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Sample records for eukaryotic elongation factor-2

  1. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the cold stress response by slowing translation elongation.

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    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Jackson, Thomas J; Utami, Wahyu; Barrett, David A; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2015-01-15

    Cells respond to external stress conditions by controlling gene expression, a process which occurs rapidly via post-transcriptional regulation at the level of protein synthesis. Global control of translation is mediated by modification of translation factors to allow reprogramming of the translatome and synthesis of specific proteins that are required for stress protection or initiation of apoptosis. In the present study, we have investigated how global protein synthesis rates are regulated upon mild cooling. We demonstrate that although there are changes to the factors that control initiation, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) on the α-subunit, the reduction in the global translation rate is mediated by regulation of elongation via phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) by its specific kinase, eEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase). The AMP/ATP ratio increases following cooling, consistent with a reduction in metabolic rates, giving rise to activation of AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase), which is upstream of eEF2K. However, our data show that the major trigger for activation of eEF2K upon mild cooling is the release of Ca2+ ions from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and, importantly, that it is possible to restore protein synthesis rates in cooled cells by inhibition of this pathway at multiple points. As cooling has both therapeutic and industrial applications, our data provide important new insights into how the cellular responses to this stress are regulated, opening up new possibilities to modulate these responses for medical or industrial use at physiological or cooler temperatures.

  2. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content...... expression and phosphorylation were unaffected by training status (NS). CONCLUSION: Basal transcriptional, translational, and/or post-translational control of CS and HAD seems to be gender-dependent. Also, gender differences in translation and/or post-translational protein modification of CS occur during...

  3. Elevated eukaryotic elongation factor 2 expression is involved in proliferation and invasion of lung squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Song, Yang; Sun, Bing; Hao, LiHong; Hu, Jun; Du, Sha; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, LiYuan; Liu, Lu; Gong, LinLin; Chi, XinMing; Liu, Qiang; Shao, ShuJuan

    2016-09-06

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (EF2), is a critical enzyme solely responsible for catalyzing the translocation of the elongated peptidyl-tRNA from the A to P sites of the ribosome during the process of protein synthesis. EF2 is found to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumors and is correlated with cancer cell progression and recurrence. The present study was designed to uncover the function of EF2 on lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) cancer cell growth and progression. Our results from clinical tissue studies showed that EF2 protein was significantly overexpressed in LSCC tissues, compared with the adjacent normal lung tissues, which was confirmed by western blotting and tissue microarray. Forced expression of EF2 resulted in the enhancement of lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H520 cells growth through promotion of G2/M progression in cell cycle, activating Akt and Cdc2/Cyclin B1. In nude mice cancer xenograft model, overexpression of EF2 significantly facilitated cell proliferation in vivo. Furthermore, forced expression of EF2 in the cells increased the capabilities of migration and invasion by changing the expressions of EMT-related proteins and genes. These results provided novel insights into the role of EF2 in tumorigenesis and progression in LSCC. EF2-targeted therapy could become a good strategy for the clinical treatment of LSCC.

  4. Silencing of EEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase) reveals AMPK-ULK1-dependent autophagy in colon cancer cells.

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    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Sham, Kathy W Y; Lai, Josie M Y; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2014-09-01

    EEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase), also known as Ca (2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, functions in downregulating peptide chain elongation through inactivation of EEF2 (eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2). Currently, there is a limited amount of information on the promotion of autophagic survival by EEF2K in breast and glioblastoma cell lines. However, the precise role of EEF2K in carcinogenesis as well as the underlying mechanism involved is still poorly understood. In this study, contrary to the reported autophagy-promoting activity of EEF2K in certain cancer cells, EEF2K is shown to negatively regulate autophagy in human colon cancer cells as indicated by the increase of LC3-II levels, the accumulation of LC3 dots per cell, and the promotion of autophagic flux in EEF2K knockdown cells. EEF2K negatively regulates cell viability, clonogenicity, cell proliferation, and cell size in colon cancer cells. Autophagy induced by EEF2K silencing promotes cell survival and does not potentiate the anticancer efficacy of the AKT inhibitor MK-2206. In addition, autophagy induced by silencing of EEF2K is attributed to induction of protein synthesis and activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway, independent of the suppression of MTOR activity and ROS generation. Knockdown of AMPK or ULK1 significantly abrogates EEF2K silencing-induced increase of LC3-II levels, accumulation of LC3 dots per cell as well as cell proliferation in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, silencing of EEF2K promotes autophagic survival via activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway in colon cancer cells. This finding suggests that upregulation of EEF2K activity may constitute a novel approach for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  5. The life and death of translation elongation factor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene; Merrill, A.R.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) occupies an essential role in protein synthesis where it catalyses the translocation of the two tRNAs and the mRNA after peptidyl transfer on the 80S ribosome. Recent crystal structures of eEF2 and the cryo-EM reconstruction of its 80S complex now provide...

  6. The life and death of translation elongation factor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene; Merrill, A.R.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) occupies an essential role in protein synthesis where it catalyses the translocation of the two tRNAs and the mRNA after peptidyl transfer on the 80S ribosome. Recent crystal structures of eEF2 and the cryo-EM reconstruction of its 80S complex now provide...... diphthamide residue, which is ADP-ribosylated by diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa....

  7. The diphthamide modification on elongation factor-2 renders mammalian cells resistant to ricin.

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    Gupta, Pradeep K; Liu, Shihui; Batavia, Mariska P; Leppla, Stephen H

    2008-08-01

    Diphthamide is a post-translational derivative of histidine in protein synthesis elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) that is present in all eukaryotes with no known normal physiological role. Five proteins Dph1-Dph5 are required for the biosynthesis of diphthamide. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells mutated in the biosynthetic genes lack diphthamide and are resistant to bacterial toxins such as diphtheria toxin. We found that diphthamide-deficient cultured cells were threefold more sensitive than their parental cells towards ricin, a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP). RIPs bind to ribosomes at the same site as eEF-2 and cleave the large ribosomal RNA, inhibiting translation and causing cell death. We hypothesized that one role of diphthamide may be to protect ribosomes, and therefore all eukaryotic life forms, from RIPs, which are widely distributed in nature. A protective role of diphthamide against ricin was further demonstrated by complementation where dph mutant CHO cells transfected with the corresponding DPH gene acquired increased resistance to ricin in comparison with the control-transfected cells, and resembled the parental CHO cells in their response to the toxin. These data show that the presence of diphthamide in eEF-2 provides protection against ricin and suggest the hypothesis that diphthamide may have evolved to provide protection against RIPs.

  8. Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation through eukaryotic elongation factor eEF-2

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    Caster, Stephen Z.; Castillo, Kathrina; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock has a profound effect on gene regulation, controlling rhythmic transcript accumulation for up to half of expressed genes in eukaryotes. Evidence also exists for clock control of mRNA translation, but the extent and mechanisms for this regulation are not known. In Neurospora crassa, the circadian clock generates daily rhythms in the activation of conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways when cells are grown in constant conditions, including rhythmic activation of the well-characterized p38 osmosensing (OS) MAPK pathway. Rhythmic phosphorylation of the MAPK OS-2 (P-OS-2) leads to temporal control of downstream targets of OS-2. We show that osmotic stress in N. crassa induced the phosphorylation of a eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) kinase, radiation sensitivity complementing kinase-2 (RCK-2), and that RCK-2 is necessary for high-level phosphorylation of eEF-2, a key regulator of translation elongation. The levels of phosphorylated RCK-2 and phosphorylated eEF-2 cycle in abundance in wild-type cells but not in cells deleted for OS-2 or the core clock component FREQUENCY (FRQ). Translation extracts from cells grown in constant conditions show decreased translational activity in the late subjective morning, coincident with the peak in eEF-2 phosphorylation, and rhythmic translation of glutathione S-transferase (GST-3) from constitutive mRNA levels in vivo is dependent on circadian regulation of eEF-2 activity. In contrast, rhythms in phosphorylated eEF-2 levels are not necessary for rhythms in accumulation of the clock protein FRQ, indicating that clock control of eEF-2 activity promotes rhythmic translation of specific mRNAs. PMID:27506798

  9. The expression profile and prognostic significance of eukaryotic translation elongation factors in different cancers

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    Hassan, Md. Khurshidul; Kumar, Dinesh; Naik, Monali

    2018-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation factors, especially initiation factors have garnered much attention with regards to their role in the onset and progression of different cancers. However, the expression levels and prognostic significance of translation elongation factors remain poorly explored in different cancers. In this study, we have investigated the mRNA transcript levels of seven translation elongation factors in different cancer types using Oncomine and TCGA databases. Furthermore, we have identified the prognostic significance of these factors using Kaplan-Meier Plotter and SurvExpress databases. We observed altered expression levels of all the elongation factors in different cancers. Higher expression of EEF1A2, EEF1B2, EEF1G, EEF1D, EEF1E1 and EEF2 was observed in most of the cancer types, whereas reverse trend was observed for EEF1A1. Overexpression of many factors predicted poor prognosis in breast (EEF1D, EEF1E1, EEF2) and lung cancer (EEF1A2, EEF1B2, EEF1G, EEF1E1). However, we didn’t see any common correlation of expression levels of elongation factors with survival outcomes across cancer types. Cancer subtype stratification showed association of survival outcomes and expression levels of elongation factors in specific sub-types of breast, lung and gastric cancer. Most interestingly, we observed a reciprocal relationship between the expression levels of the two EEF1A isoforms viz. EEF1A1 and EEF1A2, in most of the cancer types. Our results suggest that translation elongation factors can have a role in tumorigenesis and affect survival in cancer specific manner. Elongation factors have potential to serve as biomarkers and therapeutic drug targets, yet further study is required. Reciprocal relationship of differential expression between EEF1A isoforms observed in multiple cancer types indicates opposing roles in cancer and needs further investigation. PMID:29342219

  10. The Neurospora crassa colonial temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) gene encodes protein elongation factor 2.

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    Propheta, O; Vierula, J; Toporowski, P; Gorovits, R; Yarden, O

    2001-02-01

    At elevated temperatures, the Neurospora crassa mutant colonial, temperature-sensitive 3 (cot-3) forms compact, highly branched colonies. Growth of the cot-3 strain under these conditions also results in the loss of the lower molecular weight (LMW) isoform of the Ser/Thr protein kinase encoded by the unlinked cot-1 gene, whose function is also involved in hyphal elongation. The unique cot-3 gene has been cloned by complementation and shown to encode translation elongation factor 2 (EF-2). As expected for a gene with a general role in protein synthesis, cot-3 mRNA is abundantly expressed throughout all asexual phases of the N. crassa life cycle. The molecular basis of the cot-3 mutation was determined to be an ATT to AAT transversion, which causes an Ile to Asn substitution at residue 278. Treatment with fusidic acid (a specific inhibitor of EF-2) inhibits hyphal elongation and induces hyperbranching in a manner which mimics the cot-3 phenotype, and also leads to a decrease in the abundance of the LMW isoform of COT1. This supports our conclusion that the mutation in cot-3 which results in abnormal hyphal elongation/branching impairs EF-2 function and confirms that the abundance of a LMW isoform of COT1 kinase is dependent on the function of this general translation factor.

  11. Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A induces anoikis by triggering cell detachment.

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    Itagaki, Keisuke; Naito, Toshihiko; Iwakiri, Ryota; Haga, Makoto; Miura, Shougo; Saito, Yohei; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Kamiya, Sadahiro; Iyoda, Takuya; Yajima, Hirofumi; Iwashita, Shintaro; Ejiri, Shin-ichiro; Fukai, Fumio

    2012-05-04

    Anoikis, apoptosis because of loss of cell anchorage, is crucial for tissue homeostasis. Fibronectin not only provides a scaffold for cell anchorage but also harbors a cryptic antiadhesive site capable of inducing β1-integrin inactivation. In this study, this cryptic antiadhesive site is implicated in spontaneous induction of anoikis. Nontransformed fibroblasts (NIH3T3) adhering to a fibronectin substratum underwent anoikis during serum starvation culture. This anoikis was caused by proteolytic exposure of the cryptic antiadhesive site in fibronectin by matrix metalloproteinase. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) was identified as a membrane receptor for the exposed antiadhesive site. Serum starvation raised the membrane residence of eEF1A, and siRNA-based disruption of this increase rendered cells anoikis-resistant. By contrast, cells became more susceptible to anoikis in parallel with increased membrane residence of eEF1A by enforced expression. These results demonstrate that eEF1A acts as a membrane receptor for the cryptic antiadhesive site of fibronectin, which contributes to cell regulation, including anoikis, through negative regulation of cell anchorage.

  12. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  13. Characterization of the hemin-sensitive eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha kinase from mouse nonerythroid cells.

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    Berlanga, J J; Herrero, S; de Haro, C

    1998-11-27

    The heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) kinase (heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)) is activated by heme deficiency in reticulocytes and plays an important role in translational control in these cells. Previously, HRI was cloned from rabbit reticulocytes and rat brain, but a heme-regulated eIF2alpha kinase activity has only been purified from erythroid cells. In this study, we report the purification of a heme-sensitive eIF2alpha kinase activity from both mouse liver and NIH 3T3 cell extracts. Furthermore, we have cloned and characterized this mouse liver eIF2alpha kinase (mHRI), which exhibits 83 and 94% identities to rabbit and rat HRIs, respectively. Both the purified enzyme and recombinant mHRI exhibited an autokinase and an eIF2alpha kinase activity, and both activities were inhibited in vitro by hemin. In addition, wild-type mHRI, but not the inactive mHRI-K196R mutant, was autophosphorylated in vivo when it was expressed in 293 cells. Quantitation of mHRI mRNA expression in various mouse tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed relatively high levels in liver, kidney, and testis. These results provide strong evidence that mHRI is a ubiquitous eIF2alpha kinase of mammalian cells, suggesting that it could play important roles in the translational regulation of nonerythroid tissues.

  14. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 complex subunits are critical HIV-1 reverse transcription cofactors.

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    Warren, Kylie; Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Qin, Fangyun; Warrilow, David; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Abbott, Catherine M; Jones, Alun; Anderson, Jenny L; Harrich, David

    2012-06-12

    Cellular proteins have been implicated as important for HIV-1 reverse transcription, but whether any are reverse transcription complex (RTC) cofactors or affect reverse transcription indirectly is unclear. Here we used protein fractionation combined with an endogenous reverse transcription assay to identify cellular proteins that stimulated late steps of reverse transcription in vitro. We identified 25 cellular proteins in an active protein fraction, and here we show that the eEF1A and eEF1G subunits of eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) are important components of the HIV-1 RTC. eEF1A and eEF1G were identified in fractionated human T-cell lysates as reverse transcription cofactors, as their removal ablated the ability of active protein fractions to stimulate late reverse transcription in vitro. We observed that the p51 subunit of reverse transcriptase and integrase, two subunits of the RTC, coimmunoprecipitated with eEF1A and eEF1G. Moreover eEF1A and eEF1G associated with purified RTCs and colocalized with reverse transcriptase following infection of cells. Reverse transcription in cells was sharply down-regulated when eEF1A or eEF1G levels were reduced by siRNA treatment as a result of reduced levels of RTCs in treated cells. The combined evidence indicates that these eEF1 subunits are critical RTC stability cofactors required for efficient completion of reverse transcription. The identification of eEF1 subunits as unique RTC components provides a basis for further investigations of reverse transcription and trafficking of the RTC to the nucleus.

  15. Innate immune evasion mediated by the Ambystoma tigrinum virus eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha homologue.

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    Jancovich, James K; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2011-05-01

    Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae, genus Ranavirus) are large, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses whose replication is restricted to ectothermic vertebrates. Many highly pathogenic members of the genus Ranavirus encode a homologue of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). Data in a heterologous vaccinia virus system suggest that the Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) eIF2α homologue (vIF2αH; open reading frame [ORF] 57R) is involved in evading the host innate immune response by degrading the interferon-inducible, dsRNA-activated protein kinase, PKR. To test this hypothesis directly, the ATV vIF2αH gene (ORF 57R) was deleted by homologous recombination, and a selectable marker was inserted in its place. The ATVΔ57R virus has a small plaque phenotype and is 8-fold more sensitive to interferon than wild-type ATV (wtATV). Infection of fish cells with the ATVΔ57R virus leads to eIF2α phosphorylation, in contrast to infection with wtATV, which actively inhibits eIF2α phosphorylation. The inability of ATVΔ57R to prevent phosphorylation of eIF2α correlates with degradation of fish PKZ, an interferon-inducible enzyme that is closely related to mammalian PKR. In addition, salamanders infected with ATVΔ57R displayed an increased time to death compared to that of wtATV-infected salamanders. Therefore, in a biologically relevant system, the ATV vIF2αH gene acts as an innate immune evasion factor, thereby enhancing virus pathogenesis.

  16. Phosphorylation of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2α during Stress and Encystation in Entamoeba Species.

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    Hendrick, Holland M; Welter, Brenda H; Hapstack, Matthew A; Sykes, Steven E; Sullivan, William J; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2016-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric pathogen responsible for amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. It alternates between the host-restricted trophozoite form and the infective environmentally-stable cyst stage. Throughout its lifecycle E. histolytica experiences stress, in part, from host immune pressure. Conversion to cysts is presumed to be a stress-response. In other systems, stress induces phosphorylation of a serine residue on eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α (eIF2α). This inhibits eIF2α activity resulting in a general decline in protein synthesis. Genomic data reveal that E. histolytica possesses eIF2α (EheIF2α) with a conserved phosphorylatable serine at position 59 (Ser59). Thus, this pathogen may have the machinery for stress-induced translational control. To test this, we exposed cells to different stress conditions and measured the level of total and phospho-EheIF2α. Long-term serum starvation, long-term heat shock, and oxidative stress induced an increase in the level of phospho-EheIF2α, while short-term serum starvation, short-term heat shock, or glucose deprivation did not. Long-term serum starvation also caused a decrease in polyribosome abundance, which is in accordance with the observation that this condition induces phosphorylation of EheIF2α. We generated transgenic cells that overexpress wildtype EheIF2α, a non-phosphorylatable variant of eIF2α in which Ser59 was mutated to alanine (EheIF2α-S59A), or a phosphomimetic variant of eIF2α in which Ser59 was mutated to aspartic acid (EheIF2α-S59D). Consistent with the known functions of eIF2α, cells expressing wildtype or EheIF2α-S59D exhibited increased or decreased translation, respectively. Surprisingly, cells expressing EheIF2α-S59A also exhibited reduced translation. Cells expressing EheIF2α-S59D were more resistant to long-term serum starvation underscoring the significance of EheIF2α phosphorylation in managing stress. Finally, phospho-eIF2α accumulated during

  17. Aminoacyl-tRNA-charged eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is a bona fide substrate for Legionelle pneumophila effector glucosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzivelekidis, Tina; Jank, Thomas; Pohl, Corinna

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, which is the causative organism of Legionnaires disease, translocates numerous effector proteins into the host cell cytosol by a type IV secretion system during infection. Among the most potent effector proteins of Legionella are glucosyltransferases (Lgt’s), which...... selectively modify eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF) 1A at Ser-53 in the GTP binding domain. Glucosylation results in inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we show that in vitro glucosylation of yeast and mouse eEF1A by Lgt3 in the presence of the factors Phe-tRNAPhe and GTP was enhanced 150 and 590-fold...

  18. The C-terminal helix of ribosomal P stalk recognizes a hydrophobic groove of elongation factor 2 in a novel fashion.

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    Tanzawa, Takehito; Kato, Koji; Girodat, Dylan; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kumakura, Yuki; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Uchiumi, Toshio; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2018-04-06

    Archaea and eukaryotes have ribosomal P stalks composed of anchor protein P0 and aP1 homodimers (archaea) or P1•P2 heterodimers (eukaryotes). These P stalks recruit translational GTPases to the GTPase-associated center in ribosomes to provide energy during translation. The C-terminus of the P stalk is known to selectively recognize GTPases. Here we investigated the interaction between the P stalk and elongation factor 2 by determining the structures of Pyrococcus horikoshii EF-2 (PhoEF-2) in the Apo-form, GDP-form, GMPPCP-form (GTP-form), and GMPPCP-form bound with 11 C-terminal residues of P1 (P1C11). Helical structured P1C11 binds to a hydrophobic groove between domain G and subdomain G' of PhoEF-2, where is completely different from that of aEF-1α in terms of both position and sequence, implying that such interaction characteristic may be requested by how GTPases perform their functions on the ribosome. Combining PhoEF-2 P1-binding assays with a structural comparison of current PhoEF-2 structures and molecular dynamics model of a P1C11-bound GDP form, the conformational changes of the P1C11-binding groove in each form suggest that in response to the translation process, the groove has three states: closed, open, and release for recruiting and releasing GTPases.

  19. Decoding the biosynthesis and function of diphthamide, an enigmatic modification of translation elongation factor 2 (EF2

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    Raffael Schaffrath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diphthamide is a highly conserved modification of archaeal and eukaryal translation elongation factor 2 (EF2 and yet why cells need EF2 to contain diphthamide is unclear. In yeast, the first steps of diphthamide synthesis and the genes (DPH1-DPH5 required to form the intermediate diphthine are well-documented. However, the last step, amidadation of diphthine to diphthamide, had largely been ill-defined. Remarkably, through mining genome-wide synthetic gene array (SGA and chemical genomics databases, recent studies by Uthman et al. [PLoS Genetics (2013 9, e1003334] and Su et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (2012 109, 19983-19987] have identified two more diphthamide players, DPH6 and DPH7. Consistent with roles in the amidation step, dph6 and dph7 deletion strains fail to complete diphthamide synthesis and accumulate diphthine-modified EF2. In contrast to Dph6, the catalytically relevant amidase, Dph7 appears to be regulatory. As shown by Uthman et al., it promotes dissociation of diphthine synthase (Dph5 from EF2, allowing diphthine amidation by Dph6 to occur and thereby coupling diphthine synthesis to the terminal step in the pathway. Remarkably, the study by Uthman et al. suggests that Dph5 has a novel role as an EF2 inhibitor that affects cell growth when diphthamide synthesis is blocked or incomplete and, importantly, shows that diphthamide promotes the accuracy of EF2 performance during translation.

  20. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

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    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A {sup 32}P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The {sup 32}P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The {sup 32}P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as ({sup 32}P)AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the {sup 32}P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and ({sup 32}P)NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When {sup 32}P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the {sup 32}P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min.

  1. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing [ 32 P]orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A 32 P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The 32 P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The 32 P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as [ 32 P]AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the 32 P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and [ 32 P]NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When 32 P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the 32 P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min

  2. A novel interaction between adrenergic receptors and the alpha-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2B.

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    Klein, U; Ramirez, M T; Kobilka, B K; von Zastrow, M

    1997-08-01

    The alpha-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF-2B), a guanine nucleotide exchange protein that functions in regulation of translation, was observed to associate with the carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domains of the alpha2A- and alpha2B-adrenergic receptors in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a cDNA library prepared from 293 cells. This protein association was confirmed in vitro by affinity chromatography and was shown to be specific for a subset of G protein-coupled receptors, including the alpha2A-, alpha2B-, alpha2C-, and beta2-adrenergic receptors, but not the vasopressin (V2) receptor. Association of these proteins in vivo was confirmed by specific co-immunoprecipitation of eIF-2Balpha with full-length beta2-adrenergic receptors expressed in transfected 293 cells and by fluorescence microscopy showing co-localization of these proteins in intact cells. Remarkably, eIF-2Balpha co-localized with receptors exclusively in regions of the plasma membrane that are in contact with the extracellular medium, but failed to associate with membranes making cell-cell contacts. Overexpression of eIF-2Balpha in 293 cells caused a small (approximately 15%) but significant enhancement of beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase, without affecting forskolin or V2 receptor-mediated activation. These observations suggest a new role for a previously identified guanine nucleotide exchange protein in membrane biology and cell signaling.

  3. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    , together with eEF2 expression and phosphorylation at rest, were assessed in skeletal muscle of untrained (UT) and endurance trained (ET) females and males. RESULTS: Citrate synthase and HAD mRNA were higher in females than in males (27% and 48%, respectively, P ... not differ between females and males (NS). In females only, CS activity was enhanced (P volunteers (P ... by training status (NS). In UT, CS mRNA was enhanced 37% (P

  4. Expression of rat oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 in COS-7 cells following its eukaryotic expression vector construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, D-W; Han, X-J; Wang, Y-L; Xu, H-S

    2014-08-01

    The basic HLH transcription factor Olig is a key regulator for differentiating the oligodendrocyte lineage cells during development. Oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 (Olig2) plays a crucial role in differentiating the oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord. We aimed to construct and investigate the eukaryotic expression recombinant plasmid in the rat Olig2. The experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Neurobiology, Xuzhou Medical College from October 2011 to March 2012. The pEGFP-N1 vector was purchased from Invitrogen. JM101 competent cells and COS-7 cells were preserved at the Laboratory of Neurobiology, Xuzhou Medical College, China. The Olig2 cDNA fragment was cloned by RT-PCR with the total RNA from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and subsequently cloned into pGEM-T vector. The confirmed Olig2 fragment was then cloned into the pEGFP-N1 vector. The right recombinant was transfected into COS-7 cells by lipofectamine 2000. The expression of the Olig2 in COS-7 cells was detected by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Enzyme digestion and sequencing of the recombinant plasmid; and expression of the Olig2 were analyzed by fluorescence microscope and western blot. The correct pEGFP-N1-Olig2 cloning was verified by restriction endonuclease digestion and sequencing. The western blot analysis indicated that the Olig2-GFP fusion protein was expressed in the COS-7/pEGFP-N1-Olig2 cells at 72 h. The pEGFP-N1-Olig2 vector was constructed successfully. The Olig2-GFP fusion protein was expressed in the COS-7/pEGFP-N1-Olig2 cells. This study lays the foundation for further research in gene therapy for central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

  5. Autophosphorylation of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase and the role of the modification in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Jotaro; Sasaki, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Noriko; Yoshioka, Shinji; Matsushita, Miyuki; Shimizu, Toru

    2011-04-01

    Heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) kinase (HRI), functions in response to heme shortage in reticulocytes and aids in the maintenance of a heme:globin ratio of 1:1. Under normal conditions, heme binds to HRI and blocks its function. However, during heme shortage, heme dissociates from the protein and autophosphorylation subsequently occurs. Autophosphorylation comprises a preliminary critical step before the execution of the intrinsic function of HRI; specifically, phosphorylation of Ser-51 of eIF2α to inhibit translation of the globin protein. The present study indicates that dephosphorylated mouse HRI exhibits strong intramolecular interactions (between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains) compared to phosphorylated HRI. It is therefore suggested that autophosphorylation reduces the intramolecular interaction, which induces irreversible catalytic flow to the intrinsic eIF2α kinase activity after heme dissociates from the protein. With the aid of MS, we identified 33 phosphorylated sites in mouse HRI overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Phosphorylated sites at Ser, Thr and Tyr were predominantly localized within the kinase insertion region (16 sites) and kinase domain (12 sites), whereas the N-terminal domain contained five sites. We further generated 30 enzymes with mutations at the phosphorylated residues and examined their catalytic activities. The activities of Y193F, T485A and T490A mutants were significantly lower than that of wild-type protein, whereas the other mutant proteins displayed essentially similar activity. Accordingly, we suggest that Tyr193, Thr485 and Thr490 are essential residues in the catalysis. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  6. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Ting Wei

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N protein, phosphoprotein (P and matrix (M protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  7. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Marcial, Daneth; Khan, Moshin; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Snape, Natale; Ghildyal, Reena; Harrich, David; Spann, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N) protein, phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  8. Translation initiation requires cell division cycle 123 (Cdc123) to facilitate biogenesis of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perzlmaier, Angelika F; Richter, Frank; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2013-07-26

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is central to the onset of protein synthesis and its modulation in response to physiological demands. eIF2, a heterotrimeric G-protein, is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange to deliver the initiator methionyl-tRNA to the ribosome. Here we report that assembly of the eIF2 complex in vivo depends on Cdc123, a cell proliferation protein conserved among eukaryotes. Mutations of CDC123 in budding yeast reduced the association of eIF2 subunits, diminished polysome levels, and increased GCN4 expression indicating that Cdc123 is critical for eIF2 activity. Cdc123 bound the unassembled eIF2γ subunit, but not the eIF2 complex, and the C-terminal domain III region of eIF2γ was both necessary and sufficient for Cdc123 binding. Alterations of the binding site revealed a strict correlation between Cdc123 binding, the biological function of eIF2γ, and its ability to assemble with eIF2α and eIF2β. Interestingly, high levels of Cdc123 neutralized the assembly defect and restored the biological function of an eIF2γ mutant. Moreover, the combined overexpression of eIF2 subunits rescued an otherwise inviable cdc123 deletion mutant. Thus, Cdc123 is a specific eIF2 assembly factor indispensable for the onset of protein synthesis. Human Cdc123 is encoded by a disease risk locus, and, therefore, eIF2 biogenesis control by Cdc123 may prove relevant for normal cell physiology and human health. This work identifies a novel step in the eukaryotic translation initiation pathway and assigns a biochemical function to a protein that is essential for growth and viability of eukaryotic cells.

  9. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  10. The Level of Autoantibodies Targeting Eukaryote Translation Elongation Factor 1 α1 and Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme 2L3 in Nondiabetic Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunhee G. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM antibodies targeting eukaryote translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 autoantibody (EEF1A1-AAb and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 2L3 autoantibody (UBE2L3-AAb has been shown to be negatively correlated with age in T1DM subjects. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether age affects the levels of these two antibodies in nondiabetic subjects.MethodsEEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic control subjects (n=150 and T1DM subjects (n=101 in various ranges of age (18 to 69 years were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cutoff point for the presence of each autoantibody was determined based on control subjects using the formula: [mean absorbance+3×standard deviation].ResultsIn nondiabetic subjects, there were no significant correlations between age and EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels. However, there was wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels among control subjects <40 years old; the prevalence of both EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb in these subjects was 4.4%. When using cutoff points determined from the control subjects <40 years old, the prevalence of both autoantibodies in T1DM subjects was decreased (EEFA1-AAb, 15.8% to 8.9%; UBE2L3-AAb, 10.9% to 7.9% when compared to the prevalence using the cutoff derived from the totals for control subjects.ConclusionThere was no association between age and EEF1A1-AAb or UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic subjects. However, the wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels apparent among the control subjects <40 years old should be taken into consideration when determining the cutoff reference range for the diagnosis of T1DM.

  11. Succinate dehydrogenase assembly factor 2 is needed for assembly and activity of mitochondrial complex II and for normal root elongation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Ströher, Elke; Fenske, Ricarda; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) plays a central role in respiratory metabolism as a component of both the electron transport chain and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We report the identification of an SDH assembly factor by analysis of T-DNA insertions in At5g51040, a protein with unknown function that was identified by mass spectrometry analysis as a low abundance mitochondrial protein. This gene is co-expressed with a number of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, including SDH1-1, and has low partial sequence similarity to human SDHAF2, a protein required for flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) insertion into SDH. In contrast to observations of other SDH deficient lines in Arabidopsis, the sdhaf2 line did not affect photosynthetic rate or stomatal conductance, but instead showed inhibition of primary root elongation with early lateral root emergence, presumably due to the low SDH activity caused by the reduced abundance of SDHAF2. Both roots and leaves showed succinate accumulation but different responses in the abundance of other organic acids and amino acids assayed. Isolated mitochondria showed lowered SDH1 protein abundance, lowered maximal SDH activity and less protein-bound flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at the molecular mass of SDH1 in the gel separation. The short root phenotype and SDH function of sdhaf2 was fully complemented by transformation with SDHAF2. Application of the SDH inhibitor, malonate, phenocopied the sdhaf2 root architecture in WT. Whole root respiratory assays showed no difference between WT and sdhaf2, but micro-respirometry of the tips of roots clearly showed low oxygen consumption in sdhaf2 which could explain a metabolic deficit responsible for root tip growth. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Gefitinib and Erlotinib Lead to Phosphorylation of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 Alpha Independent of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Imai, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib and erlotinib are anticancer agents, which inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) occurs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving EGFR inhibitors. In the present study, we examined whether gefitinib- and erlotinib-induced lung injury related to ILD through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is a causative intracellular mechanism in cytotoxicity caused by various chemicals in adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cells. These two EGFR inhibitors increased Parkinson juvenile disease protein 2 and C/EBP homologous protein mRNA expressions, and activated the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α/activating transcription factor 4 pathway without protein kinase R-like ER kinase activation in A549 cells. Gefitinib and erlotinib caused neither ER stress nor cell death; however, these agents inhibited cell growth via the reduction of cyclin-D1 expression. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid, which is known to suppress eIF2α phosphorylation, cancelled the effects of EGFR inhibitors on cyclin-D1 expression and cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of an EGFR-silencing study using siRNA showed that gefitinib and erlotinib affected eIF2α phosphorylation and cyclin-D1 expression independent of EGFR inhibition. Therefore, the inhibition of cell growth by these EGFR inhibitors might equate to impairment of the alveolar epithelial cell repair system via eIF2α phosphorylation and reduced cyclin-D1 expression.

  13. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α--a downstream effector of mammalian target of rapamycin--modulates DNA repair and cancer response to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Tuval-Kochen

    Full Text Available In an effort to circumvent resistance to rapamycin--an mTOR inhibitor--we searched for novel rapamycin-downstream-targets that may be key players in the response of cancer cells to therapy. We found that rapamycin, at nM concentrations, increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2α in rapamycin-sensitive and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells, but had only a minimal effect on eIF2α phosphorylation in the rapamycin-insensitive triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Addition of salubrinal--an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation--decreased expression of a surface marker associated with capacity for self renewal, increased senescence and induced clonogenic cell death, suggesting that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α is detrimental to the cells' survival. Treating cells with salubrinal enhanced radiation-induced increase in eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death and showed that irradiated cells are more sensitive to increased eIF2α phosphorylation than non-irradiated ones. Similar to salubrinal--the phosphomimetic eIF2α variant--S51D--increased sensitivity to radiation, and both abrogated radiation-induced increase in breast cancer type 1 susceptibility gene, thus implicating enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α in modulation of DNA repair. Indeed, salubrinal inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination repair of double strand breaks that were induced by I-SceI in green fluorescent protein reporter plasmids. In addition to its effect on radiation, salubrinal enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor--vorinostat. Finally, the catalytic competitive inhibitor of mTOR--Ku-0063794--increased phosphorylation of eIF2α demonstrating further the involvement of mTOR activity in modulating eIF2α phosphorylation. These experiments suggest that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α decreases survival of cancer cells; making eIF2α a worthy target for

  14. Phosphorylation of the α-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α) alleviates benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoling; Jiang, Hongjuan; Fan, Yanfeng; Huang, Xiaobin; Shen, Jing; Qi, Hongyan; Li, Qian; Lu, Xiangyun; Shao, Jimin

    2011-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) is a carcinogen causing bulky-adduct DNA damage and inducing extensive cell responses regulating cell cycle, cell survival and apoptosis. However, the mechanism of cellular responses to BPDE exposure is not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of the phosphorylation of the α-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF2α) in the cellular response to BPDE exposure and addressed the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in the regulation of the cellular stress. Phosphorylation of eIF2α was induced in a normal human FL amnion epithelial cell line, and the expression of ATF4, a conserved downstream transcriptional factor of eIF2α phosphorylation, was up-regulated after BPDE exposure; however, the four known primary kinases for eIF2α phosphorylation (GCN2, HRI, PKR, and PERK) were not found activated. While BPDE induced severe cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and decreased cell viability in FL cells, salubrinal, a selective inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation, maintained the eIF2α phosphorylation and attenuated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and promoted cell survival. The findings reveal that when BPDE causes cellular damages, it induces eIF2α phosphorylation as well, which produces a pro-survival and anti-apoptotic effect to alleviate the cellular damages. Thus, the present study proposes a new cellular defensive mechanism during the environmental mutagen and carcinogen attack. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Eukaryotic origins

    OpenAIRE

    Lake, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the eukaryotes is a fundamental scientific question that for over 30 years has generated a spirited debate between the competing Archaea (or three domains) tree and the eocyte tree. As eukaryotes ourselves, humans have a personal interest in our origins. Eukaryotes contain their defining organelle, the nucleus, after which they are named. They have a complex evolutionary history, over time acquiring multiple organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, smooth and rough endo...

  16. Diphtheria toxin- and Pseudomonas A toxin-mediated apoptosis. ADP ribosylation of elongation factor-2 is required for DNA fragmentation and cell lysis and synergy with tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, H; Bonavida, B

    1992-09-15

    We have reported that diphtheria toxin (DTX) mediates target cell lysis and intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation (apoptosis) and also synergizes with TNF-alpha. In this paper, we examined which step in the pathway of DTX-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis was important for induction of cytolytic activity and for synergy. Using a DTX-sensitive tumor cell line, we first examined the activity of the mutant CRM 197, which does not catalyze the ADP ribosylation of elongation factor-2 (EF-2). CRM 197 was not cytolytic for target cells and did not mediate intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation of viable cells. The failure of CRM 197 to mediate target cell lysis suggested that the catalytic activity of DTX is prerequisite for target cell lysis. This was corroborated by demonstrating that MeSAdo, which blocks the biosynthesis of diphthamide, inhibited DTX-mediated protein synthesis inhibition and also blocked target cell lysis. Furthermore, the addition of nicotinamide, which competes with NAD+ on the DTX action site of EF-2, also blocked DTX-mediated lysis. These findings suggest that ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 may be a necessary step in the pathway leading to target cell lysis. In contrast to the sensitive line, the SKOV-3 tumor cell line is sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition by DTX but is not susceptible to cytolysis and apoptosis by DTX. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition by DTX is not sufficient to mediate target cell lysis. The synergy in cytotoxicity obtained with the combination of DTX and TNF-alpha was examined in order to determine the pathway mediated by DTX in synergy. Like the direct lysis by DTX, synergy was significantly reduced by MeSAdo and by nicotinamide. Furthermore, synergy was not observed with combination of CRM 197 and TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that, in synergy, DTX may utilize the same pathway required for its cytolytic activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin shared most the properties shown for DTX. Altogether, these findings

  17. Th1 stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani: comparative cellular and protective responses of rTriose phosphate isomerase, rProtein disulfide isomerase and rElongation factor-2 in combination with rHSP70 against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Anil Kumar; Khare, Prashant; Joshi, Sumit; Kushawaha, Pramod Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the recovery from the disease is always associated with the generation of Th1-type of cellular responses. Based on this, we have previously identified several Th1-stimulatory proteins of Leishmania donovani -triose phosphate isomerase (TPI), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and elongation factor-2 (EL-2) etc. including heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which induced Th1-type of cellular responses in both cured Leishmania patients/hamsters. Since, HSPs, being the logical targets for vaccines aimed at augmenting cellular immunity and can be early targets in the immune response against intracellular pathogens; they could be exploited as vaccine/adjuvant to induce long-term immunity more effectively. Therefore, in this study, we checked whether HSP70 can further enhance the immunogenicity and protective responses of the above said Th1-stimulatory proteins. Since, in most of the studies, immunogenicity of HSP70 of L. donovani was assessed in native condition, herein we generated recombinant HSP70 and tested its potential to stimulate immune responses in lymphocytes of cured Leishmania infected hamsters as well as in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cured patients of VL either individually or in combination with above mentioned recombinant proteins. rLdHSP70 alone elicited strong cellular responses along with remarkable up-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines and extremely lower level of IL-4 and IL-10. Among the various combinations, rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI emerged as superior one augmenting improved cellular responses followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2. These combinations were further evaluated for its protective potential wherein rLdHSP70 + rLdPDI again conferred utmost protection (∼80%) followed by rLdHSP70 + rLdEL-2 (∼75%) and generated a strong cellular immune response with significant increase in the levels of iNOS transcript as well as IFN-γ and IL-12 cytokines which was further supported by the high level of IgG2 antibody

  18. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of polo-like kinase 1/eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (PLK1/EEF2K) dual inhibitors for regulating breast cancer cells apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhaoping; Chen, Yujuan; Liu, Jingyan; Jiang, Qinglin; Yang, Shengyong; Guo, Li; He, Gu

    2018-01-20

    Both PLK1 and EEF2K are serine⁄threonine kinases that play important roles in the proliferation and programmed cell death of various types of cancer. They are highly expressed in breast cancer tissues. Based on the multiple-complexes generated pharmacophore models of PLK1 and homology models of EEF2K, the integrated virtual screening is performed to discover novel PLK1/EEF2K dual inhibitors. The top ten hit compounds are selected and tested in vitro, and five of them display PLK1 and EEF2K inhibition in vitro. Based on the docking modes of the most potent hit compound, a series of derivatives are synthesized, characterized and biological assayed on the PLK1, EEF2K as well as breast cancer cell proliferation models. Compound 18i with satisfied inhibitory potency are shifted to molecular mechanism studies contained molecular dynamics simulations, cell cycles, apoptosis and autophagy assays. Our results suggested that these novel PLK1/EEF2K dual inhibitors can be used as lead compounds for further development breast cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Dysregulation of Elongation Factor 1A Expression is Correlated with Synaptic Plasticity Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckelman, Brenna C; Day, Stephen; Zhou, Xueyan; Donohue, Maggie; Gouras, Gunnar K; Klann, Eric; Keene, C Dirk; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-06

    Synaptic dysfunction may represent an early and crucial pathophysiology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies implicate a connection between synaptic plasticity deficits and compromised capacity of de novo protein synthesis in AD. The mRNA translational factor eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is critically involved in several forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. By examining postmortem human brain samples, a transgenic mouse model, and application of synthetic human Aβ42 on mouse hippocampal slices, we demonstrated that eEF1A protein levels were significantly decreased in AD, particularly in the hippocampus. In contrast, brain levels of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 were unaltered in AD. Further, upregulation of eEF1A expression by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, which induces long-lasting synaptic plasticity, was blunted in hippocampal slices derived from Tg2576 AD model mice. Finally, Aβ-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation defects were alleviated by upregulation of eEF1A signaling via brain-specific knockdown of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 2. In summary, our findings suggest a strong correlation between the dysregulation of eEF1A synthesis and AD-associated synaptic failure. These findings provide insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying AD etiology and may aid in identification of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. A tree of life based on ninety-eight expressed genes conserved across diverse eukaryotic species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Jayaswal

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in DNA sequencing technologies have resulted in the accumulation of large data sets in the public domain, facilitating comparative studies to provide novel insights into the evolution of life. Phylogenetic studies across the eukaryotic taxa have been reported but on the basis of a limited number of genes. Here we present a genome-wide analysis across different plant, fungal, protist, and animal species, with reference to the 36,002 expressed genes of the rice genome. Our analysis revealed 9831 genes unique to rice and 98 genes conserved across all 49 eukaryotic species analysed. The 98 genes conserved across diverse eukaryotes mostly exhibited binding and catalytic activities and shared common sequence motifs; and hence appeared to have a common origin. The 98 conserved genes belonged to 22 functional gene families including 26S protease, actin, ADP-ribosylation factor, ATP synthase, casein kinase, DEAD-box protein, DnaK, elongation factor 2, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphatase 2A, ras-related protein, Ser/Thr protein phosphatase family protein, tubulin, ubiquitin and others. The consensus Bayesian eukaryotic tree of life developed in this study demonstrated widely separated clades of plants, fungi, and animals. Musa acuminata provided an evolutionary link between monocotyledons and dicotyledons, and Salpingoeca rosetta provided an evolutionary link between fungi and animals, which indicating that protozoan species are close relatives of fungi and animals. The divergence times for 1176 species pairs were estimated accurately by integrating fossil information with synonymous substitution rates in the comprehensive set of 98 genes. The present study provides valuable insight into the evolution of eukaryotes.

