measures, namely the “Council Regulation on a transitional product- specific safeguard mechanism for imports originating in the People's Republic of China” and the “Council Regulation on measures that the Community may take in relation to the combined effect of anti-dumping or anti-subsidy measures with safeguard measures." In this article, the author analyzes these safeguard measures and the European Commission's practice of such measures. By comparing the safeguard laws and their practice, it is the author's intention to clarify whether the safeguard measures in thIn 2002, the European Community imposed its first safeguard measure since the establishment of the WTO. And in 2003, it introduced two new regulations on safeguard measures, namely the "Council Regulation on a transitional product- specific safeguard mechanism for imports originating in the People's Republic of China" and the "Council Regulation on measures that the Community may take in relation to the combined effect of anti-dumping or anti-subsidy measures with safeguard measures." In this article, the author analyzes these safeguard measures and the European Commission's practice of such measures. By comparing the safeguard laws and their practice, it is the author's intention to clarify whether the safeguard measures in the European Community comply with the WTO Agreement on Safeguards. In conclusion, based on the analysis of safeguard measures in the European Community's legal system and their practice in actual cases, it apparent that the European Community is making a serious effort to comply with the standards of the WTO Safeguards Agreement. In certain respects, the European Community has a comparatively higher level of standards than the WTO. Nevertheless, there continue to be challenges to WTO

  2. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, M.A.; Singh, S.J.; Garvey, C.; ZuWallack, R.; Nici, L.; Rochester, C.; Hill, K.; Holland, A.E.; Lareau, S.C.; Man, W.D.; Pitta, F.; Sewell, L.; Raskin, J.; Bourbeau, J.; Crouch, R.; Franssen, F.M.; Casaburi, R.; Vercoulen, J.H.M.M.; Vogiatzis, I.; Gosselink, R.; Clini, E.M.; Effing, T.W.; Maltais, F.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Troosters, T.; Janssen, D.J.; Collins, E.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Brooks, D.; Fahy, B.F.; Puhan, M.A.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Garrod, R.; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Carlin, B.; Benzo, R.; Meek, P.; Morgan, M.; Molken, M.P. Rutten-van; Ries, A.L.; Make, B.; Goldstein, R.S.; Dowson, C.A.; Brozek, J.L.; Donner, C.F.; Wouters, E.F.; Rehabilitation, A.E.T.F.o.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Key Concepts and Advances in Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, Martijn A.; Singh, Sally J.; Garvey, Chris; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda; Rochester, Carolyn; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E.; Lareau, Suzanne C.; Man, W.D.C.; Pitta, Fabio; Sewell, Louise; Raskin, Jonathan; Bourbeau, Jean; Crouch, Rebecca; Franssen, Frits M.E.; Casaburi, Richard; Vercoulen, Jan H.; Vogiatzit, Ioannis; Gosselink, Rik; Clini, Enrico M.; Effing, T.W.; Maltais, Francois; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Troosters, Thierry; Janssen, Daisy J.A.; Collins, Eileen; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Brooks, Dina; Fahy, Bonnie F.; Puhan, Milo A.; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Garrod, Rachel; Schols, Annemie M.W.J.; Carlin, Brian; Benzo, Roberto; Meek, Paula; Morgan, Mike; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P.M.H.; Ries, Andrew L.; Make, Barry; Goldstein, Roger S.; Dowson, Claire A.; Brozek, Jan L.; Donner, Claudio F.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our

  4. THE EUROPEAN POSITION OF DUTCH PLANT COMMUNITIES

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    J.A.M. JANSSEN

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is analyzed for which plant communities (alliances the Netherlands has an international responsibility. Data has been brought together on the range and distribution of alliances in Europe, the area of plant communities in the Netherlands and surrounding countries and the occurrence of endemic associations in the Netherlands. The analysis resulted in a list of 34 out of 93 alliances in the Netherlands which are important from an international point of view.

  5. Methopedia - Pedagogical Design Community for European Educators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Niemczik, Christian; Brenstein, Elke

    2009-01-01

    .comble-project.eu). Methopedia is a wiki and social community aimed at facilitating knowledge transfer between trainers/educators from different institutions or countries through interactive peer-to-peer support, and sharing of learning practices.   We describe how Methopedia has been developed though engaging practitioners...

  6. Medication use in European primary care patients with lower respiratory tract infection: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoen, Marleen; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Little, Paul; Melbye, Hasse; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Chris C; Francis, Nick A; Verheij, Theo JM

    2014-01-01

    Background It is largely unknown what medication is used by patients with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). Aim To describe the use of self-medication and prescribed medication in adults presenting with LRTI in different European countries, and to relate self-medication to patient characteristics. Design and setting An observational study in 16 primary care networks in 12 European countries. Method A total of 2530 adult patients presenting with LRTI in 12 European countries filled in a diary on any medication used before and after a primary care consultation. Patient characteristics related to self-medication were determined by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The frequency and types of medication used differed greatly between European countries. Overall, 55.4% self-medicated before consultation, and 21.5% after consultation, most frequently with paracetamol, antitussives, and mucolytics. Females, non-smokers, and patients with more severe symptoms used more self-medication. Patients who were not prescribed medication during the consultation self-medicated more often afterwards. Self-medication with antibiotics was relatively rare. Conclusion A considerable amount of medication, often with no proven efficacy, was used by adults presenting with LRTI in primary care. There were large differences between European countries. These findings should help develop patient information resources, international guidelines, and international legislation concerning the availability of over-the-counter medication, and can also support interventions against unwarranted variations in care. In addition, further research on the effects of symptomatic medication is needed. PMID:24567621

  7. European Summit on the Prevention and Self-Management of Chronic Respiratory Diseases: report of the European Union Parliament Summit (29 March 2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, Peter W; Borrelli, David; Pietikainen, Sirpa; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi; Bachert, Claus; Bewick, Michael; Botjes, Erna; Constantinidis, Jannis; Fokkens, Wytske; Haahtela, Tari; Hopkins, Claire; Illario, Maddalena; Joos, Guy; Lund, Valerie; Muraro, Antonella; Pugin, Benoit; Seys, Sven; Somekh, David; Stjärne, Pär; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    On March 29, 2017, a European Summit on the Prevention and Self-Management of Chronic Respiratory Diseases (CRD) was organized by the European Forum for Research and Education in Allergy and Airway Diseases. The event took place in the European Parliament of Brussels and was hosted by MEP David Borrelli and MEP Sirpa Pietikainen. The aim of the Summit was to correspond to the needs of the European Commission and of patients suffering from CRD to join forces in Europe for the prevention and self-management. Delegates of the European Rhinologic Society, European Respiratory Society, European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, European Academy of Paediatrics, and European Patients Organization EFA all lectured on their vision and action plan to join forces in achieving adequate prevention and self-management of CRD in the context of Precision Medicine. Recent data highlight the preventive capacity of education on optimal care pathways for CRD. Self-management and patient empowerment can be achieved by novel educational on-line materials and by novel mobile health tools enabling patients and doctors to monitor and optimally treat CRDs based on the level of control. This report summarizes the contributions of the representatives of different European academic stakeholders in the field of CRD.

  8. Cadmium mobility and accumulation in soils of the European Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters B; van Beurden AUCJ

    1993-01-01

    In this overview of the effects of cadmium pollution on agricultural soils in the European Community, both the cadmium loads on agricultural land and the soil sensitivity to cadmium accumulation have been estimated. Cadmium loads have been estimated separately for arable land and grassland. The

  9. Macrophyte communities of European streams with altered physical habitat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hare, M.; Baattrup-Pedersen, A.; Nijboer, R.C.; Szoszkiewicz, K.; Ferreira, T.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of altering hydro-morphology on three macrophyte community types was investigated at 107 European stream sites. Sites were surveyed using standard macrophyte and habitat survey techniques (Mean Trophic Rank Methodology and River Habitat Survey respectively). Principal Components Analysis

  10. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  11. European seaweeds under pressure: Consequences for communities and ecosystem functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Frédéric; Arenas, Francisco; Assis, Jorge; Davies, Andrew J.; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Fernandes, Francisco; Malta, Erik-jan; Thibaut, Thierry; Van Nguyen, Tu; Vaz-Pinto, Fátima; Vranken, Sofie; Serrão, Ester A.; De Clerck, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Seaweed assemblages represent the dominant autotrophic biomass in many coastal environments, playing a central structural and functional role in several ecosystems. In Europe, seaweed assemblages are highly diverse systems. The combined seaweed flora of different European regions hold around 1550 species (belonging to nearly 500 genera), with new species continuously uncovered, thanks to the emergence of molecular tools. In this manuscript we review the effects of global and local stressors on European seaweeds, their communities, and ecosystem functioning. Following a brief review on the present knowledge on European seaweed diversity and distribution, and the role of seaweed communities in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, we discuss the effects of biotic homogenization (invasive species) and global climate change (shifts in bioclimatic zones and ocean acidification) on the distribution of individual species and their effect on the structure and functioning of seaweed communities. The arrival of new introduced species (that already account for 5-10% of the European seaweeds) and the regional extirpation of native species resulting from oceans' climate change are creating new diversity scenarios with undetermined functional consequences. Anthropogenic local stressors create additional disruption often altering dramatically assemblage's structure. Hence, we discuss ecosystem level effects of such stressors like harvesting, trampling, habitat modification, overgrazing and eutrophication that impact coastal communities at local scales. Last, we conclude by highlighting significant knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to anticipate the combined effects of global and local stressors on seaweed communities. With physical and biological changes occurring at unexpected pace, marine phycologists should now integrate and join their research efforts to be able to contribute efficiently for the conservation and management of coastal systems.

  12. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS ...... learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.......Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS...... integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing...

  13. Patterns and Regularities in the European Marketing Academic Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios; Ormrod, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the nature of scientific collaboration, as researchers have become interested in how knowledge is generated in research communities. The aim of the current paper is to provide insights into the structure of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC) and to ...... partners is socio-cultural and geographical proximity rather than marketing sub-discipline, pointing towards a very systematic tendency for EMAC members to be organised around institutions in the same or culturally related countries.......Recent years have seen a growing interest in the nature of scientific collaboration, as researchers have become interested in how knowledge is generated in research communities. The aim of the current paper is to provide insights into the structure of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC...

  14. Patterns and Regularities in the European Marketing Academic Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios; Ormrod, Robert P.; Christensen, Katrine

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the nature of scientific collaboration, as researchers have become interested in how knowledge is generated in research communities. The aim of the current paper is to provide insights into the structure of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC) and to ...... partners is socio-cultural and geographical) proximity rather than marketing sub-discipline, pointing towards a very systematic tendency for EMAC members to be organised around institutions in the same or culturally related countries.......Recent years have seen a growing interest in the nature of scientific collaboration, as researchers have become interested in how knowledge is generated in research communities. The aim of the current paper is to provide insights into the structure of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC...

  15. Tobacco industry strategies for influencing European Community tobacco advertising legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Mark; Bitton, Asaf; Glantz, Stanton

    2002-04-13

    Restrictions on tobacco company advertising and sponsorship are effective parts of tobacco control programmes worldwide. Through Council Directive 98/43/EC, the European Community (EC) sought to end all tobacco advertising and sponsorship in EC member states by 2006. Initially proposed in 1989, the directive was adopted in 1998, and was annulled by the European Court of Justice in 2000 following a protracted lobbying campaign against the directive by a number of interested organisations including European tobacco companies. A new advertising directive was proposed in May, 2001. We reviewed online collections of tobacco industry documents from US tobacco companies made public under the US Master Settlement Agreement of 1998. Documents reviewed dated from 1978 to 1994 and came from Philip Morris, R J Reynolds, and Brown and Williamson (British American Tobacco) collections. We also obtained approximately 15,000 pages of paper records related to British American Tobacco from its documents' depository in Guildford, UK. This information was supplemented with information in the published literature and consultations with European tobacco control experts. The tobacco industry lobbied against Directive 98/43/EC at the level of EC member state governments as well as on a pan-European level. The industry sought to prevent passage of the directive within the EC legislature, to substitute industry-authored proposals in place of the original directive, and if necessary to use litigation to prevent implementation of the directive after its passage. The tobacco industry sought to delay, and eventually defeat, the EC directive on tobacco advertising and sponsorship by seeking to enlist the aid of figures at the highest levels of European politics while at times attempting to conceal the industry's role. An understanding of these proposed strategies can help European health advocates to pass and implement effective future tobacco control legislation.

  16. Respiratory morbidity and lung function in two Aboriginal communities in Western Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Ton, A.; James, A.L.; Wood, M.; Musk, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in the rates of respiratory symptoms, asthma and levels of lung function in two remote Aboriginal communities. Methodology: Respiratory symptoms, smoking history, skin prick test responses to common allergens, serum IgE, lung function, airway responsiveness to

  17. Cardio-respiratory Physiology of the European Eel (Agunilla anguilla) in Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline

    The main objective of this PhD thesis was to study the cardio-respiratory capabilities of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) under extreme conditions. Three environmental conditions were studied i.e. temperature, dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide, while a fourth condition was physiological......-course of contraction, and thus maximum attainable heart rate in vivo, greatly depended on ambient temperature. The relative ventricular mass was increased after long term acclimation to 0°C and 10°C compared to individuals acclimated to 20°C, indicative of a compensatory mechanism for the limitation in heart rate...... and thus ensure adequate cardiac performance when diving to cooler depths. Furthermore, the individual contribution of three different sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels (L-type, NCX and SOCE) to the generation of force also depended on ambient temperature. Elevations in CO2 partial pressure (hypercapnia...

  18. Awareness among a Saudi Arabian university community of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus following an outbreak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maha Al-Mohaissen

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the level of awareness of faculty members, staff and students in a female Saudi Arabian university community towards Middle East respiratory syndrome coronvirus (MERS-CoV...

  19. Characterization of a Novel Betacoronavirus Related to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in European Hedgehogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor Max; Kallies, René; Philipps, Heike; Göpner, Gertraude; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Eckerle, Isabella; Brünink, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Bats are known to host viruses closely related to important human coronaviruses (HCoVs), such as HCoV-229E, severe-acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV). As RNA viruses may coevolve with their hosts, we sought to investigate the closest sister taxon to bats, the Eulipotyphla, and screened European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from Germany for CoV by nested reverse transcriptase PCR. A novel betacoronavirus species in a phylogenetic sister relationship to MERS-CoV and clade c bat CoVs was detected and characterized on the whole-genome level. A total of 58.9% of hedgehog fecal specimens were positive for the novel CoV (EriCoV) at 7.9 log10 mean RNA copies per ml. EriCoV RNA concentrations were higher in the intestine than in other solid organs, blood, or urine. Detailed analyses of the full hedgehog intestine showed the highest EriCoV concentrations in lower gastrointestinal tract specimens, compatible with viral replication in the lower intestine and fecal-oral transmission. Thirteen of 27 (48.2%) hedgehog sera contained non-neutralizing antibodies against MERS-CoV. The animal origins of this betacoronavirus clade that includes MERS-CoV may thus include both bat and nonbat hosts. PMID:24131722

  20. Household reporting of childhood respiratory health and air pollution in rural Alaska Native communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirae N. Ware

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Air pollution is an important contributor to respiratory disease in children. Objective: To examine associations between household reporting of childhood respiratory conditions and household characteristics related to air pollution in Alaska Native communities. Design: In-home surveys were administered in 2 rural regions of Alaska. The 12-month prevalence of respiratory conditions was summarized by region and age. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to describe associations between respiratory health and household and air quality characteristics. Results: Household-reported respiratory health data were collected for 561 children in 328 households. In 1 region, 33.6% of children aged <5 years had a recent history of pneumonia and/or bronchitis. Children with these conditions were 2 times more likely to live in a wood-heated home, but these findings were imprecise. Resident concern with mould was associated with elevated prevalence of respiratory infections in children (ORs 1.6–2.5, while reported wheezing was associated with 1 or more smokers living in the household. Reported asthma in 1 region (7.6% was lower than national prevalence estimates. Conclusions: Findings suggest that there may be preventable exposures, including wood smoke and mould that affect childhood respiratory disease in these rural areas. Additional research is needed to quantify particulate matter 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter or less and mould exposures in these communities, and to objectively evaluate childhood respiratory health.

  1. The hesitant European history of Denmark's accession to the European Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines the history of Denmark's accession to the European Community on 1 January 1973. Two large historical trends shaped the Danish road to EC-membership. On the one hand, the fight for survival that the Danish Nation-State had experienced from 1864-1945 produced a particular Danish......-membership from day one without seriously threatening Danish welfare legislation or Nordic co-operation. Confronted with significant internal opposition, the Social Democratic Party leadership proved instrumental in formulating the vision that not only held the party together, but also won the referendum on 2...

  2. The European Community and crisis adaptation: The impact of the 1973 oil crisis on European integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahurin, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates relationships that emerged between European Economic Community and Arab League nations during the period 1970-1978, with special attention to the period immediately following the October 1973 Arab-Israeli war and the Arab oil embargo of 1973-74. The central argument is that European integration can be measured and understood from three different levels of analysis: not only the systems or supranational level (to which neofunctionalists and federalists have largely confined their investigations), but from the nation-state and the subnational levels also. This view is justified in the context of complex interdependencies in the work of Joseph Nye and Robert Keohane. From this perspective, nation-state and subnational-level data take on a new importance. This study collected data on the nature, level, and intensity of contracts between actors within each of these three levels. The study finds at all these levels strong evidence of increased collective and convergent activity which, in the context of complex interdependencies, points to a complex but clearly advancing process of European integration during the period under investigation.

  3. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren‐Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Warren‐Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low‐quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower–middle‐income setting. There was high‐quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high‐quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low‐income setting. There was moderate‐ to high‐quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. PMID:23043518

  4. Nutritional assessment and therapy in COPD: a European Respiratory Society statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schols, Annemie M; Ferreira, Ivone M; Franssen, Frits M; Gosker, Harry R; Janssens, Wim; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Pison, Christophe; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen; Slinde, Frode; Steiner, Michael C; Tkacova, Ruzena; Singh, Sally J

    2014-12-01

    Nutrition and metabolism have been the topic of extensive scientific research in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but clinical awareness of the impact dietary habits, nutritional status and nutritional interventions may have on COPD incidence, progression and outcome is limited. A multidisciplinary Task Force was created by the European Respiratory Society to deliver a summary of the evidence and description of current practice in nutritional assessment and therapy in COPD, and to provide directions for future research. Task Force members conducted focused reviews of the literature on relevant topics, advised by a methodologist. It is well established that nutritional status, and in particular abnormal body composition, is an important independent determinant of COPD outcome. The Task Force identified different metabolic phenotypes of COPD as a basis for nutritional risk profile assessment that is useful in clinical trial design and patient counselling. Nutritional intervention is probably effective in undernourished patients and probably most when combined with an exercise programme. Providing evidence of cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention is required to support reimbursement and thus increase access to nutritional intervention. Overall, the evidence indicates that a well-balanced diet is beneficial to all COPD patients, not only for its potential pulmonary benefits, but also for its proven benefits in metabolic and cardiovascular risk. ©ERS 2014.

  5. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes. Copyright ©ATS/ERS 2015.

  6. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolome R. Celli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  7. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanzhu; Weng, Huilan; Lin, Meirui; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Xie, Qingdong; Ke, Changwen; Jiao, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Aim. FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP) test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Methods. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal) culture, and serological detection. Results. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR sho...

  8. Telithromycin: a novel agent for the treatment of community-acquired upper respiratory infections

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Mai P.

    2004-01-01

    The ketolides are a new subclass of macrolides, and telithromycin is the first of these agents to be approved. Modifications to the basic macrolide structure result in enhanced activity against penicillin- and erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. It is therefore an option in the treatment of mild to moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, such as pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, pharyngitis/tonsillitis, and sinusitis. Telithromycin also offers the adv...

  9. The photovoltaic pilot projects of the European Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, W.

    The Commission of the European Communities has started in 1980 a programme for the design and construction of a series of photovoltaic pilot projects in the range of 30-300 kWp. Virtually all important industries and other development organisations in Europe working on photovoltaic cells and systems are involved in this programme. The different technologies which are being developed concern the modules, the cabling of the array, structure design, storage strategy and power conditioning. The various applications include powering of an island, villages, recreation centres, water desalination and disinfection, powering of radio transmitters, emergency power plants, dairy farm, training school, cooling, water pumping, powering of a solar heated swimming pool and last but not least, hydrogen production.

  10. Disordered microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of cigarette smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Charlson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smokers have an increased risk of infectious diseases involving the respiratory tract. Some effects of smoking on specific respiratory tract bacteria have been described, but the consequences for global airway microbial community composition have not been determined. Here, we used culture-independent high-density sequencing to analyze the microbiota from the right and left nasopharynx and oropharynx of 29 smoking and 33 nonsmoking healthy asymptomatic adults to assess microbial composition and effects of cigarette smoking. Bacterial communities were profiled using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S sequence tags (803,391 total reads, aligned to 16S rRNA databases, and communities compared using the UniFrac distance metric. A Random Forest machine-learning algorithm was used to predict smoking status and identify taxa that best distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. Community composition was primarily determined by airway site, with individuals exhibiting minimal side-of-body or temporal variation. Within airway habitats, microbiota from smokers were significantly more diverse than nonsmokers and clustered separately. The distributions of several genera were systematically altered by smoking in both the oro- and nasopharynx, and there was an enrichment of anaerobic lineages associated with periodontal disease in the oropharynx. These results indicate that distinct regions of the human upper respiratory tract contain characteristic microbial communities that exhibit disordered patterns in cigarette smokers, both in individual components and global structure, which may contribute to the prevalence of respiratory tract complications in this population.

  11. Upper respiratory tract disease in captive orangutans (Pongo sp.): prevalence in 20 European zoos and predisposing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, N; Pirovino, M; Zingg, R; Clauss, M; Kaup, F J; Heistermann, M; Hatt, J M; Steinmetz, H W

    2011-12-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) is a significant cause of morbidity in captive orangutans (Pongo abelii, Pongo pygmaeus), and the pathogenesis is often unknown.  The prevalence of respiratory disease in captive European orangutans (201 animals; 20 zoos) and possible predisposing factors were investigated. Bornean orangutans (P. pygmaeus) showed chronic respiratory signs significantly more often (13.8%) than Sumatran (P. abelii; 3.6%), and males (15.8%) were more often afflicted than females (3.9%). Hand-reared animals (21%) developed air sacculitis more often than parent-reared animals (5%). Diseased animals were more often genetically related to animals with respiratory diseases (93%) than to healthy animals (54%). None of the environmental conditions investigated had a significant effect on disease prevalence. Results suggest a higher importance of individual factors for the development of URTD than environmental conditions. Bornean, male and hand-reared orangutans and animals related to diseased animals need increased medical surveillance for early detection of respiratory disease. © 2011 University of Zurich.

  12. Timing of First Respiratory Virus Detections in Infants: A Community-Based Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Mohinder; Ware, Robert S; Lambert, Stephen B; Sloots, Theo P; Nissen, Michael D; Grimwood, Keith

    2018-01-17

    Determining timing of first virus detection episodes (fVDEs) for different respiratory viruses in infants identifies risk periods and informs preventive interventions, including vaccination. We describe the ages and nature of fVDEs in an infant birth cohort and explore factors associated with increased odds of symptomatic fVDEs. The Observational Research in Childhood Infectious Diseases (ORChID) study is a community-based birth cohort describing acute respiratory infections in infants until their second birthday. Parents recorded daily symptoms and collected nose swabs weekly, which were batch-tested using polymerase chain reaction assays for 17 respiratory viruses. One hundred fifty-eight infants participated in ORChID. The median age for fVDEs was 2.9 months for human rhinovirus (HRV) but was ≥13.9 months for other respiratory viruses. Overall, 52% of HRV fVDEs were symptomatic, compared with 57%-83% of other fVDEs. Respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus fVDEs were more severe than HRV fVDEs. Older age and the winter season were associated with symptomatic episodes. Infants do not always experience respiratory symptoms with their fVDE. Predominance of early HRV detections highlights the need for timing any intervention early in life. fVDEs from other respiratory viruses most commonly occur when maternal vaccines may no longer provide protection.

  13. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Farrell, J.; Crooks, G.; Hellings, P.; Bel, E. H.; Bewick, M.; Chavannes, N. H.; de Sousa, J. Correia; Cruz, A. A.; Haahtela, T.; Joos, G.; Khaltaev, N.; Malva, J.; Muraro, A.; Nogues, M.; Palkonen, S.; Pedersen, S.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Samolinski, B.; Strandberg, T.; Valiulis, A.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zuberbier, T.; Bedbrook, A.; Aberer, W.; Adachi, M.; Agusti, A.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Ankri, J.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Arshad, H.; Bai, C.; Baiardini, I.; Bachert, C.; Baigenzhin, A. K.; Barbara, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghé, B.; Kheder, A. Ben; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bieber, T.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Boner, A. L.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Burney, P. G.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M. A.; Calverley, P. M.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Canonica, G. W.; Camuzat, T.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Carriazo, A.; Casale, T.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Chatzi, L.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Chung, K. F.; Ciprandi, G.; Cirule, I.; Cox, L.; Costa, D. J.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; de Carlo, G.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J. A.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Dykewicz, M. S.; El-Gamal, Y.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L. M.; Fletcher, M.; Fiocchi, A.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fonseca, J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Forastiere, F.; Frith, P.; Gaga, M.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Garces, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gemicioğlu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; González Diaz, S.; Gotua, M.; Grisle, I.; Grouse, L.; Gutter, Z.; Guzmán, M. A.; Heaney, L. G.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Henderson, D.; Hendry, A.; Heinrich, J.; Heve, D.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O.' B.; Howarth, P.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M. E.; Illario, M.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jardim, J. R.; Jares, E. J.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Julge, K.; Jung, K. S.; Just, J.; Kaidashev, I.; Kaitov, M. R.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keil, T.; Keith, P. K.; Klimek, L.; Koffi N'goran, B.; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, J.; Lodrup Carlsen, K.; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Magard, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Makela, M. J.; Manning, P.; Mara, S.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Matignon, P.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melén, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Merk, H.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Mohammad, G. M. Y.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; Mösges, R.; Mullol, J.; Nafti, S.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Naclerio, R.; Neou, A.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Niggemann, B.; Ninot, G.; Nyembue, T. D.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Panzner, P.; Papadopoulos, N.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pawankar, R.; Pengelly, R.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Poethig, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Potter, P.; Postma, D.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Repka-Ramirez, S.; Reitamo, S.; Rennard, S.; Rodenas, F.; Roberts, J.; Roca, J.; Rodriguez Mañas, L.; Rolland, C.; Roman Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Rosario, N.; Rosenwasser, L.; Rottem, M.; Ryan, D.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G. K.; Schunemann, H. J.; Serrano, E.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Schulz, H.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Simons, F. E. R.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valia, E.; Valovirta, E.; van Ganse, E.; van Hage, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vellas, B.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Vichyanond, P.; Viegi, G.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Wallaert, B.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Williams, S.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zaidi, A.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Mercier, J.

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS

  14. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3 Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D.; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067730043; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS

  15. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3 : Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J.; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J.; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H.; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman-Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D.; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C.; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS

  16. A prospective, community-based study on virologic assessment among elderly people with and without symptoms of acute respiratory infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Heijnen, M.L.; Kok, F.J.; Pallast, E.G.; Greeff, de S.C.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objective: Community-based elderly studies concerning microbiology of acute respiratory infections are scarce. Data on subclinical infections are even totally absent, although asymptomatic persons might act as a source of respiratory infections. Methods: In a 1-year community-based

  17. Understanding community perceptions, social norms and current practice related to respiratory infection in Bangladesh during 2009: a qualitative formative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizame Fosiul A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory infections are the leading cause of childhood deaths in Bangladesh. Promoting respiratory hygiene may reduce infection transmission. This formative research explored community perceptions about respiratory infections. Methods We conducted 34 in-depth interviews and 16 focus group discussions with community members and school children to explore respiratory hygiene related perceptions, practices, and social norms in an urban and a rural setting. We conducted unstructured observations on respiratory hygiene practices in public markets. Results Informants were not familiar with the term "respiratory infection"; most named diseases that had no relation to respiratory dysfunction. Informants reported that their community identified a number of 'good behaviors' related to respiratory hygiene, but they also noted, and we observed, that very few people practiced these. All informants cited hot/cold weather changes or using cold water as causes for catching cold. They associated transmission of respiratory infections with close contact with a sick person's breath, cough droplets, or spit; sharing a sick person's utensils and food. Informants suggested that avoiding such contact was the most effective method to prevent respiratory infection. Although informants perceived that handwashing after coughing or sneezing might prevent illness, they felt this was not typically feasible or practical. Conclusion Community perceptions of respiratory infections include both concerns with imbalances between hot and cold, and with person-to-person transmission. Many people were aware of measures that could prevent respiratory infection, but did not practice them. Interventions that leverage community understanding of person-to-person transmission and that encourage the practice of their identified 'good behaviors' related to respiratory hygiene may reduce respiratory disease transmission.

  18. Respiratory water loss during rest and flight in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Sophia; Suthers, Roderick A.; Biebach, Herbert; Visser, G. Henk

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory water loss in Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) at rest and during flight at ambient temperatures (T-amb) between 6 and 25 degrees C was calculated from respiratory airflow and exhaled air temperature. At rest, breathing frequency f(1.4 +/- 0.3 Hz) and tidal volume V-t (1.9 +/- 0.4 ml) were

  19. Illegal use of beta-adrenergic agonists: European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, H A; Noordam, M Y; van Dooren-Flipsen, M M; Schilt, R; Roos, A H

    1998-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products within the European Community is governed by a series of directives and regulations that describe the requirements for safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. Veterinary therapeutic use of beta-agonists has only been approved in the case of clenbuterol for bronchodilatation in horses and calves and for tocolysis in cows. No beta-agonists have been permitted in the European Community for growth-promoting purposes in farm animals. Surveillance for the presence of residues of veterinary agents in food-producing animals and meat is regulated by the Directive 86/469/EEC containing specific guidelines for sampling procedures on farms and in slaughterhouses. The level and frequency of sampling is dependent on the category of compounds and animal species. When positive samples have been identified (above certain action levels), sampling intensity is increased. Results of monitoring programs in EU member states during 1992 and 1993 for the occurrence of residues of beta-agonists in food-producing animals vary substantially with respect to the percentages of positive samples, ranging from 0 to 7%. The variability is partly explained by differences in sampling strategies, detection methods, and action levels applied. Identification of the proper matrices for sampling and detection of beta-agonists is important. In the case of clenbuterol, hair and choroid retinal tissue are appropriate tissues because clenbuterol accumulates in these matrices. A clear decrease in the use of clenbuterol in cattle has been observed in The Netherlands, Germany, Northern Ireland, and Spanish Basque Country over the last 3 yr. This is partly due to intensified surveillance activities at farms and slaughterhouses by governmental agencies and production sector organizations. There are data on human intoxication following consumption of liver or meat from cattle treated with beta-agonists. At the concentrations of clenbuterol measured in contaminated

  20. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low-quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower-middle-income setting. There was high-quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high-quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low-income setting. There was moderate- to high-quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: key concepts and advances in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Martijn A; Singh, Sally J; Garvey, Chris; ZuWallack, Richard; Nici, Linda; Rochester, Carolyn; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Man, William D-C; Pitta, Fabio; Sewell, Louise; Raskin, Jonathan; Bourbeau, Jean; Crouch, Rebecca; Franssen, Frits M E; Casaburi, Richard; Vercoulen, Jan H; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Gosselink, Rik; Clini, Enrico M; Effing, Tanja W; Maltais, François; van der Palen, Job; Troosters, Thierry; Janssen, Daisy J A; Collins, Eileen; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Brooks, Dina; Fahy, Bonnie F; Puhan, Milo A; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Garrod, Rachel; Schols, Annemie M W J; Carlin, Brian; Benzo, Roberto; Meek, Paula; Morgan, Mike; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry; Goldstein, Roger S; Dowson, Claire A; Brozek, Jan L; Donner, Claudio F; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is recognized as a core component of the management of individuals with chronic respiratory disease. Since the 2006 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Statement on Pulmonary Rehabilitation, there has been considerable growth in our knowledge of its efficacy and scope. The purpose of this Statement is to update the 2006 document, including a new definition of pulmonary rehabilitation and highlighting key concepts and major advances in the field. A multidisciplinary committee of experts representing the ATS Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the ERS Scientific Group 01.02, "Rehabilitation and Chronic Care," determined the overall scope of this update through group consensus. Focused literature reviews in key topic areas were conducted by committee members with relevant clinical and scientific expertise. The final content of this Statement was agreed on by all members. An updated definition of pulmonary rehabilitation is proposed. New data are presented on the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation, including its effectiveness in acutely ill individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and in individuals with other chronic respiratory diseases. The important role of pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic disease management is highlighted. In addition, the role of health behavior change in optimizing and maintaining benefits is discussed. The considerable growth in the science and application of pulmonary rehabilitation since 2006 adds further support for its efficacy in a wide range of individuals with chronic respiratory disease.

  2. Population trends in the European Community, 1960-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, J C

    1988-07-01

    Recent trends in fertility, marriage patterns and family formation in the 12 nations of the European Community are discussed. The total period fertility rate in this group of nations has dropped sharply (42%) since 1960, so that the annual growth was 0.15% in 1986. Immigration and the rate of mortality decline have also slowed. There are some variations in regional or national fertility, and in population growth as a result of age structure. The rate of population growth is slowing in all nations except Greece, Ireland and Portugal. The U.K., Belgium, Luxembourg and Denmark have experienced zero growth since 1980. Italy is close to zero growth. France, Netherlands and Spain have higher growth due to age structure. Ireland continues to grow at 1% yearly. In general, large families are disappearing, although different patterns are evident in various states. France shows high progression to the 1st child; many German couples choose to remain childless. People are marrying older, remaining unmarried, divorcing sooner, cohabiting before or after marriage. Non-marital births are common, especially in nordic countries, but still rare in Mediterranean countries. The restricted family norm, of 0, 1, or 2 children is becoming uniform, resulting in fertility well below, 15-40% of replacement.

  3. The etiology of viral respiratory infections in infants with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogdanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia can be caused by both bacterial and viral pathogens. The differential diagnosis based only on clinical data is not always feasible. The use of C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin might give some additional information for treatment decision-making.Aim: To evaluate the structure and rates of viral isolation in community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized infants and changes in CRP and procalcitonin levels.Materials and methods: Seventy five infants at the age of up to 11 months and 29 days, who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia confirmed by chest X-ray from March 2015 till February 2016, were included into the study. CRP and procalcitonin levels were measured. Detection of viruses in nasopharyngeal swabs was performed by a  real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Nucleic acids of respiratory viruses were isolated in 72% (54/75 of infants. The most common were respiratory syncytial virus (in 70.4%, 38/54 and human rhinovirus (in 16.6%, 9/54. Median of white blood cell count in pneumonia associated with respiratory viruses was 10.95 (9; 14.1×109 /L, CRP level, 1.95 (0.5; 7 mg/L, procalcitonin level, 0.087 (0.067; 0.17 ng/mL.Conclusion: The study showed a high prevalence of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia in infants. There was no increase in CRP and procalcitonin levels in pneumonia associated with respiratory viruses.

  4. European social model and the harmonization of Macedonian labour legislation with the European Union community labour law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalamatiev Todor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The European integration process accompanied by the harmonization of the EU member states' legislation will inevitably lead to the establishment of a European social model which has a 'sui generis' legal nature. European social model forms a part of the common legal heritage of the European countries and it can be defined as a system of values that include democracy and individual rights, free collective bargaining, market economy, equal opportunities for all, and social protection and solidarity. Subject of analysis in this paper are both, the essential components of the European social model such as: the social 'acquis communautaire' and the European industrial relations. The social 'acquis communautaire' is an integral part of the general 'acquis communautaire' and it encompasses the regulations arising from the primary and secondary labour law legislation of the EU, decisions of the European Court of Justice and other legal measures of the European Union with a binding or non-binding legal nature. European industrial relations encompass the key features of the European trade union models as well as the types of social dialogue in different EU member states. This paper pays attention to a profound elaboration of the harmonization of two EU labour law directives with the Macedonian employment legislation. The first Directive (Directive 91/533/EEC of 14 October 1991 on an employers' obligation to inform employees of the conditions applicable to the contract or employment relationship may be classified in the field of individual employment relations, while the second one (Directive 2002/14/EC of 11 March 2002 establishing a general framework for informing and consulting employees in the European Community can be subsumed within the field of collective employment relations. Finally, the authors illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the Macedonian labour legislation in the process of harmonization with the relevant EU directives

  5. Occupation and the prevalence of respiratory health symptoms and conditions: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C; London, Stephanie J; Charles, Luenda E; Pompeii, Lisa A; Wagenknecht, Lynne E

    2012-02-01

    To examine associations between occupation and respiratory health in a large, population-based cohort of adults in the United States. Data from 15,273 participants, aged 45 to 64 years, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were used to examine associations of current or most recent job held with the prevalence of self-reported chronic cough, chronic bronchitis, wheezing, asthma, and measures of lung function collected by spirometry. Eleven percent of participants reported wheezing and 9% were classified as having airway obstruction. Compared with individuals in managerial and administrative jobs, increased prevalences of respiratory outcomes were observed among participants in selected occupations, including construction and extractive trades (wheezing, prevalence ratio = 1.92, 95% confidence interval = 1.35, 2.73; airway obstruction, prevalence ratio = 1.31, 95% confidence interval = 1.05, 1.65). Specific occupations are associated with adverse respiratory health.

  6. Chlamydia-like bacteria in respiratory samples of community-acquired pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Susanne; Collingro, Astrid; Walochnik, Julia; Wagner, Michael; Horn, Matthias

    2008-04-01

    Chlamydia-like bacteria, obligate intracellular relatives of Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, are widely distributed in nature. Using a two-step nested and semi-nested PCR approach targeting the 16S rRNA gene, we found DNA of Chlamydia-like bacteria in respiratory samples from patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Of 387 cases tested, four (1.03%) tested positive if only sequences showing less than 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to known Chlamydiae were considered. These included for the first time Protochlamydia amoebophila, Waddlia chondrophila, and 'Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis'-related sequences. This study extends previous findings suggesting an association of Chlamydia-like bacteria with respiratory disease, but a causal link between these microorganisms and respiratory tract infections has yet to be established.

  7. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  8. Efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the review is to map evidence on the efficacy of a respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Specifically, the review seeks to investigate if respiratory physiotherapy interventions can achieve the following for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP.

  9. From Action to Insight: A Professional Learning Community's Experiences with the European Language Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristmanson, Paula Lee; Lafargue, Chantal; Culligan, Karla

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on an action research project set in the context of one professional learning community's (PLC's) exploration of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and the European Language Portfolio (ELP). Teachers of second and foreign languages in a large urban high school examined the potential of principles and tools related…

  10. [Respiratory day hospital care for immunocompetent adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Rosa T; Torres, María Elena P; Gallardo, Daniel M; Arias, Marisol C; Saldías, Fernando P

    2015-04-01

    Day hospitals can reduce health care costs without increasing the risks of patients with lower respiratory tract infection. To report the experience of a respiratory day hospital care delivered to adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a public hospital. During the fall and winter of 2011 and 2012, adult patients with CAP of intermediate risk categories were assessed in the emergency room, their severity was stratified according to confusion, respiratory rate, blood pressure, 65 years of age or older (CRB-65) score and the Chilean CAP Clinical Guidelines, and were admitted to the respiratory day hospital. One hundred seventeen patients aged 67 ± 16 years, (62% females) with CAP were attended in the respiratory day hospital. Ninety percent had comorbidities, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 58%, heart disease in 32%, diabetes in 16% and asthma in 13%. Their most important risk factors were age over 65 years in 60%, comorbidities in 88%, failure of antibiotic treatment in 17%, loss of autonomy in 21%, vital sign abnormalities in 60%, mental confusion in 5%, multilobar CAP in 23%, pleural effusion in 15%, hypoxemia in 41% and a serum urea nitrogen over 30 mg/dL in 16%. Patients stayed an average of seven days in the day hospital with oxygen, hydration, chest physiotherapy and third-generation cephalosporins (89%) associated with quinolones (52%) or macrolides (4%). Thirteen patients required noninvasive ventilation, eight patients were hospitalized because of clinical deterioration and three died in hospital. Day hospital care reduced hospital admission rates of patients with lower respiratory tract infections.

  11. Geographic distance and mountain ranges structure freshwater protist communities on a European scalе

    OpenAIRE

    Boenigk,Jens; Wodniok,Sabina; Bock,Christina; Beisser,Daniela; Hempel,Christopher; Grossmann,Lars; Lange,Anja; Jensen,Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Protists influence ecosystems by modulating microbial population size, diversity, metabolic outputs and gene flow. In this study we used eukaryotic ribosomal amplicon diversity from 218 European freshwater lakes sampled in August 2012 to assess the effect of mountain ranges as biogeographic barriers on spatial patterns and microbial community structure in European freshwaters. The diversity of microbial communities as reflected by amplicon clusters suggested that the eukaryotic microbial inve...

  12. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  13. Social Mixing Patterns Within a South African Township Community: Implications for Respiratory Disease Transmission and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone-Robertson, Simon P.; Mark, Daniella; Morrow, Carl; Middelkoop, Keren; Chiswell, Melika; Aquino, Lisa D. H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin

    2011-01-01

    A prospective survey of social mixing patterns relevant to respiratory disease transmission by large droplets (e.g., influenza) or small droplet nuclei (e.g., tuberculosis) was performed in a South African township in 2010. A total of 571 randomly selected participants recorded the numbers, times, and locations of close contacts (physical/nonphysical) and indoor casual contacts met daily. The median number of physical contacts was 12 (interquartile range (IQR), 7–18), the median number of close contacts was 20 (IQR, 13–29), and the total number of indoor contacts was 30 (IQR, 12–54). Physical and close contacts were most frequent and age-associative in youths aged 5–19 years. Numbers of close contacts were 40% higher than in corresponding populations in industrialized countries (P < 0.001). This may put township communities at higher risk for epidemics of acute respiratory illnesses. Simulations of an acute influenza epidemic predominantly involved adolescents and young adults, indicating that control strategies should be directed toward these age groups. Of all contacts, 86.2% occurred indoors with potential exposure to respiratory droplet nuclei, of which 27.2%, 20.1%, 20.0%, and 8.0% were in transport, own household, crèche/school, and work locations, respectively. Indoor contact time was long in households and short during transport. High numbers of indoor contacts and intergenerational mixing in households and transport may contribute to exceptionally high rates of tuberculosis transmission reported in the community. PMID:22071585

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance Trends among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens in Greece, 2009–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009–2012. A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2% and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%. Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4% penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β-lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  15. Book Review: Thomas Risse, A Community of Europeans? Transnational Identities and Public Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Nicholas Romaniuk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This book represents a multi-faceted and multi-dimensional exploration of Europe as an institutional and social conception. It systematically links understanding of the Europeanization of identities and public spheres with citizenship, nationalism, community and communication, EU (European Union enlargement, institution-building, and European democracy and politicization. As a hallmark of insightful and dynamic scholarship, Risse’s work draws inspiration from a variety of societal levels, including some of the most critical players in European political life today, and highly-praised and well-known political philosophers, and policymakers.

  16. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  17. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk......This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...

  18. Community-level characteristics and environmental factors of child respiratory illnesses in Southern Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Lothrop

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower respiratory illnesses (LRIs and asthma are common diseases in children 0.05. Conclusions Our study revealed complex, multi-factorial associations between predictors and outcomes. Findings indicate that many rural areas with lower SES have distinct factors for childhood respiratory diseases that require further investigation. County-wide differences in maternal characteristics or agricultural land uses (not tested here may also play a role in Pima County residence protecting against hospitalizations, when compared to Maricopa County. By better understanding this and other relationships, more focused public health interventions at the community level could be developed to reduce and better control these diseases in children <5 years, who are more physiologically vulnerable.

  19. Exposure to ultrafine particles and respiratory hospitalisations in five European cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samoli, Evangelia; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Katsouyanni, Klea

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the associations between exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP), with aerodynamic electrical mobility diameters <100 nm, and health is limited. We gathered data on UFP from five European cities within 2001-2011 to investigate associations between short-term changes in c...

  20. Cardio-respiratory Physiology of the European Eel (Agunilla anguilla) in Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline

    The main objective of this PhD thesis was to study the cardio-respiratory capabilities of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) under extreme conditions. Three environmental conditions were studied i.e. temperature, dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide, while a fourth condition was physiological...... in attempts to follow the oceanic spawning migration of A. anguilla. Due to the size of these tags, it is likely that their hydraulic drag constitutes an additional cost during swimming, which may have implications for successful migration. In Paper IV, migration stage eels were subjected to swimming trials...... at increasing speeds of 0.3 - 0.9 body lengths s-1, first without and subsequently with, a scaled down PSAT dummy attached, while rates of oxygen consumption (MO2) were measured. The tag increased MO2 during swimming and elevated the minimum cost of transport (COTmin) by 26%. Standard (SMR) and active metabolic...

  1. Roles of Clinician, Patient, and Community Characteristics in the Management of Pediatric Upper Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Jeffrey P; Temte, Jonathan L; Hanrahan, Lawrence P; Martinez-Donate, P

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies have evaluated factors predictive of inappropriate antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections (URIs). Community factors, however, have not been examined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of patient, clinician, and community factors in predicting appropriate management of URIs in children. We used a novel database exchange, linking electronic health record data with community statistics, to identify all patients aged 3 months to 18 years in whom URI was diagnosed in the period from 2007 to 2012. We followed the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) quality measurement titled "Appropriate treatment for children with upper respiratory infection" to determine the rate of appropriate management of URIs. We then stratified data across individual and community characteristics and used multiple logistic regression modeling to identify variables that independently predicted antibiotic prescription. Of 20,581 patients, the overall rate for appropriate management for URI was 93.5%. Family medicine clinicians (AOR = 1.5; 95% CI 1.31, 1.71; reference = pediatric clinicians), urgent care clinicians (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI 1.93, 2.57; reference = pediatric clinicians), patients aged 12 to 18 years (AOR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.25, 1.67; reference = age 3 months to 4 years), and patients of white race/ ethnicity (AOR = 1.83; 95% CI 1.41, 2.37; reference = black non-Hispanic) were independently predictive of antibiotic prescription. No community factors were independently predictive of antibiotic prescription. Results correlate with prior studies in which non-pediatric clinicians and white race/ethnicity were predictive of antibiotic prescription, while association with older patient age has not been previously reported. Findings illustrate the promise of linking electronic health records with community data to evaluate health care disparities. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  2. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L.; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H.; McEvoy, Cindy T.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory

  3. Calculation, community and cues: public opinion on European integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghe, E.A.E.B.; Marks, G.W.

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes and extends the main lines of theorizing on public opinion on European integration. We test theories of economic calculus and communal identity in a multi-level analysis of Eurobarometer data. Both economic calculus and communal identity are influential, but the latter is

  4. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  5. European Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Infants - 2013 Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2013-01-01

    of adverse outcomes in the short and long term. Many practices involved in preterm neonatal stabilization at birth are not evidence based, including oxygen administration and positive pressure lung inflation, and they may at times be harmful. Surfactant replacement therapy is crucial in the management of RDS...... but the best preparation, optimal dose and timing of administration at different gestations is not completely clear. In addition, use of very early continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has altered the indications for prophylactic surfactant administration. Respiratory support in the form of mechanical...

  6. European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants - 2010 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    in preterm neonatal stabilisation at birth are not evidence-based, including oxygen administration and positive pressure lung inflation, and they may at times be harmful. Surfactant replacement therapy is crucial in the management of RDS, but the best preparation, optimal dose and timing of administration...... at different gestations is not always clear. Respiratory support in the form of mechanical ventilation may also be lifesaving, but can cause lung injury, and protocols should be directed at avoiding mechanical ventilation where possible by using nasal continuous positive airways pressure or nasal ventilation...

  7. Identification of radically different variants of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Eastern Europe: towards a common ancestor for European and American viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadejek, T.; Stankevicius, A.; Storgaard, Torben

    2002-01-01

    We determined 22 partial porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) ORF5 sequences, representing pathogenic field strains mainly from Poland and Lithuania, and two currently available European-type live PRRSV vaccines. Also, the complete ORF7 of two Lithuanian and two Polish...

  8. Phenotypic modulation and cytokine profiles of antigen presenting cells by European subtype 1 and 3 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weesendorp, E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Popma-de Graaf, D.J.; Fijten, H.P.D.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes continuous problems in the pig industry, due to high costs of outbreaks and reduced welfare of diseased pigs. The severity of infection is, partly, dependent on the virus strain. Recently isolated Eastern-European subtype 3 strains

  9. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  10. The major envelope protein, GP(5), of a European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus contains a neutralization epitope in its N-terminal ectodomain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Wijk, van H.A.R.; Kroese, M.V.; Weiland, E.; Meulenberg, J.J.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Rijn, van P.A.

    2003-01-01

    A set of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the GP5 protein of European type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been produced previously (Weiland et al., 1999). This set reacted with a plaque-purified virus (PPV) subpopulation of Dutch isolate

  11. RANDOMIZED EUROPEAN MULTICENTER TRIAL OF SURFACTANT REPLACEMENT THERAPY FOR SEVERE NEONATAL RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME - SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE DOSES OF CUROSURF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEER, CP; ROBERTSON, B; CURSTEDT, T; HALLIDAY, HL; COMPAGNONE, D; GEFELLER, O; HARMS, K; HERTING, E; MCCLURE, G; REID, M; TUBMAN, R; HERIN, P; NOACK, G; KOK, J; KOPPE, J; VANSONDEREN, L; LAUFKOTTER, E; KOHLER, W; BOENISCH, H; ALBRECHT, K; HANSSLER, L; HAIM, M; OETOMO, SB; Okken, Albert; ALTFELD, PC; GRONECK, P; KACHEL, W; RELIER, JP; WALTI, H

    There is now convincing evidence that the severity of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome can be reduced by surfactant replacement therapy; however, the optimal therapeutic regimen has not been defined. This randomized European multicenter trial was designed to determine whether the beneficial

  12. Population based external validation of a European predictive model for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization of premature infants born 33 to 35 weeks of gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone G; Fullarton, John R; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Prospectively collected population-based data on 2529 Danish infants born at 33 to 35 weeks of gestation were used to validate an European predictive model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. The model was found to be robust with a diagnostic accuracy of 65.9% to distinguish...

  13. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanzhu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Methods. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal culture, and serological detection. Results. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR showed 100% coincidence rate in detecting coronaviruses 229E, OC43, HKU1, and NL63, human metapneumovirus, influenza A and B, and parainfluenza viruses (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV4. There were 15 viral specimens tested as disagreement positive results. FilmArray RP had higher detection rate in detecting dual viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The positive bacteria (or fungi were found in 25 specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the capability of FilmArray RP for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens and potential use in facilitating better patient care.

  14. The Clinical Significance of FilmArray Respiratory Panel in Diagnosing Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanzhu; Weng, Huilan; Lin, Meirui; He, Ping; Li, Yazhen; Xie, Qingdong; Ke, Changwen; Jiao, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FilmArray RP) test is an emerging diagnostic method in fast detecting multiple respiratory pathogens; the methodology and clinical significance of FilmArray RP in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis were evaluated in this study. Specimens from 74 patients with CAP were analyzed and compared using FilmArray RP, traditional multiple PCR assay, bacterial (or fungal) culture, and serological detection. FilmArray RP and multiplex PCR showed 100% coincidence rate in detecting coronaviruses 229E, OC43, HKU1, and NL63, human metapneumovirus, influenza A and B, and parainfluenza viruses (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV4). There were 15 viral specimens tested as disagreement positive results. FilmArray RP had higher detection rate in detecting dual viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The positive bacteria (or fungi) were found in 25 specimens. This study demonstrated the capability of FilmArray RP for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens and potential use in facilitating better patient care.

  15. Scientific and Technological Cooperation between the European Community and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valesca Raizer Borges

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available The present article regarding scientific and technological cooperation between the European Community and Latin America can be placed in the context of the development aid and cooperation offered by the European Union in the framework of its foreign policy with the Latin American region. The main aim here consists in analyzing those cooperation programmes established by the European Community with thedeveloping countries of Latin America regarding science and technology, with the goal of identifying, both on the European Union as well as on the Latin American side, the mechanisms established for putting this into practice as well as the perspectives for success which these can generate in the framework of regional cooperation.

  16. Porcine B-cells recognize epitopes that are conserved between the structural proteins of American- and European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Bøtner, Anette; Normann, Preben

    2002-01-01

    By selecting phage display libraries with immune sera from experimentally infected pigs, porcine B-cell epitopes in the open reading frame (ORF) 2, 3, 5 and 6 proteins of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were identified. The sequences of all the epitopes...... were well conserved in European-type PRRSV and even between European- and American-type PRRSV. Accordingly, sera from pigs infected with American-type PRRSV cross-reacted with the European-type epitopes. Thus, this study showed, for the first time, the presence of highly conserved epitopes...... epitopes was subjected to closer scrutiny. A heptad motif, VSRRIYQ, which is present in a single copy in ORF2 and 3 proteins, was identified; this arrangement is completely conserved in all European-type PRRSV sequences available. The VSRRIYQ repeat motif colocalized closely with one of the ORF2 epitopes...

  17. Atopy and allergic respiratory disease in rural Poland before and after accession to the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozańska, Barbara; Błaszczyk, Mateusz; Pearce, Neil; Cullinan, Paul

    2014-05-01

    In 2003, we recorded a striking difference in the prevalence of atopy between village and small-town populations in southwest Poland. Nine years later, we undertook a second survey of the same area. We sought to assess whether rapid changes in farming practices, driven by accession to the European Union in 2004, were accompanied by an increase in atopy, asthma, and hay fever in these villages. In 2012, we surveyed 1730 inhabitants older than 5 years (response rate, 85%); 560 villagers and 348 town inhabitants who had taken part in the earlier survey. Participants completed a questionnaire on farm-related exposures and symptoms of asthma and hay fever. Atopy was assessed by using skin prick tests. In 2012, far fewer villagers had contact with cows (4% vs 24.3% in 2003) or pigs (14% vs 33.5%), milked cows (2.7% vs 12.7%), or drank unpasteurized milk (9% vs 35%). Among the villagers, there was a significant increase at all ages in the prevalence of atopy between 2003 and 2012 both in the total population (7.3% vs 19.6%, P European Union. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. State Power and the Acquis Communautaire in the European Community of the early 1970s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses in a historical perspective the so-called acquis communautaire, i.e. the body of law, rules, including informal decisions/norms, taken by the European Community/European Union. In the first part of the article the early history of the concept from the establishment of the EC...... that even if national governments continued to play a leading role in European cooperation, the existence of a common body of law, rules and norms was difficult for single governments to set aside in their pursuance after of narrow national interest. This did not mean that laws could not be bent, or broken...

  19. Community-acquired respiratory infections are common in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Noa; Avivi, Irit; Kra-Oz, Zipora; Oren, Ilana; Hardak, Emilia

    2018-02-09

    Available data suggest that respiratory infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalized due to acute leukemia and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the precise incidence, risk factors, and severity of respiratory infection, mainly community-acquired, in patients with lymphoma and multiple myeloma (MM) are not fully determined. The current study aimed to investigate risk factors for respiratory infections and their clinical significance in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in the first year of diagnosis. Data of consecutive patients diagnosed with NHL or MM and treated at the Rambam Hematology Inpatient and Outpatient Units between 01/2011 and 03/2012 were evaluated. Information regarding anticancer treatment, incidence and course of respiratory infections, and infection-related outcomes was analyzed. One hundred and sixty episodes of respiratory infections were recorded in 103 (49%) of 211 (73-MM, 138-NHL) patients; 126 (79%) episodes were community-acquired, 47 (29%) of them required hospitalization. In univariate analysis, age respiratory infection risk (P = 0.058, 0.038, and 0.001, respectively). Ninety episodes (56% of all respiratory episodes) were examined for viral pathogens. Viral infections were documented in 25/90 (28%) episodes, 21 (84%) of them were community-acquired, requiring hospitalization in 5 (24%) cases. Anti-flu vaccination was performed in 119 (56%) patients. Two of the six patients diagnosed with influenza were vaccinated. Respiratory infections, including viral ones, are common in NHL and MM. Most infections are community-acquired and have a favorable outcome. Rapid identification of viral pathogens allows avoiding antibiotic overuse in this patient population.

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Policy Statement: Enhancing Implementation, Use, and Delivery of Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Carolyn L; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Holland, Anne E; Lareau, Suzanne C; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Puhan, Milo A; Spruit, Martijn A; Masefield, Sarah; Casaburi, Richard; Clini, Enrico M; Crouch, Rebecca; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Garvey, Chris; Goldstein, Roger S; Hill, Kylie; Morgan, Michael; Nici, Linda; Pitta, Fabio; Ries, Andrew L; Singh, Sally J; Troosters, Thierry; Wijkstra, Peter J; Yawn, Barbara P; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has demonstrated physiological, symptom-reducing, psychosocial, and health economic benefits for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, yet it is underutilized worldwide. Insufficient funding, resources, and reimbursement; lack of healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge; and additional patient-related barriers all contribute to the gap between the knowledge of the science and benefits of PR and the actual delivery of PR services to suitable patients. The objectives of this document are to enhance implementation, use, and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation to suitable individuals worldwide. Members of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Pulmonary Rehabilitation Assembly and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) Rehabilitation and Chronic Care Group established a Task Force and writing committee to develop a policy statement on PR. The document was modified based on feedback from expert peer reviewers. After cycles of review and revisions, the statement was reviewed and formally approved by the Board of Directors of the ATS and the Science Council and Executive Committee of the ERS. This document articulates policy recommendations for advancing healthcare professional, payer, and patient awareness and knowledge of PR, increasing patient access to PR, and ensuring quality of PR programs. It also recommends areas of future research to establish evidence to support the development of an updated funding and reimbursement policy regarding PR. The ATS and ERS commit to undertake actions that will improve access to and delivery of PR services for suitable patients. They call on their members and other health professional societies, payers, patients, and patient advocacy groups to join in this commitment.

  1. [Demographic and ideational change in the European Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesthaeghe, R; Meekers, D

    1987-01-01

    "It is argued in this article that family formation is conditioned not only by economic factors (more particularly changes in opportunity structures for the two sexes), but also by ideational trends. The economic factors could be seen as responsible for period fluctuations that are superimposed on a long term ideationally driven trend with marked cohort contrasts. Value orientations are explored and compared across countries and age groups using the international data set of the European Values Studies. The analysis identifies a scale for the degree of tolerance towards non-conformism (e.g. divorce, abortion, one-parent family, rejection of marriage as an institution...) and the meaning of parenthood. Both are related to a set of other scales (religiosity, morality, leftism, nationalism, materialism, etc.). Theoretical links are also established with the theories of, respectively, Easterlin and Simons concerning the reasons for the recent fertility decline in the West." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) excerpt

  2. Comparison of the Berlin definition with the American European consensus definition for acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Lacroix, Guillaume; Esnault, Pierre; Goutorbe, Philippe; Cotte, Jean; Dantzer, Eric; Meaudre, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a leading cause of mortality in burn patients. Smoke inhalation, pneumonia and inflammation process are the major causes of ARDS in burn patients. The American European Consensus Conference (AECC) definition proposed in 1994 has recently been revised by the Berlin definition. Our objective was to describe the epidemiology of ARDS comparing the Berlin definition with the AECC definition in a retrospective cohort of burn patients. We reviewed admitted burn adult patients for a two year period, and investigated patient who received mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h and in whom pneumonia was diagnosed. 40 patients were analyzed. According to the AECC definition, 11 patients met criteria for ALI (27.5%), and 29 patients for ARDS (72.5%). According to the Berlin definition, all patients met criteria for ARDS: 4 (10%) for a severe ARDS, 25 (62.5%) for a moderate ARDS, 11 (27.5%) for a mild ARDS. Inhalation injury was diagnosed in 10 patients (25%). Categorizing patients with the Berlin definition showed statistically significative difference of mortality within the three groups, but not with the AECC definition. The Berlin definition seems to be more accurate than the AECC definition to assess the severity of ARDS in term of outcome in burn patients. This definition may facilitate prompt recognition of ARDS in burn patients, and promote protective ventilation strategy to a larger number of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of hospital and community-acquired respiratory syncytial virus in children with severe lower respiratory tract infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Tran Anh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Hai, Nguyen thi Thanh; Tinh, Le Binh Bao; Kim, Le thi Ngoc; Do, Lien Anh Ha; Chinh B'Krong, Nguyen thi Thuy; Tham, Nguyen Thi; Hang, Vu thi Ty; Merson, Laura; Farrar, Jeremy; Thuong, Tang Chi; de Jong, Menno D; Schultsz, Constance; van Doorn, H Rogier

    2015-05-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community and nosocomial pathogen in developed countries but data regarding the importance of RSV in developing countries are relatively scarce. During a 1-year surveillance study in 2010, we took serial samples from children admitted to the Emergency Unit of the Respiratory Ward of Children's Hospital 1 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. RSV was detected within 72 hours of admission to the ward in 26% (376/1439; RSV A: n = 320; RSV B: n = 54; and RSV A and B: n = 2). Among those negative in the first 72 hours after admission, 6.6% (25/377) acquired nosocomial RSV infection during hospitalization (RSV A: n = 22; and RSV B: n = 3). Children with nosocomial RSV infection were younger (P = 0.001) and had a longer duration of hospitalization (P infection was significantly higher than among those without (P respiratory infection leading to hospitalization in young children and as a nosocomial pathogen, data from this study extend our knowledge on the genetic diversity of RSV circulating in Vietnam. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Indicator species and co-occurrence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi at the European scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouffaud, Marie Lara; Creamer, Rachel E.; Stone, Dote; Plassart, Pierre; Tuinen, van Diederik; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wipf, Daniel; Redecker, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a European transect of 54 soil samples, comprising of grasslands, arable and forest sites, we analyzed community composition of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) using pyrosequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer region. We found a significant influence of

  5. Commission Memorandum on Vocational Training in the European Community in the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Luxembourg).

    As new European Community (EC) objectives become prominent in the coming years, vocational training policy will assume increasing importance. The socioeconomic context of the 1990s will be characterized by an accelerating pace of change and the growing role of intangible capital. New forms of work organization with new requirements for…

  6. European Community Can Reduce CO2 Emissions by Sixty Percent : A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mot, E.; Bartelds, H.; Esser, P.M.; Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Laak, P.J.A. van de; Michon, S.G.L.; Nielen, R.J.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    1993-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the European Community (EC) can be reduced by roughly 60 percent. A great many measures need to be taken to reach this reduction, with a total annual cost of ECU 55 milliard. Fossil fuel use is the main cause of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere; CO2 emissions are

  7. European study protocol: `Effect of short-term changes in urban air pollution on the respiratory health of children with chronic respiratory symptoms. The PEACE project, Pollution Effects on Asthmatic Children in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, W.; Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. [Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Over the last decades, concentrations of air pollution components such as SO{sub 2} and airborne, coarse particulates have decreased in many areas in Europe. This decrease can be ascribed to emission abatement measures and changes in energy production for industrial processes and space heating. Levels of other pollutants such as NO{sub 2} have increased during the same period, mostly due to higher intensity of motor vehicle traffic. Older epidemiologic studies on health effects of air pollution used indicator pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, Total Suspended Particulate matter (TSP) and Black Smoke at extremely high levels. More recent studies using the same and other indicators such as PM10 (particles with a median aerodynamic diameter of 10 {mu}m) have shown effects of air pollution on mortality and morbidity at lower levels, even sometimes lower than current WHO air quality guidelines for Europe. These findings suggest that due to the changing composition of air pollution, effects of air pollution can be seen below levels of exposure which were thought to be safe. Another reason is that the recent studies are conducted at levels which were hard to find in earlier days. Therefore new, quantitative data are needed to evaluate the current guidelines and standards. In order to achieve this, standardization of methodology as well as the execution of epidemiologic studies using such standardized methodology is needed. In the framework of the ENVIRONMENT Research Programme of the Commission of the European Communities, a collaborative study was funded that sought to develop a standardized methodology for epidemiologic studies of effects short-term changes in air pollution on the respiratory system

  8. Warming shelf seas drive the subtropicalization of European pelagic fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Serra, Ignasi; Edwards, Martin; Genner, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Pelagic fishes are among the most ecologically and economically important fish species in European seas. In principle, these pelagic fishes have potential to demonstrate rapid abundance and distribution shifts in response to climatic variability due to their high adult motility, planktonic larval stages, and low dependence on benthic habitat for food or shelter during their life histories. Here, we provide evidence of substantial climate-driven changes to the structure of pelagic fish communities in European shelf seas. We investigated the patterns of species-level change using catch records from 57,870 fisheries-independent survey trawls from across European continental shelf region between 1965 and 2012. We analysed changes in the distribution and rate of occurrence of the six most common species, and observed a strong subtropicalization of the North Sea and Baltic Sea assemblages. These areas have shifted away from cold-water assemblages typically characterized by Atlantic herring and European sprat from the 1960s to 1980s, to warmer-water assemblages including Atlantic mackerel, Atlantic horse mackerel, European pilchard and European anchovy from the 1990s onwards. We next investigated if warming sea temperatures have forced these changes using temporally comprehensive data from the North Sea region. Our models indicated the primary driver of change in these species has been sea surface temperatures in all cases. Together, these analyses highlight how individual species responses have combined to result in a dramatic subtropicalization of the pelagic fish assemblage of the European continental shelf. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Quantitative culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, TR; Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2001-01-01

    were investigated. Results were compared to the findings in eight healthy control persons investigated in February 1998. There was no difference between study patients and control persons when quantitative culture of total cumulative bacterial findings or bacteria categorized as members...... a primary bronchial washing was compared to a secondary sampling from the same bronchus in the control group. Twenty-four (36%) of 67 patients were cultured as positive in the study group while all control persons were cultured as negative for bacteria categorized as potential pathogens. With a threshold......To evaluate the diagnostic value of quantitative bacterial culture of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, 67 consecutive immunocompetent adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections from September 1997 to May 1998...

  10. A molecular clock dates the common ancestor of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at more than 10 years before the emergence of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Roald; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Krabbe Petersen, Anne Mette

    2001-01-01

    The disease caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) emerged independently and almost simultaneously in Europe (1990) and North America (1987). The original reservoir of the virus and the date it entered the pig populations is not known. In this study, we demonstrate...... an accurate molecular clock for the European PRRSV ORF 3 gene, place the root in the genealogy, estimate the rate of nucleotide substitution, and date the most recent common viral ancestor of the data set to 1979; more than 10 years before the onset of the European epidemic. Based on these findings, we...

  11. Non-European traditional herbal medicines in Europe: a community herbal monograph perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liping; Zou, Wenjun; Zhou, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Tingmo; Greef, JanVander; Wang, Mei

    2014-10-28

    The European Directive 2004/24/EC introducing a simplified registration procedure for traditional herbal medicinal products, plays an important role in harmonising the current legislation framework for all herbal medicinal products in the European Union (EU). Although substantial achievements have been made under the new scheme, only a limited number of herbal medicinal products from non-European traditions commonly used in Europe have been registered. Therefore, identification of the obstacles, and determination of appropriate means to overcome the major challenges in the registration of non-European traditional herbal medicinal products are of critical importance for the EU herbal medicinal product market. The primary aims of this study were to understand the key issues and obstacles to registration of non-European traditional herbal medicinal products within the EU. The findings may identify the need for more attention on the Community herbal monographs elaborated by the Herbal Medicinal Products Committee (HMPC), as well as further evidence based scientific research on non-European herbal substances/preparations by the scientific community. A systematic evaluation of the herbal substances and preparations included in Community herbal monographs and public statements has been carried out. The focus was herbal substances and preparations derived from non-European traditions. Of the 109 adopted Community herbal monographs, 10 are herbal substances used in Chinese traditional medicine. Where the HMPC issued a public statement because it was unable to elaborate a monograph more than half-involved herbal substances/preparations from non-European traditions. The main reasons herbal substances/preparations from non-European traditions were not accepted for inclusion in the Community herbal monographs have been identified as due to unfulfilled requirements of Directive 2004/24/EC. The most common reasons were the lack of evidence to demonstrate a 15-year minimum

  12. Heterologous challenge with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine virus: no evidence of reactivation of previous European-type PRRS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens; Oleksiewicz, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    In Denmark, a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) control programme, comprising vaccination of seropositive herds with a live American type PRRSV vaccine, was started in 1996. In several of these herds, spread of vaccine virus from vaccinated 3-18 week old pigs to non...... in previously European PRRSV infected pigs after challenge with the vaccine strain seems to be the result of a boosting effect on the immune system, induced by the heterologous vaccine PRRSV strain....

  13. The Community Structure of the European Network of Interlocking Directorates 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Eelke M.; Daolio, Fabio; Tomassini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The boards of directors at large European companies overlap with each other to a sizable extent both within and across national borders. This could have important economic, political and management consequences. In this work we study in detail the topological structure of the networks that arise from this phenomenon. Using a comprehensive information database, we reconstruct the implicit networks of shared directorates among the top 300 European firms in 2005 and 2010, and suggest a number of novel ways to explore the trans-nationality of such business elite networks. Powerful community detection heuristics indicate that geography still plays an important role: there exist clear communities and they have a distinct national character. Nonetheless, from 2005 to 2010 we observe a densification of the boards interlocks network and a larger transnational orientation in its communities. Together with central actors and assortativity analyses, we provide statistical evidence that, at the level of corporate governance, Europe is getting closer. PMID:23894318

  14. The community structure of the European network of interlocking directorates 2005-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eelke M Heemskerk

    Full Text Available The boards of directors at large European companies overlap with each other to a sizable extent both within and across national borders. This could have important economic, political and management consequences. In this work we study in detail the topological structure of the networks that arise from this phenomenon. Using a comprehensive information database, we reconstruct the implicit networks of shared directorates among the top 300 European firms in 2005 and 2010, and suggest a number of novel ways to explore the trans-nationality of such business elite networks. Powerful community detection heuristics indicate that geography still plays an important role: there exist clear communities and they have a distinct national character. Nonetheless, from 2005 to 2010 we observe a densification of the boards interlocks network and a larger transnational orientation in its communities. Together with central actors and assortativity analyses, we provide statistical evidence that, at the level of corporate governance, Europe is getting closer.

  15. Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on active and healthy ageing. A debate at the European Union Parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Tanasescu, C C; Camuzat, T; Anto, J M; Blasi, F; Neou, A; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Antunes, J P; Samolinski, B; Yiallouros, P; Zuberbier, T

    2013-01-01

    A debate at the European Union Parliament was held on 13 November 2012 on the Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on Active and Healthy Ageing (AHA). The debate was held under the auspices of the Cyprus Presidency of the European Union (2012) and represents a follow-up of the priorities of the Polish Presidency of the European Union (2011). It highlighted the importance of early life events on the occurrence of chronic respiratory diseases later in life and their impact on active and healthy ageing. Epidemiologic evidence was followed by actions that should be taken to prevent and manage chronic respiratory diseases in children. The debate ended by practical, feasible and achievable projects, demonstrating the strength of the political action in the field. Three projects will be initiated from this debate: The first will be a meeting sponsored by the Région Languedoc-Roussillon on the developmental origins of chronic diseases and ageing: from research to policies and value creation. The second project is being led by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Asthma and Rhinitis: Prevention of Asthma, Prevention of Allergy (PAPA). The third project is the GA(2)LEN sentinel network. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Total viable molds and fungal DNA in classrooms and association with respiratory health and pulmonary function of European schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Marzia; Cai, Gui-Hong; Norback, Dan; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Lavaud, François; Sigsgaard, Torben; Wieslander, Gunilla; Nystad, Wenche; Canciani, Mario; Viegi, Giovanni; Sestini, Piersante

    2011-12-01

    Indoor molds are associated with adverse respiratory effects in children. Although schools are important exposure sources of molds, objective measurements were more often taken in homes. Our aim was to assess indoor molds in schools and related effects on schoolchildren health. The Health Effects of the School Environment study (HESE) included 21 schools (46 classrooms) in Italy, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and France and 654 schoolchildren (mean age 10 yr). Information on schoolchildren was collected by standardized questionnaires. Measurements of total viable molds (VM, colony-forming units, cfu/m(3)) and total/specific fungal DNA (cell equivalents, CE/g dust) were taken inside all classrooms in the cold season during normal activities, using the same standardized methodology. Pulmonary function tests were performed on 244 pupils. VM (mean, 320,cfu/m(3)) and total fungal DNA (geometric mean, 2.2 × 10(5) ± 2.1 CE/g dust) were detectable in all classrooms. The levels were significantly higher in buildings with mold/dampness problems. VM, but not fungal DNA, were inversely related to ventilation rate. VM exceeded the maximum standard of 300 cfu/m(3) in 33% of the classrooms. In the past 12 months, dry cough at night (34%) and rhinitis (32%) were the mostly reported. Children exposed to VM levels ≥ 300 cfu/m(3), compared with those exposed to lower levels, showed higher risk for past year dry cough at night (odds ratio, OR: 3.10, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.61-5.98) and rhinitis (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.65-4.95), as well as for persistent cough (OR: 3.79, 95% CI: 2.40-5.60). Aspergillus/Penicillium DNA was significantly positively associated with wheeze, and Aspergillus versicolor DNA with wheeze, rhinitis, and cough. There were significant inverse associations of Aspergillus versicolor DNA with forced vitality capacity (FVC) and Streptomyces DNA with both FEV(1) and FVC. In conclusion, indoor VM and fungal DNA were commonly found in monitored European schools and

  17. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  18. Safety and efficacy of a novel European vaccine for porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in bred gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontkowski, Michael D; Kroll, Jeremy; Orveillon, Francois-Xavier; Kraft, Christian; Coll, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can be devastating to commercial breeding operations. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel European PRRSV vaccinal strain for safety and efficacy in bred gilts. In 2 experiments, 110 gilts were vaccinated intramuscularly and the vaccine was evaluated for safety and efficacy. Gilts in Experiment 1 were evaluated for local and systemic reactions and gilts in both experiments were observed for clinical signs of disease through farrow. In both experiments, piglet clinical observations, piglet average daily weight gain (ADWG), gilt serology [determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)], gilt and piglet viremia [determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)], as well as piglet lung lesion scores and PRRS virus in lung tissue (qPCR) were determined. The vaccine was shown to be safe as there were no significant differences among groups in either experiment. Efficacy was established in Experiment 2 as both vaccinated groups were associated with desirable significant differences in percentage of gilts with abnormal clinical findings; gilt viral load post-challenge [day 125, day of farrowing (DOF), and DOF + 13]; percentages of alive, healthy live, weak live, and mummified piglets per litter at farrowing and weaning; percentage of piglets per gilt that were positive for viremia; percentage of piglets per gilt with clinical disease; and piglet viral load on DOF. It was concluded that a vaccine formulated from the PRRSV modified live virus (MLV) strain 94881 is a safe and effective method of protection against the detrimental effects of virulent PRRSV infection in breeding female pigs.

  19. Acute respiratory infection case definitions for young children: a systematic review of community-based epidemiologic studies in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daniel E; Gaffey, Michelle F; Smith-Romero, Evelyn; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Morris, Shaun K

    2015-12-01

    To explore the variability in childhood acute respiratory infection case definitions for research in low-income settings where there is limited access to laboratory or radiologic investigations. We conducted a systematic review of community-based, longitudinal studies in South Asia published from January 1990 to August 2013, in which childhood acute respiratory infection outcomes were reported. Case definitions were classified by their label (e.g. pneumonia, acute lower respiratory infection) and clinical content 'signatures' (array of clinical features that would be always present, conditionally present or always absent among cases). Case definition heterogeneity was primarily assessed by the number of unique case definitions overall and by label. We also compared case definition-specific acute respiratory infection incidence rates for studies reporting incidence rates for multiple case definitions. In 56 eligible studies, we found 124 acute respiratory infection case definitions. Of 90 case definitions for which clinical content was explicitly defined, 66 (73%) were unique. There was a high degree of content heterogeneity among case definitions with the same label, and some content signatures were assigned multiple labels. Within studies for which incidence rates were reported for multiple case definitions, variation in content was always associated with a change in incidence rate, even when the content differed by a single clinical feature. There has been a wide variability in case definition label and content combinations to define acute upper and lower respiratory infections in children in community-based studies in South Asia over the past two decades. These inconsistencies have important implications for the synthesis and translation of knowledge regarding the prevention and treatment of childhood acute respiratory infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Predictors of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette in a large community in Korea: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong Sil; Kim, Kyung Mi

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the level of knowledge about and practice of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette among the general population of Korea and to identify the factors that may influence the practice of respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette. The mean correct answer rate for knowledge of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette was 56.1%. Predictors of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette practice were carrying a handkerchief or tissues, prior education on respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette, awareness level of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette, daily frequency of handwashing, and knowledge level of respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. European Respiratory Society statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Dirksen, Asger; Ferrarotti, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is the most common hereditary disorder in adults. It is associated with an increased risk of developing pulmonary emphysema and liver disease. The pulmonary emphysema in AATD is strongly linked to smoking, but even a proportion of never-smokers develop progressive...

  2. Making european-style community wind power development work in theUnited States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2004-04-26

    Once primarily a European phenomenon, community wind power development--defined here as one or more locally owned, utility-scale wind turbines interconnected on either the customer or utility side of the meter--is gaining a foothold in an increasing number of states throughout the United States. This article describes the various policies and incentives that Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Massachusetts are using to support community wind power development, and how state and federal support influences the types of projects and ownership structures that are being developed. Experience in these states demonstrates that, with an array of incentives and creative financing schemes targeted at community-scale projects, there are opportunities to make community wind work in the United States.

  3. Strange Encounters on the Road to Lifelong Learning: The European Economic Community Meets Permanent Education in 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines policy formation on education in the European Economic Community during the early 1970s surrounding the 1973 report For a "Community Policy on Education", known as the Janne Report. It examines Community policy-making processes that gave rise to the Janne Report. The text of the Janne Report is analysed with regard to…

  4. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara RJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renae J McNamara,1,2 Zoe J McKeough,3 Laura R Mo,3 Jamie T Dallimore,4 Sarah M Dennis3 1Physiotherapy Department, 2Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 4Eastern Sydney Medicare Local, Rosebery, NSW, Australia Background: Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods: Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results: Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71% completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers

  5. After-hours respiratory physiotherapy for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with community-acquired pneumonia: An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-11-15

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for admission to an intensive care unit for intubation and mechanical ventilation, and results in high morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of the study was to investigate availability and provision of respiratory physiotherapy, outside of normal business hours, for intubated and mechanically ventilated adults with CAP in Australian hospitals. A cross-sectional, mixed methods online survey was conducted. Participants were senior intensive care unit physiotherapists from 88 public and private hospitals. Main outcome measures included presence and nature of an after-hours physiotherapy service and factors perceived to influence the need for after-hours respiratory physiotherapy intervention, when the service was available, for intubated adult patients with CAP. Data were also collected regarding respiratory intervention provided after-hours by other ICU professionals. Response rate was 72% (n=75). An after-hours physiotherapy service was provided by n=31 (46%) hospitals and onsite after-hours physiotherapy presence was limited (22%), with a combination of onsite and on-call service reported by 19%. Treatment response (83%) was the most frequent factor for referring patients with CAP for after-hours physiotherapy intervention by the treating day-time physiotherapist. Nurses performing respiratory intervention (77%) was significantly associated with no available after-hours physiotherapy service (p=0.04). Physiotherapy after-hours service in Australia is limited, therefore it is common for intubated patients with CAP not to receive any respiratory physiotherapy intervention outside of normal business hours. In the absence of an after-hours physiotherapist, nurses were most likely to perform after-hours respiratory intervention to intubated patients with CAP. Further research is required to determine whether the frequency of respiratory physiotherapy intervention, including after-hours provision of treatment

  6. Treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: results of a multicentric clinical trial with gatifloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections have an important clinical and economic impact and they are the most common indication for antibiotic use in outpatient practice. This prospective, multicenter non-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of gatifloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Patients were treated with a daily oral dose of gatifloxacin 400 mg for 7-14 days. The diagnosis of respiratory infection was made based on the clinical condition and/or radiologic findings. A total of 5,044 adult patients with community-acquired respiratory infections was treated with gatifloxacin in different centers in Brazil between March 1, 2001, and October 31, 2001. Among the 5,044 patients treated, 1,501 patients (29.76% had community-acquired pneumonia, 756 (14.99% had acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and 2,787 (55.25% had acute sinusitis. Of the total of patients treated, 3,607 (71.51% were considered cured, 1,261 (25% progressed with some clinical improvement, 28 (0.56% presented a relapse, 56 (1.11% failed to treatment and 92 (1.82% were unable to be evaluated. Adverse events were described in 634 (12.57% patients. The most common adverse events were: nausea (2.24%; dyspepsia (1.86%; diarrhea (0.79%; change in taste (0.46%; insomnia and irritability (0.22%; dizziness (0.77%; headache (0.42%; allergic reaction (0.18%; Central Nervous System alterations - insomnia, agitation, anxiety - (0.46%. This study showed that the treatment of respiratory tract infections with gatifloxacin was safe and efficient and had a low incidence of adverse events.

  7. [Respiratory symptoms and lung function in a geriatric population of a Galician rural community: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Barcala, F J; Takkouche, B; Montes Martínez, A; Zamarrón Sanz, C; Salgueiro Rodríguez, M; Rodríguez Suárez, J R

    2003-04-01

    Respiratory diseases are a frequent cause of health demands and have a large impact on morbidity and mortality of the Galician population, especially among the older one. Recent work shows that the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases is not optimal. This increases the utilisation of health care resources. We studied 28 patients of the municipality of Val del Dubra (Northwest Spain) aged between 65 and 74 years. We performed a spirometric exploration and carried out a questionnaire interview on respiratory symptoms, life style, and occupational and health-related antecedents. Among men, 54% of were or are smokers. None of the women ever smoked. Respiratory symptoms were more frequent among women than among men (80% versus 54%). In the spirometric study, the largest volumes and flux are observed among non-smoking males who do not report dyspnea. Respiratory symptoms are frequent in the rural population aged between 65 and 74 years. Tobacco consumption is similar to other Spanish communities, but different from that seen in other countries. Male gender, non-smoking status and absence of respiratory symptoms are associated with higher spirometric figures.

  8. Environmental policy on the way to Brussels : the issue of acidicification between the Netherlands and the European community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefferink, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The process of European integration is marked by a dynamic and often controversial balance between member state autonomy and supranational. decision making. Within the European Community (EC), enviromnental policy has in the past 25 years emerged as one of the major fields of activity. This

  9. The process of adoption of the principle of subsidiarity in the European Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Lluís Piñol

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available In disregarding the treatment that the European media offers the subject, the author sets out with the statement that the Principle of Subsidiarity is a procedural principle recently inserted in the logic of the attribution of competence and in the process of Community decision-making. Used as it is as a legal-political instrument,reinforcing the principle of democratic legitibility and closely connected to the principle of solidarity, the Principle of Subsidiarity favours the assumption of competence by the European Cornmunity as much as its decentralization.In order to understand the adoption of this principle in the Treaty on European Union, the author proceeds, in the first place, with a relatively abstract analysis about the ambiguous, multi-faceted and various interpretations that this principle has repeatedly received. Secondly, equal reference is made to the political debate concerning the inclusion or exclusion of the PS in the Community treaties, as to the specific meaning of the PS in the different Councils of Europe.The Edinburgh meeting deserves special treatment as the author considers it a model of analysis of Community decision-making in which the classic actors of the EC (its institutions and its member states have participated as well as other actors: organized political forces in the Europe of Twelve and, from 1986, the nationalparliaments of such countries. By way of a change, the author includes an analysis of the performance of those forces that existed before, but that were relatively poorly organized with respect to the theme of Community integration: the so-called regions, at individual level (lander, Catalonia or the Basque Country or organizationally in the CPLRE and the ARE and also looks at those actions taken by certain personalites such as Spinelli, Giscard dlEstaing or the very same Jacques Delors.

  10. Analysis of ORF 1 in European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by long RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H. S.; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    A rapid method was developed for partial characterization of the replicase-encoding open reading frame 1 (ORF 1) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). It comprised long RT-PCR amplification of 11.1 kb (94%) of ORF 1, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism...... analysis. The method was used to compare ORF 1 sequences of two divergent European-type PRRSV strains. Our results indicated that the structural and replicase parts of these two strains had evolved at overall similar rates....

  11. The environmental associations and the European Communities. Umweltverbaende und EG; Strategien, politische Kulturen und Organisationsformen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hey, C. (EURES - Inst. fuer Regionale Studien in Europa e.V., Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)); Brendle, U. (KATALYSE Institut fuer Angewandte Umweltforschung e.V., Koeln (Germany)); Weinber, C.; Grove-White, R.; Heijden, A. van der; Woischnik, A.; Roeder, S.; Krohberger, K.; Berkel, L. van; Heimer, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    The ecology movements in Europe currently change into strategical associations. This change into institutions is the reaction on three developments in the eighties, i.e. the growth of large associations (over 10 million members throughout the European Communities), the political career of pollution abatement and the resulting changed requriements, and the internationalization of environmental policy which requires coordinate action at different levels. The pace and complexity of this change in the European countries are different. The environmental associations have developed their own national answers to the national basic conditions. The international comparison reveals the national character of their political strategies. Five case studies (environment and internal market, energy taxes, environmental labels, florafauna habitat protection regulations, environmental standardization) show that the different national political styles impede the development of common European activities. An intercultural desire to learn is prerequisite for the environmental associations' successful action at the European level. A desire to learn is also postulated by the political institutions and administrative authorities. (orig./HSCH)

  12. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Herman

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin-binding-proteins were also investigated. ITT and PP analyses were conducted. ARS and ANS proportions increased 11- and 2.5-fold, respectively, within 48 h post-amoxicillin treatment compared with placebo [ARS mean increase (MI) 9.46, 95% CI 5.57-13.35; ANS MI 39.87, 95% CI 30.96-48.78; P  0.1588). ARS/ANS were grouped by pbp mutations. Group 1 strains exhibited significantly lower amoxicillin resistance (mean MIC 2.8 mg/L, 95% CI 2.6-3.1) than group 2 (mean MIC 9.3 mg/L, 95% CI 8.1-10.5; P amoxicillin is modest and short-lived, probably due to 'fitness costs' engendered by high-level resistance-conferring mutations. This evidence further supports European guidelines that recommend amoxicillin when an antibiotic is indicated for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  13. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C; Cheifetz, Ira M; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H; McEvoy, Cindy T; Newth, Christopher J L; Pillow, J Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-02-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice.

  14. Childhood physical abuse and respiratory disease in the community: the role of mental health and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Renee D; Wamboldt, Frederick S

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have found an association between child abuse and respiratory disease in some populations, but the mechanisms remain unknown, and this association has not been examined in a representative community-based sample. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between childhood physical abuse and the odds of respiratory disease and to investigate the role of depression, anxiety, and pack-years of smoking in this association. Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States Survey (n = 3,032), a representative sample of adults aged 25-74 years. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the association between childhood abuse and current respiratory disease (past 12 months) and to examine whether pack-years of smoking, depression, and anxiety disorders mediated the relationship. Individuals who often experienced childhood abuse had a significantly increased odds of respiratory disease (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87 [1.21, 2.90]). The association was attenuated, after adjusting for demographic characteristics and pack-years of smoking, and was no longer significant after adjusting for depression and anxiety disorders. These results are consistent with previous data suggesting a significant association between childhood abuse and respiratory disease and extend existing knowledge by providing initial evidence that demographic differences, depression and anxiety disorders, and lifetime cigarette smoking may mediate this observed relationship. Results require replication with longitudinal data in large community-based samples. Future studies that can explore potential biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations, such as immune factors, are needed next to better understand these relationships.

  15. Community trials on case management of acute respiratory infections (ARI in rural villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cissy B. Kartasasmita

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A community trial was conducted in two rural subdistricts in Subang, West Java, Indonesia, i.e., Cisalak as the intervention area and Sagalaherang as reference area. The study aimed to evaluate the usefulness new version of case management on acute respiratory tract infections (ARI. All babies born between January and December 1994 were enrolled in the study, and followed for 6 to 12 months. The field workers visited the babies every 2 weeks. They examined the babies and interviewed mothers about ARI symptoms, by using a pretested questionnaire. During that period 969 babies were born, 53.3% in Cisalak and 46.7% in Sagalaherang; 548 of them were followed for 12 months; however, only 263 among them had complete data. The morbidity of ARI increased with increasing age; there was no difference between those two study areas. The prevalence of ARI at the age of less than 3 months was 35.1% and 32.7%; between 4 to 6 months 49.9% and 45.3%; between 7 to 9 months 47.0% and 45.9% ; and between 10 to 12 months 53.7% and 50%, for Cisalak and Sagalaherang, respectively. Nevertheless, the mortality in Sagalaherang was higher than in Cisalak  (118 per 1000 and 78 per 1000, respectively, and the pneumonia-related deaths were 64.8% and 52.5%, respectively. The age specific death rate for pneumonia was high among babies of less than 3 months of age, i.e., 68.5% and 57.2%, respectively. We conclude that mothers and primary health care workers in rural areas should be taught and encouraged to use case management of ARI, and monitoring and evaluation of the application is needed.

  16. Duration of shedding of respiratory syncytial virus in a community study of Kenyan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngama Mwanajuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the transmission dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection will be better informed with improved data on the patterns of shedding in cases not limited only to hospital admissions. Methods In a household study, children testing RSV positive by direct immunofluorescent antibody test (DFA were enrolled. Nasal washings were scheduled right away, then every three days until day 14, every 7 days until day 28 and every 2 weeks until a maximum of 16 weeks, or until the first DFA negative RSV specimen. The relationship between host factors, illness severity and viral shedding was investigated using Cox regression methods. Results From 151 families a total of 193 children were enrolled with a median age of 21 months (range 1-164 months, 10% infants and 46% male. The rate of recovery from infection was 0.22/person/day (95% CI 0.19-0.25 equivalent to a mean duration of shedding of 4.5 days (95%CI 4.0-5.3, with a median duration of shedding of 4 days (IQR 2-6, range 1-14. Children with a history of RSV infection had a 40% increased rate of recovery i.e. shorter duration of viral shedding (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.01-1.86. The rate of cessation of shedding did not differ significantly between males and females, by severity of infection or by age. Conclusion We provide evidence of a relationship between the duration of shedding and history of infection, which may have a bearing on the relative role of primary versus re-infections in RSV transmission in the community.

  17. Empowering European communities to improve natural resource management for human well-being: the OPPLA web portal & communities of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, M.; Brown, C.; Pérez-Soba, M.; Rounsevell, M.; Verweij, P.; Delbaere, B.; Cojocaru, G.; Saarikoski, H.; Harrison, P.; Zellmer, K.

    2014-12-01

    The ecosystem services concept is seen by many as a useful paradigm to support decision-making at the complex interface between science, policy and practice. However, to be successful, it requires a strong willingness for collaboration and joint understanding. In support of this aspiration, OPPLA is being developed as a web portal to enable European communities to better manage ecosystems for human well-being and livelihoods. OPPLA will provide access to a variety of online resources such as tools, case studies, lessons learned, videos, manuals and training and educational materials. It will also provide expert forums and spaces for discussions between researchers, practitioners and decision makers. Hence a critical aspect of the success of OPPLA is the co-evolution of communities of practice. An example of a community of practice is the recently launched Ecosystem Services Community - Scotland (ESCom-Scotland; escomscotland.wordpress.com). ESCom-Scotland aims to support better management of Scotland's natural resources by helping to establish a community of practice between individuals and groups involved in the science, policy and practice behind sustainable ecosystem management. It aspires to encourage the sharing of ideas, increase collaboration and to initiate a support network for those engaging with the ecosystem services concept and it will use the OPPLA resources to support these activities. OPPLA is currently at the developmental stage and was instigated by two large European Commission funded research projects: OPERAs (www.operas-project.eu) and OpenNESS (www.openness-project.eu), with a combined budget of ca. €24m. These projects aim to improve understanding of how ecosystem services contribute to human well-being in different social-ecological systems. Research will establish whether, how and under what conditions the ecosystem services concept can move beyond the academic domain towards practical implementation in support of sustainable ecosystem

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammaert Blandine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0% had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%. Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing, preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5% and pleural effusions alone (4.5% and normal parenchyma (4.5%. Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28% received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0% patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR 2.1; p = 0.04 and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03 were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate

  19. [Status of acute upper respiratory infection, influenza-like illness, and influenza vaccination coverage among community residents in Jinan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Song, Shaoxia; Wang, Wei; Geng, Xingyi; Liu, Wen; Han, Debiao; Liu, Ti; Wu, Julong; Li, Zhong; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Zhenqiang

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the status of acute upper respiratory infection and influenza-like illness (ILI) among community residents in Jinan in 2015, and to make a understand of the patient's medical treatment behavior and influenza vaccination coverage status in 2014. Balloting method and convenient sampling method were used to launch a household survey. The residents who had been in Jinan for more than 3 months were selected, to investigate the residents' attack ratio of acute upper respiratory and influenza-like from Jan. 8 to Feb. 7, 2015. Totally, 1 300 persons from 410 families were involved in this survey which recovered 1 241 valid questionnaires with the efficiency of 95.5%. Based on the national age-urban demographic statistics in 2010, the attack rates of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness were estimated by the direct standardization method, and the influenza vaccination rates were also calculated in this study. χ(2)-test method was used to compare the different status of incidence and vaccination among residents with different features. The attack rate of acute upper respiratory infection and influenza-like illness in Jinan from January 8, 2015 to February 7, 2015 were 30.2% (375 cases), and 6.1% (76 cases), respectively, with a standardized rate of 29.1% and 5.4%. 5.3% (66 cases) of the residents have vaccinated with the influenza vaccine inoculation, with an adjusted rate of 3.8%. The attack rate difference of acute upper respiratory tract infections was statistically significant between each age group (χ(2)=17.121, P= 0.002). The 0-4 age group had a highest attack rate (45.4%) of acute respiratory infection, while the 15-24 age group got the lowest (26.5%). 38.9% (146 cases) of patients went for a treatment in hospital. Among them, 37.7% (55 cases) of them selected the county level hospitals for treatment, 37.7% (55 cases) selected the community level hospitals, and 24.6% (36 cases) selected the individual clinic. Significant differences of

  20. European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry Working Group on Accreditation: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, W

    2001-07-20

    During the past 10 years, many activities have taken place in the field of quality systems and accreditation in medical laboratories. Each country in Europe has a slightly different approach. The Working Group on Accreditation of the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry (EC4) tries to support harmonisation of these efforts. For this purpose, they edited the Essential Criteria for quality systems of medical laboratories and supported the forthcoming International ISO standard "Quality management for the medical laboratory". At this moment, a Model Quality Manual is nearly ready for publication. The next items are setting up criteria for auditing the quality system and criteria for the accreditation process.

  1. A RESEARCH OF E-BOOK MARKET TRENDS: NORTH AMERICA AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY

    OpenAIRE

    Andreja Zubac; Andreja Tominac

    2014-01-01

    AbstractPurpose: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of research on the presence of the electronic book on the book market, its trends and developments as well as point towards the difficulties faced by all professions related to it in the countries of the European Community.Methodology / approach: This paper analyzes the domestic and foreign literature and explores the websites of companies that operate with e-books in order to get an overview of the actual state of business oper...

  2. Synthetic Biology: The Response of the Commission of the (Catholic) Bishops' Conferences of the European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavey, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The Commission of the (Catholic) Bishops' Conferences of the European Community (COMECE) has issued an opinion on the ethics of synthetic biology (synbio). Examining synbio from religious and more general ethical perspectives, it examines synbio's potential pros and cons, as well as whether it is ethical in and of itself. Its conclusions mirror those of the ethical mainstream; namely, that synbio may present humanity with opportunities for both great advancement and great destruction. It suggests a prudent approach, and calls for regulation to be used to encourage positive outcomes while reducing the likelihood of negative ones.

  3. Communities, households and animals. Convergent developments in Central Anatolian and Central European Neolithic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Marciniak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to scrutinize striking similarities in cultural developments and social transformations in Neolithic communities in the North European Plain of Central Europe and Central Anatolia in the early phase of their development and in the following post-Eearly Neolithic period. They will be explored through evidence pertaining to architecture and the organization of space, alongside changes in settlement pattern, as well as animal bone assemblages and zoomorphic representations. Social changes, in particular a transition from communal arrangements of local groups in the Early Neolithic to autonomous household organization in the following period, will be debated.

  4. Risks, regulation responsibilities and costs in nuclear waste management: A preliminary survey in the European Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, S.

    The use of nuclear energy produces radioactive waste which may present risks of pollution for man and his environment. Their protection must be ensured by technical or institutional controls. The report examines the second, i.e., the administrative, legal and financial measures, dealing with the management of radioactive waste in existence or under consideration within the Member States of the European Community. The following aspects are studied: laws and regulations, authorities concerned, costs and financing of radioactive waste management, civil liability, national policies, international aspects of radioactive waste management.