  1. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  2. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.A.K.W.

    2010-01-01

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components

  3. Synthesis of Elongated Microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Calle, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the factors that influence the effectiveness of self-healing in functional materials is the amount of liquid healing agents that can be delivered to the damaged area. The use of hollow tubes or fibers and the more sophisticated micro-vascular networks has been proposed as a way to increase the amount of healing agents that can be released when damage is inflicted. Although these systems might be effective in some specific applications, they are not practical for coatings applications. One possible practical way to increase the healing efficiency is to use microcapsules with high-aspect-ratios, or elongated microcapsules. It is understood that elongated microcapsules will be more efficient because they can release more healing agent than a spherical microcapsule when a crack is initiated in the coating. Although the potential advantage of using elongated microcapsules for self healing applications is clear, it is very difficult to make elongated microcapsules from an emulsion system because spherical microcapsules are normally formed due to the interfacial tension between the dispersed phase and the continuous phase. This paper describes the two methods that have been developed by the authors to synthesize elongated microcapsules. The first method involves the use of an emulsion with intermediate stability and the second involves the application of mechanical shear conditions to the emulsion.

  4. Heat shock protein 70 promotes coxsackievirus B3 translation initiation and elongation via Akt-mTORC1 pathway depending on activation of p70S6K and Cdc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengping; Qiu, Ye; Zhang, Huifang M; Hanson, Paul; Ye, Xin; Zhao, Guangze; Xie, Ronald; Tong, Lei; Yang, Decheng

    2017-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection upregulated heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and promoted CVB3 multiplication. Here, we report the underlying mechanism by which Hsp70 enhances viral RNA translation. By using an Hsp70-overexpressing cell line infected with CVB3, we found that Hsp70 enhanced CVB3 VP1 translation at two stages. First, Hsp70 induced upregulation of VP1 translation at the initiation stage via upregulation of internal ribosome entry site trans-acting factor lupus autoantigen protein and activation of eIF4E binding protein 1, a cap-dependent translation suppressor. Second, we found that Hsp70 increased CVB3 VP1 translation by enhancing translation elongation. This was mediated by the Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signal cascade, which led to the activation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 via p70S6K- and cell division cycle protein 2 homolog (Cdc2)-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. We also determined the position of Cdc2 in this signal pathway, indicating that Cdc2 is regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1. This signal transduction pathway was validated using a number of specific pharmacological inhibitors, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and a dominant negative Akt plasmid. Because Hsp70 is a central component of the cellular network of molecular chaperones enhancing viral replication, these data may provide new strategies to limit this viral infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Eukaryotic Cell Panorama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. This report describes the scientific results that support an illustration of a eukaryotic cell, enlarged by one million times to show the distribution and arrangement of macromolecules. The panoramic cross section includes eight panels that extend…

  6. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman MT (United States); Cassak, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown WV (United States); Priest, Eric R. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-20

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s{sup −1}. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  7. Precambrian Skeletonized Microbial Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Jere H.

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal heterotrophic eukaryotes are mostly absent from the Precambrian, although algal eukaryotes appear about 2.2 billion years ago. Tintinnids, radiolaria and foraminifera have molecular origins well back into the Precambrian yet no representatives of these groups are known with certainty in that time. These data infer times of the last common ancestors, not the appearance of true representatives of these groups which may well have diversified or not been preserved since those splits. Previous reports of these groups in the Precambrian are misinterpretations of other objects in the fossil record. Reported tintinnids at 1600 mya from China are metamorphic shards or mineral artifacts, the many specimens from 635-715 mya in Mongolia may be eukaryotes but they are not tintinnids, and the putative tintinnids at 580 mya in the Doushantou formation of China are diagenetic alterations of well-known acritarchs. The oldest supposed foraminiferan is Titanotheca from 550 to 565 mya rocks in South America and Africa is based on the occurrence of rutile in the tests and in a few modern agglutinated foraminifera, as well as the agglutinated tests. Neither of these nor the morphology are characteristic of foraminifera; hence these fossils remain as indeterminate microfossils. Platysolenites, an agglutinated tube identical to the modern foraminiferan Bathysiphon, occurs in the latest Neoproterozoic in Russia, Canada, and the USA (California). Some of the larger fossils occurring in typical Ediacaran (late Neoproterozoic) assemblages may be xenophyophorids (very large foraminifera), but the comparison is disputed and flawed. Radiolaria, on occasion, have been reported in the Precambrian, but the earliest known clearly identifiable ones are in the Cambrian. The only certain Precambrian heterotrophic skeletal eukaryotes (thecamoebians) occur in fresh-water rocks at about 750 mya. Skeletonized radiolaria and foraminifera appear sparsely in the Cambrian and radiate in the Ordovician

  8. Elongated Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan N. (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Perusich, Stephen A. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Elongated microcapsules, such as elongated hydrophobic-core and hydrophilic-core microcapsules, may be formed by pulse stirring an emulsion or shearing an emulsion between two surfaces moving at different velocities. The elongated microcapsules may be dispersed in a coating formulation, such as paint.

  9. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F.; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  10. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Large amplitude oscillatory elongation flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Laillé, Philippe; Yu, Kaijia

    2008-01-01

    A filament stretching rheometer (FSR) was used for measuring the elongation flow with a large amplitude oscillative elongation imposed upon the flow. The large amplitude oscillation imposed upon the elongational flow as a function of the time t was defined as epsilon(t) =(epsilon) over dot(0)t...... with a molecular weight of 145 kg/ mol was subjected to the oscillative flow. The onset of the steady periodic regime is reached at the same Hencky strain as the onset of the steady elongational viscosity ( Lambda = 0). The integral molecular stress function formulation within the 'interchain pressure' concept...

  12. Meeting Report: Minutes from EMBO: Ten Years of Comparative Genomics of Eukaryotic Microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; López-García, P.; Louis, E.; Boekhout, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 3 (2016), s. 217-221 ISSN 1434-4610 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : protist * eukaryotic microorganisms * genomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.794, year: 2016

  13. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  14. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Origins of eukaryotic sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Ursula; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Sexual reproduction is a nearly universal feature of eukaryotic organisms. Given its ubiquity and shared core features, sex is thought to have arisen once in the last common ancestor to all eukaryotes. Using the perspectives of molecular genetics and cell biology, we consider documented and hypothetical scenarios for the instantiation and evolution of meiosis, fertilization, sex determination, uniparental inheritance of organelle genomes, and speciation.

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  17. The Many Faces of Elongator in Neurodevelopment and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kojic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system requires a variety of cellular activities, such as proliferation, migration, axonal outgrowth and guidance and synapse formation during the differentiation of neural precursors into mature neurons. Malfunction of these highly regulated and coordinated events results in various neurological diseases. The Elongator complex is a multi-subunit complex highly conserved in eukaryotes whose function has been implicated in the majority of cellular activities underlying neurodevelopment. These activities include cell motility, actin cytoskeleton organization, exocytosis, polarized secretion, intracellular trafficking, and the maintenance of neural function. Several studies have associated mutations in Elongator subunits with the neurological disorders familial dysautonomia, intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and rolandic epilepsy. Here, we review the various cellular activities assigned to this complex and discuss the implications for neural development and disease. Further research in this area has the potential to generate new diagnostic tools, better prevention strategies and more effective treatment options for a wide variety of neurological disorders.

  18. Elongation Cutoff Technique: Parallel Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Korchowiec

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is demonstrated that the elongation cutoff technique (ECT substantially speeds up thequantum-chemical calculation at Hartree-Fock (HF level of theory and is especially wellsuited for parallel performance. A comparison of ECT timings for water chains with thereference HF calculations is given. The analysis includes the overall CPU (central processingunit time and its most time consuming steps.

  19. Aminoglycoside interactions and impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, Irina; Altman, Roger B.; Djumagulov, Muminjon; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Ferguson, Angelica; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom; Yusupov, Marat; Blanchard, Scott C.; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are chemically diverse, broad-spectrum antibiotics that target functional centers within the bacterial ribosome to impact all four principle stages (initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling) of the translation mechanism. The propensity of aminoglycosides to induce miscoding errors that suppress the termination of protein synthesis supports their potential as therapeutic interventions in human diseases associated with premature termination codons (PTCs). However, the sites of interaction of aminoglycosides with the eukaryotic ribosome and their modes of action in eukaryotic translation remain largely unexplored. Here, we use the combination of X-ray crystallography and single-molecule FRET analysis to reveal the interactions of distinct classes of aminoglycosides with the 80S eukaryotic ribosome. Crystal structures of the 80S ribosome in complex with paromomycin, geneticin (G418), gentamicin, and TC007, solved at 3.3- to 3.7-Å resolution, reveal multiple aminoglycoside-binding sites within the large and small subunits, wherein the 6′-hydroxyl substituent in ring I serves as a key determinant of binding to the canonical eukaryotic ribosomal decoding center. Multivalent binding interactions with the human ribosome are also evidenced through their capacity to affect large-scale conformational dynamics within the pretranslocation complex that contribute to multiple aspects of the translation mechanism. The distinct impacts of the aminoglycosides examined suggest that their chemical composition and distinct modes of interaction with the ribosome influence PTC read-through efficiency. These findings provide structural and functional insights into aminoglycoside-induced impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome and implicate pleiotropic mechanisms of action beyond decoding. PMID:29208708

  20. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Gonococcal attachment to eukaryotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, J.F.; Lammel, C.J.; Draper, D.L.; Brown, D.A.; Sweet, R.L.; Brooks, G.F.

    The attachment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture was analyzed by use of light and electron microscopy and by labeling of the bacteria with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)adenine. Isogenic piliated and nonpiliated N. gonorrhoeae from opaque and transparent colonies were studied. The results of light microscopy studies showed that the gonococci attached to cells of human origin, including Flow 2000, HeLa 229, and HEp 2. Studies using radiolabeled gonococci gave comparable results. Piliated N. gonorrhoeae usually attached in larger numbers than nonpiliated organisms, and those from opaque colonies attached more often than isogenic variants from transparent colonies. Day-to-day variation in rate of attachment was observed. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the gonococcal attachment to be specific for microvilli of the host cells. It is concluded that more N. gonorrhoeae from opaque colonies, as compared with isogenic variants from transparent colonies, attach to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture.

  2. Eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic chemosensory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, Andrea; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    In the last decades, microbiologists demonstrated that microorganisms possess chemosensory capabilities and communicate with each other via chemical signals. In parallel, it was demonstrated that solitary eukaryotic chemosensory cells are diffusely located on the mucosae of digestive and respiratory apparatuses. It is now evident that on the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates, two chemoreceptorial systems (i.e. eukaryotic and prokaryotic) coexist in a common microenvironment. To date, it is not known if the two chemosensory systems reciprocally interact and compete for detection of chemical cues. This appears to be a fruitful field of study and future researches must consider that the mucosal epithelia possess more chemosensory capabilities than previously supposed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been the focus of intense research towards the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantæ and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity and citotoxicity are also reviewed.

  4. Elongational dynamics of multiarm polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2009-01-01

    The startup of uni-axial elongational flow followed by stress relaxation and reversed bi-axial flow has been measured for a branched polystyrene melt with narrow molar mass distribution using the filament stretching rheometer. The branched polystyrene melt was a multiarm A(q)-C-C-A(q) pom......-pom polystyrene with an estimated average number of arms of q=2.5. The molar mass of each arm is about 28 kg/mole with an overall molar mass of M-w=280 kg/mole. An integral molecular stress function constitutive formulation within the "interchain pressure" concept agrees reasonably well with the experiments....

  5. Latrunculin B-induced plant dwarfism: Plant cell elongation is F-actin-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, F; Jasik, J; Edelmann, H G; Salajová, T; Volkmann, D

    2001-03-01

    Marine macrolides latrunculins are highly specific toxins which effectively depolymerize actin filaments (generally F-actin) in all eukaryotic cells. We show that latrunculin B is effective on diverse cell types in higher plants and describe the use of this drug in probing F-actin-dependent growth and in plant development-related processes. In contrast to other eukaryotic organisms, cell divisions occurs in plant cells devoid of all actin filaments. However, the alignment of the division planes is often distorted. In addition to cell division, postembryonic development and morphogenesis also continue in the absence of F-actin. These experimental data suggest that F-actin is of little importance in the morphogenesis of higher plants, and that plants can develop more or less normally without F-actin. In contrast, F-actin turns out to be essential for cell elongation. When latrunculin B was added during germination, morphologically normal Arabidopsis and rye seedlings developed but, as a result of the absence of cell elongation, these were stunted, resembling either genetic dwarfs or environmental bonsai plants. In conclusion, F-actin is essential for the plant cell elongation, while this F-actin-dependent cell elongation is not an essential feature of plant-specific developmental programs.

  6. The revised classification of eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adl, S.; Simpson, A. G. B.; Lane, C. E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, D.; Bowser, S. S.; Brown, M W.; Burki, F.; Dunthorn, M.; Hampl, V.; Heiss, A.; Hoppenrath, M.; Lara, E.; Gall, L. L.; Lynn, D. H.; McManus, H.; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Mozley-Stanridge, S. E.; Parfrey, L. W.; Pawlowski, J.; Rueckert, S.; Shadwick, L.; Schoch, C.L.; Smirnov, A.; Spiegel, F. W.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2012), s. 429-514 ISSN 1066-5234 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Algae * amoebae * biodiversity * ciliates * flagellates * fungi * parasites * protozoa * systematics * taxonomy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.162, year: 2012 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1550-7408.2012.00644.x/pdf

  7. Auxin and Cellular Elongation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  8. Eukaryotic diversity in historical soil samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Tzeneva, V.A.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Smidt, H.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic biodiversity in historical air-dried samples of Dutch agricultural soil has been assessed by random sequencing of an 18S rRNA gene library and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Representatives of nearly all taxa of eukaryotic soil microbes could be identified, demonstrating

  9. Phonation threshold flow in elongated excised larynges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jack J; Regner, Michael F; Tao, Chao; Pauls, Steven

    2008-07-01

    This study proposes the use of a new parameter of vocal aerodynamics, phonation threshold flow (PTF). The sensitivities of the PTF and the phonation threshold pressure (PTP) were quantitatively compared to the percent of vocal fold elongation from physiologic length. Ten excised canine larynges were mounted on a bench apparatus capable of controlling vocal fold elongation. Subglottal airflow was gradually increased until the onset of phonation. Elongation of the vocal folds was varied from +0% (physiologic length) to +15%, and the PTF and PTP were measured. The mean PTFs at physiologic vocal fold length ranged from 101 to 217 mL/s. No statistically significant relationship was found to exist between the size of the larynx and the measured PTF values (p = .404). The average percent change of PTF compared to the magnitude of elongation was found to be statistically significant (p < .001). The data indicated that the PTF was proportional to the percent of vocal fold elongation. The PTF was positively correlated with vocal fold elongation and the PTP for small magnitudes of elongation. The results suggest that the PTF may be indicative of the biomechanical properties of the vocal folds, thus providing a possibly valuable tool in the clinical evaluation of laryngeal function.

  10. Kinetics of CrPV and HCV IRES-mediated eukaryotic translation using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaud, Olivier; Barbier, Nathalie; Chommy, Hélène; Fiszman, Nicolas; Le Gall, Antoine; Dulin, David; Saguy, Matthieu; Westbrook, Nathalie; Perronet, Karen; Namy, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    Protein synthesis is a complex multistep process involving many factors that need to interact in a coordinated manner to properly translate the messenger RNA. As translating ribosomes cannot be synchronized over many elongation cycles, single-molecule studies have been introduced to bring a deeper understanding of prokaryotic translation dynamics. Extending this approach to eukaryotic translation is very appealing, but initiation and specific labeling of the ribosomes are much more complicated. Here, we use a noncanonical translation initiation based on internal ribosome entry sites (IRES), and we monitor the passage of individual, unmodified mammalian ribosomes at specific fluorescent milestones along mRNA. We explore initiation by two types of IRES, the intergenic IRES of cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) and the hepatitis C (HCV) IRES, and show that they both strongly limit the rate of the first elongation steps compared to the following ones, suggesting that those first elongation cycles do not correspond to a canonical elongation. This new system opens the possibility of studying both IRES-mediated initiation and elongation kinetics of eukaryotic translation and will undoubtedly be a valuable tool to investigate the role of translation machinery modifications in human diseases. © 2017 Bugaud et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. The eukaryotic fossil record in deep time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, N.

    2011-12-01

    Eukaryotic organisms are defining constituents of the Phanerozoic biosphere, but they also extend well back into the Proterozoic record, primarily in the form of microscopic body fossils. Criteria for identifying pre-Ediacaran eukaryotes include large cell size, morphologically complex cell walls and/or the recognition of diagnostically eukaryotic cell division patterns. The oldest unambiguous eukaryote currently on record is an acanthomorphic acritarch (Tappania) from the Palaeoproterozoic Semri Group of central India. Older candidate eukaryotes are difficult to distinguish from giant bacteria, prokaryotic colonies or diagenetic artefacts. In younger Meso- and Neoproterozoic strata, the challenge is to recognize particular grades and clades of eukaryotes, and to document their macro-evolutionary expression. Distinctive unicellular forms include mid-Neoproterozoic testate amoebae and phosphate biomineralizing 'scale-microfossils' comparable to an extant green alga. There is also a significant record of seaweeds, possible fungi and problematica from this interval, documenting multiple independent experiments in eukaryotic multicellularity. Taxonomically resolved forms include a bangiacean red alga and probable vaucheriacean chromalveolate algae from the late Mesoproterozoic, and populations of hydrodictyacean and siphonocladalean green algae of mid Neoproterozoic age. Despite this phylogenetic breadth, however, or arguments from molecular clocks, there is no convincing evidence for pre-Ediacaran metazoans or metaphytes. The conspicuously incomplete nature of the Proterozoic record makes it difficult to resolve larger-scale ecological and evolutionary patterns. Even so, both body fossils and biomarker data point to a pre-Ediacaran biosphere dominated overwhelming by prokaryotes. Contemporaneous eukaryotes appear to be limited to conspicuously shallow water environments, and exhibit fundamentally lower levels of morphological diversity and evolutionary turnover than

  12. From archaeon to eukaryote: the evolutionary dark ages of the eukaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martijn, Joran; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2013-02-01

    The evolutionary origin of the eukaryotic cell represents an enigmatic, yet largely incomplete, puzzle. Several mutually incompatible scenarios have been proposed to explain how the eukaryotic domain of life could have emerged. To date, convincing evidence for these scenarios in the form of intermediate stages of the proposed eukaryogenesis trajectories is lacking, presenting the emergence of the complex features of the eukaryotic cell as an evolutionary deus ex machina. However, recent advances in the field of phylogenomics have started to lend support for a model that places a cellular fusion event at the basis of the origin of eukaryotes (symbiogenesis), involving the merger of an as yet unknown archaeal lineage that most probably belongs to the recently proposed 'TACK superphylum' (comprising Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Korarchaeota) with an alphaproteobacterium (the protomitochondrion). Interestingly, an increasing number of so-called ESPs (eukaryotic signature proteins) is being discovered in recently sequenced archaeal genomes, indicating that the archaeal ancestor of the eukaryotic cell might have been more eukaryotic in nature than presumed previously, and might, for example, have comprised primitive phagocytotic capabilities. In the present paper, we review the evolutionary transition from archaeon to eukaryote, and propose a new model for the emergence of the eukaryotic cell, the 'PhAT (phagocytosing archaeon theory)', which explains the emergence of the cellular and genomic features of eukaryotes in the light of a transiently complex phagocytosing archaeon.

  13. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  14. Polyamines and Anaerobic Elongation of Rice Coleoptile

    OpenAIRE

    Remo, Reggiani; Alejandro, Hochkoeppler; Alcide, Bertani; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.; Istituto Biosintesi Vegetali, C. N. R.

    1989-01-01

    The role of polyamines in the anaerobic elongation of rice (Oryza sativa L.) coleoptiles was studied. The reduced growth of rice coleoptiles under anoxic conditions was accompanied by a massive accumulation of free putrescine. Putrescine was synthesized from arginine in a reaction catalyzed by arginine decarboxylase (ADC). The anoxic titer of putrescine was closely correlated with elongation of coleoptiles. In experiments in which putrescine and inhibitors [a-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and...

  15. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  16. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  17. Broadly sampled multigene trees of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logsdon John M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life and the tremendous diversity of microbial eukaryotes is in flux as additional genes and diverse taxa are sampled for molecular analyses. Despite instability in many analyses, there is an increasing trend to classify eukaryotic diversity into six major supergroups: the 'Amoebozoa', 'Chromalveolata', 'Excavata', 'Opisthokonta', 'Plantae', and 'Rhizaria'. Previous molecular analyses have often suffered from either a broad taxon sampling using only single-gene data or have used multigene data with a limited sample of taxa. This study has two major aims: (1 to place taxa represented by 72 sequences, 61 of which have not been characterized previously, onto a well-sampled multigene genealogy, and (2 to evaluate the support for the six putative supergroups using two taxon-rich data sets and a variety of phylogenetic approaches. Results The inferred trees reveal strong support for many clades that also have defining ultrastructural or molecular characters. In contrast, we find limited to no support for most of the putative supergroups as only the 'Opisthokonta' receive strong support in our analyses. The supergroup 'Amoebozoa' has only moderate support, whereas the 'Chromalveolata', 'Excavata', 'Plantae', and 'Rhizaria' receive very limited or no support. Conclusion Our analytical approach substantiates the power of increased taxon sampling in placing diverse eukaryotic lineages within well-supported clades. At the same time, this study indicates that the six supergroup hypothesis of higher-level eukaryotic classification is likely premature. The use of a taxon-rich data set with 105 lineages, which still includes only a small fraction of the diversity of microbial eukaryotes, fails to resolve deeper phylogenetic relationships and reveals no support for four of the six proposed supergroups. Our analyses provide a point of departure for future taxon- and gene-rich analyses of the

  18. Natural history of eukaryotic DNA methylation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines and adenines in DNA is a widespread epigenetic mark in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In eukaryotes, it has a profound influence on chromatin structure and dynamics. Recent advances in genomics and biochemistry have considerably elucidated the functions and provenance of these DNA modifications. DNA methylases appear to have emerged first in bacterial restriction-modification (R-M) systems from ancient RNA-modifying enzymes, in transitions that involved acquisition of novel catalytic residues and DNA-recognition features. DNA adenine methylases appear to have been acquired by ciliates, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates, and certain chlorophyte algae. Six distinct clades of cytosine methylases, including the DNMT1, DNMT2, and DNMT3 clades, were acquired by eukaryotes through independent lateral transfer of their precursors from bacteria or bacteriophages. In addition to these, multiple adenine and cytosine methylases were acquired by several families of eukaryotic transposons. In eukaryotes, the DNA-methylase module was often combined with distinct modified and unmodified peptide recognition domains and other modules mediating specialized interactions, for example, the RFD module of DNMT1 which contains a permuted Sm domain linked to a helix-turn-helix domain. In eukaryotes, the evolution of DNA methylases appears to have proceeded in parallel to the elaboration of histone-modifying enzymes and the RNAi system, with functions related to counter-viral and counter-transposon defense, and regulation of DNA repair and differential gene expression being their primary ancestral functions. Diverse DNA demethylation systems that utilize base-excision repair via DNA glycosylases and cytosine deaminases appear to have emerged in multiple eukaryotic lineages. Comparative genomics suggests that the link between cytosine methylation and DNA glycosylases probably emerged first in a novel R-M system in bacteria. Recent studies suggest that the 5mC is not

  19. Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2006-12-01

    Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

  20. Elongation-based fiber optic tunable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, G. G.; Mejia-Islas, J. A.; Andrade-González, E. A.; Pérez-Torres, J. R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper focuses on introducing the results of a model using a control system for an optical filter that can be tuned, using a solution that employs both, an elongation control system and a fiber Bragg grating. At the first stage, the optical characterization of the filter was made, then the stepper motors were chosen for the desired wavelength selection with a couple of pulleys which produce the grating elongation and, as a consequence, the wavelength shifting. The pulleys diameters were calculated to produce 0.8 nm shift for each filtering wavelength using a control program.

  1. Communities of microbial eukaryotes in the mammalian gut within the context of environmental eukaryotic diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Walters, William A.; Lauber, Christian L.; Clemente, Jose C.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Teiling, Clotilde; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Brunelle, Julie; Driscoll, Mark; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2014-06-19

    Eukaryotic microbes (protists) residing in the vertebrate gut influence host health and disease, but their diversity and distribution in healthy hosts is poorly understood. Protists found in the gut are typically considered parasites, but many are commensal and some are beneficial. Further, the hygiene hypothesis predicts that association with our co-evolved microbial symbionts may be important to overall health. It is therefore imperative that we understand the normal diversity of our eukaryotic gut microbiota to test for such effects and avoid eliminating commensal organisms. We assembled a dataset of healthy individuals from two populations, one with traditional, agrarian lifestyles and a second with modern, westernized lifestyles, and characterized the human eukaryotic microbiota via high-throughput sequencing. To place the human gut microbiota within a broader context our dataset also includes gut samples from diverse mammals and samples from other aquatic and terrestrial environments. We curated the SILVA ribosomal database to reflect current knowledge of eukaryotic taxonomy and employ it as a phylogenetic framework to compare eukaryotic diversity across environment. We show that adults from the non-western population harbor a diverse community of protists, and diversity in the human gut is comparable to that in other mammals. However, the eukaryotic microbiota of the western population appears depauperate. The distribution of symbionts found in mammals reflects both host phylogeny and diet. Eukaryotic microbiota in the gut are less diverse and more patchily distributed than bacteria. More broadly, we show that eukaryotic communities in the gut are less diverse than in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and few taxa are shared across habitat types, and diversity patterns of eukaryotes are correlated with those observed for bacteria. These results outline the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in the mammalian gut and across

  2. Reproduction, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing questions about reproduction, individuality, and the units of selection in symbiotic associations, with special attention to the origin of the eukaryotic cell. Three kinds of reproduction are distinguished, and a possible evolutionary sequence giving rise to a mitochondrion-containing eukaryotic cell from an endosymbiotic partnership is analyzed as a series of transitions between each of the three forms of reproduction. The sequence of changes seen in this “egalitarian” evolutionary transition is compared with those that apply in “fraternal” transitions, such as the evolution of multicellularity in animals. PMID:26286983

  3. Bacterial elongation factors EF-Tu, their mutants, chimeric forms, and domains: isolation and purification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonák, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 849, 1-2 (2007), s. 141-153 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052206; GA AV ČR KJB500520503; GA MŠk 2B06065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : bacterial elongation factors EF-Tu, , G-domain * recombinant EF-Tus * preparation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.935, year: 2007

  4. The Sweetness of Embryonic Elongation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganathan, Sundar R; Oates, Andrew C

    2017-02-27

    Metabolic pathways play a vital yet poorly understood role in embryogenesis. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Bulusu et al. (2017) and Oginuma et al. (2017) provide insights into the intricate relationship between metabolism and morphogenesis, showing that glycolysis facilitates body elongation and balances neural and mesodermal differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Static Elongation of a Suspended Slinky™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Mikolaj ``Mik''

    2002-05-01

    Elongation of a vertically suspended Slinky under its own weight and a weight hung from it is discussed using elementary considerations. Displacement of the center of mass of Slinky is also found. The results are verified experimentally using a 1 apparatus.

  6. Rhizome elongation and seagrass clonal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marbà, N.; Duarte, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    A compilation of published and original data on rhizome morphometry, horizontal and vertical elongation rates and branching patterns for 27 seagrass species developing in 192 seagrass stands allowed an examination of the variability of seagrass rhizome and clonal growth programmes across and within

  7. Eukaryotic acquisition of a bacterial operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the champions of basic biomedical research due to its compact eukaryotic genome and ease of experimental manipulation. Despite these immense strengths, its impact on understanding the genetic basis of natural phenotypic variation has been limited by strai...

  8. The origin of the eukaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H.

    1984-01-01

    The endosymbiotic hypothesis for the origin of the eukaryotic cell has been applied to the origin of the mitochondria and chloroplasts. However as has been pointed out by Mereschowsky in 1905, it should also be applied to the nucleus as well. If the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts are endosymbionts, then it is likely that the organism that did the engulfing was not a DNA-based organism. In fact, it is useful to postulate that this organism was a primitive RNA-based organism. This hypothesis would explain the preponderance of RNA viruses found in eukaryotic cells. The centriole and basal body do not have a double membrane or DNA. Like all MTOCs (microtubule organising centres), they have a structural or morphic RNA implicated in their formation. This would argue for their origin in the early RNA-based organism rather than in an endosymbiotic event involving bacteria. Finally, the eukaryotic cell uses RNA in ways quite unlike bacteria, thus pointing to a greater emphasis of RNA in both control and structure in the cell. The origin of the eukaryotic cell may tell us why it rather than its prokaryotic relative evolved into the metazoans who are reading this paper.

  9. Evidence for a Minimal Eukaryotic Phosphoproteome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, Sander H.; Parikh, Kaushal; van der Sijde, Marijke; Joore, Jos; Ritsema, Tita; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Reversible phosphorylation catalysed by kinases is probably the most important regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings. We studied the in vitro phosphorylation of peptide arrays exhibiting the majority of PhosphoBase-deposited protein sequences, by factors in

  10. Eukaryotic membrane protein overproduction in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Chan, Ka Wai; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Floyd, Suzanne; O’Connor, Rosemary; Monné, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic membrane proteins play many vital roles in the cell and are important drug targets. Approximately 25% of all genes identified in the genome are known to encode membrane proteins, but the vast majority have no assigned function. Although the generation of structures of soluble proteins has

  11. A microRNA-mediated decrease in eukaryotic initiation factor 2α promotes cell survival during PS-341 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Zang, Dan; Yi, Songgang; Li, Xiaofen; Yang, Changshan; Dong, Xiaoxian; Zhao, Chong; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Liu, Shouting; Liu, Ningning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2016-02-22

    MicroRNAs (miRs) play pivotal roles in carcinogenesis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that performs the folding, modification and trafficking of proteins targeted to the secretory pathway. Cancer cells often endure ER stress during tumor progression but use the adaptive ER stress response to gain survival advantage. Here we report: (i) A group of miRs, including miR-30b-5p and miR-30c-5p, are upregulated by proteasome inhibitor PS-341 treatment, in HepG2 and MDA-MB-453 cells. (ii) Two representative PS-341-induced miRs: miR-30b-5p and miR-30c-5p are found to promote cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis in both tumor cells. (iii) eIF2α is confirmed as the congenerous target of miR-30b-5p and miR-30c-5p, essential to the anti-apoptotic function of these miRs. (iv) Upregulation of miR-30b-5p or miR-30c-5p, which occurs latter than the increase of phosphorylated eIF2α (p-eIF2α) in the cell under ER stress, suppresses the p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP pro-apoptotic pathway. (v) Inhibition of the miR-30b-5p or miR-30c-5p sensitizes the cancer cells to the cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition. In conclusion, we unravels a new miRs-based mechanism that helps maintain intracellular proteostasis and promote cell survival during ER stress through upregulation of miR-30b-5p and miR-30c-5p which target eIF2α and thereby inhibit the p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP pro-apoptotic pathway, identifying miR-30b-5p and miR-30c-5p as potentially new targets for anti-cancer therapies.

  12. Planar elongation of soft polymeric networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Krog; Hassager, Ole; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2010-01-01

    A new test fixture for the filament stretch rheometer (FSR) has been developed to measure planar elongation of soft polymeric networks with application towards pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs). The concept of this new geometry is to elongate a tube-like sample by keeping the perimeter constant....... To validate this new technique, soft polymeric networks of poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) were investigated during deformation. Particle tracking and video recording were used to detect to what extent the imposed strain rate and the sample perimeter remained constant. It was observed that, by using...... an appropriate choice of initial sample height, perimeter, and thickness, the planar stretch ratio will follow lambda(t) = h(t)/h(0) = exp((epsilon)overdot t), with h(t) being the height at time t and (epsilon)overdot the imposed constant strain rate. The perimeter would decrease by a few percent only, which...

  13. Towards New Antifolates Targeting Eukaryotic Opportunistic Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Bolstad, E; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Trimethoprim, an antifolate commonly prescribed in combination with sulfamethoxazole, potently inhibits several prokaryotic species of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). However, several eukaryotic pathogenic organisms are resistant to trimethoprim, preventing its effective use as a therapeutic for those infections. We have been building a program to reengineer trimethoprim to more potently and selectively inhibit eukaryotic species of DHFR as a viable strategy for new drug discovery targeting several opportunistic pathogens. We have developed a series of compounds that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of DHFR from the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma as well as the fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the structures of DHFR from the fungal species Candida glabrata and Pneumocystis suggests that the compounds may also potently inhibit Pneumocystis DHFR.

  14. Rolling-circle transposons in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitonov, V V; Jurka, J

    2001-07-17

    All eukaryotic DNA transposons reported so far belong to a single category of elements transposed by the so-called "cut-and-paste" mechanism. Here, we report a previously unknown category of eukaryotic DNA transposons, Helitron, which transpose by rolling-circle replication. Autonomous Helitrons encode a 5'-to-3' DNA helicase and nuclease/ligase similar to those encoded by known rolling-circle replicons. Helitron-like transposons have conservative 5'-TC and CTRR-3' termini and do not have terminal inverted repeats. They contain 16- to 20-bp hairpins separated by 10--12 nucleotides from the 3'-end and transpose precisely between the 5'-A and T-3', with no modifications of the AT target sites. Together with their multiple diverged nonautonomous descendants, Helitrons constitute approximately 2% of both the Arabidopsis thaliana and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes and also colonize the Oriza sativa genome. Sequence conservation suggests that Helitrons continue to be transposed.

  15. Eukaryotic algal phytochromes span the visible spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Duanmu, Deqiang; Martin, Shelley S.; Bachy, Charles; Price, Dana C.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms exploit photosensory proteins to respond to changing light conditions. In land plants, phytochromes use the ratio of red to far-red light to detect shading by neighboring plants, leading to changes in growth and development. Light conditions can be more variable for algae because of the wavelength-dependent attenuation of light by water and because of ocean mixing. We studied phytochromes from taxonomically diverse eukaryotic algae from groups considered important for...

  16. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the a...

  17. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongational...

  18. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Vece, Marcel Di; Rath, Jatindra K; Dijk, Lourens van; Schropp, Ruud E I

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  19. Origins of robustness in translational control via eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Farhan; Spurgeon, Sarah; von der Haar, Tobias

    2018-05-14

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is one of the best studied and most widely used means for regulating protein synthesis activity in eukaryotic cells. This pathway regulates protein synthesis in response to stresses, viral infections, and nutrient depletion, among others. We present analyses of an ordinary differential equation-based model of this pathway, which aim to identify its principal robustness-conferring features. Our analyses indicate that robustness is a distributed property, rather than arising from the properties of any one individual pathway species. However, robustness-conferring properties are unevenly distributed between the different species, and we identify a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex as a species that likely contributes strongly to the robustness of the pathway. Our analyses make further predictions on the dynamic response to different types of kinases that impinge on eIF2. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA......-binding protein with functions in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Bur1 interacted via its C-terminal domain with RPA, and bur1-¿C mutants showed a deregulated DNA damage response accompanied by increased sensitivity to DNA damage and replication stress as well as increased levels of persisting Rad52...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  1. Elongational viscosity of multiarm (Pom-Pom) polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2006-01-01

    -Pom was estimated to have 2.5 arms on average, while the estimate is 3.3 for the asymmetric star. The molar mass of each arm is about 27 kg/mol. The melts were characterized in the linear viscoelastic regime and in non-linear elongational rheometry. The transient elongational viscosity for the Pom-Pom molecule...... it corresponds well with an estimate of the maximum stretchability of the backbone. Time-strain separability was not observed for the 'Asymmetric star' molecule at the elongation rates investigated. The transient elongational viscosity for the 'Pom-Pom' molecule went through a reproducible maximum...... in the viscosity at the highest elongational rate....

  2. Different polyamine pathways from bacteria have replaced eukaryotic spermidine biosynthesis in ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetaurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sok Ho; Zhang, Yang; Hanfrey, Colin C; Elliott, Katherine A; Ealick, Steven E; Michael, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    The polyamine spermidine is absolutely required for growth and cell proliferation in eukaryotes, due to its role in post-translational modification of essential translation elongation factor eIF5A, mediated by deoxyhypusine synthase. We have found that free-living ciliates Tetrahymena and Paramecium lost the eukaryotic genes encoding spermidine biosynthesis: S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn). In Tetrahymena, they were replaced by a gene encoding a fusion protein of bacterial AdoMetDC and SpdSyn, present as three copies. In Paramecium, a bacterial homospermidine synthase replaced the eukaryotic genes. Individual AdoMetDC-SpdSyn fusion protein paralogues from Tetrahymena exhibit undetectable AdoMetDC activity; however, when two paralogous fusion proteins are mixed, AdoMetDC activity is restored and spermidine is synthesized. Structural modelling indicates a functional active site is reconstituted by sharing critical residues from two defective protomers across the heteromer interface. Paramecium was found to accumulate homospermidine, suggesting it replaces spermidine for growth. To test this concept, a budding yeast spermidine auxotrophic strain was found to grow almost normally with homospermidine instead of spermidine. Biosynthesis of spermidine analogue aminopropylcadaverine, but not exogenously provided norspermidine, correlated with some growth. Finally, we found that diverse single-celled eukaryotic parasites and multicellular metazoan Schistosoma worms have lost the spermidine biosynthetic pathway but retain deoxyhypusine synthase. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Trade studies of plasma elongation for next-step tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.; Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    The effect of elongation on minimum-cost devices is investigated for elongations ranging from 2 to 3. The analysis, carried out with the TETRA tokamak systems code, includes the effects of elongation on both physics (plasma beta limit) and engineering (poloidal field coil currents) issues. When ignition is required, the minimum cost occurs for elongations from 2.3 to 2.9, depending on the plasma energy confinement scaling used. Scalings that include favorable plasma current dependence and/or degradation with fusion power tend to have minimum cost at higher elongation (2.5-2.9); scalings that depend primarily on size result in lower elongation (/approximately/2.3) for minimum cost. For design concepts that include steady-state current-driven operation, minimum cost occurs at an elongation of 2.3. 12 refs., 13 figs

  4. Prokaryotes versus Eukaryotes: Who is hosting whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eTellez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our world. For millions of years, prokaryotic microorganisms have functioned as a major selective force shaping eukaryotic evolution. Microbes that live inside and on animals outnumber the animals’ actual somatic and germ cells by an estimated 10-fold. Collectively, the intestinal microbiome represents a ‘forgotten organ’, functioning as an organ inside another that can execute many physiological responsibilities. The nature of primitive eukaryotes was drastically changed due to the association with symbiotic prokaryotes facilitating mutual coevolution of host and microbe. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. From termites and honey bees to ruminants and mammals, depending on novel biochemistries provided by the prokaryotic microbiome, the association helps to metabolize several nutrients that the host cannot digest and converting these into useful end products (such as short chain fatty acids, a process which has huge impact on the biology and homeostasis of metazoans. More importantly, in a direct and/or indirect way, the intestinal microbiota influences the assembly of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, helps to educate immune system, affects the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, modulates proliferation and differentiation of its epithelial lineages, regulates angiogenesis, and modifies the activity of enteric as well as the central nervous system,. Despite these important effects, the mechanisms by which the gut microbial community influences the host’s biology remains almost entirely unknown. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification between prokaryotes and eukaryotes which encourage us to postulate: Who is

  5. Profilin Plays a Role in Cell Elongation, Cell Shape Maintenance, and Flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, S.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ishimaru, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Profilin (PFN) is an ubiquitous, low-M-r, actin-binding protein involved in the organization of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotes including higher plants. PFNs are encoded by a multigene family in Arabidopsis. We have analyzed in vivo functions of Arabidopsis PFN by generating transgenic plants....... Compared with equivalent cells in WT, most cells in PFN-U hypocotyls and roots were shorter, but more isodiametric, and microscopic observations of etiolated PFN-U hypocotyls revealed a rough epidermal surface. In contrast, light-grown seedlings overexpressing PFN had longer roots and root hair although...... etiolated seedlings overexpressing PFN were either the same size or slightly longer than WT seedlings. Transgenic seedlings harboring a PFN-1-GUS transgene directed expression in root and root hair and in a ring of cells at the elongating zone of the root tip. As the seedlings matured PFN-1-GUS was mainly...

  6. Probing eukaryotic cell mechanics via mesoscopic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor V.; Lykov, Kirill; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Shang, Menglin; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2017-11-01

    We developed a new mesoscopic particle based eukaryotic cell model which takes into account cell membrane, cytoskeleton and nucleus. The breast epithelial cells were used in our studies. To estimate the viscoelastic properties of cells and to calibrate the computational model, we performed micropipette aspiration experiments. The model was then validated using data from microfluidic experiments. Using the validated model, we probed contributions of sub-cellular components to whole cell mechanics in micropipette aspiration and microfluidics experiments. We believe that the new model will allow to study in silico numerous problems in the context of cell biomechanics in flows in complex domains, such as capillary networks and microfluidic devices.

  7. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  8. Asgard archaea illuminate the origin of eukaryotic cellular complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Katarzyna; Caceres, Eva F; Saw, Jimmy H; Bäckström, Disa; Juzokaite, Lina; Vancaester, Emmelien; Seitz, Kiley W; Anantharaman, Karthik; Starnawski, Piotr; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Stott, Matthew B; Nunoura, Takuro; Banfield, Jillian F; Schramm, Andreas; Baker, Brett J; Spang, Anja; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2017-01-19

    The origin and cellular complexity of eukaryotes represent a major enigma in biology. Current data support scenarios in which an archaeal host cell and an alphaproteobacterial (mitochondrial) endosymbiont merged together, resulting in the first eukaryotic cell. The host cell is related to Lokiarchaeota, an archaeal phylum with many eukaryotic features. The emergence of the structural complexity that characterizes eukaryotic cells remains unclear. Here we describe the 'Asgard' superphylum, a group of uncultivated archaea that, as well as Lokiarchaeota, includes Thor-, Odin- and Heimdallarchaeota. Asgard archaea affiliate with eukaryotes in phylogenomic analyses, and their genomes are enriched for proteins formerly considered specific to eukaryotes. Notably, thorarchaeal genomes encode several homologues of eukaryotic membrane-trafficking machinery components, including Sec23/24 and TRAPP domains. Furthermore, we identify thorarchaeal proteins with similar features to eukaryotic coat proteins involved in vesicle biogenesis. Our results expand the known repertoire of 'eukaryote-specific' proteins in Archaea, indicating that the archaeal host cell already contained many key components that govern eukaryotic cellular complexity.

  9. Elongator and SPT4/SPT5 complexes as proxy to study RNA polymerase II transcript elongation control of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Dürr, Julius; Woloszynska, Magdalena; Grasser, Klaus D

    2014-10-01

    The elongation phase of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription process is dynamic and regulated. Elongator and SUPPRESSOR OF Ty4 (SPT4)/SPT5 are transcript elongation factors that contribute to the regulation of mRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase II in the chromatin context. Recently, the Elongator complex consisting of six subunits and the SPT4/SPT5 heterodimer were isolated from Arabidopsis. Mutant plants affected in the expression of Elongator or SPT4/SPT5 share various auxin-signaling phenotypes. In line with that observation, auxin-related genes are prominent among the genes differentially expressed in these mutants. Exemplified by Elongator and SPT4/SPT5, we discuss here the role that transcript elongation factors may play in the control of plant growth and development. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Phosphorylation Stoichiometries of Human Eukaryotic Initiation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armann Andaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation initiation factors are the principal molecular effectors regulating the process converting nucleic acid to functional protein. Commonly referred to as eIFs (eukaryotic initiation factors, this suite of proteins is comprised of at least 25 individual subunits that function in a coordinated, regulated, manner during mRNA translation. Multiple facets of eIF regulation have yet to be elucidated; however, many of the necessary protein factors are phosphorylated. Herein, we have isolated, identified and quantified phosphosites from eIF2, eIF3, and eIF4G generated from log phase grown HeLa cell lysates. Our investigation is the first study to globally quantify eIF phosphosites and illustrates differences in abundance of phosphorylation between the residues of each factor. Thus, identification of those phosphosites that exhibit either high or low levels of phosphorylation under log phase growing conditions may aid researchers to concentrate their investigative efforts to specific phosphosites that potentially harbor important regulatory mechanisms germane to mRNA translation.