  5. Differential gene expression profiles according to the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society histopathological classification in lung adenocarcinoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Romero, Camilo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Ortega-Gómez, Alette; Alanis-Funes, Gerardo J; Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Mercado, Gabriela E; Cardona, Andrés F; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Arrieta, Oscar

    2017-08-01

    The current lung cancer classification from the Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society has considerably changed the pathologic diagnosis of lung invasive adenocarcinoma, identifying disease subtypes with substantial implications for medical practice, such as clinical, radiological, molecular, and prognostic differences. We analyzed the differences in the genetic expression of adenocarcinoma subtypes according to the new classification. Microarray gene expression analysis was performed on a cohort of 29 adenocarcinoma patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of Mexico from 2008 to 2011. All patients had an available biopsy sample and were classified into 4 different subtypes of adenocarcinoma (2015 World Health Organization classification). Lepidic-predominant adenocarcinoma was the only pattern that exhibited a marked gene expression difference compared with other predominant histologic patterns, revealing genes with significant expression (P adenocarcinoma that could be used as a gene signature. The lepidic-predominant histologic pattern has a differential gene expression profile compared with all predominant histologic patterns. Additionally, we identified a gene expression signature of 13 genes that have a unique behavior in the lepidic histologic pattern; these 13 genes are candidates for follow-up studies for their potential use as biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Results from this study highlight the importance of the new Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification and exemplify the potential clinical implications of correlating histopathology with exclusive molecular beacons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography of Respiratory Quinones for Microbial Community Analysis in Environmental and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Fujie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ and menaquinones (MK without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces.

  7. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-05

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces).

  8. Proximity to mining industry and respiratory diseases in children in a community in Northern Chile: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Ronald; Radon, Katja; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Cifuentes, Stella; Muñoz, Daniel Moraga; Berger, Ursula

    2016-06-07

    In a community in northern Chile, explosive procedures are used by two local industrial mines (gold, copper). We hypothesized that the prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis in the community may be associated with air pollution emissions generated by the mines. A cross-sectional study of 288 children (aged 6-15 years) was conducted in a community in northern Chile using a validated questionnaire in 2009. The proximity between each child's place of residence and the mines was assessed as indicator of exposure to mining related air pollutants. Logistic regression, semiparametric models and spatial Bayesian models with a parametric form for distance were used to calculate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals. The prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis was 24 and 34 %, respectively. For rhinoconjunctivitis, the odds ratio for average distance between both mines and child's residence was 1.72 (95 % confidence interval 1.00, 3.04). The spatial Bayesian models suggested a considerable increase in the risk for respiratory diseases closer to the mines, and only beyond a minimum distance of more than 1800 m the health impact was considered to be negligible. The findings indicate that air pollution emissions related to industrial gold or copper mines mainly occurring in rural Chilean communities might increase the risk of respiratory diseases in children.

  9. Towards the actual implementation of ecodesign in industry - the `haves` and `needs` viewed by the European ecodesign community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bey, N.; Boks, C.; Ernzer, M.

    2002-01-01

    for further activities to foster the implementation of ecodesign in industry. In this elaboration, the paper defines a number of research ave-nues that, so far, have not been part of common research approaches in the European Ecodesign Community, and are of great validity for the research community....

  10. A European community pharmacy-based survey to investigate patterns of prescription fraud through identification of falsified prescriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Gony, Mireille; Carvajal, Alfonso; Macias, Diego; Conforti, Anita; D'incau, Paola; Heerdink, Rob; Van Der Stichele, Robert; Bergman, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To identify prescription drugs involved in falsified prescriptions in community pharmacies in 6 European countries. Methods: A cross-sectional survey among 2,105 community pharmacies in Belgium, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden was carried out to collect all suspect prescription

  11. The impact of laboratory characteristics on molecular detection of respiratory syncytial virus in a European multicentre quality control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerhoff, T. J.; MacKay, W. G.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W. J.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Schellevis, F.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for detecting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in 25 laboratories across Europe by an external quality assessment study. In addition, factors related to the diagnostic performance of laboratories were explored. The results of

  12. The impact of laboratory characteristics on molecular detection of respiratory syncytial virus in a European multicentre quality control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerhoff, T.J.; MacKay, W.G.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W.J.; Niesters, H.G.M.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Schellevis, F.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for detecting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in 25 laboratories across Europe by an external quality assessment study. In addition, factors related to the diagnostic performance of laboratories were explored. The results of

  13. Surfactant treatment of neonates with respiratory failure and group B streptococcal infection. Members of the Collaborative European Multicenter Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herting, E.; Gefeller, O.; Land, M.; Van Sonderen, L.; Harms, K.; Robertson, B.

    2000-01-01

    Connatal pneumonia caused by group B streptococcal (GBS) infection may be associated with surfactant dysfunction. We investigated the effects of surfactant treatment in term and preterm neonates with GBS infection and respiratory failure, in comparison with corresponding data from a control

  14. General Principles of the WTO and European Community Laws in Building International Competition Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Mo Chung

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Trade Organization (WTO established a Working Group on the interaction between trade and competition policy in 1996. By the Doha Ministerial Declaration, it recognized the case for international competition policy framework and agreed that the relevant negotiations take place after the Fifth Session of the Ministerial Conference. The Working Group is meant to focus on the clarification of: core principles, including transparency, non-discrimination and procedural fairness among others in the period until the Fifth Session. This article attempts to clarify the implications of the core (WTO principles to the would-be international competition laws and practices. It further tries to get lessons from competition law and practices of the European Community. Protection of fundamental rights, proportionality, non-discrimination, transparency, supremacy, subsidiarity and direct effect are the general principles of the European Community law to be discussed in relation to the competition law and policy. It concludes that the general principles of the WTO and EC laws provide guiding principles for the future international competition norms, and makes some preliminary assessment of the present Korean competition law and policy in the light of those principles.

  15. Consumer knowledge and perceptions about antibiotics and upper respiratory tract infections in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Ian; Hollingworth, Samantha; Pudmenzky, Alex; Rossato, Laurence; Syed, Shahzad; Kairuz, Therése

    2015-12-01

    Overuse of antibiotics is a global concern and the World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned of relapsing to an era with no effective antibiotics. In Australia, various national consumer campaigns had been running since 2000, and the concern was prioritised in 2011, when the need for a national approach to address antibiotic resistance was identified. The aim of this study was to explore consumer attitudes and knowledge about (upper respiratory tract) infections, colds and flu, and antibiotics, and to identify factors contributing to antibiotic misuse which could be addressed by tailored patient counselling. A community pharmacy in an area of Brisbane, Australia. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed among pharmacy consumers. Perceptions of, and knowledge about antibiotics were measured using a 5-point Likert-type scale of agreement/disagreement. The proportion of self-diagnosers and non self-diagnosers who agreed/disagreed with the attitude statement, "I know that I need antibiotics before I visit my doctor"; and the proportion of mistaken and non-mistaken who agreed/disagreed with the statement, "I will get better faster if I take antibiotics when I have a cold or flu". Over a third of the 252 participants believed that they would recover faster by taking antibiotics when suffering from a cold or flu, and nearly one-fifth felt that antibiotics would cure viral infections. More females (62.2 vs. 43.9 %) self-diagnosed (p = 0.002) although more males (42.1 vs. 30.8 %) were mistaken about the efficacy of antibiotics for treating colds and flus. Mistaken respondents were more likely than non-mistaken respondents to self-diagnose (p = 0.01). This study confirms a lack of knowledge among consumers about the efficacy of antibiotics in treating viral infections despite education campaigns. The findings strongly suggest there is a need for pharmacists and other health care professionals to elicit consumer beliefs and understanding about antibiotics

  16. Microbial communities present in the lower respiratory tract of clinically healthy birds in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Malys, Tyler; Ivanov, Yury V; Park, Jihye; Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Rabbani, Masood; Yaqub, Tahir; Harvill, Eric Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Commercial poultry is an important agricultural industry worldwide. Although dense living conditions and large flocks increase meat and egg production, they also increase the risk of disease outbreaks and zoonoses. Current pathogen identification methods mostly rely on culture-dependent techniques and, therefore, are limited to a very small number of bacteria present in the environment. Next Generation Sequencing allows for culture-independent characterization of lower respiratory microbiome of birds including the identification of novel commensals and potentially emerging pathogens. In this study, we collected tracheo-bronchoalveolar lavage of 14 birds raised at 3 different farms in the Punjab province of Pakistan. To characterize the lower respiratory microbiome of these birds, we sequenced hyper-variable regions of the 16S ribosomal subunit gene. Although dominated by bacteria belonging to a small number of taxonomic classifications, the lower respiratory microbiome from each farm was far more diverse and novel than previously known. The differences in microbiome among farms suggest that inter-farm differences affect the microbiome of birds more than breed, geographic location, or management system. The presence of potential and known pathogens in genetically similar specialty breeds of chickens kept at unnaturally high densities and under variable conditions presents an extraordinary opportunity for the selection of highly pathogenic bacteria. In some instances, opportunistic respiratory pathogens were observed in apparently healthy birds. Understanding and monitoring the respiratory microbiome of such populations may allow the early detection of future disease threats. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. European integration and the supervision of local and regional authorities
    Experiences in the Netherlands with requirements of European Community law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Hessel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of increasing European integration, local and regional authorities are having to deal with European law more and more intensively. As Member States (read: central government are responsible vis-à-vis the Community for the errors of local and regional authorities, the question arises within Member States whether the central government possesses sufficient supervisory instruments for complying with their obligations under Community law: they must ensure that the errors of local and regional authorities are rectified in time, and national law must provide for sufficient possibilities to do so. Although Community law is neutral towards the internal relations between the various tiers of government within the Member States, this responsibility of the central government may, as a result of European integration, lead to a need for more powerful supervisory instruments in relation to local and regional authorities. In the past five years there has been some debate on this subject within the Netherlands and after a long delay the Dutch cabinet in 2004 decided that the existing supervisory instruments in the decentralized unitary state of the Netherlands should be expanded. The legislation intended to realize this expansion is being prepared. This discussion and its results would seem of interest to other Member States of the Community facing similar problems.

  18. The cost of community-managed viral respiratory illnesses in a cohort of healthy preschool-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kelly M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs during childhood are often caused by respiratory viruses, result in significant morbidity, and have associated costs for families and society. Despite their ubiquity, there is a lack of interdisciplinary epidemiologic and economic research that has collected primary impact data, particularly associated with indirect costs, from families during ARIs in children. Methods We conducted a 12-month cohort study in 234 preschool children with impact diary recording and PCR testing of nose-throat swabs for viruses during an ARI. We used applied values to estimate a virus-specific mean cost of ARIs. Results Impact diaries were available for 72% (523/725 of community-managed illnesses between January 2003 and January 2004. The mean cost of ARIs was AU$309 (95% confidence interval $263 to $354. Influenza illnesses had a mean cost of $904, compared with RSV, $304, the next most expensive single-virus illness, although confidence intervals overlapped. Mean carer time away from usual activity per day was two hours for influenza ARIs and between 30 and 45 minutes for all other ARI categories. Conclusion From a societal perspective, community-managed ARIs are a significant cost burden on families and society. The point estimate of the mean cost of community-managed influenza illnesses in healthy preschool aged children is three times greater than those illnesses caused by RSV and other respiratory viruses. Indirect costs, particularly carer time away from usual activity, are the key cost drivers for ARIs in children. The use of parent-collected specimens may enhance ARI surveillance and reduce any potential Hawthorne effect caused by compliance with study procedures. These findings reinforce the need for further integrated epidemiologic and economic research of ARIs in children to allow for comprehensive cost-effectiveness assessments of preventive and therapeutic options.

  19. Prevalence of respiratory virus in symptomatic children in private physician office settings in five communities of the state of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Chew, Rosa M; Espinoza, Marco A; Taboada, Blanca; Aponte, Fernando E; Arias-Ortiz, María A; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Santos-Preciado, José I; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-06-25

    Acute respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. Many studies have described the frequency of viruses in hospitalized patients, but studies describing the prevalence of viruses in the community setting are limited, particularly in developing countries, where most of the deaths from serious respiratory diseases occur. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diversity of respiratory viruses in the community setting using molecular diagnostic tools, as well as the clinical characteristics of respiratory viral infections in the general pediatric practice in Mexico. Children with respiratory tract infections attending private pediatric practices during a 10-month period in five cities of the state of Veracruz were included. Nasal swabs were taken and processed by a multiplex detection kit for 15 respiratory viruses. 525 children were included from July 2011 to May 2012; 44% were female, mean age was 45 months. The 3 most frequent clinical diagnosis were: rhinopharyngitis 68%, pharyngitis 18%, and 3.3% influenza-like illness. 71.5% of the samples were positive for virus. The five most frequent pathogens were respiratory syncycitial virus in 18.3% of the children, rhinovirus in 17.5%, influenza A 9.1%, adenovirus 7.2%, and enterovirus 3.4%, although all 15 viruses were detected; there were viral coinfections in 14.1%, and 28.5% of the samples were negative. A large proportion of respiratory infections in the community setting in Mexico was associated to viruses. Although testing for common respiratory pathogens in children with acute respiratory tract infections may lead to a better understanding of the role of viral pathogens in, and eventually to improvement in the management of, individual patients, additional prospective studies are required to study the need of routinely using such tests in general pediatric practices in resource-limited countries.

  20. Higher Prevalence of Retinopathy in Diabetic Patients of South Asian Ethnicity Compared With White Europeans in the Community

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, Neil T.; Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Reynold, Dilini R.; Bush, Kate; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh; Bellary, Srikanth; Barnett, Anthony H.; Kumar, Sudhesh; O'Hare, J. Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE?The purpose of this study was to compare prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among U.K. residents of South Asian or white European ethnicity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS?This was a community-based cross-sectional study involving 10 general practices; 1,035 patients with type 2 diabetes were studied: 421 of South Asian and 614 of white European ethnicity. Diabetic retinopathy, sight-threatening retinopathy, maculopathy, and previous laser photocoagulation therapy wer...

  1. Extremely low exposure of a community to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus: false seropositivity due to use of bacterially derived antigens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, D.T.; Maren, W.W.C. van; Chan, F.K.; Chan, W.S.; Lo, A.W.; Ma, C.H.; Tam, F.C.; To, K.F.; Chan, P.K.; Sung, J.J.; Lim, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Estimates of seropositivity to a new infectious agent in a community are useful to public health. For severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the figures are conflicting. Herein, we screened 12,000 people in a community stricken by SARS 10 months previously and found 53 individuals (0.44%) who had

  2. Epidemiology of acute respiratory infections in children - preliminary results of a cohort in a rural north Indian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anand; Amarchand, Ritvik; Gupta, Vivek; Lafond, Kathryn E; Suliankatchi, Rizwan Abdulkader; Saha, Siddhartha; Rai, Sanjay; Misra, Puneet; Purakayastha, Debjani Ram; Wahi, Abhishek; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kapil, Arti; Dawood, Fatimah; Pandav, Chandrakant S; Broor, Shobha; Kapoor, Suresh K; Lal, Renu; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-10-26

    Despite acute respiratory infections being a major cause of death among children in developing countries including India, there is a lack of community-based studies that document its burden and aetiology. A dynamic cohort of children aged 0-10 years was established in four villages in a north Indian state of Haryana from August 2012 onwards. Trained health workers conducted weekly home visits to screen children for acute respiratory infection (ARI) defined as one of the following: cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, earache/discharge, or breathing difficulty. Nurses clinically assessed these children to grade disease severity based on standard age-specific guidelines into acute upper or lower respiratory infection (AURI or ALRI) and collected nasal/throat swabs for pathogen testing. Our first year results show that ARI incidence in 0-10 years of age was 5.9 (5.8-6.0) per child-year with minimal gender difference, the ALRI incidence in the under-five age group was higher among boys (0.43; 0.39-0.49) as compared to girls (0.31; 0.26-0.35) per child year. Boys had 2.4 times higher ARI-related hospitalization rate as compared to girls. ARI impose a significant burden on the children of this cohort. This study platform aims to provide better evidence for prevention and control of pneumonia in developing countries.

  3. Screening for Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans in patients with upper respiratory tract infections 2007-2008: a multicentre European study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wagner, K S

    2011-04-01

    Diphtheria is now rare in most European countries but, when cases do arise, the case fatality rate is high (5-10%). Because few countries continue to routinely screen for the causative organisms of diphtheria, the extent to which they are circulating amongst different European populations is largely unknown. During 2007-2008, ten European countries each screened between 968 and 8551 throat swabs from patients with upper respiratory tract infections. Six toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae were identified: two from symptomatic patients in Latvia (the country with the highest reported incidence of diphtheria in the European Union) and four from Lithuania (two cases, two carriers); the last reported case of diphtheria in Lithuania was in 2002. Carriage rates of non-toxigenic organisms ranged from 0 (Bulgaria, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Italy) to 4.0 per 1000 (95% CI 2.0-7.1) in Turkey. A total of 28 non-toxigenic strains were identified during the study (26 C. diphtheriae, one Corynebacterium ulcerans, one Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis). The non-toxigenic C. ulcerans strain was isolated from the UK, the country with the highest reported incidence of cases due to C. ulcerans. Of the eleven ribotypes detected, Cluj was seen most frequently in the non-toxigenic isolates and, amongst toxigenic isolates, the major epidemic clone, Sankt-Petersburg, is still in circulation. Isolation of toxigenic C. diphtheriae and non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans in highly-vaccinated populations highlights the need to maintain microbiological surveillance, laboratory expertise and an awareness of these organisms amongst public health specialists, microbiologists and clinicians.

  4. Community based study to compare the incidence and health services utilization pyramid for gastrointestinal, respiratory and dermal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI), respiratory and dermal symptoms are common and cause substantial morbidity, although the information on their exact incidence and comparative burden is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and rate these three major symptom complexes in order to improve our understanding of the health burden imposed by these symptoms. Methods We used data from a community based randomised control trial conducted from June 2007 to August 2008 among 277 South Australian families consuming rainwater. Using weekly health diaries, we prospectively collected information on GI (diarrhoea or vomiting), respiratory (sore throat, runny nose or cough) and dermal (rash, generalised itch or dermal infection) symptoms, as well as on relevant GP visits, time off work and/or hospitalisation due to these symptoms. Data were analysed using generalized estimating equations approach taking into account the variable number of weeks of follow-up of each individual and within-family clustering of responses. Results Over one year, at least one episode of GI symptoms was reported by 54% of participants (95% CI 50%-58%), at least one respiratory episode by 91% (95% CI 88%-93%) and at least one episode of dermal symptoms by 27% (95% CI 24%-30%). The average number of weeks per year during which respiratory symptoms occurred was four times greater than for GI or dermal symptoms (4.9, 1.2 and 1.2 weeks, respectively, p<0.001), with an average number of GP visits per person per year being twice as frequent (0.48, 0.26, 0.19 respectively, p<0.001). However, on a per episode basis, a higher proportion of people saw a GP or were hospitalised for GI symptoms. Conclusions This first comparative study of three different symptom complexes showed that although respiratory symptoms are most common, GI symptoms cause a greater per episode burden on healthcare resources. Measuring and comparing the community based burden of these symptom complexes will assist

  5. Physical and rehabilitation medicine section and board of the European Union of Medical Specialists. Community context; history of European medical organizations; actions under way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Korvin, G; Delarque, A

    2009-01-01

    The European Community is based on a series of treaties and legal decisions, which result from preliminary documents prepared long before by different organizations and lobbies. The European union of medical specialists (Union européenne des médecins specialists [UEMS]) came into being in order to address the questions raised by European directives (e.g., free circulation of people and services, reciprocal recognition of diplomas, medical training, quality improvements). The specialty sections of the UEMS contribute actively to this work. The physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) section is composed of three committees: the PRM board is devoted to initial and continuing education and has published a harmonized teaching programme and organized a certification procedure, which can be considered as a European seal of quality; the Clinical Affairs Committee is concerned with the quality of PRM care, and it has set up a European accreditation system for PRM programs of care, which will help to describe PRM clinical activity more concretely; and the Professional Practice Committee works on the fields of competence in our specialty. This third committee has already published a White Book, and further documents are being prepared, based on both the International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) and reference texts developed by the French Federation of PRM.

  6. [Excess respiratory diseases in children and elderly people in a community of Santiago with high particulate air pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto C, María José; Mancilla F, Pedro; Astudillo O, Pedro; Reyes P, Alvaro; Román A, Oscar

    2007-02-01

    The relationship between air pollution and health damage has been sufficiently documented. In station "R" of the air quality monitoring system, located in a community of Metropolitan Santiago (Cerro Navia), the Chilean standard of 150 microg/m3, averaged in 24 hours, for particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less (PM10), has been exceeded more days than in the rest of the city stations. To investigate if the population living near that station has a higher proportion of lower respiratory infections than the Metropolitan Region (MR) as a whole. An outpatient clinic located near station "R" (Centro Albertz), was implemented as a sentinel center according to UNICEF methodology, used since 1992 by the Acute Respiratory Infections National Program. Daily information was collected between May and December 2004. Monitoring data included total number of consults by children less than 15 years old for lower respiratory tract infections, pneumonia, obstructive bronchitis syndrome in children and by adults over 64 years old for lower airway disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pneumonia. Results were compared with those of the rest of MR. Compared with the MR, children from the sentinel clinic had a significantly higher proportion of consults for obstructive bronchial syndrome (20.1% and 26.4% respectively, in pelderly, the average consults for lower airway disease were 17% in the sentinel clinic and 12.2% in MR (pChildren and elderly subjects at the sentinel clinic had a significantly higher proportion of respiratory infections (pneumonia and obstructive bronchial syndrome in children and lower airway disease in the elderly) as compared to the Metropolitan Region.

  7. Differentiation, Leaders and Fairness. Negotiating Climate Commitments in the European Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringius, Lasse

    1997-12-31

    This report shows that it is possible to negotiate and reach asymmetrical environmental agreements that take into account significant national dissimilarities. It is argued that analytical models and intuitively appealing model-based quantitative indicators of national circumstances can establish premises for negotiations leading to differentiated environmental agreements. While they cannot take the place of political negotiations, they help identify a formula that defines the problem in a resolvable fashion and prevent the bargaining space from expanding uncontrollably. Scholars arguing that symmetrical environmental measures are widely used because they simplify negotiations and prevent countries from pursuing extremist positions, and that salient focal points are significant in negotiation, overlook this argument. In pre-Kyoto European Community climate policy, which this report empirically examines, high transaction costs and EC member states` ability to block economically hurtful agreements were not essential issues. 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  8. Collective dose to the European Community from nuclear industry effluents discharge in 1978

    CERN Document Server

    Camplin, W C

    1983-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to evaluate the collective dose commitment to the population of the European Community from effluents released by the nuclear industry within the EC in 1978. Airborne and liquid effluent discharge data have been taken from published sources, and computer modelling techniques have been used to predict the transfer of radioactivity through the environment to man. The collective dose commitments due to discharges from each nuclear installation have been evaluated and the comparative significance of individual radionuclides and their pathways to man have been considered. Airborne releases resulted in an estimated collective effective dose equivalent commitment of 95 man Sv, the major part of which is due to carbon-14 from both power stations and reprocessing plants. The collective effective dose equivalent commitment from liquid effluents is estimated to be 408 man Sv, mostly due to caesium-137 and other radionuclides from the Sellafield (formerly Windscale) reprocessing plant...

  9. Safety profile of cefditoren. A pooled analysis of data from clinical trials in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granizo, J J; Aguilar, L; Gimenez, M J; Coronel, P; Gimeno, M; Prieto, J

    2009-06-01

    A high number of individuals in the population are exposed to antibiotics for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. It is important to review the adverse events profile related to antibiotic exposure during the clinical development of drugs that are or have been recently included in the therapeutic armamentarium. Safety data from all 13 clinical trials of cefditoren on community acquired respiratory infections were reviewed. Safety population was defined as all randomized patients with at least one dose intake. Adverse events considered by investigators as related during antibiotic exposure were considered. The overall safety population consisted in 4,592 patients for cefditoren and 2,784 for comparators. Overall reported diarrhoea related to cefditoren administration was significantly higher (p < or = 0.001) than comparators (9.9% vs 6.9%) due to the significant difference in the pooled pharyngotonsillitis studies (8.3% vs 3.2%), while no significant differences in others pathologies were found, with 9.4% (with cefditoren) vs 10.3% (with comparators) in the case of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Dyspepsia and abdominal pain were reported as adverse events in < 2.7% patients regardless the treated disease. In females population lower related vaginosis rate was found in cefditoren vs comparators, mainly due to differences among patients treated for sinusitis (4.5% vs 8.1%) and CAP (2.3% vs 5.5%) although differences were not significant (p = 0.017 and p = 0.008, respectively). This study analysing reported adverse events from clinical trials showed an adverse events profile of cefditoren similar to those of standard antibiotics used in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  10. Seasonal incidence of medically attended respiratory syncytial virus infection in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L McClure

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is not routinely performed in adults. We estimated medically attended RSV seasonal incidence in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old during four influenza seasons (2006-07 through 2009-10. METHODS: Patients seeking care for acute respiratory illness (ARI were prospectively enrolled and tested for RSV by multiplex RT-PCR. Results from enrolled patients were used to estimate projected cases among non-enrolled patients with ARI. The seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was the sum of actual and projected cases divided by the community cohort denominator. Since each enrollment period did not include the entire RSV season, incidence estimates were adjusted to account for the statewide proportion of RSV occurring outside the study enrollment period. RESULTS: There were 16,088 to 17,694 adults in the cohort each season and 164 RSV cases in all 4 seasons. The overall seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was 154 episodes (95% CI, 132-180 per 10,000 persons; the incidence was highest in 2007-08 (179 and lowest in 2006-07 (110. Among persons 50-59, 60-69, and ≥70 years old, RSV incidence was 124 (95% CI, 99-156, 147 (95% CI, 110-196, and 199 (95% CI, 153-258, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of medically attended RSV increased with age and was similar during four seasons.

  11. Differences in cardiopulmonary exercise test results by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage categories and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Plata, Victor M; Celli-Cruz, Romulo A; Vassaux, Carlos; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Mendes, Asante; Rassulo, John; Celli, Bartolome R

    2007-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS)-Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) has developed a new staging system based on the degree of airflow obstruction. Its validity to predict exercise capacity as an outcome has not been extensively studied. We hypothesized that exercise performance measured by cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) results should decline significantly with each disease stage, independent of gender. We examined 453 consecutive incremental CPET and pulmonary function tests performed in patients who had been referred to a single respiratory physiology laboratory in a tertiary care hospital. They were divided into a control group (normal lung function) and ATS/ERS-GOLD stages 1 to 4. We measured anthropometrics, peak work (in watts), peak oxygen uptake (in liters per kilogram per minute and percent predicted), breathing reserve (in percent predicted), and arterial blood gas response. We compared these results between different stages and genders. The mean (+/- SD) age for the entire group was 64 +/- 11 years, the mean FEV(1) was 66 +/- 28%, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.2 +/- 5.82 kg/m(2). Patients in stage 4 were significantly younger (p difference disappeared when adjusted by COPD stages. The ATS/ERS-GOLD staging system can be used to indicate differences in exercise capacity in patients with COPD stages 2 to 4 and to normalize apparent gender disparities. The value of differentiating stage 1 patients requires further studies with different outcomes.

  12. Community support and participation among persons with disabilities. A study in three European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Wilken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Community support and participation among persons with disabilities. A study in three European countriesThis article describes a European project which was aimed at improving the situation of persons with psychiatric or learning disabilities with regard to social participation and citizenship. The project took place in three countries (Estonia, Hungary and the Netherlands and four cities (Tallinn, Budapest, Amersfoort and Maastricht. The project included research and actions at the policy level, the organizational level and the practice level. At the policy level, the framework of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2006 and the European Disability Strategy (European Commission, 2010 were used to look at national and local policies, at the reality of the lives of those with disabilities and at the support that professional services offer with regard to participation and inclusion. The project generated a number of insights, recommendations and methods by which to improve the quality of service and increase the number of opportunities for community engagement. In this article, we present some of the lessons learned from the meta-analysis. Although the circumstances in each country are quite different with regard to policy, culture and service systems, it is remarkable that people with disabilities face many of the same problems.The study shows that in all three countries, access to services could be improved. Barriers include bureaucratic procedures and a lack of services. The research identified that in every country and city there are considerable barriers regarding equal participation in the field of housing, work and leisure activities. In addition to financial barriers, there are the barriers of stigma and self-stigmatization. Marginalization keeps people in an unequal position and hinders their recovery and participation. In all countries, professionals need to develop a stronger focus

  13. Role of vermicompost chemical composition, microbial functional diversity, and fungal community structure in their microbial respiratory response to three pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gómez, Manuel J; Nogales, Rogelio; Insam, Heribert; Romero, Esperanza; Goberna, Marta

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between vermicompost chemical features, enzyme activities, community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs), fungal community structures, and its microbial respiratory response to pesticides were investigated. Fungal community structure of vermicomposts produced from damaged tomato fruits (DT), winery wastes (WW), olive-mill waste and biosolids (OB), and cattle manure (CM) were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rDNA. MicroResp™ was used for assessing vermicompost CLPPs and testing the microbial response to metalaxyl, imidacloprid, and diuron. Vermicompost enzyme activities and CLPPs indicated that WW, OB, and DT had higher microbial functional diversity than CM. The microbiota of the former tolerated all three pesticides whereas microbial respiration in CM was negatively affected by metalaxyl and imidacloprid. The response of vermicompost microbiota to the fungicide metalaxyl was correlated to its fungal community structure. The results suggest that vermicomposts with higher microbial functional diversity can be useful for the management of pesticide pollution in agriculture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory viruses detected in Mexican children younger than 5 years old with community-acquired pneumonia: a national multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Chew, Rosa María; García-León, Miguel L; Noyola, Daniel E; Perez Gonzalez, Luis F; Gaitan Meza, Jesús; Vilaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martinez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Rivera-Nuñez, Victor Hugo; Newton-Sánchez, Oscar A; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; Del Río-Almendarez, Carlos N; González-Rodríguez, Alejandra Pamela; Ortiz-García, Enrique R; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana; Soria-Rodríguez, Carmen; Carrasco-Castillo, Adoniram; Sánchez-Medina, Eneida; López-Martínez, Irma; Hernández-Andrade, Teresa; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Santos-Preciado, José I

    2017-09-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of mortality in children worldwide, especially in developing countries. Pneumonia accounts for 16% of all deaths of children under 5 years of age and was the cause of death of 935000 children in 2015. Despite its frequency and severity, information regarding its etiology is limited. The aim of this study was to identify respiratory viruses associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children younger than 5 years old. One thousand four hundred and four children younger than 5 years of age with a clinical and/or radiological diagnosis of CAP in 11 hospitals in Mexico were included. Nasal washes were collected, placed in viral medium, and frozen at -70°C until processing. The first 832 samples were processed using the multiplex Bio-Plex/Luminex system and the remaining 572 samples using the Anyplex multiplex RT-PCR. Clinical data regarding diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms, radiographic pattern, and risk factors were obtained and recorded. Of the samples tested, 81.6% were positive for viruses. Respiratory syncytial virus (types A and B) was found in 23.7%, human enterovirus/rhinovirus in 16.6%, metapneumovirus in 5.7%, parainfluenza virus (types 1-4) in 5.5%, influenza virus (types A and B) in 3.6%, adenovirus in 2.2%, coronavirus (NL63, OC43, 229E, and HKU1) in 2.2%, and bocavirus in 0.4%. Co-infection with two or more viruses was present in 22.1%; 18.4% of the samples were negative. Using biomass for cooking, daycare attendance, absence of breastfeeding, and co-infections were found to be statistically significant risk factors for the presence of severe pneumonia. Respiratory syncytial virus (types A and B), human enterovirus/rhinovirus, and metapneumovirus were the respiratory viruses identified most frequently in children younger than 5 years old with CAP. Co-infection was present in an important proportion of the children. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  15. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu ZW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhiwei Lu,* Yusheng Cheng,* Xiongwen Tu, Liang Chen, Hu Chen, Jian Yang, Jinyan Wang, Liqin Zhang Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit.Patients and methods: A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis.Results: A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05. Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01.Conclusion: CAP may be

  16. Characterization of patients in the European Forsteo Observational Study (EFOS): postmenopausal women entering teriparatide treatment in a community setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajzbaum, Gerald; Jakob, Franz; Karras, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The European Forsteo Observational Study (EFOS) study was primarily designed to assess fracture incidence, degree of pain, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and compliance in women prescribed teriparatide in a community setting. This report describes the design of the study...

  17. Species-specific effects of Asian and European earthworms on microbial communities in Mid-Atlantic deciduous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earthworm species with different feeding, burrowing, and/or casting behaviors can lead to distinct microbial communities through complex direct and indirect processes. European earthworm invasion into temperate deciduous forests in North America has been shown to alter microbial biomass in the soil ...

  18. Development of social responsibility In moldovan enterprises as a strategic objective of integration in the european community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendrea Mariana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Socio-economic integration of the Republic of Moldova into the European Community may be held by the companies to achieve concrete measures in order to ensure the effective functioning of the international standards of quality management, social responsibility and environmental management ISO 9000 series, SA 800 and ISO 14000.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MOLDOVAN ENTERPRISES AS A STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE OF INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia BUCIUSCAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Socio-economic integration of the Republic of Moldova into the European Community may be held by the companies to achieve concrete measures in order to ensure the effective functioning of the international standards of quality management, social responsibility and environmental management ISO 9000 series, SA 800 and ISO 14000.

  20. British Efforts To Upgrade Business Foreign Language Skills: Preparing for Participation in the Single Market of the European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James Calvert

    The need for British businesses to be able to communicate with their customers in their own languages is discussed in this analysis of British preparation for doing business in the European Community (EC). The EC now accounts for half of all exports from the United Kingdom (UK). This paper summarizes five major types of resources available to…

  1. Report on a Survey of Sign Language Interpreter Training and Provision within the Member Nations of the European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Bencie

    1988-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of sign language interpreter training and provision in European Community countries. The questionnaire addressed such areas as: language forms used by deaf people and interpreters; training funding and priorities; interpreter evaluation, registration, availability, and salaries; and societal acceptance of sign language…

  2. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  3. Microbiology and prognostic factors of hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chaojie; Cheng, Zhenshun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jiong

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hospital-acquired pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia is high; however, many features of this disease remain imprecise. Our objective was to characterize the microbial etiology and their antibiotic resistance and to determine the prognostic factors in aspiration pneumonia among patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). A prospective survey was conducted in 112 patients exhibiting hospital-or community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in the RICU of a provincial general hospital from 2010-2012. Bronchoalveolar lavage sampling was collected, and then followed by standard culture and drug-sensitive test. Risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. One hundred twenty-eight strains were isolated in 94 patients, gram-negative bacilli (57.8%) was the predominant cultured microorganism, followed by fungus (28.9%) and gram-positive cocci (13.3%). The 5 main isolated bacteria demonstrated high and multiantibiotic resistance. The crude overall mortality was 43.8%, 50%, and 40%, respectively, in hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia group. Multivariate logistic analysis identified age older than 65 years, use of inotropic support, and ineffective initial therapy as independent risk factors of poor outcome. The predominant pathogenic bacteria of aspiration pneumonia in patients admitted to an RICU were antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and effective initial supportive management secured better prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Spirometry interpretation feasibility among pre-school children according to the European Respiratory Society and American Thoracic Society Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Roberto M; González, Scarlett A; Moya, Ana I; Fierro, Laura T; Brockmann, Pablo V; Caussade, Solange L

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most used test to evaluate pulmonary function. Guidelines that defined acceptability and repeatability criteria for its implementation and interpretation among preschoolers were published in 2007. Our objective was to quantify the actual compliance with these criteria among pre-school patients. A review was performed on the baseline spirometry measured in patients aged 2 to 5 years in the Pediatric Respiratory Laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, who were admitted due to recurrent or persistent coughing or wheezing. Only those results obtained in patients who took the test for the first time were considered. They were analyzed by international standards. A total of 93 spirometry results (mean age 57.4 ± 8.6 months, 48 males) were obtained, of which 44 (47%) met all acceptable criteria, 87 (93%) obtained expiratory time of ≥ 0.5seconds, and 67 (72%) of the patients had an end-expiratory flow of ≤10% from peak flow. The variation in the measurement of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was very low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.9). It was possible to meet the acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry among pre-school children in our Center, which was similar to previous reports. As in older children, this test is fully recommended for pre-school children who require lung function studies. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. The benefit of the European User Community from transnational access to national radiation facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrier, Elise; Manuel Braz Fernandes, Francisco; Bujan, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Transnational access (TNA) to national radiation sources is presently provided via programmes of the European Commission by BIOSTRUCT-X and CALIPSO with a major benefit for scientists from European countries. Entirely based on scientific merit, TNA allows all European scientists to realise synchr...

  6. Interconnectivity vs. isolation of prokaryotic communities in European deep-sea mud volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachiadaki, M. G.; Kormas, K. A.

    2013-05-01

    During the past two decades, European cold seep ecosystems have attracted the scientific interest and to date there are several studies which have investigated the community structure and biodiversity of individual sites. In order to gain a better insight into the biology, biodiversity, and biogeography of seep-associated microbial communities along Europe's continental margins, a comparative approach was applied in the present work. By exploiting the publicly available data on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, Gulf of Cádiz and the eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes/pockmarks (Anaximander area and Nile Fan), we investigated the prokaryotic biological components connecting these geographically isolated systems. The construction of interaction networks for both archaeal and bacterial shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) among the different sites, revealed the presence of persistent OTUs, which can be considered as "key-players". One archaeal OTU (HQ588641) belonging to the ANME-3 group and one δ-Proteobacteria (HQ588562) were found in all five investigated areas. Other Archaea OTUs shared between four sites or less, belonged to the ANME-2c, -2a, MBG-D, -B and Thaumarchaeota. All other shared Bacteria belonged to the δ- and γ-Proteobacteria, with the exception of one JS1 affiliate OTU. The distribution of the majority of the shared OTUs seems to be restricted in cold seeps, mud volcanoes and other marine methane-rich environments. Although the investigated sites were connected through a small number of OTUs, these microorganisms hold central ecophysiological roles in these sediments, namely methane- and sulfur-mediated mineralization.

  7. Interconnectivity vs. isolation of prokaryotic communities in European deep-sea mud volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Pachiadaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, European cold seep ecosystems have attracted the scientific interest and to date there are several studies which have investigated the community structure and biodiversity of individual sites. In order to gain a better insight into the biology, biodiversity, and biogeography of seep-associated microbial communities along Europe's continental margins, a comparative approach was applied in the present work. By exploiting the publicly available data on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, Gulf of Cádiz and the eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes/pockmarks (Anaximander area and Nile Fan, we investigated the prokaryotic biological components connecting these geographically isolated systems. The construction of interaction networks for both archaeal and bacterial shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs among the different sites, revealed the presence of persistent OTUs, which can be considered as "key-players". One archaeal OTU (HQ588641 belonging to the ANME-3 group and one δ-Proteobacteria (HQ588562 were found in all five investigated areas. Other Archaea OTUs shared between four sites or less, belonged to the ANME-2c, -2a, MBG-D, -B and Thaumarchaeota. All other shared Bacteria belonged to the δ- and γ-Proteobacteria, with the exception of one JS1 affiliate OTU. The distribution of the majority of the shared OTUs seems to be restricted in cold seeps, mud volcanoes and other marine methane-rich environments. Although the investigated sites were connected through a small number of OTUs, these microorganisms hold central ecophysiological roles in these sediments, namely methane- and sulfur-mediated mineralization.

  8. Particulate matter air pollution and respiratory symptoms in individuals having either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a European multicentre panel study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karakatsani Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate matter air pollution has been associated with adverse health effects. The fraction of ambient particles that are mainly responsible for the observed health effects is still a matter of controversy. Better characterization of the health relevant particle fraction will have major implications for air quality policy since it will determine which sources should be controlled. The RUPIOH study, an EU-funded multicentre study, was designed to examine the distribution of various ambient particle metrics in four European cities (Amsterdam, Athens, Birmingham, Helsinki and assess their health effects in participants with asthma or COPD, based on a detailed exposure assessment. In this paper the association of central site measurements with respiratory symptoms and restriction of activities is examined. Methods At each centre a panel of participants with either asthma or COPD recorded respiratory symptoms and restriction of activities in a diary for six months. Exposure assessment included simultaneous measurements of coarse, fine and ultrafine particles at a central site. Data on gaseous pollutants were also collected. The associations of the 24-hour average concentrations of air pollution indices with the health outcomes were assessed in a hierarchical modelling approach. A city specific analysis controlling for potential confounders was followed by a meta-analysis to provide overall effect estimates. Results A 10 μg/m3 increase in previous day coarse particles concentrations was positively associated with most symptoms (an increase of 0.6 to 0.7% in average and limitation in walking (OR= 1.076, 95% CI: 1.026-1.128. Same day, previous day and previous two days ozone concentrations were positively associated with cough (OR= 1.061, 95% CI: 1.013-1.111; OR= 1.049, 95% CI: 1.016-1.083 and OR= 1.059, 95% CI: 1.027-1.091, respectively. No consistent associations were observed between fine particle concentrations, nitrogen

  9. Effects of microplastics on European flat oysters, Ostrea edulis and their associated benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dannielle Senga

    2016-09-01

    Plastic pollution is recognised as an emerging threat to aquatic ecosystems, with microplastics now the most abundant type of marine debris. Health effects caused by microplastics have been demonstrated at the species level, but impacts on ecological communities remain unknown. In this study, impacts of microplastics on the health and biological functioning of European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and on the structure of associated macrofaunal assemblages were assessed in an outdoor mesocosm experiment using intact sediment cores. Biodegradable and conventional microplastics were added at low (0.8 μg L(-1)) and high (80 μg L(-1)) doses in the water column repeatedly for 60 days. Effects on the oysters were minimal, but benthic assemblage structures differed and species richness and the total number of organisms were ∼1.2 and 1.5 times greater in control mesocosms than in those exposed to high doses of microplastics. Notably, abundances of juvenile Littorina sp. (periwinkles) and Idotea balthica (an isopod) were ∼2 and 8 times greater in controls than in mesocosms with the high dose of either type of microplastic. In addition, the biomass of Scrobicularia plana (peppery furrow shell clam) was ∼1.5 times greater in controls than in mesocosms with the high dose of microplastics. This work indicates that repeated exposure to high concentrations of microplastics could alter assemblages in an important marine habitat by reducing the abundance of benthic fauna. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence based policy making in the European Union: the role of the scientific community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcen, Špela

    2017-03-01

    In the times when the acquis of the European Union (EU) has developed so far as to reach a high level of technical complexity, in particular in certain policy fields such as environmental legislation, it is important to look at what kind of information and data policy decisions are based on. This position paper looks at the extent to which evidence-based decision-making process is being considered in the EU institutions when it comes to adopting legislation in the field of environment at the EU level. The paper calls for closer collaboration between scientists and decision-makers in view of ensuring that correct data is understood and taken into consideration when drafting, amending, negotiating and adopting new legal texts at all levels of the EU decision-making process. It concludes that better awareness of the need for such collaboration among the decision-makers as well as the scientific community would benefit the process and quality of the final outcomes (legislation).

  11. Next generation capacity building for the GEOSS community - an European approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Group on Earth observation embarked on the next 10 year phase with an ambition to streamline and futher develop its achievements in building the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The NextGEOSS project evolves the European vision of GEOSS data exploitation for innovation and business, relying on the three main pillars of engaging communities, delivering technological developments and advocating the use of GEOSS, in order to support the creation and deployment of Earth observation based innovative research activities and commercial services. In this presentation we will present the new integrated approach to capacity building engaging the various actors involved in the entire value-chain from data providers to decision-makers. A presentation of the general approach together with concrete pilot cases will be included.In this work it will be shown how we integrate new technological development and societial change enabling GEO and GEOSS to adapt to the current environment. The result is important for better decision-making and better use of our limited resources to manage our planet.

  12. Identifying the Value of the ACT Score as a Predictor of Student Success in Respiratory Care, Radiography, and Nursing at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott-Robbins, Rebecca Jon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate--by utilizing data obtained from the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) PeopleSoft database-- whether the American College Testing (ACT) assessment was a predictor of student success for students who had graduated from respiratory, radiography, and nursing programs at Southeast…

  13. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections : A randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C.; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Hermanon; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Bruno, Pascale; Hering, Iris; Lemiengre, Marieke; Loens, Katherine; Malmvall, Bo Eric; Muras, Magdalena; Romano, Nuria Sanchez; Prat, Matteu Serra; Svab, Igor; Swain, Jackie; Tarsia, Paolo; Leus, Frank; Veen, Robert; Worby, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Methods: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for

  14. [From the Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression to a European network (EAAD)--extending community-based awareness-campaigns on national and European level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerl, Ulrich; Schäfer, Rita

    2007-09-01

    With the aim to improve the care of depressed patients and to reduce suicidality, the Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression was initiated 2001 in the framework of the German Research Network on Depression and Suicidality (funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research). The Alliance's concept is based on an intervention on four levels: Co-operation with GPs, an information- and awareness-campaign for the broad public, educational training for multipliers such as teachers, priests or geriatric care-givers as well as the support and initiative of self-help-activities. After two years of intervention the number of suicidal acts, the study's main outcome criteria, was significantly reduced by 24 percent compared to the baseline and to a representative control region. Since 2002 the successful four-level-intervention, its concepts and materials have been adapted by other regions within Germany. Nearly 40 community-based local campaigns are forming the German Alliance Against Depression (GAD) and many more regions are interested. On international level the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD) was established 2004. Funded by the European Commission the four-level-programme is implemented in 17 European countries.

  15. The Case-Law of the Court of Justice of the European Communities Concerning the Law of the World Trade Organization and the Autonomy of the European Community in the Implementation of Its Common Commercial Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Cepillo Galvín

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years some authors have questioned the autonomy of the European Community when implementing its commercial policy, due to the amount of trade agreements signed by it and especially because of the commitments acquired in the WTO. There is no doubt that the compulsory fulfilment of these commitments is a conditioning factor with regard to the implementation of the Common Commercial Policy, but that doesn’t make the autonomy of the EU disappear in order to put its model of commercial policy into practice. In this respect, it’s necessary to underline the ample discretionary margin in the management of the commercial policy that the Court of Justice of the European Communities recognizes in favour of the EU institutions within the framework of its case-law related to the denial of the direct effect of the WTO agreements, as we analyze in this paper.

  16. The microbiota of the respiratory tract: gatekeeper to respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wing Ho; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-05-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts as a gatekeeper that provides resistance to colonization by respiratory pathogens. The respiratory microbiota might also be involved in the maturation and maintenance of homeostasis of respiratory physiology and immunity. The ecological and environmental factors that direct the development of microbial communities in the respiratory tract and how these communities affect respiratory health are the focus of current research. Concurrently, the functions of the microbiome of the upper and lower respiratory tract in the physiology of the human host are being studied in detail. In this Review, we will discuss the epidemiological, biological and functional evidence that support the physiological role of the respiratory microbiota in the maintenance of human health.

  17. Linking microbiota and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Matthias; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2016-11-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates the relevance of microbiota for pulmonary health and disease. Independent investigations recently demonstrated that the lung harbors a resident microbiota. Therefore, it is intriguing that a lung microbiota can shape pulmonary immunity and epithelial barrier functions. Here, we discuss the ways how the composition of the microbial community in the lung may influence pulmonary health and vice versa, factors that determine community composition. Prominent microbiota at other body sites such as the intestinal one may also contribute to pulmonary health and disease. However, it is difficult to discriminate between influences of lung vs. gut microbiota due to systemic mutuality between both communities. With focuses on asthma and respiratory infections, we discuss how microbiota of lung and gut can determine pulmonary immunity and barrier functions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Energy 2000. A reference projection and alternative outlooks for the European Community and the world to the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmot, J.-F.; McGlue, D.; Valette, P.; Waeterloos, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book represents the first output from the energy systems analysis and modelling research programme funded by the Commission of the European Communities. It provides detailed and consistent energy projections on a country basis and at the level of the EC as a whole using the same methodological approach and harmonized energy data. Results are presented for each country in terms of primary energy source and energy demand by sector.

  19. A RESEARCH OF E-BOOK MARKET TRENDS: NORTH AMERICA AND THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Zubac

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPurpose: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of research on the presence of the electronic book on the book market, its trends and developments as well as point towards the difficulties faced by all professions related to it in the countries of the European Community.Methodology / approach: This paper analyzes the domestic and foreign literature and explores the websites of companies that operate with e-books in order to get an overview of the actual state of business operations in the states mentioned in the text.Results: The emergence of the first online bookstores in the United States in the 20th century paved the way for the electronic book to enter the online market. Today, the e-book is an integral part of publishing, book trade and library activities worldwide. Economic indicators testify to a constant growth of revenues from the sale of electronic books on the book market and technology in the U.S. and Europe. This paper provides an explanation of the term electronic book and indicates the interest of many countries for its acquisition and application in order to keep up with the technological demands of the market.Research restrictions: E-book trends and business operations related to them are constantly changing. In terms of librarianship, this is most visible in public libraries as both one of the customers and as later distributors of e-books to users. In their business, new models constantly emerge together with their combinations and approaches to offering these new media.The originality: The issue of business operations in relation to the e-book is interesting to young people, libraries, publishers, authors, booksellers, etc.Contribution: This paper provides an overview of the most recent situation on the e-book market and can serve as the basis of some future researches.

  20. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the food and drink industries of the European community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passant, Neil R.; Richardson, Stephen J.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Gibson, N.; Woodfield, M. J.; van der Lugt, Jan Pieter; Wolsink, Johan H.; Hesselink, Paul G. M.

    Estimates were made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the atmosphere as a result of the industrial manufacture and processing of food and drink in the European Community. The estimates were based on a review of literature sources, industrial and government contacts and recent measurements. Data were found on seven food manufacturing sectors (baking, vegetable oil extraction, solid fat processing, animal rendering, fish meal processing, coffee production and sugar beet processing) and three drink manufacturing sectors (brewing, spirit production and wine making). The principle of a data quality label is advocated to illustrate the authors' confidence in the data, and to highlight areas for further research. Emissions of ethanol from bread baking and spirit maturation were found to be the principle sources. However, significant losses of hexane and large quantities of an ill-defined mixture of partially oxidized hydrocarbons were noted principally from seed oil extraction and the drying of plant material, respectively. This latter mixture included low molecular weight aldehydes, carboxylic acids, ketones, amines and esters. However, the precise composition of many emissions were found to be poorly understood. The total emission from the food and drink industry in the EC was calculated as 260 kt yr -1. However, many processes within the target industry were found to be completely uncharacterized and therefore not included in the overall estimate (e.g. soft drink manufacture, production of animal food, flavourings, vinegar, tea, crisps and other fried snacks). Moreover, the use of data quality labels illustrated the fact that many of our estimates were based on limited data. Hence, further emissions monitoring is recommended from identified sources (e.g. processing of sugar beet, solid fat and fish meal) and from uncharacterized sources.

  1. Analysis of risk factors for acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) of Toddlers in Ingin Jaya community health centre of Aceh Besar district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safitri, Faradilla; Hayati, Risna; Marniati

    2017-09-01

    Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) is a disease in developing countries 25% that caused the death of children under five. In Aceh province disease is always on the list of 10 biggest disease each year which amounted to 47.258 cases. In Ingin Jaya Community Health Centre cases of acute respiratory tract infections in infants in 2014 were 112 cases, while in 2015 an increase of as many as 123 cases. Objective: To analyze the risk factors of acute respiratory diseases in health centers of Toddlers Ingin Jaya, Aceh Besar district. Analytical research the design of case control, case-control comparison of 1: 1 ie the sample of 60 cases and 60 control, retrieval of data taken from the register space IMCI Health Center. The study was conducted in 2016. Results: Factor toddler age (OR=11.811), gender (OR=3.512), birth weight (OR=8.805), immunization status (OR=4.846), exclusive breastfeeding (OR=2.529). Conclusions and Recommendations: Toddlers aged>2 years has the opportunity 11.811 times of acute respiratory tract infections. Male Toddler has a chance 3.512 times of acute respiratory tract infections. Toddlers are born with a normal weight does not have a chance of 8.805 times of acute respiratory tract infections. Toddlers who do not get complete immunization has the opportunity 4.846 times of acute respiratory tract infections. Toddlers who did not receive exclusive breastfeeding has 2,529 times greater chance of respiratory tract infections. Health workers and the Aceh Provincial Health Office can provide information through health education each month for each work area of health centers, or create a billboard on the causes of the ispa in infants.

  2. Successful application of a simple specimen transport method for the conduct of respiratory virus surveillance in remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Torzillo, Paul J; Rockett, Rebecca J; Whiley, David M; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P; Lambert, Stephen B

    2011-06-01

    Surveillance programs and research for acute respiratory infections in remote Aboriginal communities are complicated by difficulties in the storage and transport of frozen samples to urban laboratories for testing. This study assessed the sensitivity of a simple method for transporting respiratory samples from a remote setting for viral PCR compared with frozen specimens. We sampled every individual who presented to a remote Aboriginal community clinic in a non-epidemic respiratory season. Two anterior nasal swabs were collected from each participant. The left nare specimen was mailed to the laboratory via routine postal services. The right nare specimen was transported frozen. Testing for 16 viruses was undertaken using real-time multiplex PCR. A total of 140 participants were enrolled who contributed 150 study visits. Respiratory illnesses accounted for 10% of the reasons for presentation. Sixty-one viruses were identified in 50 (33.3%) presentations for 40 (28.6%) individuals; bocavirus and rhinovirus were the most common viruses identified (14.0% and 12.6% of episodes respectively). The sensitivity for any virus detected in mailed specimens was 67.2% (95%CI 55.4, 78.9) compared to 65.6% (95%CI 53.7, 77.5) for frozen specimens. The mailing of unfrozen nasal specimens from remote communities does not compromise the viability of the specimen for viral studies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Wspolnoty Europejskie wobec problemow jezykowych (Addressing Language Problems in the European Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Raises questions about the a European Union commissioned report titled "Les Europeens et les langues," which was prepared in accordance with the customary routine used for a series of report on European public opinion. Issues discussed include the omission of several languages, the use of Esperanto, the languages reportedly used by…

  4. Distinct respiratory responses of soils to complex organic substrate are governed predominantly by soil architecture and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, F C; Todman, L C; Corstanje, R; Deeks, L K; Harris, J A; Pawlett, M; Whitmore, A P; Ritz, K

    2016-12-01

    Factors governing the turnover of organic matter (OM) added to soils, including substrate quality, climate, environment and biology, are well known, but their relative importance has been difficult to ascertain due to the interconnected nature of the soil system. This has made their inclusion in mechanistic models of OM turnover or nutrient cycling difficult despite the potential power of these models to unravel complex interactions. Using high temporal-resolution respirometery (6 min measurement intervals), we monitored the respiratory response of 67 soils sampled from across England and Wales over a 5 day period following the addition of a complex organic substrate (green barley powder). Four respiratory response archetypes were observed, characterised by different rates of respiration as well as different time-dependent patterns. We also found that it was possible to predict, with 95% accuracy, which type of respiratory behaviour a soil would exhibit based on certain physical and chemical soil properties combined with the size and phenotypic structure of the microbial community. Bulk density, microbial biomass carbon, water holding capacity and microbial community phenotype were identified as the four most important factors in predicting the soils' respiratory responses using a Bayesian belief network. These results show that the size and constitution of the microbial community are as important as physico-chemical properties of a soil in governing the respiratory response to OM addition. Such a combination suggests that the 'architecture' of the soil, i.e. the integration of the spatial organisation of the environment and the interactions between the communities living and functioning within the pore networks, is fundamentally important in regulating such processes.

  5. The benefit of the European User Community from transnational access to national radiation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, Elise; Braz Fernandes, Francisco Manuel; Bujan, Maya; Feiters, Martin C; Froideval, Annick; Ghijsen, Jacques; Hase, Thomas; Hough, Michael A; Jergel, Matej; Jimenez, Ignacio; Kajander, Tommi; Kikas, Arvo; Kokkinidis, Michael; Kover, Laszlo; Larsen, Helge B; Lawson, David Mark; Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Mariani, Carlo; Mikulik, Petr; Monnier, Judith; Morera, Solange; McGuinness, Cormac; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Meedom Nielson, Martin; Pietsch, Ullrich; Tromp, Moniek; Simon, Marc; Stangl, Julian; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Transnational access (TNA) to national radiation sources is presently provided via programmes of the European Commission by BIOSTRUCT-X and CALIPSO with a major benefit for scientists from European countries. Entirely based on scientific merit, TNA allows all European scientists to realise synchrotron radiation experiments for addressing the Societal Challenges promoted in HORIZON2020. In addition, by TNA all European users directly take part in the development of the research infrastructure of facilities. The mutual interconnection of users and facilities is a strong prerequisite for future development of the research infrastructure of photon science. Taking into account the present programme structure of HORIZON2020, the European Synchrotron User Organization (ESUO) sees considerable dangers for the continuation of this successful collaboration in the future.

  6. Respiratory gated PET/CT in a European multicentre retrospective study: added diagnostic value in detection and characterization of lung lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); De Ponti, Elena [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); Landoni, Claudio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Gilardi, Maria Carla [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Scientific Institute Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Military Institute of Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Koza, Magdalena [Masovian PET-CT Centre, Euromedic Diagnostic, Warsaw (Poland); Ahond-Vionnet, Renee; Collin, Bertrand [Hopital Pierre Beregovoy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Nevers (France); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the added diagnostic value of respiratory gated (4-D) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in lung lesion detection/characterization in a large patient population of a multicentre retrospective study. The data of 155 patients (89 men, 66 women, mean age 63.9 {+-} 11.1 years) from 5 European centres and submitted to standard (3-D) and 4-D PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. Overall, 206 lung lesions were considered for the analysis (mean {+-} SD lesions dimension 14.7 {+-} 11.8 mm). Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) and lesion detectability were assessed for both 3-D and 4-D PET/CT studies; 3-D and 4-D PET/CT findings were compared to clinical follow-up as standard reference. Mean {+-} SD 3-D and 4-D SUV{sub max} values were 5.2 {+-} 5.1 and 6.8 {+-} 6.1 (p < 0.0001), respectively, with an average percentage increase of 30.8 %. In 3-D PET/CT, 86 of 206 (41.7 %) lesions were considered positive, 70 of 206 (34 %) negative and 50 of 206 (24.3 %) equivocal, while in 4-D PET/CT 117 of 206 (56.8 %) lesions were defined as positive, 80 of 206 (38.8 %) negative and 9 of 206 (4.4 %) equivocal. In 34 of 50 (68 %) 3-D equivocal lesions follow-up data were available and the presence of malignancy was confirmed in 21 of 34 (61.8 %) lesions, while in 13 of 34 (38.2 %) was excluded. In 31 of these 34 controlled lesions, 20 of 34 (58.8 %) and 11 of 34 (32.4 %) were correctly classified by 4-D PET/CT as positive and negative, respectively; 3 of 34 (8.8 %) remained equivocal. With equivocal lesions classified as positive, the overall accuracy of 3-D and 4-D was 85.7 and 92.8 %, respectively, while the same figures were 80.5 and 94.2 % when equivocal lesions were classified as negative. The respiratory gated PET/CT technique is a valuable clinical tool in diagnosing lung lesions, improving quantification and confidence in reporting, reducing 3-D undetermined findings and increasing the overall accuracy in lung

  7. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  8. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50......) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin......-binding-proteins were also investigated. ITT and PP analyses were conducted. RESULTS: ARS and ANS proportions increased 11- and 2.5-fold, respectively, within 48 h post-amoxicillin treatment compared with placebo [ARS mean increase (MI) 9.46, 95% CI 5.57-13.35; ANS MI 39.87, 95% CI 30.96-48.78; P 

  9. Prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification in stage IB lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C-h; Wang, W; Wei, Y; Hu, H-d; Zou, J; Yan, J; Yu, L-k; Yang, R-s; Wang, Y

    2015-10-01

    Patients with pathological stage IB lung adenocarcinoma have a variable prognosis, even if received the same treatment. This study investigated the prognostic value of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) lung adenocarcinoma classification in resected stage IB lung adenocarcinoma. We identified 276 patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma who had undergone surgical resection at the Nanjing Chest Hospital between 2005 and 2010. The histological subtypes of all patients were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS international multidisciplinary lung adenocarcinoma classification. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to analyze the correlation between the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification and patients' prognosis. Two hundred and seventy-six patients with pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma had an 86.2% 5-year overall survival (OS) and 80.4% 5-year disease-free survival (DFS). Patients with micropapillary and solid predominant tumors had a significantly worse OS and DFS as compared to those with other subtypes predominant tumors (p = 0.003 and 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the new classification was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and DFS of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma (p = 0.009 and 0.003). Our study revealed that the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification was an independent prognostic factor of pathological stage IB adenocarcinoma. This new classification is valuable of screening out high risk patients to receive postoperative adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A Model of the Costs of Community and Nosocomial Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Canadian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately one in 10 hospitalized patients will acquire a nosocomial infection (NI after admission to hospital, of which 71% are due to respiratory viruses, including the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. NIs are concerning and lead to prolonged hospitalizations. The economics of NIs are typically described in generalized terms and specific cost data are lacking.

  11. Disease severity and viral load are correlated in infants with primary respiratory syncytial virus infection in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M. L.; Coenjaerts, F. E. J.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Belderbos, M. E.; Hofland, R. W.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Bont, L.

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, with remarkable variability in disease severity. Factors determining severity of disease in previously healthy infants are still unclear. It was hypothesized that disease severity is correlated with viral

  12. Respiratory viruses detected in Mexican children younger than 5 years old with community-acquired pneumonia: a national multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Wong-Chew

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Respiratory syncytial virus (types A and B, human enterovirus/rhinovirus, and metapneumovirus were the respiratory viruses identified most frequently in children younger than 5 years old with CAP. Co-infection was present in an important proportion of the children.

  13. Respiratory symptoms and lung function 8-10 months after community exposure to chlorine gas: a public health intervention and cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kathleen A; Chanda, Debjani; Balte, Pallavi; Karmaus, Wilfried J; Cai, Bo; Vena, John; Lawson, Andrew B; Mohr, Lawrence C; Gibson, James J; Svendsen, Erik R

    2013-10-09

    We implemented a community based interventional health screening for individuals located within one mile of a 54 metric tons release of liquid chlorine following a 16 tanker car train derailment on 6 January, 2005 in Graniteville, South Carolina, USA. Public health intervention occurred 8-10 months after the event, and provided pulmonary function and mental health assessment by primary care providers. Its purpose was to evaluate those exposed to chlorine for evidence of ongoing impairment for medical referral and treatment. We report comparative analysis between self-report of respiratory symptoms via questionnaire and quantitative spirometry results. Health assessments were obtained through respiratory symptom and exposure questionnaires, simple spirometry, and physical exam. Simple spirometry was used as the standard to identify continued breathing problems. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were applied to evaluate the validity of the respiratory questionnaire. We also identified the direction of discrepancy between self-reported respiratory symptoms and spirometry measures. Generalized estimation equations determined prevalence ratios for abnormal spirometry based on the presence of participant persistent respiratory symptoms. Covariate adjustment was made for participant age, sex, race, smoking and educational status. Two hundred fifty-nine people participated in the Graniteville health screening; 53 children (mean age = 11 years, range: chlorine exposure, the Graniteville health screening participants under-reported respiratory symptoms when compared to abnormal spirometry results. Sensitivity and specificity were low, and we determined that relying upon the self-report questionnaire was not adequate to objectively assess the lung health of our population following irritant gas exposure.

  14. Respiratory symptoms and lung function 8–10 months after community exposure to chlorine gas: a public health intervention and cross-sectional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We implemented a community based interventional health screening for individuals located within one mile of a 54 metric tons release of liquid chlorine following a 16 tanker car train derailment on 6 January, 2005 in Graniteville, South Carolina, USA. Public health intervention occurred 8–10 months after the event, and provided pulmonary function and mental health assessment by primary care providers. Its purpose was to evaluate those exposed to chlorine for evidence of ongoing impairment for medical referral and treatment. We report comparative analysis between self-report of respiratory symptoms via questionnaire and quantitative spirometry results. Methods Health assessments were obtained through respiratory symptom and exposure questionnaires, simple spirometry, and physical exam. Simple spirometry was used as the standard to identify continued breathing problems. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were applied to evaluate the validity of the respiratory questionnaire. We also identified the direction of discrepancy between self-reported respiratory symptoms and spirometry measures. Generalized estimation equations determined prevalence ratios for abnormal spirometry based on the presence of participant persistent respiratory symptoms. Covariate adjustment was made for participant age, sex, race, smoking and educational status. Results Two hundred fifty-nine people participated in the Graniteville health screening; 53 children (mean age = 11 years, range: chlorine exposure, the Graniteville health screening participants under-reported respiratory symptoms when compared to abnormal spirometry results. Sensitivity and specificity were low, and we determined that relying upon the self-report questionnaire was not adequate to objectively assess the lung health of our population following irritant gas exposure. PMID:24107111

  15. Relationship between the use of inhaled steroids for chronic respiratory diseases and early outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Almirall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. METHODS: Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality. RESULTS: Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%. In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002 in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787. This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542, with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194, but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027. Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis.

  16. Prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV and respiratory symptoms in two Zambian communities: implications for tuberculosis control in the era of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ayles

    Full Text Available The Stop TB Partnership target for tuberculosis is to have reduced the prevalence of tuberculosis by 50% comparing 2015 to 1990. This target is challenging as few prevalence surveys have been conducted, especially in high burden tuberculosis and HIV countries. Current tuberculosis control strategies in high HIV prevalent settings are therefore based on limited epidemiological evidence and more evidence is needed from community-based surveys to inform improved policy formulation.8044 adults were sampled from 2 sub-districts (wards in Lusaka province, Zambia. Questionnaires were used to screen for symptoms, respiratory samples were obtained for culture and oral secretions collected for HIV testing. 79 individuals were found to have Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum, giving an adjusted overall prevalence of tuberculosis of 870/100,000 (95% CI 570-1160/100,000. The adjusted overall prevalence of HIV was 28.61% (95% CI 26.04-31.19. HIV- infection was significantly associated with prevalent tuberculosis (Adj OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.42-3.74 and the population attributable fraction of HIV for prevalent tuberculosis was 36%. Symptoms such as prolonged cough (adj OR 12.72, 95% CI 7.05-22.94 and fever (Adj OR 2.04, 95%CI 1.23-3.39, were associated with prevalent tuberculosis, but 8 (10% individuals with prevalent tuberculosis denied having any symptoms at all and only 34 (43% would have been classified as a TB suspect by current guidelines.Undiagnosed tuberculosis is a challenge for tuberculosis control and new approaches are needed if we are to reach international targets. Epidemiological studies can inform screening algorithms for both detection and prevention of active tuberculosis.

  17. Risk factors for persistence of lower respiratory symptoms among community members exposed to the 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Hannah T; Friedman, Stephen M; Reibman, Joan; Goldring, Roberta M; Miller Archie, Sara A; Ortega, Felix; Alper, Howard; Shao, Yongzhao; Maslow, Carey B; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Berger, Kenneth I

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We studied the course of lower respiratory symptoms (LRS; cough, wheeze or dyspnoea) among community members exposed to the 9/11/2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks during a period of 12–13 years following the attacks, and evaluated risk factors for LRS persistence, including peripheral airway dysfunction and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Non-smoking adult participants in a case-control study of post-9/11-onset LRS (exam 1, 2008–2010) were recruited for follow-up (exam 2, 2013–2014). Peripheral airway function was assessed with impulse oscillometry measures of R5 and R5-20. Probable PTSD was a PTSD checklist score ≥44 on a 2006–2007 questionnaire. Results Of 785 exam 1 participants, 545 (69%) completed exam 2. Most (321, 59%) were asymptomatic at all assessments. Among 192 participants with initial LRS, symptoms resolved for 110 (57%) by exam 2, 55 (29%) had persistent LRS and 27 (14%) had other patterns. The proportion with normal spirometry increased from 65% at exam 1 to 85% at exam 2 in the persistent LRS group (p<0.01) and was stable among asymptomatic participants and those with resolved LRS. By exam 2, spirometry results did not differ across symptom groups; however, R5 and R5-20 abnormalities were more common among participants with persistent LRS (56% and 46%, respectively) than among participants with resolved LRS (30%, p<0.01; 27%, p=0.03) or asymptomatic participants (20%, p<0.001; 8.2%, p<0.001). PTSD, R5 at exam 1, and R5-20 at exam 1 were each independently associated with persistent LRS. Conclusions Peripheral airway dysfunction and PTSD may contribute to LRS persistence. Assessment of peripheral airway function detected pulmonary damage not evident on spirometry. Mental and physical healthcare for survivors of complex environmental disasters should be coordinated carefully. PMID:28341697

  18. Regulation of medicinal plants for public health--European community monographs on herbal substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, Werner; Chinou, Ioanna

    2012-08-01

    The European legislation on medicinal products also addresses the medicinal use of products originating from plants. The objective of the legislation is to ensure the future existence of such products and to consider particular characteristics when assessing quality, efficacy, and safety. Two categories are defined: i) herbal medicinal products can be granted a marketing authorisation; and ii) traditional herbal medicinal products can be granted a registration based on their longstanding use if they are complying with a set of provisions ensuring their safe use. The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) was established at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to provide monographs and list entries on herbal substances and preparations thereof. Meanwhile, approx. 100 monographs have been published, which define a current scientific and regulatory standard for efficacy and safety of herbal substances and herbal preparations used in medicinal products. This harmonised European standard will facilitate the availability and adequate use of traditional herbal medicinal products and herbal medicinal products within the European Union. Consequent labelling shall also enable patients and health care professionals to differentiate medicinal products from other product categories like cosmetics, food supplements, and medical devices. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The concept of economic and social cohesion in the treaty establishing the European Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, E.J.Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This article is a diplomatic history of the development of the concept of Economic and Social Cohesion in the EC Treaty. The article was written in order to check on the span of commitment which the Member States undertook when inserting this concept in the EC Treaty by way of the Single European

  20. Laboratories of Community : How Digital Humanities Can Further New European Integration History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, Maarten; Coll Ardanuy, Mariona; Sporleder, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    It has been said that media is an important but mostly overlooked player in European integration history. Now, the mass digitisation of newspapers and the introduction of new digital techniques promise great potential to remedy this inattention. With the conjecture that people are drivers and

  1. DIVERSITY AND INTEGRATION OF EUROPEAN COMMUNITY BUSINESS LAW IN THE CONTEXT OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Filip GRZEGORCZYK

    2009-01-01

    In the future, European Union is to become a single economic zone. Achieving this goal requires creating good and unified legal grounds for business, which presently are lacking. This paper describes the main problems with conducting business across-borders, evaluates current EC business legislation and formulates some de lege ferenda ideas.

  2. Community support and participation among persons with diabilities. A study in three European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. dr. Jean Pierre Wilken; Frans Leenders; Marju Medar; Zsolt Bugarszki

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a European project which was aimed at improving the situation of persons with psychiatric or learning disabilities with regard to social participation and citizenship. The project took place in three countries (Estonia, Hungary and the Netherlands) and four cities (Tallinn,

  3. The Modern University as an Imagined Community: European Dreams and Belarusian Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark S.; Tereshkovich, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores various aspects of modern Belarusian national identity through an analysis of two connected case studies, the development of the flagship national university, Belarusian State University (BSU) in Minsk and of the European Humanities University (EHU), a private institution founded in Minsk in 1992 with international funding.…

  4. Intentional communities : Methods for reviewing the rise of citizens’ housing initiatives in a European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, L.

    2011-01-01

    Intentional communities, Cooperatives de logement, Genossenschaften or Co-housing are types of collaborative housing in which residents actively participate in the design and operation of their own neighbourhoods. Cohousing residents are consciously committed to living as a community, and to

  5. Excess respiratory diseases in children and elderly people in a community of Santiago with high particulate air pollution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prieto C, María José; Mancilla F, Pedro; Astudillo O, Pedro; Reyes P, Alvaro; Román A, Oscar

    2007-01-01

    ...), has been exceeded more days than in the rest of the city stations. To investigate if the population living near that station has a higher proportion of lower respiratory infections than the Metropolitan Region (MR) as a whole...

  6. [Geographical pattern of plant affinity to different communities and its causes (by the example of North-European forests)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucherov, I B

    2003-01-01

    The same vascular plant species occur in communities of different types in different parts of their ranges. This phenomenon can be traced in both the latitudinal and the longitudinal directions. Changes in plant affinity to communities of different types are viewed by the example of the North-European forest studied in 1993-2001. Species occurring near their range limits, prefer habitats with smoothed amplitudes of minimum factors ("the law of preference for non-varying environments"). That's why Oxalis acetosella and other boreal-nemoral species demonstrate affinity to riparian forests of the middle-boreal subzone. Another cases of latitudinal change in ecological behavior may be caused by decrease in competitive ability (in Milium effusum), respective changes in the regeneration niche (in Cystopteris fragilis), or behavior of birds dispersing seeds (in Lonicera xylosteum). The longitudinal variation in plant behavior, as viewed by the example of the European-Siberian riparian-subalpine tall-herb synusia, is connected with the post-glacial plant migration in the European North. There is a lot of evidence for the individualistic character of the process, but it looks coherent in the historical retrospective. The possible role of refugia and long-distance dispersal in the process of formation of the present-day ranges of species is briefly reviewed. Conditions for plant dispersal in the past seemingly differ from those nowadays observed. The principal factor, which governs the dispersal rate, is that of interspecific competition level. Plant dispersal could be rather fast in the course of the corresponding primary succession following the glacier retreat or the marine retrogression (the "impulse" hypothesis). Since the climax pattern is established running waters and disturbed lands serve as "migration channels" for plants.

  7. The future of European mining: What should our mining industry learn from the Skouries and Rosia Montana community gold conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Liam; Heller, Shaun; Faltyn, Rowan; Stefanaki, Anna; Economidou, Romina; Savin, Irina; Hood, Leo; Conway, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The popular image of mining portrayed by media and by a majority of public opinion is a dominantly negative one. From worker's rights to environmental damages, disasters such as the Copiapó mine collapse (Chile), the acid mine drainage at Lousal (Portugal) and the Pb contamination of waters around the Tyndrum mines (Scotland) overshadow initiatives like the ICMM. Some companies receive little praise despite creating active community education and investment projects, while others simply build higher barbed wire fences and attempt to weather the protests, budgeting them into mine life assessments. This image problem, combined with the decentralised political segregation of Europe and the increased power of grass-roots protest initiatives (such as Antigold in Greece), has resulted in mining companies joining a long list of industries effected by the 'auto-protest' reaction in face of development, regardless of potential regional and national benefits, there is a pre-existing lack of trust in corporate and government powers to protect community interests. The poor management of existing licences is thus becoming a significant danger to future operations and the wider industry. Here we report on the Rosia Montana dispute (Romania) and the ongoing Skouries conflict (Greece). We then discuss how the European mining industry may need to significantly adapt its exploration and community engagement strategies to avoid future conflicts and, present a recent example of how effective suitably organised community engagement projects can be for local mining initiatives from Southern Portugal.

  8. Impact of a Pharmacist-Driven Respiratory Viral Panel Stewardship Program on Antibiotic Exposure Within a Multicenter Community Health System

    OpenAIRE

    Cubillos, Ashley; Estrada, Sandy; Bachmeier, Harrison; Turner, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Strategies to ensure optimal use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) testing results for antimicrobial stewardship in acute respiratory infections remain to be elucidated. This study sought to assess the impact of pharmacist intervention (by means of prospective feedback to prescribers) on overall antibiotic exposure in patients with viral-positive mPCR Respiratory Viral Panel (RVP) laboratory test results. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patient...

  9. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413982653; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  10. Regulations governing veterinary medicinal products containing genetically modified organisms in the European community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, G

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes particular aspects of the marketing of veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) that contain or consist of genetically modified micro-organisms (GMMs) or genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The regulatory requirements and the procedures applied in the European Union for each phase (pre-marketing, authorisation process, and post-authorisation labelling and monitoring) are explained. In most cases VMPs are subject to both pharmaceutical and GMO regulations. In the early stages of the process, before applications for marketing authorisation are submitted, the assessment of clinical trials and experiments in contained areas is principally the responsibility of national authorities. However, the marketing of all VMPs containing or consisting of GMOs must be authorised at European level, although the national authorities are informed and involved in the assessment process.

  11. Building dampness and mold in European homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey ECRHS II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, D; Zock, J-P; Plana, E; Heinrich, J; Tischer, C; Jacobsen Bertelsen, R; Sunyer, J; Künzli, N; Villani, S; Olivieri, M; Verlato, G; Soon, A; Schlünssen, V; Gunnbjörnsdottir, M I; Jarvis, D

    2017-09-01

    We studied dampness and mold in homes in relation to climate, building characteristics and socio-economic status (SES) across Europe, for 7127 homes in 22 centers. A subsample of 3118 homes was inspected. Multilevel analysis was applied, including age, gender, center, SES, climate, and building factors. Self-reported water damage (10%), damp spots (21%), and mold (16%) in past year were similar as observed data (19% dampness and 14% mold). Ambient temperature was associated with self-reported water damage (OR=1.63 per 10°C; 95% CI 1.02-2.63), damp spots (OR=2.95; 95% CI 1.98-4.39), and mold (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.04-4.67). Precipitation was associated with water damage (OR=1.12 per 100 mm; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) and damp spots (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.20). Ambient relative air humidity was not associated with indoor dampness and mold. Older buildings had more dampness and mold (Pbuilding age can be risk factors for dampness and mold in homes in Europe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [European community guidelines and standards in indoor air quality: what proposals for Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settimo, Gaetano; D'Alessandro, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Indoor air quality is an issue on which to focus because of the increasing number of exposed population and in view of the strong public feeling on this issue. This paper reports the rules of EU and several European countries about indoor air quality, focusing on the initiatives performed in Italy to respond to WHO recommendations. Several EU countries have introduced in their legislation rules relating to indoor air quality. At the moment, in Italy, a reference rule has not been issued. For this reason, up to date main informations concerning some guidelines or reference values in indoor air, to be used for a first comparison, are those obtained by the scientific literature, or by the guidelines issued by other European countries or, for analogy, by other standard values such as limit or reference values regarding outdoor air. Even the EU, while reaffirming the priority of energy efficiency measures, recommends healthier indoor environments and the development of a specific European strategy on the issue of indoor air quality. The National Study Group on indoor pollution of the Italian National Health Institute (ISS), is working for the development of shared technical and scientific documents, in order to provide greater uniformity of actions at national level, waiting for a legal framework for indoor air quality, in the light of the indication already produced by the WHO.

  13. Effects of Airborne Particulate Matter on Respiratory Health in a Community near a Cement Factory in Chilanga, Zambia: Results from a Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkhama, Emmy; Ndhlovu, Micky; Dvonch, J Timothy; Lynam, Mary; Mentz, Graciela; Siziya, Seter; Voyi, Kuku

    2017-11-06

    We conducted a panel study to investigate seasonal variations in concentrations of airborne PM2.5 and PM10 and the effects on respiratory health in a community near a cement factory; in Chilanga; Zambia. A panel of 63 and 55 participants aged 21 to 59 years from a community located at the edge of the factory within 1 km and a control community located 18 km from the factory respectively; were followed up for three climatic seasons July 2015 to February 2016. Symptom diary questionnaires were completed and lung function measurements taken daily for 14 days in each of the three climatic seasons. Simultaneously, PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in ambient air were monitored at a fixed site for each community. Mean seasonal concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 ranged from 2.39-24.93 μg/m(3) and 7.03-68.28 μg/m³ respectively in the exposed compared to the control community 1.69-6.03 μg/m³ and 2.26-8.86 μg/m³. The incident rates of reported respiratory symptoms were higher in the exposed compared to the control community: 46.3 vs. 13.8 for cough; 41.2 vs. 9.6 for phlegm; 49.0 vs.12.5 for nose; and 13.9 vs. 3.9 for wheeze per 100 person-days. There was a lower performance on all lung indices in the exposed community compared to the control; overall the mean FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) and FVC (forced vital capacity) predicted percentage for the exposed was six and four percentage points lower than the control. Restriction of industrial emissions coupled with on-going monitoring and regulatory enforcement are needed to ensure that PM (airborne particulate matter) levels in the ambient air are kept within recommended levels to safeguard the respiratory health of nearby community residents.

  14. Frequency and time to onset of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in patients receiving esomeprazole: a retrospective analysis of patient-level data in placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estborn, L; Joelson, S

    2015-09-01

    Debate continues on whether a causal association exists between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the risk of respiratory tract infections, in particular pneumonia. To investigate the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, in patients receiving esomeprazole. A retrospective investigation of pooled data on adverse events related to respiratory tract infections, originally reported in 24 randomised, double-blind clinical studies, was conducted. The frequencies of respiratory tract infections and their relative risks were calculated retrospectively for the total patient population (9602 patients receiving esomeprazole and 5500 receiving placebo) and for sub-populations defined according to sex, age, esomeprazole dose, indication and geographical region. The cumulative frequency of first occurrence of events was calculated over 180 days. Frequencies of respiratory tract infections were similar in patients receiving esomeprazole and in those receiving placebo (any respiratory tract infection or signs/symptoms potentially indicating an respiratory tract infection, 0.278 and 0.296 patients per patient-year; lower respiratory tract infections, 0.048 and 0.058 per patient-year; pneumonia, 0.006 and 0.009 per patient-year, respectively). The relative risk for any respiratory tract infection in patients receiving esomeprazole compared with placebo was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.86-1.04). For lower respiratory tract infections, the relative risk was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.03) and for pneumonia, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.36-1.22). Sub-analyses by demographics, dose and indication yielded similar results to the overall analysis. The occurrence of respiratory tract infections was evenly distributed over time and similar in the esomeprazole and placebo groups. There is no causal association between treatment with esomeprazole and the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influenza vaccine effectiveness for hospital and community patients using control groups with and without non-influenza respiratory viruses detected, Auckland, New Zealand 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierse, Nevil; Kelly, Heath; Thompson, Mark G; Bissielo, Ange; Radke, Sarah; Huang, Q Sue; Baker, Michael G; Turner, Nikki

    2016-01-20

    We aimed to estimate the protection afforded by inactivated influenza vaccine, in both community and hospital settings, in a well characterised urban population in Auckland during 2014. We used two different comparison groups, all patients who tested negative for influenza and only those patients who tested negative for influenza and had a non-influenza respiratory virus detected, to calculate the vaccine effectiveness in a test negative study design. Estimates were made separately for general practice outpatient consultations and hospitalised patients, stratified by age group and by influenza type and subtype. Vaccine status was confirmed by electronic record for general practice patients and all respiratory viruses were detected by real time polymerase chain reaction. 1039 hospitalised and 1154 general practice outpatient consultations met all the study inclusion criteria and had a respiratory sample tested for influenza and other respiratory viruses. Compared to general practice patients, hospitalised patients were more likely to be very young or very old, to be Māori or Pacific Islander, to have a low income and to suffer from chronic disease. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) adjusted for age and other participant characteristics using all influenza negative controls was 42% (95% CI: 16 to 60%) for hospitalised and 56% (95% CI: 35 to 70%) for general practice patients. The vaccine appeared to be most effective against the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain with an adjusted VE of 62% (95% CI:38 to 77%) for hospitalised and 59% (95% CI:36 to 74%) for general practice patients, using influenza virus negative controls. Similar results found when patients testing positive for a non-influenza respiratory virus were used as the control group. This study contributes to validation of the test negative design and confirms that inactivated influenza vaccines continue to provide modest but significant protection against laboratory-confirmed influenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  16. Risk factors for persistence of lower respiratory symptoms among community members exposed to the 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Hannah T; Friedman, Stephen M; Reibman, Joan; Goldring, Roberta M; Miller Archie, Sara A; Ortega, Felix; Alper, Howard; Shao, Yongzhao; Maslow, Carey B; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Berger, Kenneth I

    2017-06-01

    We studied the course of lower respiratory symptoms (LRS; cough, wheeze or dyspnoea) among community members exposed to the 9/11/2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks during a period of 12-13 years following the attacks, and evaluated risk factors for LRS persistence, including peripheral airway dysfunction and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Non-smoking adult participants in a case-control study of post-9/11-onset LRS (exam 1, 2008-2010) were recruited for follow-up (exam 2, 2013-2014). Peripheral airway function was assessed with impulse oscillometry measures of R5 and R5-20. Probable PTSD was a PTSD checklist score ≥44 on a 2006-2007 questionnaire. Of 785 exam 1 participants, 545 (69%) completed exam 2. Most (321, 59%) were asymptomatic at all assessments. Among 192 participants with initial LRS, symptoms resolved for 110 (57%) by exam 2, 55 (29%) had persistent LRS and 27 (14%) had other patterns. The proportion with normal spirometry increased from 65% at exam 1 to 85% at exam 2 in the persistent LRS group (p<0.01) and was stable among asymptomatic participants and those with resolved LRS. By exam 2, spirometry results did not differ across symptom groups; however, R5 and R5-20 abnormalities were more common among participants with persistent LRS (56% and 46%, respectively) than among participants with resolved LRS (30%, p<0.01; 27%, p=0.03) or asymptomatic participants (20%, p<0.001; 8.2%, p<0.001). PTSD, R5 at exam 1, and R5-20 at exam 1 were each independently associated with persistent LRS. Peripheral airway dysfunction and PTSD may contribute to LRS persistence. Assessment of peripheral airway function detected pulmonary damage not evident on spirometry. Mental and physical healthcare for survivors of complex environmental disasters should be coordinated carefully. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  17. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  18. Climate variability and planktonic communities: The effect of an extreme event (severe drought) in a southern European estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Sónia Cotrim; Azeiteiro, Ulisses Miranda; Martinho, Filipe; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo

    2007-07-01

    As a consequence of climate change, flood and drought events are increasing in frequency throughout the world. Nevertheless, knowledge of the effects on zooplankton estuarine communities is still scarce. The present study aimed to examine zooplankton ecology over two contrasting environmental conditions: regular years and extreme dry years, in a shallow temperate southern European estuary, the Mondego Estuary (Portugal). Monthly samples were carried out during three consecutive years: 2003 characterized as a regular temperate year concerning precipitation and river flow, and an extremely dry period during 2004-2005. The spatial and temporal structure of the biological data was evaluated by a three-mode principal component analysis (PCA), which allowed us to distinguish three distinct ecological areas based on their biological composition and their relationship with hydrologic parameters. The severe drought in 2004-2005 was responsible for spatial shifts in the estuary regarding zooplankton community and interannual variability, with an increase in abundance and diversity during the period of low freshwater flow. This freshwater flow regime influenced the composition of the zooplankton community at the most upstream section of Mondego estuary (zone 3), with a replacement of the freshwater community by one predominantly dominated by estuarine organisms. The occurrence of such estuarine community contributed to the increase in zooplankton abundance which is ascribed to the estuarine species Acartia tonsa. The comparison with previous data obtained for this estuarine ecosystem, demonstrated the occurrence of a different scenario at times of high freshwater flow, being defined the existence of two sub-estuarine systems, the north and south arm, presenting the south one the highest values of abundance.

  19. International association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society international multidisciplinary classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim R; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G; Powell, Charles A; Riely, Gregory J; Van Schil, Paul E; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H M; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W; Hirsch, Fred R; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2011-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤ 5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection, will have 100% or near 100

  20. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G.; Powell, Charles A.; Riely, Gregory J.; Van Schil, Paul E.; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H. M.; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M.; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Methods An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection

  1. [The problem of abortion in the countries of the European Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourlen Rollier, A M

    1973-01-01

    The abortion laws in effect and being considered in several European countries are summarized briefly (Scandinavian and Eastern European countries, Switzerland, Austria); others are more comprehensively reviewed, including dates, content and individual sponsors of proposed laws (Denmark, England, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Holland, West Germany, Italy). Denmark and England have liberal abortion laws; Denmark permits abortion on demand up to 12 weeks but to residents only, but England performs about 25% (24,000/year) of its abortions on foreigners. Illegal abortions are estimated at 500,000-1,000,000/year in Germany, 250,000-800,000/year in France, and 30,000-50,000/year in Belgium. All of these countries have repressive abortion laws, usually prescribing 5 years in prison and/or a fine for the woman, and 5 years in prison with suspension of license for the practitioner. Convictions are rare in comparison with illegal abortions not prosecuted. A controversial conviction was that of Dr. Willy Peers, Professor of Gynecology of Brussels, who was imprisoned for performing an abortion on a mentally retarded girl raped by her father. Germany, France, Holland, and Belgium each have proposed liberal legislation during 1971-1973. A condemnation of abortion by Pope Paul has prompted 2 proposed bills in the Italian assembly which stand, however, little chance of being ennacted.

  2. ETHNOBIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS USED FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN OF A TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF BARBALHA, CEARÁ, BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Izabel Cristina Santiago; Delmondes, Gyllyandeson de Araújo; Dos Santos, Ana Deyva Ferreira; Santos, Enaide Soares; de Oliveira, Dayanne Rakelly; de Figueiredo, Patrícia Rosane Leite; Alves, Dailon de Araújo; Barbosa, Roseli; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; Fernandes, George Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural resources for the treatment of acute respiratory infections in children is a widespread practice within traditional communities, especially by women by being the primary caregivers. This study aimed to perform ethnobiological survey of plants and animals used for the treatment of acute respiratory infections in children of a traditional community in the municipality of Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil. It is a descriptive exploratory study with a quantitative approach, developed in Sitio Santo Antonio, in the municipality of Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil. As a tool for data collection, was applied a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Data analysis used descriptive statistics (simple and percentage rate) and the Relative Frequency of Citation. The research included a total of 54 informants. In total, there were 38 species cited. According to the Relative Frequency of Citation the following species were the most cited: Ocimum basilicum L. (0.59), Eucalyptus globulus Labili (0.59), Plectranthus amboinicus (L.) Spreng (0.42), Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit. (0.24), Allium aescalonicum L. (0.22) and Mentha arvensis L. (0.18). Among the symptoms mentioned by the research subjects to treat the acute respiratory infections in childhood, there were: fever; cough; coughing with secretions; sore throat; hoarseness; tiredness; nasal congestion. It is important the knowledge about the usefulness of natural resources as alternative practices in diseases treatment, seeking to rescue popular knowledge used in the traditional community and fomenting the need to consider cultural aspects in the full practice to children's health care.

  3. ETHNOBIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS USED FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN OF A TRADITIONAL COMMUNITY IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF BARBALHA, CEARÁ, BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Izabel Cristina Santiago; Delmondes, Gyllyandeson de Araújo; dos Santos, Ana Deyva Ferreira; Santos, Enaide Soares; de Oliveira, Dayanne Rakelly; de Figueiredo, Patrícia Rosane Leite; Alves, Dailon de Araújo; Barbosa, Roseli; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; Fernandes, George Pimentel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of natural resources for the treatment of acute respiratory infections in children is a widespread practice within traditional communities, especially by women by being the primary caregivers. This study aimed to perform ethnobiological survey of plants and animals used for the treatment of acute respiratory infections in children of a traditional community in the municipality of Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil. Methods: It is a descriptive exploratory study with a quantitative approach, developed in Sitio Santo Antonio, in the municipality of Barbalha, Ceará, Brazil. As a tool for data collection, was applied a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Data analysis used descriptive statistics (simple and percentage rate) and the Relative Frequency of Citation. Results: The research included a total of 54 informants. In total, there were 38 species cited. According to the Relative Frequency of Citation the following species were the most cited: Ocimum basilicum L. (0.59), Eucalyptus globulus Labili (0.59), Plectranthus amboinicus (L.) Spreng (0.42), Hyptis suaveolens (L.) Poit. (0.24), Allium aescalonicum L. (0.22) and Mentha arvensis L. (0.18). Among the symptoms mentioned by the research subjects to treat the acute respiratory infections in childhood, there were: fever; cough; coughing with secretions; sore throat; hoarseness; tiredness; nasal congestion. Conclusions: It is important the knowledge about the usefulness of natural resources as alternative practices in diseases treatment, seeking to rescue popular knowledge used in the traditional community and fomenting the need to consider cultural aspects in the full practice to children’s health care. PMID:28852733

  4. Translational reprocessing of spent fuel elements in the light of European Community law. Grenzueberschreitende atomare Wiederaufarbeitung im Lichte des europaeischen Gemeinschaftsrechts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuing, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    Objections are being raised against the current reprocessing of fuel elements from German nuclear power plants in France and Great Britain on the grounds that, measured by German protection requirements, it cannot be regarded as 'inncuous utilization' of radioactive waste material; this brings a momentous intervention of the German authorities against the operators of German nuclear power plants into consideration. Yet would not such a 'national solo attempt' conflict with European Community law . This question is illuminated in its different aspects. First the issue is examined from the point of view of radiation protection law under the Euratom Treaty and of the aim of the EC to establish the single market. Subsequent focal points are an inquiry into compatibility with the freedom of merchandise traffic and commercial services as provided by European Community law. The outcome is that European Community law does not oppose the German authorities intervencing. Rather such self-discipline practised by member states for the benefit of the European environment is admissible so long as the other EC member states do not establish equally stringent standards on their own accord or European Community law itself does not provide protection on a high level. (orig.).

  5. Child Sexual Abuse Consequences in Community Samples of Latino and European American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Michael D.; Munoz, David T.; Carmona, Jennifer Vargas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Research investigating the impact of child sexual abuse (CSA) in community samples of adolescents has been limited. This study aims to identify sexual abuse among ethnically diverse high school adolescents of both genders and evaluate their psycho-emotional consequences. Method: Through the use of self-report instruments, a sample of…

  6. The Governance of European Intellectual Property Rights: Toward a Differentiated Community Approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kica, Evisa; Groenendijk, Nico

    2009-01-01

    In this article we argue that the regulation of Intellectual Property (IP) protection should go beyond the traditional regulatory models and follow a more flexible regulatory framework. Considering the range of industrial needs and developments, the article develops a differentiated Community IP

  7. Improving Community Support and participation of persons with disabilities. A study in three European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jean Pierre Wilken

    2014-01-01

    This project builds upon a collaboration which has been established since 15 years in the field of social work between teachers and lecturers of Zuyd University, HU University and Elte University. Another network joining this project was CARe Europe, an NGO aimed at improving community care

  8. From traits to life-history strategies: Deconstructing fish community composition across European seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécuchet, Lauréne; Lindegren, Martin; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The life history of a species is determined by trade-offs between growth, survival and reproduction to maximize fitness in a given environment. Following a theoretical model, we investigate whether the composition of marine fish communities can be understood in terms of a set of lifehistory...

  9. Characterization of patients in the European Forsteo Observational Study (EFOS): postmenopausal women entering teriparatide treatment in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajzbaum, Gerald; Jakob, Franz; Karras, Dimitrios; Ljunggren, Osten; Lems, Willem F; Langdahl, Bente L; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Walsh, J Bernard; Gibson, Anthony; Tynan, Aodán J; Marin, Fernando

    2008-02-01

    The European Forsteo Observational Study (EFOS) study was primarily designed to assess fracture incidence, degree of pain, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and compliance in women prescribed teriparatide in a community setting. This report describes the design of the study and characteristics of the patients at entry. At entry, 1645 postmenopausal women with a diagnosis of osteoporosis and about to initiate teriparatide treatment were enrolled in eight European countries. Baseline data were collected on demographic characteristics, medical and osteoporosis history, disease status, prior use of medications and HRQoL. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of patients was 71.5 (8.4) years, lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) T-score was -3.3 (1.2), the mean number of previous fractures reported after 40 years of age was 2.9 (2.0), 70% had two or more vertebral deformities and 91.7% were pre-treated with bisphosphonates. HRQoL, evaluated by the health state value (HSV) (median: 0.59, Q1; Q3: 0.08; 0.71) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (median 50.0, Q1; Q3: 35.0; 69.0) status of the European quality of life questionnaire (EQ-5D) was poor. Extreme problems were reported by 31% of patients for the pain/discomfort dimension, mobility was limited in 69% and anxiety/depression was reported by 57% of patients. Chronic or intermittent back pain was reported by 91% of patients, which occurred every day or almost every day within the last month in 66% of patients. The post-menopausal women prescribed teriparatide were severely osteoporotic, with a high fracture risk and poor HRQoL, despite previous therapy for osteoporosis. Moderate to severe back pain was very common.

  10. Epidemiological pattern of community-acquired respiratory tract infections of the conscripts in the North Fleet during a vaccine-challenged period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new military units in the North fleet is accompanied by vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The accination coincides with periods of a rising number of army conscripts being taken ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts: acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. We need to study is to ascertain whether there is the correlation between the periods of the increase in the number of ervicemen fallen ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination. The study was carried out on the North fleet conscripts who were drawn blood samples from the ulnar vein before and after the vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The blood was examined for the presence of antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus using direct hemagglutination test. The health status of the vaccinated conscripts was under observation for 4 months, during which acute illnesses (acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia were registered. Serologic testing demonstrated a high rate of immunological protection against diphtheria and tetanus before vaccination. After the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination, the number of conscripts, who were taken ill in the first month, was significantly higher compared to the following months. The conscripts, who fell ill, had high antibody titers against diphtheria and tetanus in the vaccine-challenged period. Vaccination of the servicemen using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified, is serologically unfounded; it leads to complications such as acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia during the vaccinechallenged period especially during the first month and less considerably during the following months.