  11. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Noort Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1, we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability.

  12. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cytoskeletons: Structure and Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is an assembly of filamentous proteins and a host of associated proteins that collectively serve functional needs ranging from spatial organization and transport to the production and transmission of forces. These systems can exhibit a wide variety of non-equilibrium, self-assembled phases depending on context and function. While much recent progress has been made in understanding the self-organization, rheology and nonlinear mechanical properties of such active systems, in this talk, we will concentrate on some emerging aspects of cytoskeletal physics that are promising. One such aspect is the influence of cytoskeletal network topology and its dynamics on both active and passive intracellular transport. Another aspect we will highlight is the interplay between chirality of filaments, their elasticity and their interactions with the membrane that can lead to novel conformational states with functional implications. Finally we will consider homologs of cytoskeletal proteins in bacteria, which are involved in templating cell growth, segregating genetic material and force production, which we will discuss with particular reference to contractile forces during cell division. These prokaryotic structures function in remarkably similar yet fascinatingly different ways from their eukaryotic counterparts and can enrich our understanding of cytoskeletal functioning as a whole.

  13. Cell cycle control across the eukaryotic kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Schnittger, Arp

    2013-07-01

    Almost two billion years of evolution have generated a vast and amazing variety of eukaryotic life with approximately 8.7 million extant species. Growth and reproduction of all of these organisms depend on faithful duplication and distribution of their chromosomes to the newly forming daughter cells in a process called the cell cycle. However, most of what is known today about cell cycle control comes from a few model species that belong to the unikonts; that is, to only one of five 'supergroups' that comprise the eukaryotic kingdom. Recently, analyzing species from distantly related clades is providing insights into general principles of cell cycle regulation and shedding light on its evolution. Here, referring to animal and fungal as opposed to non-unikont systems, especially flowering plants from the archaeplastid supergroup, we compare the conservation of central cell cycle regulator functions, the structure of network topologies, and the evolutionary dynamics of substrates of core cell cycle kinases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-03-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC.

  15. Immiscible blend morphology after shear and elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch, Gibson L.; Trifkovic, Milana; Hedegaard, Aaron; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2015-05-01

    This work examines the role of shear and extensional strain on immiscible blend morphology, namely domain size, orientation, and co-continuity. The domain size reduces with surface tension similar to what is observed with isolated droplets. The domain size is shown to increase with shear strain due to coalescence. Hence the best mixing is found with low shear strains, i.e. low rates of shear and short durations of time. Extensional strain (extrusion draw ratio DR) reduces phase width and thickness with a DR-0.5 dependence, suggesting the transformation to a fibrilar morphology. The critical draw ratio for morphology transformation is approximately 7, in agreement with observations by Grace for droplet breakup in elongation. Fibrilar morphology is also consistent with a large increase in strain-to-break in the drawn film and with observed creep and optical scattering behavior.

  16. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...... are conserved among lineages, the genes making up those pathways can have very different origins in different eukaryotes. Thus, from the perspective of the effects of lateral gene transfer on individual gene ancestries in different lineages, eukaryotic metabolism appears to be chimeric....

  17. The Genome of Naegleria gruberi Illuminates Early Eukaryotic Versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Ginger, Michael L.; Dacks, Joel; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Field, Mark C.; Kuo, Alan; Paredez, Alex; Chapman, Jarrod; Pham, Jonathan; Shu, Shengqiang; Neupane, Rochak; Cipriano, Michael; Mancuso, Joel; Tu, Hank; Salamov, Asaf; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cande, W. Zacheus; Fulton, Chandler; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2010-03-01

    Genome sequences of diverse free-living protists are essential for understanding eukaryotic evolution and molecular and cell biology. The free-living amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi belongs to a varied and ubiquitous protist clade (Heterolobosea) that diverged from other eukaryotic lineages over a billion years ago. Analysis of the 15,727 protein-coding genes encoded by Naegleria's 41 Mb nuclear genome indicates a capacity for both aerobic respiration and anaerobic metabolism with concomitant hydrogen production, with fundamental implications for the evolution of organelle metabolism. The Naegleria genome facilitates substantially broader phylogenomic comparisons of free-living eukaryotes than previously possible, allowing us to identify thousands of genes likely present in the pan-eukaryotic ancestor, with 40% likely eukaryotic inventions. Moreover, we construct a comprehensive catalog of amoeboid-motility genes. The Naegleria genome, analyzed in the context of other protists, reveals a remarkably complex ancestral eukaryote with a rich repertoire of cytoskeletal, sexual, signaling, and metabolic modules.

  18. Identification of elongation factor G as the conserved cellular target of argyrin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Nyfeler

    Full Text Available Argyrins, produced by myxobacteria and actinomycetes, are cyclic octapeptides with antibacterial and antitumor activity. Here, we identify elongation factor G (EF-G as the cellular target of argyrin B in bacteria, via resistant mutant selection and whole genome sequencing, biophysical binding studies and crystallography. Argyrin B binds a novel allosteric pocket in EF-G, distinct from the known EF-G inhibitor antibiotic fusidic acid, revealing a new mode of protein synthesis inhibition. In eukaryotic cells, argyrin B was found to target mitochondrial elongation factor G1 (EF-G1, the closest homologue of bacterial EF-G. By blocking mitochondrial translation, argyrin B depletes electron transport components and inhibits the growth of yeast and tumor cells. Further supporting direct inhibition of EF-G1, expression of an argyrin B-binding deficient EF-G1 L693Q variant partially rescued argyrin B-sensitivity in tumor cells. In summary, we show that argyrin B is an antibacterial and cytotoxic agent that inhibits the evolutionarily conserved target EF-G, blocking protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondrial translation in yeast and mammalian cells.

  19. Quality control systems for aberrant mRNAs induced by aberrant translation elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    RNA processing is an essential gene expression step and plays a crucial role to achieve diversity of gene products in eukaryotes. Various aberrant mRNAs transiently produced during RNA processing reactions are recognized and eliminated by specific quality control systems. It has been demonstrated that these mRNA quality control systems stimulate the degradation of aberrant mRNA to prevent the potentially harmful products derived from aberrant mRNAs. Recent studies on quality control systems induced by abnormal translation elongation and termination have revealed that both aberrant mRNAs and proteins are subjected to rapid degradation. In NonStop Decay (NSD) quality control system, a poly(A) tail of nonstop mRNA is translated and the synthesis of poly-lysine sequence results in translation arrest followed by co-translational degradation of aberrant nonstop protein. In No-Go Decay (NGD) quality control system, the specific amino acid sequences of the nascent polypeptide induce ribosome stalling, and the arrest products are ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In Nonfunctional rRNA Decay (NRD) quality control system, aberrant ribosomes composed of nonfunctional ribosomal RNAs are also eliminated when aberrant translation elongation complexes are formed on mRNA. I describe recent progresses on the mechanisms of quality control systems and the relationships between quality control systems. This article is part of a Special issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A 3D Hydrodynamic Model for Cytokinesis of Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    called cytokinesis. For eukaryotic cells , cell division is a much more complicated process than the division of prokaryotic cells . Despite of extensive...2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A 3D Hydrodynamic Model for Cytokinesis of Eukaryotic Cells ...stage of the mitotic cycle of eukaryotic cells , cytokinesis ensues where a parent cell replicates its nucleus with the necessary genetical substances

  1. Methylglyoxal synthase regulates cell elongation via alterations of cellular methylglyoxal and spermidine content in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Min; Song, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kwak, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2017-10-01

    Methylglyoxal regulates cell division and differentiation through its interaction with polyamines. Loss of their biosynthesizing enzyme causes physiological impairment and cell elongation in eukaryotes. However, the reciprocal effects of methylglyoxal and polyamine production and its regulatory metabolic switches on morphological changes in prokaryotes have not been addressed. Here, Bacillus subtilis methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA) and polyamine biosynthesizing genes encoding arginine decarboxylase (SpeA), agmatinase (SpeB), and spermidine synthase (SpeE), were disrupted or overexpressed. Treatment of 0.2mM methylglyoxal and 1mM spermidine led to the elongation and shortening of B. subtilis wild-type cells to 12.38±3.21μm (P<0.05) and 3.24±0.73μm (P<0.01), respectively, compared to untreated cells (5.72±0.68μm). mgsA-deficient (mgsA - ) and -overexpressing (mgsA OE ) mutants also demonstrated cell shortening and elongation, similar to speB- and speE-deficient (speB - and speE - ) and -overexpressing (speB OE and speE OE ) mutants. Importantly, both mgsA-depleted speB OE and speE OE mutants (speB OE /mgsA - and speE OE /mgsA - ) were drastically shortened to 24.5% and 23.8% of parental speB OE and speE OE mutants, respectively. These phenotypes were associated with reciprocal alterations of mgsA and polyamine transcripts governed by the contents of methylglyoxal and spermidine, which are involved in enzymatic or genetic metabolite-control mechanisms. Additionally, biophysically detected methylglyoxal-spermidine Schiff bases did not affect morphogenesis. Taken together, the findings indicate that methylglyoxal triggers cell elongation. Furthermore, cells with methylglyoxal accumulation commonly exhibit an elongated rod-shaped morphology through upregulation of mgsA, polyamine genes, and the global regulator spx, as well as repression of the cell division and shape regulator, FtsZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant cell wall polysaccharide analysis during cell elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoyuan

    Plant cell walls are complex structures whose composition and architecture are important to various cellular activities. Plant cell elongation requires a high level of rearrangement of the cell wall polymers to enable cell expansion. However, the cell wall polysaccharides dynamics during plant cell...... elongation is poorly understood. This PhD project aims to elucidate the cell wall compositional and structural change during cell elongation by using Comprehensive Microarray Polymer Profiling (CoMPP), microscopic techniques and molecular modifications of cell wall polysaccharide. Developing cotton fibre......, pea and Arabidopsis thaliana were selected as research models to investigate different types of cell elongation, developmental elongation and tropism elongation. A set of comprehensive analysis covering 4 cotton species and 11 time points suggests that non-cellulosic polysaccharides contribute...

  3. Using dynamic input allocation for elongation control at FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncagni, L.; Galeani, S.; Granucci, G.; Varano, G.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we exploit the dynamic allocation scheme for input redundant control systems proposed in to achieve elongation control on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). The scheme first serves as a means for regulating the current in the F coils. Then, due to the quasi-static relationship between the plasma elongation and the F coils current, elongation control is achieved by suitably generalizing the allocation scheme. Both simulation and experimental results are reported.

  4. Arabinogalactan proteins have deep roots in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervé, Cécile; Siméon, Amandine; Jam, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly glycosylated, hydroxyproline-rich proteins found at the cell surface of plants, where they play key roles in developmental processes. Brown algae are marine, multicellular, photosynthetic eukaryotes. They belong to the phylum Stramenopiles, which...... is unrelated to land plants and green algae (Chloroplastida). Brown algae share common evolutionary features with other multicellular organisms, including a carbohydrate-rich cell wall. They differ markedly from plants in their cell wall composition, and AGPs have not been reported in brown algae. Here we...... investigated the presence of chimeric AGP-like core proteins in this lineage. We report that the genome sequence of the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus encodes AGP protein backbone motifs, in a gene context that differs considerably from what is known in land plants. We showed the occurrence of AGP...

  5. DNA Mismatch Repair in Eukaryotes and Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Fukui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA mismatch repair (MMR corrects mismatched base pairs mainly caused by DNA replication errors. The fundamental mechanisms and proteins involved in the early reactions of MMR are highly conserved in almost all organisms ranging from bacteria to human. The significance of this repair system is also indicated by the fact that defects in MMR cause human hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancers as well as sporadic tumors. To date, 2 types of MMRs are known: the human type and Escherichia coli type. The basic features of the former system are expected to be universal among the vast majority of organisms including most bacteria. Here, I review the molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic and bacterial MMR, emphasizing on the similarities between them.

  6. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  7. Bacterial proteins pinpoint a single eukaryotic root

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Derelle, R.; Torruella, G.; Klimeš, V.; Brinkmann, H.; Kim, E.; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B.F.; Eliáš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 7 (2015), E693-E699 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24983S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0100; Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Early Career Scientist Program(US) 55007424; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, European Molecular Biology Organization Young Investigator Program(ES) BFU2012-31329; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, "Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa" - European Regional Development Fund(ES) Sev-2012-0208, BES-2013-064004 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : eukaryote phylogeny * phylogenomics * Opimoda * Diphoda * LECA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  8. Balanced Codon Usage Optimizes Eukaryotic Translational Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenfeng; Yang, Jian-Rong; Pearson, Nathaniel M.; Maclean, Calum; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Cellular efficiency in protein translation is an important fitness determinant in rapidly growing organisms. It is widely believed that synonymous codons are translated with unequal speeds and that translational efficiency is maximized by the exclusive use of rapidly translated codons. Here we estimate the in vivo translational speeds of all sense codons from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, preferentially used codons are not translated faster than unpreferred ones. We hypothesize that this phenomenon is a result of codon usage in proportion to cognate tRNA concentrations, the optimal strategy in enhancing translational efficiency under tRNA shortage. Our predicted codon–tRNA balance is indeed observed from all model eukaryotes examined, and its impact on translational efficiency is further validated experimentally. Our study reveals a previously unsuspected mechanism by which unequal codon usage increases translational efficiency, demonstrates widespread natural selection for translational efficiency, and offers new strategies to improve synthetic biology. PMID:22479199

  9. Role of Mediator in Regulating Pol II Elongation and Nucleosome Displacement in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Selena B.; Kim, Sunyoung; Jeon, Jeong Ok; Moustafa, Yara W.; Chen, Apeng; Zhao, Jing; Gross, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Mediator is a modular multisubunit complex that functions as a critical coregulator of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. While it is well accepted that Mediator plays important roles in the assembly and function of the preinitiation complex (PIC), less is known of its potential roles in regulating downstream steps of the transcription cycle. Here we use a combination of genetic and molecular approaches to investigate Mediator regulation of Pol II elongation in the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that ewe (expression without heat shock element) mutations in conserved Mediator subunits Med7, Med14, Med19, and Med21—all located within or adjacent to the middle module—severely diminish heat-shock–induced expression of the Hsf1-regulated HSP82 gene. Interestingly, these mutations do not impede Pol II recruitment to the gene’s promoter but instead impair its transit through the coding region. This implies that a normal function of Mediator is to regulate a postinitiation step at HSP82. In addition, displacement of histones from promoter and coding regions, a hallmark of activated heat-shock genes, is significantly impaired in the med14 and med21 mutants. Suggestive of a more general role, ewe mutations confer hypersensitivity to the anti-elongation drug 6-azauracil (6-AU) and one of them—med21—impairs Pol II processivity on a GAL1-regulated reporter gene. Taken together, our results suggest that yeast Mediator, acting principally through its middle module, can regulate Pol II elongation at both heat-shock and non–heat-shock genes. PMID:22377631

  10. Soil eukaryotic functional diversity, a metatranscriptomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Julie; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Verner, Marie-Christine; Debaud, Jean-Claude; Lemaire, Marc; Wésolowski-Louvel, Micheline; Marmeisse, Roland

    2007-11-01

    To appreciate the functional diversity of communities of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms we evaluated an experimental approach based on the construction and screening of a cDNA library using polyadenylated mRNA extracted from a forest soil. Such a library contains genes that are expressed by each of the different organisms forming the community and represents its metatranscriptome. The diversity of the organisms that contributed to this library was evaluated by sequencing a portion of the 18S rDNA gene amplified from either soil DNA or reverse-transcribed RNA. More than 70% of the sequences were from fungi and unicellular eukaryotes (protists) while the other most represented group was the metazoa. Calculation of richness estimators suggested that more than 180 species could be present in the soil samples studied. Sequencing of 119 cDNA identified genes with no homologues in databases (32%) and genes coding proteins involved in different biochemical and cellular processes. Surprisingly, the taxonomic distribution of the cDNA and of the 18S rDNA genes did not coincide, with a marked under-representation of the protists among the cDNA. Specific genes from such an environmental cDNA library could be isolated by expression in a heterologous microbial host, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is illustrated by the functional complementation of a histidine auxotrophic yeast mutant by two cDNA originating possibly from an ascomycete and a basidiomycete fungal species. Study of the metatranscriptome has the potential to uncover adaptations of whole microbial communities to local environmental conditions. It also gives access to an abundant source of genes of biotechnological interest.

  11. The contractility of elongated microvilli in early sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Evelyn; Howard, Louisa; Spiegel, Melvin

    1990-04-01

    Elongated microvilli attach the early sea urchin embryo to the fertilization envelope and support it in a concentric position within the perivitelline space. The contractility of the elongated microvilli was demonstrated in several ways. (1) During normal cleavage, these microvilli change their length to adapt to the change in shape and numbers of blastomeres. (2) When treated with calcium-free sea water, embryos become eccentrically located and the microvilli extend further than normal on one side; when returned to normal sea water, the embryos become centered again. (3) Several agents cause the fertilization envelope to become higher and thinner than normal and the elongated microvilli to extend correspondingly if treated within ten min after fertilization. In some cases, both elongated microvilli and fertilization envelope return to normal size when returned to normal sea water. (4) Fertilization in a papain solution causes the elongated microvilli and the fertilization envelope to contract to the surface of the embryo. (5) Refertilization after the papain-induced contraction can bring about the elongation of these microvilli and the elevation of the fertilization envelope a second time. It was also shown that elongated microvilli are extended immediately upon fertilization, at the same time as the short microvilli. The firm adherence of the tips of elongated microvilli to the fertilization envelope by means of extracellular matrix fibers is shown in a high voltage electron microscope stereoimage. This allows us to understand why it is that when the elongated microvilli extend or contract, the fertilization envelope also extends and contracts accordingly.

  12. Representing GC variation along eukaryotic chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pačes, Jan; Zíka, Radek; Pačes, Václav; Pavlíček, A.; Clay, O.; Bernardi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 333, - (2004), s. 135-141 ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : GC content * genome organization * compositional homogenity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.705, year: 2004

  13. Lokiarchaea are close relatives of Euryarchaeota, not bridging the gap between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cunha, Violette; Gaia, Morgan; Gadelle, Daniele; Nasir, Arshan; Forterre, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    The eocyte hypothesis, in which Eukarya emerged from within Archaea, has been boosted by the description of a new candidate archaeal phylum, "Lokiarchaeota", from metagenomic data. Eukarya branch within Lokiarchaeota in a tree reconstructed from the concatenation of 36 universal proteins. However, individual phylogenies revealed that lokiarchaeal proteins sequences have different evolutionary histories. The individual markers phylogenies revealed at least two subsets of proteins, either supporting the Woese or the Eocyte tree of life. Strikingly, removal of a single protein, the elongation factor EF2, is sufficient to break the Eukaryotes-Lokiarchaea affiliation. Our analysis suggests that the three lokiarchaeal EF2 proteins have a chimeric organization that could be due to contamination and/or homologous recombination with patches of eukaryotic sequences. A robust phylogenetic analysis of RNA polymerases with a new dataset indicates that Lokiarchaeota and related phyla of the Asgard superphylum are sister group to Euryarchaeota, not to Eukarya, and supports the monophyly of Archaea with their rooting in the branch leading to Thaumarchaeota.

  14. Lokiarchaea are close relatives of Euryarchaeota, not bridging the gap between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The eocyte hypothesis, in which Eukarya emerged from within Archaea, has been boosted by the description of a new candidate archaeal phylum, “Lokiarchaeota”, from metagenomic data. Eukarya branch within Lokiarchaeota in a tree reconstructed from the concatenation of 36 universal proteins. However, individual phylogenies revealed that lokiarchaeal proteins sequences have different evolutionary histories. The individual markers phylogenies revealed at least two subsets of proteins, either supporting the Woese or the Eocyte tree of life. Strikingly, removal of a single protein, the elongation factor EF2, is sufficient to break the Eukaryotes-Lokiarchaea affiliation. Our analysis suggests that the three lokiarchaeal EF2 proteins have a chimeric organization that could be due to contamination and/or homologous recombination with patches of eukaryotic sequences. A robust phylogenetic analysis of RNA polymerases with a new dataset indicates that Lokiarchaeota and related phyla of the Asgard superphylum are sister group to Euryarchaeota, not to Eukarya, and supports the monophyly of Archaea with their rooting in the branch leading to Thaumarchaeota. PMID:28604769

  15. Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A dephosphorylation is required for translational arrest in stationary phase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Janete; Rocha, Antonio A; Tonelli, Renata R; Castilho, Beatriz A; Schenkman, Sergio

    2013-04-15

    The protein known as eIF5A (eukaryotic initiation factor 5A) has an elusive role in translation. It has a unique and essential hypusine modification at a conserved lysine residue in most eukaryotes. In addition, this protein is modified by phosphorylation with unknown functions. In the present study we show that a phosphorylated state of eIF5A predominates in exponentially growing Trypanosoma cruzi cells, and extensive dephosphorylation occurs in cells in stationary phase. Phosphorylation occurs mainly at Ser(2), as shown in yeast eIF5A. In addition, a novel phosphorylation site was identified at Tyr(21). In exponential cells, T. cruzi eIF5A is partially associated with polysomes, compatible with a proposed function as an elongation factor, and becomes relatively enriched in polysomal fractions in stationary phase. Overexpression of the wild-type eIF5A, or eIF5A with Ser(2) replaced by an aspartate residue, but not by alanine, increases the rate of cell proliferation and protein synthesis. However, the presence of an aspartate residue instead of Ser(2) is toxic for cells reaching the stationary phase, which show a less-pronounced protein synthesis arrest and a decreased amount of eIF5A in dense fractions of sucrose gradients. We conclude that eIF5A phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cycles regulate translation according to the growth conditions.

  16. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the archaebacteria, euryarchaeote genomes most frequently harbored the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear gene, whereas among eubacteria, the α-proteobacteria were most frequently represented within the sister group. Only 3 genes out of 571 gave a 3-domain tree. Homologues from α-proteobacterial genomes that branched as the sister to nuclear genes were found more frequently in genomes of facultatively anaerobic members of the rhiozobiales and rhodospirilliales than in obligate intracellular ricketttsial parasites. Following α-proteobacteria, the most frequent eubacterial sister lineages were γ-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, and firmicutes, which were also the prokaryote genomes least frequently found as monophyletic groups in our trees. Although all 22 higher prokaryotic taxa sampled (crenarchaeotes, γ-proteobacteria, spirochaetes, chlamydias, etc.) harbor genes that branch as the sister to homologues present in the eukaryotic common ancestor, that is not evidence of 22 different prokaryotic cells participating at eukaryote origins because prokaryotic “lineages” have laterally acquired genes for more than 1.5 billion years since eukaryote origins. The data underscore the archaebacterial (host) nature of the eukaryotic informational genes and the eubacterial (mitochondrial) nature of eukaryotic energy metabolism. The network linking genes of the eukaryote ancestor to contemporary homologues distributed across prokaryotic genomes elucidates eukaryote gene origins in a

  17. The COG database: an updated version includes eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov Alexander V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple, essentially complete genome sequences of prokaryotes and eukaryotes spurred both the demand and the opportunity for the construction of an evolutionary classification of genes from these genomes. Such a classification system based on orthologous relationships between genes appears to be a natural framework for comparative genomics and should facilitate both functional annotation of genomes and large-scale evolutionary studies. Results We describe here a major update of the previously developed system for delineation of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs from the sequenced genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes and the construction of clusters of predicted orthologs for 7 eukaryotic genomes, which we named KOGs after eukaryotic orthologous groups. The COG collection currently consists of 138,458 proteins, which form 4873 COGs and comprise 75% of the 185,505 (predicted proteins encoded in 66 genomes of unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs include proteins from 7 eukaryotic genomes: three animals (the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, one plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, two fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the intracellular microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. The current KOG set consists of 4852 clusters of orthologs, which include 59,838 proteins, or ~54% of the analyzed eukaryotic 110,655 gene products. Compared to the coverage of the prokaryotic genomes with COGs, a considerably smaller fraction of eukaryotic genes could be included into the KOGs; addition of new eukaryotic genomes is expected to result in substantial increase in the coverage of eukaryotic genomes with KOGs. Examination of the phyletic patterns of KOGs reveals a conserved core represented in all analyzed species and consisting of ~20% of the KOG set. This conserved portion of the

  18. Mass composition analysis using elongation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochilo, Livingstone; Risse, Markus; Yushkov, Alexey [University of Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum has been observed to flatten at around 5.2 x 10{sup 18} eV where the spectral index changes from γ = 3.2 to γ = 2.6, a feature called the ''ankle'' of the spectrum. Cosmic rays with energy around the ankle and beyond, known as ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), have a very low flux and reconstruction of their properties from extensive air shower measurements is subject to uncertainties for instance from hadronic interaction models. Since the year 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has recorded a considerable number of UHECR events beyond the ankle. With the greatly improved statistics, the mass composition of the extreme end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum is now being investigated with improved accuracy. The measured composition of UHECR is an important parameter in validating the models used to explain their sources and acceleration mechanisms. In this study, we perform a mass composition analysis using elongation rate (the rate of change of the depth of shower maximum with energy), measured by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The advantage of this approach is a weak dependence of the results on the choice of the hadronic interaction models.

  19. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    checkpoints' which are known to regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle may be absent or altered in. E. histolytica. [Banerjee S, Das S and Lohia A 2002 Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of Entamoeba histolytica; J. Biosci. (Suppl.

  20. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  1. High n ballooning modes in highly elongated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.H.; Bateman, G.

    1980-02-01

    An analytic study of stability against high n ballooning modes in highly elongated axisymmetric plasmas is presented and compared with computational results. From the equation for the marginal pressure gradient, it is found that the local shear plays an important role on the stability of elongated and shifted plasma, and that high elongation deteriorates the stability by decreasing the stabilizing effects of field line bending and local shear. The net contribution of the local shear to stability decreases with elongation and shift for strongly ballooning modes (eigenfunctions strongly localized near the outer edge of the toroidal flux surfaces) but increases for interchange modes (eigenfunctions more uniform along the flux surfaces). The computational study of high n ballooning modes in a highly elongated plasma reveals that lowering the aspect ratio and broadening the pressure profile enhance the marginal beta for β/sub p/ less than unity but severely reduce the marginal beta for β/sub p/ larger than unity

  2. Sequence-Dependent Elongation Dynamics on Macrolide-Bound Ribosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Johansson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough.

  3. Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All complex life on Earth is eukaryotic. All eukaryotic cells share a common ancestor that arose just once in four billion years of evolution. Prokaryotes show no tendency to evolve greater morphological complexity, despite their metabolic virtuosity. Here I argue that the eukaryotic cell originated in a unique prokaryotic endosymbiosis, a singular event that transformed the selection pressures acting on both host and endosymbiont. Results The reductive evolution and specialisation of endosymbionts to mitochondria resulted in an extreme genomic asymmetry, in which the residual mitochondrial genomes enabled the expansion of bioenergetic membranes over several orders of magnitude, overcoming the energetic constraints on prokaryotic genome size, and permitting the host cell genome to expand (in principle) over 200,000-fold. This energetic transformation was permissive, not prescriptive; I suggest that the actual increase in early eukaryotic genome size was driven by a heavy early bombardment of genes and introns from the endosymbiont to the host cell, producing a high mutation rate. Unlike prokaryotes, with lower mutation rates and heavy selection pressure to lose genes, early eukaryotes without genome-size limitations could mask mutations by cell fusion and genome duplication, as in allopolyploidy, giving rise to a proto-sexual cell cycle. The side effect was that a large number of shared eukaryotic basal traits accumulated in the same population, a sexual eukaryotic common ancestor, radically different to any known prokaryote. Conclusions The combination of massive bioenergetic expansion, release from genome-size constraints, and high mutation rate favoured a protosexual cell cycle and the accumulation of eukaryotic traits. These factors explain the unique origin of eukaryotes, the absence of true evolutionary intermediates, and the evolution of sex in eukaryotes but not prokaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Eugene Koonin, William Martin

  4. Rpb5 modulates the RNA polymerase II transition from initiation to elongation by influencing Spt5 association and backtracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Verónica; Garrido-Godino, Ana Isabel; Mirón-García, María Carmen; Begley, Victoria; Fernández-Pévida, Antonio; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Navarro, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    Rpb5 is a subunit shared by the three eukaryotic RNA polymerases although its role in transcription remains unclear. It has been proposed that it makes contact with the promoter DNA and to participate in the coordination of the opening/closing of the RNA polymerase II DNA cleft. Here, we report the specific role of Rpb5 in the function of the yeast RNA polymerase II. The rpb5-P151T mutation specifically impairs transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II but does not influence the functions of RNA polymerases I or III. The comparison of RNA polymerase II ChIP and run-on signals indicates a higher tendency to backtrack by this mutant, in agreement with its lower elongation rate and its genetic interactions with dst1Δ mutant. This phenotype is particularly striking shortly after transcription initiation and is linked to differences in the phosphorylation state of the RNA polymerase II and reduced recruitment of Spt5 to transcribe chromatin, thus influencing its anti-backtracking activity. All together, our results reveal an important role of Rpb5 in the transition from initiation to elongation mediated by the RNA polymerase II, by modulating the Spt5 association, and the backtracking activity of the enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Eukaryotic versus prokaryotic marine picoplankton ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massana, Ramon; Logares, Ramiro

    2013-05-01

    Marine microorganisms contribute markedly to global biomass and ecosystem function. They include a diverse collection of organisms differing in cell size and in evolutionary history. In particular, microbes within the picoplankton are similar in size but belong to two drastically different cellular plans, the prokaryotes and the eukaryotes. Compared with larger organisms, prokaryotes and picoeukaryotes share ecological features, such as high specific activity, large and constant abundances, and high dispersal potential. Still, there are some aspects where their different cell organization influences their ecological performance. First, prokaryotes have a huge metabolic versatility and are involved in all biogeochemical cycles, whereas picoeukaryotes are metabolically less flexible but can exploit diverse predatory life strategies due to their phagocytic capacity. Second, sexual reproduction is absent in prokaryotes but may be present in picoeukaryotes, thus determining different evolutionary diversification dynamics and making species limits clearer in picoeukaryotes. Finally, it is plausible that picoeukaryotes are less flexible to enter a reversible state of low metabolic activity, thus picoeukaryote assemblages may have fewer rare species and may be less resilient to environmental change. In summary, lumping together pico-sized microbes may be convenient for some ecological studies, but it is also important to keep in mind their differences. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Do lipids shape the eukaryotic cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Samuel; Shearman, Gemma C

    2018-01-01

    Successful passage through the cell cycle presents a number of structural challenges to the cell. Inceptive studies carried out in the last five years have produced clear evidence of modulations in the lipid profile (sometimes referred to as the lipidome) of eukaryotes as a function of the cell cycle. This mounting body of evidence indicates that lipids play key roles in the structural transformations seen across the cycle. The accumulation of this evidence coincides with a revolution in our understanding of how lipid composition regulates a plethora of biological processes ranging from protein activity through to cellular signalling and membrane compartmentalisation. In this review, we discuss evidence from biological, chemical and physical studies of the lipid fraction across the cell cycle that demonstrate that lipids are well-developed cellular components at the heart of the biological machinery responsible for managing progress through the cell cycle. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanisms by which this careful control is exercised. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  8. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonin, Eugene V., E-mail: koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894 (United States); Dolja, Valerian V., E-mail: doljav@science.oregonstate.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Krupovic, Mart, E-mail: krupovic@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, Department of Microbiology, Paris 75015 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  9. (R)-β-lysine-modified elongation factor P functions in translation elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J; Zou, S Betty; Rajkovic, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of bacterial elongation factor P (EF-P) with (R)-β-lysine at a conserved lysine residue activates the protein in vivo and increases puromycin reactivity of the ribosome in vitro. The additional hydroxylation of EF-P at the same lysine residue by the YfcM protein has...... also recently been described. The roles of modified and unmodified EF-P during different steps in translation, and how this correlates to its physiological role in the cell, have recently been linked to the synthesis of polyproline stretches in proteins. Polysome analysis indicated that EF-P functions...... in translation elongation, rather than initiation as proposed previously. This was further supported by the inability of EF-P to enhance the rate of formation of fMet-Lys or fMet-Phe, indicating that the role of EF-P is not to specifically stimulate formation of the first peptide bond. Investigation of hydroxyl-(β)-lysyl-EF-P...

  10. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijffels, René H; Kruse, Olaf; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2013-06-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments. Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms for the production of small molecules that can be secreted such as ethanol, butanol, fatty acids and other organic acids. Eukaryotic microalgae are interesting for products for which cellular storage is important such as proteins, lipids, starch and alkanes. For the development of new and promising lines of production, strains of both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae have to be improved. Transformation systems have been much better developed in cyanobacteria. However, several products would be preferably produced with eukaryotic microalgae. In the case of cyanobacteria a synthetic-systems biology approach has a great potential to exploit cyanobacteria as cell factories. For eukaryotic microalgae transformation systems need to be further developed. A promising strategy is transformation of heterologous (prokaryotic and eukaryotic) genes in established eukaryotic hosts such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Experimental outdoor pilots under containment for the production of genetically modified cyanobacteria and microalgae are in progress. For full scale production risks of release of genetically modified organisms need to be assessed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-05-01

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order "Megavirales" that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources along

  12. Crystal structure of catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Mohammad, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    , surface exposed acidic patch which might interact with the lysine boxes of eIF2β. Interestingly, Tryptophan 699 was found to be solvent exposed and involved in crystal packing. This residue could possibly be important for the specific interaction with eIF2β. Furthermore, the structure shows the location......CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF THE INITIATION FACTOR 2B EPSILON SUBUNIT Thomas Boesen1,Sarah S. Mohammad2, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers R. Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department of Biomolecular Sciences......, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the exchange factor of initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and catalyses the reaction where GDP bound to eIF2 is exchanged for GTP, a crucial step in translation. The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the e...

  13. Resin Elongation Phenomenon of Polystyrene Nanopillars in Nanoimprint Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Kosuke; Miyauchi, Akihiro; Sugimura, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the elongation of polystyrene nanopillars formed by thermal nanoimprint lithography. Silicone and perfluoropolyether were used as mold release agents to obtain molds with different adhesion forces against polystyrene to be imprinted. The adhesion force between the resin and release layers was evaluated as a force curve by atomic force microscope with a polystyrene colloid probe. Elongation depended on the aspect ratio of the corresponding microholes on the mold and the adhesion force against the release layer. The conditions under which the elongation occurred exhibited a clear threshold on the stress loaded on the foot area of the nanopillars.

  14. Scattering phaseshift formulas for mesons and baryons in elongated boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank X.; Alexandru, Andrei

    2018-03-01

    We derive Lüscher phaseshift formulas for two-particle states in boxes elongated in one of the dimensions. Such boxes offer a cost-effective way of varying the relative momentum of the particles. Boosted states in the elongated direction, which allow wider access to energies, are also considered. The formulas for the various scenarios (moving and zero-momentum states in cubic and elongated boxes) are compared and relations between them are clarified. The results are applicable to a wide set of meson-meson and meson-baryon elastic scattering processes, with the two-particle system having equal or unequal masses.

  15. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 11. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the Historical Jantar Mantar Observatory. N Rathnasree. Classroom Volume 9 Issue 11 November 2004 pp 46-55 ...

  16. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments. Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms

  17. Repair of DNA DSB in higher eukaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Takeda, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes process within minutes double strand breaks (DSBs) in their genome using a NHEJ apparatus that engages DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, and other as of yet unidentified factors. Although chemical inhibition, or mutation, in any of these factors delays processing, cells ultimately remove the majority of DNA DSBs using an alternative pathway operating with slower kinetics. This alternative pathway is active in mutants deficient in genes of the RAD52 epistasis group. We proposed, therefore, that it reflects an alternative form of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ) to the DNA-PK- dependent (D-NHEJ) pathway, rather than homology directed repair of DSBs. We studied the role of Ku and DNA-PKcs in the coordination of these pathways using as a model end joining of restriction endonuclease linearized plasmid DNA in whole cell extracts. Efficient error-free endjoining observed in such in-vitro reactions is strongly inhibited by anti-Ku antibodies. The inhibition requires DNA-PKcs, despite that fact that Ku efficiently binds DNA ends in the presence of antibodies, or in the absence of DNA-PKcs. Strong inhibition of DNA endjoining is also mediated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, in the presence but not in the absence of Ku, and this inhibition can be rescued by pre-incubating the reaction with double stranded oligonucleotides. The results are compatible with a role of Ku in directing endjoining to a DNA-PK dependent pathway, mediated by efficient end binding and productive interactions with DNA-PKcs. On the other hand, efficient end joining is observed in extracts of cells lacking DNA-PKcs, as well as in Ku-depleted extracts sugggesting the operation of alternative pathways. Extracts depleted of Ku and DNA-PKcs rejoin blunt ends, as well as homologous ends with 3' or 5' protruding single strands with similar efficiency, but addition of Ku suppresses joining of blunt ends and homologous ends with 3' overhangs. We propose that the

  18. Spondylolisthesis caused by extreme pedicle elongation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo, Roland; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Eysel, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Although osteogenesis imperfecta is a well-known skeletal disorder, reports of spondylolisthesis in osteogenesis imperfecta are rare. Only very few cases of spondylolisthesis caused by elongation of lumbar pedicles have been described in the literature. Here we report three patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta showing a severe form of hyperlordosis caused by lumbar pedicle elongation and consecutive spondylolisthesis. Radiographs in the course of childhood and adolescence show a ra...

  19. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkonian Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes. Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further test this hypothesis, an extensive search for proteins of chlamydial origin was performed using several recently sequenced algal genomes and EST databases, and the proteins subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 39 proteins of chlamydial origin were retrieved from the photosynthetic eukaryotes analyzed and their identity verified through phylogenetic analyses. The distribution of the chlamydial proteins among four groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes (Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae, Glaucoplantae, Bacillariophyta was complex suggesting multiple acquisitions and losses. Evidence is presented that all except one of the chlamydial genes originated from an ancient endosymbiosis of a chlamydial bacterium into the ancestor of the Plantae before their divergence into Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae and Glaucoplantae, i.e. more than 1.1 BYA. The chlamydial proteins subsequently spread through secondary plastid endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. Of 20 chlamydial proteins recovered from the genomes of two Bacillariophyta, 10 were of rhodoplant, and 10 of viridiplant origin suggesting that they were acquired by two different secondary endosymbioses. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences demonstrated that the viridiplant secondary endosymbiosis likely occurred before the divergence of Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. Conclusion We identified 39 proteins of chlamydial origin in photosynthetic eukaryotes signaling an ancient invasion of the ancestor of the

  20. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  1. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-07-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important DNA repair pathway that plays critical roles in DNA replication fidelity, mutation avoidance and genome stability, all of which contribute significantly to the viability of cells and organisms. MMR is widely-used as a diagnostic biomarker for human cancers in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the eukaryotic MMR machinery discriminates between the parental (template) and the daughter (nascent) DNA strand is incompletely understood and how cells choose between the EXO1-dependent and the EXO1-independent subpathways of MMR is not known. This review summarizes recent literature on eukaryotic MMR, with emphasis on the diverse cellular roles of eukaryotic MMR proteins, the mechanism of strand discrimination and cross-talk/interactions between and co-regulation of MMR and other DNA repair pathways in eukaryotic cells. The main conclusion of the review is that MMR proteins contribute to genome stability through their ability to recognize and promote an appropriate cellular response to aberrant DNA structures, especially when they arise during DNA replication. Although the molecular mechanism of MMR in the eukaryotic cell is still not completely understood, increased used of single-molecule analyses in the future may yield new insight into these unsolved questions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the Diversification of the Translation Apparatus across Eukaryotes

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    Greco Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity is one of the most remarkable features of living organisms. Current assessments of eukaryote biodiversity reaches 1.5 million species, but the true figure could be several times that number. Diversity is ingrained in all stages and echelons of life, namely, the occupancy of ecological niches, behavioral patterns, body plans and organismal complexity, as well as metabolic needs and genetics. In this review, we will discuss that diversity also exists in a key biochemical process, translation, across eukaryotes. Translation is a fundamental process for all forms of life, and the basic components and mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes have been largely established upon the study of traditional, so-called model organisms. By using modern genome-wide, high-throughput technologies, recent studies of many nonmodel eukaryotes have unveiled a surprising diversity in the configuration of the translation apparatus across eukaryotes, showing that this apparatus is far from being evolutionarily static. For some of the components of this machinery, functional differences between different species have also been found. The recent research reviewed in this article highlights the molecular and functional diversification the translational machinery has undergone during eukaryotic evolution. A better understanding of all aspects of organismal diversity is key to a more profound knowledge of life.

  3. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  4. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2016-04-27

    Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real-the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as "non-Darwinian" because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious-all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes.

  5. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil W. Blackstone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real—the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as “non-Darwinian” because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious—all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes.

  6. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer gives rise to genome mosaicism in euglenids

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    Weber Andreas PM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euglenophytes are a group of photosynthetic flagellates possessing a plastid derived from a green algal endosymbiont, which was incorporated into an ancestral host cell via secondary endosymbiosis. However, the impact of endosymbiosis on the euglenophyte nuclear genome is not fully understood due to its complex nature as a 'hybrid' of a non-photosynthetic host cell and a secondary endosymbiont. Results We analyzed an EST dataset of the model euglenophyte Euglena gracilis using a gene mining program designed to detect laterally transferred genes. We found E. gracilis genes showing affinity not only with green algae, from which the secondary plastid in euglenophytes evolved, but also red algae and/or secondary algae containing red algal-derived plastids. Phylogenetic analyses of these 'red lineage' genes suggest that E. gracilis acquired at least 14 genes via eukaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfer from algal sources other than the green algal endosymbiont that gave rise to its current plastid. We constructed an EST library of the aplastidic euglenid Peranema trichophorum, which is a eukaryovorous relative of euglenophytes, and also identified 'red lineage' genes in its genome. Conclusions Our data show genome mosaicism in E. gracilis and P. trichophorum. One possible explanation for the presence of these genes in these organisms is that some or all of them were independently acquired by lateral gene transfer and contributed to the successful integration and functioning of the green algal endosymbiont as a secondary plastid. Alternative hypotheses include the presence of a phagocytosed alga as the single source of those genes, or a cryptic tertiary endosymbiont harboring secondary plastid of red algal origin, which the eukaryovorous ancestor of euglenophytes had acquired prior to the secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga.