  11. COMMUNITY DESIGN PROTECTION: PARTICULAR ASPECTS OF THE PROCEDURE BEFORE THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA MIHAELA CONEA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU has the opportunity to decide on the Community design and interpretation of the rules governing this matter in actions that can follow two different procedural paths. In the first case we refer to the action brought before the Court against a decision of the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM. In this situation we must distinguish between actions that may or may not be led by a proceeding before the Board of Appeal of the Office. In a second case, we are in the presence of the preliminary procedure raised by national courts. Regarding action against the decision of OHIM the approach will be different, taking into account several reasons. First, we have to identify the nature of the action: are we in the presence of an action for annulment in the ordinary sense? The second reason is imposed by the existence of specific differences related to intellectual property rights litigation, compared to other European court procedures. This paper is considering CJEU case law and implications of the new Rules of Procedure of the Court of Justice.

  12. Sharing fishers´ ethnoecological knowledge of the European pilchard (Sardina pilchardus) in the westernmost fishing community in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Heitor de Oliveira; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Azeiteiro, Ulisses Miranda

    2017-09-14

    With the present difficulties in the conservation of sardines in the North Atlantic, it is important to investigate the local ecological knowledge (LEK) of fishermen about the biology and ecology of these fish. The ethnoecological data of European pilchard provided by local fishermen can be of importance for the management and conservation of this fishery resource. Thus, the present study recorded the ethnoecological knowledge of S. pilchardus in the traditional fishing community of Peniche, Portugal. This study was based on 87 semi-structured interviews conducted randomly from June to September 2016 in Peniche. The interview script contained two main points: Profile of fishermen and LEK on European pilchard. The ethnoecological data of sardines were compared with the scientific literature following an emic-etic approach. Data collected also were also analysed following the union model of the different individual competences and carefully explored to guarantee the objectivity of the study. The profile of the fishermen was investigated and measured. Respondents provided detailed informal data on the taxonomy, habitat, behaviour, migration, development, spawning and fat accumulation season of sardines that showed agreements with the biological data already published on the species. The main uses of sardines by fishermen, as well as beliefs and food taboos have also been mentioned by the local community. The generated ethnoecological data can be used to improve the management of this fishery resource through an adaptive framework among the actors involved, in addition to providing data that can be tested in further ecological studies. Therefore, this local knowledge may have the capacity to contribute to more effective conservation actions for sardines in Portugal.

  13. Development of a new resequencing pathogen microarray based assay for detection of broad-spectrum respiratory tract viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Shen

    Full Text Available A Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM is a single, highly multiplexed assay for detecting and differentiating similarly related pathogens by using closely overlapping probe sets to determine a target organism's nucleotide sequence. In this study, a new RPM (RPM-IVDC1 that consisted of 224-bp detector tiles corresponding to 9 influenza A subtypes, 11 rhinoviruses, 28 enteroviruses and 38 other respiratory viruses was developed and optimized to provide individual and simultaneous detection sensitivities ranging from 15 to 750 genomic copies for 16 common respiratory pathogens. A total of 110 consecutive patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP admitted to 5 district general hospitals in Beijing during a 1-year period were assessed using the new assay. Among the children (under age 5 and adult patients (above age 18, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and rhinovirus (RV were the most common etiological agents, respectively, which is consistent with reference assays. Atypical pathogens that may cause CAP-like illness, including rubella virus, measles virus, influenza type C virus, human herpesvirus (HHV were also detected. The results show the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for the accurate detection and identification of multiple virus types, which may be of significant use in epidemic surveillance and outbreak investigations of atypical pathogens.

  14. Evaluating a European knowledge hub on climate change in agriculture: Are we building a better connected community?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetnan, Eli Rudinow; Kipling, Richard Philip

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain food security and sustainability of production under climate change, interdisciplinary and international collaboration in research is essential. In the EU, knowledge hubs are important funding instruments for the development of an interconnected European Research Area. Here, network analysis was used to assess whether the pilot knowledge hub MACSUR has affected interdisciplinary collaboration, using co-authorship of peer reviewed articles as a measure of collaboration. The broad community of all authors identified as active in the field of agriculture and climate change was increasingly well connected over the period studied. Between knowledge hub members, changes in network parameters suggest an increase in collaborative interaction beyond that expected due to network growth, and greater than that found in the broader community. Given that interdisciplinary networks often take several years to have an impact on research outputs, these changes within the relatively new MACSUR community provide evidence that the knowledge hub structure has been effective in stimulating collaboration. However, analysis showed that knowledge hub partners were initially well-connected, suggesting that the initiative may have gathered together researchers with particular resources or inclinations towards collaborative working. Long term, consistent funding and ongoing reflection to improve networking structures may be necessary to sustain the early positive signs from MACSUR, to extend its success to a wider community of researchers, or to repeat it in less connected fields of science. Tackling complex challenges such as climate change will require research structures that can effectively support and utilise the diversity of talents beyond the already well-connected core of scientists at major research institutes. But network research shows that this core, well-connected group are vital brokers in achieving wider integration.

  15. Global climate change in large European rivers: long-term effects on macroinvertebrate communities and potential local confounding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floury, Mathieu; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Ferreol, Martial; Delattre, Cecile; Souchon, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Aquatic species living in running waters are widely acknowledged to be vulnerable to climate-induced, thermal and hydrological fluctuations. Climate changes can interact with other environmental changes to determine structural and functional attributes of communities. Although such complex interactions are most likely to occur in a multiple-stressor context as frequently encountered in large rivers, they have received little attention in such ecosystems. In this study, we aimed at specifically addressing the issue of relative long-term effects of global and local changes on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in multistressed large rivers. We assessed effects of hydroclimatic vs. water quality factors on invertebrate community structure and composition over 30 years (1979-2008) in the Middle Loire River, France. As observed in other large European rivers, water warming over the three decades (+0.9 °C between 1979-1988 and 1999-2008) and to a lesser extent discharge reduction (-80 m(3) s(-1) ) were significantly involved in the disappearance or decrease in taxa typical from fast running, cold waters (e.g. Chloroperlidae and Potamanthidae). They explained also a major part of the appearance and increase of taxa typical from slow flowing or standing waters and warmer temperatures, including invasive species (e.g. Corbicula sp. and Atyaephyra desmarestii). However, this shift towards a generalist and pollution tolerant assemblage was partially confounded by local improvement in water quality (i.e. phosphate input reduction by about two thirds and eutrophication limitation by almost one half), explaining a significant part of the settlement of new pollution-sensitive taxa (e.g. the caddisfly Brachycentridae and Philopotamidae families) during the last years of the study period. The regain in such taxa allowed maintaining a certain level of specialization in the invertebrate community despite climate change effects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. THE WAY TO HARMONY - EUROPEAN COMMUNITY IN THE CONTEXT OF MUSICAL ARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Kobylka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main idea of the article is to show particular kind of similarly between musical composition and the community, bound together by common values and tradition. Tradition that unites does not limit creative and innovative approach to the past, present and future. On the contrary, values give meaning to the searching process. Musical composition - as consisting of series of complementary elements - in perfect way reflects to the idea of "unity of diversity", - so crucial for building the community. History reveals how universal language music is and how important is the musical wealth of particular nations - as it constitutes specific inspiration for composers, originating from various areas of the world. Music serves also as a perfect communication tool and opens our minds for the beauty, variety and dynamics of constantly evolving and changing reality.

  17. European ST80 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus orbital cellulitis in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsironi Evangelia E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital environment, but also, lately, in the community. This case report is, to our knowledge, the first detailed description of a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST80 orbital cellulitis in a previously healthy neonate. Possible predisposing factors of microbial acquisition and treatment selection are also discussed. Case presentation A 28-day-old Caucasian boy was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of right orbital cellulitis. His symptoms included right eye proptosis, periocular edema and redness. Empirical therapy of intravenous daptomycin, rifampin and ceftriaxone was initiated. The culture of pus yielded a methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate and the molecular analysis revealed that it was a Panton-Valentine leukocidine-positive ST80 strain. The combination antimicrobial therapy was continued for 42days and the infection was successfully controlled. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that young infants, even without any predisposing condition, are susceptible to orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Prompt initiation of the appropriate empirical therapy, according to the local epidemiology, should successfully address the infection, preventing ocular and systemic complications.

  18. Factors associated with upper respiratory tract disease caused by feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus, Chlamydophila felis and Bordetella bronchiseptica in cats: experience from 218 European catteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helps, C.R.; Lait, P.; Damhuis, A.; Björnehammar, U.; Bolta, D.; Brovida, C.; Chabanne, L.; Egberink, H.; Ferrand, G.; Fontbonne, A.; Pennisi, M.G.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.; Gunn-Moore, D.; Hartmann, K.; Lutz, H.; Malandain, E.; Möstl, K.; Stengel, C.; Harbour, D.A.; Graat, E.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A full history of the management practices and the prevalence of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) at 218 rescue shelters, breeding establishments and private households with five or more cats was recorded. Oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs and blood samples were taken from 1748 cats. The

  19. High diversity of protistan plankton communities in remote high mountain lakes in the European Alps and the Himalayan mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, Barbara; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Filker, Sabine; Sommaruga, Ruben; Sonntag, Bettina; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the genetic diversity (V4 region of the 18S rRNA) of planktonic microbial eukaryotes in four high mountain lakes including two remote biogeographic regions (the Himalayan mountains and the European Alps) and distinct habitat types (clear and glacier-fed turbid lakes). The recorded high genetic diversity in these lakes was far beyond of what is described from high mountain lake plankton. In total, we detected representatives from 66 families with the main taxon groups being Alveolata (55.0% OTUs 97%, operational taxonomic units), Stramenopiles (34.0% OTUs 97%), Cryptophyta (4.0% OTUs 97%), Chloroplastida (3.6% OTUs 97%) and Fungi (1.7% OTUs 97%). Centrohelida, Choanomonada, Rhizaria, Katablepharidae and Telonema were represented by <1% OTUs 97%. Himalayan lakes harbored a higher plankton diversity compared to the Alpine lakes (Shannon index). Community structures were significantly different between lake types and biogeographic regions (Fisher exact test, P < 0.01). Network analysis revealed that more families of the Chloroplastida (10 vs 5) and the Stramenopiles (14 vs 8) were found in the Himalayan lakes than in the Alpine lakes and none of the fungal families was shared between them. Biogeographic aspects as well as ecological factors such as water turbidity may structure the microbial eukaryote plankton communities in such remote lakes. © FEMS 2015.

  20. Windstorms as mediator of soil nematode community changes: Evidence from European spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renčo M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nematode communities in a Norway spruce forest in High Tatra National Park, Slovakia were monitored for the period of several years (2006 and 2013. Unfortunately, in May 2014 natural windstorm damaged the forest. This disastrous event, together with preliminary obtained results allowed us to compare the direct impact of windstorm damage of forest habitat on soil nematode assemblages. The forest destruction by windstorm had a significant effect on the total nematode abundance, the abundance of omnivores and herbivores, as well as the nematode species diversity. The most dominant species, representing 55 % of the total nematode fauna, in the plot studied were Acrobeloides nanus followed by Malenchus exiguus, Filenchus vulgaris, Plectus communis, Plectus parvus and Tylencholaimus mirabilis. The abundance of bacterivorous signifi cantly increased after the windstorm, meanwhile the abundance of omnivores, fungivores, and herbivores ectoparasites and epidermal/root hair feeders showed an opposite trend. Of the evaluative indicators, Shannon species diversity (H’spp, maturity index (MI, maturity index 2-5 (MI2-5, sigma maturity index (ΣMI, enrichment index (EI and structure index (SI decreased significantly after windstorm. The EI and SI indexes characterized soil ecosystems before windstorm (2006 - 2013 as maturing with low or moderate disturbance, but soil ecosystems shortly after the windstorm (2014 were degraded and nutrient depleted. This also corresponded with graphical display of metabolic footprints characteristics of soil food web. Overall, the nematode communities differed significantly before and after forest damage. These results suggest the role of nematode communities as indicators of environment condition quality or its disruption.

  1. Drivers of innovation in the European Food Industry: Evidences from the Community Innovation Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ciliberti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation is particularly important for innovation in the food industry. as it has traditionally been considered as a “low tech” sector. This paper analyses how different forms of cooperation affect innovation activities in the EU’s food industry. To this purpose, we analysed data at the country level drawn from the Community Innovation Survey (CIS. A random effect linear model is formulated and estimated to analyse the panel data obtained from five CIS waves. The model indicates that cooperation with universities positively affects innovative activity whereas, surprisingly, government financial support has not been an effective instrument to foster innovation.

  2. European national healthy city networks: the impact of an elite epistemic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Zoë; Green, Geoff

    2013-10-01

    National healthy cities networks (NNs) were created 20 years ago to support the development of healthy cities within the WHO Europe Region. Using the concept of epistemic communities, the evolution and impact of NNs is considered, as is their future development. Healthy cities national networks are providing information, training and support to member cities. In many cases, they are also involved in supporting national public health policy development and disseminating out healthy city principles to other local authorities. National networks are a fragile but an extremely valuable resource for sharing public health knowledge.

  3. Policy Evaluation of a New Approach to Wind Energy Implementation in the European Community. SIWERM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, F.

    2004-12-15

    SIWERM stands for Successful Implementation of Wind Energy at Regional and Municipal level. It is a project of the European Union's ALTENER programme. This study aims to evaluate the SIWERM project by inspecting its wind policy. The research assesses if the method is successful in the Netherlands and what a successful wind energy policy is composed of. First of all, the Dutch national situation for wind energy development and corresponding policies will be analysed by extensive literature review. Secondly, an analysis of the procedures used in the SIWERM project will be made which also identifies its success factors. Furthermore, 5 comparisons will be made between successful and unsuccessful wind energy projects in the Netherlands and between those using the SIWERM wind policy and those using other methods. This research will be carried out in form of case studies and in form of interviews with relevant stakeholders such as municipal, provincial and national energy coordinators, consultants, developers, opposition groups, land owners, politicians, environmental agencies and energy companies. The policy will also be compared to a theoretical framework of public participation. Once the success of the approach has been proven an assessment of reasons for its success will be made in the national context of the Netherlands. Finally, factors will be identified which characterise a successful wind policy.

  4. WETLANDS ECOLOGICAL-ECONOMIC MAPPING AT COMMUNITY-TRIBAL LANDS IN THE RUSSIAN EUROPEAN ARCTIC COAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Evseev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic-ecological map for Nenets community tribal lands at the Russian Arctic coast wetlands was compiled. Wetlands supply a large variety of ecosystem services beneficial to ecological stability and biological resources for indigenous population support. Ecosystem services assessed in this project were mainly regulating: carbon deposition by different ecosystems (climate regulation function due to CO2 consumption, water purification and “warming” effect of bogs. This list was limited by data and assessment methods availability. We used traditional methods for ecological services assessment, based on their existing and possible (virtual market prices. Mapping approaches were based on Target 2 Action 5 Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services (MAES of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020. Proportional value regulating services of peat bogs appeared to be nearly the same as maximal existing lands value. Our assessment results enabled us to present spatial dimensions of ecosystem services of community-tribal lands, whose value appeared to be higher than compensatory sums for “lost profit” in case they are replaced by oil extraction infrastructure. Traditional nature management lands may be regarded as an alternative to further primarily industrial land use type and attribute ecological buffers role to them as well as indigenous population material and spiritual support functions.

  5. Incentives for Developing Resilient Agritourism Entrepreneurship in Rural Communities in Romania in a European Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cristina Drăgoi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a global setting where the requirements for development equally address the economic viability but also social and environmental sustainability, the healthy and efficient growth of rural communities poses substantial challenges. Our paper focuses on specific conditions and constraints that influence the progress of agritourism business initiatives as viable entrepreneurial solutions for self-sustainable rural communities in Romania. To assess the impact of economic, social and tourism-related factors on agritourism entrepreneurship for Romanian counties during 2010–2015 periods, we conducted several Ordinary Least Square regression models. The results emphasize that economic indicators like regional GDP and kilometers of national roads have a positive influence on the number of agritourism business units; also, a positive impact on agritourism entrepreneurship was identified for tourism-related factors like: number of employees and corresponding salaries in tourism, total tourists, share of tourism firms and their turnover in total firms and turnover of the region, as well as preference of tourists for agritourism. The conclusions highlight the direct link between resilient agritourism entrepreneurship and sustainable development of the region and open further research directions.

  6. Infections Caused By Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus European Clone (ST80 In Slovenia Between 2006 And 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermota Urška

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the existing literature, a heterogeneous sequence type (ST or clones of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA circulate in Europe. In Europe, the European clone that belongs to sequence type ST80 is predominant.

  7. Deutschland und die Europaische Gemeinschaft: Ein Landeskundliches Curriculum fur die 90er Jahre (Germany and the European Community: A Curriculum for the 1990's).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidheiser, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Information is provided for German teachers on the main aspects of the European Community (EC), and on how to integrate the EC into the classroom. The history of the EC is outlined, and political and economic features are highlighted. (Author/VWL)

  8. The effect of social relationships on survival in elderly residents of a Southern European community: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otero Angel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative evidence regarding the effects of social relationships on mortality in Mediterranean communities will increase our knowledge of their strengths and the ways in which they influence longevity across cultures. Men and women may benefit differently from social relationships because of cultural differences in gender roles. Psychosocial mechanisms such as social support, which may explain the effects of social networks, may also vary by culture. Methods Detailed information on the social relationships of a representative sample of 1,174 community-dwelling older adults was collected in Leganés, a city in central Spain. Mortality over a 6-year follow-up period was ascertained. Information on socio-demographic, health and disability variables was also collected. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted separately for men and women and for the combined sample. Results Having a confidant was associated with a 25% (95% CI 5–40% reduction in the mortality risk. The hazard ratio for lack of social participation was 1.5 (95% CI 1.3–1.7. Being engaged in meaningful roles protected against mortality, while receipt of emotional support did not affect survival. These results were comparable for men and women. Having contact with all family ties was associated with reduced mortality only in men. Structural aspects of social networks make a unique contribution to survival, independently of emotional support and the role played in the lives of significant others. Conclusion In this elderly Southern European population, the beneficial effects of social networks, social participation, engagement in the life of significant others and having a confidant call for public policies that foster intergenerational and community exchanges.

  9. International ERS/ESICM/ESCMID/ALAT guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia: Guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)/ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and Asociación Latinoamericana del Tórax (ALAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael S; Chastre, Jean; Ewig, Santiago; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Hanberger, Hakan; Kollef, Marin; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luna, Carlos M; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Paiva, J Artur; Read, Robert C; Rigau, David; Timsit, Jean François; Welte, Tobias; Wunderink, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The most recent European guidelines and task force reports on hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were published almost 10 years ago. Since then, further randomised clinical trials of HAP and VAP have been conducted and new information has become available. Studies of epidemiology, diagnosis, empiric treatment, response to treatment, new antibiotics or new forms of antibiotic administration and disease prevention have changed old paradigms. In addition, important differences between approaches in Europe and the USA have become apparent.The European Respiratory Society launched a project to develop new international guidelines for HAP and VAP. Other European societies, including the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, were invited to participate and appointed their representatives. The Latin American Thoracic Association was also invited.A total of 15 experts and two methodologists made up the panel. Three experts from the USA were also invited (Michael S. Niederman, Marin Kollef and Richard Wunderink).Applying the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology, the panel selected seven PICO (population-intervention-comparison-outcome) questions that generated a series of recommendations for HAP/VAP diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  10. Commentary on “Music Does Not Alter Anxiety in Patients with Suspected Lung Cancer Undergoing Bronchoscopy: A Randomised Controlled Trial” – European Clinical Respiratory Journal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Carsten Michel

    2016-01-01

    of the study was to measure the effect of “MusiCure -music as medicine”, on bronchoscopy-related anxiety. We hypothesised that MusiCure reduces bronchoscopy-related anxiety. MusiCure is music composed by the danish composer Niels Eje. There are contradictory findings both on the effect of MusiCure on anxiety...... with the bronchoscopy (Figure 1). depression-anxiety-Department-Respiratory-Medicine Figure 1: Patient from Department of Respiratory Medicine, Bispebjerg Hosptial, who had supporting colleagues who printed this t-shirt for her. This patient expressed major worries about the bronchoscopy she had to undergo. The aim...... and of the effect of music on bronchoscopy-related anxiety [2-5]. The patients included in our study had state-anxiety scores ranging from no anxiety to considerable anxiety, with a median state anxiety score at 39 (Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI) (Figure 2). depression-anxiety...

  11. Discourses of crises and the European Union as a community without qualities: A view from the literary history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding from the assumption that meanings and perceptions of social reality are generated by means of public language, or in other words, from the belief that the role of public language is more that of shaping the social reality, rather than description or detection of problems, the authors assume a reserved approach to contemporary discourses on the crises of the European Union. Such approach is explained by the vagueness and deprival of meaning of the term crises, as it is typically used in current political discourses. By pointing out to a loss of the semantic core of the term, caused by its inconsistent usage and longevity of the condition termed 'crisis', they also express doubts concerning its analytical operativeness. In the authors' opinion, this 'profaned' term has become a performative representation of simulation - sort of crisis, which has, either as a justification, necessity or a pretext, created numerous effects in recent years. The assumption that simulation - seen as the absence of the reality rather than its disguise (Jean Baudrillard - represents a leading principle of our age is examined through the concept of continued effect of literature and corroborated by the authors' interpretation of Robert Musil's novel 'Man Without Qualities', as a mythopoetic framework of the analysis and reflections of high art in the contemporary age. In the first part of the text, the authors point out to Musil's poetic anticipation of the direction taken by the European society, that is, the cultural climate and conditions favouring development of man without qualities. In the absence of these qualities and, especially, in preference given to Musil's category 'sense of possibility'over the 'sense of reality', the authors recognise the interpretative basis for the analysis of Community without qualities, as another name for the European Union. From that point of view, which, in addition to loss of specific qualities, also involves deprival of

  12. Novel insights into microbial community dynamics during the fermentation of Central European ice wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bučková, Mária; Puškárová, Andrea; Ženišová, Katarína; Kraková, Lucia; Piknová, Ľubica; Kuchta, Tomáš; Pangallo, Domenico

    2018-02-02

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent strategies were applied to investigate the microbiota of autumn undamaged and damaged berries, winter berries and ice wine must samples of Grüner Veltliner (Veltlínske zelené) from Small Carpathian wine-producing region. One hundred twenty-six yeasts and 242 bacterial strains isolated from several microbiological media (YPD, PDA, R2A, GYC, MRS and MRS-T) were clustered by ITS-PCR and subsequent Qiaxcel electrophoresis. Representatives of each cluster were identified by sequencing. The extracellular hydrolytic properties and intracellular activities of esterase and β-glucosidase of isolates were assayed. The culture-independent approach permitted the analysis of extracted DNA and RNA coupling DGGE fingerprinting with construction of clone libraries (bacterial and fungal; DGGE-cloning). The combination of the two approaches provided comprehensive data that evidenced the presence of a complex microbiota in each analyzed sample. RNA and DNA analyses facilitated differentiation of living microorganisms from the entire microbiota. Diverse microbial communities colonized the autumn and winter berries. Generally, the combination of results obtained by the methods suggested that the must samples contained mainly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Metschnikowia spp., Hanseniaspora uvarum, Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc spp. The strains exhibited interesting esterase and β-glucosidase properties, which are important for aroma formation in wine. Fermentation strategies utilising these microorganisms, could be attempted in the future in order to modulate the ice wine characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of parasitic communities within European ticks using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Bonnet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment of tick-borne and zoonotic disease emergence necessitates sound knowledge of the particular microorganisms circulating within the communities of these major vectors. Assessment of pathogens carried by wild ticks must be performed without a priori, to allow for the detection of new or unexpected agents.We evaluated the potential of Next-Generation Sequencing techniques (NGS to produce an inventory of parasites carried by questing ticks. Sequences corresponding to parasites from two distinct genera were recovered in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in Eastern France: Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. Four Babesia species were identified, three of which were zoonotic: B. divergens, Babesia sp. EU1 and B. microti; and one which infects cattle, B. major. This is the first time that these last two species have been identified in France. This approach also identified new sequences corresponding to as-yet unknown organisms similar to tropical Theileria species.Our findings demonstrate the capability of NGS to produce an inventory of live tick-borne parasites, which could potentially be transmitted by the ticks, and uncovers unexpected parasites in Western Europe.

  14. Identification of Parasitic Communities within European Ticks Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Sarah; Michelet, Lorraine; Moutailler, Sara; Cheval, Justine; Hébert, Charles; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk assessment of tick-borne and zoonotic disease emergence necessitates sound knowledge of the particular microorganisms circulating within the communities of these major vectors. Assessment of pathogens carried by wild ticks must be performed without a priori, to allow for the detection of new or unexpected agents. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the potential of Next-Generation Sequencing techniques (NGS) to produce an inventory of parasites carried by questing ticks. Sequences corresponding to parasites from two distinct genera were recovered in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in Eastern France: Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. Four Babesia species were identified, three of which were zoonotic: B. divergens, Babesia sp. EU1 and B. microti; and one which infects cattle, B. major. This is the first time that these last two species have been identified in France. This approach also identified new sequences corresponding to as-yet unknown organisms similar to tropical Theileria species. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate the capability of NGS to produce an inventory of live tick-borne parasites, which could potentially be transmitted by the ticks, and uncovers unexpected parasites in Western Europe. PMID:24675738

  15. The SWENET Online Archive: 10 Years of a European Space Weather Community Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Hannah; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain; Beltrami, Pablo; Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Amata, Ermanno; Clarke, Ellen

    The SWENET archive was initially developed as part of the ESA Space Weather Applications Pilot Project, starting in 2003. The Pilot Project supported the development of a network of prototype space weather services, many of which are still active and have been developed further in the intervening time. SWENET was established as the common access portal and data repository for these services, providing a series of analysis tools and added functionalities to both service developers and users. SWENET gives users access to a wealth of space weather data and products that cover ground, Ionospheric and spacecraft effects. The archive has stored information since 2003 and currently houses a large amount of data from ~20 different providers. As part of the initial SWENET development a set of preliminary metrics, or index quality statistics, were provided as an additional service via the SWENET web portal. The objective of this project is to review the database and revisit the existing metrics with a view to assessing the performance of a number of the original prototype services. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these forecasts ensures a reliable service to the end user. As an initial case study, we have selected two services which forecast geomagnetic indices and/or data for analysis, namely the BINCASTS and GIFINT (Dst forecast). We have assessed the corresponding data in the SWENET archive using a selection of metrics that are currently in use by the space weather and meteorology community. Appropriate metrics to each service have been used to compare the model performance to actual observations, helping to identify and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each model.

  16. Short-term effects of forest disturbances on soil nematode communities in European mountain spruce forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čerevková, A; Renčo, M; Cagáň, L

    2013-09-01

    The nematode communities in spruce forests were compared with the short-term effects of forest damage, caused by windstorm, wildfire and management practices of forest soils. Soil samples were collected in June and October from 2006 to 2008 in four different sites: (1) forest unaffected by the wind (REF); (2) storm-felled forest with salvaged timber (EXT); (3) modified forest affected by timber salvage (wood removal) and forest fire (FIR); and (4) storm-felled forest where timber had been left unsalvaged (NEX). Nematode analysis showed that the dominant species in all four investigated sites were Acrobeloides nanus and Eudorylaimus silvaticus. An increase of A. nanus (35% of the total nematode abundance) in the first year in the FIR site led to the highest total abundance of nematodes compared with other sites, where nematode abundance reached the same level in the third year. In the FIR site bacterial feeders appeared to be the most representative trophic group, although in the second and third year, after disturbance, the abundance of this trophic group gradually decreased. In the NEX site, the number of nematode species, population densities and Maturity Index were similar to that recorded for the FIR site. In EXT and NEX sites, the other dominant species was the plant parasitic nematode Paratylenchus microdorus. Analyses of nematodes extracted from different forest soil samples showed that the highest number of species and diversity index for species (H'spp) were in the REF site. Differences between the nematode fauna in REF and other localities were clearly depicted by cluster analysis. The greatest Structure Index and Enrichment Index values were also in REF. In the EXT site, the number of nematode species, their abundance, H'spp and Maturity Index were not significantly different from those recorded in the reference site.

  17. Patients' perspective on dental aesthetics in a South-Eastern European community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudea, Diana; Lasserre, Jean-François; Alb, Camelia; Culic, Bogdan; Pop Ciutrila, Ioana Sofia; Colosi, Horatiu

    2012-07-01

    To assess the importance attributed to dental aesthetics by subjects from a Romanian community. In addition, the role played by dental color, the group-distributions based on the self-evaluation of dental color and the previous experience regarding whitening treatments are analysed. A multiple-choice questionnaire was administered to 540 patients in dental offices in Cluj-Napoca, Romania; the subjects were also asked to self-evaluate their dental shade, using a set of images as a comparison. Answers to the questionnaires were statistically analysed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS 13.00 (Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Kendall's tau b). From the participants, 17.96% were motivated by aesthetic reasons to ask for treatment; most of the patients evaluated their smile as "acceptable" (38.51%) or "having some defects" (29.44%) and were self-included in groups of medium and dark shades (33.7% and 33.89%, respectively). Whilst 22.40% of the subjects considered the dental color as being the most evident defect of their dentition, 39.07% indicated a self-perception of "an abnormal dental shade". A strong correlation between darker self-assessed tooth color-groups and the self-perception of an abnormal tooth color was found (Chi square p≪0.001, Kendall's tau-c=0.44, with p≪0.001). Previous whitening treatments were reported by 8.88% of the subjects. Among patients who wanted to improve one of their oral functions, the majority requested changes in aesthetics. Dental shade is one of the aspects recognized as problematic by the participants, but nonetheless the percentage of patients who had previously benefited by whitening treatments was moderate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Is the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale valid for use in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards the mentally ill? A confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Roisin; Scott, Philomena Anne; Cocoman, Angela; Chambers, Mary; Guise, Veslemøy; Välimäki, Maritta; Clinton, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the construct validity of the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards mental illness and mental health patients. The harbouring of negative attitudes by nurses towards any patient can have implications for recovery. To gather robust evidence upon which to base information and education aimed at fostering acceptance, support and general positivity towards people with mental health illness, a valid and reliable system of data collection is required. A confirmatory factor analysis of both the original Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale and two modified versions of the scale were carried out during May - June 2007 using a data set representing the responses of 858 European nurses to the scale. Data were subjected to three different confirmatory factor analyses using Maximum Likelihood estimation in the software package, Analysis of Moment Structures 7. A number of absolute, relative and incremental fit statistics were used to assess the fit of the original Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale and two modified versions to the European nursing data. A modification of the scale was found to be most suitable for use in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards mental illness and people with mental illness. Further research is recommended to develop a valid and reliable research tool to specifically measure the attitudes of 'nurses' working across different mental healthcare facilities towards this vulnerable patient group. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  20. Security of Energy Supply in the New Europe: A Role for the European Atomic Energy Community in the European Union’s Neighbourhood Policy?

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Pamela M.

    2008-01-01

    External energy relations are essential components of both the European Union’s search for an overall energy strategy, an Energy Policy for Europe (EPE) and the development of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). In this article questions are posed about the role for the use of nuclear technology as the means of meeting some of the objectives of both areas of policy. As both the EPE and the ENP are dependent on the negotiation of international agreements with third parties for their effec...

  1. Students’ Recognition of European Identity: Initiation of Projects on the Range of Problems Dealing with the Danube Region Local Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Kichuk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of identity as personal characteristic associated with the self-actualization process and depended on social context of his life activity. The students’ ability to their prosocial activity actualizes under social, dynamic changes, increasing globalization. The need of the students’ recognition of European identity is increasing because of European integration process of Ukraine. In this context the best practices of initiation of projects on the range of problems dealing with the local community development are given. This article is based on the students’ efficient inclusion to social projecting dealing with the Ukrainian Danube region effective development.

  2. Seroepidemiology of respiratory (group 2) canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and Bordetella bronchiseptica infections in urban dogs in a humane shelter and in rural dogs in small communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Anseeuw, Erika; Gow, Sheryl; Bryan, Heather; Salb, Amanda; Goji, Noriko; Rhodes, Carrie; La Coste, Stacey; Smits, Judit; Kutz, Susan

    2011-08-01

    This prospective study evaluated seroepidemiologic features of canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), and Bordetella bronchiseptica infections in dogs in an urban humane shelter and in rural/small community dog populations in western Canada. Seroprevalence of CRCoV and CPIV was low compared with other countries; seroprevalence of B. bronchiseptica was moderate to high in most populations examined. Rural dogs were 0.421 times (P ≤ 0.0001) less likely to be positive for CRCoV than dogs admitted to the shelter. There were no statistical differences in prevalence of antibodies to B. bronchiseptica and CPIV between urban and rural populations. Dogs from Fort Resolution, NWT were significantly (P dogs in the shelter. Seroconversion to CRCoV was common in dogs in the shelter, but was not associated (P = 0.18) with respiratory disease. Antibodies to CRCoV, CPIV, or B. bronchiseptica on arrival were not significantly (P > 0.05) associated with disease-sparing after entry into the shelter.

  3. Activation analysis and characteristics of the European community water cooled ceramic breeder blanket design proposal for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V. [ENEA-ERG-FUS, Frascati (Italy); Cepraga, D.G. [ENEA-INN-FIS, Bologna (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    The European Community (EC) Home Team has proposed various alternative blanket designs to the basic concept (essentially integrated first wall, cooled by liquid metal, with structures made by vanadium alloys). One of the EC proposal is the Water Cooled Ceramic Blanket developed on the basis of a common action between NET and ENEA. It is based on a more conservative approach, but involving well proven technologies and qualified materials: SS-316L as structural material, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as first breeder material choice (50% Li{sup 6} enrichment) and low temperature water coolant (160/200{degrees}C). Beryllium has been chosen as multiplying material. The nominal performance are: 1 MW/m{sup 2} as average neutron wall load, corresponding to 1.5 GW fusion power, 1 MW-y/m{sup 2} beneath it has been proved to withstand power excursion till 5 GW. The proposed blanket concept is based on a Breeder Inside Tube (BIT) type technology, with poloidal breeding elements, each one consisting of two concentric tubes. Breeder pebbles are filled into the inner tube, the water coolant flows in the annular channel between the two tubes. Beryllium pebbles fill the space of the blanket box outside the outer tube. A helium purge gas flows through the breeder pebbles bed for tritium recovery. Alternative operating water temperature and pressure are proposed, considering also batch tritium recovery.

  4. Fault2SHA- A European Working group to link faults and Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment communities in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Oona; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The key questions we ask are: What is the best strategy to fill in the gap in knowledge and know-how in Europe when considering faults in seismic hazard assessments? Are field geologists providing the relevant information for seismic hazard assessment? Are seismic hazard analysts interpreting field data appropriately? Is the full range of uncertainties associated with the characterization of faults correctly understood and propagated in the computations? How can fault-modellers contribute to a better representation of the long-term behaviour of fault-networks in seismic hazard studies? Providing answers to these questions is fundamental, in order to reduce the consequences of future earthquakes and improve the reliability of seismic hazard assessments. An informal working group was thus created at a meeting in Paris in November 2014, partly financed by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, with the aim to motivate exchanges between field geologists, fault modellers and seismic hazard practitioners. A variety of approaches were presented at the meeting and a clear gap emerged between some field geologists, that are not necessarily familiar with probabilistic seismic hazard assessment methods and needs and practitioners that do not necessarily propagate the "full" uncertainty associated with the characterization of faults. The group thus decided to meet again a year later in Chieti (Italy), to share concepts and ideas through a specific exercise on a test case study. Some solutions emerged but many problems of seismic source characterizations with people working in the field as well as with people tackling models of interacting faults remained. Now, in Wien, we want to open the group and launch a call for the European community at large to contribute to the discussion. The 2016 EGU session Fault2SHA is motivated by such an urgency to increase the number of round tables on this topic and debate on the peculiarities of using faults in seismic hazard

  5. Soil CO2 emission of different ecosystems and soil microbial community respiration (European Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushko, Sofia; Ananyeva, Nadezhda; Ivashchenko, Kristina; Vasenev, Vyacheslav

    2017-04-01

    Soil CO2 emission is mainly provided by soil microorganisms and plant roots respiration. Our study focuses on finding a relationship between soil CO2 emission of different ecosystems and soil microbial community functioning. Soil CO2 emission was monthly measured (LI-820) from May to October 2015 in the 5-th spatially distributed points of forest, meadow (steppe), arable (bare fallow), urban of subtaiga and forest-steppe vegetation subzones (Albeluvisol and Chernozems, Moscow and Kursk regions, respectively). Soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic, substrate-induced respiration method), basal respiration (BR), organic carbon content (Corg), pHw and soil C/N ratio were measured in soil samples (0-10 cm, litter excluded, n = 240). Specific respiration of soil microbial biomass (qCO2) was calculated as BR / Cmic. Soil CO2 emission of different ecosystems was ranged 0.2-87.4 and 1.1-87.9 g CO2 m-2 d-1 for subtaiga and forest-steppe, respectively. It was reached on average 20.5, 33.5, 3.8, 28.4 and 15.0, 23.8, 3.7, 15.3 g CO2 m-2 d-1 for forest, meadow, arable, urban of subtaiga and forest-steppe, respectively. The high soil CO2 emission was found in grassland ecosystems, the low - in arable, however it was quite high in urban. Soil organic carbon content of different ecosystems was ranged 1.0-3.3% and 1.4-3.7%, pH was 4.7-7.6 and 6.1-8.2, C/N = 10.8-16.0 and 12.0-18.1 for subtaiga and forest-steppe, respectively. Soil Cmic of different ecosystems was ranged 60-1294 and 178-2531 μg C g-1 for subtaiga and forest-steppe, respectively. The Cmic of forest, meadow, arable, urban in subtaiga and forest-steppe was reached on average 331, 549, 110, 517 and 1525, 1430, 320, 482 μg C g-1, respectively. Soil BR of different ecosystems was ranged 0.14-2.23 and 0.15-2.80 μg C-CO2 g-1 h-1 for subtaiga and forest-steppe, respectively. Moreover, the BR of forest, meadow, arable, urban in subtaiga and forest-steppe was on average 0.87, 0.92, 0.42, 0.47 and 1.20, 1.42, 0.33, 0.64 μg C

  6. Multicenter randomized study of two once daily regimens in the initial management of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in 163 children: azithromycin versus ceftibuten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galova, K; Sufliarska, S; Kukova, Z; Danisovicova, A; Hrachova, I; Grausova, S; Marinova, I; Krizan, S; Stopkova, K; Stahorska, A; Durcanska, K; Raskova, J; Krupova, I; Krcméry, V

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized trial, we compared the efficacy and toxicity of azithromycin and ceftibuten once daily in the initial (empiric) therapy of proven or suspected community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) in 163 pediatric patients: 95.5% of those treated with azithromycin and 83.6% of those treated with ceftibuten were cured or improved. Streptococcus pneumoniae was more frequently eradicated in the azithromycin than in the ceftibuten group, whereas gram-negative bacilli were more susceptible to ceftibuten. Elimination rates for Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae were similar; adverse reactions did not differ in both arms. Thus, azithromycin was more effective but equally safe than ceftibuten in the initial therapy of pediatric CARTI.

  7. [Diffuse idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. International multidisciplinary consensus classification by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society, principal clinico-pathological entities, and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, V; Capron, F; Grenier, P; Cordier, J-F

    2004-04-01

    The classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias includes seven clinico-pathologic entities. The diagnosis is based on a multidisciplinary approach, integrating the clinical evaluation, the high-resolution computerised tomography, and the pathological pattern. A definitive diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis relies on the association of a suggestive clinico-radiological profile and a pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity, with a better prognosis than that of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia has been included in the group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias because of its idiopathic and multifocal characteristics, although it does not predominate in the lung interstitium. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia and respiratory bronchiolitis with interstitial lung disease are rare entities with predominance in young smoking adults. Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, usually encountered in the context of Sjögren's syndrome, is very rare in its idiopathic form. Acute interstitial pneumonia is responsible for idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome. The current classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias better defines the diagnostic criterias of each clinico-pathologic entity, and is expected to facilitate clinical research. This classification has clinical implications, with prognostic and therapeutic significance.

  8. Promoting palliative care in the community: production of the primary palliative care toolkit by the European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce in primary palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Scott A; Firth, Adam; Schneider, Nils; Van den Eynden, Bart; Gomez-Batiste, Xavier; Brogaard, Trine; Villanueva, Tiago; Abela, Jurgen; Eychmuller, Steffen; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Downing, Julia; Sallnow, Libby; van Rijswijk, Erik; Barnard, Alan; Lynch, Marie; Fogen, Frederic; Moine, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    A multidisciplinary European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce was established to scope the extent of and learn what facilitates and hinders the development of palliative care in the community across Europe. To document the barriers and facilitators for palliative care in the community and to produce a resource toolkit that palliative care specialists, primary care health professionals or policymakers, service developers, educationalists and national groups more generally could use to facilitate the development of palliative care in their own country. (1) A survey instrument was sent to general practitioners with knowledge of palliative care services in the community in a diverse sample of European countries. We also conducted an international systematic review of tools used to identify people for palliative care in the community. (2) A draft toolkit was then constructed suggesting how individual countries might best address these issues, and an online survey was then set up for general practitioners and specialists to make comments. Iterations of the toolkit were then presented at international palliative care and primary care conferences. Being unable to identify appropriate patients for palliative care in the community was a major barrier internationally. The systematic review identified tools that might be used to help address this. Various facilitators such as national strategies were identified. A primary palliative care toolkit has been produced and refined, together with associated guidance. Many barriers and facilitators were identified. The primary palliative care toolkit can help community-based palliative care services to be established nationally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Preparation for emergence of an Eastern European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain in Western Europe: Immunization with modified live virus vaccines or a field strain confers partial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renson, P; Fablet, C; Le Dimna, M; Mahé, S; Touzain, F; Blanchard, Y; Paboeuf, F; Rose, N; Bourry, O

    2017-05-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes huge economic losses for the swine industry worldwide. In the past several years, highly pathogenic strains that lead to even greater losses have emerged. For the Western European swine industry, one threat is the possible introduction of Eastern European PRRSV strains (example Lena genotype 1.3) which were shown to be more virulent than common Western resident strains under experimental conditions. To prepare for the possible emergence of this strain in Western Europe, we immunized piglets with a Western European PRRSV field strain (Finistere: Fini, genotype 1.1), a new genotype 1 commercial modified live virus (MLV) vaccine (MLV1) or a genotype 2 commercial MLV vaccine (MLV2) to evaluate and compare the level of protection that these strains conferred upon challenge with the Lena strain 4 weeks later. Results show that immunization with Fini, MLV1 or MLV2 strains shortened the Lena-induced hyperthermia. In the Fini group, a positive effect was also demonstrated in growth performance. The level of Lena viremia was reduced for all immunized groups (significantly so for Fini and MLV2). This reduction in Lena viremia was correlated with the level of Lena-specific IFNγ-secreting cells. In conclusion, we showed that a commercial MLV vaccine of genotype 1 or 2, as well as a field strain of genotype 1.1 may provide partial clinical and virological protection upon challenge with the Lena strain. The cross-protection induced by these immunizing strains was not related with the level of genetic similarity to the Lena strain. The slightly higher level of protection established with the field strain is attributed to a better cell-mediated immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel approach to long-term respiratory care: results of a community-based post-rehabilitation maintenance program in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Marla K; Francella, Susan; Romano, Julia M; Goldstein, Roger S; Brooks, Dina

    2013-08-01

    Although the short-term benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) are well established, improvements in exercise tolerance and health status diminish over time. The objectives of this study were to determine the feasibility and within-subject effects of a 1-year community-based maintenance exercise program for patients with COPD following completion of hospital-based PR. A single-arm longitudinal study was undertaken. After completion of PR, consecutive patients with COPD were recruited to attend a twice weekly exercise program supervised by fitness consultants at a local community centre. The transition from hospital to the community was facilitated by a case manager. Outcome measurements at baseline (pre-PR), post-PR, 6-months and 1-year included the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) for exercise capacity and the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) for health-related quality of life. Feasibility was assessed primarily through subject adherence. A total of 29 patients (mean age 66.8 ± 7.8 years, mean FEV1 45.1 ± 18.8 percent predicted) were enrolled in the program. Mean compliance to twice weekly exercise was 70%. No adverse events were reported. Statistically significant and clinically important improvements in the 6MWT and CRQ total and dyspnea domain were observed at 6-months and 1-year after PR compared to baseline (all p < 0.01). A community-based maintenance exercise program is feasible and can successfully preserve exercise capacity and health-related quality of life following institutionally-based PR in patients with moderate to severe COPD. A more formal evaluation of this approach is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of Community Land Model parameters for an improved assessment of net carbon fluxes at European sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Hanna; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Fox, Andrew; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2017-03-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) contains many parameters whose values are uncertain and thus require careful estimation for model application at individual sites. Here we used Bayesian inference with the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM(zs)) algorithm to estimate eight CLM v.4.5 ecosystem parameters using 1 year records of half-hourly net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) observations of four central European sites with different plant functional types (PFTs). The posterior CLM parameter distributions of each site were estimated per individual season and on a yearly basis. These estimates were then evaluated using NEE data from an independent evaluation period and data from "nearby" FLUXNET sites at 600 km distance to the original sites. Latent variables (multipliers) were used to treat explicitly uncertainty in the initial carbon-nitrogen pools. The posterior parameter estimates were superior to their default values in their ability to track and explain the measured NEE data of each site. The seasonal parameter values reduced with more than 50% (averaged over all sites) the bias in the simulated NEE values. The most consistent performance of CLM during the evaluation period was found for the posterior parameter values of the forest PFTs, and contrary to the C3-grass and C3-crop sites, the latent variables of the initial pools further enhanced the quality-of-fit. The carbon sink function of the forest PFTs significantly increased with the posterior parameter estimates. We thus conclude that land surface model predictions of carbon stocks and fluxes require careful consideration of uncertain ecological parameters and initial states.

  12. Efficacy testing of cosmetic products. A proposal to the European Community by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency, Ministry of Environment and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, J

    2001-08-01

    Regulations for cosmetic products primarily address safety of the products that may be used by large populations of healthy consumers. Requirements for documentation of efficacy claims are only fragmentary. This synopsis aims to review and conclude a set of standards that may be acceptable to the European Community, and the cosmetic industry, as a legal standard for efficacy documentation in Europe in the future. Ethical, formal, experimental, statistical and other aspects of efficacy testing are described, including validation, quality control and assurance. The importance of user relevant clinical end points, a controlled randomized trial design and evidence-based cosmetic product documentation, validation of methods, statistical power estimation and proper data handling, reporting and archiving is emphasized. The main principles of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) good clinical practice (GCP) should be followed by the cosmetics industry in a spirit of good documentation standard and scientific soundness, but full GCP is not considered mandatory in the field of cosmetics. Documentation by validated bio-instrumental methods may be acceptable, but efficacy documentation based on information about raw materials, reference to literature and laboratory experiments are only acceptable in exceptional cases. Principles for efficacy substantiation of cosmetic products in Europe, as described in this synopsis, are officially proposed by the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy to the European Community as a basis for an amendment to the Cosmetics Directive or otherwise implemented as a European Community regulation.

  13. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopstaken, R.M. E-mail: rogier.hopstaken@hag.unimaas.nl; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present ({kappa}=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae ({kappa}=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement.

  14. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS' MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael, Joel A; Richardson, Daniel; Rovick, Allen; Modell, Harold; Bruce, David; Horwitz, Barbara; Hudson, Margaret; Silverthorn, Dee; Whitescarver, Shirley; Williams, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 700 undergraduates studying physiology at community colleges, a liberal arts college, and universities were surveyed to determine the prevalence of four misconceptions about respiratory phenomena...

  15. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillinsusceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12 µg/mL that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90,1 µg/mL and linezolid (MIC90,2 Jg/mL. The 1-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in communityacquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections.

  16. [To evaluate the auxiliary diagnostic value of Japanese respiratory society scoring system for the rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in inpatients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin; Jin, Xin; Niu, Wenkai; Cui, Qian; Liu, Huiying; Zheng, Jing; Heng, Zhizhi; Bai, Changqing

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the auxiliary diagnostic value of Japanese respiratory society (JRS) scoring system for the rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MP) in inpatients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The clinical data of inpatients with CAP between January 2013 and Novermber 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The gold standard for identification of MP infection was determined by both positive culture and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Blood and sputum culture were used to detect other bacteria and fungi, and real time PCR to detect Chlamydia and Legionella pneumonia and the common respiratory viruses. Diagnostic test results consistency inspection was performed by Kappa test and continuous variable analysis was performed using t test. Data from 139 CAP inpatients were analyzed. An aetiological diagnosis was made for 61 patients (43.9%). Thirty-five cases (25.2%) were diagnosed as MP infection by the gold standard, while 72 cases (52.0%) by the JRS scoring system. The sensitivity of JRS scoring system for the diagnosis of MP infection was 85.7% (30/35), specificity 59.6% (62/104), positive predictive value 41.7% (30/72)and negative predictive value 92.5% (62/67). According to age, for the patients younger than 40 years old, the sensitivity of JRS routine scoring system for the diagnosis of MP infection was 24/24, specificity was 4/29, positive predictive value 24/49 and negative predictive value was 4/4. The JRS scoring system provides an auxiliary value for the identification of MP pneumonia. It has a high sensitivity and a strong negative predictive value. For patients younger than 40 yrs with low grades of JRS swring system. MP infection can be almost excluded from.

  17. Security of energy supply under the laws of the European Union / European Community; Energieversorgungssicherheit im Recht der Europaeischen Union, Europaeischen Gemeinschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proefrock, M.C.

    2007-07-01

    Security of supply is defined as the availability and reliability of energy supply at acceptable prices. By security of energy supply we mean a globally large supply of reliable, affordable, clean energy. By virtue of its nature security of supply in the energy sector primarily requires making provisions for the future through exploration, innovation, research, diversification and investments in technology. Energy politics takes place in a tension field defined by the goals of economic efficiency, sustainability and security of supply. In the past there have been repeated shifts within this triad of goals. The task for a rational energy policy is to reconciliate these goals in a meaningful way. European energy policy is understood to comprise all sovereign measures taken by the European Union in the energy sector, in particular measures that impact on the supply and demand for energy resources. Energy law serves, or should serve, to bring energy policy to realisation and therefore presupposes the existence of the latter. Energy policy means the figuration of an economy's energy sector in such a manner that the present and future demand of the economic region is covered.

  18. A survey of clinicians regarding respiratory physiotherapy intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with community-acquired pneumonia. What is current practice in Australian ICUs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Lisa; Hill, Anne-Marie; Patman, Shane

    2017-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause for intensive care unit (ICU) admission resulting in high morbidity and mortality. There is a paucity of evidence regarding respiratory physiotherapy for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients with CAP, and anecdotally clinical practice is variable in this cohort. The aims of this study were to identify the degree of variability in physiotherapy practice for intubated adult patients with CAP and to explore ICU physiotherapist perceptions of current practice for this cohort and factors that influence physiotherapy treatment mode, duration, and frequency. A survey was developed based on common aspects of assessment, clinical rationale, and intervention for intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Senior ICU physiotherapists across 88 Australian public and private hospitals were recruited. The response rate was 72%. Respondents (n = 75) stated their main rationale for providing a respiratory intervention were improved airway clearance (98%, n = 60/61), alveolar recruitment (74%, n = 45/61), and gas exchange (33%, n = 20/61). Respondents estimated that average intervention lasted between 16 and 30 minutes (70% of respondents, n = 41/59) and would be delivered once (44%) or twice (44%) daily. Results indicated large variability in reported practice; however, trends existed regarding positioning in alternate side-lying (81%, n = 52/64) or affected lung uppermost (83%, n = 53/64) and use of hyperinflation techniques (81%, 52/64). Decisions regarding duration were reported to be based on sputum volume (95%), viscosity (93%) and purulence (88%), cough effectiveness (95%), chest X-ray (87%), and auscultation (84%). Sixty percent reported that workload and staffing affected intervention duration and frequency. Intervention time was more likely increased when there was greater staffing (P = .03). Respiratory physiotherapy treatment varies for intubated patients with CAP. Further research is

  19. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  20. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  1. The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing Synergies: Protocol for a Prospective Observational Study to Measure the Impact of a Community-Based Program on Prevention and Mitigation of Frailty (ICP - PMF) in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, G; Orfila, F; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M; Roller-Winsberger, R; Illario, M; Musian, D; Alvino, S; O'Caoimh, R; Cano, A; Molloy, W; Iaccarino, G; Marazzi, M C; Inzerilli, M C; Madaro, O; Paul, C; Csonka, P; Vince, A C; Menditto, E; Maggio, M; Scarcella, P; Gilardi, F; Lucaroni, F; Abete, P; Girardi, V; Barra, R; Palombi, L

    2016-11-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe the protocol of the study "Impact of a Community-based Program on Prevention and Mitigation of Frailty in community-dwelling older adults" developed in the framework of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. This proposal has been developed by the Partnership Action groups on frailty, fall prevention and polypharmacy in older. The proposal wants to assess the impact of community-based programs aimed to counteract three main outcomes related to frailty: hospitalization, institutionalization and death. Bringing together researchers from seven European countries, the proposal aims to achieve the critical mass and the geographical extension enough to provide information useful to all older European citizens. An observational study will be carried out to calculate the incidence of the different outcomes in relation to the various interventions that will be assessed; results will be compared with data coming from already established national, regional and local dataset using the observed/expected approach. The sample will be made up by at least 2000 citizens for each outcome. All the citizens will be assessed at the baseline with two multidimensional questionnaires: the RISC questionnaire and the Short Functional Geriatric Evaluation questionnaire. The outcomes will be assessed every six-twelve months.

  2. Cardio-respiratory outcomes associated with exposure to wildfire smoke are modified by measures of community health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappold, Ana G; Cascio, Wayne E; Kilaru, Vasu J; Stone, Susan L; Neas, Lucas M; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2012-09-24

    Characterizing factors which determine susceptibility to air pollution is an important step in understanding the distribution of risk in a population and is critical for setting appropriate policies. We evaluate general and specific measures of community health as modifiers of risk for asthma and congestive heart failure following an episode of acute exposure to wildfire smoke. A population-based study of emergency department visits and daily concentrations of fine particulate matter during a wildfire in North Carolina was performed. Determinants of community health defined by County Health Rankings were evaluated as modifiers of the relative risk. A total of 40 mostly rural counties were included in the study. These rankings measure factors influencing health: health behaviors, access and quality of clinical care, social and economic factors, and physical environment, as well as, the outcomes of health: premature mortality and morbidity. Pollutant concentrations were obtained from a mathematically modeled smoke forecasting system. Estimates of relative risk for emergency department visits were based on Poisson mixed effects regression models applied to daily visit counts. For asthma, the strongest association was observed at lag day 0 with excess relative risk of 66% (28,117). For congestive heart failure the excess relative risk was 42% (5,93). The largest difference in risk was observed after stratifying on the basis of Socio-Economic Factors. Difference in risk between bottom and top ranked counties by Socio-Economic Factors was 85% and 124% for asthma and congestive heart failure respectively. The results indicate that Socio-Economic Factors should be considered as modifying risk factors in air pollution studies and be evaluated in the assessment of air pollution impacts.

  3. The use of community herbal monographs to facilitate registrations and authorisations of herbal medicinal products in the European Union 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Wieland

    2014-12-02

    The provisions for the simplified registration of traditional herbal medicinal products in the European Union were introduced by Directive 2004/24/EC amending Directive 2001/83/EC (Chapter 2a) in 2004. Since implementation in the European member states until December 2012 a total of 1015 registrations (traditional use) and 514 authorisations (well-established use) have been granted for products containing substances/ preparations from about 200 different herbal drugs. The overall number of received applications with more than one third still under assessment suggests a further increase for the next years. This review summarises the main features of registered and authorised herbal medicinal products in the EU and evaluates available data against provisions of Directive 2004/24/EC and European standards established by the Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products at the European Medicines Agency. The supportive function of Community herbal monographs is described as regards availability and their use in national procedures, which is complemented by an analysis of specific future challenges from experiences made with the implementation of Directive 2004/24/EC so far. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Correlation of EGFR mutation status with predominant histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new lung adenocarcinoma classification of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Celina; Cagle, Philip T; Johnson, Melissa; Patel, Jyoti D; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Raj, Rishi; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Raparia, Kirtee

    2014-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer. To investigate the relationship of EGFR mutation status to the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma according to the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We screened EGFR mutation in 200 consecutive lung adenocarcinoma resection specimens diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Among 200 lung adenocarcinomas, EGFR mutations were identified in 41 tumors (20.5%). The mean age in the EGFR-mutant group was 64.8 years and this group consisted of 78% females and 22% males. Most patients with EGFR-positive lung cancers were never-smokers (51%) as compared to 8% with EGFR-negative cancers (P adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers as compared to 69% with acinar pattern in EGFR wild-type lung cancers (P adenocarcinomas, 8 (36%) had EGFR mutations, accounting for 20% of adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations (P adenocarcinoma was lepidic (44%) in EGFR-mutant lung cancers (P lung adenocarcinomas of other subtypes.

  5. Community-based surveillance in the united states of macrolide-resistant pediatric pharyngeal group A streptococci during 3 respiratory disease seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanz, Robert R; Shulman, Stanford T; Shortridge, Virginia D; Kabat, William; Kabat, Kathy; Cederlund, Emily; Rippe, Jason; Beyer, Jill; Doktor, Stella; Beall, Bernard W

    2004-12-15

    In 2001, a total of 48% of pharyngeal group A streptococci (GAS) from Pittsburgh children were macrolide resistant. We assessed macrolide resistance, resistance genes, and emm types among GAS in the United States. In prospective, multicenter, community-based surveillance of pharyngeal GAS recovered from children 3-18 years old during 3 respiratory seasons (the 2000-2001 season, the 2001-2002 season, and the 2002-2003 season), GAS were tested for macrolide resistance and underwent emm gene sequencing. Macrolide-resistant GAS were tested for resistance to clindamycin, and resistance genes were determined. Erythromycin resistance was observed in 4.4% of isolates from the 2000-2001 season, 4.3% from the 2001-2002 season, and 3.8% from the 2002-2003 season (P=.80). Clindamycin resistance was found in 1.04% of isolates; annual rates of clindamycin resistance were stable (P=.75). The predominant resistance genotype each year was mef A (65%-76.9%; overall, 70.3%). Resistant isolates included strains representing 8-11 different emm types each year. Heterogeneity of emm subtypes, resistance genes, and clindamycin resistance was evident among resistant isolates within some emm types. Geographic variability in resistance rates was present each year. The macrolide resistance rate among pharyngeal GAS was <5% and was stable over the 3 seasons. However, rates varied among sites each year. There was no evidence of spread of a specific resistant clone, increasing clindamycin resistance, or escalation in median erythromycin MICs.

  6. Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Birkner, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory protection is used as a method of protecting individuals from inhaling harmful airborne contaminants and in some cases to supply them with breathable air in oxygen-deficient environments. This article focuses on the use and types of personal respiratory protection (respirators) worn by individuals at workplaces where airborne hazardous contaminants may exist. Respirators are increasingly also being used in nonindustrial settings such as health care facilities, as concerns regarding infectious epidemics and terrorist threats grow. Pulmonologists and other clinicians should understand fundamental issues regarding respiratory protection against airborne contaminants and the use of respirators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High-Attenuation Areas on Chest Computed Tomography and Clinical Respiratory Outcomes in Community-Dwelling Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolanczuk, Anna J; Oelsner, Elizabeth C; Barr, R Graham; Bernstein, Elana J; Hoffman, Eric A; Easthausen, Imaani J; Stukovsky, Karen Hinckley; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Michos, Erin D; Raghu, Ganesh; Kawut, Steven M; Lederer, David J

    2017-12-01

    Areas of increased lung attenuation visualized by computed tomography are associated with all-cause mortality in the general population. It is uncertain whether this association is attributable to interstitial lung disease (ILD). To determine whether high-attenuation areas are associated with the risk of ILD hospitalization and mortality in the general population. We performed a cohort study of 6,808 adults aged 45-84 years sampled from six communities in the United States. High-attenuation areas were defined as the percentage of imaged lung volume with attenuation values between -600 and -250 Hounsfield units. An adjudication panel determined ILD hospitalization and death. After adjudication, 52 participants had a diagnosis of ILD during 75,232 person-years (median, 12.2 yr) of follow-up. There were 48 hospitalizations attributable to ILD (crude rate, 6.4 per 10,000 person-years). Twenty participants died as a result of ILD (crude rate, 2.7 per 10,000 person-years). High-attenuation areas were associated with an increased rate of ILD hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.6 per 1-SD increment in high-attenuation areas; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.5; P areas were also associated with an increased rate of ILD-specific death (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.0; P Areas of increased lung attenuation are a novel risk factor for ILD hospitalization and mortality. Measurement of high-attenuation areas by screening and diagnostic computed tomography may be warranted in at-risk adults.

  8. Respiratory Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated with workers, and other areas (more often, rural areas) will be in need of respiratory therapists’ ... workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. ...

  9. Comparing the Community Composition of European and Eastern Chinese Waterbirds and the Influence of Human Factors on the China Waterbird Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Cao, L.; Barter, M.; Wang, X.; Sun, M.; Oeveren, van H.; Leeuw, de J.; Barzen, J.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the European and eastern Chinese waterbird assemblages and checked whether the effects of human disturbance could be detected in the assemblages’ composition. For the different Chinese provinces, we expected to find a negative effect of economic development on the mean bird species mass

  10. Is there a threshold concentration of cat allergen exposure on respiratory symptoms in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Mei; Thiering, Elisabeth; Zock, Jan-Paul; Villani, Simona; Olivieri, Mario; Modig, Lars; Jarvis, Deborah; Norbäck, Dan; Verlato, Giuseppe; Heinrich, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Cat allergen concentrations higher than 8 μg/g in settled house dust, have been suggested to provoke exacerbation of allergic respiratory symptoms. However, whether the 8 μg/g of indoor cat allergen concentration is indeed the minimal exposure required for triggering the asthma related respiratory symptoms or the development of sensitization has not yet been confirmed. We studied the associations between domestic cat allergen concentrations and allergic symptoms in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II, with the aim of confirming this suggested threshold. Cat allergen concentrations were measured in the mattress dust of 3003 participants from 22 study centres. Levels of specific immunoglobulin E to cat allergens were measured in serum samples using an immunoassay. Information on allergic symptoms, medication use, home environment and smoking was obtained from a face-to-face interview. Domestic cat allergen concentrations were not associated with allergic/ asthmatic symptoms in the entire study population, nor in the subset sensitized to cat allergen. We also found no association among individuals exposed to concentrations higher than 8 μg/g. However, exposure to medium cat allergen concentrations (0.24-0.63 μg/g) was positively associated with reported asthmatic respiratory symptoms in subjects who have experienced allergic symptoms when near animals. The proposed 8 μg/g threshold of cat allergen concentrations for the exacerbation of allergic/ respiratory symptoms was not confirmed in a general European adult population. Potential biases attributable to avoidance behaviours and an imprecise exposure assessment cannot be excluded.

  11. Duration of secretory IgM and IgA antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus in a community study in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, L G; Kofoed, P E; Nante, E J

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is probably the single major cause of lower respiratory infection (LRI) among infants worldwide. Its relative importance may be underestimated, as the diagnosis is based on antigen detection and antigen may only be detectable in the early phase of infection. We...

  12. A community study of clinical traits and risk factors for human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection during the first year of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Høgh, Mette; Nordbø, Svein

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are important respiratory pathogens with similar symptomatology. The aim of this prospective birth cohort study was to identify risk factors for an hMPV or RSV infection during the first year of life in unselected healthy children...

  13. Prevalência de asma em funcionários de hospital universitário avaliada por meio de questionário de saúde respiratória da Comunidade Européia Asthma prevalence among employees of a university hospital as evaluated using a European Union respiratory health questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Soares Aguiar Filho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de asma brônquica em funcionários de um hospital universitário, com idades entre 20 e 44 anos, segundo os critérios do European Community Respiratory Health Survey. MÉTODOS: Através de estudo descritivo, prospectivo, aleatório e estratificado de prevalência, foram analisados os questionários de 351 funcionários do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, entre abril e outubro de 2002. Foram consideradas as variáveis de caracterização amostral, as independentes referentes a sinais e sintomas e a dependente (asma, caracterizada pela informação de crise, diagnosticada por médico, nos doze meses anteriores à pesquisa. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de asma foi de 10,7%. Dispnéia noturna, sensação de aperto torácico e tosse noturna foram os sintomas mais freqüentes, com significância só no sexo feminino (respectivamente p = 0,03, p = 0,04 e p = 0,001. Dispnéia noturna, sibilos nos últimos doze meses, dispnéia com sibilos e uso de medicação para asma predominaram entre 20 e 29 anos, com significância para os dois últimos sintomas (p OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bronchial asthma among university hospital employees between the ages of 20 and 44 based on the criteria established in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. METHODS: A descriptive, prospective, randomized, stratified prevalence study was conducted, in which questionnaires completed between April and October of 2002 by 351 employees of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Federal University at Pernambuco Hospital das Clínicas were evaluated. For sample characterization, the independent variables used were the signs and symptoms of asthma, and one dependent variable (physician-diagnosed asthma, characterized by data related to attacks occurring within the 12 months preceding the study was included. RESULTS: The prevalence of asthma was 10.7%. Nocturnal dyspnea, chest tightness and

  14. Imagined Religious Communities and the “Culture of Bible-Readers”: Hinduism’s Challenge to European Religious Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Christopher Jason

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the challenges posed by modern conceptions of Hinduism - in particular Heinrich von Stietencron’s conception of a “collection of religions” and Romila Thapar’s application of Benedict Anderson’s theory of “imagined communities” to Hinduism-to the European style of religious studies, particularly at the undergraduate level.

  15. The evaluation of patient self-completion concordance forms used in community pharmacy : a comparison of two European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Marlies M E; Zuydgeest, Iris A; Walser, Sabine; Kijlstra, Nico B; Petkova, Valentina; de Gier, Johan J

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the use of patient self-completion concordance forms in Dutch and Bulgarian pharmacies. Second, to show any differences in pharmacy practice and patient behaviour in two European countries: the Netherlands and Bulgaria. METHODS: A random sample of 500 pharmacies were

  16. Paediatric respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Everard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual “home”.

  17. Paediatric respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary infections remain a major cause of infant and child mortality worldwide and are responsible for a substantial burden of morbidity. During the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, some of the main findings from peer-reviewed articles addressing this topic that were published in the preceding 12 months were reviewed in a Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session. The following article highlights some of the insights provided by these articles into the complex interactions of the human host with the extensive and dynamic populations of microorganisms that call an individual "home". Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  18. Higher prevalence of retinopathy in diabetic patients of South Asian ethnicity compared with white Europeans in the community: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Neil T; Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Reynold, Dilini R; Bush, Kate; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh; Bellary, Srikanth; Barnett, Anthony H; Kumar, Sudhesh; O'Hare, J Paul

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among U.K. residents of South Asian or white European ethnicity. This was a community-based cross-sectional study involving 10 general practices; 1,035 patients with type 2 diabetes were studied: 421 of South Asian and 614 of white European ethnicity. Diabetic retinopathy, sight-threatening retinopathy, maculopathy, and previous laser photocoagulation therapy were assessed after grading of retinal photographs. Data were collected on risk factors including age, duration, and treatment of diabetes, blood pressures, serum total cholesterol, and A1C. Patients of South Asian ethnicity had significantly higher systolic (144 vs. 137 mmHg, P blood pressure, A1C (7.9 vs. 7.5%, P maculopathy for South Asian versus white European patients. Patients of South Asian ethnicity had a significantly higher prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy, with significantly elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure, A1C, and total cholesterol; lower attained age; and younger age at diagnosis. Earlier onset of disease and higher levels of modifiable risk factors make early detection of diabetes, annual referral for retinal screening, and intensive risk factor control key elements in addressing this health inequality.

  19. Diagnosis of lung cancer in small biopsies and cytology: implications of the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G; Geisinger, Kim; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Wistuba, Ignacio; Flieder, Douglas B; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Hasleton, Philip S; Henderson, Douglas W; Kerr, Keith M; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    The new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society lung adenocarcinoma classification provides, for the first time, standardized terminology for lung cancer diagnosis in small biopsies and cytology; this was not primarily addressed by previous World Health Organization classifications. Until recently there have been no therapeutic implications to further classification of NSCLC, so little attention has been given to the distinction of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in small tissue samples. This situation has changed dramatically in recent years with the discovery of several therapeutic options that are available only to patients with adenocarcinoma or NSCLC, not otherwise specified, rather than squamous cell carcinoma. This includes recommendation for use of special stains as an aid to diagnosis, particularly in the setting of poorly differentiated tumors that do not show clear differentiation by routine light microscopy. A limited diagnostic workup is recommended to preserve as much tissue for molecular testing as possible. Most tumors can be classified using a single adenocarcinoma marker (eg, thyroid transcription factor 1 or mucin) and a single squamous marker (eg, p40 or p63). Carcinomas lacking clear differentiation by morphology and special stains are classified as NSCLC, not otherwise specified. Not otherwise specified carcinomas that stain with adenocarcinoma markers are classified as NSCLC, favor adenocarcinoma, and tumors that stain only with squamous markers are classified as NSCLC, favor squamous cell carcinoma. The need for every institution to develop a multidisciplinary tissue management strategy to obtain these small specimens and process them, not only for diagnosis but also for molecular testing and evaluation of markers of resistance to therapy, is emphasized.

  20. Mitosis trumps T stage and proposed international association for the study of lung cancer/american thoracic society/european respiratory society classification for prognostic value in resected stage 1 lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhig, Edwina Elizabeth; Dettrick, Andrew; Godbolt, David Burleigh; Pauli, John; van Zwieten, Anthony; Hansen, Aaron Richard; Yang, Ian Anthony; Fong, Kwun Meng; Clarke, Belinda Edith; Bowman, Rayleen Veronica

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether a group of pathologists could reproducibly apply the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification for lung adenocarcinoma to a cohort of stage 1 tumors and whether this architectural classification and/or other parameters could demonstrate survival advantage. A total of 145 cases of 7 edition of tumor, node, metastasis stage 1 adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed for predominant architectural pattern, including cribriform pattern, nuclear grade, mitotic index, and necrosis. The parameters were assessed for reproducibility and survival and using multivariate analysis, compared with stage, age, and sex. The majority of tumors had a mixed architecture with the acinar pattern being the most common predominant architecture. Micropapillary and cribriform architecture were the least frequent patterns. This study demonstrated that a group of five pathologists could reproducibly apply the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Although there were insufficient cribriform-predominant adenocarcinomas for assessment, when the percentage of all cribriform was combined with other architectures, it was associated with a worse prognosis. The majority of the parameters assessed demonstrated significance with univariate analysis but only mitotic index, as assessed by the highest count/10 high-power fields remained significant with multivariate analysis. In this study of resected stage 1 primary lung adenocarcinoma, we found mitotic index to be the only independent prognostic marker. It was more closely associated with outcome than either pathologic T stage or IASLC/ATS/ERS architecture-based classification. Further validation of concordance and reproducibility in reporting mitotic index, as well as validation of prognostic significance, needs to be undertaken in independent data sets.

  1. The European Union Food Distribution programme for the Most Deprived Persons of the community, 1987-2013: From agricultural policy to social inclusion policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraher, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The European Union Food Distribution programme for the Most Deprived Persons (MDP) of the community ran from 1987 until 2013. It was funded from Common Agricultural Policy budgets. The programme initially made use of surplus foods from the food mountains resulting from intervention stocks. This food was then distributed through aid agencies within member states, coordinated at a national government level. Reform of the CAP and global rises in food prices resulted in an increase in budget from €300 to €500 million Euros in 2010 with the added power to buy food on the open market. This led to a formal challenge to the scheme on the basis that buying goods on the open market shifted the emphasis from an agricultural/financial basis to a social one. A court ruling found that because the program was no longer used for removing surpluses the link to agriculture policy has become tenuous and therefore had no basis in community law. As a result of this legal challenge a number of policy compromises ensured the MDP would continue until the end of 2013 with a reduced budget. The scheme has been superseded by a new scheme in March 2014 called the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD). This is seen as a social programme. The way that policy and politics developed and changed the MDP programme are set out. The article tracks its move from being an agricultural policy to a social welfare one. The key policy players and actors in this move are set out as are the changing context and policy frameworks. The replacement of the MDP by FEAD is discussed as is how intensive lobbying in 2012/13 resulted in the development of a new Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  3. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.

    2013-01-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the hea......By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data......, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach...

  4. Respiratory Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin R. Miller

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Mechanics by Theodore Wilson is a slim paperback volume (64 pages) describing three aspects of the way the lungs work: 1) pressure?volume relationships with regard to the lungs, 2) chest wall and muscles with regard to how the respiratory pump works, and 3) gas flow and transport. Relevant details about the author are missing, which I think is a loss. He is Emeritus Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics and this background and his expertise was a perfect fit for the inv...

  5. Long-term evolution of fish communities in European mountainous rivers: past log driving effects, river management and species introduction (Salzach River, Danube).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidvogl, Gertrud; Pont, Didier; Dolak, Horst; Hohensinner, Severin

    Using historical sources from the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, we investigated the long-term evolution of the fish community in a mountainous river network and the influence of different human uses and management measures. Within the alpine Salzach catchment, historical presence was reconstructed for 26 fish species, abundance classes for 19 species. Due to channelization, flood protection and dam erections, the spatial distribution of fish species was reduced during the 20th century. Many rheophilic and eurytopic fish species historically inhabited river reaches along a wide longitudinal profile and were present in more upstream river reaches than nowadays. The decrease of species diversity in the headwater sections is a consequence of lost lateral connectivity. Strongest effects are reported for sensitive species requiring different habitat types during their life cycles (especially pike, nase, Danube salmon). One of the most important shifts from the historical fish community to the present one reflects the deliberate introduction of fish species for fisheries. Rainbow trout and brook trout, absent from the historical fish assemblage, today represent up to 29 % of the total number of fish occurrences. In contrast, log driving, one of the most common historical pressures in European mountainous rivers, did not show significant negative effects on the past fish ecological situation. This result strongly differs from the impacts of log driving and deforestation demonstrated for recent times, and could be related to the change in log driving practices during the 20th century and to the high societal value of fish before the industrialization period along with other historical pressures affecting fish in rivers without log driving. In general, our results can be valid for a large number of European mountainous rivers. They highlight the usefulness of such detailed historical studies for our understanding of the long-term evolution of fish communities and

  6. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  7. The European Respiratory Society spirometry tent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maio, Sara; Sherrill, Duane L; MacNee, William

    2012-01-01

    and doctors from pulmonary departments of local hospitals/universities gave their service for free. Lower limit of normal (LLN) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria for diagnosing and grading airway obstruction were used. Of 12,448 participants in six congress cities, 10...... tent during the annual ERS Congresses in 2004-2009. Spirometry was performed during the ERS Congresses in volunteers; all participants answered a simple, brief questionnaire on their descriptive characteristics, smoking and asthma. Portable spirometers were freely provided by the manufacturer. Nurses......,395 (83.5%) performed acceptable spirometry (mean age 51.0 ± 18.4 yrs; 25.5% smokers; 5.5% asthmatic). Airway obstruction was present in 12.4% of investigated subjects according to LLN criteria and 20.3% according to GOLD criteria. Through multinomial logistic regression analysis, age, smoking habits...

  8. Prevalence of asthma symptoms based on the European Community Respiratory Health Survey questionnaire and FENO in university students: gender differences in symptoms and FENO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Tsuburai, Takahiro; Dobashi, Kunio; Ohshima, Kihachi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-01-01

    .... We expected that the subjective asthma symptoms in women might be different from those in men. Therefore, we investigated the gender differences of asthma symptoms and FENO in a survey of asthma prevalence in university students...

  9. Assessing the state of pelagic fish communities within an ecosystem approach and the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shephard, Samuel; Rindorf, Anna; Dickey-Collas, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Pelagic fish are key elements in marine foodwebs and thus comprise an important part of overall ecosystem health. We develop a suite of ecological indicators that track pelagic fish community state and evaluate state of specific objectives against Good Environmental Status (GES) criteria. Indicator....... The pelagic fish communities of both subregions currently appear to be close to GES, but each remains vulnerable. In the CS subregion, fishing mortality is close to the precautionary reference point, although the unknown dynamics of sandeel, sprat, and sardine in the subregion may reduce the robustness...... of this evaluation. In the North Sea, sandeel stocks have been in poor state until very recently. Pelagic fish community biomass is slightly below the precautionary reference point in both subregions...

  10. Supportive environments for physical activity, community action, and policy in 8 European Union Member States: comparative analysis and specificities of context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruetten, Alfred; Frahsa, Annika; Engbers, Luuk; Gusi, Narcis; Mota, Jorge; Pacenka, Rimantas; Troelsen, Jens; Vasickova, Jana; Vuillemin, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A multilevel theoretical framework of physical activity (PA) promotion that addresses supportive environments, PA behavior, community action, and PA promoting policies is related to research and development in an international comparative study. Most-different and most-similar case selection was applied to data from 8 European Union Member States. Data from semistructured key informant qualitative interviews, focus group interviews with experts and policy-makers, as well as document analysis were linked to corresponding Eurobarometer data. The framework on the interplay of environment, PA behavior, community action and policies appears to be working across most different countries. Comprehensive systems of PA infrastructures are interlinked with relatively high levels of PA prevalence. These countries implement comprehensive national policies on PA promotion and show a positive perception of related local governments' engagement. Less comprehensive systems of infrastructures interplay with lower levels of PA prevalence, less community action and fewer policies. Differences between similar cases are linked to country-specific contexts. Framework application and comparative analysis indicates how to relate theory to empirical research and complex data sets. In-depth analysis of country-specific contexts and longitudinal observation on changes within and between countries might advise on how to integrate the framework into intervention research.

  11. Relative frequencies and sites of presentation of lymphoid neoplasms in a community hospital according to the revised European-American classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, J D; Mulvaney, D A; Potter, K L; Fishkin, P A; Geoffroy, F J

    1999-03-01

    Relative frequencies for common subtypes in the revised European-American classification of lymphoid neoplasms (REAL classification) have been reported. We determined the relative frequencies and sites of presentation of REAL subtypes at a 700-bed community hospital in central Illinois. A database was used to identify and prospectively catalogue all newly diagnosed lymphoid neoplasms from July 1, 1995 to March 1, 1998. The approach to diagnosis and subtyping incorporated morphologic features, immunophenotype, and clinical findings according to criteria proposed in the REAL classification. Of 347 lymphoid neoplasms diagnosed, 319 were subtyped in the REAL classification. Of these, 261 were B-cell neoplasms, 21 were T-cell neoplasms, and 37 were Hodgkin disease variants. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma/prolymphocytic leukemia, diffuse large cell, and follicle center neoplasms were the most common B-cell subtypes. Large granular lymphocyte leukemia was the most common T-cell neoplasm. Nodular sclerosis was the most common Hodgkin disease variant. The relative frequencies in a US community hospital setting are similar to those reported in other studies. Differences are attributable to patient selection criteria, study group geographic location and racial composition, and/or referral patterns. Diverse REAL classification subtypes may be expected in US community hospitals.

  12. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), European Society for Neonatology (ESN), Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS), European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI)ORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann...

  13. European „C” quest: community, competitiveness, convergence, cohesion. what should the “eu new comer romanians” aim for?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jora Octavian-Dragomir

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The analyses carried out both at the centre (Brussels and at the destination (member states (abuse of the principle that in public expenditure terms “spent money means well-spent money” and consider that absorption capacity equals economic performance (equated quite disputably with disparity reduction. The aggregate Keynesian perspective provides the main argument in favour of this interpretation: EU funds lead to GDP growth (economic growth. This vision overlooks the crucial importance of resource allocation micro-processes, private property and business activity. Therewith, the process of making European funds profitable and, consequently, the EU convergence feasible depends on the extent to which the absorption environment is structurally reformed. The “cohesion paradox,” which can be formulated like “least underdeveloped regions have relatively higher chances to attract European funds, while disparities compared to relatively less developed regions might even intensify”, can be broken only through multi-dimensional reform, immaterial to whether we speak about Romania, or Ireland, or Portugal, or Spain, or Greece.

  14. Living with Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  15. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  16. The 'European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD)': a multifaceted, community-based action programme against depression and suicidality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegerl, U.; Wittmann, M.; Arensman, E.; Van Audenhove, C.; Bouleau, J.H.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Gusmao, R.; Kopp, M.; Lohr, C.; Maxwell, M.; Meise, U.; Mirjanic, M.; Oskarsson, H.; Sola, V.P.; Pull, C.; Pycha, R.; Ricka, R.; Tuulari, J.; Varnik, A.; Pfeiffer-Gerschel, T.

    2008-01-01

    Action programmes fostering partnerships and bringing together regional and national authorities to promote the care of depressed patients are urgently needed. In 2001 the 'Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression' was initiated as a community-based model project within the large-scale 'German Research

  17. Examining the psychometric validity of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure-Revised (MEIM-R) in a community sample of African American and European American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakawa, Ayanda; Butler, Robert C; Shapiro, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure-Revised (MEIM-R), focusing on a sample drawn from a geographic region in the United States that has not been included in previously published research on the MEIM-R. Data were obtained from a community-based sample of 105 African American (AA) and 91 European American (EA) adults located in the state of Alabama. The MEIM-R was best represented by two constructs-exploration and commitment. AA adults reported higher levels of racial/ethnic identity exploration and commitment than EA adults. Differential item functioning was found among 1 of the exploration items. The current study provides additional support for the structural validity of the MEIM-R. Further research on the invariance of responses to the MEIM-R across a variety of sociodemographic factors is still necessary. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The evolution of public policies for the promotion of SMEs in the Andean Community of Nations and the European Union: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Heredia Rodríguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the policies designed to promote SMEs implemented in the Andean Community of Nations (ACN and the European Union (EU in the past few decades. Based on an analytical and comparative methodology, it is set out that, with regard to synchronous or sequential adoption hypotheses, public policies that support SMEs respond to an independent adoption model and are determined by their own historical and political context, according to the different arenas in which the economic integration process of both regions is found. The paper also highlights that in the ACN, in contrast to the EU, it is difficult to find abiding lines of action in the design of these public policies.

  19. Declining Innovation Performance of the Hungarian Economy: Special Focus on Organizational Innovation. The Example of the European Community Innovation Survey (CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Makó

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors intend to examine the innovation performance of the Hungarian firms before and following the period of the global financial crisis and economic downturn. Contrary to the mainstream approach non-technological innovation, more precisely workplace innovation is put into the focus of the analysis. The authors argue that this is a neglected dimension of firms’ innovation activities which may become an important source of competitiveness at company level and thus it deserves more attention. The analysis of empirical data of the various waves of the European Community Innovation Survey (CIS on non-technological innovation shows that the innovation performance of the Hungarian firms is declining. The authors complement this statistical analysis with the results of the European Working Conditions Survey demonstrating that there are significant differences in the innovation performance of such country groups as the EU-27, the Nordic and the Post-Socialist countries. Beside the country-specific comparison, the authors evaluate the performance of the Hungarian and Slovakian knowledge-intensive business service sector identified as a driver playing a “benchmark” role in speeding up workplace innovations. Finally, some key lessons are drawn indicating the need for a map on the distribution of different work organization forms in order to better understand the companies’ innovation activity and skill requirements.

  20. European Law in the Making:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten

    the legal service of the High Authority from early on promoted a ‘constitutional’ interpretation of European law, but where the member state, as well as most legal experts, still considered European law a subset of international law. How did the Court of Justice of the ECSC manoeuvre between...... on European law in the making.......Traditionally, the Court of Justice of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) has mainly been considered the somewhat dull predecessor to the more famous Court of Justice of the European Communities, which in 1963-64 ‘constitutionalised’ the Treaties of Rome with the seminal judgments of Van...

  1. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"ABS 1. HOW SAFE IS NASAL CANNULAE OXYGEN THERAPY DURING NEONATAL TRANSPORT? • A. Brunton, J. O’Shea, A. JacksonABS 2. WEANING PREMATURE INFANTS FROM NASAL CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE – CURRENT PRACTICE IN GERMANY • A. Kidszun, C. Arnold, J. Winter, C. Whybra-Trümpler, E. MildenbergerABS 3. TIMING OF KEY EVENTS IN NEONATAL RE­SUSCITATION • A. Heathcote, J. Jones, P. ClarkeABS 4. COMPARING NON-INVASIVE VENTILATION METHODS IN RESPIRATORY SUPPORT OF PRETERM NEONATES WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES • A.S. Farhat, A. Mohammadzadeh, G.A. Mamuri, R. Saeidi, S. NoorizadehABS 5. PREDICTORS AND OUTCOMES OF CONTINU­OUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE AND NA­SAL HIGH-FLOW TREATMENT FAILURE IN PRE­TERM INFANTS: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF A RANDOMIZED TRIAL • B. Manley, C. Roberts, D. Frøisland, L. Doyle, P. Davis, L. OwenABS 6. NEONATAL NON-INVASIVE RESPIRATORY SUPPORT APPROACH: A TWO COUNTRIES COMPARISON • I. Bresesti, S. Zivanovic, G. Lista, C. RoehrABS 7. PREDICTORS OF EARLY CPAP FAILURE IN VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PRETERM

  2. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro De Pascale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs, supported by the European Respiratory Society, has been recently established, with the aim at studying all respiratory tract infective episodes except community-acquired ones. A multicentre, observational study is in progress, enrolling more than 1000 patients fulfilling the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings consistent with a LRTI. This article describes the methodology of this study. A specific interest is the clinical impact of non-ICU-acquired nosocomial pneumonia requiring ICU admission, non-ventilator-associated LRTIs occurring in the ICU, and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. The clinical meaning of microbiologically negative infectious episodes and specific details on antibiotic administration modalities, dosages and duration are also highlighted. Recently released guidelines address many unresolved questions which might be answered by such large-scale observational investigations. In light of the paucity of data regarding such topics, new interesting information is expected to be obtained from our network research activities, contributing to optimisation of care for critically ill patients in the ICU.

  3. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Nseir, Saad; Chastre, Jean; Welte, Tobias; Antonelli, Massimo; Navalesi, Paolo; Garofalo, Eugenio; Bruni, Andrea; Coelho, Luis Miguel; Skoczynski, Szymon; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Grimaldi, David; Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Lange, Christoph; Froes, Filipe; Artigas, Antoni; Díaz, Emili; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Panigada, Mauro; Comellini, Vittoria; Fasano, Luca; Soave, Paolo M.; Spinazzola, Giorgia; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Marin, Judith; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Chiumello, Davide; Pezzi, Angelo; Schultz, Marcus; Mohamed, Hafiz; Van Der Eerden, Menno; Hoek, Roger A.S.; Gommers, D.A.M.P.J.; Pasquale, Marta Di; Civljak, Rok; Kutleša, Marko; Bassetti, Matteo; Dimopoulos, George; Nava, Stefano; Rios, Fernando; Zampieri, Fernando G.; Povoa, Pedro; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs), supported by the European Respiratory Society, has been recently established, with the aim at studying all respiratory tract infective episodes except community-acquired ones. A multicentre, observational study is in progress, enrolling more than 1000 patients fulfilling the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings consistent with a LRTI. This article describes the methodology of this study. A specific interest is the clinical impact of non-ICU-acquired nosocomial pneumonia requiring ICU admission, non-ventilator-associated LRTIs occurring in the ICU, and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. The clinical meaning of microbiologically negative infectious episodes and specific details on antibiotic administration modalities, dosages and duration are also highlighted. Recently released guidelines address many unresolved questions which might be answered by such large-scale observational investigations. In light of the paucity of data regarding such topics, new interesting information is expected to be obtained from our network research activities, contributing to optimisation of care for critically ill patients in the ICU. PMID:29164144

  4. Investigating the long-term legacy of drought and warming on the soil microbial community across five European shrubland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousk, Johannes; Smith, Andrew R; Jones, Davey L

    2013-12-01

    We investigated how the legacy of warming and summer drought affected microbial communities in five different replicated long-term (>10 years) field experiments across Europe (EU-FP7 INCREASE infrastructure). To focus explicitly on legacy effects (i.e., indirect rather than direct effects of the environmental factors), we measured microbial variables under the same moisture and temperature in a brief screening, and following a pre-incubation at stable conditions. Specifically, we investigated the size and composition of the soil microbial community (PLFA) alongside measurements of bacterial (leucine incorporation) and fungal (acetate in ergosterol incorporation) growth rates, previously shown to be highly responsive to changes in environmental factors, and microbial respiration. We found no legacy effects on the microbial community size, composition, growth rates, or basal respiration rates at the effect sizes used in our experimental setup (0.6 °C, about 30% precipitation reduction). Our findings support previous reports from single short-term ecosystem studies thereby providing a clear evidence base to allow long-term, broad-scale generalizations to be made. The implication of our study is that warming and summer drought will not result in legacy effects on the microbial community and their processes within the effect sizes here studied. While legacy effects on microbial processes during perturbation cycles, such as drying-rewetting, and on tolerance to drought and warming remain to be studied, our results suggest that any effects on overall ecosystem processes will be rather limited. Thus, the legacies of warming and drought should not be prioritized factors to consider when modeling contemporary rates of biogeochemical processes in soil. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing synergies: protocol for a prospective observational study to measure the Impact of a community-based program on prevention and mitigation of frailty (ICP – PMF) in community-dwelling older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liotta, G.; Orfila, F.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Roller-Winsberger, R.; Illaria, M.; Musian, D.; Alvino, S.; O'Caoimh, R.; Cano, A.; Molloy, W.; Iaccarino, G.; Marazzi, M.C.; Inzerilli, M.C.; Madaro, O.; Paul, C.; Csonka, P.; Vince, A.C.; Menditto, E.; Maggio, M.; Scarcella, P.; Gilardi, F.; Lucaroni, F.; Abete, P.; Girardi, V.; Barra, R.; Palombi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe the protocol of the study “Impact of a Community-based Program on Prevention and Mitigation of Frailty in community-dwelling older adults‿ developed in the framework of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. This proposal has been developed

  6. A community study of clinical traits and risk factors for human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection during the first year of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linstow, Michael Ernst Von; Hogh, M.; Nordbo, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are important respiratory pathogens with similar symptomatology. The aim of this prospective birth cohort study was to identify risk factors for an hMPV or RSV infection during the first year of life in unselected healthy children......% CI:0.09-0.85). Risk factors for RSV hospitalisation (n = 11) were: (1) older siblings (OR = 4.49; 95% CI: 1.08-18.73) and (2) smoking in the household (OR = 5.06; 95% CI: 1.36-18.76). Exclusive breastfeeding for the first 14 days of life protected against hospitalisation (OR = 0.21; 95% CI:0...

  7. Architecture for an advanced biomedical collaboration domain for the European paediatric cancer research community (ABCD-4-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzlnader, Michael; Falgenhauer, Markus; Gossy, Christian; Schreier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Today, progress in biomedical research often depends on large, interdisciplinary research projects and tailored information and communication technology (ICT) support. In the context of the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) project the exchange of data between data source (Source Domain) and data consumer (Consumer Domain) systems in a distributed computing environment needs to be facilitated. This work presents the requirements and the corresponding solution architecture of the Advanced Biomedical Collaboration Domain for Europe (ABCD-4-E). The proposed concept utilises public as well as private cloud systems, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework and web-based applications to provide the core capabilities in accordance with privacy and security needs. The utility of crucial parts of the concept was evaluated by prototypic implementation. A discussion of the design indicates that the requirements of ENCCA are fully met. A whole system demonstration is currently being prepared to verify that ABCD-4-E has the potential to evolve into a domain-bridging collaboration platform in the future.

  8. Does deregulation in community pharmacy impact accessibility of medicines, quality of pharmacy services and costs? Evidence from nine European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Habimana, Katharina; Arts, Danielle

    2014-09-01

    To analyse the impact of deregulation in community pharmacy on accessibility of medicines, quality of pharmacy services and costs. We analysed and compared community pharmacy systems in five rather deregulated countries (England, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden) and four rather regulated countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, Spain). Data were collected by literature review, a questionnaire survey and interviews. Following a deregulation, several new pharmacies and dispensaries of Over-the-Counter (OTC) medicines tended to be established, predominantly in urban areas. Unless prevented by regulation, specific stakeholders, e.g. wholesalers, were seen to gain market dominance which limited envisaged competition. There were indications for an increased workload for pharmacists in some deregulated countries. Economic pressure to increase the pharmacy turnover through the sale of OTC medicines and non-pharmaceuticals was observed in deregulated and regulated countries. Prices of OTC medicines were not found to decrease after a deregulation in pharmacy. Access to pharmacies usually increases after a deregulation but this is likely to favour urban populations with already good accessibility. Policy-makers are recommended to take action to ensure equitable accessibility and sustainable competition in a more deregulated environment. No association between pharmaceutical expenditure and the extent of regulation/deregulation appears to exist. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation du systeme de traduction automatique SYSTRAN anglais-Francais, version 1978, de la Commission des Communautes Europeennes (Evaluation of the English-French SYSTRAN Machine Translation System, 19 version, of the Commission of European Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slype, Georges

    1979-01-01

    Describes the French-English version of the SYSTRAN machine translation system, used by the Commission of European Communities, and an evaluation study which examined the quality, cost, and weaknesses of the system. The study concluded that this type of system is useful for "pretranslation" and "rough" translation only. (AM)

  10. Bilinguismo e immigrazione: una nota sociolinguistica al piano europeo di mantenimento delle lingue nazionali nelle comunita di emigrati (Bilingualism and Immigration: A Sociolinguistic View of the European Plan for the Maintainance of National Languages in Immigrant Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Arturo

    1979-01-01

    Outlines the European Economic Community's (EEC) plan for the maintainance of national languages among immigrants. Describes the variety of objectives behind the EEC's linguistic policy as incompatible with the creation of a unified instructional approach. Emphasizes that dialects spoken within immigrant families create additional problems in…

  11. Ambient pollution and respiratory outcomes among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic position from effects of ambient air pollutant concentrations, with regard to both short-term exacerbations and prevalence of specific respiratory diagnoses and symptoms. All primary schools in the selected communities were assessed ...

  12. Economic evaluation of HIV testing for men who have sex with men in community-based organizations - results from six European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Julian; Rosado, Ricardo; Amri, Omar; Morel, Stéphane; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Chanos, Sophocles; Cigan, Bojan; Lobnik, Miha; Fuertes, Ricardo; Pichon, François; Kaye, Per Slaaen; Agustí, Cristina; Fernàndez-López, Laura; Lorente, Nicolas; Casabona, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The non-decreasing incidence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) has motivated the emergence of Community Based Voluntary Counselling and Testing (CBVCT) services specifically addressed to MSM. The CBVCT services are characterized by facilitated access and linkage to care, a staff largely constituted by voluntary peers, and private not-for-profit structures outside the formal health system institutions. Encouraging results have been measured about their effectiveness, but these favourable results may have been obtained at high costs, questioning the opportunity to expand the experience. We performed an economic evaluation of HIV testing for MSM at CBVCT services, and compared them across six European cities. We collected retrospective data for six CBVCT services from six cities (Copenhagen, Paris, Lyon, Athens, Lisbon, and Ljubljana), for the year 2014, on the number of HIV tests and HIV reactive tests, and on all expenditures to perform the testing activities. The total costs of CBVCTs varied from 54,390€ per year (Ljubljana) to 245,803€ per year (Athens). The cost per HIV test varied from to 41€ (Athens) to 113€ (Ljubljana). The cost per HIV reactive test varied from 1966€ (Athens) to 9065€ (Ljubljana). Our results show that the benefits of CBVCT services are obtained at an acceptable cost, in comparison with the literature (values, mostly from the USA, range from 1600$ to 16,985$ per HIV reactive test in clinical and non-clinical settings). This result was transversal to several European cities, highlighting that there is a common CBVCT model, the cost of which is comparable regardless of the epidemiological context and prices. The CBVCT services represent an effective and "worth it" experience, to be continued and expanded in future public health strategies towards HIV.

  13. Smoking, respiratory symptoms and likely asthma in young people: evidence from postal questionnaire surveys in the Wythenshawe Community Asthma Project (WYCAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linehan Mary

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is recognised that smoking is a major risk factor for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is associated with respiratory symptoms, there is less agreement concerning the relationship between asthma and smoking. This study aims to examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and asthma prevalence. Method Data were used from two postal questionnaire surveys (1999 and 2001 in two general practice populations, using a respiratory questionnaire based on the ECRHQ and a generic quality of life questionnaire (EQ-5D. Only subjects less than 45 years old were included in the survey. An empirical definition of likely asthma was used based on respiratory questionnaire responses. Smoking was examined according to three categories, current smoker, ex smoker and never smoker. Results Almost 3500 subjects were included in the analyses. Current smokers had a higher prevalence of likely asthma compared to never smokers, odds ratio (OR 1.59 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.24 to 2.04. and also compared to ex smokers OR 1.79 (CI 1.25 to 2.56, but there was no difference between ex smokers and never smokers (OR 1.00 (0.75–1.35. Current smoking was also positively associated with all symptoms but not with a history of hayfever/eczema. Conclusion Although the positive association found between current smoking and obstructive airways disease is likely to be due to the effect of cigarettes on asthma, it could reflect an association with early COPD (GOLD stages 0 or 1. Smoking cessation has a beneficial effect on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and is therefore of paramount importance among these young adults.