  7. Codon usage influences the local rate of translation elongation to regulate co-translational protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Dang, Yunkun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Wu, Cheng; Zhao, Fangzhou; Sachs, Matthew S.; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Codon usage bias is a universal feature of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and has been proposed to regulate translation efficiency, accuracy and protein folding based on the assumption that codon usage affects translation dynamics. The roles of codon usage in translation, however, are not clear and have been challenged by recent ribosome profiling studies. Here we used a Neurospora cell-free translation system to directly monitor the velocity of mRNA translation. We demonstrated that the preferred codons enhance rate of translation elongation, whereas non-optimal codons slow elognatioon. Codon usage also controls ribosome traffic on mRNA. These conclusions were further supported by ribosome profiling results in vitro and in vivo with template mRNAs designed to increase signal to noise. Finally, we demonstrate that codon usage regulates protein function by affecting co-translational protein folding. These results resolve a long-standing fundamental question and suggest the existence of a codon usage code for protein folding. PMID:26321254

  8. Transcriptional control by NF-κB: elongation in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Gil; Dikstein, Rivka

    2013-09-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors governs the cellular reaction to a variety of extracellular signals. Following stimulation, NF-κB activates genes involved in inflammation, cell survival, cell cycle, immune cell homeostasis and more. This review focuses on studies of the past decade that uncover the transcription elongation process as a key regulatory stage in the activation pathway of NF-κB. Of interest are studies that point to the elongation phase as central to the selectivity of target gene activation by NF-κB. Particularly, the cascade leading to phosphorylation and acetylation of the NF-κB subunit p65 on serine 276 and lysine 310, respectively, was shown to mediate the recruitment of Brd4 and P-TEFb to many pro-inflammatory target genes, which in turn facilitate elongation and mRNA processing. On the other hand, some anti-inflammatory genes are refractory to this pathway and are dependent on the elongation factor DSIF for efficient elongation and mRNA processing. While these studies have advanced our knowledge of NF-κB transcriptional activity, they have also raised unresolved issues regarding the specific genomic and physiological contexts by which NF-κB utilizes different mechanisms for activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of several ribosomal mutations on speed of elongation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D.J.; Branscomb, E.W.

    1976-09-28

    Consideration of simple kinetic schemes for the discrimination of charged tRNA at the ribosome has led us to expect changes in the elongation speed to be caused by some ribosomal mutations. We have examined this hypothesis by investigating the effect of several well-studied mutations of E. coli ribosomes on the chain elongation time in the translation of the Z gene of the lactose operon. The lag time (at 37/sup 0/C) in the appearance of the first active, newly-synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecule after induction of the operon was measured, and the average elongation time estimated. We found that mutations to resistance to high levels of streptomycin (at the str A locus) fall into two classes; one class exhibits a slow-down in elongation of about 30 percent, the other exhibits little, if any, detectable change. Mutation to paramomycin resistance also causes a significant decrease in speed. On the other hand, mutation to spectinomycin resistance appears not to affect the speed. A common characteristic of streptomycin and paramomycin is that they both are known to cause misreading during translation (and resistance causes a decrease in errors) whereas spectinomycin is known to have no such effect. This evidence, together with kinetic considerations, seems to indicate that mutations which affect the accuracy of translation may also affect elongation speed.

  10. Amphiregulin Antibody and Reduction of Axial Elongation in Experimental Myopia

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    Wen Jun Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine the mechanism of ocular axial elongation in myopia, guinea pigs (age: 2–3 weeks which either underwent unilateral or bilateral lens-induced myopization (group 1 or which were primarily myopic at baseline (group 2 received unilateral intraocular injections of amphiregulin antibody (doses: 5, 10, or 15 μg three times in intervals of 9 days. A third group of emmetropic guinea pigs got intraocular unilateral injections of amphiregulin (doses: 0.25, 0.50 or 1.00 ng, respectively. In each group, the contralateral eyes received intraocular injections of Ringer's solution. In intra-animal inter-eye comparison and intra-eye follow-up comparison in groups 1 and 2, the study eyes as compared to the contralateral eyes showed a dose-dependent reduction in axial elongation. In group 3, study eyes and control eyes did not differ significantly in axial elongation. Immunohistochemistry revealed amphiregulin labelling at the retinal pigment epithelium in eyes with lens-induced myopization and Ringer's solution injection, but not in eyes with amphiregulin antibody injection. Intraocular injections of amphiregulin-antibody led to a reduction of lens-induced axial myopic elongation and of the physiological eye enlargement in young guinea pigs. In contrast, intraocularly injected amphiregulin in a dose of ≤1 ng did not show a significant effect. Amphiregulin may be one of several essential molecular factors for axial elongation.

  11. Sequence-dependent elongation dynamics on macrolide-bound ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Jin; Tsai, Albert; Kornberg, Guy; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-06-12

    The traditional view of macrolide antibiotics as plugs inside the ribosomal nascent peptide exit tunnel (NPET) has lately been challenged in favor of a more complex, heterogeneous mechanism, where drug-peptide interactions determine the fate of a translating ribosome. To investigate these highly dynamic processes, we applied single-molecule tracking of elongating ribosomes during inhibition of elongation by erythromycin of several nascent chains, including ErmCL and H-NS, which were shown to be, respectively, sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Peptide sequence-specific changes were observed in translation elongation dynamics in the presence of a macrolide-obstructed NPET. Elongation rates were not severely inhibited in general by the presence of the drug; instead, stalls or pauses were observed as abrupt events. The dynamic pathways of nascent-chain-dependent elongation pausing in the presence of macrolides determine the fate of the translating ribosome stalling or readthrough. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Film dosimetry of small elongated electron beams for treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroomand-Rad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, and 18 Mev electron beams for small elongated fields of dimensions L x W (where L=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 cm; and W=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 cm) have been studied. Film dosimetry and parallel-plate ion chamber measurements have been used to obtain various dose parameters. Selective results of a series of systematic measurements for central axis depth dose data, uniformity index, field flatness, and relative output factors of small elongated electron beams are reported. The square-root method is employed to predict the beam data of small elongated electron fields from corresponding small square electron fields using film dosimetry. The single parameter area/perimeter radio A/P is used to characterize the relative output factors of elongated electron beams. It is our conclusion that for clinical treatment planning square-root method may be applied with caution in determining the beam characteristics of small elongated electron fields from film dosimetry. The calculated and estimated relative output factors from square-root method and A/P ratio are in good agreement and show agreement to within 1% with the measured film values

  13. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome—the high-eukaryote–specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)—remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Perspectives on the ribosome’. PMID:28138070

  14. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

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    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  15. Energide-cell body as smallest unit of eukaryotic life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Lyons, Sherrie

    2018-02-21

    The evolutionary origin of the eukaryotic nucleus is obscure and controversial. Currently preferred are autogenic concepts; ideas of a symbiotic origin are mostly discarded and forgotten. Here we briefly discuss these issues and propose a new version of the symbiotic and archaeal origin of the eukaryotic nucleus. The nucleus of eukaryotic cells forms via its perinuclear microtubules, the primary eukaryotic unit known also as the Energide-cell body. As for all other endosymbiotic organelles, new Energides are generated only from other Energides. While the Energide cannot be generated de novo, it can use its secretory apparatus to generate de novo the cell periphery apparatus. We suggest that Virchow's tenet Omnis cellula e cellula should be updated as Omnis Energide e Energide to reflect the status of the Energide as the primary unit of the eukaryotic cell, and life. In addition, the plasma membrane provides feedback to the Energide and renders it protection via the plasma membrane-derived endosomal network. New discoveries suggest archaeal origins of both the Energide and its host cell.

  16. Bilateral elongated mandibular coronoid process in an Anatolian skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çorumlu, Ufuk; Kopuz, Cem; Demir, Mehmet Tevfik; Pirzirenli, Mennan Ece

    2016-09-01

    Elongation or hyperplasia of coronoid process of mandible is rare condition characterized by abnormal bone development which cause malocclusion and the limited mouth opening. In this study, in an Anatolian skull, a case of bilateral elongation of mandibular coronoid process was presented. Levandoski panographic analysis was performed on the panoramic radiographie to determine the hyperplasia of the coronoid process. The right condylar process was exactly hyperplastic. The measurements of Kr-Go/Cd-Go were 95.10 mm/79.03 mm on right side and 97.53 mm/87.80 mm on left side. The ratio of Kr-Go/Cd-Go on the right side was 1.20. Elongated coronoid process is one of the factors cause mandibular hypomobility, it as reported here might lead to limited mouth opening. The knowledge of this variation or abnormality can be useful for the radiologist and surgeons and prevent misdiagnosis.

  17. Ubiquitylation and degradation of elongating RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Harreman, Michelle; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    During its journey across a gene, RNA polymerase II has to contend with a number of obstacles to its progression, including nucleosomes, DNA-binding proteins, DNA damage, and sequences that are intrinsically difficult to transcribe. Not surprisingly, a large number of elongation factors have...... evolved to ensure that transcription stalling or arrest does not occur. If, however, the polymerase cannot be restarted, it becomes poly-ubiquitylated and degraded by the proteasome. This process is highly regulated, ensuring that only RNAPII molecules that cannot otherwise be salvaged are degraded....... In this review, we describe the mechanisms and factors responsible for the last resort mechanism of transcriptional elongation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation....

  18. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective

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    Kris Brannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5′ ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  19. Yielding and Flow of Soft-Jammed Systems in Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Fadoul, O.; Lorenceau, E.; Coussot, P.

    2018-01-01

    So far, yielding and flow properties of soft-jammed systems have only been studied from simple shear and then extrapolated to other flow situations. In particular, simple flows such as elongations have barely been investigated experimentally or only in a nonconstant, partial volume of material. We show that using smooth tool surfaces makes it possible to obtain a prolonged elongational flow over a large range of aspect ratios in the whole volume of material. The normal force measured for various soft-jammed systems with different microstructures shows that the ratio of the elongation yield stress to the shear yield stress is larger (by a factor of around 1.5) than expected from the standard theory which assumes that the stress tensor is a function of the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. This suggests that the constitutive tensor of the materials cannot be determined solely from macroscopic shear measurements.

  20. Spondylolisthesis caused by extreme pedicle elongation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerderer, Sebastian; Eysel, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Although osteogenesis imperfecta is a well-known skeletal disorder, reports of spondylolisthesis in osteogenesis imperfecta are rare. Only very few cases of spondylolisthesis caused by elongation of lumbar pedicles have been described in the literature. Here we report three patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta showing a severe form of hyperlordosis caused by lumbar pedicle elongation and consecutive spondylolisthesis. Radiographs in the course of childhood and adolescence show a rapid progression of pedicle elongation and hyperlordosis with increased mechanical loads. The treatment strategy consists of physiotherapy, medical treatment with bisphosphonates, and orthopedic surgery and is preferably conservative. In the three patients reported here, one patient was treated with laminectomy and postero-lateral fusion, whereas in the other two patients surgery is currently not considered as necessary. PMID:17242874

  1. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

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    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  2. Unraveling adaptation in eukaryotic pathways: lessons from protocells.

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    Giovanna De Palo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic adaptation pathways operate within wide-ranging environmental conditions without stimulus saturation. Despite numerous differences in the adaptation mechanisms employed by bacteria and eukaryotes, all require energy consumption. Here, we present two minimal models showing that expenditure of energy by the cell is not essential for adaptation. Both models share important features with large eukaryotic cells: they employ small diffusible molecules and involve receptor subunits resembling highly conserved G-protein cascades. Analyzing the drawbacks of these models helps us understand the benefits of energy consumption, in terms of adjustability of response and adaptation times as well as separation of cell-external sensing and cell-internal signaling. Our work thus sheds new light on the evolution of adaptation mechanisms in complex systems.

  3. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays......DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important DNA repair pathway that plays critical roles in DNA replication fidelity, mutation avoidance and genome stability, all of which contribute significantly to the viability of cells and organisms. MMR is widely-used as a diagnostic biomarker for human cancers...... novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore...

  4. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  5. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band which had the same size as that of the Humanin positive control. The sequence of recombinant plasmids accorded with the Humnain gene sequence. A eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin was successfully constructed.

  6. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Results: Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band which had the same size as that of the Humanin positive control. The sequence of recombinant plasmids accorded with the Humnain gene sequence. Conclusions: A eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin was successfully constructed. PMID:15593385

  7. Phylogenomic analysis of the cystatin superfamily in eukaryotes and prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk Vito

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cystatin superfamily comprises cysteine protease inhibitors that play key regulatory roles in protein degradation processes. Although they have been the subject of many studies, little is known about their genesis, evolution and functional diversification. Our aim has been to obtain a comprehensive insight into their origin, distribution, diversity, evolution and classification in Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea. Results We have identified in silico the full complement of the cystatin superfamily in more than 2100 prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The analysis of numerous eukaryotic genomes has provided strong evidence for the emergence of this superfamily in the ancestor of eukaryotes. The progenitor of this superfamily was most probably intracellular and lacked a signal peptide and disulfide bridges, much like the extant Giardia cystatin. A primordial gene duplication produced two ancestral eukaryotic lineages, cystatins and stefins. While stefins remain encoded by a single or a small number of genes throughout the eukaryotes, the cystatins have undergone a more complex and dynamic evolution through numerous gene and domain duplications. In the cystatin superfamily we discovered twenty vertebrate-specific and three angiosperm-specific orthologous families, indicating that functional diversification has occurred only in multicellular eukaryotes. In vertebrate orthologous families, the prevailing trends were loss of the ancestral inhibitory activity and acquisition of novel functions in innate immunity. Bacterial cystatins and stefins may be emergency inhibitors that enable survival of bacteria in the host, defending them from the host's proteolytic activity. Conclusion This study challenges the current view on the classification, origin and evolution of the cystatin superfamily and provides valuable insights into their functional diversification. The findings of this comprehensive study provide guides for future

  8. Viscosity overshoot in the start-up of uniaxial elongation of low density polyethylene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Bach, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The transient uniaxial elongational viscosity of BASF Lupolen 1840D and 3020D melts has been measured on a filament stretch rheometer up to Hencky strains of 6-7. The elongational viscosity of both melts was measured at 130 degrees C within a broad range of elongational rates. At high elongation ...

  9. Construction of a eukaryotic expression plasmid of Humanin*

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ben-yan; Chen, Xiang-ming; Tang, Min; Chen, Feng; Chen, Zhi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pGEMEX-1-Humanin was digested with restriction endonucleases BamH I and Hind III and the Humanin gene fragments, about 100 bp length, were obtained. Then the Humanin gene fragments were inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(-) and the recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1(-)-Humanin were identified by sequencing. Results: Recombinant plasmid DNA successfully produced a band whic...

  10. Visualization of elongation measurements using an SER universal testing platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Zelenková, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-8 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/2342 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : elongational viscosity * Universal Testing Platform (SER) * polymer melts * LDPE Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2015

  11. CLOSED FORM OF THE STEERED ELONGATED HERMITE-GAUSS WAVELETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papari, Giuseppe; Campisi, Patrizio; Petkov, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    We provide a closed form, both in the spatial and in the frequency domain, of a family of wavelets which arise from steering elongated Hermite-Gauss filters. These wavelets have interesting mathematical properties, as they form new dyadic families of eigenfunctions of the 2D Fourier transform, and

  12. Longitudinal domain wall formation in elongated assemblies of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varón, Miriam; Beleggia, Marco; Jordanovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Through evaporation of dense colloids of ferromagnetic ~13 nm ε-Co particles onto carbon substrates, anisotropic magnetic dipolar interactions can support formation of elongated particle structures with aggregate thicknesses of 100-400 nm and lengths of up to some hundred microns. Lorenz microsco...

  13. Tandem Oligonucleotide Probe Annealing and Elongation To Discriminate Viral Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, Maria; Uhd, Jesper; Miotke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    opportunities in transcriptome analysis, virology, and other fields. Herein, we report for the first time a "click" chemistry approach to oligonucleotide probe elongation as a novel approach to specifically detect a viral sequence. We hybridized a library of short, terminally labeled probes to Ebola virus RNA...

  14. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is posttranslationally modified at a conserved lysyl residue by the coordinated action of two enzymes, PoxA and YjeK. We have previously established the importance of this modification in Salmonella stress resistance. Here we report that, like poxA and yjeK mutants, Sal...

  15. On the measurement of elongational viscosity of polyethylene materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švrčinová, Petra; Kharlamov, Alexander; Filip, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-57 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/08/1307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Elongational viscosity * SER Universal * Testing Platform * LDPE Escorene Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  16. Modelling elongational and shear rheology of two LDPE melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rolón-Garrido, V. H.; Pivokonský, Radek; Filip, Petr; Zatloukal, M.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2009), s. 691-697 ISSN 0035-4511 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Rheology * MSF model * Shear flow * Elongational flow * Strain hardening * Low-density polyethylene * Polymer melts Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.882, year: 2009

  17. One-step purification of E. coli elongation factor Tu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.; Degn, B

    1993-01-01

    The tuf A gene, encoding the E. coli elongation factor Tu, was cloned in the pGEX gene fusion system. Upon expression EF-Tu is fused to glutathione-S-transferase serving as a purification handle with affinity for glutathione immobilised on agarose. This allows purification of EF-Tu in a one...

  18. The biology of eukaryotic promoter prediction - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Computational prediction of eukaryotic promoters from the nucleotide sequence is one of the most attractive problems in sequence analysis today, but it is also a very difficult one. Thus, current methods predict in the order of one promoter per kilobase in human DNA, while the average distance...

  19. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a BLAST search of all these sequences against a database containing sequences of a host genome (e.g. human genome) will take enormous amount of time and computing resources. In this article, we present a novel alignment-free algorithm, called Eu-Detect, that can detect eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic data ...

  20. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    species but also from accidental contamination from the genome of eukaryotic host cells. The latter scenario generally occurs in the case of host-associated metagenomes, e.g. microbes living in human gut. In such cases, one needs to identify and remove contaminating host DNA sequences, since the latter sequences will ...

  1. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur

    2016-01-01

    Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration...

  2. Tracking Eukaryotic Production and Burial Through Time with Zinc Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T. Y. S.; Planavsky, N.; Owens, J. D.; Love, G. D.; Lyons, T.; Peterson, L. C.; Knoll, A. H.; Dupont, C. L.; Reinhard, C.; Zumberge, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zinc is an important, often co-limiting nutrient for eukaryotes in the oceans today. Given the importance of Zn in the modern oceans, we developed a Zn isotope approach to track the extent of Zn limitation and eukaryotic production through Earth's history. Specifically, we use the isotopic systematics of the pyrite (δ66Znpyr), rock extracts (bitumen) and kerogen pyrolysate (δ66Znorg) within euxinic black shales. We show that δ66Znpyr of euxinic core-top muds from the Cariaco basin capture the global deep seawater signature, validating its use as a seawater proxy. Additionally, we propose that Δ66Znpyr-org can be used to track surface water zinc bioavailability. Detailed studies of short-lived oceanic anoxic events such as Cretaceous OAE2, which punctuate an otherwise dominantly oxic Phanerozoic world, exhibit dramatic shifts in seawater δ66Zn and organic bound zinc. Such perturbations are consistent with the demise of eukaryotes under a nitrogen stressed regime, in which cyanobacteria carry the competitive advantage. Contradictory to previous models, however, our data suggest that zinc remained largely bioavailable throughout these anoxic intervals despite significant drawdown of the global reservoir. The framework developed from studies of the modern, Cenozoic, and Mesozoic can be used to track the Precambrian evolution of the marine Zn cycle and the rise of eukaryotic algae to ecological dominance.

  3. The emerging roles of inositol pyrophosphates in eukaryotic cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These energy-rich small molecules are present in all eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, and are involved in a wide range of cellular functions including apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, DNA repair, osmoregulation, phosphate homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, immune signalling, cell cycle regulation, and ribosome ...

  4. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plots depicting the classification accuracy of Eu-Detect with various combinations of. 'cumulative sequence count' (40K, 50K, 60K, 70K, 80K) and 'coverage threshold' (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%,. 80%). While blue bars represent Eu-Detect's average classification accuracy with eukaryotic data sets, red bars represent.

  5. Benthic eukaryotic diversity in the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Kysela, David T; Teske, Andreas; de Vera Gomez, Alvin; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2002-05-28

    Molecular microbial ecology studies have revealed remarkable prokaryotic diversity in extreme hydrothermal marine environments. There are no comparable reports of culture-independent surveys of eukaryotic life in warm, anoxic marine sediments. By using sequence comparisons of PCR-amplified small subunit ribosomal RNAs, we characterized eukaryotic diversity in hydrothermal vent environments of Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California. Many sequences from these anoxic sediments and the overlaying seawater represent previously uncharacterized protists, including early branching eukaryotic lineages or extended diversity within described taxa. At least two mechanisms, with overlapping consequences, account for the eukaryotic community structure of this environment. The adaptation to anoxic environments is evidenced by specific affinity of environmental sequences to aerotolerant anaerobic species in molecular trees. This pattern is superimposed against a background of widely distributed aerophilic and aerotolerant protists, some of which may migrate into and survive in the sediment whereas others (e.g., phototrophs) are simply deposited by sedimentary processes. In contrast, bacterial populations in these sediments are primarily characteristic of anoxic, reduced, hydrocarbon-rich sedimentary habitats.

  6. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has also been shown that although this organism contains sequence homologs of genes which are known to control the cell cycle of most eukaryotes, these genes may be structurally altered and their equivalent function yet to be demonstrated in amoeba. The available information suggests that surveillance mechanisms ...

  7. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  8. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments.Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms for

  9. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are known to control the cell cycle of most eukaryotes, these genes may be structurally altered and their equiva- lent function yet to be ... points controlling the cell division of these organisms? Is the cell division cycle of these organisms ..... mitotic-phase inhibitor and may become a useful tool for studies on the relationship ...

  10. Molecular typing of fecal eukaryotic microbiota of human infants and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The micro-eukaryotic diversity from the human gut was investigated using universal primers directed towards 18S rRNA gene, fecal samples being the source of DNA. The subjects in this study included two breast-fed and two formula-milk-fed infants and their mothers. The study revealed that the infants did not seem to ...

  11. Monitoring disulfide bond formation in the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Henrik; Tachibana, Christine; Winther, Jakob R.

    2004-01-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight thiol in the eukaryotic cytosol. The compartment-specific ratio and absolute concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively) are, however, not easily determined. Here, we present a glutathione-specific green...

  12. An inside-out origin for the eukaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, David A; Baum, Buzz

    2014-10-28

    Although the origin of the eukaryotic cell has long been recognized as the single most profound change in cellular organization during the evolution of life on earth, this transition remains poorly understood. Models have always assumed that the nucleus and endomembrane system evolved within the cytoplasm of a prokaryotic cell. Drawing on diverse aspects of cell biology and phylogenetic data, we invert the traditional interpretation of eukaryotic cell evolution. We propose that an ancestral prokaryotic cell, homologous to the modern-day nucleus, extruded membrane-bound blebs beyond its cell wall. These blebs functioned to facilitate material exchange with ectosymbiotic proto-mitochondria. The cytoplasm was then formed through the expansion of blebs around proto-mitochondria, with continuous spaces between the blebs giving rise to the endoplasmic reticulum, which later evolved into the eukaryotic secretory system. Further bleb-fusion steps yielded a continuous plasma membrane, which served to isolate the endoplasmic reticulum from the environment. The inside-out theory is consistent with diverse kinds of data and provides an alternative framework by which to explore and understand the dynamic organization of modern eukaryotic cells. It also helps to explain a number of previously enigmatic features of cell biology, including the autonomy of nuclei in syncytia and the subcellular localization of protein N-glycosylation, and makes many predictions, including a novel mechanism of interphase nuclear pore insertion.

  13. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  14. Exploring the behavior of small eukaryotic gene networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, F.J.; Oancea, I.; van Driel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the genome organization of higher eukaryotes indicates that it contains many clusters of functionally related genes. In these clusters, the activity of a single gene is regulated hierarchically at a local gene-level and a global cluster-level. Whether a single gene can be activated by a

  15. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. Plots depicting the classification accuracy of Eu-Detect with various combinations of. 'cumulative sequence count' (40K, 50K, 60K, 70K, 80K) and 'coverage threshold' (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%,. 80%). While blue bars represent Eu-Detect's average classification accuracy with eukaryotic ...

  16. Polarised asymmetric inheritance of accumulated protein damage in higher eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rujano, Maria A.; Bosveld, Floris; Salomons, Florian A.; Dijk, Freark; van Waarde, Maria A. W. H.; van der Want, Johannes J. L.; de Vos, Rob A. I.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2006-01-01

    Disease-associated misfolded proteins or proteins damaged due to cellular stress are generally disposed via the cellular protein quality-control system. However, under saturating conditions, misfolded proteins will aggregate. In higher eukaryotes, these aggregates can be transported to accumulate in

  17. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  18. Patterns of intron gain and conservation in eukaryotic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The presence of introns in protein-coding genes is a universal feature of eukaryotic genome organization, and the genes of multicellular eukaryotes, typically, contain multiple introns, a substantial fraction of which share position in distant taxa, such as plants and animals. Depending on the methods and data sets used, researchers have reached opposite conclusions on the causes of the high fraction of shared introns in orthologous genes from distant eukaryotes. Some studies conclude that shared intron positions reflect, almost entirely, a remarkable evolutionary conservation, whereas others attribute it to parallel gain of introns. To resolve these contradictions, it is crucial to analyze the evolution of introns by using a model that minimally relies on arbitrary assumptions. Results: We developed a probabilistic model of evolution that allows for variability of intron gain and loss rates over branches of the phylogenetic tree, individual genes, and individual sites. Applying this model to an extended set of conserved eukaryotic genes, we find that parallel gain, on average, accounts for only ~8% of the shared intron positions. However, the distribution of parallel gains over the phylogenetic tree of eukaryotes is highly non-uniform. There are, practically, no parallel gains in closely related lineages, whereas for distant lineages, such as animals and plants, parallel gains appear to contribute up to 20% of the shared intron positions. In accord with these findings, we estimated that ancestral introns have a high probability to be retained in extant genomes, and conversely, that a substantial fraction of extant introns have retained their positions since the early stages of eukaryotic evolution. In addition, the density of sites that are available for intron insertion is estimated to be, approximately, one in seven basepairs. Conclusion: We obtained robust estimates of the contribution of parallel gain to the observed

  19. Eukaryotic microorganisms in cold environments. Examples from Pyrenean glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGarcia-Descalzo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the viability of eukaryotic microorganisms preserved in icy regions. Here we report on the diversity of microbial eukaryotes in ice samples derived from four Pyrenean glaciers. The species composition of eukaryotic communities in these glaciers is unknown mostly because of the presence of a multi-year ice cap, and it is not clear whether they harbor the same populations. The recent deglaciation of these areas is allowing an easy access to glacial layers that correspond to the Little Ice Age although some isolated deposits are attributed to previous glacial cycles. In this study, we use molecular 18S rRNA-based approaches to characterize some of the microbial eukaryotic populations associated with Pyrenean glaciers. Firstly, we performed a chemical and microscopical characterization of ice samples. Secondly, molecular analyses revealed interesting protist genetic diversity in glaciers. In order to understand the microbial composition of the ice samples the eukaryotic communities resident in the glacial samples were examined by amplifying community DNA and constructing clone libraries with 18S rRNA primers. After removal of potential chimeric sequences and derreplication of identical sequences, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that several different protists could be identified. Protist diversity was more phylum rich in Aneto and Monte Perdido glaciers. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (> 1 % of all sequences were Viridiplantae and Rhizaria. Significant variations in relative abundances of protist phyla between higher and lower glaciers were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Chloromonas, Raphidonema , Heteromita , Koliella and Bodomorpha. In addition, protist community structure showed significant differences between glaciers. The relative abundances of protist groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with the altitude and area of glaciers

  20. Eukaryotic microorganisms in cold environments: examples from Pyrenean glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Descalzo, Laura; García-López, Eva; Postigo, Marina; Baquero, Fernando; Alcazar, Alberto; Cid, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the viability of eukaryotic microorganisms preserved in icy regions. Here we report on the diversity of microbial eukaryotes in ice samples derived from four Pyrenean glaciers. The species composition of eukaryotic communities in these glaciers is unknown mostly because of the presence of a multi-year ice cap, and it is not clear whether they harbor the same populations. The recent deglaciation of these areas is allowing an easy access to glacial layers that correspond to the “Little Ice Age” although some isolated deposits are attributed to previous glacial cycles. In this study, we use molecular 18S rRNA-based approaches to characterize some of the microbial eukaryotic populations associated with Pyrenean glaciers. Firstly, we performed a chemical and microscopical characterization of ice samples. Secondly, molecular analyses revealed interesting protist genetic diversity in glaciers. In order to understand the microbial composition of the ice samples the eukaryotic communities resident in the glacial samples were examined by amplifying community DNA and constructing clone libraries with 18S rRNA primers. After removal of potential chimeric sequences and dereplication of identical sequences, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that several different protists could be identified. Protist diversity was more phylum rich in Aneto and Monte Perdido glaciers. The dominant taxonomic groups across all samples (>1% of all sequences) were Viridiplantae and Rhizaria. Significant variations in relative abundances of protist phyla between higher and lower glaciers were observed. At the genus level, significant differences were also recorded for the dominant genera Chloromonas, Raphidonema, Heteromita, Koliella, and Bodomorpha. In addition, protist community structure showed significant differences between glaciers. The relative abundances of protist groups at different taxonomic levels correlated with the altitude and area of glaciers and with pH of

  1. Transition zone cells reach G2 phase before initiating elongation in maize root apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Victoria Alarcón

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root elongation requires cell divisions in the meristematic zone and cell elongation in the elongation zone. The boundary between dividing and elongating cells is called the transition zone. In the meristem zone, initial cells are continuously dividing, but on the basal side of the meristem cells exit the meristem through the transition zone and enter in the elongation zone, where they stop division and rapidly elongate. Throughout this journey cells are accompanied by changes in cell cycle progression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that meristematic cells are in cycle, but exit when they enter the elongation zone. In addition, the percentage of cells in G2 phase (4C strongly increased from the meristem to the elongation zone. However, we did not observe remarkable changes in the percentage of cells in cell cycle phases along the entire elongation zone. These results suggest that meristematic cells in maize root apex stop the cell cycle in G2 phase after leaving the meristem.

  2. Eukaryotes dominate new production in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, S. E.; Lomas, M. W.; Ward, B. B.; Casey, J. R.; Sigman, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The vast subtropical ocean gyres are considered unproductive “deserts” due to the extremely low concentrations of essential nutrients in their sunlit surface waters. Because of intense upper ocean stratification, phytoplankton growth in the subtropical gyres is limited by the slow supply of nitrate from below, and is assumed to be supported predominantly by “regenerated” nitrogen (N): ammonium and other reduced N sources recycled in surface waters. The phytoplankton assemblage of the subtropical Sargasso Sea is dominated by the prokaryotic cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, which occur in very high cell numbers compared to the rarer, and usually larger, eukaryotic algae. Coupling flow cytometry and a new high-sensitivity method for N isotope analysis, we measure the 15N/14N of major phytoplankton taxa and other biologically distinct particle populations collected from the surface waters of the Sargasso Sea during the stratified summer period. We find that the cyanobacteria and eukaryotic phytoplankton show distinct N isotope signatures, indicating that they utilize different sources of N for growth. Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus have a uniformly low 15N/14N, consistent with the expectation that these phytoplankton rely on regenerated N. However, the 15N/14N of eukaryotic phytoplankton is higher and more variable, with a mean 15N/14N comparable to the new nitrate supply from below, indicating that eukaryotes dominate the consumption of this nitrate and rely on it for more than half of their N requirement. Using our measured 15N/14N values for the various sorted autotrophic populations, we calculate eukaryote-specific summer f-ratios of 0.6-0.67 and total community summer f-ratios of 0.15-0.23. These values are higher than those based on comparison of primary production and sediment-trap derived organic carbon (C) export, and agree well with annual f-ratio estimates implied by geochemical tracers. The high 15N/14N of eukaryotic biomass can

  3. Enhancement of +1 frameshift by polyamines during translation of polypeptide release factor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Kyohei; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Taniguchi, Shiho; Terui, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2006-04-07

    Polypeptide release factor 2 (RF2) in Escherichia coli is known to be synthesized by a +1 frameshift at the 26th UGA codon of RF2 mRNA. Polyamines were found to stimulate the +1 frameshift of RF2 synthesis, an effect that was reduced by excess RF2. Polyamine stimulation of +1 frameshift of RF2 synthesis was observed at the early logarithmic phase, which is the important phase in determination of the overall rate of cell growth. A Shine-Dalgarno-like sequence was necessary for an efficient +1 frameshift of RF2 synthesis, but not for polyamine stimulation. Spectinomycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and neomycin reduced polyamine stimulation of the +1 frameshift of RF2 synthesis. The results suggest that a structural change of the A site on 30 S ribosomal subunits is important for polyamine stimulation of the +1 frameshift. The level of mRNAs of ribosomal proteins and elongation factors having UAA as termination codon was enhanced by polyamines, and OppA synthesis from OppA mRNA having UAA as termination codon was more enhanced by polyamines than that from OppA mRNA having a UGA termination codon. Furthermore, synthesis of ribosomal protein L20 and elongation factor G from the mRNAs having a UAA termination codon was enhanced by polyamines at the level of translation and transcription. The results suggest that some protein synthesis from mRNAs having a UAA termination codon is enhanced at the level of translation through polyamine stimulation of +1 frameshift of RF2 synthesis. It is concluded that prfB encoding RF2 is a new member of the polyamine modulon.

  4. The Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1 Alpha (eEF1α from the Parasite Leishmania infantum Is Modified with the Immunomodulatory Substituent Phosphorylcholine (PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Timm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and glycolipids have been found to be decorated with phosphorylcholine (PC both in protozoa and nematodes that parasitize humans and animals. PC epitopes can provoke various effects on immune cells leading to an immunomodulation of the host’s immune system that allows long-term persistence of the parasites. So far, only a limited number of PC-modified proteins, mainly from nematodes, have been identified. Infections caused by Leishmania spp. (e.g., L. infantum in southern Europe affect about 12 million people worldwide and are characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical forms in humans, ranging from cutaneous to fatal visceral leishmaniasis. To establish and maintain the infection, these protozoa are dependent on the secretion of effector molecules into the host for modulating their immune system. In this project, we analyzed the PC modification of L. infantum promastigotes by 2D-gel based proteomics. Western blot analysis with the PC-specific antibody TEPC-15 revealed one PC-substituted protein in this organism, identified as eEF1α. We could demonstrate that the binding of eEF1α to one of its downstream effectors is dependent on its PC-modification. In this study we provide evidence that in this parasite the modification of eEF1α with PC may be essential for its function as an important virulence factor.

  5. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells

  6. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells.

  7. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented

  8. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Reyes, M.; Lopez-Sandoval, R.; Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Garibay-Alonso, R.; Carroll, D.L.; Lastras-Martinez, A.

    2007-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam

  9. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  10. TERRA promotes telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Martin; Wischnewski, Harry; Bah, Amadou; Hu, Yan; Liu, Na; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; King, Megan C; Azzalin, Claus M

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase-mediated telomere elongation provides cell populations with the ability to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase is capable of recognizing and extending the shortest telomeres in cells; nevertheless, how this mechanism is executed remains unclear. Here, we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, shortened telomeres are highly transcribed into the evolutionarily conserved long noncoding RNA TERRA A fraction of TERRA produced upon telomere shortening is polyadenylated and largely devoid of telomeric repeats, and furthermore, telomerase physically interacts with this polyadenylated TERRA in vivo We also show that experimentally enhanced transcription of a manipulated telomere promotes its association with telomerase and concomitant elongation. Our data represent the first direct evidence that TERRA stimulates telomerase recruitment and activity at chromosome ends in an organism with human-like telomeres. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complexes promote neurite elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bica

    Full Text Available Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato-copper complex, Cu(II(gtsm on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II(gtsm induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complex, Cu(II(atsm, but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II(gtsm was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II(gtsm inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm, suggesting a potential link between Cu(II(gtsm-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes.

  12. IAA-glucopyranoside stimulation of corn coleoptiles elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Szmidt-Jaworska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously suggested that 1-O-IAGIuc growth stimulation occurs as the effect of its hydrolysis into a free IAA. In present experiments castanospermine, a known β-glucosidase inhibitor, was included. 1-O-IAGluc in the presence of castanospermine stimulated growth of corn coleoptiles segments even stronger then free IAA. So, it seems that 1-O-IAGluc itself, is responsible for the observed stimulation of corn coleoptile segments elongation.

  13. Polymer film strain gauges for measuring large elongations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratov, A. P.; Zueva, A. M.; Varakin, R. S.; Taranec, I. P.; Savenkova, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    The paper shows the possibility to print polymer strain gages, microstrip lines, coplanar waveguides, and other prints for avionics using printing technology and equipment. The methods of screen and inkjet printing have been complemented by three new operations of preparing print films for application of an electrically conductive ink layer. Such additional operations make it possible to enhance the conductive ink layer adhesion to the film and to manufacture strain gages for measuring large elongations.

  14. Significant enhancement by biochar of caproate production via chain elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming; Zhang, Hua; Lü, Fan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, biochar was introduced into a chain elongation system to enhance the bioproduction of caproate and caprylate. The concentration of caproate increased to 21.1 g/L upon the addition of biochar, which is the highest level of caproate reported for such a system to date when ethanol was used as electron donor. The addition of biochar created a tougher system with more stable microorganism community structure for chain elongation, in which no obvious inhibition by products or substrates was observed, moreover, the lag phase was reduced 2.3-fold compared to the system without biochar. These reinforcement effect of biochar are attributed to the enhanced conductivity due to the significant enrichment of functional microorganisms via the microbial network surrounding smaller biochar particles, and via the adsorption on the rough surfaces or pores of larger particles, which facilitated electron transfer. Higher amounts of extracellular polymer substances and higher conductivity induced by biochar could contribute to the reinforcement effect in chain elongation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Three tRNAs on the ribosome slow translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhong; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2017-12-26

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome simultaneously binds up to three different transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules. Among the three tRNA binding sites, the regulatory role of the exit (E) site, where deacylated tRNA spontaneously dissociates from the translational complex, has remained elusive. Here we use two donor-quencher pairs to observe and correlate both the conformation of ribosomes and tRNAs as well as tRNA occupancy. Our results reveal a partially rotated state of the ribosome wherein all three tRNA sites are occupied during translation elongation. The appearance and lifetime of this state depend on the E-site tRNA dissociation kinetics, which may vary among tRNA species and depends on temperature and ionic strength. The 3-tRNA partially rotated state is not a proper substrate for elongation factor G (EF-G), thus inhibiting translocation until the E-site tRNA dissociates. Our result presents two parallel kinetic pathways during translation elongation, underscoring the ability of E-site codons to modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis.

  16. Analysis of cracking potential and micro-elongation of linerboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supattra Panthai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Folding cracks of linerboards in relation to their micro-elongation and the forming conditions were studied using an industrial linerboard machine with a top former. The experiments consisted of the study of various forming conditions by manipulating the jet/wire speed ratio to produce linerboard with differences in fiber structures that were related to the cracked and uncracked products. The results showed that changes to the jet/wire speed ratio of about 0.01–0.02 to improve the tested folding endurance in the machine direction potentially produced folding cracks in the linerboard, which indicated an ambiguous interpretation of the foldability tests. The delaminated cracked layers were found to have a high folding endurance and tensile strength, while the decrease in the micro-elongation formulated in this study was found to be related to cracking. A lower micro-elongation of about 350–500 μm/N·g was found in a range of products with folding cracks.

  17. Bacillus anthracis Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Interacts with and Modifies Elongation Factor Tu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnicker, Nicholas J. [Department; Razzaghi, Mortezaali [Department; Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta [Department; Chakravarthy, Srinivas [Biophysics; Dey, Mishtu [Department

    2017-10-17

    Prolyl hydroxylation is a very common post-translational modification and plays many roles in eukaryotes such as collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and controlling protein transcription and translation. There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that prokaryotes contain prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) homologous to the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes that act on elongation factor Tu (EFTu) and are likely involved in the regulation of bacterial translation. Recent biochemical and structural studies with a PHD from Pseudomonas putida (PPHD) determined that it forms a complex with EFTu and hydroxylates a prolyl residue of EFTu. Moreover, while animal, plant, and viral P4Hs act on peptidyl proline, most prokaryotic P4Hs have been known to target free l-proline; the exceptions include PPHD and a P4H from Bacillus anthracis (BaP4H) that modifies collagen-like proline-rich peptides. Here we use biophysical and mass spectrometric methods to demonstrate that BaP4H recognizes full-length BaEFTu and a BaEFTu 9-mer peptide for site-specific proline hydroxylation. Using size-exclusion chromatography coupled small-angle X-ray scattering (SEC–SAXS) and binding studies, we determined that BaP4H forms a 1:1 heterodimeric complex with BaEFTu. The SEC–SAXS studies reveal dissociation of BaP4H dimeric subunits upon interaction with BaEFTu. While BaP4H is unusual within bacteria in that it is structurally and functionally similar to the animal PHDs and collagen P4Hs, respectively, this work provides further evidence of its promiscuous substrate recognition. It is possible that the enzyme might have evolved to hydroxylate a universally conserved protein in prokaryotes, similar to the PHDs, and implies a functional role in B. anthracis.

  18. Metal ion transport in eukaryotic microorganisms: insights from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, D J

    2000-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, copper, manganese, and zinc are essential nutrients for all eukaryotic microorganisms. Therefore, these organisms possess efficient uptake mechanisms to obtain these nutrients from their extracellular environment. Metal ions must also be transported into intracellular organelles where they function as catalytic and structural cofactors for compartmentalized enzymes. Thus, intracellular transport mechanisms are also present. When present in high levels, metal ions can also be toxic, so their uptake and intracellular transport is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to limit metal ion overaccumulation and facilitate storage and sequestration. Remarkable molecular insight into these processes has come from recent studies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism, which is the primary subject of this chapter, serves as a useful paradigm to understand metal ion metabolism in other eukaryotic microbes.

  19. [Advance of heterologous expression study of eukaryote-origin laccases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Na; Tan, Huijun; Sun, Xinxin; Ni, Jinfeng

    2017-04-25

    Laccases are enzymes belonging to the group of multi-copper oxidases. These enzymes are widely distributed in insects, plants, fungi and bacteria. In general, laccases can oxidize an exceptionally high number of substrates, so they have broad applications in textile, pulp, food and the degradation of lignin. However, low yield, low activity and thermo-instability of laccase in nature limit the application of laccase. High efficient heterologous expression of the protein is an effective way for solving this problem. Here, we summarize the research advances of heterologous expression of eukaryote-origin laccases. We focus on the overexpression of eukaryote-origin laccases using different expression system and the method for improving the production yield and enzyme activity in yeast cells. Information provided in this review would be helpful for researchers in the field.

  20. Anionic lipids and the maintenance of membrane electrostatics in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-02-01

    A wide range of signaling processes occurs at the cell surface through the reversible association of proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Some low abundant lipids are enriched at the membrane of specific compartments and thereby contribute to the identity of cell organelles by acting as biochemical landmarks. Lipids also influence membrane biophysical properties, which emerge as an important feature in specifying cellular territories. Such parameters are crucial for signal transduction and include lipid packing, membrane curvature and electrostatics. In particular, membrane electrostatics specifies the identity of the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Membrane surface charges are carried by anionic phospholipids, however the exact nature of the lipid(s) that powers the plasma membrane electrostatic field varies among eukaryotes and has been hotly debated during the last decade. Herein, we discuss the role of anionic lipids in setting up plasma membrane electrostatics and we compare similarities and differences that were found in different eukaryotic cells.

  1. Starting the protein synthesis machine: eukaryotic translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Thomas; W Hentze, Matthias

    2003-12-01

    The final assembly of the protein synthesis machinery occurs during translation initiation. This delicate process involves both ends of eukaryotic messenger RNAs as well as multiple sequential protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions. As is expected from its critical position in the gene expression pathway between the transcriptome and the proteome, translation initiation is a selective and highly regulated process. This synopsis summarises the current status of the field and identifies intriguing open questions. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Extreme Diversity of Diplonemid Eukaryotes in the Ocean

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Flegontov, Pavel; Malviya, S.; Audic, S.; Wincker, P.; de Vargas, C.; Bowler, C.; Lukeš, Julius; Horák, Aleš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 22 (2016), s. 3060-3065 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP506/12/P931; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-23986S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : virus-sized particles * microbial eukaryotes * sea-floor * phytoplankton * communities * euglenozoa * dispersal * ecosystem Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 8.851, year: 2016

  3. Sulfate assimilation in eukaryotes: fusions, relocations and lateral transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durnford Dion G

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sulfate assimilation pathway is present in photosynthetic organisms, fungi, and many bacteria, providing reduced sulfur for the synthesis of cysteine and methionine and a range of other metabolites. In photosynthetic eukaryotes sulfate is reduced in the plastids whereas in aplastidic eukaryotes the pathway is cytosolic. The only known exception is Euglena gracilis, where the pathway is localized in mitochondria. To obtain an insight into the evolution of the sulfate assimilation pathway in eukaryotes and relationships of the differently compartmentalized isoforms we determined the locations of the pathway in lineages for which this was unknown and performed detailed phylogenetic analyses of three enzymes involved in sulfate reduction: ATP sulfurylase (ATPS, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR and sulfite reductase (SiR. Results The inheritance of ATPS, APR and the related 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPR are remarkable, with multiple origins in the lineages that comprise the opisthokonts, different isoforms in chlorophytes and streptophytes, gene fusions with other enzymes of the pathway, evidence a eukaryote to prokaryote lateral gene transfer, changes in substrate specificity and two reversals of cellular location of host- and endosymbiont-originating enzymes. We also found that the ATPS and APR active in the mitochondria of Euglena were inherited from its secondary, green algal plastid. Conclusion Our results reveal a complex history for the enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. Whilst they shed light on the origin of some characterised novelties, such as a recently described novel isoform of APR from Bryophytes and the origin of the pathway active in the mitochondria of Euglenids, the many distinct and novel isoforms identified here represent an excellent resource for detailed biochemical studies of the enzyme structure/function relationships.

  4. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  5. Nucleoporin Nup98: a gatekeeper in the eukaryotic kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-06-01

    The nucleoporin Nup98 is an essential component of the nuclear pore complex. This peripheral nucleoporin with its Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly (GLFG) repeat domain contributes to nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking, including mRNA export. In addition, accumulating studies indicate that Nup98 plays roles in several important biological events such as gene expression, mitotic checkpoint, and pathogenesis. Nup98 is well conserved among organisms belonging to the fungi and animal kingdoms. These kingdoms belong to the eukaryotic supergroup Opisthokonta. However, there is considerable diversity in the Nup98 orthologs expressed in organisms belonging to other eukaryotic supergroups. Intriguingly, in ciliates, a unicellular organism having two functionally distinct nuclei, GLFG-Nup98 is present in one of the nuclei and a distinct Nup98 ortholog is present in the other nucleus, and these different Nup98s participate in a nucleus-selective transport mechanism. In this review, we focus on Nup98 function and discuss how this nucleoporin has evolved in eukaryotic kingdoms.

  6. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoter prediction using hybrid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao; Li, Qian-Zhong

    2011-06-01

    Promoters are modular DNA structures containing complex regulatory elements required for gene transcription initiation. Hence, the identification of promoters using machine learning approach is very important for improving genome annotation and understanding transcriptional regulation. In recent years, many methods have been proposed for the prediction of eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoters. However, the performances of these methods are still far from being satisfactory. In this article, we develop a hybrid approach (called IPMD) that combines position correlation score function and increment of diversity with modified Mahalanobis Discriminant to predict eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoters. By applying the proposed method to Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis promoter sequences, we achieve the sensitivities and specificities of 90.6 and 97.4% for D. melanogaster, 88.1 and 94.1% for H. sapiens, 83.3 and 95.2% for C. elegans, 84.9 and 91.4% for E. coli, as well as 80.4 and 91.3% for B. subtilis. The high accuracies indicate that the IPMD is an efficient method for the identification of eukaryotic and prokaryotic promoters. This approach can also be extended to predict other species promoters.

  7. Eukaryotic transcriptomics in silico: Optimizing cDNA-AFLP efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüst Christian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary-DNA based amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP is a commonly used tool for assessing the genetic regulation of traits through the correlation of trait expression with cDNA expression profiles. In spite of the frequent application of this method, studies on the optimization of the cDNA-AFLP assay design are rare and have typically been taxonomically restricted. Here, we model cDNA-AFLPs on all 92 eukaryotic species for which cDNA pools are currently available, using all combinations of eight restriction enzymes standard in cDNA-AFLP screens. Results In silco simulations reveal that cDNA pool coverage is largely determined by the choice of individual restriction enzymes and that, through the choice of optimal enzyme combinations, coverage can be increased from Conclusion The insights gained from in silico screening of cDNA-AFLPs from a broad sampling of eukaryotes provide a set of guidelines that should help to substantially increase the efficiency of future cDNA-AFLP experiments in eukaryotes. In silico simulations also suggest a novel use of cDNA-AFLP screens to determine the number of transcripts expressed in a target tissue, an application that should be invaluable as next-generation sequencing technologies are adapted for differential display.

  8. diArk – a resource for eukaryotic genome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of completed eukaryotic genome sequences and cDNA projects has increased exponentially in the past few years although most of them have not been published yet. In addition, many microarray analyses yielded thousands of sequenced EST and cDNA clones. For the researcher interested in single gene analyses (from a phylogenetic, a structural biology or other perspective it is therefore important to have up-to-date knowledge about the various resources providing primary data. Description The database is built around 3 central tables: species, sequencing projects and publications. The species table contains commonly and alternatively used scientific names, common names and the complete taxonomic information. For projects the sequence type and links to species project web-sites and species homepages are stored. All publications are linked to projects. The web-interface provides comprehensive search modules with detailed options and three different views of the selected data. We have especially focused on developing an elaborate taxonomic tree search tool that allows the user to instantaneously identify e.g. the closest relative to the organism of interest. Conclusion We have developed a database, called diArk, to store, organize, and present the most relevant information about completed genome projects and EST/cDNA data from eukaryotes. Currently, diArk provides information about 415 eukaryotes, 823 sequencing projects, and 248 publications.

  9. Relative Mesothelioma Potencies for Unregulated Respirable Elongated Mineral and Synthetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    For decades uncertainties and contradictions have surrounded the issue of whether exposures to respirable elongated mineral and synthetic particles (REMPs and RESPs) present health risks such as those recognized for exposures to elongated asbestiform mineral particles from the fi...

  10. A Cellular Factor for Regulation of Transcriptional Elongation by HIV TAT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Qiang

    1998-01-01

    Control of transcriptional elongation has been recognized as an important step in gene regulation, but mechanisms regulating the efficiency of elongation by RNA polymerase II have not been extensively studied...

  11. Characteristics of elongated and ruptured anterior cruciate ligament grafts: An analysis of 21 consecutive revision cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iio

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The location of the original femoral tunnel was more proximal in patients with elongated grafts than in those with ruptured grafts. Different bone tunnel position from native ACL might lead to graft elongation.

  12. Origin of phagotrophic eukaryotes as social cheaters in microbial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of eukaryotic cells was one of the most dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. It is generally assumed that eukaryotes evolved later then prokaryotes by the transformation or fusion of prokaryotic lineages. However, as yet there is no consensus regarding the nature of the prokaryotic group(s ancestral to eukaryotes. Regardless of this, a hardly debatable fundamental novel characteristic of the last eukaryotic common ancestor was the ability to exploit prokaryotic biomass by the ingestion of entire cells, i.e. phagocytosis. The recent advances in our understanding of the social life of prokaryotes may help to explain the origin of this form of total exploitation. Presentation of the hypothesis Here I propose that eukaryotic cells originated in a social environment, a differentiated microbial mat or biofilm that was maintained by the cooperative action of its members. Cooperation was costly (e.g. the production of developmental signals or an extracellular matrix but yielded benefits that increased the overall fitness of the social group. I propose that eukaryotes originated as selfish cheaters that enjoyed the benefits of social aggregation but did not contribute to it themselves. The cheaters later evolved into predators that lysed other cells and eventually became professional phagotrophs. During several cycles of social aggregation and dispersal the number of cheaters was contained by a chicken game situation, i.e. reproductive success of cheaters was high when they were in low abundance but was reduced when they were over-represented. Radical changes in cell structure, including the loss of the rigid prokaryotic cell wall and the development of endomembranes, allowed the protoeukaryotes to avoid cheater control and to exploit nutrients more efficiently. Cellular changes were buffered by both the social benefits and the protective physico-chemical milieu of the interior of biofilms. Symbiosis

  13. How do roots elongate in a structured soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kemo; Shen, Jianbo; Ashton, Rhys W; Dodd, Ian C; Parry, Martin A J; Whalley, William R

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we examine how roots penetrate a structured soil. We first examine the relationship between soil water status and its mechanical strength, as well as the ability of the soil to supply water to the root. We identify these as critical soil factors, because it is primarily in drying soil that mechanical constraints limit root elongation. Water supply to the root is important because root water status affects growth pressures and root stiffness. To simplify the bewildering complexity of soil-root interactions, the discussion is focused around the special cases of root elongation in soil with pores much smaller than the root diameter and the penetration of roots at interfaces within the soil. While it is often assumed that the former case is well understood, many unanswered questions remain. While low soil-root friction is often viewed as a trait conferring better penetration of strong soils, it may also increase the axial pressure on the root tip and in so doing reduce the rate of cell division and/or expansion. The precise trade-off between various root traits involved in root elongation in homogeneous soil remains to be determined. There is consensus that the most important factors determining root penetration at an interface are the angle at which the root attempts to penetrate the soil, root stiffness, and the strength of the soil to be penetrated. The effect of growth angle on root penetration implicates gravitropic responses in improved root penetration ability. Although there is no work that has explored the effect of the strength of the gravitropic responses on penetration of hard layers, we attempt to outline possible interactions. Impacts of soil drying and strength on phytohormone concentrations in roots, and consequent root-to-shoot signalling, are also considered.

  14. Fruiting branch K+ level affects cotton fibre elongation through osmoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiashuo eYang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K deficiency in cotton plants results in reduced fibre length. As one of the primary osmotica, K+ contributes to an increase in cell turgor pressure during fibre elongation. Therefore, it is hypothesized that fibre length is affected by K deficiency through an osmotic pathway, so in 2012 and 2013, an experiment was conducted to test this hypothesis by imposing three potassium supply regimes (0, 125, 250 kg K ha-1 on a low-K-sensitive cultivar, Siza 3, and a low-K-tolerant cultivar, Simian 3. We found that fibres were longer in the later season bolls than in the earlier ones in cotton plants grown under normal growth conditions, but later season bolls showed a greater sensitivity to low-K stress, especially the low-K sensitive genotype. We also found that the maximum velocity of fibre elongation (Vmax is the parameter that best reflects the change in fibre elongation under K deficiency. This parameter mostly depends on cell turgor, so the content of the osmotically active solutes was analysed accordingly. Statistical analysis showed that K+ was the major osmotic factor affecting fibre length, and malate was likely facilitating K+ accumulation into fibres, which enabled the low-K-tolerant genotype to cope with low-K stress. Moreover, the low-K-tolerant genotype tended to have greater K+ absorptive capacities in the upper fruiting branches. Based on our findings, we suggest a fertilization scheme for Gossypium hirsutum that adds extra potash fertilizer or distributes it during the development of late season bolls to mitigate K deficiency in the second half of the growth season and to enhance fibre length in late season bolls.

  15. Origin and evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in the network of eukaryotic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2014-09-02

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton evolved from prokaryotic cytomotive filaments. Prokaryotic filament systems show bewildering structural and dynamic complexity and, in many aspects, prefigure the self-organizing properties of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Here, the dynamic properties of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytoskeleton are compared, and how these relate to function and evolution of organellar networks is discussed. The evolution of new aspects of filament dynamics in eukaryotes, including severing and branching, and the advent of molecular motors converted the eukaryotic cytoskeleton into a self-organizing "active gel," the dynamics of which can only be described with computational models. Advances in modeling and comparative genomics hold promise of a better understanding of the evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in early eukaryotes, and its role in the evolution of novel eukaryotic functions, such as amoeboid motility, mitosis, and ciliary swimming. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Transcription Elongation Machinery for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    determined in vitro and in vivo. Cell lines used: MCF10A progression model ( MCF10A , M-II and M-IV cells), all in hand. Mouse strain used: 5-week old...breast cancer cells. 6-30 H. Lu (Zhou) 7 Cell lines used: MCF10A , M-II and M-IV. Subtask 2: Determine the molecular basis underlying high sensitivity...of EMT and metastasis-related genes to control at the transcription elongation stage. Cell lines used: MCF10A , M-II and M-IV. 12-36 H. Lu (Zhou

  17. Time Dependent and Steady Uni-axial Elongational Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens K.; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Here we present measurements of transient and steady uni-axial elongational viscosity, using the Filament Stretching Rheometer1 or FSR1 (see Fig. 1) of the following melts: Four narrow MMD polystyrene (PS) samples with weight-average molar mass Mw in the range of 50k to 390k. Three different bi......-disperse samples, mixed from the narrow MMD PS. Two low-density polyethylene (LDPE) melts (Lupolen 1840D and 3020D). A steady-state viscosity was kept for 1-2.5 Hencky strain units in all measurements....

  18. Controlled laser production of elongated articles from particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Lewis, Gary K.; Milewski, John O.

    2002-01-01

    It has been discovered that wires and small diameter rods can be produced using laser deposition technology in a novel way. An elongated article such as a wire or rod is constructed by melting and depositing particulate material into a deposition zone which has been designed to yield the desired article shape and dimensions. The article is withdrawn from the deposition zone as it is formed, thus enabling formation of the article in a continuous process. Alternatively, the deposition zone is moved along any of numerous deposition paths away from the article being formed.

  19. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  20. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  2. Comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Anireddy SN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesins, a superfamily of molecular motors, use microtubules as tracks and transport diverse cellular cargoes. All kinesins contain a highly conserved ~350 amino acid motor domain. Previous analysis of the completed genome sequence of one flowering plant (Arabidopsis has resulted in identification of 61 kinesins. The recent completion of genome sequencing of several photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes that belong to divergent lineages offers a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in plant and non-plant systems and infer their evolutionary relationships. Results We used the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesins in the completed genome sequences of 19 species, including 13 newly sequenced genomes. Among the newly analyzed genomes, six represent photosynthetic eukaryotes. A total of 529 kinesins was used to perform comprehensive analysis of kinesins and to construct gene trees using the Bayesian and parsimony approaches. The previously recognized 14 families of kinesins are resolved as distinct lineages in our inferred gene tree. At least three of the 14 kinesin families are not represented in flowering plants. Chlamydomonas, a green alga that is part of the lineage that includes land plants, has at least nine of the 14 known kinesin families. Seven of ten families present in flowering plants are represented in Chlamydomonas, indicating that these families were retained in both the flowering-plant and green algae lineages. Conclusion The increase in the number of kinesins in flowering plants is due to vast expansion of the Kinesin-14 and Kinesin-7 families. The Kinesin-14 family, which typically contains a C-terminal motor, has many plant kinesins that have the motor domain at the N terminus, in the middle, or the C terminus. Several domains in kinesins are present exclusively either in plant or animal lineages. Addition of novel domains to kinesins in lineage

  3. Automatic generation of gene finders for eukaryotic species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Krogh, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background The number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes is rapidly increasing. This means that over time it will be hard to keep supplying customised gene finders for each genome. This calls for procedures to automatically generate species-specific gene finders and to re-train them as the quantity...... length distributions. The performance of each individual gene predictor on each individual genome is comparable to the best of the manually optimised species-specific gene finders. It is shown that species-specific gene finders are superior to gene finders trained on other species....

  4. Rationales and Approaches for Studying Metabolism in Eukaryotic Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Veyel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of efficient production strains is essential for the use of eukaryotic microalgae for biofuel production. Systems biology approaches including metabolite profiling on promising microalgal strains, will provide a better understanding of their metabolic networks, which is crucial for metabolic engineering efforts. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii represents a suited model system for this purpose. We give an overview to genetically amenable microalgal strains with the potential for biofuel production and provide a critical review of currently used protocols for metabolite profiling on Chlamydomonas. We provide our own experimental data to underpin the validity of the conclusions drawn.

  5. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...... complex (preRC) formation are based on studies from yeast and Xenopus, while much less is known for mammalian cells. Here we discuss our recent data demonstrating that Geminin is required for preventing rereplication in human normal and cancer cells....

  6. Localization of checkpoint and repair proteins in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cellular response to DNA damage depends on the type of DNA structure being recognized by the checkpoint and repair machinery. DNA ends and single-stranded DNA are hallmarks of double-strand breaks and replication stress. These two structures are recognized by distinct sets...... of proteins, which are reorganized into a focal assembly at the lesion. Moreover, the composition of these foci is coordinated with cell cycle progression, reflecting the favoring of end-joining in the G1 phase and homologous recombination in S and G2. The assembly of proteins at sites of DNA damage...... focusing on budding yeast and mammalian cells....

  7. DNA resection in eukaryotes: deciding how to fix the break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by different mechanisms, including homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining. DNA-end resection, the first step in recombination, is a key step that contributes to the choice of DSB repair. Resection, an evolutionarily conserved process that generates single-stranded DNA, is linked to checkpoint activation and is critical for survival. Failure to regulate and execute this process results in defective recombination and can contribute to human disease. Here I review recent findings on the mechanisms of resection in eukaryotes, from yeast to vertebrates, provide insights into the regulatory strategies that control it, and highlight the consequences of both its impairment and its deregulation.

  8. Doc toxin is a kinase that inactivates elongation factor Tu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W; Rothenbacher, Francesca P; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S; Dunham, Christine M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2014-03-14

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site.

  9. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  10. Application of an Elongated Kelvin Model to Space Shuttle Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle foams are rigid closed-cell polyurethane foams. The two foams used most-extensively oil space shuttle external tank are BX-265 and NCFL4-124. Because of the foaming and rising process, the foam microstructures are elongated in the rise direction. As a result, these two foams exhibit a nonisotropic mechanical behavior. A detailed microstructural characterization of the two foams is presented. Key features of the foam cells are described and the average cell dimensions in the two foams are summarized. Experimental studies are also conducted to measure the room temperature mechanical response of the two foams in the two principal material directions (parallel to the rise and perpendicular to the rise). The measured elastic modulus, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile strength, and Poisson's ratios are reported. The generalized elongated Kelvin foam model previously developed by the authors is reviewed and the equations which result from this model are summarized. Using the measured microstructural dimensions and the measured stiffness ratio, the foam tensile strength ratio and Poisson's ratios are predicted for both foams and are compared with the experimental data. The predicted tensile strength ratio is in close agreement with the measured strength ratio for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. The comparison between the predicted Poisson's ratios and the measured values is not as favorable.

  11. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole (PS52K) and 103 kg/mole (PS103K), and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The bidisperse melts consist of PS103K or PS52K and a monodisperse...... (closed loop proportional regulator) using the laser in such a way that the stretch rate at the neck is kept constant. The rheometer has been described in more detail in (A. Bach, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Journal of Rheology, 47 (2003) 429). PS390K show a decrease in the steady viscosity as a power......-law function of the elongational rate (A. Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager, Macromolecules 36 (2003) 5174). PS52K and PS103K show that the steady viscosity has a maximum that is respectively 100% and 50% above 3 times the zero-shear-rate viscosity. The bidisperse melts show a significant...

  12. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Jiang, Tianyi; Yu, Bo; Wang, Limin; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  13. Initiation and elongation of lateral roots in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Lactuca sativa cv. Baijianye seedlings do not normally produce lateral roots, but removal of the root tip or application of auxin, especially indole-butyric acid, triggered the formation of lateral roots. Primordia initiated within 9 h and were fully developed after 24 h by activating the pericycle cells opposite the xylem pole. The pericycle cells divided asymmetrically into short and long cells. The short cells divided further to form primordia. The effect of root tip removal and auxin application was reversed by 6-benzylaminopurine at concentrations >10(-8) M. The cytokinin oxidase inhibitor N1-(2chloro4pyridyl)-N2-phenylurea also suppressed auxin-induced lateral rooting. The elongation of primary roots was promoted by L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl) glycine and silver ions, but only the latter enhanced elongation of lateral roots. The data indicate that the induction of lateral roots is controlled by basipetally moving cytokinin and acropetally moving auxin. Lateral roots appear to not produce ethylene.

  14. Axial elongation following prolonged near work in myopes and emmetropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Emily C; Read, Scott A; Collins, Michael J; Hegarty, Katherine J; Priddle, Scott B; Smith, Josephine M; Perro, Judd V

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the influence of a period of sustained near work upon axial length in groups of emmetropes (EMM) and myopes. Forty young adult subjects (20 myopes and 20 emmetropes) were recruited for the study. Myopes were further classified as early onset (EOM), late onset (LOM), stable (SM) or progressing (PM) subgroups. Axial length was measured with the IOLMaster instrument before, immediately after and then again 10 min after a continuous 30 min near task of 5 D accommodation demand. Measures of distance objective refraction were also collected. Significant changes in axial length were observed immediately following the near task. EOM axial length elongated on average by 0.027±0.021 mm, LOM by 0.014±0.020 mm, EMM by 0.010±0.015 mm, PM by 0.031±0.022 mm and SM by 0.014±0.018 mm. At the conclusion of the 10 min regression period, axial length measures were not significantly different from baseline values. Axial elongation was observed following a prolonged near task. Both EOM and PM groups showed increases in axial length that were significantly greater than emmetropes.

  15. Granular packings of elongated faceted particles deposited under gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Raúl Cruz; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical results of the effect that particle shape has on the packing properties of granular materials. We have systematically measured the particle angular distribution, the cluster size distribution and the stress profiles of ensembles of faceted elongated particles deposited in a bidimensional box. Stress transmission through this granular system has been numerically simulated using a two-dimensional model of irregular particles. For grains of maximum symmetry (squares), the stress propagation localizes and forms chain-like forces analogous to those observed for granular materials composed of spheres. For thick layers of grains, a pressure saturation is observed for deposit depths beyond a characteristic length. This scenario correlates with packing morphology and can be understood in terms of stochastic models of aggregation and random multiplicative processes. As grains elongate and lose their symmetry, stress propagation is strongly affected. Lateral force transmission becomes less favored than vertical transfer, and hence, an increase in the pressure develops with depth, hindering force saturation

  16. Swimming of a Sea Butterfly with an Elongated Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ferhat; Maas, Amy E.; Murphy, David W.

    2017-11-01

    Sea butterflies (pteropods) are small, zooplanktonic marine snails which swim by flapping highly flexible parapodia. Previous studies show that the swimming hydrodynamics of Limacina helicina, a polar pteropod with a spiraled shell, is similar to tiny insect flight aerodynamics and that forward-backward pitching is key for lift generation. However, swimming by diverse pteropod species with different shell shapes has not been examined. We present measurements of the swimming of Cuvierina columnella, a warm water species with an elongated non-spiraled shell collected off the coast of Bermuda. With a body length of 9 mm, wing beat frequency of 4-6 Hz and swimming speed of 35 mm/s, these organisms swim at a Reynolds number of approximately 300, larger than that of L. helicina. High speed 3D kinematics acquired via two orthogonal cameras reveals that the elongated shell correlates with reduced body pitching and that the wings bend approximately 180 degrees in each direction, overlapping at the end of each half-stroke. Time resolved 2D flow measurements collected with a micro-PIV system reveal leading edge vortices present in both power and recovery strokes. Interactions between the overlapping wings and the shell also likely play a role in lift generation.

  17. Measurements of rope elongation or deflection in impact destructive testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of energy dissipation in mechanical protective systems and the corresponding determination of their safe use in mine shafts, requires a precise description of their bending and elongation, for instance, in conditions of dynamic, transverse loading induced by the falling of mass. The task aimed to apply a fast parallactic rangefinder and then to mount it on a test stand, which is an original development of the Central Mining Institute's Laboratory of Rope Testing in Katowice. In the solution presented in this paper, the measuring method and equipment in which the parallactic laser rangefinder, provided with a fast converter and recording system, ensures non-contact measurement of elongation, deflection or deformation of the sample (construction during impact loading. The structure of the unit, and metrological parameters are also presented. Additionally, the method of calibration and examples of the application in the impact tests of steel wire ropes are presented. The measurement data obtained will provide a basis for analysis, the prediction of the energy of events and for applying the necessary means to maintain explosion-proofness in the case of destructive damage to mechanical elements in the mine atmosphere. What makes these measurements novel is the application of a fast and accurate laser rangefinder to the non-contact measurement of crucial impact parameters of dynamic events that result in the destruction of the sample. In addition, the method introduces a laser scanning vibrometer with the aim of evaluating the parameters of the samples before and after destruction.

  18. A possible mechanism for exonuclease 1-independent eukaryotic mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Farid A.; Genschel, Jochen; Fang, Yanan; Penland, Elisabeth; Edelmann, Winfried; Modrich, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Mismatch repair contributes to genetic stability, and inactivation of the mammalian pathway leads to tumor development. Mismatch correction occurs by an excision-repair mechanism and has been shown to depend on the 5′ to 3′ hydrolytic activity exonuclease 1 (Exo1) in eukaryotic cells. However, genetic and biochemical studies have indicated that one or more Exo1-independent modes of mismatch repair also exist. We have analyzed repair of nicked circular heteroduplex DNA in extracts of Exo1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblast cells. Exo1-independent repair under these conditions is MutLα-dependent and requires functional integrity of the MutLα endonuclease metal-binding motif. In contrast to the Exo1-dependent reaction, we have been unable to detect a gapped excision intermediate in Exo1-deficient extracts when repair DNA synthesis is blocked. A possible explanation for this finding has been provided by analysis of a purified system comprised of MutSα, MutLα, replication factor C, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, replication protein A, and DNA polymerase δ that supports Exo1-independent repair in vitro. Repair in this system depends on MutLα incision of the nicked heteroduplex strand and dNTP-dependent synthesis-driven displacement of a DNA segment spanning the mismatch. Such a mechanism may account, at least in part, for the Exo1-independent repair that occurs in eukaryotic cells, and hence the modest cancer predisposition of Exo1-deficient mammalian cells. PMID:19420220

  19. Eukaryotic snoRNAs: a paradigm for gene expression flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Giorgio; Preti, Milena; Montanini, Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are one of the most ancient and numerous families of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The main function of snoRNAs - to guide site-specific rRNA modification - is the same in Archaea and all eukaryotic lineages. In contrast, as revealed by recent genomic and RNomic studies, their genomic organization and expression strategies are the most varied. Seemingly snoRNA coding units have adopted, in the course of evolution, all the possible ways of being transcribed, thus providing a unique paradigm of gene expression flexibility. By focusing on representative fungal, plant and animal genomes, we review here all the documented types of snoRNA gene organization and expression, and we provide a comprehensive account of snoRNA expressional freedom by precisely estimating the frequency, in each genome, of each type of genomic organization. We finally discuss the relevance of snoRNA genomic studies for our general understanding of ncRNA family evolution and expression in eukaryotes.

  20. Generic eukaryotic core promoter prediction using structural features of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeel, Thomas; Saeys, Yvan; Bonnet, Eric; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Despite many recent efforts, in silico identification of promoter regions is still in its infancy. However, the accurate identification and delineation of promoter regions is important for several reasons, such as improving genome annotation and devising experiments to study and understand transcriptional regulation. Current methods to identify the core region of promoters require large amounts of high-quality training data and often behave like black box models that output predictions that are difficult to interpret. Here, we present a novel approach for predicting promoters in whole-genome sequences by using large-scale structural properties of DNA. Our technique requires no training, is applicable to many eukaryotic genomes, and performs extremely well in comparison with the best available promoter prediction programs. Moreover, it is fast, simple in design, and has no size constraints, and the results are easily interpretable. We compared our approach with 14 current state-of-the-art implementations using human gene and transcription start site data and analyzed the ENCODE region in more detail. We also validated our method on 12 additional eukaryotic genomes, including vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi, and protists.

  1. Characterization of an eukaryotic peptide deformylase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchi-Ricard, V; Nguyen, K T; Zhou, Y; Rajagopalan, P T; Chakrabarti, D; Pei, D

    2001-12-15

    Ribosomal protein synthesis in eubacteria and eukaryotic organelles initiates with an N-formylmethionyl-tRNA(i), resulting in N-terminal formylation of all nascent polypeptides. Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the subsequent removal of the N-terminal formyl group from the majority of bacterial proteins. Until recently, PDF has been thought as an enzyme unique to the bacterial kingdom. Searches of the genomic DNA databases identified several genes that encode proteins of high sequence homology to bacterial PDF from eukaryotic organisms. The cDNA encoding Plasmodium falciparum PDF (PfPDF) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein is catalytically active in deformylating N-formylated peptides, shares many of the properties of bacterial PDF, and is inhibited by specific PDF inhibitors. Western blot analysis indicated expression of mature PfPDF in trophozoite, schizont, and segmenter stages of intraerythrocytic development. These results provide strong evidence that a functional PDF is present in P. falciparum. In addition, PDF inhibitors inhibited the growth of P. falciparum in the intraerythrocytic culture. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  2. Eukaryotic Replisome Components Cooperate to Process Histones During Chromosome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Foltman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA unwinding at eukaryotic replication forks displaces parental histones, which must be redeposited onto nascent DNA in order to preserve chromatin structure. By screening systematically for replisome components that pick up histones released from chromatin into a yeast cell extract, we found that the Mcm2 helicase subunit binds histones cooperatively with the FACT (facilitiates chromatin transcription complex, which helps to re-establish chromatin during transcription. FACT does not associate with the Mcm2-7 helicase at replication origins during G1 phase but is subsequently incorporated into the replisome progression complex independently of histone binding and uniquely among histone chaperones. The amino terminal tail of Mcm2 binds histones via a conserved motif that is dispensable for DNA synthesis per se but helps preserve subtelomeric chromatin, retain the 2 micron minichromosome, and support growth in the absence of Ctf18-RFC. Our data indicate that the eukaryotic replication and transcription machineries use analogous assemblies of multiple chaperones to preserve chromatin integrity.

  3. In silico ionomics segregates parasitic from free-living eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greganova, Eva; Steinmann, Michael; Mäser, Pascal; Fankhauser, Niklaus

    2013-01-01

    Ion transporters are fundamental to life. Due to their ancient origin and conservation in sequence, ion transporters are also particularly well suited for comparative genomics of distantly related species. Here, we perform genome-wide ion transporter profiling as a basis for comparative genomics of eukaryotes. From a given predicted proteome, we identify all bona fide ion channels, ion porters, and ion pumps. Concentrating on unicellular eukaryotes (n = 37), we demonstrate that clustering of species according to their repertoire of ion transporters segregates obligate endoparasites (n = 23) on the one hand, from free-living species and facultative parasites (n = 14) on the other hand. This surprising finding indicates strong convergent evolution of the parasites regarding the acquisition and homeostasis of inorganic ions. Random forest classification identifies transporters of ammonia, plus transporters of iron and other transition metals, as the most informative for distinguishing the obligate parasites. Thus, in silico ionomics further underscores the importance of iron in infection biology and suggests access to host sources of nitrogen and transition metals to be selective forces in the evolution of parasitism. This finding is in agreement with the phenomenon of iron withholding as a primordial antimicrobial strategy of infected mammals.

  4. Marine biofilm bacteria evade eukaryotic predation by targeted chemical defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Matz

    Full Text Available Many plants and animals are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential, little is known about chemical defenses against bacterivorous consumers. An emerging hypothesis is that sessile bacterial communities organized as biofilms serve as bacterial refuge from predation. By testing growth and survival of two common bacterivorous nanoflagellates, we find evidence that chemically mediated resistance against protozoan predators is common among biofilm populations in a diverse set of marine bacteria. Using bioassay-guided chemical and genetic analysis, we identified one of the most effective antiprotozoal compounds as violacein, an alkaloid that we demonstrate is produced predominately within biofilm cells. Nanomolar concentrations of violacein inhibit protozoan feeding by inducing a conserved eukaryotic cell death program. Such biofilm-specific chemical defenses could contribute to the successful persistence of biofilm bacteria in various environments and provide the ecological and evolutionary context for a number of eukaryote-targeting bacterial metabolites.

  5. Sparse Non-negative Matrix Factor 2-D Deconvolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel N.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the non-negative matrix factor 2-D deconvolution (NMF2D) model, which decomposes a matrix into a 2-dimensional convolution of two factor matrices. This model is an extension of the non-negative matrix factor deconvolution (NMFD) recently introduced by Smaragdis (2004). We derive and ...... this form of factorization. The developed algorithms have been used for source separation and music transcription....

  6. Effect of two culture media on Pinus taeda shoots elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Imbrogno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinus taeda L. is a forest species of great international importance and in Argentina. Biotechnological techniques can provide an alternative to propagate this species, as well as for obtaining mother plants. The aim of this study was to achieve adequate elongation of in vitro shoots before transfer to the rooting stage. The shoots were obtained from acclimatized mother plants. It was disinfected for in vitro establishment. Two types of basal culture media: WV5 and DCR were studied. The best results were achieved with the combination of the WV5 salts supplement with 0.5% activated carbon, 0.01 mg l-1 ANA to obtain vigorous and longer than 40.0 mm in length shoots. Key words: forest, micropropagation, pine

  7. Iwr1 facilitates RNA polymerase II dynamics during transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Estruch, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    Iwr1 is an RNA polymerase II (RNPII) interacting protein that directs nuclear import of the enzyme which has been previously assembled in the cytoplasm. Here we present genetic and molecular evidence that links Iwr1 with transcription. Our results indicate that Iwr1 interacts with RNPII during elongation and is involved in the disassembly of the enzyme from chromatin. This function is especially important in resolving problems posed by damage-arrested RNPII, as shown by the sensitivity of iwr1 mutants to genotoxic drugs and the Iwr1's genetic interactions with RNPII degradation pathway mutants. Moreover, absence of Iwr1 causes genome instability that is enhanced by defects in the DNA repair machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sigmoid Colon Elongation Evaluation by Volume Rendering Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla SENAYLI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid colons have various measurements, shapes, and configurations for individuals. In this subject there are rare clinical trials to answer the question of sigmoidal colon maldevelopment predicting a risk for volvulus. Therefore, sigmoid colon measurement may be beneficial to decide for volvulus. In a study, sigmoid colon diameters were evaluated during abdominal surgeries and it was found that median length was 47 cm and median vertical mesocolon length was 13 cm. We report a 14-year-old female patient who has a sigmoidal colon measured as nearly 54 cm. We used tomographic equipments for this evaluation. We know that MRI technique was used for this purpose but, there has not been data for MRI predicting the sigmoidal volvulus. We hope that our findings by this evaluation can contribute to insufficient literature of sigmoidal elongation. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 71-73

  9. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue

  10. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, Angelita [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Marzi, Stefano [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002 CNRS, IBMC (Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology), 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, France, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Fabbretti, Attilio [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale -INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gualerzi, Claudio O. [University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Monaco) (Italy); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale - INSERM U964/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  11. Elongational rheology and cohesive fracture of photo-oxidated LDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolón-Garrido, Víctor H.; Wagner, Manfred H.

    2014-01-01

    It was found recently that low-density polyethylene (LDPE) samples with different degrees of photo-oxidation represent an interesting system to study the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture and the aspects of the cohesive rupture in elongational flow. Sheets of LDPE were subjected to photo-oxidation in the presence of air using a xenon lamp to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Characterisation methods included Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solvent extraction method, and rheology in shear and uniaxial extensional flows. Linear viscoelasticity was increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by the carbonyl index, acid and aldehydes groups, and gel fraction. The molecular stress function model was used to quantify the experimental data, and the nonlinear model parameter β was found to be correlated with the gel content. The uniaxial data showed that the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture was shifted to lower elongational rates, the higher the gel content was. From 2 weeks photo-oxidation onwards, cohesive rupture occurred at every strain rate investigated. The true strain and true stress at cohesive fracture as well as the energy density applied to the sample up to fracture were analyzed. At low gel content, rupture was mainly determined by the melt fraction while at high gel content, rupture occurred predominantly in the gel structure. The strain at break was found to be independent of strain rate, contrary to the stress at break and the energy density. Thus, the true strain and not the stress at break or the energy density was found to be the relevant physical quantity to describe cohesive fracture behavior of photo-oxidated LDPE. The equilibrium modulus of the gel structures was correlated with the true strain at rupture. The stiffer the gel structure, the lower was the deformation tolerated before the sample breaks

  12. Network dynamics of eukaryotic LTR retroelements beyond phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Carlos; Muñoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Bernad, Lucia; Botella, Hector; Moya, Andrés

    2009-11-02

    Sequencing projects have allowed diverse retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons from different eukaryotic organisms to be characterized. It is known that retroviruses and other retro-transcribing viruses evolve from LTR retrotransposons and that this whole system clusters into five families: Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia, Bel/Pao and Caulimoviridae. Phylogenetic analyses usually show that these split into multiple distinct lineages but what is yet to be understood is how deep evolution occurred in this system. We combined phylogenetic and graph analyses to investigate the history of LTR retroelements both as a tree and as a network. We used 268 non-redundant LTR retroelements, many of them introduced for the first time in this work, to elucidate all possible LTR retroelement phylogenetic patterns. These were superimposed over the tree of eukaryotes to investigate the dynamics of the system, at distinct evolutionary times. Next, we investigated phenotypic features such as duplication and variability of amino acid motifs, and several differences in genomic ORF organization. Using this information we characterized eight reticulate evolution markers to construct phenotypic network models. The evolutionary history of LTR retroelements can be traced as a time-evolving network that depends on phylogenetic patterns, epigenetic host-factors and phenotypic plasticity. The Ty1/Copia and the Ty3/Gypsy families represent the oldest patterns in this network that we found mimics eukaryotic macroevolution. The emergence of the Bel/Pao, Retroviridae and Caulimoviridae families in this network can be related with distinct inflations of the Ty3/Gypsy family, at distinct evolutionary times. This suggests that Ty3/Gypsy ancestors diversified much more than their Ty1/Copia counterparts, at distinct geological eras. Consistent with the principle of preferential attachment, the connectivities among phenotypic markers, taken as network-represented combinations, are power

  13. Network dynamics of eukaryotic LTR retroelements beyond phylogenetic trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernad Lucia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing projects have allowed diverse retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons from different eukaryotic organisms to be characterized. It is known that retroviruses and other retro-transcribing viruses evolve from LTR retrotransposons and that this whole system clusters into five families: Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia, Bel/Pao and Caulimoviridae. Phylogenetic analyses usually show that these split into multiple distinct lineages but what is yet to be understood is how deep evolution occurred in this system. Results We combined phylogenetic and graph analyses to investigate the history of LTR retroelements both as a tree and as a network. We used 268 non-redundant LTR retroelements, many of them introduced for the first time in this work, to elucidate all possible LTR retroelement phylogenetic patterns. These were superimposed over the tree of eukaryotes to investigate the dynamics of the system, at distinct evolutionary times. Next, we investigated phenotypic features such as duplication and variability of amino acid motifs, and several differences in genomic ORF organization. Using this information we characterized eight reticulate evolution markers to construct phenotypic network models. Conclusion The evolutionary history of LTR retroelements can be traced as a time-evolving network that depends on phylogenetic patterns, epigenetic host-factors and phenotypic plasticity. The Ty1/Copia and the Ty3/Gypsy families represent the oldest patterns in this network that we found mimics eukaryotic macroevolution. The emergence of the Bel/Pao, Retroviridae and Caulimoviridae families in this network can be related with distinct inflations of the Ty3/Gypsy family, at distinct evolutionary times. This suggests that Ty3/Gypsy ancestors diversified much more than their Ty1/Copia counterparts, at distinct geological eras. Consistent with the principle of preferential attachment, the connectivities among phenotypic markers, taken as

  14. Biological processing of dinuclear ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Heimann, Kirsten; Dinh, Xuyen Thi; Keene, F Richard; Collins, J Grant

    2016-10-20

    The biological processing - mechanism of cellular uptake, effects on the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial membranes, intracellular sites of localisation and induction of reactive oxygen species - of two dinuclear polypyridylruthenium(ii) complexes has been examined in three eukaryotic cells lines. Flow cytometry was used to determine the uptake of [{Ru(phen)2}2{μ-bb12}](4+) (Rubb12) and [Ru(phen)2(μ-bb7)Ru(tpy)Cl](3+) {Rubb7-Cl, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and bbn = bis[4(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-1,n-alkane} in baby hamster kidney (BHK), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. The results demonstrated that the major uptake mechanism for Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl was active transport, although with a significant contribution from carrier-assisted diffusion for Rubb12 and passive diffusion for Rubb7-Cl. Flow cytometry coupled with Annexin V/TO-PRO-3 double-staining was used to compare cell death by membrane damage or apoptosis. Rubb12 induced significant direct membrane damage, particularly with HepG2 cells, while Rubb7-Cl caused considerably less membrane damage but induced greater levels of apoptosis. Confocal microscopy, coupled with JC-1 assays, demonstrated that Rubb12 depolarises the mitochondrial membrane, whereas Rubb7-Cl had a much smaller affect. Cellular localisation experiments indicated that Rubb12 did not accumulate in the mitochondria, whereas significant mitochondrial accumulation was observed for Rubb7-Cl. The effect of Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl on intracellular superoxide dismutase activity showed that the ruthenium complexes could induce cell death via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. The results of this study demonstrate that Rubb12 predominantly kills eukaryotic cells by damaging the cytoplasmic membrane. As this dinuclear ruthenium complex has been previously shown to exhibit greater toxicity towards bacteria than eukaryotic cells, the results of the present study suggest that

  15. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  16. Temperature Dependence of the Elongation Behavior of Polyphenylene Sulfide using Melt Spinning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Changbin; Yang, Yan; Gao, Jun; Li, Shenghu; Qing, Long

    2017-12-01

    The elongational properties of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) melt were measured using a melt spinning technique. The relationship between extrusion temperature and melt strength (MS) as well as between elongational viscosity and drawability were investigated with respect to the effects of extrusion temperature and extensional strain rate on the melt extensional stress and elongational viscosity. The results showed that the stretching force for the PPS melt decreased with a rise of extrusion temperature while increased roughly with an increase of extensional rate. The MS decreased with an increase of temperature, and the ln MS was a linear function of 1/T when the extrusion velocity was constant. Both the melt extensional stress and elongational viscosity decreased with the increase of the extrusion temperature. With increase of the extensional strain rate, the extensional stress increased while the melt elongational viscosity first decreases and then increases gradually. A low melt elongational viscosity might be beneficial to improve the melt drawability.

  17. Ancient photosynthetic eukaryote biofilms in an Atacama Desert coastal cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azua-Bustos, A.; Gonzalez-Silva, C.; Mancilla, R.A.; Salas, L.; Palma, R.E.; Wynne, J.J.; McKay, C.P.; Vicuna, R.

    2009-01-01

    Caves offer a stable and protected environment from harsh and changing outside prevailing conditions. Hence, they represent an interesting habitat for studying life in extreme environments. Here, we report the presence of a member of the ancient eukaryote red algae Cyanidium group in a coastal cave of the hyperarid Atacama Desert. This microorganism was found to form a seemingly monospecific biofilm growing under extremely low photon flux levels. Our work suggests that this species, Cyanidium sp. Atacama, is a new member of a recently proposed novel monophyletic lineage of mesophilic "cave" Cyanidium sp., distinct from the remaining three other lineages which are all thermo-acidophilic. The cave described in this work may represent an evolutionary island for life in the midst of the Atacama Desert. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009.

  18. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Dorothy A.