  14. Expanding professional pharmacy services in European community setting: Is it cost-effective? A systematic review for health policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraudin, Clémence; Bugnon, Olivier; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    To synthesize cost-effectiveness analyses on professional pharmacy services (PPS) performed in Europe in order to contribute to current debates on their funding and reimbursement. Systematic review in PubMed, Embase and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases to identify full economic evaluation studies of PPS in community setting from 2004. Twenty-one studies were included, conducted in the United-Kingdom (n=13), the Netherlands (n=3), Spain (n=2), Belgium (n=1), France (n=1) and Denmark (n=1). PPS to enhance medicine safety (interprofessional meetings to reduce errors, n=2) and access to medicines (minor ailment scheme, n=1) were in favour of their cost-effectiveness in the UK context, but the evidence is not sufficient. Eleven studies assessed PPS to improve treatment outcomes of individual patients-such as pharmaceutical care services, medication review, educational and coaching program, disease support service, medicines management and telephone-based advisory for improving adherence. Findings were contradictory and did not lead to strong conclusion. Screening programs for different diseases showed robust positive results (n=2) as well as smoking cessation services (n=5) and should be considered to be more widely available in accordance with national context. The review provides arguments for the implementation of PPS aiming to improve public health through screening programs and smoking cessation services. However, further full economic evaluations are needed to support or refute the added value of other services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavioural effects of a community-oriented setting-based intervention for prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. Main results from the IDEFICS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Verbestel, V; De Henauw, S; Maes, L; Huybrechts, I; Mårild, S; Eiben, G; Moreno, L A; Barba, G; Kovács, É; Konstabel, K; Tornaritis, M; Gallois, K; Hebestreit, A; Pigeot, I

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the behavioural effects, as reported by the parents of the participating boys and girls, of the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of Dietary- and lifestyle-induced health EFfects In Children and infantS) intervention. The effectiveness of the IDEFICS intervention was evaluated through a cluster-controlled trial in eight European countries (control and intervention communities in each country) including more than 16,000 children. The 2- to 9.9-year-old children in the intervention group were exposed to a culturally adapted intervention that aimed to prevent childhood obesity through the community, schools/kindergartens and family. Parents completed questionnaires to measure water, soft drink and fruit juice intake; fruit and vegetable intake; daily TV viewing and other sedentary behaviours; daily physical activity levels and strengthening of the parent-child relationships at baseline and follow-up (2 years later). Mixed models with an additional random effect for country were used to account for the clustered study design, and results were stratified by sex. The pan-European analysis revealed no significant time by condition interaction effects, neither for boys nor girls, i.e. the analysis revealed no intervention effects on the behaviours of the IDEFICS children as reported by their parents (F = 0.0 to 3.3, all p > 0.05). Also very few significances were found in the country-specific analyses. Positive intervention effects were only found for sport club participation in Swedish boys, for screen time in weekends for Spanish boys and for TV viewing in Belgian girls. Although no expected intervention effects as reported by the parents on diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviours could be shown for the overall IDEFICS cohort, a few favourable intervention effects were found on specific behaviours in some individual countries. More in-depth analyses of the process evaluation data are needed to obtain more

  16. European aid control policy and environmental protection - an evaluation of the new Community guidelines; Die europaeische Beihilfenaufsicht im Umweltschutz - Darstellung und Kritik des neuen Gemeinschaftsrahmens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewringmann, D.; Thoene, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Finanzwissenschaftliches Forschungsinstitut; Fischer, H.G.

    2002-01-01

    On 3 February 2001 the European Commission adopted the new Community guidelines on state aid for environmental protection. These guidelines outline the methods and criteria used by the Commission when controlling environmental state aid according to Art. 87 and 88 of the EC-Treaty. The study analyses the development of the new guidelines and their potential effects on environmental protection and environmental policy in the Member States of the European Union. In essence, the guidelines display three harmful tendencies: - they hamper progressive and innovative environmental policy that improves on 'least common denominator'-Community standards; - they do not respect the limits of the Commissions's authority, and interfere with the Member States' exclusive authority to decide on strategies and instruments of their respective environmental policies, and they especially affect Member States' choices between different energy sources and the general structure of its energy supply; - finally, they do not improve the protection of air competition on the common market. Based on these findings, the report delineates perspectives for an aid control policy that protects fair competition, and that gives incentives for voluntary national and regional environmental protection, allows for the equal treatment of clean techniques, and provides a consistent framework for exemptions from ecological taxes and environmental levies at the same time. (orig.) [German] Die Europaeische Kommission hat mit Wirkung vom 3. Februar 2001 einen neuen Gemeinschaftsrahmen fuer staatliche Umweltschutzbeihilfen erlassen. Dieser skizziert die Verfahren und Kriterien, welche die Kommission in ihrer Ueberpruefung staatlicher Umweltschutzbeihilfen auf Vereinbarkeit mit dem gemeinsamen Markt nach Art. 87 u. 88 EGV nutzen will. Die vorliegende Untersuchung schildert die Entstehung des Beihilferahmens und analysiert dessen potenzielle Wirkungen auf den Umweltschutz und die

  17. Trend in Antibiotic Resistance of and Strains Isolated from Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal between 2005 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guèye Ndiaye

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of antibiotic resistance among common respiratory pathogens is a major cause of concern worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are among the most common respiratory pathogens. In this study, representative samples obtained from 3 different medical centers in Dakar, Senegal were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. The samples were collected from 2005 to 2008 and the data obtained was compared to establish resistance patterns between the two years (i.e. 2005–2006 to 2007–2008. S. pneumoniae exhibited a significant increase in the resistance to azithromycin and the intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and cotrimoxazole. H. influenzae also exhibited a significant increase in resistance to azithromycin and intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol. None of H. influenzae samples were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalosporin and fluroquinolones and most of the S. pneumoniae isolates demonstrated high susceptibility to the antibiotics tested. Results from this study will provide greater insights to antibiotic therapy during respiratory tract infections in Dakar, Senegal. This study also establishes the importance of continuous monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns that are often region-specific.

  18. Trend in Antibiotic Resistance of Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Haemophilus Influenzae Strains Isolated from Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal Between 2005 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guèye Ndiaye

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of antibiotic resistance among common respiratory pathogens is a major cause of concern worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are among the most common respiratory pathogens. In this study, representative samples obtained from 3 different medical centers in Dakar, Senegal were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. The samples were collected from 2005 to 2008 and the data obtained was compared to establish resistance patterns between the two years (i.e. 2005–2006 to 2007–2008. S. pneumoniae exhibited a significant increase in the resistance to azithromycin and the intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and cotrimoxazole. H. influenzae also exhibited a significant increase in resistance to azithromycin and intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol. None of H. influenzae samples were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalosporin and fluroquinolones and most of the S. pneumoniae isolates demonstrated high susceptibility to the antibiotics tested. Results from this study will provide greater insights to antibiotic therapy during respiratory tract infections in Dakar, Senegal. This study also establishes the importance of continuous monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns that are often region-specific.

  19. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verbestel Vera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. Methods The intervention mapping protocol (IMP was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. Results The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. Conclusions The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of

  20. Using the intervention mapping protocol to develop a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in a multi-centre European project: the IDEFICS intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbestel, Vera; De Henauw, Stefaan; Maes, Lea; Haerens, Leen; Mårild, Staffan; Eiben, Gabriele; Lissner, Lauren; Moreno, Luis A; Frauca, Natalia Lascorz; Barba, Gianvincenzo; Kovács, Eva; Konstabel, Kenn; Tornaritis, Michael; Gallois, Katharina; Hassel, Holger; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased during the past decades and is now considered an urgent public health problem. Although stabilizing trends in obesity prevalence have been identified in parts of Europe, preventive efforts in children are still needed. Using the socio-ecological approach as the underlying theoretical perspective, the IDEFICS project aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in eight European countries. The aim of the present manuscript was to describe the content and developmental process of the IDEFICS intervention. The intervention mapping protocol (IMP) was used to develop the community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity in 3 to 10 years old children. It is a theory- and evidence-based tool for the structured planning and development of health promotion programs that requires the completion of six different steps. These steps were elaborated by two coordinating centers and discussed with the other participating centers until agreement was reached. Focus group research was performed in all participating centers to provide an informed basis for intervention development. The application of the IMP resulted in an overall intervention framework with ten intervention modules targeting environmental and personal factors through the family, the school and the community. The summary results of the focus group research were used to inform the development of the overall intervention. The cultural adaptation of the overall intervention was realised by using country specific focus group results. The need for cultural adaptation was considered during the entire process to improve program adoption and implementation. A plan was developed to evaluate program effectiveness and quality of implementation. The IDEFICS project developed a community-based intervention for the prevention of childhood obesity by using to the intervention mapping heuristic. The

  1. The Incidence and Short-term Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Illness with Cough in Children from a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Urban Community in Australia: A Community-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry K. Hall

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute respiratory illnesses with cough (ARIwC are predominant causes of morbidity in Australian Indigenous children; however, data on disease burden in urban communities are scarce. This study aimed to determine the incidence of ARIwC, the predictors of recurrent (≥4 episodes ARIwC, and development of chronic cough following an ARIwC in urban, predominantly Indigenous, children aged <5 years from northern Brisbane, Australia.MethodsProspective cohort study of children aged <5 years registered with a primary healthcare center. ARIwC episodes and outcomes were collected for 12 months. Recurrent ARIwC was defined as ≥4 episodes in 12 months. Chronic cough was defined as cough lasting >4 weeks. Children who developed chronic cough were reviewed by a pediatric pulmonologist. Incidence densities per child-month of observation were calculated and predictors of recurrent ARIwC and chronic cough were evaluated in logistic regression models.ResultsBetween February 2013 and November 2015, 200 children were enrolled; median age of 18.1 months, range (0.7–59.7 months and 90% identified as Indigenous. A total of 1,722 child-months of observation were analyzed (mean/child = 8.58, 95% CI 8.18–9.0. The incidence of ARIwC was 24.8/100 child-months at risk (95% CI 22.3–27.5. Twenty-one children (10.5% experienced recurrent ARIwC. Chronic cough was identified in 70/272 (25.7% episodes of ARIwC. Predictors of recurrent ARIwC were presence of eczema, mold in the house, parent/carer employment status, and having an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mother/non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander father (compared to both parents being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. Predictors of chronic cough included being aged <12 months, eczema, childcare attendance, previous history of cough of >4 weeks duration, having an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mother/non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander father (compared to

  2. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  3. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  4. Variation of a benthic heterotrophic bacteria community with different respiratory metabolisms in Coyuca de Benítez coastal lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Ferrara-Guerrero

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuations of the number, biomass and composition of the heterotrophic community were studied daily for two days, according to depth, pH, Eh, O2 and organic carbon concentration within a zone of the canal between the Coyuca de Benítez lagoon (Guerrero, Mexico and the coastal waters. At the three moments of the day studied (6 am, 2 pm and 10 pm, the oxygen concentrations in the overlying water and in the superficial sediment layer were near air-saturation in the diurnal samplings (582 µM at 6 am and 665 µM at 2 pm, and sub-satured during the night (158 µM. In the sediments, the models of vertical distribution of Eh and organic carbon distributions were very irregular due to the bio-perturbation of the benthic, meio- and macrofauna, whose activity allows the superficial organic carbon to migrate towards sediment deeper layers. Vertical distribution of the different viable bacteria populations seems to be related to the hydrodynamic patterns of the communicating canal and sediments heterogeneity. In the sediment column, the heterotrophic bacteria total number varied from 6.8 to 20.3 x 108 cells cm-3. The highest heterotrophic bacterial biomass values were encountered during the diurnal samplings (39.2 µgC.l-1 at 6 am and 34.4 µgC.l-1 at 2 pm and the lowest during the night (9.7 µgC.l-1. The fluctuations of viable heterotrophic bacteria populations with different respiratory metabolisms (aerobic, microaerophilic and anaerobic can be explained by the existence of suboxic microniches that appear when particles of sediment are resuspended due to the water circulation and the benthic infauna excavating activity, that allows the supernatant water oxygen to penetrate through its galleries towards deeper sediment zones. The statistical analysis (Multiple lineal regression model r²≥ 0.5 showed that the on the whole, the hydrological parameters are not influence over the bacterial number and bacterial biomass distribution (r²≤ 0

  5. Duration of secretory IgM and IgA antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus in a community study in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, L G; Kofoed, P E; Nante, E J

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is probably the single major cause of lower respiratory infection (LRI) among infants worldwide. Its relative importance may be underestimated, as the diagnosis is based on antigen detection and antigen may only be detectable in the early phase of infection. We...... phase of infection. A secondary response may be more likely in children with low IgM responses in the acute phase (RR = 2.08 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-4.70)). The IgA response was highest on days 28 and 42 after antigen detection, 72% having a detectable IgA response within the first 1.5 mo...... have therefore assessed the duration of secretory IgM and IgA antibody responses and whether assays for these antibodies can be used to improve the diagnosing of RSV-associated infections. During two RSV epidemics in Guinea-Bissau, 32 RSV antigen-positive children with LRI were followed with sequential...

  6. Community acquired respiratory virus infections in cancer patients-Guideline on diagnosis and management by the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for haematology and Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Berger, Annemarie; Christopeit, Maximilian; Hentrich, Marcus; Heussel, Claus Peter; Kalkreuth, Jana; Klein, Michael; Kochanek, Matthias; Penack, Olaf; Hauf, Elke; Rieger, Christina; Silling, Gerda; Vehreschild, Maria; Weber, Thomas; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Lehners, Nicola; Schalk, Enrico; Mayer, Karin

    2016-11-01

    Community acquired viruses (CRVs) may cause severe disease in cancer patients. Thus, efforts should be made to diagnose CRV rapidly and manage CRV infections accordingly. A panel of 18 clinicians from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Medical Oncology have convened to assess the available literature and provide recommendations on the management of CRV infections including influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, human metapneumovirus and adenovirus. CRV infections in cancer patients may lead to pneumonia in approximately 30% of the cases, with an associated mortality of around 25%. For diagnosis of a CRV infection, combined nasal/throat swabs or washes/aspirates give the best results and nucleic acid amplification based-techniques (NAT) should be used to detect the pathogen. Hand hygiene, contact isolation and face masks have been shown to be of benefit as general infection management. Causal treatment can be given for influenza, using a neuraminidase inhibitor, and respiratory syncytial virus, using ribavirin in addition to intravenous immunoglobulins. Ribavirin has also been used to treat parainfluenza virus and human metapneumovirus, but data are inconclusive in this setting. Cidofovir is used to treat adenovirus pneumonitis. CRV infections may pose a vital threat to patients with underlying malignancy. This guideline provides information on diagnosis and treatment to improve the outcome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study community related the mode of transmíssion to the bite of infective mosquitoes and 43.7% of ... mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are mainly believed to bite human beings at night (73,2%), breed in stagnant water (71%) and rest in dark places inside houses during daytime (44.3%). ... Maize and enset (false banana) are the.

  8. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  9. Can the European Central Bank Create a European identity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Sørensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In what ways do central banks construct community, and how may the European Central Bank (ECB) contribute to a supranational European identity? In this paper I seek to answer these two questions by developing a conceptual framework for the ways that central banks construct national identities and...

  10. European Music Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  11. Community Surveillance of Respiratory Viruses Among Families in the Utah Better Identification of Germs-Longitudinal Viral Epidemiology (BIG-LoVE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Carrie L; Ampofo, Krow; Stockmann, Chris; Adler, Frederick R; Herbener, Amy; Miller, Trent; Sheng, Xiaoming; Blaschke, Anne J; Crisp, Robert; Pavia, Andrew T

    2015-10-15

    This study: (1) describes the viral etiology of respiratory illness by prospectively collecting weekly symptom diaries and nasal swabs from families for 1 year, (2) analyzed data by reported symptoms, virus, age, and family composition, and (3) evaluated the duration of virus detection. Twenty-six households (108 individuals) provided concurrent symptom and nasal swab data for 4166 person-weeks. The FilmArray polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform (BioFire Diagnostics, LLC) was used to detect 16 respiratory viruses. Viral illnesses were defined as ≥1 consecutive weeks with the same virus detected with symptoms reported in ≥1 week. Participants reported symptoms in 23% and a virus was detected in 26% of person-weeks. Children younger than 5 years reported symptoms more often and were more likely to have a virus detected than older participants (odds ratio [OR] 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.08-2.94 and OR 3.96, 95% CI, 3.35-4.70, respectively). Compared with single person households, individuals living with children experienced 3 additional weeks of virus detection. There were 783 viral detection episodes; 440 (56%) associated with symptoms. Coronaviruses, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A detections were usually symptomatic; bocavirus and rhinovirus detections were often asymptomatic. The mean duration of PCR detection was ≤2 weeks for all viruses and detections of ≥3 weeks occurred in 16% of episodes. Younger children had longer durations of PCR detection. Viral detection is often asymptomatic and occasionally prolonged, especially for bocavirus and rhinovirus. In clinical settings, the interpretation of positive PCR tests, particularly in young children and those who live with them, may be confounded. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The evaluation of technical models used for major-accident hazard installations. Report to Commission of the European Communities Directorate General 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britter, R. E.

    1991-08-01

    Models are used in many ways by individuals and organizations within the European Community. Within the context of major technological hazards decisions of considerable importance are based wholly, or partly, on these models. The quality, that is the fitness-for-purpose, of these models will differ and there is obviously an interest in both the relative quality of one model against another and the absolute quality of any particular model. This leads to the evaluation of model quality and to methods by which model quality might be improved. It is noted that models are a principal method for the transfer of technology but also that the nature, role, and limitations of models is frequently misunderstood. There is a widespread demand for guidance on model quality and consequently on the development of evaluation techniques. The CEC is an appropriate body to have a role in the study of the quality and the management of quality of technical models. The evaluation of the quality of technical models entails: (1) an assurance of correct coding of algorithms is required and this is probably straightforward; (2) a statistical model validation is required and this entails comparison with experimental data sets (considerable care is required in performing such a validation, in particular in determination of an appropriate protocol to ensure unambiguous conclusions to be drawn from the validation); and (3) a model assessment including a scientific review and other less objective aspects is also required and should be given equal weight to a statistical model validation. Actions which may lead to an improvement in model quality are presented.

  13. Macroparasite communities in European eels, Anguilla anguilla, from French Mediterranean lagoons, with special reference to the invasive species Anguillicola crassus and Pseudodactylogyrus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fazio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available European eel parasites, in particular invasive species, are suspected to play a role in the decline in the populations of their host. The aims of this work were to describe the parasitic fauna of eels in French Mediterranean lagoons and to study the epidemiological trends of the invasive helminth species, the nematode Anguillicola crassus and the monogenean Pseudodactylogyrus spp., in regard to spatio-temporal dynamics, host biological characteristics and parasite community. A total of 418 eels was sampled in eight lagoons between March 2003 and June 2005. Our results revealed a total macroparasite richness of 23 species: 1 Monogenea, 13 Digenea, 2 Cestoda, 3 Nematoda, 2 Acantocephala and 2 Crustacea. We found no variation in A. crassus abundance in Salses-Leucate lagoon in the same month across years. However, the nematode abundance was higher in eels caught in summer than in those caught in winter. Pseudodactylogyrus sp. was not found in Salses-Leucate lagoon, except in July 2004. Comparisons between the lagoons on the same date showed that they could be separated into two groups for both species' abundance: Grau-du-Roi, Mauguio, Palavas and Vaccarès lagoons, where abundance was rather high, against Bages-Sigean, Pierre-Blanche, Salses-Leucate and Thau lagoons, where abundance was rather low or nil. We found significant negative relationships between A. crassus abundance and the length and age of eels. We also found a significant positive relationship between A. crassus and Pseudodactylogyrus sp. abundance. Finally, our results showed significant positive relationships between both A. crassus and Pseudodactylogyrus sp. abundance and the abundance of the digeneans Prosorhynchus aculeatus and Lecithochirium gravidum. We discuss the results in regard to the dynamics of invasions, the characteristics of the parasite life cycles and the ecology of eels.

  14. The prevalence of self-reported underuse of medications due to cost for the elderly: results from seven European urban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankuniene, Aurima; Stankunas, Mindaugas; Avery, Mark; Lindert, Jutta; Mikalauskiene, Rita; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco; Ioannidi-Kapolou, Elisabeth; Barros, Henrique; Savickas, Arūnas; Radziunas, Raimondas; Soares, Joaquim J F

    2015-09-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of self-reported underuse of medications due to procurement costs amongst older persons from seven European urban communities. The data were collected in a cross-sectional study ("ABUEL, Elder abuse: A multinational prevalence survey") in 2009. Randomly selected people aged 60-84 years (n = 4,467) from seven urban communities: Stuttgart (Germany), Athens (Greece), Ancona (Italy), Kaunas (Lithuania), Porto (Portugal), Granada (Spain) and Stockholm (Sweden) were interviewed. Response rate - 45.2%. Ethical permission was received in each country. The results indicate that 3.6% (n = 162) of the respondents self-reported refraining from buying prescribed medications due to cost. The highest prevalence of this problem was identified in Lithuania (15.7%, n = 99) and Portugal (4.3%, n = 28). Other countries reported lower percentages of refraining from buying medications (Germany - 2.0%, Italy - 1.6%, Sweden - 1.0%, Greece - 0.6%, Spain - 0.3%). Females refrained more often from buying medications than males (2.6% vs. 4.4%, p increase with economic hardship. These differences between countries can be only partly described by the financing of health-care systems. In spite of the presence of cost reimbursement mechanisms, patients need to make co-payments (or in some cases to pay the full price) for prescribed medications. This indicates that the purchasing power of people in 10.1186/s12913-015-1089-4 the particular country can play a major role and be related with the economic situation in the country. Lithuania, which has reported the highest refrain rates, had the lowest gross domestic product (at the time of conducting this study) of all participating countries in the study. Refraining from buying the prescribed medications due to cost is a problem for women and men in respect to ageing people in Europe. Prevalence varies by country, sex, and economic hardship.

  15. Prospective association of the SHARE-operationalized frailty phenotype with adverse health outcomes: evidence from 60+ community-dwelling Europeans living in 11 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macklai Nejma S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the many definitions of frailty, the frailty phenotype defined by Fried et al. is one of few constructs that has been repeatedly validated: first in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS and subsequently in other large cohorts in the North America. In Europe, the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE is a gold mine of individual, economic and health information that can provide insight into better understanding of frailty across diverse population settings. A recent adaptation of the original five CHS-frailty criteria was proposed to make use of SHARE data and measure frailty in the European population. To test the validity of the SHARE operationalized frailty phenotype, this study aims to evaluate its prospective association with adverse health outcomes. Methods Data are from 11,015 community-dwelling men and women aged 60+ participating in wave 1 and 2 of the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe, a population-based survey. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the 2-year follow up effect of SHARE-operationalized frailty phenotype on the incidence of disability (disability-free at baseline and on worsening disability and morbidity, adjusting for age, sex, income and baseline morbidity and disability. Results At 2-year follow up, frail individuals were at increased risk for: developing mobility (OR 3.07, 95% CI, 1.02-9.36, IADL (OR 5.52, 95% CI, 3.76-8.10 and BADL (OR 5.13, 95% CI, 3.53-7.44 disability; worsening mobility (OR 2.94, 95% CI, 2.19- 3.93 IADL (OR 4.43, 95% CI, 3.19-6.15 and BADL disability (OR 4.53, 95% CI, 3.14-6.54; and worsening morbidity (OR 1.77, 95% CI, 1.35-2.32. These associations were significant even among the prefrail, but with a lower magnitude of effect. Conclusions The SHARE-operationalized frailty phenotype is significantly associated with all tested health outcomes independent of baseline morbidity and disability in community-dwelling men

  16. EuGH: Innocuousness of the nuclear fuel tax according to the European community law; EuGH: Europarechtliche Unbedenklichkeit der Kernbrennstoffsteuer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2015-08-14

    The tax levied on nuclear fuel in Germany does not contravene European law. This was the conclusion of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) on 4 June. The ECJ has now, for the first time, made a clear decision on the admissibility of preliminary ruling proceedings referred to the ECJ and to the domestic constitutional court in parallel: Article 267 TFEU not only entitles the domestic court but even obliges it to submit issues that are decisive for the dispute to the European Court of Justice for interpretation or a decision on the applicability of European law. Such an obligation and the issue of incompatibility with European law did not depend on whether the same provision had been submitted to the domestic court for review or not. After all, even if a provision has been declared unconstitutional under domestic law it will still remain applicable for a certain period of time.

  17. Allergy immunotherapy across the life cycle to promote active and healthy ageing: from research to policies: An AIRWAYS Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) programme item (Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on active and healthy ageing) and the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD), a World Health Organization GARD research demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, M A; Demoly, P; Casale, T; Akdis, C A; Bachert, C; Bewick, M; Bilò, B M; Bohle, B; Bonini, S; Bush, A; Caimmi, D P; Canonica, G W; Cardona, V; Chiriac, A M; Cox, L; Custovic, A; De Blay, F; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Di Lorenzo, G; Du Toit, G; Durham, S R; Eng, P; Fiocchi, A; Fox, A T; van Wijk, R Gerth; Gomez, R M; Haathela, T; Halken, S; Hellings, P W; Jacobsen, L; Just, J; Tanno, L K; Kleine-Tebbe, J; Klimek, L; Knol, E F; Kuna, P; Larenas-Linnemann, D E; Linneberg, A; Matricardi, M; Malling, H J; Moesges, R; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N; Passalacqua, G; Pastorello, E; Pfaar, O; Price, D; Del Rio, P Rodriguez; Ruëff, R; Samolinski, B; Scadding, G K; Senti, G; Shamji, M H; Sheikh, A; Sisul, J C; Sole, D; Sturm, G J; Tabar, A; Van Ree, R; Ventura, M T; Vidal, C; Varga, E M; Worm, M; Zuberbier, T; Bousquet, J

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases often occur early in life and persist throughout life. This life-course perspective should be considered in allergen immunotherapy. In particular it is essential to understand whether this al treatment may be used in old age adults. The current paper was developed by a working group of AIRWAYS integrated care pathways for airways diseases, the model of chronic respiratory diseases of the European Innovation Partnership on active and healthy ageing (DG CONNECT and DG Santé). It considered (1) the political background, (2) the rationale for allergen immunotherapy across the life cycle, (3) the unmet needs for the treatment, in particular in preschool children and old age adults, (4) the strategic framework and the practical approach to synergize current initiatives in allergen immunotherapy, its mechanisms and the concept of active and healthy ageing.

  18. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus are the major respiratory viruses detected from prospective testing of pediatric and adult coronial autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, David J; Moss, Daniel M; Minney-Smith, Cara; Levy, Avram; Smith, David W

    2013-11-01

    To ascertain the full mortality of influenza and other respiratory viruses, the testing of community autopsy specimens is essential. Respiratory virus PCR and culture were performed on 2418 fresh unfrozen respiratory samples collected from 1611 coronial cases where the death was either unknown or infection was suspected, from July 2007 to June 2011, to detect the common respiratory viruses in children and adults, using standardized microbiological testing. The respiratory virus positive rate was 8·3% (134 cases) with a peak of 28% (42 of 151 cases) in children under 10 years of age. Influenza virus was the commonest respiratory virus (50 cases, 3%), followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (30 cases, 2%). All tested respiratory viruses were found in children, most commonly adenovirus, enterovirus and RSV, and influenza A and RSV predominated in those over 60 years, but coinfection was uncommon. Almost all influenza cases occurred when influenza was widely circulating in the community but few were diagnosed pre-mortem. Influenza and RSV detection was associated with bronchitis or bronchiolitis in 7 (9%) of the 80 cases and caused pneumonia in 14 (0·8%) deaths overall. Our prospective review of respiratory viruses using standardized testing found a single lower respiratory tract autopsy specimen for respiratory virus PCR would detect most community infections at the time of death. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus: co-infection and paediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Suzuki, Motoi; Nguyen, Hien Anh; Le, Minh Nhat; Dinh Vu, Thiem; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Ai; Le, Huu Tho; Morimoto, Konosuke; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Dang, Duc Anh; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2013-08-01

    Comprehensive population-based data on the role of respiratory viruses in the development of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain unclear. We investigated the incidence and effect of single and multiple infections with respiratory viruses on the risk of LRTIs in Vietnam. Population-based prospective surveillance and a case-control study of hospitalised paediatric patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were conducted from April 2007 through to March 2010. Healthy controls were randomly recruited from the same community. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected and tested for 13 respiratory viruses using multiplex PCRs. 1992 hospitalised ARI episodes, including 397 (19.9%) with LRTIs, were enrolled. Incidence of hospitalised LRTIs among children aged respiratory syncytial virus (20.1%) and influenza A virus (12.0%) were the most common and 9.5% had multiple-viral infections. Respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections independently increased the risk of LRTIs. Respiratory syncytial virus further increased the risk, when co-infected with human rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza virus-3 but not with influenza A virus. The case-control analysis revealed that respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus increased the risk of ARI hospitalisation but not human rhinovirus. Respiratory syncytial virus is the leading pathogen associated with risk of ARI hospitalisation and LRTIs in Vietnam.

  20. European communion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2013-01-01

    Political theory of European union, through an engagement between political concepts and theoretical understandings, provides a means of identifying the EU as a political object. It is argued that understanding the projects, processes and products of European union, based on ‘sharing’ or ‘communion......’, provides a better means of perceiving the EU as a political object rather than terms such as ‘integration’ or ‘co-operation’. The concept of ‘European communion’ is defined as the ‘subjective sharing of relationships’, understood as the extent to which individuals or groups believe themselves to be sharing...... relations (or not), and the consequences of these beliefs for European political projects, processes and products. By exploring European communion through an engagement with contemporary political theory, using very brief illustrations from the Treaty of Lisbon, the article also suggests that European...

  1. The respiratory microbiome and respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, Stefan A.; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances over the past ten years lower respiratory tract infections still comprise around a fifth of all deaths worldwide in children under five years of age with the majority in low- and middle-income countries. Known risk factors for severe respiratory infections and poor chronic

  2. The rate of antibiotic utilization in Iranian under 5-year-old children with acute respiratory tract illness: A nationwide community-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Mostafavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the prevalence of antibiotic usage in children aged <5 years with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI in Iran. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from a national health survey conducted in 2010 (Iran′s Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey. Participants of this cross-sectional study were selected by multistage stratified cluster-random sampling from 31 provinces of Iran. Parents of children with <5 years of age responded to questions about the occurrence of any cough during the previous 2 weeks, referral to private/governmental/other health care systems, and utilization of any oral/injection form of antibiotics. Data were analyzed using SPSS software18. The chi-square test was used to determine antibiotic consumption in various gender and residency groups and also a place of residence with the referral health care system. Results: Of the 9345 children under 5 years who participated in the study, 1506 cases (16.2% had ARTI during 2 weeks prior to the interview, in whom 1143 (75.9% were referred to urban or rural health care centers (43.4 vs. 30.4%; P < 0.001. Antibiotics were utilized by 715 (62.6% of affected children. Injection formulations were used for 150 (13.1% patients. The frequency of receiving antibiotics was higher in urban than in rural inhabitants (66.0% vs. 57.7%; P < 0.05. Conclusion: The prevalence of total and injection antibiotics usage in children <5 years with ARTI is alarmingly high in Iran. Therefore, interventions to reduce antibiotic use are urgently needed.

  3. Antibacterial resistance of community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens recovered from patients in Latin America: results from the PROTEKT surveillance study (1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PROTEKT (Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin is a global surveillance study established in 1999 to monitor antibacterial resistance of respiratory tract organisms. Thirteen centers from Argentina, Brazil and Mexico participat ed during 1999-2000; they collected 1,806 isolates (Streptococcus pneumoniae 518, Haemophilus influenzae 520, Moraxella catarrhalis 140, Staphylococcus aureus 351, S. pyogenes 277. Overall, 218 (42.1% of the S. pneumoniae isolates had reduced susceptibility to penicillin, 79 (15.3% were penicillin-resistant and 79 (15.3% were erythromycin-resistant. Mexico had the highest prevalence of penicillin (76.5% and erythromycin (31.2% resistance. Of 77 erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae tested for resistance genotype, 43 possessed mef(A, 33 possessed erm(B and 1 possessed both erm(B and mef(A mechanism. All S. pneumoniae isolates were fully susceptible to telithromycin, linezolid, teicoplanin and vancomycin. Among H. influenzae isolates, 88 (16.9% produced b-lactamase, ranging from 11% (Brazil to 24.5% (Mexico. Among M. catarrhalis isolates, 138 (98.6% produced b-lactamase. Twenty-four (8.7% of the S. pyogenes isolates were erythromycin-resistant; resistance being attributable to mefA (n=18, ermTR (n=5 and ermB (n=1. All H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pyogenes were fully susceptible to telithromycin. Methicillin resistance was found in 26.5% of the S. aureus isolates (Argentina 15%; Mexico 20%; Brazil 31.3%. Telithromycin was effective against 97.7% of methicillin-susceptible isolates. PROTEKT confirms that antibacterial resistance is an emerging problem in Latin America. The previously reported high levels of pneumococcal resistance to the b-lactam and macrolides were exceeded. New agents that do not induce resistance or that exert low selective pressure, e.g. telithromycin, are essential to safeguard future antibacterial efficacy.

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  6. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  7. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  8. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  9. Selective Europeanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoch Jovanovic, Tamara; Lynggaard, Kennet

    2014-01-01

    political contexts at the European level. We further show how the “translation” of international norms to a domestic context has worked to reinforce the original institutional setup, dating back to the mid-1950s. The translation of European-level minority policy developed in the 1990s and 2000s works most...

  10. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S

    2016-01-01

    Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). The socio-economic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent...... David Borrelli, and with active participation of the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis, MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways...

  11. Respiratory Protection in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Grisso, Robert D. (Robert Dwight), 1956-

    2014-01-01

    Farm workers can encounter a variety of respiratory problems ranging from temporary discomfort caused by allergic reactions to fatal asphyxiation. However, the risk of contracting serious lung diseases or death can be significantly decreased by using respiratory protection. This publication lists farm work that requires respiratory protection and equipment that will help prevention of future problems.

  12. How Is Respiratory Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  13. How Is Respiratory Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  15. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  16. Transnational European Television Drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib; Redvall, Eva Novrup; Helles, Rasmus

    This book deals with the role of television drama in Europe as enabler of transnational, cultural encounters for audiences and the creative community. It demonstrates that the diversity of national cultures is a challenge for European TV drama but also a potential richness and source of creative...... variation. Based on data on the production, distribution and reception of recent TV drama from several European countries, the book presents a new picture of the transnational European television culture. The authors analyse main tendencies in television policy and challenges for national broadcasters...... coming from new global streaming services. Comparing cases of historical, contemporary and crime drama from several countries, this study shows the importance of creative co-production and transnational mediated cultural encounters between national cultures of Europe....

  17. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  18. Spain: The new entry rules, free movement, and residence of European community citizens and assimilated persons / El nuevo régimen de entrada, libre circulación y residencia de ciudadanos comunitarios y “asimilados”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Ortega Giménez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, Spain has approached the percentage of foreign population of the other EU member states. The accession of Spain to the European Communities as a member state with full rights, and while no kind of uniform regulation is achieved, makes it necessary to establish the legal regimen for EU nationals on our soil. Spain, in recent times a host country to EU nationals, has been involved in establishing administrative criteria for the exercise of the rights of entry, exit, and residency in Spain for the citizens of its member states for the realization of activities as an employed or freelance person.

  19. European surveillance for enterovirus D68 during the emerging North-American outbreak in 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, Randy; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Van Leer-Buter, Coretta; Josset, Laurence; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Lina, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background: In August and September 2014, unexpected clusters of enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) infections associated with severe respiratory disease emerged from North-America. In September, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) asked European countries to strengthen respiratory

  20. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  1. Respiratory cancer database: An open access database of respiratory cancer gene and miRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Choubey

    2017-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: RespCanDB is expected to contribute to the understanding of scientific community regarding respiratory cancer biology as well as developments of new way of diagnosing and treating respiratory cancer. Currently, the database consist the oncogenomic information of lung cancer, laryngeal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer. Data for other cancers, such as oral and tracheal cancers, will be added in the near future. The URL of RespCanDB is http://ridb.subdic-bioinformatics-nitrr.in/.

  2. INTERNATIONAL AND EUROPEAN LAW PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitriţa FLOREA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We live nowadays a posteriori establishment through institutional treaties and a well-built jurisprudence that set up some of the general treaties. The structure of the European Union as well as the particular nature of the community legal order led to the establishment of some general principles, such as the principle of the institutional balance, the principle of solidarity between member states, the principle of primacy, the principle of the immediate and direct effect of the European law. It is certain that the legal order of the community law has its basis in the legal order of the International public law from which it has continuously delineated. The European communities, as subjects of the International public law are obliged to comply with the general International law, its fundamental principles and its bases, leading to some obligations capable to produce effects in the community legal order. The Court Of Justice of the European Union established as principles applicable in the European law the principles of the International public law, especially when it was called to assert regarding the International relationships of the Community as well as those of the 28 member states, confirming in the matter of the applicability of the treaties, the pacta sunt servanda rule, the principle of the good faith, the legitimate faith or the rebus sic standibus exception, all of them belonging to the custom International law.

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline: Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Eddy; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Goligher, Ewan C; Hodgson, Carol L; Munshi, Laveena; Walkey, Allan J; Adhikari, Neill K J; Amato, Marcelo B P; Branson, Richard; Brower, Roy G; Ferguson, Niall D; Gajic, Ognjen; Gattinoni, Luciano; Hess, Dean; Mancebo, Jordi; Meade, Maureen O; McAuley, Daniel F; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rubin, Eileen; Seckel, Maureen; Slutsky, Arthur S; Talmor, Daniel; Thompson, B Taylor; Wunsch, Hannah; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Brozek, Jan; Brochard, Laurent J

    2017-05-01

    This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of mechanical ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A multidisciplinary panel conducted systematic reviews and metaanalyses of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations. For all patients with ARDS, the recommendation is strong for mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volumes (4-8 ml/kg predicted body weight) and lower inspiratory pressures (plateau pressure patients with severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong for prone positioning for more than 12 h/d (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with moderate or severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong against routine use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (high confidence in effect estimates) and conditional for higher positive end-expiratory pressure (moderate confidence in effect estimates) and recruitment maneuvers (low confidence in effect estimates). Additional evidence is necessary to make a definitive recommendation for or against the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe ARDS. The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected ventilatory interventions for adult patients with ARDS. Clinicians managing patients with ARDS should personalize decisions for their patients, particularly regarding the conditional recommendations in this guideline.

  4. Comparative virulence of reproductive diseases caused by type 1 (European-like) and type 2 (North American-like) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in experimentally infected pregnant gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K; Seo, H W; Park, C; Kang, I; Youn, S-K; Lee, S Y; Kim, S-H; Chae, C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the virulence of type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) as assessed by the level of viral replication, viral distribution and apoptosis in stillborn fetuses and live-born piglets from infected pregnant gilts. Type 1 or type 2 PRRSV was given intranasally to pregnant gilts at 3 weeks before the expected date of parturition. Regardless of virus genotype, PRRSV-infected gilts farrowed between 102 and 109 days of gestation, while control uninfected gilts carried the pregnancy to term and farrowed at 114-115 days of gestation. There were no significant differences in the mean number of virus-infected cells per unit area of tissue when type 1 and type 2 virus infections were compared between stillborn fetuses and live-born piglets. Stillborn fetuses from the type 1 PRRSV-infected pregnant gilts had a significantly higher mean number of apoptotic cells per unit area of thymus (P = 0.013) than those from type 2 PRRSV-infected pregnant gilts. Significant differences in virulence were not observed between types 1 and 2 PRRSV in terms of female reproductive failure, although thymic apoptosis differed in stillborn fetuses from type 1 and type 2 PRRSV-infected pregnant gilts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of monoclonal antibody-based immunohistochemistry for the detection of European and North American Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and a comparison with in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kiwon; Seo, Hwi Won; Oh, Yeonsu; Kang, Ikjae; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Kwon, Byungjoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the ability of 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; SDOW17 and SR30) to detect types 1 and 2 Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and to compare the immunohistochemical results with in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) detection techniques. Lungs from 30 experimentally infected pigs (15 pigs with each genotype of PRRSV) and 20 naturally infected pigs (10 pigs with each genotype of PRRSV) with types 1 and 2 PRRSV, respectively, were used for the IHC, ISH, and RT-nPCR analyses. The SR30 mAb-based IHC detected significantly more type 1 PRRSV-positive cells in the accessory and caudal lobes from the experimentally infected pigs at 7 (P = 0.025) and 14 (P = 0.018) days postinoculation, respectively, compared to the SDOW17 mAb-based IHC. The results demonstrated that SR30 mAb-based IHC is useful for detecting both types 1 and 2 PRRSV antigen in FFPE lung tissues.

  6. Pneumococcal vaccination and chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froes F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Froes,1 Nicolas Roche,2 Francesco Blasi3,4 1Chest Department, Hospital Pulido Valente, North Lisbon Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 4Internal Medicine Department, Respiratory Unit and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Patients with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable to viral and bacterial pulmonary infections, which are major causes of exacerbations, hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality in COPD patients. Effective vaccines could reduce the burden of respiratory infections and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, but what is the evidence for this? This article reviews and discusses the existing evidence for pneumococcal vaccination efficacy and its changing role in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, especially COPD. Specifically, the recent Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA showed the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults, many of whom had additional risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including chronic lung diseases. Taken together, the evidence suggests that pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations can prevent community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, while pneumococcal vaccination early in the course of COPD could help maintain stable health status. Despite the need to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and evidence for the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine coverage and awareness are low and need to be improved. Respiratory physicians need to communicate the benefits of vaccination more effectively to their patients who suffer from chronic respiratory diseases

  7. [The respiratory therapist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karg, O; Bubulj, C; Esche, B; Geiseler, J; Bonnet, R; Mäder, I

    2008-11-01

    Because of the expected significant growth in the elderly population and respiratory diseases, the topic of "delegation of physician's duties" is of increasing importance to the German health-care system. In 2004 the German Respiratory Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V. (DGP)) established the new profession: respiratory therapist. A curriculum was defined which offers training for certified nurses and physiotherapists. Respiratory therapists evaluate, treat, document and care for patients with pulmonary disorders. Under appropriate supervision a licensed respiratory therapist performs some of the work previously done by physicians at the same quality of care. The first respiratory therapists have finished their professional training in Germany. Most of these respiratory therapists are now employed in hospital-based positions requiring their specific skills. Generally, the increased medical responsibility and the increased degree of decision-making possibilities associated with the new profession contribute to a better job satisfaction. However, this is not yet true for all the newly employed respiratory therapists. Only few of the new graduate respiratory therapists were awarded higher salaries. It is a strongly recommendation to the heads of medical departments and the human resources managers of hospitals that they should recognise the increased qualifications of nurses and physiotherapists who become respiratory therapists by appropriate remuneration.

  8. Final results of the European Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (EU-ARCCS) expanded-access study: a large open-label study in diverse community settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, J.; Procopio, G.; Bajetta, E.; Keilholz, U.; Negrier, S.; Szczylik, C.; Bokemeyer, C.; Bracarda, S.; Richel, D. J.; Staehler, M.; Strauss, U. P.; Mersmann, S.; Burock, K.; Escudier, B.

    2011-01-01

    The European Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (EU-ARCCS) expanded-access study provided sorafenib to advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in whom previous systemic therapy had failed. The study assessed the safety and use of sorafenib for the treatment of advanced RCC in a large

  9. Active Learning Improves Student Performance in a Respiratory Physiology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alex M.; Liachovitzky, Carlos; Abdullahi, Abass S.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the introduction of active learning exercises into the anatomy and physiology curriculum in a community college setting. Specifically, the incorporation of a spirometry-based respiratory physiology lab resulted in improved student performance in two concepts (respiratory volumes and the hallmarks of…

  10. Respiratory Symptoms among Crop Farmers Exposed to Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The improper use of pesticide is associated with respiratory morbidity in many developing countries. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and its association with the use of agricultural pesticide among crop farmers in three rural communities in Ekiti State, ...

  11. The European concerted action on air pollution epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann-Liebrich, U. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Social and Preventive Medicine

    1995-12-31

    The European Concerted Action on Air Pollution Epidemiology was started in 1990 with the aim of bringing together European researchers in the field and improving research through collaboration and by preparing documents which would help to this end and by organizing workshops. A further aim was to stimulate cooperative research. Air pollution epidemiology investigates human effects of community air pollution by epidemiological methods. Epidemiology in general investigates the distribution and determinants of health-related states and events in populations. Diseases in which air pollution may play a significant role are mainly diseases of the respiratory system, for example chronic non-specific lung disease and lung cancer. Most diseases caused by air pollution can also be caused by other factors. Air pollution epidemiology is therefore specific in the expo variable (community air pollution) rather than in the type of health effects being studied. Air pollution epidemiology is beset with some specially challenging difficulties: ubiquitous exposure and as a consequence limited heterogeneity in exposure, low relative risks, few or specific health end points, and strong confounding. Further on the exposure-effect relationship is complicated by assumptions inherent to different study designs which relate to the exposure duration necessary to produce a certain health effect. In reports and workshops the concerted action tries to propose strategies to deal with these problems. (author)

  12. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  13. Respiratory physiology at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, C; Naylor, J

    2011-03-01

    The changes in respiratory physiology that occur with increasing altitude are driven by the fall in the partial pressure of oxygen that occurs with decreasing barometric pressure. At altitude, respiratory system changes occur which impact on each step of the oxygen cascade that occurs within the body. These changes are pivotal to the process of acclimatisation to altitude. The study of human respiratory physiology at altitude has the potential to produce research that will be translational to disease states characterised by hypoxaemia.

  14. Does training respiratory physicians in clinical respiratory physiology and interpretation of pulmonary function tests improve core knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patout, M; Sesé, L; Gille, T; Coiffard, B; Korzeniewski, S; Lhuillier, E; Pradel, A; Tardif, C; Chambellan, A; Straus, C; Matecki, S; Perez, T; Thiberville, L; Didier, A

    2018-01-01

    Lung function tests have a major role in respiratory medicine. Training in lung function tests is variable within the European Union. In this study, we have shown that an internship in a lung function tests laboratory significantly improved the technical and diagnostic skills of French respiratory trainees. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. A União Européia: uma comunidade em construção The European Union: a community under construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia de Camargo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O novo Tratado da União, o Tratado Reformador ou Tratado de Lisboa, aprovado na Cúpula Européia de Chefes de Estado e de Governo em outubro de 2007 durante a presidência de Portugal, abre um período de profunda reflexão sobre as razões que levaram a França e a Holanda a dizer "não" ao Tratado Constitucional apresentado à população em 2005 e sobre o novo rumo a ser tomado. Neste artigo, proponho-me a reconstituir o debate político-institucional que cercou esses dois momentos, debate profundamente influenciado pela incorporação ao espaço territorial da União Européia de 130 milhões de novos habitantes de diferentes procedências e identidades, o que certamente vai produzir um impacto crescente na distribuição de recursos políticos e econômicos e na percepção das diferentes identidades entre seus cidadãos. Tanto o debate normativo quanto o da diversidade cultural serão examinados à luz das principais teorias que cercam os estudos sobre a União Européia.The European Lisbon Treaty, approved by the European Council in October 2007 during the Portuguese presidency, opened a period of profound discussions about the reasons that led France and the Netherlands to reject in referenda the Constitutional Treaty presented to the population in 2005 as well about the new course that should be adopted in designing Union's new institutions. The present text summarizes the political-institutional debate that surrounded these two moments. This debate is affected by the incorporation of 130 million new European citizens from different origins and identities to the European Union territorial space, having a growing impact on political and economic resource distribution and on the perception of differences among the European population. Similarly to the normative debate, the cultural diversity will be examined in light of the main theories in the field of European studies.

  16. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  17. Managing respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Sarah; Restrick, Louise; Stern, Myra

    2017-02-01

    The diverse and evolving role of a psychologist within a respiratory multidisciplinary team (MDT) is described, providing a working model for service provision. The rationale for appointing a psychologist within a respiratory MDT is presented first, citing relevant policy and research and outlining the wider psychosocial impact of respiratory disease. This is followed by an insight into the psychologist's role by highlighting important areas, including key therapy themes and the challenge of patient engagement. The way in which the psychologist supports the collective aims and aspirations of respiratory colleagues to provide a more holistic package of care is illustrated throughout.