    2017-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome. PMID:26436461

  19. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial communities during microalgal biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Hulatt, Chris J; Wakeman, Kathryn D; Thomas, David N; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotic and bacterial communities were characterized and quantified in microalgal photobioreactor cultures of freshwater Chlorella vulgaris and marine Dunaliella tertiolecta. The microalgae exhibited good growth, whilst both cultures contained diverse bacterial communities. Both cultures included Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, while C. vulgaris cultures also contained Actinobacteria. The bacterial genera present in the cultures were different due to different growth medium salinities and possibly different extracellular products. Bacterial community profiles were relatively stable in D. tertiolecta cultures but not in C. vulgaris cultures likely due to presence of ciliates (Colpoda sp.) in the latter. The presence of ciliates did not, however, cause decrease in total number of C. vulgaris or bacteria during 14 days of cultivation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) reliably showed relative microalgal and bacterial cell numbers in the batch cultures with stable microbial communities, but was not effective when bacterial communities varied. Raw culture samples were successfully used as qPCR templates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pi sensing and signalling: from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wanjun; Baldwin, Stephen A; Muench, Stephen P; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Phosphorus is one of the most important macronutrients and is indispensable for all organisms as a critical structural component as well as participating in intracellular signalling and energy metabolism. Sensing and signalling of phosphate (Pi) has been extensively studied and is well understood in single-cellular organisms like bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae In comparison, the mechanism of Pi regulation in plants is less well understood despite recent advances in this area. In most soils the available Pi limits crop yield, therefore a clearer understanding of the molecular basis underlying Pi sensing and signalling is of great importance for the development of plants with improved Pi use efficiency. This mini-review compares some of the main Pi regulation pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and identifies similarities and differences among different organisms, as well as providing some insight into future research. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Eukaryotic promoter prediction based on relative entropy and positional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuanhu; Xie, Xudong; Liew, Alan Wee-Chung; Yan, Hong

    2007-04-01

    The eukaryotic promoter prediction is one of the most important problems in DNA sequence analysis, but also a very difficult one. Although a number of algorithms have been proposed, their performances are still limited by low sensitivities and high false positives. We present a method for improving the performance of promoter regions prediction. We focus on the selection of most effective features for different functional regions in DNA sequences. Our feature selection algorithm is based on relative entropy or Kullback-Leibler divergence, and a system combined with position-specific information for promoter regions prediction is developed. The results of testing on large genomic sequences and comparisons with the PromoterInspector and Dragon Promoter Finder show that our algorithm is efficient with higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting promoter regions.

  2. Substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pooja; Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2009-03-01

    Chaperonins are double ring-shaped biological nanomachines that assist protein folding. Spectacular conformational changes take place within each chaperonin ring using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. These changes result in transitions from the open to the closed ring. Substrate proteins bind to the open ring and are encapsulated within the closed ring cavity. We focus on the substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins. We predict substrate protein binding sites using structural and bioinformatic analyses of functional states during the chaperonin cycle. Based on large changes in solvent accessible surface area and contact maps we glean the functional role of chaperonin amino acids. During the transition between open to closed chaperonin ring, the largest change in accessible surface area of amino acids is found in helical protrusion and two helices located at the cavity opening. Our calculations suggest that the helical protrusion and two helices constitute the substrate protein binding site.

  3. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  4. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    specific transcripts. Here, we present the crystal structure of the S. pombe Pop2p protein to 1.4 Å resolution. The high resolution structure provides a clear picture of the active site architecture. Structural alignment of single nucleotides and poly(A)-oligonucleotides from earlier co-crystal structures...... form the 3'-end of mRNA, is normally the first and also rate-limiting step in cellular mRNA degradation and therefore a key process in the control of eukaryotic mRNA turnover. Since Ccr4p is believed to be the main deadenylase the precise role of Pop2p in the complex is less clear. Nevertheless, Pop2p...

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a versatile eukaryotic system in virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breinig Tanja

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-established model system for understanding fundamental cellular processes relevant to higher eukaryotic organisms. Less known is its value for virus research, an area in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be very fruitful as well. The present review will discuss the main achievements of yeast-based studies in basic and applied virus research. These include the analysis of the function of individual proteins from important pathogenic viruses, the elucidation of key processes in viral replication through the development of systems that allow the replication of higher eukayotic viruses in yeast, and the use of yeast in antiviral drug development and vaccine production.

  6. Mechanisms of heat-shock gene activation in higher eukaryotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienz, M.; Pelham, H.R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Heat-shock genes are activated under conditions of heat shock or other environmental stresses. This gene activation is rapid and reversible, resulting in a transition from hardly detectable levels of transcription to extremely high transcription rates causing heat-shock proteins (HSP) to accumulate to high levels. In this review, the components of the heat-shock gene activation systems, including the cis-acting elements and the trans-acting factors, are considered. Data on how these components act together to result in transcription activation and how multiple controls are achieved are summarized. Finally, the questions of how the cell detects the environmental stimulus and translates it into gene activation and how the functions of the gene products relate to this process are addressed. The article focuses on heat-shock gene activation in higher eukaryotes. Only those aspects of heat-shock genes and proteins which are relevant to the question of gene activation are included

  7. Polarised asymmetric inheritance of accumulated protein damage in higher eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A Rujano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Disease-associated misfolded proteins or proteins damaged due to cellular stress are generally disposed via the cellular protein quality-control system. However, under saturating conditions, misfolded proteins will aggregate. In higher eukaryotes, these aggregates can be transported to accumulate in aggresomes at the microtubule organizing center. The fate of cells that contain aggresomes is currently unknown. Here we report that cells that have formed aggresomes can undergo normal mitosis. As a result, the aggregated proteins are asymmetrically distributed to one of the daughter cells, leaving the other daughter free of accumulated protein damage. Using both epithelial crypts of the small intestine of patients with a protein folding disease and Drosophila melanogaster neural precursor cells as models, we found that the inheritance of protein aggregates during mitosis occurs with a fixed polarity indicative of a mechanism to preserve the long-lived progeny.

  8. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic contributions to colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, Kyle L; McCoy, Kathy D; Wallace, John L

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an important modulator of many aspects of digestive function, both in health and disease. Colonic tissue H(2)S synthesis increases markedly during injury and inflammation and appears to contribute to resolution. Some of the bacteria residing in the colon can also produce H(2)S. The extent to which bacterial H(2)S synthesis contributes to what is measured as colonic H(2)S synthesis is not clear. Using conventional and germ-free mice, we have delineated the eukaryotic vs. prokaryotic contributions to colonic H(2)S synthesis, both in healthy and colitic mice. Colonic tissue H(2)S production is entirely dependent on the presence of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6)), while bacterial H(2)S synthesis appears to occur independent of this cofactor. As expected, approximately one-half of the H(2)S produced by feces is derived from eukaryotic cells. While colonic H(2)S synthesis is markedly increased when the tissue is inflamed, and, in proportion to the extent of inflammation, fecal H(2)S synthesis does not change and tissue granulocytes do not appear to be the source of the elevated H(2)S production. Rats fed a B vitamin-deficient diet for 6 wk exhibited significantly diminished colonic H(2)S synthesis, but fecal H(2)S synthesis was not different from that of rats on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that H(2)S production by colonic bacteria does not contribute significantly to what is measured as colonic tissue H(2)S production, using the acetate trapping assay system employed in this study.

  9. Synthesis of eukaryotic lipid biomarkers in the bacterial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, P. V.; Banta, A. B.; Lee, A. K.; Wei, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Lipid biomarkers are organic molecules preserved in sediments and sedimentary rocks that can function as geological proxies for certain microbial taxa or for specific environmental conditions. These molecular fossils provide a link between organisms and their environments in both modern and ancient settings and have afforded significant insight into ancient climatic events, mass extinctions, and various evolutionary transitions throughout Earth's history. However, the proper interpretation of lipid biomarkers is dependent on a broad understanding of their diagenetic precursors in modern systems. This includes understanding the taphonomic transformations that these molecules undergo, their biosynthetic pathways, and the ecological conditions that affect their cellular production. In this study, we focus on one group of lipid biomarkers - the sterols. These are polycyclic isoprenoidal lipids that have a high preservation potential and play a critical role in the physiology of most eukaryotes. However, the synthesis and function of these lipids in the bacterial domain has not been fully explored. Here we utilize a combination of bioinformatics, microbial genetics, and biochemistry to demonstrate that bacterial sterol producers are more prevalent in environmental metagenomic samples than in the genomic databases of cultured organisms and to identify novel proteins required to synthesize and modify sterols in bacteria. These proteins represent a distinct pathway for sterol synthesis exclusive to bacteria and indicate that sterol synthesis in bacteria may have evolved independently of eukaryotic sterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate how studies in extant bacteria can provide insight into the biological sources and the biosynthetic pathways of specific lipid biomarkers and in turn may allow for more robust interpretation of biomarker signatures.

  10. Uniform Structure of Eukaryotic Plasma Membrane: Lateral Domains in Plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malínská, Kateřina; Zažímalová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2011), s. 148-155 ISSN 1389-2037 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Plasma membrane * microdomains * lateral segregation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.886, year: 2011

  11. Elongation Kinetics of Polyglutamine Peptide Fibrils: A Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Robert H.; Jacobson, Kurt H.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Murphy, Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally expanded polyglutamine domains in proteins are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease. Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) domain facilitates aggregation of the affected protein, and several studies directly link aggregation to neurotoxicity. Studies of synthetic polyQ peptides have contributed substantially to our understanding of the mechanism of aggregation. In this report, polyQ fibrils were immobilized onto a sensor, and their elongation by polyQ peptides of various length and conformation was examined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The rate of elongation increased as the peptide length increased from 8 to 24 glutamines (Q8, Q20, and Q24). Monomer conformation affected elongation rates: insertion of a β-turn template d-Pro-Gly in the center of the peptide increased elongation rates several-fold, while insertion of Pro-Pro dramatically slowed elongation. Dissipation measurements of the QCM-D provided qualitative information about mechanical properties of the elongating fibrils. These data showed clear differences in the characteristics of the elongating aggregates, depending on the specific identity of the associating polyQ peptide. Elongation rates were sensitive to the pH and ionic strength of the buffer. Comparison of QCM-D data with those obtained by optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy revealed that very little water was associated with the elongation of fibrils by the peptide containing d-Pro-Gly, but a significant amount of water was associated when the fibrils were elongated by Q20. Together, the data indicate that elongation of polyQ fibrils can occur without full consolidation to the fibril structure, resulting in variations to the aggregate structure during elongation. PMID:22459263

  12. Engineering of methionine chain elongation part of glucoraphanin pathway in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Crocoll, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2016-01-01

    in Escherichia coli cytosol. Introduction of two plasmids encoding the methionine chain elongation pathway into E. coli resulted in production of 25mgL(-1) of dihomo-methionine. In addition to chain-elongated methionine products, side-products from chain elongation of leucine were produced. Methionine...... supplementation enhanced dihomo-methionine production to 57mgL(-1), while keeping a steady level of the chain-elongated leucine products. Engineering of the de-compartmentalized pathway of dihomo-methionine in E. coli cytosol provides an important first step for microbial production of the health...

  13. RNase MRP and the RNA processing cascade in the eukaryotic ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Michael D; Stadler, Peter F; Penny, David; Collins, Lesley J

    2007-02-08

    Within eukaryotes there is a complex cascade of RNA-based macromolecules that process other RNA molecules, especially mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. An example is RNase MRP processing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome biogenesis. One hypothesis is that this complexity was present early in eukaryotic evolution; an alternative is that an initial simpler network later gained complexity by gene duplication in lineages that led to animals, fungi and plants. Recently there has been a rapid increase in support for the complexity-early theory because the vast majority of these RNA-processing reactions are found throughout eukaryotes, and thus were likely to be present in the last common ancestor of living eukaryotes, herein called the Eukaryotic Ancestor. We present an overview of the RNA processing cascade in the Eukaryotic Ancestor and investigate in particular, RNase MRP which was previously thought to have evolved later in eukaryotes due to its apparent limited distribution in fungi and animals and plants. Recent publications, as well as our own genomic searches, find previously unknown RNase MRP RNAs, indicating that RNase MRP has a wide distribution in eukaryotes. Combining secondary structure and promoter region analysis of RNAs for RNase MRP, along with analysis of the target substrate (rRNA), allows us to discuss this distribution in the light of eukaryotic evolution. We conclude that RNase MRP can now be placed in the RNA-processing cascade of the Eukaryotic Ancestor, highlighting the complexity of RNA-processing in early eukaryotes. Promoter analyses of MRP-RNA suggest that regulation of the critical processes of rRNA cleavage can vary, showing that even these key cellular processes (for which we expect high conservation) show some species-specific variability. We present our consensus MRP-RNA secondary structure as a useful model for further searches.

  14. Venus 2004: east and west elongations and solar transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, R. J.; Blaxall, K.; Heath, A.

    2007-04-01

    The year 2004 was exceptional in producing the first solar transit of Venus since the late Victorian era. The bright aureole and atmospheric ring were re-observed, and the entire phenomenon was witnessed for the first time ever in hydrogen alpha light. Although routine observations throughout 2004 were unexceptional, patterns of visibility of bright and dark markings, cusp extensions and cusp-caps were recorded. No correlation was found between the latitude of the sub-Earth point and the visibility of either cusp-cap, with the S. cap predominating for most of the year. It was possible to accurately follow individual ultraviolet dark markings over many consecutive rotations, extending from the E. to W. elongations, and thereby to make a current measurement of the synodic atmospheric rotation period for the near-equatorial features: 3.996 ± 0.001 days. The true Ashen Light was reported visually on only a few occasions, but these correspond closely to times when infrared emission from the surface of the dark side was recorded in 1-micron waveband images. Some of the stable dark side albedo features were also visible upon the 1-micron images, and have been tentatively identified with known surface features. Infrared imaging at the same waveband showed little detail on the sunlit disk, but a few bright spots were sufficiently well observed to suggest a synodic rotation period close to 5.0 days, not atypical for the lower cloud decks.

  15. The undulatory swimming gait of elongated swimmers revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosilevskii, Gil

    2017-03-31

    An undulatory swimming gait is characterized by short lateral displacement waves that propagate backwards along the body of the swimmer faster than it swims. Hydrodynamic theory of elongated bodies predicts that if the amplitude of the displacement waves does not increase toward the caudal end, the part of the swimmer posteriad of the dorso-ventrally widest point takes no part in propulsion. It also predicts that if the amplitude does increase, then the hydrodynamic propulsion efficiency suffers. Cusk eels have their widest point located in the anterior half of the body with the bulk of their locomotive muscles located posteriad of it; indeed, they swim so that the amplitude of the propulsion wave increases toward the caudal end. Anguillid eels have their widest point posteriad of the mid-body, and their locomotive muscles are distributed along their entire length-but they swim as cusk eels, using the posterior half only. Apparently, both use hydrodynamically inefficient gaits. The paper questions the definition of propulsion efficiency and shows that biomechanical considerations are more important than hydrodynamic, and that most probably fish adjust their gait to maximize the ratio between the energy made good (the product of thrust and distance) and the chemical energy consumed by the muscles. The role of body shape is discussed.

  16. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  17. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  18. Combining orthogonal polarization for elongated target detection with GPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lualdi, Maurizio; Lombardi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    For an accurate imaging of ground penetrating radar data the polarization characteristics of the propagating electromagnetic (EM) wavefield and wave amplitude variations with antenna pattern orientation must be taken into account. For objects that show some directionality feature and cylindrical shape any misalignment between transmitter and target can strongly modify the polarization state of the backscattered wavefield, thus conditioning the detection capability of the system. Hints on the depolarization can be used to design the optimal GPR antenna survey to avoid omissions and pitfalls during data processing. This research addresses the issue of elongated target detection through a multi azimuth (or multi polarization) approach based on the combination of mutually orthogonal GPR data. Results from the analysis of the formal scattering problem demonstrate how this strategy can reach a scalar formulation of the scattering matrix and achieve a rotational invariant quantity. The effectiveness of the algorithm is then evaluated with a detailed field example showing results closely proximal to those obtained under the optimal alignment condition: detection is significantly improved and the risk of target missing is reduced. (paper)

  19. Aquatic bacteria elongate and wobble their bodies for flagellar performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Valenzuela, Joanna; Chopra, Pooja

    2017-11-01

    Bacteria are endowed with well-regulated sizes and shapes. A bacillus has a rod-like cell body, achieving swimming motility by rotating a single flagellum or multiple flagella. Along with other shapes, this elongated cell is often viewed as a payload, and its movements are regarded as passive responses to its flagellar propulsion. Here, we simultaneously measured the morphology and movement of individual free-swimming bacteria using an automated tracking microscope and 3D reconstruction techniques. These cells were found to consistently precess, based on reconstructions of the apparent wobbling movements viewed from a microscope. Through a hydrodynamic model that incorporates such precessing cell bodies and rod-like geometries, we found that there is a critical cell size below which wobbling movement is beneficial for flagellar performance. This critical cell size is consistent with the cellular morphologies of Caulobacter crescentus and Escherichia coli, as examples of single- and multi-flagellated species that are known for wobbling movements in aquatic environments. We also showed that the moderate cell sizes of these species could be attributed to a compromise between dispersal speed and power consumption. The authors thank the support of NSF-CREST: Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Machines at UC Merced (NSF-HRD-1547848).

  20. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  1. The Impact of Aminoglycosides on the Dynamics of Translation Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging, as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-transfer RNA site (A site in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead, it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition.

  2. The impact of aminoglycosides on the dynamics of translation elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Albert; Uemura, Sotaro; Johansson, Magnus; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Marshall, R. Andrew; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Korlach, Jonas; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously-measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally-distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site) in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution NMR structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition. PMID:23416053

  3. Cooling dynamics of a granular gas of elongated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Takeichi; Hidalgo, Raúl Cruz; Maza, Diego; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    The cooling dynamics of a 2D granular gas of elongated particles is analyzed. We perform simulations on the temporal evolution of soft particles, using a molecular dynamics algorithm. For weakly dissipative particles, we found a homogeneous cooling process where the overall translational kinetic energy decreases analogously to viscoelastic circular particles. In contrast, for strongly dissipative particles we observed an inhomogeneous cooling process where the diminishing of translational kinetic energy notably slows down. The rotational kinetic energy, however, always decays in agreement with Haff's prediction for the homogeneous cooling state of inelastic particles. We mainly found that the cooling kinetics of the system is controlled by the mechanisms that determine the local energy dissipation (collisions). However, we detected a strong influence of particle shape and inelasticity on the structure of the clusters which develop in the inhomogeneous cooling regimes. Our numerical outcomes suggest that strong dissipation and particle anisotropy induce the formation of ordered cluster structures that retards the relaxation to the final asymptotic regime

  4. APOBEC3G inhibits elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate N Bishop

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a host cytidine deaminase that, in the absence of Vif, restricts HIV-1 replication and reduces the amount of viral DNA that accumulates in cells. Initial studies determined that A3G induces extensive mutation of nascent HIV-1 cDNA during reverse transcription. It has been proposed that this triggers the degradation of the viral DNA, but there is now mounting evidence that this mechanism may not be correct. Here, we use a natural endogenous reverse transcriptase assay to show that, in cell-free virus particles, A3G is able to inhibit HIV-1 cDNA accumulation not only in the absence of hypermutation but also without the apparent need for any target cell factors. We find that although reverse transcription initiates in the presence of A3G, elongation of the cDNA product is impeded. These data support the model that A3G reduces HIV-1 cDNA levels by inhibiting synthesis rather than by inducing degradation.

  5. Eelgrass Leaf Surface Microbiomes Are Locally Variable and Highly Correlated with Epibiotic Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia M. Bengtsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eelgrass (Zostera marina is a marine foundation species essential for coastal ecosystem services around the northern hemisphere. Like all macroscopic organisms, it possesses a microbiome (here defined as an associated prokaryotic community which may play critical roles in modulating the interaction of eelgrass with its environment. For example, its leaf surface microbiome could inhibit or attract eukaryotic epibionts which may overgrow the eelgrass leading to reduced primary productivity and subsequent eelgrass meadow decline. We used amplicon sequencing of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to assess the leaf surface microbiome (prokaryotes as well as eukaryotic epibionts in- and outside lagoons on the German Baltic Sea coast. Prokaryote microbiomes varied substantially both between sites inside lagoons and between open coastal and lagoon sites. Water depth, leaf area and biofilm chlorophyll a concentration explained a large amount of variation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic community composition. The prokaryotic microbiome and eukaryotic epibiont communities were highly correlated, and network analysis revealed disproportionate co-occurrence between a limited number of eukaryotic taxa and several bacterial taxa. This suggests that eelgrass leaf surfaces are home to a mosaic of microbiomes of several epibiotic eukaryotes, in addition to the microbiome of the eelgrass itself. Our findings thereby underline that eukaryotic diversity should be taken into account in order to explain prokaryotic microbiome assembly and dynamics in aquatic environments.

  6. Sex is a ubiquitous, ancient, and inherent attribute of eukaryotic life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijer, Dave; Lukeš, Julius; Eliáš, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction and clonality in eukaryotes are mostly seen as exclusive, the latter being rather exceptional. This view might be biased by focusing almost exclusively on metazoans. We analyze and discuss reproduction in the context of extant eukaryotic diversity, paying special attention to

  7. Heavy metal whole-cell biosensors using eukaryotic microorganisms: an updated critical review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos eGutierrez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of using eukaryotic microorganisms to design whole-cell biosensors (WCBs for monitoring environmental heavy metal pollution in soil or aquatic habitats. Basic considerations for designing an eukaryotic WCB are also shown. A comparative analysis of the promoter genes used to design whole-cell biosensors is carried out, and the sensitivity and reproducibility of the main reporter genes used is also reviewed. Three main eukaryotic taxonomic groups are considered: yeasts, microalgae and ciliated protozoa. Models that have been widely analyzed as potential WCBs are the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model among yeasts, the Tetrahymena thermophila model for ciliates and Chlamydomonas model for microalgae. The advantages and disadvantages of each microbial group are discussed, and a ranking of sensitivity to the same type of metal pollutant from reported eukaryotic WCBs is also shown. General conclusions and possible future developments of eukaryotic WCBs are reported.

  8. On the Archaeal Origins of Eukaryotes and the Challenges of Inferring Phenotype from Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Gautam; Thattai, Mukund; Baum, Buzz

    2016-07-01

    If eukaryotes arose through a merger between archaea and bacteria, what did the first true eukaryotic cell look like? A major step toward an answer came with the discovery of Lokiarchaeum, an archaeon whose genome encodes small GTPases related to those used by eukaryotes to regulate membrane traffic. Although 'Loki' cells have yet to be seen, their existence has prompted the suggestion that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes engulfed the future mitochondrion by phagocytosis. We propose instead that the archaeal ancestor was a relatively simple cell, and that eukaryotic cellular organization arose as the result of a gradual transfer of bacterial genes and membranes driven by an ever-closer symbiotic partnership between a bacterium and an archaeon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen fixation in eukaryotes – New models for symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockhart Peter

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen, a component of many bio-molecules, is essential for growth and development of all organisms. Most nitrogen exists in the atmosphere, and utilisation of this source is important as a means of avoiding nitrogen starvation. However, the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme complex is restricted to some bacteria. Eukaryotic organisms are only able to obtain fixed nitrogen through their symbiotic interactions with nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. These symbioses involve a variety of host organisms, including animals, plants, fungi and protists. Results We have compared the morphological, physiological and molecular characteristics of nitrogen fixing symbiotic associations of bacteria and their diverse hosts. Special features of the interaction, e.g. vertical transmission of symbionts, grade of dependency of partners and physiological modifications have been considered in terms of extent of co-evolution and adaptation. Our findings are that, despite many adaptations enabling a beneficial partnership, most symbioses for molecular nitrogen fixation involve facultative interactions. However, some interactions, among them endosymbioses between cyanobacteria and diatoms, show characteristics that reveal a more obligate status of co-evolution. Conclusion Our review emphasises that molecular nitrogen fixation, a driving force for interactions and co-evolution of different species, is a widespread phenomenon involving many different organisms and ecosystems. The diverse grades of symbioses, ranging from loose associations to highly specific intracellular interactions, might themselves reflect the range of potential evolutionary fates for symbiotic partnerships. These include the extreme evolutionary modifications and adaptations that have accompanied the formation of organelles in eukaryotic cells: plastids and mitochondria. However, age and extensive adaptation of plastids and mitochondria complicate the

  10. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  11. Experimental results on elongation control using dynamic input allocation at FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varano, G.; Boncagni, L.; Galeani, S.; Granucci, G.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the experimental results related to a recently proposed control scheme for the regulation of plasma elongation using the poloidal field coils available at FTU, already used for the horizontal position control. The proposed technique allows to realize elongation regulation as a secondary task using the same poloidal coils.

  12. Cotton properties: relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of the relative humidity (RH) of testing conditions on stelometer cotton flat bundle strength and elongation measurements, and on the morphology of fiber fractures will be discussed in this talk. We observed a trend for stelometer strength and elongations measurements. Testing in conditi...

  13. Rwandan female genital modification: elongation of the Labia minora and the use of local botanical species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.; Price, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The elongation of the labia minora is classified as a Type IV female genital mutilation by the World Health Organization. However, the term mutilation carries with it powerful negative connotations. In Rwanda, the elongation of the labia minora and the use of botanicals to do so is meant to increase

  14. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the

  15. Genetic separation of phototropism and blue light inhibition of stem elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscum, E.; Young, J. C.; Poff, K. L.; Hangarter, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light-induced regulation of cell elongation is a component of the signal response pathway for both phototropic curvature and inhibition of stem elongation in higher plants. To determine if blue light regulates cell elongation in these responses through shared or discrete pathways, phototropism and hypocotyl elongation were investigated in several blue light response mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, the blu mutants that lack blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation were found to exhibit a normal phototropic response. In contrast, a phototropic null mutant (JK218) and a mutant that has a 20- to 30-fold shift in the fluence dependence for first positive phototropism (JK224) showed normal inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in blue light. F1 progeny of crosses between the blu mutants and JK218 showed normal phototropism and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and approximately 1 in 16 F2 progeny were double mutants lacking both responses. Thus, blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and phototropism operate through at least some genetically distinct components.

  16. Contribution of Arg288 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu to translational functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattenborg, Thomas; Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1997-01-01

    The recently solved structure of the ternary complex formed between GTP-bound elongation factor Tu and aminoacylated tRNA reveals that the elements of aminoacyl-tRNA that interact with elongation factor Tu can be divided into three groups: the T stem; the 3'-end CCA-Phe; and the 5' end. The conse...

  17. On the age of eukaryotes: evaluating evidence from fossils and molecular clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, Laura; Sharpe, Susan C; Brown, Matthew W; Roger, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of the phylogenetic relationships among eukaryotic lineages has improved dramatically over the few past decades thanks to the development of sophisticated phylogenetic methods and models of evolution, in combination with the increasing availability of sequence data for a variety of eukaryotic lineages. Concurrently, efforts have been made to infer the age of major evolutionary events along the tree of eukaryotes using fossil-calibrated molecular clock-based methods. Here, we review the progress and pitfalls in estimating the age of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) and major lineages. After reviewing previous attempts to date deep eukaryote divergences, we present the results of a Bayesian relaxed-molecular clock analysis of a large dataset (159 proteins, 85 taxa) using 19 fossil calibrations. We show that for major eukaryote groups estimated dates of divergence, as well as their credible intervals, are heavily influenced by the relaxed molecular clock models and methods used, and by the nature and treatment of fossil calibrations. Whereas the estimated age of LECA varied widely, ranging from 1007 (943-1102) Ma to 1898 (1655-2094) Ma, all analyses suggested that the eukaryotic supergroups subsequently diverged rapidly (i.e., within 300 Ma of LECA). The extreme variability of these and previously published analyses preclude definitive conclusions regarding the age of major eukaryote clades at this time. As more reliable fossil data on eukaryotes from the Proterozoic become available and improvements are made in relaxed molecular clock modeling, we may be able to date the age of extant eukaryotes more precisely. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. GTP hydrolysis by IF2 guides progression of the ribosome into elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. Andrew; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent structural data have revealed two distinct conformations of the ribosome during initiation. We employed single-molecule fluorescence methods to probe the dynamic relation of these ribosomal conformations in real time. In the absence of initiation factors, the ribosome assembles in two distinct conformations. The initiation factors discriminate between these two conformations, guiding assembly of the conformation that can enter the elongation cycle. In particular, IF2 both accelerates the rate of subunit joining and actively promotes the transition to the elongation-competent conformation. Blocking GTP hydrolysis by IF2 results in 70S complexes formed in the conformation unable to enter elongation. We observe that rapid GTP hydrolysis by IF2 drives the transition to the elongation-competent conformation, thus committing the ribosome to enter the elongation cycle. PMID:19595714

  19. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

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    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity

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    Mitali Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM 2–7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the “MCM paradox.” Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  1. The prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy: meanings and mythology.

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    Sapp, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Drawing on documents both published and archival, this paper explains how the prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy of the 1960s was constructed, the purposes it served, and what it implied in terms of classification and phylogeny. In doing so, I first show how the concept was attributed to Edouard Chatton and the context in which he introduced the terms. Following, I examine the context in which the terms were reintroduced into biology in 1962 by Roger Stanier and C. B. van Niel. I study the discourse over the subsequent decade to understand how the organizational dichotomy took on the form of a natural classification as the kingdom Monera or superkingdom Procaryotae. Stanier and van Niel admitted that, in regard to constructing a natural classification of bacteria, structural characteristics were no more useful than physiological properties. They repeatedly denied that bacterial phylogenetics was possible. I thus examine the great historical irony that the "prokaryote," in both its organizational and phylogenetic senses, was defined (negatively) on the basis of structure. Finally, we see how phylogenetic research based on 16S rRNA led by Carl Woese and his collaborators confronted the prokaryote concept while moving microbiology to the center of evolutionary biology.

  2. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

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    Heike Angerer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine motif proteins (LYRMs of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6 or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1 of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria.

  3. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O 2 # sm b ullet# - ) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR Gi ) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T final ) with Fe 3+ ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK a = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR Gi reacts with O 2 # sm b ullet# - with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k 1 = 1.0 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T 1 ; this in turn rapidly decays to the T final state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR Gi is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  4. Break induced replication in eukaryotes: mechanisms, functions, and consequences.

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    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Malkova, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is an important pathway specializing in repair of one-ended double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This type of DSB break typically arises at collapsed replication forks or at eroded telomeres. BIR initiates by invasion of a broken DNA end into a homologous template followed by initiation of DNA synthesis that can proceed for hundreds of kilobases. This synthesis is drastically different from S-phase replication in that instead of a replication fork, BIR proceeds via a migrating bubble and is associated with conservative inheritance of newly synthesized DNA. This unusual mode of DNA replication is responsible for frequent genetic instabilities associated with BIR, including hyper-mutagenesis, which can lead to the formation of mutation clusters, extensive loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, copy-number variations and complex genomic rearrangements. In addition to budding yeast experimental systems that were initially employed to investigate eukaryotic BIR, recent studies in different organisms including humans, have provided multiple examples of BIR initiated within different cellular contexts, including collapsed replication fork and telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase. In addition, significant progress has been made towards understanding microhomology-mediated BIR (MMBIR) that can promote complex chromosomal rearrangements, including those associated with cancer and those leading to a number of neurological disorders in humans.

  5. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms

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    da-Silva A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively. Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism.

  6. Studies of elongation factor Tu in Streptococcus faecium (ATCC 9790)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourbeau, P.P.

    1986-01-01

    It has been known for over twenty years that elongation factor Tu (Ef-Tu) is one of the proteins involved in protein synthesis in bacteria. Several years ago, it was proposed that Ef-Tu may, in addition, have other structural functions in bacterial. The author's research has examined the function of Ef-Tu in Streptococcus faecium. Using an antibiotic kirromycin, which specifically inhibits Ef-Tu function, the effects upon a number of cellular parameters were determined. Inhibition of both protein and RNA synthesis was found to be similar to the effect of chloramphenicol. Using the residual division technique for the determination of cell cycle events with both heterogeneous and sucrose gradient fractionated cell populations, a kirromycin sensitive event was detected between 8 min. (Td = 30 min.) and 19 min. (Td = 175 min.) later in the cell cycle than the chloramphenical sensitive event. This suggests that kirromycin is inhibiting a terminal cell cycle event which is in addition to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Purification of Ef-Tu was performed using two different methods: ion exchange and molecular exclusion chromatography; and GDP affinity chromatography. Various schemes were employed to try and obtain optimum cellular fractionation, allowing for both proper separation of ribosomes from the other cellular fractions and retention of enzymatic activity by Ef-Tu as determined by a /sup 3/H-GDP binding assay. Analysis of the cell cycle of S. faecium using the residual division technique was also performed. In addition, certain cell wall antibiotics were used to determine if other cell cycle events could be determined using the residual division technique.

  7. Horizontal transfer of bacterial polyphosphate kinases to eukaryotes: implications for the ice age and land colonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Michael P; Hooley, Paul; W Brown, Michael R

    2013-06-05

    Studies of online database(s) showed that convincing examples of eukaryote PPKs derived from bacteria type PPK1 and PPK2 enzymes are rare and currently confined to a few simple eukaryotes. These enzymes probably represent several separate horizontal transfer events. Retention of such sequences may be an advantage for tolerance to stresses such as desiccation or nutrient depletion for simple eukaryotes that lack more sophisticated adaptations available to multicellular organisms. We propose that the acquisition of encoding sequences for these enzymes by horizontal transfer enhanced the ability of early plants to colonise the land. The improved ability to sequester and release inorganic phosphate for carbon fixation by photosynthetic algae in the ocean may have accelerated or even triggered global glaciation events. There is some evidence for DNA sequences encoding PPKs in a wider range of eukaryotes, notably some invertebrates, though it is unclear that these represent functional genes.Polyphosphate (poly P) is found in all cells, carrying out a wide range of essential roles. Studied mainly in prokaryotes, the enzymes responsible for synthesis of poly P in eukaryotes (polyphosphate kinases PPKs) are not well understood. The best characterised enzyme from bacteria known to catalyse the formation of high molecular weight polyphosphate from ATP is PPK1 which shows some structural similarity to phospholipase D. A second bacterial PPK (PPK2) resembles thymidylate kinase. Recent reports have suggested a widespread distribution of these bacteria type enzymes in eukaryotes. On - line databases show evidence for the presence of genes encoding PPK1 in only a limited number of eukaryotes. These include the photosynthetic eukaryotes Ostreococcus tauri, O. lucimarinus, Porphyra yezoensis, Cyanidioschyzon merolae and the moss Physcomitrella patens, as well as the amoeboid symbiont Capsaspora owczarzaki and the non-photosynthetic eukaryotes Dictyostelium (3 species

  8. The independent prokaryotic origins of eukaryotic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase and the implications of their origins for the evolution of eukaryotic Calvin cycle

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    Jiang Yong-Hai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Calvin cycle of eubacteria, the dephosphorylations of both fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphate (SBP are catalyzed by the same bifunctional enzyme: fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase/sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (F/SBPase, while in that of eukaryotic chloroplasts by two distinct enzymes: chloroplastic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (SBPase, respectively. It was proposed that these two eukaryotic enzymes arose from the divergence of a common ancestral eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase of mitochondrial origin. However, no specific affinity between SBPase and eubacterial FBPase or F/SBPase can be observed in the previous phylogenetic analyses, and it is hard to explain why SBPase and/or F/SBPase are/is absent from most extant nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes according to this scenario. Results Domain analysis indicated that eubacterial F/SBPase of two different resources contain distinct domains: proteobacterial F/SBPases contain typical FBPase domain, while cyanobacterial F/SBPases possess FBPase_glpX domain. Therefore, like prokaryotic FBPase, eubacterial F/SBPase can also be divided into two evolutionarily distant classes (Class I and II. Phylogenetic analysis based on a much larger taxonomic sampling than previous work revealed that all eukaryotic SBPase cluster together and form a close sister group to the clade of epsilon-proteobacterial Class I FBPase which are gluconeogenesis-specific enzymes, while all eukaryotic chloroplast FBPase group together with eukaryotic cytosolic FBPase and form another distinct clade which then groups with the Class I FBPase of diverse eubacteria. Motif analysis of these enzymes also supports these phylogenetic correlations. Conclusions There are two evolutionarily distant classes of eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase. Eukaryotic FBPase and SBPase do not diverge from either of them but have two independent origins

  9. Simultaneous measurement of genome-wide transcription elongation speeds and rates of RNA polymerase II transition into active elongation with 4sUDRB-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gilad; Voichek, Yoav; Rabani, Michal; Benjamin, Sima; Gilad, Shlomit; Amit, Ido; Oren, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    4sUDRB-seq separately measures, on a genomic scale, the distinct contributions of transcription elongation speed and rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transition into active elongation (TAE) to the overall mRNA production rate. It uses reversible inhibition of transcription elongation with 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), combined with a pulse of 4-thiouridine (4sU), to tag newly transcribed RNA. After DRB removal, cells are collected at several time points, and tagged RNA is biotinylated, captured on streptavidin beads and sequenced. 4sUDRB-seq enables the comparison of elongation speeds between different developmental stages or different cell types, and it allows the impact of specific transcription factors on transcription elongation speed versus TAE to be studied. RNA preparation takes ∼4 d to complete, with deep sequencing requiring an additional ∼4-11 d plus 1-3 d for bioinformatics analysis. The experimental protocol requires basic molecular biology skills, whereas data analysis requires knowledge in bioinformatics, particularly MATLAB and the Linux environment.

  10. Quantitative prediction of shrimp disease incidence via the profiles of gut eukaryotic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; Yu, Weina; Dai, Wenfang; Zhang, Jinjie; Qiu, Qiongfen; Ou, Changrong

    2018-04-01

    One common notion is emerging that gut eukaryotes are commensal or beneficial, rather than detrimental. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have been taken to discern the factors that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes, despite growing interest in the dysbiosis of gut microbiota-disease relationship. Herein, we firstly explored how the gut eukaryotic microbiotas were assembled over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. The gut eukaryotic communities changed markedly as healthy shrimp aged, and converged toward an adult-microbiota configuration. However, the adult-like stability was distorted by disease exacerbation. A null model untangled that the deterministic processes that governed the gut eukaryotic assembly tended to be more important over healthy shrimp development, whereas this trend was inverted as the disease progressed. After ruling out the baseline of gut eukaryotes over shrimp ages, we identified disease-discriminatory taxa (species level afforded the highest accuracy of prediction) that characteristic of shrimp health status. The profiles of these taxa contributed an overall 92.4% accuracy in predicting shrimp health status. Notably, this model can accurately diagnose the onset of shrimp disease. Interspecies interaction analysis depicted how the disease-discriminatory taxa interacted with one another in sustaining shrimp health. Taken together, our findings offer novel insights into the underlying ecological processes that govern the assembly of gut eukaryotes over shrimp postlarval to adult stages and a disease progression. Intriguingly, the established model can quantitatively and accurately predict the incidences of shrimp disease.

  11. Repertory of eukaryotes (eukaryome) in the human gastrointestinal tract: taxonomy and detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I; Raoult, D; Bittar, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotes are an important component of the human gut, and their relationship with the human host varies from parasitic to commensal. Understanding the diversity of human intestinal eukaryotes has important significance for human health. In the past few decades, most of the multitudes of techniques that are involved in the diagnosis of the eukaryotic population in the human intestinal tract were confined to pathological and parasitological aspects that mainly rely on traditionally based methods. However, development of culture-independent molecular techniques comprised of direct DNA extraction from faeces followed by sequencing, offer new opportunities to estimate the occurrence of eukaryotes in the human gut by providing data on the entire eukaryotic community, particularly not-yet-cultured or fastidious organisms. Further broad surveys of the eukaryotic communities in the gut based on high throughput tools such as next generation sequencing might lead to uncovering the real diversity of these ubiquitous organisms in the human intestinal tract and discovering the unrecognized roles of these eukaryotes in modulating the host immune system and inducing changes in host gut physiology and ecosystem. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Characterization of novel elongated Parvulin isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and originate from alternative transcription initiation

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    Hartmann-Fatu Cristina

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase Parvulin (Par14/PIN4 is highly conserved in all metazoans and is assumed to play a role in cell cycle progression and chromatin remodeling. It is predominantly localized to the nucleus and binds to chromosomal DNA as well as bent oligonucleotides in vitro. Results In this study we confirm by RT-PCR the existence of a longer Parvulin isoform expressed in all tissues examined so far. This isoform contains a 5' extension including a 75 bp extended open reading frame with two coupled SNPs leading to amino acid substitutions Q16R and R18S. About 1% of all Parvulin mRNAs include the novel extension as quantified by real-time PCR. The human Parvulin promoter is TATA-less and situated in a CpG island typical for house keeping genes. Thus, different Parvulin mRNAs seem to arise by alternative transcription initiation. N-terminally extended Parvulin is protected from rapid proteinaseK degradation. In HeLa and HepG2 cell lysates two protein species of about 17 and 28 KDa are detected by an antibody against an epitope within the N-terminal extension. These two bands are also recognized by an antibody towards the PPIase domain of Parvulin. The longer Parvulin protein is encoded by the human genome but absent from rodent, bovine and non-mammalian genomes. Conclusion Due to its molecular weight of 16.6 KDa we denote the novel Parvulin isoform as Par17 following the E. coli Par10 and human Par14 nomenclature. The N-terminal elongation of Par17-QR and Par17-RS suggests these isoforms to perform divergent functions within the eukaryotic cell than the well characterized Par14.

  13. Analysis of a splice array experiment elucidates roles of chromatin elongation factor Spt4-5 in splicing.

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    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4-5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4-Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function.

  14. Myosin repertoire expansion coincides with eukaryotic diversification in the Mesoproterozoic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmar, Martin; Mühlhausen, Stefanie

    2017-09-04

    The last eukaryotic common ancestor already had an amazingly complex cell possessing genomic and cellular features such as spliceosomal introns, mitochondria, cilia-dependent motility, and a cytoskeleton together with several intracellular transport systems. In contrast to the microtubule-based dyneins and kinesins, the actin-filament associated myosins are considerably divergent in extant eukaryotes and a unifying picture of their evolution has not yet emerged. Here, we manually assembled and annotated 7852 myosins from 929 eukaryotes providing an unprecedented dense sequence and taxonomic sampling. For classification we complemented phylogenetic analyses with gene structure comparisons resulting in 79 distinct myosin classes. The intron pattern analysis and the taxonomic distribution of the classes suggest two myosins in the last eukaryotic common ancestor, a class-1 prototype and another myosin, which is most likely the ancestor of all other myosin classes. The sparse distribution of class-2 and class-4 myosins outside their major lineages contradicts their presence in the last eukaryotic common ancestor but instead strongly suggests early eukaryote-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer. By correlating the evolution of myosin diversity with the history of Earth we found that myosin innovation occurred in independent major "burst" events in the major eukaryotic lineages. Most myosin inventions happened in the Mesoproterozoic era. In the late Neoproterozoic era, a process of extensive independent myosin loss began simultaneously with further eukaryotic diversification. Since the Cambrian explosion, myosin repertoire expansion is driven by lineage- and species-specific gene and genome duplications leading to subfunctionalization and fine-tuning of myosin functions.

  15. Current drive by Alfven waves in elongated cross section tokamak

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    Tsypin, V.S.; Elfimov, A.G.; Nekrasov, F.M.; Azevedo, C.A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Assis, A.S. de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. The problem of the noninductive current drive in cylindrical plasma model and in circular cross-section tokamaks had been already discussed intensively. At the beginning of the study of this problem it have been clear that there are significant difficulties in using of the current-drive in toroidal magnetic traps, especially in a tokamak reactor. Thus, in the case of the lower-hybrid current-drive the efficiency of this current-drive drops strongly as the plasma density increases. For the Alfven waves, there is an opinion that the efficiency of the current-drive drops as a result of waves absorption by the trapped particles 1,2. Okhawa proposed that the current in a magnetized plasma can be maintained also by means of forces, depending on the radiofrequency (rf) field amplitude gradients (the helicity injection). This idea was developed later, some new hopes appeared, connected with the possibility of the current-drive efficiency increasing. It was shown that for the cylindrical plasmas the local efficiency of Alfev wave current drive can be increased by one order of magnitude due to gradient forces, for the kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) and the global Alfven waves (GAW) at some range of the phase velocity. For tokamaks, this additional nonresonant current drive does not depend on the trapped particle effects, which reduce strongly the Alfven current drive efficiency in tokamaks, as it is supposed. Now, the theory development of the Alfven wave (AW) current drive is very important in the cource of the future experiments on the TCA/BR tokamak (Brazil). In this paper, an attempt is made to clarify some general aspects of this problems for magnetic traps. For large aspects ratio tokamaks, with an elongated cross-section, some general formulas concerning the untrapped and trapped particles dynamics and their input to the Landau damping of the Alfven waves, are presented. They are supposed to be used for the further development of the Alfven current drive theory

  16. MetWAMer: eukaryotic translation initiation site prediction

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    Brendel Volker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translation initiation site (TIS identification is an important aspect of the gene annotation process, requisite for the accurate delineation of protein sequences from transcript data. We have developed the MetWAMer package for TIS prediction in eukaryotic open reading frames of non-viral origin. MetWAMer can be used as a stand-alone, third-party tool for post-processing gene structure annotations generated by external computational programs and/or pipelines, or directly integrated into gene structure prediction software implementations. Results MetWAMer currently implements five distinct methods for TIS prediction, the most accurate of which is a routine that combines weighted, signal-based translation initiation site scores and the contrast in coding potential of sequences flanking TISs using a perceptron. Also, our program implements clustering capabilities through use of the k-medoids algorithm, thereby enabling cluster-specific TIS parameter utilization. In practice, our static weight array matrix-based indexing method for parameter set lookup can be used with good results in data sets exhibiting moderate levels of 5'-complete coverage. Conclusion We demonstrate that improvements in statistically-based models for TIS prediction can be achieved by taking the class of each potential start-methionine into account pending certain testing conditions, and that our perceptron-based model is suitable for the TIS identification task. MetWAMer represents a well-documented, extensible, and freely available software system that can be readily re-trained for differing target applications and/or extended with existing and novel TIS prediction methods, to support further research efforts in this area.

  17. Structural and biomechanical basis of mitochondrial movement in eukaryotic cells

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    Wu M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Min Wu,1 Aruna Kalyanasundaram,2 Jie Zhu1 1Laboratory of Biomechanics and Engineering, Institute of Biophysics, College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 2College of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Mitochondria serve as energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells. In addition to providing the energy supply for cells, the mitochondria are also involved in other processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, information transfer, and apoptosis, and play an important role in regulation of cell growth and the cell cycle. In order to achieve these functions, the mitochondria need to move to the corresponding location. Therefore, mitochondrial movement has a crucial role in normal physiologic activity, and any mitochondrial movement disorder will cause irreparable damage to the organism. For example, recent studies have shown that abnormal movement of the mitochondria is likely to be the reason for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. So, in the cell, especially in the particular polarized cell, the appropriate distribution of mitochondria is crucial to the function and survival of the cell. Mitochondrial movement is mainly associated with the cytoskeleton and related proteins. However, those components play different roles according to cell type. In this paper, we summarize the structural basis of mitochondrial movement, including microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, and adaptin, and review studies of the biomechanical mechanisms of mitochondrial movement in different types of cells. Keywords: mitochondrial movement, microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, adaptin

  18. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-}) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR{sub Gi}) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T{sub final}) with Fe{sup 3+} ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK{sub a} = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR{sub Gi} reacts with O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-} with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k{sub 1} = 1.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T{sub 1}; this in turn rapidly decays to the T{sub final} state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR{sub Gi} is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  19. The role of the distal elongation zone in the response of maize roots to auxin and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    We used a video digitizer system to (a) measure changes in the pattern of longitudinal surface extension in primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) upon application and withdrawal of auxin and (b) compare these patterns during gravitropism in control roots and roots pretreated with auxin. Special attention was paid to the distal elongation zone (DEZ), arbitrarily defined as the region between the meristem and the point within the elongation zone at which the rate of elongation reaches 0.3 of the peak rate. For roots in aqueous solution, the basal limit of the DEZ is about 2.5 mm behind the tip of the root cap. Auxin suppressed elongation throughout the elongation zone, but, after 1 to 3 h, elongation resumed, primarily as a result of induction of rapid elongation in the DEZ. Withdrawal of auxin during the period of strong inhibition resulted in exceptionally rapid elongation attributable to the initiation of rapid elongation in the DEZ plus recovery in the main elongation zone. Gravistimulation of auxin-inhibited roots induced rapid elongation in the DEZ along the top of the root. This resulted in rapid gravitropism even though the elongation rate of the root was zero before gravistimulation. The results indicate that cells of the DEZ differ from cells in the bulk of the elongation zone with respect to auxin sensitivity and that DEZ cells play an important role in gravitropism.

  20. Evolution and Allometry of Calcaneal Elongation in Living and Extinct Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Doug M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Gladman, Justin T.; Bloch, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal

  1. The crystal structure of elongation factor G complexed with GDP, at 2.7 A resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Czworkowski, J; Wang, J; Steitz, T A; Moore, P B

    1994-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation step of protein synthesis in bacteria, and like the other bacterial elongation factor, EF-Tu--whose structure is already known--it is a member of the GTPase superfamily. We have determined the crystal structure of EF-G--GDP from Thermus thermophilus. It is an elongated molecule whose large, N-terminal domain resembles the G domain of EF-Tu, except for a 90 residue insert, which covers a surface that is involved in nucleotide exchange in E...

  2. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution star and pom-pom polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the transient and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity, using the filament stretching rheometer (FSR), of two narrow molar mass distribution (MMD) long-chain branched polystyrene melts: AnBAm (a ‘pom-pom’ molecule) and AnB (a ‘asymmetric star’ molecule). The elongational...... viscosities for the 'pom-pom' molecule are separable in time and strain for times less than the reptation time. Separability was not observed in the elongational viscosities for the ‘asymmetric star’ molecule....

  3. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene. A Bach, K. Almdal, H.K. Rasmussen and O. Hassager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distributin polystyrene melts ......Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distributin polystyrene melts ...

  4. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is essential for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tariq, Mohammad [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Ito, Akihiro, E-mail: akihiro-i@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED-CREST, 1-7-1 Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-0004 (Japan); Ishfaq, Muhammad; Bradshaw, Elliot [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED-CREST, 1-7-1 Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-0004 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is an essential protein involved in translation elongation and cell proliferation. eIF5A undergoes several post-translational modifications including hypusination and acetylation. Hypusination is indispensable for the function of eIF5A. On the other hand, the precise function of acetylation remains unknown, but it may render the protein inactive since hypusination blocks acetylation. Here, we report that acetylation of eIF5A increases under hypoxia. During extended hypoxic periods an increase in the level of eIF5A acetylation correlated with a decrease in HIF-1α, suggesting involvement of eIF5A activity in HIF-1α expression under hypoxia. Indeed, suppression of eIF5A by siRNA oligo-mediated knockdown or treatment with GC7, a deoxyhypusine synthase inhibitor, led to significant reduction of HIF-1α activity. Furthermore, knockdown of eIF5A or GC7 treatment reduced tumor spheroid formation with a concomitant decrease in HIF-1α expression. Our results suggest that functional, hypusinated eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α expression during hypoxia and that eIF5A is an attractive target for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces acetylation of eIF5A. • Active eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia. • Active eIF5A is important for tumor spheroid growth.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of P5 P-type ATPases, a eukaryotic lineage of secretory pathway pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Annette; Asp, Torben; Holm, Preben Bach

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotes encompass a remarkable variety of organisms and unresolved lineages. Different phylogenetic analyses have lead to conflicting conclusions as to the origin and associations between lineages and species. In this work, we investigated evolutionary relationship of a family of cation pumps...... exclusive for the secretory pathway of eukaryotes by combining the identification of lineage-specific genes with phylogenetic evolution of common genes. Sequences of P5 ATPases, which are regarded to be cation pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), were identified in all eukaryotic lineages but not in any...... far, while P5B ATPases appear to be lost in three eukaryotic lineages; excavates, entamoebas and land plants. A lineage-specific gene expansion of up to four different P5B ATPases is seen in animals....

  6. Bacterial and eukaryotic systems collide in the three Rs of Methanococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard P; Walters, Alison D; Chong, James P J

    2011-01-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis S2 is a methanogenic archaeon with a well-developed genetic system. Its mesophilic nature offers a simple system in which to perform complementation using bacterial and eukaryotic genes. Although information-processing systems in archaea are generally more similar to those in eukaryotes than those in bacteria, the order Methanococcales has a unique complement of DNA replication proteins, with multiple MCM (minichromosome maintenance) proteins and no obvious originbinding protein. A search for homologues of recombination and repair proteins in M. maripaludis has revealed a mixture of bacterial, eukaryotic and some archaeal-specific homologues. Some repair pathways appear to be completely absent, but it is possible that archaeal-specific proteins could carry out these functions. The replication, recombination and repair systems in M. maripaludis are an interesting mixture of eukaryotic and bacterial homologues and could provide a system for uncovering novel interactions between proteins from different domains of life.

  7. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, Alvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles

  8. Internalization of a polysialic acid-binding Escherichia coli bacteriophage into eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Timo A; Pajunen, Maria I; Skog, Maria S; Finne, Jukka

    2017-12-04

    Eukaryotic organisms are continuously exposed to bacteriophages, which are efficient gene transfer agents in bacteria. However, bacteriophages are considered not to pass the eukaryotic cell membrane and enter nonphagocytic cells. Here we report the binding and penetration of Escherichia coli PK1A2 bacteriophage into live eukaryotic neuroblastoma cells in vitro. The phage interacts with cell surface polysialic acid, which shares structural similarity with the bacterial phage receptor. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy, we show that phages are internalized via the endolysosomal route and persist inside the human cells up to one day without affecting cell viability. Phage capsid integrity is lost in lysosomes, and the phage DNA is eventually degraded. We did not detect the entry of phage DNA into the nucleus; however, we speculate that this might occur as a rare event, and propose that this potential mechanism could explain prokaryote-eukaryote gene flow.

  9. Alternatives to vitamin B1 uptake revealed with discovery of riboswitches in multiple marine eukaryotic lineages

    OpenAIRE

    McRose, Darcy; Guo, Jian; Monier, Adam; Sudek, Sebastian; Wilken, Susanne; Yan, Shuangchun; Mock, Thomas; Archibald, John M; Begley, Tadhg P; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine pyrophosphate, TPP) is essential to all life but scarce in ocean surface waters. In many bacteria and a few eukaryotic groups thiamine biosynthesis genes are controlled by metabolite-sensing mRNA-based gene regulators known as riboswitches. Using available genome sequences and transcriptomes generated from ecologically important marine phytoplankton, we identified 31 new eukaryotic riboswitches. These were found in alveolate, cryptophyte, haptophyte and rhizarian phytopla...

  10. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  11. Eukaryotic beta-alanine synthases are functionally related but have a high degree of structural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gojkovic, Zoran; Sandrini, Michael; Piskur, Jure

    2001-01-01

    activity was used to clone analogous genes from different eukaryotes. Putative PYD3 sequences from the yeast S. kluyveri, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster complemented the pyd3 defect. When the S. kluyveri PYD3 gene was expressed in S. cerevisiae, which has......-carbamyl-beta -alanine, but not by uracil. This wrork establishes S. kluyveri as a model organism for studying pyrimidine degradation and beta -alanine production in eukaryotes....

  12. Gibberellin-enhanced elongation of inverted Pharbitis nil shoot prevents the release of apical dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    Ethylene evolution resulting from the gravity stress of shoot inversion appears to induce the release of apical dominance in Pharbitis nil (L.) by inhibiting elongation of the inverted shoot. It has been previously demonstrated that this shoot inversion release of apical dominance can be prevented by promoting elongation in the inverted shoot via interference with ethylene synthesis or action. In the present study it was shown that apical dominance release can also be prevented by promoting elongation of the inverted shoot via treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3). A synergistic effect was observed when AgNO3, the ethylene action inhibitor, was applied with GA3. Both GA3 and AgNO3 increased ethylene production in the inverted shoot. These results are consistent with the view that it is ethylene-induced inhibition of elongation and not any direct effect of ethylene per se which is responsible for the outgrowth of the highest lateral bud.

  13. Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated buildings based on wind tunnel simulations-BDW-1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set is associated with the results found in the journal article: Perry et al, 2016. Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated buildings based...

  14. Uni-axial Elongational Viscosity of Linear and Branched polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    About 40 years ago interest in the measurement of elongational viscosity of polymer melts started to grow. Here we present measurements of transient (and steady) uni-axial elongational viscosity, using the FSR, of the following melts: Four narrow MMD polystyrene (PS) samples with weight......-average molar mass Mw in the range of 50k to 390k. Three different bi-disperse samples, mixed from the narrow MMD PS. Two low-density polyethylene (LDPE) melts (Lupolen 1840D and 3020D). A steady-state viscosity was kept for 1-2.5 Hencky strain units in all measurements.The measurements on the bi-disperse PS...... melts have demonstrated that both the transient and steady elongational viscosity is quite sensitive to polydispersity. Bi-disperse PS resembles the behaviour of mono-disperse melts only at elongational rates larger then the inverse of maximal time constant of the smallest molecule. As observed in Boger...

  15. Construction of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries using low input of total environmental metatranscriptomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajiv Kumar; Barbi, Florian; Ziller, Antoine; Luis, Patricia; Marmeisse, Roland; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence

    2014-09-03

    Construction of high quality cDNA libraries from the usually low amounts of eukaryotic mRNA extracted from environmental samples is essential in functional metatranscriptomics for the selection of functional, full-length genes encoding proteins of interest. Many of the inserts in libraries constructed by standard methods are represented by truncated cDNAs due to premature stoppage of reverse transcriptase activity and preferential cloning of short cDNAs. We report here a simple and cost effective technique for preparation of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from as low as three microgram of total soil RNA dominated by ribosomal and bacterial RNA. cDNAs synthesized by a template switching approach were size-fractionated by two dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis prior to PCR amplification and cloning. Effective size selection was demonstrated by PCR amplification of conserved gene families specific of each size class. Libraries of more than one million independent inserts whose sizes ranged between one and four kb were thus produced. Up to 80% of the insert sequences were homologous to eukaryotic gene sequences present in public databases. A simple and cost effective technique has been developed to construct sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from environmental samples. This technique will facilitate expression cloning of environmental eukaryotic genes and contribute to a better understanding of basic biological and/or ecological processes carried out by eukaryotic microbial communities.

  16. Widespread horizontal gene transfer from double-stranded RNA viruses to eukaryotic nuclear genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Li, Guoqing; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Peng, Youliang; Ghabrial, Said A; Yi, Xianhong

    2010-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer commonly occurs from cells to viruses but rarely occurs from viruses to their host cells, with the exception of retroviruses and some DNA viruses. However, extensive sequence similarity searches in public genome databases for various organisms showed that the capsid protein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes from totiviruses and partitiviruses have widespread homologs in the nuclear genomes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, arthropods, fungi, nematodes, and protozoa. PCR amplification and sequencing as well as comparative evidence of junction coverage between virus and host sequences support the conclusion that these viral homologs are real and occur in eukaryotic genomes. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these genes were likely transferred horizontally from viruses to eukaryotic genomes. Furthermore, we present evidence showing that some of the transferred genes are conserved and expressed in eukaryotic organisms and suggesting that these viral genes are also functional in the recipient genomes. Our findings imply that horizontal transfer of double-stranded RNA viral genes is widespread among eukaryotes and may give rise to functionally important new genes, thus entailing that RNA viruses may play significant roles in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  17. Why did eukaryotes evolve only once? Genetic and energetic aspects of conflict and conflict mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2013-07-19

    According to multi-level theory, evolutionary transitions require mediating conflicts between lower-level units in favour of the higher-level unit. By this view, the origin of eukaryotes and the origin of multicellularity would seem largely equivalent. Yet, eukaryotes evolved only once in the history of life, whereas multicellular eukaryotes have evolved many times. Examining conflicts between evolutionary units and mechanisms that mediate these conflicts can illuminate these differences. Energy-converting endosymbionts that allow eukaryotes to transcend surface-to-volume constraints also can allocate energy into their own selfish replication. This principal conflict in the origin of eukaryotes can be mediated by genetic or energetic mechanisms. Genome transfer diminishes the heritable variation of the symbiont, but requires the de novo evolution of the protein-import apparatus and was opposed by selection for selfish symbionts. By contrast, metabolic signalling is a shared primitive feature of all cells. Redox state of the cytosol is an emergent feature that cannot be subverted by an individual symbiont. Hypothetical scenarios illustrate how metabolic regulation may have mediated the conflicts inherent at different stages in the origin of eukaryotes. Aspects of metabolic regulation may have subsequently been coopted from within-cell to between-cell pathways, allowing multicellularity to emerge repeatedly.

  18. Patterns of kinesin evolution reveal a complex ancestral eukaryote with a multifunctional cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Thomas A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genesis of the eukaryotes was a pivotal event in evolution and was accompanied by the acquisition of numerous new cellular features including compartmentalization by cytoplasmic organelles, mitosis and meiosis, and ciliary motility. Essential for the development of these features was the tubulin cytoskeleton and associated motors. It is therefore possible to map ancient cell evolution by reconstructing the evolutionary history of motor proteins. Here, we have used the kinesin motor repertoire of 45 extant eukaryotes to infer the ancestral state of this superfamily in the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA. Results We bioinformatically identified 1624 putative kinesin proteins, determined their protein domain architectures and calculated a comprehensive Bayesian phylogeny for the kinesin superfamily with statistical support. These data enabled us to define 51 anciently-derived kinesin paralogs (including three new kinesin families and 105 domain architectures. We then mapped these characters across eukaryotes, accounting for secondary loss within established eukaryotic groupings, and alternative tree topologies. Conclusions We show that a minimum of 11 kinesin families and 3 protein domain architectures were present in the LCEA. This demonstrates that the microtubule-based cytoskeleton of the LCEA was surprisingly highly developed in terms of kinesin motor types, but that domain architectures have been extensively modified during the diversification of the eukaryotes. Our analysis provides molecular evidence for the existence of several key cellular functions in the LCEA, and shows that a large proportion of motor family diversity and cellular complexity had already arisen in this ancient cell.

  19. Transcriptomic and hormone analyses reveal mechanisms underlying petal elongation in Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Jinba'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Haibin; Ding, Lian; Song, Aiping; Shen, Feng; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2017-04-01

    Auxin regulates chrysanthemum petal elongation by promoting cell elongation. Transcriptomic analysis shows that auxin signal transduction may connect with other transcription factors by TCPs to regulate chrysanthemum petal elongation. As an ornamental species, Chrysanthemum morifolium has high ornamental and economic value. Petal size is the primary factor that influences the ornamental value of chrysanthemum, but the mechanism underlying the development of C. morifolium petals remains unclear. In our study, we tracked the growth of petals and found that the basal region of 'Jinba' petals showed a higher elongation rate, exhibiting rapid cell elongation during petal growth. During petal elongation growth, auxin was demonstrated to promote cell elongation and an increase in cell numbers in the petal basal region. To further study the molecular mechanisms underlying petal growth, the RNA-seq (high-throughput cDNA sequencing) technique was employed. Four cDNA libraries were assembled from petals in the budding, bud breaking, early blooming and full blooming stages of 'Jinba' flower development. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed that auxin was the most important regulator in controlling petal growth. The TEOSINTEBRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA and PCF transcription factor genes (TCPs), basic helix-loop-helix-encoding gene (bHLH), glutaredoxin-C (GRXC) and other zinc finger protein genes exhibited obvious up-regulation and might have significant effects on the growth of 'Jinba' petals. Given the interaction between these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we speculated that auxin signal transduction might exhibit a close relationship with transcription factors through TCPs. In summary, we present the first comprehensive transcriptomic and hormone analyses of C. morifolium petals. The results offer direction in identifying the mechanism underlying the development of chrysanthemum petals in the elongated phase and have great significance in improving the

  20. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  1. Are lesions induced by ionizing radiation direct blocks to DNA chain elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation blocks DNA chain elongation in normal diploid fibroblasts but not in fibroblasts from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia, even though there are no differences in the damage induced between the two cell types. This difference suggests that radiation-induced lesions in DNA are not themselves blocks to chain elongation in ataxia cells and raises the possibility that in normal cells a mediator exists between DNA damage and chain termination

  2. Movement of endogenous calcium in the elongating zone of graviresponding roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Cameron, I. L.; Smith, N. K.

    1989-01-01

    Endogenous calcium (Ca) accumulates along the lower side of the elongating zone of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent. This accumulation of Ca correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature, and occurs in the cytoplasm, cell walls and mucilage of epidermal cells. Corresponding changes in endogenous Ca do not occur in cortical cells of the elongating zone of intact roots. These results indicate that the calcium asymmetries associated with root gravicurvature occur in the outermost layers of the root.

  3. Effect of adenine sulphate in the regeneration and elongation of common bean shoots

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdes R. García; Idalmis Bermúdez-Caraballoso; Novisel Veitía; Raúl Collado; Damaris Torres; Carlos Romero

    2012-01-01

    Plant regeneration and its further development of these are critical steps in tissue culture of Phaseolus vulgaris. The paper shows the effect of adenine sulfate included in the culture media on regeneration and elongation of shoots in the cultivar `CIAP 7247F'. The results showed that adenine sulfate affect plant regeneration and its elongation. The values of regenerated shoots and the plant height were increased. Keywords: in vitro culture, culture medium, Phaseolus vulgaris.

  4. Effect of adenine sulphate in the regeneration and elongation of common bean shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes R. García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant regeneration and its further development of these are critical steps in tissue culture of Phaseolus vulgaris. The paper shows the effect of adenine sulfate included in the culture media on regeneration and elongation of shoots in the cultivar `CIAP 7247F'. The results showed that adenine sulfate affect plant regeneration and its elongation. The values of regenerated shoots and the plant height were increased. Keywords: in vitro culture, culture medium, Phaseolus vulgaris.

  5. CDK9 inhibitors define elongation checkpoints at both ends of RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitem, Clélia; Zaborowska, Justyna; Isa, Nur F; Kufs, Johann; Dienstbier, Martin; Murphy, Shona

    2015-05-01

    Transcription through early-elongation checkpoints requires phosphorylation of negative transcription elongation factors (NTEFs) by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 9. Using CDK9 inhibitors and global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), we have mapped CDK9 inhibitor-sensitive checkpoints genome wide in human cells. Our data indicate that early-elongation checkpoints are a general feature of RNA polymerase (pol) II-transcribed human genes and occur independently of polymerase stalling. Pol II that has negotiated the early-elongation checkpoint can elongate in the presence of inhibitors but, remarkably, terminates transcription prematurely close to the terminal polyadenylation (poly(A)) site. Our analysis has revealed an unexpected poly(A)-associated elongation checkpoint, which has major implications for the regulation of gene expression. Interestingly, the pattern of modification of the C-terminal domain of pol II terminated at this new checkpoint largely mirrors the pattern normally found downstream of the poly(A) site, thus suggesting common mechanisms of termination.

  6. Contribution of Cell Elongation to the Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Anaerobic Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO2 −) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process. PMID:21267455

  7. Use of Digital Panoramic Radiographs in the Study of Styloid Process Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cabral dos Santos Accioly Lins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the occurrence of suggestive images of styloid process elongation in panoramic radiographs, noting their frequency according to sex, age, and location, as well as measure and classify the types and patterns of calcification of elongated styloid processes. 2,500 panoramic radiographs were evaluated in a Radiology Clinic in Recife, PE, Brazil, performed between 2008 and 2010, with the age ranging from 25 to 80 years old. 560 of the radiographs analyzed fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of this total, 216 (38.57% presented suggestive images of the styloid process elongation, 45 (20.8% belonging to male and 171 (79.2% to female, and 84.7% were bilateral. After all measurements, mean values of 35.5 mm (left side and 37.6 mm (right side were obtained and these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001. The most common type of stretching found was elongated (type I with 73.1%, and the pattern of calcification was partially calcified (62.5%. It was found that the elongation of the styloid process is an anatomical variation, which must be taken into account by dentists, and because panoramic radiography is a technique of easy approach and low cost and routine, it can be used to aid in the diagnosis of elongated styloid process.

  8. Scaling of elongation transition thickness during thin-film growth on weakly interacting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, B.; Souqui, L.; Elofsson, V.; Sarakinos, K.

    2017-08-01

    The elongation transition thickness ( θElong) is a central concept in the theoretical description of thin-film growth dynamics on weakly interacting substrates via scaling relations of θElong with respect to rates of key atomistic film-forming processes. To date, these scaling laws have only been confirmed quantitatively by simulations, while experimental proof has been left ambiguous as it has not been possible to measure θElong. Here, we present a method for determining experimentally θElong for Ag films growing on amorphous SiO2: an archetypical weakly interacting film/substrate system. Our results confirm the theoretically predicted θElong scaling behavior, which then allow us to calculate the rates of adatom diffusion and island coalescence completion, in good agreement with the literature. The methodology presented herein casts the foundation for studying growth dynamics and cataloging atomistic-process rates for a wide range of weakly interacting film/substrate systems. This may provide insights into directed growth of metal films with a well-controlled morphology and interfacial structure on 2D crystals—including graphene and MoS2—for catalytic and nanoelectronic applications.

  9. Arabidopsis RSS1 Mediates Cross-Talk Between Glucose and Light Signaling During Hypocotyl Elongation Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Singh, Dhriti; Khurana, Jitendra P; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2017-11-23

    Plants possess exuberant plasticity that facilitates its ability to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. The developmental plasticity largely depends upon cellular elongation which is governed by a complex network of environmental and phytohormonal signals. Here, we report role of glucose (Glc) and Glc-regulated factors in controlling elongation growth and shade response in Arabidopsis. Glc controls shade induced hypocotyl elongation in a dose dependent manner. We have identified a Glc repressed factor REGULATED BY SUGAR AND SHADE1 (RSS1) encoding for an atypical basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein of unknown biological function that is required for normal Glc actions. Phenotype analysis of mutant and overexpression lines suggested RSS1 to be a negative regulator of elongation growth. RSS1 affects overall auxin homeostasis. RSS1 interacts with the elongation growth-promoting proteins HOMOLOG OF BEE2 INTERACTING WITH IBH 1 (HBI1) and BR ENHANCED EXPRESSION2 (BEE2) and negatively affects the transcription of their downstream targets such as YUCs, INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE (IAAs), LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED1 (HFR1), HOMEOBOX PROTEIN 2 (ATHB2), XYLOGLUCAN ENDOTRANSGLUCOSYLASE/HYDROLASES (XTHs) and EXPANSINS. We propose, Glc signals might maintain optimal hypocotyl elongation under multiple signals such as light, shade and phytohormones through the central growth regulatory bHLH/HLH module.

  10. Cannabinoid Modulation of Eukaryotic Initiation Factors (eIF2α and eIF2B1 and Behavioral Cross-Sensitization to Cocaine in Adolescent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A. Melas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Reduced eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2α phosphorylation (p-eIF2α enhances protein synthesis, memory formation, and addiction-like behaviors. However, p-eIF2α has not been examined with regard to psychoactive cannabinoids and cross-sensitization. Here, we find that a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2 mesylate [WIN] reduced p-eIF2α in vitro by upregulating GADD34 (PPP1R15A, the recruiter of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. The induction of GADD34 was linked to ERK/CREB signaling and to CREB-binding protein (CBP-mediated histone hyperacetylation at the Gadd34 locus. In vitro, WIN also upregulated eIF2B1, an eIF2 activator subunit. We next found that WIN administration in vivo reduced p-eIF2α in the nucleus accumbens of adolescent, but not adult, rats. By contrast, WIN increased dorsal striatal levels of eIF2B1 and ΔFosB among both adolescents and adults. In addition, we found cross-sensitization between WIN and cocaine only among adolescents. These findings show that cannabinoids can modulate eukaryotic initiation factors, and they suggest a possible link between p-eIF2α and the gateway drug properties of psychoactive cannabinoids. : Melas et al. show that psychoactive cannabinoids modulate levels of two eukaryotic initiation factors (eIF2α and eIF2B1 known to be involved in protein synthesis, memory formation, and drug sensitivity. Cannabinoid modulation of eIF2α in vivo is only observed in adolescent animals, and is associated with cross-sensitization to cocaine. Keywords: drug use, addiction, cannabis, marijuana, cocaine, epigenetics, eIF2a, CREB, GADD34, gateway drugs

  11. Phylogenetic diversity and in situ detection of eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Matsubayashi

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic communities in aerobic wastewater treatment processes are well characterized, but little is known about them in anaerobic processes. In this study, abundance, diversity and morphology of eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR, 18S rRNA gene clone library construction and catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH. Samples were taken from four different anaerobic sludge digesters in Japan. Results of qPCR of rRNA genes revealed that Eukarya accounted from 0.1% to 1.4% of the total number of microbial rRNA gene copy numbers. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 251 clones were Fungi, Alveolata, Viridiplantae, Amoebozoa, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and Metazoa. Eighty-five percent of the clones showed less than 97.0% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating most of the eukaryotes in anaerobic sludge digesters are largely unknown. Clones belonging to the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota of Fungi were most abundant in anaerobic sludge, which accounted for 50% of the total clones. The most dominant OTU in each library belonged to either the LKM11 lineage or the uncultured lineage A31 in Alveolata. Principal coordinate analysis indicated that the eukaryotic and prokaryotic community structures were related. The detection of anaerobic eukaryotes, including the members of the LKM11 and A31 lineages in anaerobic sludge digesters, by CARD-FISH revealed their sizes in the range of 2-8 μm. The diverse and uncultured eukaryotes in the LKM11 and the A31 lineages are common and ecologically relevant members in anaerobic sludge digester.

  12. Dynamic arrest in a liquid of symmetric dumbbells: reorientational hopping for small molecular elongations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angel J; Chong, Song-Ho; Kob, Walter; Sciortino, Francesco

    2005-11-22

    We present extensive equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a liquid of symmetric dumbbell molecules, for constant packing fraction, as a function of temperature and molecular elongation. We compute diffusion constants as well as odd and even orientational correlators. The notations odd and even refer to the parity of the order l of the corresponding Legendre l polynomial, evaluated for the orientation of the molecular axis relative to its initial position. Rotational degrees of freedom of order l are arrested if, in the long-time limit, the corresponding orientational l correlator does not decay to zero. It is found that for large elongations translational and rotational degrees of freedom freeze at the same temperature. For small elongations only the even rotational degrees of freedom remain coupled to translational motions and arrest at a finite common temperature. On the contrary, the odd rotational degrees of freedom remain ergodic at all investigated temperatures. Hence, in the translationally arrested state, each molecule remains trapped in the cage formed by its neighboring molecules, but is able to perform 180 degrees rotations, which lead to relaxation only for the odd orientational correlators. The temperature dependence of the characteristic time of these residual rotations is well described by an Arrhenius law. Finally, we discuss the evidence in favor of the presence of the type-A transition for the odd rotational degrees of freedom, as predicted by mode-coupling theory for small molecular elongations. This transition is distinct from the type-B transition, associated with the arrest of the translational and even rotational degrees of freedom for small elongations, and with all degrees of freedom for large elongations. Odd orientational correlators are computed for small elongations at very low temperatures in the translationally arrested state. The obtained results suggest that hopping events restore the ergodicity of

  13. Mitochondria, the Cell Cycle, and the Origin of Sex via a Syncytial Eukaryote Common Ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sriram G; Martin, William F

    2016-07-02

    Theories for the origin of sex traditionally start with an asexual mitosing cell and add recombination, thereby deriving meiosis from mitosis. Though sex was clearly present in the eukaryote common ancestor, the order of events linking the origin of sex and the origin of mitosis is unknown. Here, we present an evolutionary inference for the origin of sex starting with a bacterial ancestor of mitochondria in the cytosol of its archaeal host. We posit that symbiotic association led to the origin of mitochondria and gene transfer to host's genome, generating a nucleus and a dedicated translational compartment, the eukaryotic cytosol, in which-by virtue of mitochondria-metabolic energy was not limiting. Spontaneous protein aggregation (monomer polymerization) and Adenosine Tri-phosphate (ATP)-dependent macromolecular movement in the cytosol thereby became selectable, giving rise to continuous microtubule-dependent chromosome separation (reduction division). We propose that eukaryotic chromosome division arose in a filamentous, syncytial, multinucleated ancestor, in which nuclei with insufficient chromosome numbers could complement each other through mRNA in the cytosol and generate new chromosome combinations through karyogamy. A syncytial (or coenocytic, a synonym) eukaryote ancestor, or Coeca, would account for the observation that the process of eukaryotic chromosome separation is more conserved than the process of eukaryotic cell division. The first progeny of such a syncytial ancestor were likely equivalent to meiospores, released into the environment by the host's vesicle secretion machinery. The natural ability of archaea (the host) to fuse and recombine brought forth reciprocal recombination among fusing (syngamy and karyogamy) progeny-sex-in an ancestrally meiotic cell cycle, from which the simpler haploid and diploid mitotic cell cycles arose. The origin of eukaryotes was the origin of vertical lineage inheritance, and sex was required to keep vertically

  14. Metabarcoding analysis of eukaryotic microbiota in the gut of HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Abou Abdallah, Rita; Ravaux, Isabelle; Mokhtari, Saadia; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Michelle, Caroline; Stein, Andreas; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2018-01-01

    Research on the relationship between changes in the gut microbiota and human disease, including AIDS, is a growing field. However, studies on the eukaryotic component of the intestinal microbiota have just begun and have not yet been conducted in HIV-infected patients. Moreover, eukaryotic community profiling is influenced by the use of different methodologies at each step of culture-independent techniques. Herein, initially, four DNA extraction protocols were compared to test the efficiency of each method in recovering eukaryotic DNA from fecal samples. Our results revealed that recovering eukaryotic components from fecal samples differs significantly among DNA extraction methods. Subsequently, the composition of the intestinal eukaryotic microbiota was evaluated in HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers through clone sequencing, high-throughput sequencing of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers 1 (ITS1) and 2 (ITS2) amplicons and real-time PCRs. Our results revealed that not only richness (Chao-1 index) and alpha diversity (Shannon diversity) differ between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, depending on the molecular strategy used, but also the global eukaryotic community composition, with little overlapping taxa found between techniques. Moreover, our results based on cloning libraries and ITS1/ITS2 metabarcoding sequencing showed significant differences in fungal composition between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, but without distinct clusters separating the two groups. Malassezia restricta was significantly more prevalent in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients, according to cloning libraries, whereas operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis were significantly more abundant in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients compared to healthy subjects in both ITS subregions. Finally, real-time PCR showed the presence of Microsporidia, Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis and

  15. Metabarcoding analysis of eukaryotic microbiota in the gut of HIV-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hamad

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between changes in the gut microbiota and human disease, including AIDS, is a growing field. However, studies on the eukaryotic component of the intestinal microbiota have just begun and have not yet been conducted in HIV-infected patients. Moreover, eukaryotic community profiling is influenced by the use of different methodologies at each step of culture-independent techniques. Herein, initially, four DNA extraction protocols were compared to test the efficiency of each method in recovering eukaryotic DNA from fecal samples. Our results revealed that recovering eukaryotic components from fecal samples differs significantly among DNA extraction methods. Subsequently, the composition of the intestinal eukaryotic microbiota was evaluated in HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers through clone sequencing, high-throughput sequencing of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers 1 (ITS1 and 2 (ITS2 amplicons and real-time PCRs. Our results revealed that not only richness (Chao-1 index and alpha diversity (Shannon diversity differ between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, depending on the molecular strategy used, but also the global eukaryotic community composition, with little overlapping taxa found between techniques. Moreover, our results based on cloning libraries and ITS1/ITS2 metabarcoding sequencing showed significant differences in fungal composition between HIV-infected patients and healthy volunteers, but without distinct clusters separating the two groups. Malassezia restricta was significantly more prevalent in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients, according to cloning libraries, whereas operational taxonomic units (OTUs belonging to Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis were significantly more abundant in fecal samples of HIV-infected patients compared to healthy subjects in both ITS subregions. Finally, real-time PCR showed the presence of Microsporidia, Giardia lamblia, Blastocystis

  16. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for lateral gene transfer within and between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral gene transfer can introduce genes with novel functions into genomes or replace genes with functionally similar orthologs or paralogs. Here we present a study of the occurrence of the latter gene replacement phenomenon in the four gene families encoding different classes of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, to evaluate and compare the patterns and rates of lateral gene transfer (LGT in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Results We extend the taxon sampling of gdh genes with nine new eukaryotic sequences and examine the phylogenetic distribution pattern of the various GDH classes in combination with maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. The distribution pattern analyses indicate that LGT has played a significant role in the evolution of the four gdh gene families. Indeed, a number of gene transfer events are identified by phylogenetic analyses, including numerous prokaryotic intra-domain transfers, some prokaryotic inter-domain transfers and several inter-domain transfers between prokaryotes and microbial eukaryotes (protists. Conclusion LGT has apparently affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes to a similar extent within the gdh gene families. In the absence of indications that the evolution of the gdh gene families is radically different from other families, these results suggest that gene transfer might be an important evolutionary mechanism in microbial eukaryote genome evolution.

  17. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are abundantly expressed by microbial eukaryotes in a high-Arctic fjord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Anna; Laughinghouse, Haywood D; Griffiths, Colin; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Gabrielsen, Tove M

    2018-02-01

    Proton-pumping rhodopsins provide an alternative pathway to photosynthesis by which solar energy can enter the marine food web. Rhodopsin genes are widely found in marine bacteria, also in the Arctic, and were recently reported from several eukaryotic lineages. So far, little is known about rhodopsin expression in Arctic eukaryotes. In this study, we used metatranscriptomics and 18S rDNA tag sequencing to examine the mid-summer function and composition of marine protists (size 0.45-10 µm) in the high-Arctic Billefjorden (Spitsbergen), especially focussing on the expression of microbial proton-pumping rhodopsins. Rhodopsin transcripts were highly abundant, at a level similar to that of genes involved in photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses placed the environmental rhodopsins within disparate eukaryotic lineages, including dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, haptophytes and cryptophytes. Sequence comparison indicated the presence of several functional types, including xanthorhodopsins and a eukaryotic clade of proteorhodopsin. Transcripts belonging to the proteorhodopsin clade were also abundant in published metatranscriptomes from other oceanic regions, suggesting a global distribution. The diversity and abundance of rhodopsins show that these light-driven proton pumps play an important role in Arctic microbial eukaryotes. Understanding this role is imperative to predicting the future of the Arctic marine ecosystem faced by a changing light climate due to diminishing sea-ice. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Functional capacity of Shiga-toxin promoter sequences in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentancor, Leticia V; Bilen, Marcos F; Mejías, María P; Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Panek, Cecilia A; Ramos, Maria V; Fernández, Gabriela C; Isturiz, Martín; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Palermo, Marina S

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are the main virulence factors in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections, causing diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The genes encoding for Shiga toxin-2 (Stx2) are located in a bacteriophage. The toxin is formed by a single A subunit and five B subunits, each of which has its own promoter sequence. We have previously reported the expression of the B subunit within the eukaryotic environment, probably driven by their own promoter. The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of the eukaryotic machinery to recognize stx2 sequences as eukaryotic-like promoters. Vero cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding Stx2 under its own promoter. The cytotoxic effect on these cells was similar to that observed upon incubation with purified Stx2. In addition, we showed that Stx2 expression in Stx2-insensitive BHK eukaryotic cells induced drastic morphological and cytoskeletal changes. In order to directly evaluate the capacity of the wild promoter sequences of the A and B subunits to drive protein expression in mammalian cells, GFP was cloned under eukaryotic-like putative promoter sequences. GFP expression was observed in 293T cells transfected with these constructions. These results show a novel and alternative way to synthesize Stx2 that could contribute to the global understanding of EHEC infections with immediate impact on the development of treatments or vaccines against HUS.

  19. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  20. Production of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems: higher activity of R2 produced by eukaryotic cells related to higher iron-binding capacity.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarche, N; Matton, G; Massie, B; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; Dumas, F; Gaudreau, P; Langelier, Y

    1996-01-01

    The R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase from herpes simplex virus type 2 was overproduced with prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant R2 purified by a two-step procedure exhibited a 3-fold higher activity when produced in eukaryotic cells. Precise quantification of the R2 concentration at each step of the purification indicated that the activity was not altered during the purification procedure. Moreover, we have observed that the level of R2 expression, in eukaryot...

  1. Adherens junction distribution mechanisms during cell-cell contact elongation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Goldenberg

    Full Text Available During Drosophila gastrulation, amnioserosa (AS cells flatten and spread as an epithelial sheet. We used AS morphogenesis as a model to investigate how adherens junctions (AJs distribute along elongating cell-cell contacts in vivo. As the contacts elongated, total AJ protein levels increased along their length. However, genetically blocking this AJ addition indicated that it was not essential for maintaining AJ continuity. Implicating other remodeling mechanisms, AJ photobleaching revealed non-directional lateral mobility of AJs along the elongating contacts, as well as local AJ removal from the membranes. Actin stabilization with jasplakinolide reduced AJ redistribution, and live imaging of myosin II along elongating contacts revealed fragmented, expanding and contracting actomyosin networks, suggesting a mechanism for lateral AJ mobility. Actin stabilization also increased total AJ levels, suggesting an inhibition of AJ removal. Implicating AJ removal by endocytosis, clathrin endocytic machinery accumulated at AJs. However, dynamin disruption had no apparent effect on AJs, suggesting the involvement of redundant or dynamin-independent mechanisms. Overall, we propose that new synthesis, lateral diffusion, and endocytosis play overlapping roles to populate elongating cell-cell contacts with evenly distributed AJs in this in vivo system.