  18. Respiratory adaptations in different types of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazovic, B; Mazic, S; Suzic-Lazic, J; Djelic, M; Djordjevic-Saranovic, S; Durmic, T; Zikic, D; Zugic, V

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that current European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society spirometric reference equations, used in general population, may not be applicable in population of elite athletes. Althought it is well known that physical activity may affect lung volumes, the effect of sporting activity on pulmonary function testing indices was never examined. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in functional respiratory parameters in various types of sports by measuring lung volumes and to extend the existing factors as well as sport disciplines which affect respiratory function the most. A total of 1639 elite male athletes, aged 18-35 years were divided in 4 groups according to the predominant characteristics of training: skill, power, mixed and endurance athletes. They performed basic anthropometric measurements and spirometry. Groups were compared, and Pearson's simple correlation was performed to test the relation between anthropometric and spirometric characteristics of athletes. All anthropometric characteristics significantly differed among groups and correlate with respiratory parameters. The highest correlation was found for body height and weight. Sports participation is associated with respiratory adaptation, and the extent of adaptation depends on type of activity. Endurance sports athletes have higher lung volumes in comparison with skill, mixed and power group of sport.

  19. Community benefits from wind power: a study of UK practice and comparison with leading European countries. Report to the Renewables Advisory Board and the DTI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The size and nature of local community benefits from wind power projects in the UK is investigated. These are compared with the benefits in Denmark, Germany, Spain and Ireland where wind power has enjoyed significantly higher rates of development and benefits come within the framework of all wind power projects. Ten wind power projects in the UK are examined and the remaining projects are surveyed. Support mechanisms, public acceptance, planning systems, community involvement (jobs, local income, ownership) in the UK and the other four countries are analysed. Typical community benefits from wind power in the different countries are listed, and recommendations are given.

  20. The European Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martinelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available European identity is not only a scientifically interesting question, but also a politically important issue: in fact, sixty years after the signing of the Treaty of Rome, the European Union finds itself for the first time facing risks that threaten its own existence. The European Union is a limited and incomplete project because Europe’s economic integration has not been accompanied by a genuine supranational political union and greater cultural integration. The deficit of democratic representation and cultural integration is due to the fact that the community process is based only on economic rationality and not on a feeling of common belonging. In the current situation in which the Union faces difficult challenges which threaten to undermine the future, it necessary to affirm the policy of interests with a policy of identity. In this essay, we will first concentrate on the concept of identity – that is on the nucleus of values and common institutions –; then we will discuss how the European identity has changed over time (also in relation to national identities and what are the mechanisms that may favour its taking root in the current situation. The European project of political unification needs to be re-emphasized, finding the way to a European collective identity, not contrasted with but alongside the different national identities, referring to loyalty and shared commitment to a whole collection of cultural values: fundamental human rights, civil liberties, democratic political institutions, rule of law, freedom of movement of people, goods and capital, social justice and non-violent resolution of conflicts.

  1. A european-wide study on the role of streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia among adults: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechlivanoglou, P.; Rozenbaum, M.; Van Der Werf, T.; Lo-Ten-Foe, J.; Postma, M.; Hak, E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia is an important cause of hospitalization and death among adults, but figures on the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae largely vary. We aimed to identify the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae by systematically reviewing all available

  2. Relationship between frailty and respiratory function in the community-dwelling elderly Estudo da relação entre fragilidade e função respiratória em idosos comunitários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maycon S. Pegorari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of frailty on respiratory function in a community- dwelling elderly. METHOD: 51 community-dwelling elderly were evaluated (mean age of 73±6 years, being 29 men (56.7% and 22 women (43.3%. We collect the following variables: sociodemographic characteristics, frailty phenotype, pulmonary function test and assessment of the respiratory muscles using an analog manometer. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests, one-way ANOVA, Paired Student's t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da fragilidade sobre a função respiratória em idosos comunitários. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 51 idosos comunitários (73±6 anos, sendo 29 homens (56,7% e 22 mulheres (43,3%, por meio de aspectos sociodemográficos, fenótipo de fragilidade, prova de função pulmonar e manovacuometria analógica para os músculos respiratórios. Procedeu-se à análise estatística com os testes Kolmogorov e Smirnov, ANOVA one-way, t de Student Pareado e Coeficiente de Correlação de Pearson (p<0,05. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças significativas entre os grupos frágeis (GF=9,8%, pré-frágeis (GP=47,1% e não frágeis (GN=43,1% em relação aos dados antropométricos, demográficos e espirométricos. Para as pressões inspiratórias e expiratórias máximas (PImáx e PEmáx, observaram-se diferenças entre os três grupos, sendo essas pressões significativamente menores no GF e no GP, quando comparados ao GN. Em relação aos valores obtidos e previstos, o GF e o GP apresentaram diferença significativa (p=0,004. O GP apresentou, nas PImáx e PEmáx, correlações positivas com os valores da força de preensão palmar (r=0,7. O GN apresentou, na PEmáx, correlação positiva com os valores de nível de atividade física (r=0,7. CONCLUSÕES: O estudo evidenciou que as pressões respiratórias máximas podem decrescer de acordo com a condição de fragilidade entre os idosos

  3. European Cinema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different

  4. ENSAR, a Nuclear Science Project for European Research Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turzó, Ketel; Lewitowicz, Marek; Harakeh, Muhsin N.

    2015-01-01

    During the period from September 2010 to December 2014, the European project European Nuclear Science and Applications Research (ENSAR) coordinated research activities of the Nuclear Physics community performing research in three major subfields: Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Astrophysics, and Nuclear

  5. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  6. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which requires the most regu- lar and precise evaluation of physiological function for complete assessment of the patient. The very nature of respiratory physiology requires the availability of a range of technological devices. Physiological measurements that may be.

  7. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S

    2015-01-01

    David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory....... This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The Commissioner underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient...

  8. Effects of tree diversity and environmental factors on the soil microbial community in three soil depth in a Central European beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornacon, C.; Jacob, M.; Guckland, A.; Meinen, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the link between aboveground and belowground diversity in forest ecosystems. Therefore, we determined the effect of tree composition on amount and composition of the soil microbial community using phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the Hainich National Park in Thuringia, a deciduous mixed forest on loess over limestone in Central Germany. On the one hand we investigated the composition of the microbial community in dependence of leave litter composition, hypothesizing that distinct leave litter compositions activated signature PLFA's. On the other hand we determined if environmental factor like clay content or nutrient status influence the microbial community in deeper soil horizons. Consequently soil was sampled from depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Plots with highest diversity of leave litter had highest total amounts of fatty acids in the upper 5 cm. Mainly PLFA 16:1?5 was activated in autumn, being a common marker for mycorrhizal fungi. In soil depth below 5 cm the environmental factors like clay and soil nutrients like phosphorus and carbon, explained most of the soil microbial variability. On pure beech sites the total phosphorus content of soil influenced soil microbial diversity, but on sites with higher tree diversity no single factor varying the microbial community could be identified. Tree diversity and environmental factors together effect soil microbial community and are closely related to the link between aboveground and belowground diversity.

  9. Pirating European Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Timus

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Open Science has gained a lot of attention not only within the academic community but also among policy-makers. Some international publishers have been active in moving towards open access publications and research data, but, overall, modest results have been achieved so far. In this context, the digital piracy engines emerge as vital actors in disseminating and determining the impact of research. This study examines the Sci-Hub downloads data in order to uncover patterns of piracy in European Studies research. We identify journals and the subjects of articles that have been pirated the most. We also study the geographical distribution of download requests. The analysis reveals that the readers are mostly interested in subjects reflecting the current major European challenges, specifically populism and the economic crisis. Both developing countries as well as the ‘old’ EU members are active in illegal downloads.

  10. ASSESSING THE CONSERVATION STATUS OF EUROPEAN UNION HABITATS – RESULTS OF THE COMMUNITY REPORT WITH A CASE STUDY OF THE GERMAN NATIONAL REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. BALZER

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU Habitats Directive requires all member states to report every 6 years on the implementation of the Directive. The report covering the period 2000 – 2006 included for the first time an assessment of the conservation status of the habitats and species listed on annexes I, II, IV & V of the Habitats Directive following an agreed format. Based on national reports submitted from member States the European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity has prepared assessments for each biogeographical region at EU-level. The majority of the habitats of Annex I are not at favourable status although there is much variation both between countries and regions and between habitats. The results will be discussed at European level and at member state level with a case study of the German national report. At the same time a number of methodical problems became apparent both in Germany and at EU-level. Work is already under way to improve the next report for the period 2007 – 2012. The dimension of management needs, threats and pressures and the time scale for improvements of the conservation status are discussed. Habitats linked to agriculture appear to be particularly unfavourable.

  11. ASSESSING THE CONSERVATION STATUS OF EUROPEAN UNION HABITATS – RESULTS OF THE COMMUNITY REPORT WITH A CASE STUDY OF THE GERMAN NATIONAL REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. SIPKOVA

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The EU Habitats Directive requires all member states to report every 6 years on the implementation of the Directive. The report covering the period 2000 – 2006 included for the first time an assessment of the conservation status of the habitats and species listed on annexes I, II, IV & V of the Habitats Directive following an agreed format. Based on national reports submitted from member States the European Topic Centre on Biological Diversity has prepared assessments for each biogeographical region at EU-level. The majority of the habitats of Annex I are not at favourable status although there is much variation both between countries and regions and between habitats. The results will be discussed at European level and at member state level with a case study of the German national report. At the same time a number of methodical problems became apparent both in Germany and at EU-level. Work is already under way to improve the next report for the period 2007 – 2012. The dimension of management needs, threats and pressures and the time scale for improvements of the conservation status are discussed. Habitats linked to agriculture appear to be particularly unfavourable.

  12. Community-Owned wind power development: The challenge of applying the European model in the United States, and how states are addressing that challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2004-03-28

    Local farmers, towns, schools, and individual investors are, however, beginning to invest in wind power. With the help of state policy and clean energy fund support, new federal incentives, and creative local wind developers who have devised ownership structures that maximize the value of both state and federal support, community wind power is beginning to take a foothold in parts of the US, in particular the upper Midwest. The purpose of this report is to describe that foothold, as well as the state support that helped to create it. There are a number of reasons why states are becoming increasingly interested in community wind power. In rural Midwestern states such as Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois, community wind is seen as a way to help supplement and stabilize farmer income, and thereby contribute to the preservation of farming communities and the rural landscapes and values they create. In the Northeast, densely populated states such as Massachusetts are turning to community-scale wind development to increase not only the amount of wind power on the grid, but also the public's knowledge, perception, and acceptance of wind power. In still other areas--such as the Pacific Northwest, which is already home to several large wind farms--states are simply responding to strong interest from local constituents who see community wind power as a way to take responsibility for, and mitigate the environmental impact of, electricity generation. But what exactly is ''community wind power''? Definitions vary widely, ranging from behind-the-meter installations to the Danish wind ''cooperatives'' to wind projects owned by municipal utilities. Possible defining criteria include: project size (small vs. large projects); purpose (to offset end-use power consumption vs. to sell power to the grid); ownership (single local vs. multiple local vs. municipal utility vs. commercial owners); and interconnection (behind the meter vs

  13. Respiratory medicines for children: current evidence, unlicensed use and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, A R; Barbato, A; Beydon, N

    2010-01-01

    This European Respiratory Society task force has reviewed the evidence for paediatric medicines in respiratory disease occurring in adults and children. We describe off-licence use, research priorities and ongoing studies. Off-licence and off-label prescribing in children is widespread...

  14. Respiratory medicines for children: Current evidence, unlicensed use and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Smyth; A. Barbato (A.); N. Beydon (Nicole); H. Bisgaard; K. de Boeck (Kris); P.L.P. Brand (Paul L.P.); A. Bush (Andrew); B. Fauroux (Brigitte); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); M. Korppi; C. O'Callaghan; M.W.H. Pijnenburg (Mariëlle); F. Ratjen (Felix); K. Southern; D. Spencer; A. Thomson; H. Vyas; A. Warris (Adilia); P.J.F.M. Merkus (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis European Respiratory Society task force has reviewed the evidence for paediatric medicines in respiratory disease occurring in adults and children. We describe off-licence use, research priorities and ongoing studies. Off-licence and off-label prescribing in children is widespread

  15. Supportive environments for physical activity, community action, and policy in 8 European Union Member States: Comparative analysis and specificities of context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruetten, A.; Frahsa, A.; Engbers, L.; Gusi, N.; Mota, J.; Pacenka, R.; Troelsen, J.; Vasickova, J.; Vuillemin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A multilevel theoretical framework of physical activity (PA) promotion that addresses supportive environments, PA behavior, community action, and PA promoting policies is related to research and development in an international comparative study. Methods: Most-different and most-similar

  16. The community impact of the 2009 influenza pandemic in the WHO European region: a comparison with historical seasonal data from 28 countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martirosyan, L.; Paget, W.J.; Jorgensen, P.; Brown, C.S.; Meerhoff, T.J.; Pereyaslov, D.; Mott, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The world has recently experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century that lasted 14 months from June 2009 to August 2010. This study aimed to compare the timing, geographic spread and community impact during the winter wave of influenza pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 to historical

  17. Evaluation design of Urban Health Centres Europe (UHCE): preventive integrated health and social care for community-dwelling older persons in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Voorham; R. van Staveren; E. Koppelaar; L.F.J. Martijn; E. Valía-Cotanda; T. Alhambra-Borrás; T. Rentoumis; L. Bilajac; V. Vasiljev Marchesi; T. Rukavina; A. Verma; G. Williams; G. Clough; J. Garcés-Ferrer; F. Mattace Raso; H. Raat; C.B. Franse

    2017-01-01

    Older persons often have interacting physical and social problems and complex care needs. An integrated care approach in the local context with collaborations between community-, social-, and health-focused organisations can contribute to the promotion of independent living and quality of life. In

  18. Evaluation design of Urban Health Centres Europe (UHCE): Preventive integrated health and social care for community-dwelling older persons in five European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franse, C.B. (Carmen B.); A.J. Voorham; Van Staveren, R. (Rob); E. Koppelaar (Elin); Martijn, R. (Rens); Valía-Cotanda, E. (Elisa); Alhambra-Borrás, T. (Tamara); Rentoumis, T. (Tasos); Bilajac, L. (Lovorka); Marchesi, V.V. (Vanja Vasiljev); Rukavina, T. (Tomislav); Verma, A. (Arpana); Williams, G. (Greg); Clough, G. (Gary); Garcés-Ferrer, J. (Jorge); F.M. Raso; H. Raat (Hein)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Older persons often have interacting physical and social problems and complex care needs. An integrated care approach in the local context with collaborations between community-, social-, and health-focused organisations can contribute to the promotion of independent living

  19. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Projected range contractions of European protected oceanic montane plant communities: focus on climate change impacts is essential for their future conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodd, Rory L; Bourke, David; Skeffington, Micheline Sheehy

    2014-01-01

    Global climate is rapidly changing and while many studies have investigated the potential impacts of this on the distribution of montane plant species and communities, few have focused on those with oceanic montane affinities. In Europe, highly sensitive bryophyte species reach their optimum occurrence, highest diversity and abundance in the north-west hyperoceanic regions, while a number of montane vascular plant species occur here at the edge of their range. This study evaluates the potential impact of climate change on the distribution of these species and assesses the implications for EU Habitats Directive-protected oceanic montane plant communities. We applied an ensemble of species distribution modelling techniques, using atlas data of 30 vascular plant and bryophyte species, to calculate range changes under projected future climate change. The future effectiveness of the protected area network to conserve these species was evaluated using gap analysis. We found that the majority of these montane species are projected to lose suitable climate space, primarily at lower altitudes, or that areas of suitable climate will principally shift northwards. In particular, rare oceanic montane bryophytes have poor dispersal capacity and are likely to be especially vulnerable to contractions in their current climate space. Significantly different projected range change responses were found between 1) oceanic montane bryophytes and vascular plants; 2) species belonging to different montane plant communities; 3) species categorised according to different biomes and eastern limit classifications. The inclusion of topographical variables in addition to climate, significantly improved the statistical and spatial performance of models. The current protected area network is projected to become less effective, especially for specialised arctic-montane species, posing a challenge to conserving oceanic montane plant communities. Conservation management plans need significantly

  1. Projected range contractions of European protected oceanic montane plant communities: focus on climate change impacts is essential for their future conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory L Hodd

    Full Text Available Global climate is rapidly changing and while many studies have investigated the potential impacts of this on the distribution of montane plant species and communities, few have focused on those with oceanic montane affinities. In Europe, highly sensitive bryophyte species reach their optimum occurrence, highest diversity and abundance in the north-west hyperoceanic regions, while a number of montane vascular plant species occur here at the edge of their range. This study evaluates the potential impact of climate change on the distribution of these species and assesses the implications for EU Habitats Directive-protected oceanic montane plant communities. We applied an ensemble of species distribution modelling techniques, using atlas data of 30 vascular plant and bryophyte species, to calculate range changes under projected future climate change. The future effectiveness of the protected area network to conserve these species was evaluated using gap analysis. We found that the majority of these montane species are projected to lose suitable climate space, primarily at lower altitudes, or that areas of suitable climate will principally shift northwards. In particular, rare oceanic montane bryophytes have poor dispersal capacity and are likely to be especially vulnerable to contractions in their current climate space. Significantly different projected range change responses were found between 1 oceanic montane bryophytes and vascular plants; 2 species belonging to different montane plant communities; 3 species categorised according to different biomes and eastern limit classifications. The inclusion of topographical variables in addition to climate, significantly improved the statistical and spatial performance of models. The current protected area network is projected to become less effective, especially for specialised arctic-montane species, posing a challenge to conserving oceanic montane plant communities. Conservation management plans need

  2. Homo habitus: agency, structure and the transformation of tradition in the constitution of the TRB foraging-farming communities in the North European plain (ca 4500–2000 BC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Zvelebil

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The current generally accepted view of the dispersal of farming into Europe is that farming groups in the eastern Mediterranean colonised selectively optimal farming areas. The role of contact between indigenous hunter-gatherers and incoming farmers was very important to the operation of this process. This general view of the spread of farming at a broad inter-regional scale gives us our understanding of the origins of the Neolithic but merits closer examination at the local and regional level, as increasingly it is becoming apparent that the causes and motivations may have differed. In this paper, Mesolithic to Neolithic communities with evidence of the transition from hunter-gatherer to farmer will be examined at a regional scale, in the central part of the north European plain, focussing on Kujavia. Additionally, the theory of structuration will be applied in order to elucidate the transition process at this level.

  3. Habermas on European Constitution and European Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Biró-Kaszás

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For the last two decades or so philosophers have been reflecting on a set of practical and political concerns in connection with the new political structural arrangements beyond the nation-state. In this article two essays by Jürgen Habermas shall be examined. An attempt shall be made to tackle Habermas’ philosophical concepts of personal and collective identity as well as the role that a constitution may play in building the post-national constellation. It has been shown that Habermas has normative answers. Firstly, according to him, the fragile balance between the legal order and the particular cultures and traditions of a community has to be protected by the constitutional state. For that reason the political culture has to be “decoupled” from the majority culture. Secondly, the democratically structured attempt to achieve shared meaning has to find the delicate balance between the context-transcending universal normative claims and the claims of particular individual and collective life. Thirdly, it is possible to expand legally mediated civil solidarity trans-nationally, across Europe – we may recognize this development as the emergence of European identity –, since the process of democratic will-formation of citizens may get loose from the structures provided by the state if both shared democratic political cultures as well as a European-wide public sphere exist. The European Constitution may have a catalytic function in materialization of these conditions. It has been shown that in his deliberations Habermas tried to find a reflective equilibrium between the normative and the empirical.

  4. Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; Hoes, A W; van Loon, A M; Hak, E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated mortality and hospitalisations, especially the influenza-associated burden among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs old, not yet recommended for influenza vaccination in many European countries.

  5. Towards a European contract law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondius, E.H.

    2000-01-01

    I. Introduction. II. Subject-matter of this paper. III. Constitutionality. IV. Codification. V. Is it Feasible?VI. Howto proceed. VII. New problems: finding the Law. VIII. The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. IX. Common Law and Civil Law. X. East and west. XI. European Community Law. XII.

  6. The Future of Copyright Management: European Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Michele

    This paper presents European perspectives on the future of copyright management. The first section is an overview of intellectual property rights in Europe, including differences between copyright countries and "droit d'auteur" countries. The second section addresses European Community legal policy, including examples related to the…

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) ... diseases that affect the lungs, heart, or immune system , RSV infections can lead to other more serious ...

  8. Respiratory disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth; Hardy, Erica; Powrie, Raumond

    2015-07-01

    Many physiological and anatomical changes of pregnancy affect the respiratory system. These changes often affect the presentation and management of the various respiratory illnesses in pregnancy. This article focuses on several important respiratory issues in pregnancy. The management of asthma, one of the most common chronic illnesses in pregnancy, remains largely unchanged compared to the nonpregnant state. Infectious respiratory illness, including pneumonia and tuberculosis, are similarly managed in pregnancy with antibiotics, although special attention may be needed for antibiotic choices with more pregnancy safety data. When mechanical ventilation is necessary, consideration should be given to the maternal hemodynamics of pregnancy and fetal oxygenation. Maintaining maternal oxygen saturation above 95% is recommended to sustain optimal fetal oxygenation. Cigarette smoking has known risks in pregnancy, and current practice guidelines recommend offering cognitive and pharmacologic interventions to pregnant women to assist in smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that secretes mucus. The mucus traps smaller particles like pollen or smoke. Hairlike structures called cilia line the mucous membrane ...

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Robert A; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  12. Alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Federica; Alesii, Annalisa; Dall'armi, Valentina; Rubino, Salvatore; Ferri, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are no studies that have investigated the role of alexithymia in respiratory rehabilitation. We aimed to observe the prevalence of alexithymia in patients attending respiratory rehabilitation and to verify the presence of a difference between alexithymics and non-alexithymics responsiveness to the respiratory rehabilitation standard protocol. A prospective cohort study evaluating the influence of alexithymia on functional recovery of in-patients afferent to the Respiratory Rehabilitation Unit of IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana. Sixty patients were consecutively enrolled into the study and evaluated for alexithymia, anxiety and depression. Functional recovery was assessed with the six-minute walking test (6MWT). Prior and post-completion of this test dyspnoea, oxygen saturation and cardiac frequency were recorded. Alexithymia was not found to be significantly affecting the functional recovery of participants in respiratory rehabilitation. The distance walked at the 6MWT (6MWD) increased in both alexithymics and non-alexithymics (p(alexithymics) = 0.014; p(non-alexithymics) respiratory rehabilitation.

  13. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  14. Outstanding challenges in the seismological study of volcanic processes: Results from recent U.S. and European community-wide discussion workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, D. C.; Rodgers, M.; Mather, T. A.; Power, J. A.; Pyle, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of volcanically induced seismicity are essential for eruption forecasting and for real-time and near-real-time warnings of hazardous volcanic activity. Studies of volcanic seismicity and of seismic wave propagation also provide critical understanding of subsurface magmatic systems and the physical processes associated with magma genesis, transport, and eruption. However, desipite significant advances in recent years, our ability to successfully forecast volcanic eruptions and fully understand subsurface volcanic processes is limited by our current understanding of the source processes of volcano-seismic events, the effects on seismic wave propagation within volcanic structures, limited data, and even the non-standardized terminology used to describe seismic waveforms. Progress in volcano seismology is further hampered by inconsistent data formats and standards, lack of state-of-the-art hardware and professional technical staff, as well as a lack of widely adopted analysis techniques and software. Addressing these challenges will not only advance scientific understanding of volcanoes, but also will lead to more accurate forecasts and warnings of hazardous volcanic eruptions that would ultimately save lives and property world-wide. Two recent workshops held in Anchorage, Alaska, and Oxford, UK, represent important steps towards developing a relationship among members of the academic community and government agencies, focused around a shared, long-term vision for volcano seismology. Recommendations arising from the two workshops fall into six categories: 1) Ongoing and enhanced community-wide discussions, 2) data and code curation and dissemination, 3) code development, 4) development of resources for more comprehensive data mining, 5) enhanced strategic seismic data collection, and 6) enhanced integration of multiple datasets (including seismicity) to understand all states of volcano activity through space and time. As presented sequentially above, these

  15. Securitizing the Arctic indigenous peoples: A community security perspective with special reference to the Sámi of the European high north

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Kamrul

    2016-09-01

    The theory of securitization-the so-called Copenhagen school-centers the concept of security on various identified threats. Security based on the collective identity by which a society preserves its essential characteristics has been defined as community security, or societal security. The underlying principle of the Copenhagen school is that state-based, sovereignty-oriented security is ineffective unless the other components of security threats are addressed. The concept of human security, developed nearly simultaneously to that of securitization, identifies threat components at the sub-state level which are not traditionally understood as security concerns. Both schools of security thought are similar as they offer nontraditional approaches to understanding the concept of security. In this article, I explore securitization theory and the concept of human security to elaborate community perspectives in the understanding of security. In a case study, I investigate the security concerns of the indigenous peoples of the Arctic. The transformation of the Arctic by climate change and its impacts has resulted in new challenges and opportunities, so I explore how indigenous peoples in general and the Sámi in particular understand security which promotes their societal security. Although I show that this group of people deserves recognition and the ability to exercise greater authority, I conclude that diverse concepts of security do not by any means undermine the core traditional concept of security. These aspects of security remain subject to scrutiny by states and exist in a vertical structure. The Sámi, therefore, rely on affirmative actions by states to enjoy greater rights to maintain their community security.

  16. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate administration during early life: effects on performance, immunity and microbial community of European sea bass yolk-sac larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Andrea; Roth, Olivia; Schryver, Peter De; Bayer, Till; Garcia-Gonzalez, Linsey; Künzel, Sven; Bossier, Peter; Miest, Joanna J; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2017-11-08

    The reliable production of marine fish larvae is one of the major bottlenecks in aquaculture due to high mortalities mainly caused by infectious diseases. To evaluate if the compound poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) might be a suitable immunoprophylactic measure in fish larviculture, its capacity to improve immunity and performance in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) yolk-sac larvae was explored. PHB was applied from mouth opening onwards to stimulate the developing larval immune system at the earliest possible point in time. Larval survival, growth, microbiota composition, gene expression profiles and disease resistance were assessed. PHB administration improved larval survival and, furthermore, altered the larva-associated microbiota composition. The bacterial challenge test using pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum revealed that the larval disease resistance was not influenced by PHB. The expression profiles of 26 genes involved e.g. in the immune response showed that PHB affected the expression of the antimicrobial peptides ferritin (fer) and dicentracin (dic), however, the response to PHB was inconsistent and weaker than previously demonstrated for sea bass post-larvae. Hence, the present study highlights the need for more research focusing on the immunostimulation of different early developmental stages for gaining a more comprehensive picture and advancing a sustainable production of high quality fry.

  17. Individual and Relationship Factors Associated With the Self-Identified Inability to Experience Orgasm in a Community Sample of Heterosexual Men From Three European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheira, Ana; Santana, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The inability to reach orgasm is probably the least common and least understood of all male sexual dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate the incidence of the inability to reach orgasm, and the psychological and interpersonal factors associated with this sexual difficulty. A total of 3,672 heterosexual men from three European countries (1,937 Portuguese, 1,215 Croats, 520 Norwegians) participated in this web survey (M age = 36.6 years, SD = 18-75 years). A total of 354 (9.6%) reported the inability to reach orgasm. Among those men, 89.8% reported moderate to extreme distress regarding this sexual difficulty. A multivariate assessment revealed that men in short-term relationships and taking antidepressants were more likely to report inability to reach orgasm. Men who reported having difficulties getting or maintaining an erection were 4 times more likely to have experienced the inability to reach orgasm than were those who did not report this difficulty. Men who experienced difficulty "'letting go' and surrendering to sexual pleasure during sex" were 2.7 times more likely to have experienced the inability to reach orgasm than were those who did not report this difficulty. This difficulty of "letting go" might reflect the unwillingness to give oneself, an idea presented in previous research.

  18. First HIV prevalence estimates of a representative sample of adult sub-Saharan African migrants in a European city. Results of a community-based, cross-sectional study in Antwerp, Belgium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Loos

    Full Text Available While sub-Saharan African migrants are the second largest group affected by HIV in Europe, sound HIV prevalence estimates based on representative samples of these heterogeneous communities are lacking. Such data are needed to inform prevention and public health policy.This community-based, cross-sectional study combined oral fluid HIV testing with an electronic behavioral survey. Adopting a two-stage time location sampling HIV prevalence estimates for a representative sample of adult sub-Saharan African migrants in Antwerp, Belgium were obtained. Sample proportions and estimated adjusted population proportions were calculated for all variables. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis explored factors independently associated with HIV infection.Between December 2013 and October 2014, 744 sub-Saharan African migrants were included (37% women. A substantial proportion was socially, legally and economically vulnerable: 21% were probably of undocumented status, 63% had financial problems in the last year and 9% lacked stable housing. Sexual networks were mostly African and crossed national borders, i.e. sexual encounters during travels within Europa and Africa. Concurrency is common, 34% of those in a stable relationship had a partner on the side in the last year. HIV prevalence was 5.9%(95%CI:3.4%-10.1% among women and 4.2% (95%CI:1.6%-10.6% among men. Although high lifetime HIV testing was reported at community level (73%, 65.2% (CI95%:32.4%-88.0% of sub-Saharan African migrants were possibly undiagnosed. Being 45 years or older, unprotected sex when travelling within Europe in the last year, high intentions to use condoms, being unaware of their last sexual partners' HIV status, recent HIV testing and not having encountered partner violence in the last year were independently associated with HIV infection in multivariable logical regression. In univariable analysis, HIV infection was additionally associated to unemployment

  19. COBA-Cohort: a prospective cohort of HIV-negative men who have sex with men, attending community-based HIV testing services in five European countries (a study protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Nicolas; Fernàndez-López, Laura; Fuertes, Ricardo; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Pichon, François; Cigan, Bojan; Chanos, Sophocles; Meireles, Paula; Lucas, Raquel; Morel, Stéphane; Slaaen Kaye, Per; Agustí, Cristina; Klavs, Irena; Platteau, Tom; Casabona, Jordi

    2016-07-13

    Community-based voluntary counselling and testing (CBVCT) services for men who have sex with men (MSM) can reach those most-at-risk and provide an environment for gay men that is likely to be non-stigmatising. Longitudinal data on the behaviour of HIV-negative MSM are scarce in Europe. The aim of this protocol, developed during the Euro HIV Early Diagnosis And Treatment (EDAT) project, is to implement a multicentre community-based cohort of HIV-negative MSM attending 15 CBVCT services in 5 European countries. (1) To describe the patterns of CBVCT use, (2) to estimate HIV incidence, and to identify determinants of (3) HIV seroconversion and (4) HIV and/or sexually transmitted infection (STI) test-seeking behaviour. All MSM aged 18 years or over and who had a negative HIV test result are invited to participate in the COmmunity-BAsed Cohort (COBA-Cohort). Study enrolment started in February 2015, and is due to continue for at least 12 months at each study site. Follow-up frequency depends on the testing recommendations in each country (at least 1 test per year). Sociodemographic data are collected at baseline; baseline and follow-up questionnaires both gather data on attitudes and perceptions, discrimination, HIV/STI testing history, sexual behaviour, condom use, and pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis. Descriptive, exploratory and multivariate analyses will be performed to address the main research objectives of this study, using appropriate statistical tests and models. These analyses will be performed on the whole cohort data and stratified by study site or country. The study was approved by the Public Health authorities of each country where the study is being implemented. Findings from the COBA-Cohort study will be summarised in a report to the European Commission, and in leaflets to be distributed to study participants. Articles and conference abstracts will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and conferences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  20. Respiratory cancer database: An open access database of respiratory cancer gene and miRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Jyotsna; Choudhari, Jyoti Kant; Patel, Ashish; Verma, Mukesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory cancer database (RespCanDB) is a genomic and proteomic database of cancer of respiratory organ. It also includes the information of medicinal plants used for the treatment of various respiratory cancers with structure of its active constituents as well as pharmacological and chemical information of drug associated with various respiratory cancers. Data in RespCanDB has been manually collected from published research article and from other databases. Data has been integrated using MySQL an object-relational database management system. MySQL manages all data in the back-end and provides commands to retrieve and store the data into the database. The web interface of database has been built in ASP. RespCanDB is expected to contribute to the understanding of scientific community regarding respiratory cancer biology as well as developments of new way of diagnosing and treating respiratory cancer. Currently, the database consist the oncogenomic information of lung cancer, laryngeal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer. Data for other cancers, such as oral and tracheal cancers, will be added in the near future. The URL of RespCanDB is http://ridb.subdic-bioinformatics-nitrr.in/.

  1. Respiratory care informatics and the practice of respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Constance C

    2008-04-01

    Recently I reported the results of a study that was conducted to determine how respiratory care information is managed and processed in respiratory care departments. Data obtained from the respiratory care departments surveyed indicated that their information systems (paper-based or automated) do not manage and process respiratory care information effectively or efficiently. Since the goal of an information system is to improve delivery of services, any useful information system must mirror business processes (or professional activities) to achieve that goal. Consequently, I suggested that, in addition to inadequate database management systems, the shortcomings of the information systems surveyed may have stemmed from a failure to accurately define and describe the data, information, and knowledge unique to the respiratory care profession. Accurate description and definition of respiratory care data, information, and knowledge, however, require a formal language and taxonomy for the respiratory care profession. This article explores the concept of respiratory care informatics and its relevance to the practice of respiratory care.

  2. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  3. European and Integration Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kaveshnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soviet scientific school of pan-European integration studies began to emerge in the 1960s at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations (Russian Academy of Science. Among the leading scientists who have developed methodological approaches of Soviet integration studies were M.M. Maximova, Y.A. Borko, Y. Shishkov, L.I. Capercaillie. Later, a new center for integration studies became the Institute of Europe, created in 1987. It was led by such renowned scientists as Academicians V.V. Zhurkin and N.P. Shmelev. In the 1980s the subject of the integration process in Europe attracted attention of experts from MGIMO. An important role in the development of school of integration research in the USSR was played by a MGIMO professor, head of the chair of history of international relations and foreign policy of the USSR V.B. Knyazhinskiy. His work contributed to the deliverance of the national scientific community from skepticism about the prospects for European integration. Ideas of V.B. Knyazhinsky are developed today in MGIMO by his followers A.V. Mal'gin and T.V. Ur'eva. In the mid-1990s, having retired from diplomatic service, professor Yu. Matveevskiy started to work at MGIMO. With a considerable practical experience in the field, he produced a series of monographs on the history of European integration. In his works, he analyses the development of integration processes in Western Europe from their inception to the present day, showing the gradual maturation of the necessary spiritual and material prerequisites for the start of integration and traces the various stages of the "integration". In the late 1990s, the growing demand from the domestic business and government for professionals who are capable of interacting with the European Union, has produced the necessary supply in the form of educational programs based on accumulated scientific knowledge. Setting up a discipline "European Integration" was a major step in the development

  4. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  5. European Languages: Instruments and Symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ožbot

    2008-07-01

    Further, the role of Latin as the single most important European language over the centuries and as a unifying feature of European culture is discussed. Parallels are drawn between Latin as the historical European lingua franca on the one hand and English as the modern language of international communication on the other: the importance of both languages started growing after substantial territorial expansion of their speakers and it was especially the political and economic power associated to these languages that played a significant role in their diffusion and long-term influence. Taking into consideration the instrumental as well as the symbolic function of languages, the question about the relationship between English and other European languages in today’s Europe is dealt with; it is suggested that the European languages are in principle not endangered as a result of the spread of English, with the exception of those instances in which English has been taking over the functions they have traditionally performed as national or community languages. It is emphasized that the future of Europe lies in the promotion of biand multilingualism, which have, in actual fact, been present on this continent throughout its history, and which in the cases of some European languages (e.g. Catalan, Basque, Irish, etc. have been successfully enhanced over the past decades.

  6. European Law: Ending Discrimination against Girls in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendel, Margherita

    1992-01-01

    Examines how the European Convention on Human Rights and its case law could combat sexist education and develop concepts of philosophical convictions, the European Community's duty, and children's rights. Considers feminist strategies for improving girls' education, English and European procedural laws, and difficulties of using English law. (RLC)

  7. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  8. Prospective open randomized study comparing efficacies and safeties of a 3-day course of azithromycin and a 10-day course of erythromycin in children with community-acquired acute lower respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roord, JJ; Goossens, MMHT; Kimpen, JLL; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacies and safeties of a 3-day, 3-dose course of azithromycin (10 mg/kg of body weight per day) and a 10-day, 30-dose course of erythromycin (40 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children were compared in an open randomized multicenter study.

  9. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  10. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rocca

    Full Text Available The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076. Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data.

  11. Bringing a community-based vision to the heart of Europe's research the European Union's new research commissioner hopes that his plans to promote science will win over critics in the EU

    CERN Multimedia

    Dickson, D

    1999-01-01

    Busquin's top priority is to create an European scientific 'espace' to bring added value to European research efforts. He is also keen to give the commission's research programmes a more human face (1 page).

  12. The European Court of Justice's Strategy for European Community integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacqueson, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    EF-Domstolen - aktivisme - analyse af retspraksis indenfor den fri bevægelighed af personer - økonomisk aktive personer - Unionsborgerskabet - "political science" teorier......EF-Domstolen - aktivisme - analyse af retspraksis indenfor den fri bevægelighed af personer - økonomisk aktive personer - Unionsborgerskabet - "political science" teorier...

  13. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J.; Kimpen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  15. Therapy for respiratory tract infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woensel, J; Kimpen, J

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infancy and young children. No effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (RSV-LRTI) exists. Ribavirin initially proved to be an effective anti-viral drug for RSV-LTRI.

  16. [Nutrition and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, M; Burgos, R

    2000-01-01

    Unlike other pathologies, not much attention has been paid to the relationship between nutrition and respiratory disease. This is probably because some of these diseases, such as cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are closely associated with smoking while others that could be more directly linked with nutrition such as cystic fibrosis and emphysema are not directly caused by nutrition disorders. Not all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are undernourished. When malnutrition is present in these patients it is because of multiple reasons and is associated with an increase in both mortality and morbidity. In patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, malnutrition is often secondary to a heightened catabolic state leading to the severe fundamental illness. We also know that nutritional treatment may not only correct malnutrition but also help in improving the respiratory function. This nutritional therapy is not normally easy to comply with. It must be accompanied by other non-pharmacological therapies such as rehabilitation. Renourishment may also entail risks for patients with respiratory diseases so it is very important to know as closely as possible their nutritional requirements and to focus on specific actions.

  17. Respiratory transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  18. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network of monitoring centres - mainly in the Witwatersrand and Vereeniging area with one centre in Middelburg - that ...

  19. Respiratory effects of trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Despreaux, Thomas; Perros, Frédéric; Lau, Edmund; Andujar, Pascal; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Descatha, Alexis

    2018-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated solvent that has been used widely around the world in the twentieth century for metal degreasing and dry cleaning. Although TCE displays general toxicity and is classified as a human carcinogen, the association between TCE exposure and respiratory disorders are conflicting. In this review we aimed to systematically evaluate the current evidence for the respiratory effects of TCE exposure and the implications for the practicing clinician. There is limited evidence of an increased risk of lung cancer associated with TCE exposure based on animal and human data. However, the effect of other chlorinated solvents and mixed solvent exposure should be further investigated. Limited data are available to support an association between TCE exposure and respiratory tract disorders such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, or rhinitis. The most consistent data is the association of TCE with autoimmune and vascular diseases such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Although recent data are reassuring regarding the absence of an increased lung cancer risk with TCE exposure, clinicians should be aware of other potential respiratory effects of TCE. In particular, occupational exposure to TCE has been linked to less common conditions such as systemic sclerosis and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  1. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  2. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake in a Respiratory Outpatients Clinic

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rossiter, A

    2017-02-01

    Influenza is an acute viral respiratory illness that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in Ireland. Despite well-established national and international guidelines1 and increased public awareness campaigns, vaccine uptake rates are well below target worldwide2. We performed an audit of influenza vaccine uptake at a Respiratory outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral centre. 54% (n=41) of patients received the annual vaccine, well below the target of 75% set by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

  3. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  4. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. Updated ...

  5. Acute respiratory infections at children

    OpenAIRE

    Delyagin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The common signs of virus respiratory diseases, role of pathological inclination to infections, value of immunodeficiency are presented at lecture. Features of most often meeting respiratory virus infections are given.

  6. Interference between respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus in respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, S; Toivonen, L; Schuez-Havupalo, L; Waris, M; Peltola, V

    2016-02-01

    An acute viral respiratory tract infection might prevent infections by other viruses because of the antiviral innate immune response. However, with the use of PCR methods, simultaneous detection of two or more respiratory viruses is frequent. We analysed the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the occurrence of simultaneous rhinovirus (RV) infection in children within a birth cohort study setting. We used PCR for virus detection in nasal swabs collected from children with an acute respiratory tract infection at the age of 0-24 months and from healthy control children, who were matched for age and date of sample collection. Of 226 children with RSV infections, 18 (8.0%) had co-infections with RV, whereas RV was detected in 31 (14%) of 226 control children (p 0.049 by chi-square test). Adjustment for sex, number of siblings and socio-economic status strengthened the negative association between RSV and RV (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.90; p 0.02). The median durations of symptoms (cough, rhinorrhoea, or fever) were 11 days in children with single RSV infections and 14 days in children with RSV-RV co-infections (p 0.02). Our results suggest that the presence of RSV reduces the probability of RV infection, but that, if a co-infection occurs, both viruses cause clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The decline of the impetigo epidemic caused by the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone: an 11.5-year population-based incidence study from a community in Western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørtveit, Sverre; Skutlaberg, Dag Harald; Langeland, Nina; Rortveit, Guri

    2014-12-01

    From around the year 2000, Northern Europe experienced a rise in impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus resistant to fusidic acid. A single clone of S. aureus was found to be the bacterial pathogen involved in the impetigo outbreak in Norway, Sweden, the UK and Ireland, termed 'the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone' (EEFIC). We have followed the incidence of impetigo during the years 2001-2012 based on all patients in general practice in the island community of Austevoll, Western Norway. We previously reported a marked decline of impetigo incidence in Austevoll, from 0.0260 cases per person-year in 2002 to 0.0038 in 2009. This article explores indications of an end to the impetigo epidemic caused by the EEFIC clone. All four general practitioners (GPs) in the community (mean population = 4400) were asked to diagnose impetigo in a uniform way and to take bacterial specimens from all impetigo cases. Phenotypic characteristics of specimen bacteria were determined for the whole period and molecular analyses were performed on isolates in the period 2008-2012. We observed a further decline in incidence of impetigo in Austevoll in the study period. The proportion of fusidic acid-resistant S. aureus isolates decreased during the period 2002-2012, with a mean of 80% in the epidemic years of 2002-2004, 55% in 2005-2009, and 6% in 2010-2012. In total, 44 S. aureus isolates from impetigo were subject to molecular analyses in the period 2008-2012, and 11 were found to be related to the EEFIC. All EEFIC isolates were found in 2008-2009, with no new isolates in 2010-2012. There is an apparent end to the impetigo epidemic related to the EEFIC in this population in Western Norway.

  8. Effectiveness of community facilitator training in improving knowledge, attitudes, and confidence in relation to depression and suicidal behavior: results of the OSPI-Europe intervention in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Evelien; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Iddi, Samuel; Arensman, Ella; Gottlebe, Katrin; Koburger, Nicole; Coffey, Claire; Gusmão, Ricardo; Quintão, Sónia; Costa, Susana; Székely, András; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    Community facilitators (CFs), such as teachers, nurses and social workers, are well placed as gatekeepers for depression and suicidal behavior, but not properly prepared to provide preventive and supportive services. The current study aimed: (1) to improve CFs' attitudes toward depression, knowledge on suicide, and confidence to detect suicidal behavior in four European countries and (2) to identify specific training needs across regions and CF groups. A standardized training program was provided to 1276 CFs in Germany, Hungary, Ireland, and Portugal. Attitudes toward depression, knowledge about suicide, and confidence in identifying suicidal persons were assessed before training, after training, and at three to six months follow-up. Additionally, several participants' characteristics were registered. At baseline, CFs showed relatively favorable attitudes toward depression, but limited knowledge on suicide, and little confidence to identify suicidal behavior. Basic skills strongly differed across CF groups and countries. For example, in Germany, carers for the elderly, nurses, teachers, and managers were most in need of training, while in Portugal pharmacists and the clergy appeared to be important target groups. Most importantly, the training program improved the competencies of CF groups across countries and these improvements were sustained after three to six months. CFs with low basic skills benefited most of the training. The observed training effects could be influenced by other external factors as our results are based upon a pre-post comparison with no control group. Gatekeeper trainings in community settings are successful in improving knowledge, reshaping attitudes, and boosting the confidence of gatekeepers. The most effective strategy to achieve the preferred objectives is to target those CF groups that are most in need of training and to tailor the content of the training program to the individual needs of the target group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  9. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S

    2015-01-01

    David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory...... Effectiveness Group (REG). MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, underlined the importance of the need for a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach for patients with Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases, and encouraged a joint initiative to control....... This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The Commissioner underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient...

  10. Epidemiology of coronavirus respiratory infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D; Flowers, D; Clarke, J R; Valman, H B; MacNaughton, M R

    1983-01-01

    Human coronaviruses were found by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in upper respiratory tract secretions taken during 30% of 108 acute respiratory infections experienced by 30 children under age 6 years with recurrent respiratory infections (index group), and during 29% of 51 acute infections experienced by their siblings. Lower respiratory tract infection--predominantly wheezy bronchitis--occurred in 30% of the index children's coronavirus positive infections but in none of their siblings' ...

  11. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome What Is Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  12. [Respiratory Rehabilitation to Reduce Respiratory Complications after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2017-07-01

    The number of cardiovascular surgical operations has been increasing, accompanied by an increase in the number of patients with an aging patient and various comorbidities. For this reason, the risk of respiratory complications after cardiovascular surgery is high, and ingenuity to alleviate this is necessary. We evaluated preoperative respiratory function and examined whether there is a difference in the onset of postoperative respiratory complications with or without respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative. As a result, the incidence of respiratory complications was significantly reduced in the group subjected to preoperative respiratory rehabilitation. Also, the intensive care unit stay was significantly shortened. From this, it is important to perform respiratory rehabilitation from preoperative time. And as a breathing exercise method, active cycle breathing technique is safe and highly effective.

  13. Long-term ambient air pollution and respiratory symptoms in adults (SAPALDIA study). The SAPALDIA Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, E; Elsasser, S; Schindler, C; Künzli, N; Perruchoud, A P; Domenighetti, G; Medici, T; Ackermann-Liebrich, U; Leuenberger, P; Monn, C; Bolognini, G; Bongard, J P; Brändli, O; Karrer, W; Keller, R; Schöni, M H; Tschopp, J M; Villiger, B; Zellweger, J P

    1999-04-01

    The association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and respiratory symptoms was investigated in a cross-sectional study in random population samples of adults (aged 18 to 60 yr, n = 9,651) at eight study sites in Switzerland. Information on respiratory symptoms was obtained with an extended version of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey questionnaire. The impact of annual mean concentrations of air pollutants was analyzed separately for never-, former, and current smokers. After controlling for age, body mass index, gender, parental asthma, parental atopy, low education, and foreign citizenship, we found positive associations between annual mean concentrations of NO2, total suspended particulates, and particulates of less than 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) and reported prevalences of chronic phlegm production, chronic cough or phlegm production, breathlessness at rest during the day, breathlessness during the day or at night, and dyspnea on exertion. We found no associations with wheezing without cold, current asthma, chest tightness, or chronic cough. Among never-smokers, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for a 10 micrograms/ m3 increase in the annual mean concentration of PM10 was 1. 35 (1.11 to 1.65) for chronic phlegm production, 1.27 (1.08 to 1.50) for chronic cough or phlegm production, 1.48 (1.23 to 1.78) for breathlessness during the day, 1.33 (1.14 to 1.55) for breathlessness during the day or at night, and 1.32 (1.18 to 1.46) for dyspnea on exertion. No associations were found with annual mean concentrations of O3. Similar associations were also found for former and current smokers, except for chronic phlegm production. The observed associations remained stable when further control was applied for environmental tobacco smoke exposure, past and current occupational exposures, atopy, and early childhood respiratory infections when restricting the analysis to long-term residents and to non- alpine areas

  14. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  15. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  16. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, M J; Lemen, R J

    1997-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is associated with the clinical signs and symptoms of small airway obstruction. A major public health problem throughout the world, this condition is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Management is primarily preventive, through strict hand washing, avoidance of exposure during the respiratory illness season and intravenously administered prophylactic anti-RSV Immune globulin, especially in selected small infants with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. Supportive measures, including fluid hydration, good nutrition, aerosolized bronchodilators and steroids, may be helpful. Ribavirin may be useful in severely ill children or those with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. A significant number of patients have recurrent episodes of bronchiolitis and wheezing, and may develop asthma later in life. Avoidance of exposure to tobacco smoke, cold air and air pollutants is also beneficial to long-term recovery from RSV bronchiolitis. A number of vaccines to prevent this infection are currently being studied.

  18. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  19. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  20. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4