  2. Fossil evidence and stages of elongation of the Giraffa camelopardalis neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danowitz, Melinda; Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Kortlandt, Victoria; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Several evolutionary theories have been proposed to explain the adaptation of the long giraffe neck; however, few studies examine the fossil cervical vertebrae. We incorporate extinct giraffids, and the okapi and giraffe cervical vertebral specimens in a comprehensive analysis of the anatomy and elongation of the neck. We establish and evaluate 20 character states that relate to general, cranial and caudal vertebral lengthening, and calculate a length-to-width ratio to measure the relative slenderness of the vertebrae. Our sample includes cervical vertebrae (n=71) of 11 taxa representing all seven subfamilies. We also perform a computational comparison of the C3 of Samotherium and Giraffa camelopardalis, which demonstrates that cervical elongation occurs disproportionately along the cranial–caudal vertebral axis. Using the morphological characters and calculated ratios, we propose stages in cervical lengthening, which are supported by the mathematical transformations using fossil and extant specimens. We find that cervical elongation is anisometric and unexpectedly precedes Giraffidae. Within the family, cranial vertebral elongation is the first lengthening stage observed followed by caudal vertebral elongation, which accounts for the extremely long neck of the giraffe. PMID:26587249

  3. Role of lipids on elongation of the preimplantation conceptus in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Eduardo S; Santos, José E P; Thatcher, William W

    2016-10-01

    Elongation of the preimplantation conceptus is a prerequisite for successful pregnancy in ruminants and depends on histotroph secretion by the endometrium. Lipids are an essential component of the histotroph, and recent studies indicate that lipids have important roles in the elongation phase of conceptus development. The onset of elongation is marked by dynamic changes in the transcriptome of trophectoderm cells, which are associated with lipid metabolism. During elongation, the trophectoderm increases transcript expression of genes related to uptake, metabolism and de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and prostaglandins. Expression of the gene PPARG increases substantially, and activation of the transcription factor PPARG by binding of lipid ligands appears to be crucial for the coordination of cell biology during elongation. Lipids accumulated in the epithelial cells of the endometrium during diestrus are likely the most important source of fatty acids for utilization by the conceptus and become available in the uterine lumen through exporting of exosomes, microvesicles, carrier proteins and lipoproteins. Targeting of uterine lipid metabolism and PPARG activity during preimplantation conceptus development through nutraceutical diets may be a good strategy to improve pregnancy survival and reproductive efficiency in ruminants. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  4. The effect of heat and radiation on the initiation and elongation processes of DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.C.; Bowden, G.T.; Cress, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    The pH step alkaline elution and alkaline sucrose gradient techniques were utilized to evaluate alterations in DNA replication (initiation and elongation) induced by heat and low dose X-irradiation in synchronized Chinese hamster ovary cells. The initiation and elongation processes of DNA synthesis were radioresistant at the G 1 /S boundary (4 hours after mitosis) while in mid S phase (9 hours after mitosis) DNA initiation and elongation were sensitive to X-irradiation. The initiation and elongation processes of DNA synthesis which were radiation resistant at the G 1 /S boundary could be inhibited by a hyperthermia treatment (43 0 C for 1 hour beginning at 4 hours after mitosis). The impairment of initiation in the heated cells was maintained through late S phase while that of elongation was reversible as judged by full recovery at 15 hours after mitosis. These data suggest that the known synergistic lethality of heat and radiation may be mediated by an impairment of initiation of DNA synthesis. (author)

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans Elongator complex regulates neuronal alpha-tubulin acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jachen A Solinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although acetylated alpha-tubulin is known to be a marker of stable microtubules in neurons, precise factors that regulate alpha-tubulin acetylation are, to date, largely unknown. Therefore, a genetic screen was employed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that identified the Elongator complex as a possible regulator of alpha-tubulin acetylation. Detailed characterization of mutant animals revealed that the acetyltransferase activity of the Elongator is indeed required for correct acetylation of microtubules and for neuronal development. Moreover, the velocity of vesicles on microtubules was affected by mutations in Elongator. Elongator mutants also displayed defects in neurotransmitter levels. Furthermore, acetylation of alpha-tubulin was shown to act as a novel signal for the fine-tuning of microtubules dynamics by modulating alpha-tubulin turnover, which in turn affected neuronal shape. Given that mutations in the acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator (Elp3 and in a scaffold subunit (Elp1 have previously been linked to human neurodegenerative diseases, namely Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Familial Dysautonomia respectively highlights the importance of this work and offers new insights to understand their etiology.

  6. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre-mRNA em...... elongation, particularly across areas encompassing affected exons. Together, these data indicate that the DBIRD complex acts at the interface between mRNP particles and RNAPII, integrating transcript elongation with the regulation of alternative splicing.......Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD...

  7. Optimum alcohol concentration for chain elongation in mixed-culture fermentation of cellulosic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonkar, Sagar; Fu, Zhihong; Holtzapple, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA, e.g., caproic, heptanoic, caprylic acid) are more valuable than short-chain fatty acids (SCFA, e.g., acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric acid). SCFAs are major products in methane-inhibited mixed-culture anaerobic fermentation. By feeding ethanol to the fermentor, MCFA formation is enhanced through chain elongation. Microorganisms such as Clostridium kluyveri elongate short-chain acids by combining them with alcohol. Very low ethanol concentration reduces chain elongation rates, whereas very high ethanol concentrations inhibit microorganisms. To maximize MCFA production, different ethanol concentrations were investigated in the mixed-culture fermentation of office paper and chicken manure. At 10 g/L ethanol concentration, 10 g/L MCFA was formed. High ethanol concentrations (above 40 g/L) inhibit microorganisms resulting in no chain elongation. For chain elongation, propanol was found to be more inhibitory than ethanol. The data suggest that MCFA production will increase by continuously extracting MCFA and maintaining 5-10 g/L ethanol concentration by periodic addition. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2597-2604. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Abscisic Acid Regulates Auxin Homeostasis in Rice Root Tips to Promote Root Hair Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA plays an essential role in root hair elongation in plants, but the regulatory mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that exogenous ABA can promote rice root hair elongation. Transgenic rice overexpressing SAPK10 (Stress/ABA-activated protein kinase 10 had longer root hairs; rice plants overexpressing OsABIL2 (OsABI-Like 2 had attenuated ABA signaling and shorter root hairs, suggesting that the effect of ABA on root hair elongation depends on the conserved PYR/PP2C/SnRK2 ABA signaling module. Treatment of the DR5-GUS and OsPIN-GUS lines with ABA and an auxin efflux inhibitor showed that ABA-induced root hair elongation depends on polar auxin transport. To examine the transcriptional response to ABA, we divided rice root tips into three regions: short root hair, long root hair and root tip zones; and conducted RNA-seq analysis with or without ABA treatment. Examination of genes involved in auxin transport, biosynthesis and metabolism indicated that ABA promotes auxin biosynthesis and polar auxin transport in the root tip, which may lead to auxin accumulation in the long root hair zone. Our findings shed light on how ABA regulates root hair elongation through crosstalk with auxin biosynthesis and transport to orchestrate plant development.

  9. The evolution of eukaryotic cells from the perspective of peroxisomes: phylogenetic analyses of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes support mitochondria-first models of eukaryotic cell evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Kathrin; Rensing, Stefan A; Maier, Uwe-G

    2015-02-01

    Beta-oxidation of fatty acids and detoxification of reactive oxygen species are generally accepted as being fundamental functions of peroxisomes. Additionally, these pathways might have been the driving force favoring the selection of this compartment during eukaryotic evolution. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses of enzymes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids in Bacteria, Eukaryota, and Archaea. These imply an alpha-proteobacterial origin for three out of four enzymes. By integrating the enzymes' history into the contrasting models on the origin of eukaryotic cells, we conclude that peroxisomes most likely evolved non-symbiotically and subsequent to the acquisition of mitochondria in an archaeal host cell. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A superfamily of archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins homologous to animal transglutaminases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, K S; Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1999-08-01

    Computer analysis using profiles generated by the PSI-BLAST program identified a superfamily of proteins homologous to eukaryotic transglutaminases. The members of the new protein superfamily are found in all archaea, show a sporadic distribution among bacteria, and were detected also in eukaryotes, such as two yeast species and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Sequence conservation in this superfamily primarily involves three motifs that center around conserved cysteine, histidine, and aspartate residues that form the catalytic triad in the structurally characterized transglutaminase, the human blood clotting factor XIIIa'. On the basis of the experimentally demonstrated activity of the Methanobacterium phage pseudomurein endoisopeptidase, it is proposed that many, if not all, microbial homologs of the transglutaminases are proteases and that the eukaryotic transglutaminases have evolved from an ancestral protease.

  11. Structural basis of eukaryotic cell targeting by type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Tommaso; Pflug, Alexander; Discola, Karen F; Neves, David; Dessen, Andréa

    2013-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are macromolecular complexes that translocate a wide number of effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. Once within the cytoplasm, many T3SS effectors mimic the structure and/or function of eukaryotic proteins in order to manipulate signaling cascades, and thus play pivotal roles in colonization, invasion, survival and virulence. Structural biology techniques have played key roles in the unraveling of bacterial strategies employed for mimicry and targeting. This review provides an overall view of our current understanding of structure and function of T3SS effectors, as well as of the different classes of eukaryotic proteins that are targeted and the consequences for the infected cell. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Faster growth of the major prokaryotic versus eukaryotic CO2 fixers in the oligotrophic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2014-04-29

    Because maintenance of non-scalable cellular components--membranes and chromosomes--requires an increasing fraction of energy as cell size decreases, miniaturization comes at a considerable energetic cost for a phytoplanktonic cell. Consequently, if eukaryotes can use their superior energetic resources to acquire nutrients with more or even similar efficiency compared with prokaryotes, larger unicellular eukaryotes should be able to achieve higher growth rates than smaller cyanobacteria. Here, to test this hypothesis, we directly compare the intrinsic growth rates of phototrophic prokaryotes and eukaryotes from the equatorial to temperate South Atlantic using an original flow cytometric (14)CO2-tracer approach. At the ocean basin scale, cyanobacteria double their biomass twice as frequently as the picoeukaryotes indicating that the prokaryotes are faster growing CO2 fixers, better adapted to phototrophic living in the oligotrophic open ocean-the most extensive biome on Earth.

  13. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik D.; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Tachibana, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods...... for detecting eccDNA are needed to clarify how these elements affect genome stability and how environmental and biological factors induce their formation in eukaryotic cells. This video presents a sensitive eccDNA-purification method called Circle-Seq. The method encompasses column purification of circular DNA...... DNA. Validation of the Circle-Seq method on three S. cerevisiae CEN.PK populations of 10(10) cells detected hundreds of eccDNA profiles in sizes larger than 1 kilobase. Repeated findings of ASP3-1, COS111, CUP1, RSC30, HXT6, HXT7 genes on circular DNA in both S288c and CEN.PK suggests that DNA...

  14. The Evolution of Organellar Coat Complexes and Organization of the Eukaryotic Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2017-06-20

    Eukaryotic cells possess a remarkably diverse range of organelles that provide compartmentalization for distinct cellular functions and are likely responsible for the remarkable success of these organisms. The origins and subsequent elaboration of these compartments represent a key aspect in the transition between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular forms. The protein machinery required to build, maintain, and define many membrane-bound compartments is encoded by several paralog families, including small GTPases, coiled-bundle proteins, and proteins with β-propeller and α-solenoid secondary structures. Together these proteins provide the membrane coats and control systems to structure and coordinate the endomembrane system. Mechanistically and evolutionarily, they unite not only secretory and endocytic organelles but also the flagellum and nucleus. The ancient origins for these families have been revealed by recent findings, providing new perspectives on the deep evolutionary processes and relationships that underlie eukaryotic cell structure.

  15. Large-scale analysis of phosphorylation site occupancy in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    in proteins is currently lacking. We have therefore analyzed the occurrence and occupancy of phosphorylated sites (~ 100,281) in a large set of eukaryotic proteins (~ 22,995). Phosphorylation probability was found to be much higher in both the  termini of protein sequences and this is much pronounced...... maximum randomness. An analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that just 40 motifs and a much lower number of associated kinases might account for nearly 50% of the known phosphorylations in eukaryotic proteins. Our results provide a broad picture of the phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins.......Many recent high throughput technologies have enabled large-scale discoveries of new phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. Although they have provided a number of insights into protein phosphorylation and the related processes, an inclusive analysis on the nature of phosphorylated sites...

  16. Stress relaxation of entangled polystyrene solution after constant-rate, uniaxial elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumiya, Yumi; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    For an entangled solution of linear polystyrene (PS 545k; M = 545k) in dibutyl phthalate (DBP), the stress relaxation after constant-rate uniaxial elongation was examined with an extensional viscosity fixture mounted on ARES (TA Instruments). The PS concentration, c = 52 wt%, was chosen in a way...... that the entanglement density M/Me of the solution coincided with that of PS 290k melt (M = 290k). After the elongation at the Rouse-based Weissenberg number Wi(R) ~ 3 up to the Hencky strain of 3, the short time stress relaxation of the solution was accelerated by a factor of ~4, which was less significant compared...... but this reduction weakens on an increase of the concentration of un-stretchable solvent molecules. This change of the stretch/orientation reduction of the friction with the solvent concentration appears to be consistent with the monotonic thinning of the steady-state elongational viscosity seen for melts...

  17. DNA damage regulates alternative splicing through changes in POL II elongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.J.; Perez Santangelo, M.S.; De la Mata, M.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Many apoptotic genes are regulated via alternative splicing (AS) but little is known about the mechanisms controlling AS in stress situations derived from DNA damage. Here we show that ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects co-transcriptional, but not post transcriptional, AS through a systemic mechanism involving a CDK-9-dependent hyper phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain (CTD) and a subsequent and unprecedented inhibition of transcriptional elongation, estimated in vivo and in real time by FRAP. To mimic this hyper phosphorylation we used CTD mutants with serines 2 or 5 substituted by glutamic acids and found that they not only display lower elongation rates but duplicate the effects of UV light on AS in the absence of irradiation. Consistently, substitution of the serines with alanines prevents the UV effect on splicing. These results represent the first in vivo proof of modulation of elongation in response to an environmental signal, affecting in turn the kinetic coupling between transcription and splicing. (authors)

  18. Similarity between Cytokinin and Blue Light Inhibition of Cucumber Hypocotyl Elongation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lila; Gepstein, Shimon; Horwitz, Benjamin A.

    1991-01-01

    The cytokinin benzyladenine inhibited endogenous hypocotyl elongation in intact etiolated seedlings of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). In hypocotyl segments, the inhibitory effect of benzyladenine on growth was clearly detectable in the presence of indoleacetic acid. Fusicoccin-induced elongation was unaffected by the presence of cytokinin. The effect of cytokinin on elongation of the segments was determined by measuring changes in fresh weight, a linear function of extension growth. The effect of benzyladenine on hypocotyl growth was at least as large in segments prepared from red-light-grown seedlings as in those from seedlings grown in total darkness. A comparison was made between the inhibitory effects of cytokinin and blue light. The use of the calcium chelator ethyleneglycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N, N′-tetraacetic acid indicated that calcium ions are required for manifestation of benzyladenine-induced inhibition. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667984

  19. A constitutive analysis of transient and steady-state elongational viscosities of bidisperse polystyrene blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Manfred H.; Rolon-Garrido, Victor H.; Nielsen, Jens Kromann

    2008-01-01

    The transient and steady-state elongational viscosity data of three bidisperse polystyrene blends were investigated recently by Nielsen et al. [J. Rheol. 50, 453-476 (2006)]. The blends contain a monodisperse high molar mass component (M-L= 390 kg/ mol) in a matrix of a monodisperse small molar...... stretching potential of the long-chain component and an increasing steady-state elongational viscosity with increasing strain rate. In addition, in the dilution regime, a transition from affine chain stretch to nonaffine tube squeeze with decreasing strain rate is identified. The dilution regime ends......, and allowing (albeit by use of empirical linear-viscoelastic shift factors to correct the linear-viscoelastic predictions) for a quantitative description of the transient and steady-state elongational viscosities of the bidisperse polystyrene blends....

  20. The reduced kinome of Ostreococcus tauri: core eukaryotic signalling components in a tractable model species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Matthew M; Martin, Sarah F; Noordally, Zeenat B; van Ooijen, Gerben; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Simpson, T Ian; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J

    2014-08-02

    The current knowledge of eukaryote signalling originates from phenotypically diverse organisms. There is a pressing need to identify conserved signalling components among eukaryotes, which will lead to the transfer of knowledge across kingdoms. Two useful properties of a eukaryote model for signalling are (1) reduced signalling complexity, and (2) conservation of signalling components. The alga Ostreococcus tauri is described as the smallest free-living eukaryote. With less than 8,000 genes, it represents a highly constrained genomic palette. Our survey revealed 133 protein kinases and 34 protein phosphatases (1.7% and 0.4% of the proteome). We conducted phosphoproteomic experiments and constructed domain structures and phylogenies for the catalytic protein-kinases. For each of the major kinases families we review the completeness and divergence of O. tauri representatives in comparison to the well-studied kinomes of the laboratory models Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and of Homo sapiens. Many kinase clades in O. tauri were reduced to a single member, in preference to the loss of family diversity, whereas TKL and ABC1 clades were expanded. We also identified kinases that have been lost in A. thaliana but retained in O. tauri. For three, contrasting eukaryotic pathways - TOR, MAPK, and the circadian clock - we established the subset of conserved components and demonstrate conserved sites of substrate phosphorylation and kinase motifs. We conclude that O. tauri satisfies our two central requirements. Several of its kinases are more closely related to H. sapiens orthologs than S. cerevisiae is to H. sapiens. The greatly reduced kinome of O. tauri is therefore a suitable model for signalling in free-living eukaryotes.

  1. Convergent use of RhoGAP toxins by eukaryotic parasites and bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Colinet

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of host Rho GTPases is a widespread strategy employed by bacterial pathogens to manipulate mammalian cellular functions and avoid immune defenses. Some bacterial toxins mimic eukaryotic Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs to inactivate mammalian GTPases, probably as a result of evolutionary convergence. An intriguing question remains whether eukaryotic pathogens or parasites may use endogenous GAPs as immune-suppressive toxins to target the same key genes as bacterial pathogens. Interestingly, a RhoGAP domain-containing protein, LbGAP, was recently characterized from the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi, and shown to protect parasitoid eggs from the immune response of Drosophila host larvae. We demonstrate here that LbGAP has structural characteristics of eukaryotic RhoGAPs but that it acts similarly to bacterial RhoGAP toxins in mammals. First, we show by immunocytochemistry that LbGAP enters Drosophila immune cells, plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, and that morphological changes in lamellocytes are correlated with the quantity of LbGAP they contain. Demonstration that LbGAP displays a GAP activity and specifically interacts with the active, GTP-bound form of the two Drosophila Rho GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, both required for successful encapsulation of Leptopilina eggs, was then achieved using biochemical tests, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and GST pull-down assays. In addition, we show that the overall structure of LbGAP is similar to that of eukaryotic RhoGAP domains, and we identify distinct residues involved in its interaction with Rac GTPases. Altogether, these results show that eukaryotic parasites can use endogenous RhoGAPs as virulence factors and that despite their differences in sequence and structure, eukaryotic and bacterial RhoGAP toxins are similarly used to target the same immune pathways in insects and mammals.

  2. Gene flow and biological conflict systems in the origin and evolution of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L eAravind

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotes brought together two disparate genomes in the cell. Additionally, eukaryotic natural history has included other endosymbiotic events, phagotrophic consumption of organisms, and intimate interactions with viruses and endoparasites. These phenomena facilitated large-scale lateral gene transfer and biological conflicts. We synthesize information from nearly two decades of genomics to illustrate how the interplay between lateral gene transfer and biological conflicts has impacted the emergence of new adaptations in eukaryotes. Using apicomplexans as example, we illustrate how lateral transfer from animals has contributed to unique parasite-host interfaces comprised of adhesion- and O-linked glycosylation-related domains. Adaptations, emerging due to intense selection for diversity in the molecular participants in organismal and genomic conflicts, being dispersed by lateral transfer, were subsequently exapted for eukaryote-specific innovations. We illustrate this using examples relating to eukaryotic chromatin, RNAi and RNA-processing systems, signaling pathways, apoptosis and immunity. We highlight the major contributions from catalytic domains of bacterial toxin-systems to the origin of signaling enzymes (e.g. ADP-ribosylation and small-molecule messenger synthesis, mutagenic enzymes for immune receptor diversification and RNA-processing. Similarly, we discuss contributions of bacterial antibiotic/siderophore synthesis systems and intra-genomic and intra-cellular selfish elements (e.g. restriction-modification, mobile elements and lysogenic phages in the emergence of chromatin remodeling/modifying enzymes and RNA-based regulation. We develop the concept that biological conflict systems served as evolutionary nurseries for innovations in the protein world, which were delivered to eukaryotes via lateral gene flow to spur key evolutionary innovations all the way from nucleogenesis to lineage-specific adaptations

  3. Engineering of ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural and artificial bacterial riboswitches have been reported thus far. However, they generally function only in bacteria, not in eukaryotes. This is because of the differences of expression mechanisms (transcription, translation, and so on) between these two main types of organisms. For example, the mechanism of translation initiation is quite different between bacteria and eukaryotes, especially in ribosome loading on mRNA. While the bacterial ribosome binds to a well-conserved, internal sequence some bases before the start codon to initiate translation, the eukaryotic one is loaded on the 5' terminus with the help of certain eukaryotic initiation factors. This means not only that bacterial riboswitches regulating translation initiation are not available in eukaryotic translation systems, but also that it is physically difficult to construct eukaryotic ON riboswitches that regulate the eukaryotic canonical translation initiation, because an aptamer cannot be inserted upstream of the ribosome loading site. However, the mechanism of noncanonical translation initiation via "ribosomal shunt" enables us to design translation initiation-modulating (specifically, ribosomal shunt-modulating) eukaryotic ON riboswitches. This chapter describes a facile method for engineering these ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system. Because these riboswitches do not require hybridization switching thanks to a unique shunting mechanism, they have the major advantages of a low energy requirement for upregulation and relatively straightforward design over common hybridization switch-based ON riboswitches. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Poliovirus polymerase residue 5 plays a critical role in elongation complex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobdey, Sarah E; Kempf, Brian J; Steil, Benjamin P; Barton, David J; Peersen, Olve B

    2010-08-01

    The structures of polio-, coxsackie-, and rhinovirus polymerases have revealed a conserved yet unusual protein conformation surrounding their buried N termini where a beta-strand distortion results in a solvent-exposed hydrophobic amino acid at residue 5. In a previous study, we found that coxsackievirus polymerase activity increased or decreased depending on the size of the amino acid at residue 5 and proposed that this residue becomes buried during the catalytic cycle. In this work, we extend our studies to show that poliovirus polymerase activity is also dependent on the nature of residue 5 and further elucidate which aspects of polymerase function are affected. Poliovirus polymerases with mutations of tryptophan 5 retain wild-type elongation rates, RNA binding affinities, and elongation complex formation rates but form unstable elongation complexes. A large hydrophobic residue is required to maintain the polymerase in an elongation-competent conformation, and smaller hydrophobic residues at position 5 progressively decrease the stability of elongation complexes and their processivity on genome-length templates. Consistent with this, the mutations also reduced viral RNA production in a cell-free replication system. In vivo, viruses containing residue 5 mutants produce viable virus, and an aromatic phenylalanine was maintained with only a slightly decreased virus growth rate. However, nonaromatic amino acids resulted in slow-growing viruses that reverted to wild type. The structural basis for this polymerase phenotype is yet to be determined, and we speculate that amino acid residue 5 interacts directly with template RNA or is involved in a protein structural interaction that stabilizes the elongation complex.

  5. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad A. Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 inhibitor (DPQ-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids.

  6. Comparative radiobiology of genetic loci of eukaryots as the basis of the general theory of mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, I.D.

    1983-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems of modern molecular cellular radiobiology is to reveal general and peculiar processes of the formation of gene mutations and chromosome aberrations in each stage of their formation in the irradiated genome of the higher eukaryots. The solution of the problems depends on the development of research within the framework of comparative radiobiology of genetic loci of the higher eukaryots that makes it possible to study quantitative regularities in the formation of gene (point) mutations and chromosome aberrations in one object and in the same experiment

  7. Dynamic instability--a common denominator in prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA segregation and cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuesler, John A; Li, Hsin-Jung Sophia

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic instability is an essential phenomenon in eukaryotic nuclear division and prokaryotic plasmid R1 segregation. Although the molecular machines used in both systems differ greatly in composition, strong similarities and requisite nuances in dynamics and segregation mechanisms are observed. This brief examination of the current literature provides a functional comparison between prokaryotic and eukaryotic dynamically unstable filaments, specifically ParM and microtubules. Additionally, this mini-review should support the notion that any dynamically unstable filament could serve as the molecular machine driving DNA segregation, but these machines possess auxiliary features to adapt to temporal and spatial disparities in either system.

  8. Use of prokaryotic transcriptional activators as metabolite biosensors in eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2018-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of transcriptional activators from prokaryotic organisms for use in eukaryotic cells, such as yeast as sensors of intracellular and extracellular accumulation of a ligand or metabolite specifically activating this transcriptional activator in a eukaryot......, such as yeast cell, such as a cell engineered to produce this ligand. The transcriptional activator controls a promoter upstream of one or more gene, which may include e.g. a reporter gene that may be a fluorescence marker, such as luciferase, green fluorescent protein or a gnee encoding antibiotic resistance....

  9. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells...... prokaryotes and eukaryotes are inactivated until the next cell cycle. Furthermore, in both systems the beta-clamp of the replicative polymerase associates with enzymatic activities that contribute to the inactivation of the helicase loaders. Finally, recent studies suggest that the control mechanism...

  10. Molecular analyses reveal high levels of eukaryotic richness associated with enigmatic deep-sea protists (Komokiacea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecroq, Beatrice; Gooday, Andrew John; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    morphological features. To examine their taxonomic position at the molecular level, we analysed the SSU rDNA sequences of two species, Normanina conferta and Septuma ocotillo, obtained either with specific foraminiferal or universal eukaryotic primers. Many different sequences resulted from this investigation...... but none of them could clearly be attributed to komokiaceans. Although our study failed to confirm univocally that Komokiacea are foraminiferans, it revealed a huge eukaryotic richness associated with these organisms, comparable with the richness in the overall surrounding sediment. These observations...

  11. Prediction of RNA Polymerase II recruitment, elongation and stalling from histone modification data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Jørgensen, Mette; Kolde, Raivo

    2011-01-01

    strategies are needed to progress from descriptive annotation of data to quantitative, predictive models. RESULTS: Here, we describe a computational framework which with high accuracy can predict the locations of core promoters, the amount of recruited RNAPII at the promoter, the amount of elongating RNAPII...... of RNAPII stalling. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we introduce a general framework to accurately predict the level of RNAPII recruitment, elongation, stalling and mRNA expression from chromatin signals. The versatility of the method also makes it ideally suited to investigate other genomic data....

  12. Contactless Measurement Of Rectilinearity Of An Elongated Object Based On The Example A Crane Rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćmielewski Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The common aim of engineering surveys is to determine deviations from rectilinearity for elongated objects. We have developed a number of methods for measuring points that represent an elongated object. These are the constant straight (optical, laser, mechanical-string method, the trigonometric method, geometric levelling method, photogrammetric methods and terrestrial laser scanning. When taking these measurements, it is crucial to have a direct access to the survey points of the measured object. Factors impeding the measurements include: adverse lighting conditions, vibration, dust, refractory effects, lack of direct access to the survey points, etc.

  13. A comparison of acute effects between Kinesio tape and electrical muscle elongation in hamstring extensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo-Antúnez, L; López-Miñarro, P A; Garrido-Ardila, E M; Castillo-Lozano, R; Domínguez-Vera, P; Maya-Martín, J; Albornoz-Cabello, M

    2015-01-01

    To improve hamstring extensibility some methods have been analyzed and compared for determining their acute and chronic effectiveness. To compare the immediate effect of electrical muscle elongation (EME) versus Kinesio tape (KT) in hamstring muscle extensibility. One hundred and twenty adult amateur athletes with hamstring shortness (straight leg raise test angle Kinesio tape are effective techniques in the short-term in amateur athletes with decreased hamstring extensibility. The higher increase of hamstring extensibility, with a better clinical effect was achieved with the application of electrical muscle elongation. However, no significant differences were found when comparing the effectiveness of both techniques.

  14. XTACC3-XMAP215 association reveals an asymmetric interaction promoting microtubule elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortuza, Gulnahar B; Cavazza, Tommaso; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor

    2014-01-01

    215 (chTOG), dissecting the mechanism by which their interaction promotes microtubule elongation during spindle assembly. Using SAXS, we show that the TACC domain (TD) is an elongated structure that mediates the interaction with the C terminus of XMAP215. Our data suggest that one TD and two XMAP215...... molecules associate to form a four-helix coiled-coil complex. A hybrid methods approach was used to define the precise regions of the TACC heptad repeat and the XMAP215 C terminus required for assembly and functioning of the complex. We show that XTACC3 can induce the recruitment of larger amounts of XMAP...

  15. Application of Numerical Dispersion Compensation of the Yee-FDTD Algorithm on Elongated Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Zhang, Shuai; Olesen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    A postprocessing method to compensate for the numerical dispersion of the Yee-FDTD scheme is presented. The method makes use of frequency domain deconvolution of the erroneous phase shift from the obtained results and can be applied on certain specific conditions, such as for simulations on elong...... on elongated computational domains. Validation of the method is performed by comparing to analytical solution in a simplified empty-space scenario. Application to simulation of an UWB deflection sensing system is demonstrated, with good match between numerical and measured results....

  16. Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend propagation and arm elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanassy, S; Botvinnik, A; Flash, T; Hochner, B

    2015-05-13

    The bend propagation involved in the stereotypical reaching movement of the octopus arm has been extensively studied. While these studies have analyzed the kinematics of bend propagation along the arm during its extension, possible length changes have been ignored. Here, the elongation profiles of the reaching movements of Octopus vulgaris were assessed using three-dimensional reconstructions. The analysis revealed that, in addition to bend propagation, arm extension movements involve elongation of the proximal part of the arm, i.e., the section from the base of the arm to the propagating bend. The elongations are quite substantial and highly variable, ranging from an average strain along the arm of -0.12 (i.e. shortening) up to 1.8 at the end of the movement (0.57 ± 0.41, n = 64 movements, four animals). Less variability was discovered in an additional set of experiments on reaching movements (0.64 ± 0.28, n = 30 movements, two animals), where target and octopus positions were kept more stationary. Visual observation and subsequent kinematic analysis suggest that the reaching movements can be broadly segregated into two groups. The first group involves bend propagation beginning at the base of the arm and propagating towards the arm tip. In the second, the bend is formed or present more distally and reaching is achieved mainly by elongation and straightening of the segment proximal to the bend. Only in the second type of movements is elongation significantly positively correlated with the distance of the bend from the target. We suggest that reaching towards a target is generated by a combination of both propagation of a bend along the arm and arm elongation. These two motor primitives may be combined to create a broad spectrum of reaching movements. The dynamical model, which recapitulates the biomechanics of the octopus muscular hydrostatic arm, suggests that achieving the observed elongation requires an extremely low ratio of longitudinal to transverse muscle

  17. Stress and neutron scattering measurements on linear polymer melts undergoing steady elongational flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Mortensen, Kell; Bach, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We use small-angle neutron scattering to measure the molecular stretching in polystyrene melts undergoing steady elongational flow at large stretch rates. The radius of gyration of the central segment of a partly deuterated polystyrene molecule is, in the stretching direction, increasing with the......We use small-angle neutron scattering to measure the molecular stretching in polystyrene melts undergoing steady elongational flow at large stretch rates. The radius of gyration of the central segment of a partly deuterated polystyrene molecule is, in the stretching direction, increasing...

  18. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  19. Phytosterol content and the campesterol:sitosterol ratio influence cotton fiber development: role of phytosterols in cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shasha; Wei, Ting; Tan, Kunling; Hu, Mingyu; Li, Fang; Zhai, Yunlan; Ye, Shue; Xiao, Yuehua; Hou, Lei; Pei, Yan; Luo, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Phytosterols play an important role in plant growth and development, including cell division, cell elongation, embryogenesis, cellulose biosynthesis, and cell wall formation. Cotton fiber, which undergoes synchronous cell elongation and a large amount of cellulose synthesis, is an ideal model for the study of plant cell elongation and cell wall biogenesis. The role of phytosterols in fiber growth was investigated by treating the fibers with tridemorph, a sterol biosynthetic inhibitor. The inhibition of phytosterol biosynthesis resulted in an apparent suppression of fiber elongation in vitro or in planta. The determination of phytosterol quantity indicated that sitosterol and campesterol were the major phytosterols in cotton fibers; moreover, higher concentrations of these phytosterols were observed during the period of rapid elongation of fibers. Furthermore, the decrease and increase in campesterol:sitosterol ratio was associated with the increase and decease in speed of elongation, respectively, during the elongation stage. The increase in the ratio was associated with the transition from cell elongation to secondary cell wall synthesis. In addition, a number of phytosterol biosynthetic genes were down-regulated in the short fibers of ligon lintless-1 mutant, compared to its near-isogenic wild-type TM-1. These results demonstrated that phytosterols play a crucial role in cotton fiber development, and particularly in fiber elongation.

  20. Mechanisms of Regulating Tissue Elongation in Drosophila Wing: Impact of Oriented Cell Divisions, Oriented Mechanical Forces, and Reduced Cell Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X.; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division plays fundamental roles in tissue morphogenesis. However, the mechanisms of regulating tissue elongation through cell growth and cell division are still not well understood. The wing imaginal disc of Drosophila provides a model system that has been widely used to study tissue morphogenesis. Here we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the mechanisms of regulating tissue elongation in Drosophila wing. We simulate the effects of directional cues on tissue elongation. We also computationally analyze the role of reduced cell size. Our simulation results indicate that oriented cell divisions, oriented mechanical forces, and reduced cell size can all mediate tissue elongation, but they function differently. We show that oriented cell divisions and oriented mechanical forces act as directional cues during tissue elongation. Between these two directional cues, oriented mechanical forces have a stronger influence than oriented cell divisions. In addition, we raise the novel hypothesis that reduced cell size may significantly promote tissue elongation. We find that reduced cell size alone cannot drive tissue elongation. However, when combined with directional cues, such as oriented cell divisions or oriented mechanical forces, reduced cell size can significantly enhance tissue elongation in Drosophila wing. Furthermore, our simulation results suggest that reduced cell size has a short-term effect on cell topology by decreasing the frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our simulation results suggest that cell divisions without cell growth play essential roles in tissue elongation. PMID:24504016

  1. The relationship between the types of axial elongation and the prevalence of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, T

    1998-02-01

    To assess the relationship between the prevalence of lattice degeneration and the types of axial elongation. Nine hundred seventy eyes of 542 highly myopic patients with axial length of 26.00-31.99 mm were evaluated by using A-scan axial length measurements and fundus examinations. Then the prevalence of lattice degeneration was compared between eyes with posterior staphyloma and those without posterior staphyloma. At each axial length, lattice degeneration was more frequent in eyes without posterior staphyloma (the entire eye elongates) than those with posterior staphyloma (only the posterior pole elongates). The difference was statistically significant (plattice degeneration is influenced by the types of axial elongation in high myopic eyes.

  2. Effect of gamma rays doses on pollen germination, polysiphony and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula Schiede et Deppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katiyar, S.R.; Chauhan, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    The present study aimed to study the effects of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) on pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula. Pollen germination and pollen tube elongation are stimulated by low doses of radiation. Although higher doses of radiation inhibit the germination of pollen, pollen tube elongation remains unaffected. Thus in Pinus patula pollen tube elongation is less radiosensitive than pollen germination. Compared to control pollen, irradiated pollen produced more number of long pollen tubes. Therefore pollen tube size can be improved using low doses of radiation. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tables

  3. Towards a palaeoecological model of the Mesoproterozoic Taoudeni Basin, Mauritania, Northwestern Africa: implications for early eukaryote evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghin, Jérémie; Guilbaud, Romain; Poulton, Simon W.; Gueneli, Nur; Brocks, Jochen J.; Storme, Jean-Yves; Blanpied, Christian; Javaux, Emmanuelle J.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Proterozoic rock record preserves a relatively moderate diversity of early eukaryotes, despite the early evolution of fundamental features of the eukaryotic cell. Common hypotheses involve the redox state of stratified oceans with oxic shallow waters, euxinic mid-depth waters, and anoxic and ferruginous deep waters during this time period. Mid-Proterozoic eukaryotes would have found suitable ecological niches in estuarine, fluvio-deltaic and coastal shallow marine environments near nutrient sources, while N2-fixing photoautotrophs bacteria would have been better competitors than eukaryotic algae in nutrient-poor niches. Here, we present the first palaeoecological model of the late Mesoproterozoic Taoudeni Basin, Mauritania, Northwestern Africa. Previous palaeontological studies in the basin reported stromatolites, a low diversity of microfossils - including one species of presumed eukaryotes: verrucae-bearing acritarch - and biomarkers of anoxygenic phototrophic purple and green sulfur bacteria, cyanobacteria and microaerophilic methanotrophs. However, no biomarkers diagnostic for crown group eukaryotes were reported so far. In addition to exceptionally well preserved microbial mats showing chain-like aggregates of pyrite grains, we observed a total of sixty-two morphotaxa including nine presumed prokaryotes, thirty-five possible prokaryotes or eukaryotes, fifteen unambiguous species of eukaryotes - ornamented and process-bearing acritarchs, multicellular morphotaxon, putative VSMs, large budding vesicles, and vesicles with a sophisticated excystment structure: the pylome - and three remains of structured kerogen. Here, we combined the geological context (sedimentological features and lithofacies), iron speciation (n = 156) - with the aim of reconstructing palaeoredox environmental conditions -, and microfossils quantitative analysis (n = 61). Sediments were deposited under shallow waters in pericratonic (western basin) and epicratonic (eastern basin

  4. The strawberry gene FaGAST affects plant growth through inhibition of cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José I; Amaya, Iraida; Castillejo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Quesada, Miguel A; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2006-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) FaGAST gene encodes a small protein with 12 cysteine residues conserved in the C-terminal region similar to a group of proteins identified in other species with diverse assigned functions such as cell division, elongation, or elongation arrest. This gene is expressed in the fruit receptacle, with two peaks during ripening at the white and the red-ripe stages, both coincident with an arrest in the growth pattern. Expression is also high in the roots but confined to the cells at the end of the elongation zone. Exogenous application of gibberellin increased the transcript level of the FaGAST gene in strawberry fruits. Ectopic expression of FaGAST in transgenic Fragaria vesca under the control of the CaMV-35S promoter caused both delayed growth of the plant and fruits with reduced size. The same growth defect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing FaGAST. In addition, the transgenic plants exhibited late flowering and low sensitivity to exogenous gibberellin. Taken together, the expression pattern, the regulation by gibberellin, and the transgenic phenotypes point to a role for FaGAST in arresting cell elongation during strawberry fruit ripening.

  5. DksA guards elongating RNA polymerase against ribosome-stalling-induced arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Mooney, Rachel A; Grass, Jeffrey A; Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Herman, Christophe; Landick, Robert; Wang, Jue D

    2014-03-06

    In bacteria, translation-transcription coupling inhibits RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalling. We present evidence suggesting that, upon amino acid starvation, inactive ribosomes promote rather than inhibit RNAP stalling. We developed an algorithm to evaluate genome-wide polymerase progression independently of local noise and used it to reveal that the transcription factor DksA inhibits promoter-proximal pausing and increases RNAP elongation when uncoupled from translation by depletion of charged tRNAs. DksA has minimal effect on RNAP elongation in vitro and on untranslated RNAs in vivo. In these cases, transcripts can form RNA structures that prevent backtracking. Thus, the effect of DksA on transcript elongation may occur primarily upon ribosome slowing/stalling or at promoter-proximal locations that limit the potential for RNA structure. We propose that inactive ribosomes prevent formation of backtrack-blocking mRNA structures and that, in this circumstance, DksA acts as a transcription elongation factor in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of elongational flow on immiscible polymer blend/nanoparticle composites: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebert, George L; Lak Joo, Yong

    2016-07-13

    Using coarse-grained nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, the dynamics of a blend of the equal ratio of immiscible polymers mixed with nanoparticles (NP) are simulated. The simulations are conducted under planar elongational flow, which affects the dispersion of the NPs and the self-assembly morphology. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of planar elongational flow on the nanocomposite blend system as well as to thoroughly compare the blend to an analogous symmetric block copolymer (BCP) system to understand the role of the polymer structure on the morphology and NP dispersion. Two types of spherical NPs are considered: (1) selective NPs that are attracted to one of the polymer components and (2) nonselective NPs that are neutral to both components. A comparison of the blend and BCP systems reveals that for selective NP, the blend system shows a much broader NP distribution in the selective phase than the BCP phase. This is due to a more uniform distribution of polymer chain ends throughout the selective phase in the blend system than the BCP system. For nonselective NP, the blend and BCP systems show similar results for low elongation rates, but the NP peak in the BCP system broadens as elongation rates approach the order-disorder transition. In addition, the presence of NP is found to affect the morphology transitions of both the blend and BCP systems, depending on the NP type.

  7. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Ko, E-mail: miyoshi@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Brain Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato [Department of Brain Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  8. Adaptation during northern range expansion in the elongate hemlock scale Fiorinia externa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan Preisser; Alexandra Lodge; David Orwig; Joseph Elkinton

    2007-01-01

    The elongate hemlock scale Fiorinia externa, (EHS) an invasive pest from Japan, was first found in the eastern United States in 1908. It feeds on a variety of plants, most notably the eastern hemlock Tsuga canadensis, and has been spreading slowly into southern New England. In order to examine the northern spread of EHS and the...

  9. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: biological role of interferon tau in endometrial function and conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorniak, P; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2013-04-01

    This review integrates established and new information on the biological role of ovarian progesterone (P4) and interferon tau as well as conceptus- and endometrial-derived factors, PG and cortisol, in endometrial function and conceptus elongation during the periimplantation period of pregnancy in ruminants. Interferon tau is the maternal recognition of pregnancy signal that inhibits production of luteolytic pulses of PGF2α by the endometrium to maintain corpora lutea and their production of P4, the unequivocal hormone of pregnancy. Conceptus-endometrial interactions in ruminants are complex and involve carefully orchestrated temporal and spatial alterations in endometrial gene expression during pregnancy. Available results from studies in sheep support the idea that the individual, interactive, and coordinated actions of P4, interferon tau, PG, and cortisol regulate expression of elongation- and implantation-related genes in the endometrial epithelia and that P4 and PG are essential regulators of conceptus elongation. The outcome of these gene expression changes is alterations in endometrial secretions that govern conceptus elongation via effects on trophectoderm proliferation, migration, attachment, and adhesion. An increased knowledge of conceptus-endometrial interactions during early pregnancy in ruminants is necessary to understand and elucidate the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss and to provide a basis for new strategies to improve pregnancy outcome and reproductive efficiency.

  10. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li 2 CO 3 were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  11. Getting up to speed with transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Iris; Lis, John T.

    Recent advances in sequencing techniques that measure nascent transcripts and that reveal the positioning of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) have shown that the pausing of Pol II in promoter-proximal regions and its release to initiate a phase of productive elongation are key steps in transcription

  12. Kinetic separation of phototropism from blue-light inhibition of stem elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that phototropic bending arises when a light gradient across the stem differentially inhibits cell elongation because of direct inhibition of cell elongation by light (the Blaauw hypothesis). Continuous irradiation of dark-grown cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) with unilateral blue light inhibited hypocotyl elongation within 30 s, but did not induce phototropic curvature until 4.5 h after the start of irradiation. Marking experiments showed that curvature began simultaneously at the top and bottom of the growing region. In situ measurements of the light gradient across the stem with a glass fiber optic indicated that a 5- to 6-fold difference in fluence rate was established on the two sides of the stem. The light gradient established at the start of irradiation was the same as that after 6 h of irradiation. Changes in gravitropic responsiveness during this period were also ruled out. Calculations show that the light gradient should have caused curvature which would be detectable within 30 to 60 min and which would extrapolate to the start of irradiation--if the Blaauw hypothesis were correct. The long lag for phototropism in this case indicates that rapid inhibition of cell elongation by blue light does not cause the asymmetrical growth of phototropism. Rather, phototropism is superimposed upon this separate light growth response.

  13. Photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue and red light: effects on hydraulic and cell wall properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigel, J.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of photoinhibition of stem elongation by blue (BL) and red light (RL) was studied in etiolated seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska). Brief BL irradiations resulted in fast transient inhibition of elongation, while a delayed (lag approximately 60 minutes) but prolonged inhibition was observed after brief RL. Possible changes in the hydraulic and wall properties of the growing cells during photoinhibition were examined. Cell sap osmotic pressure was unaffected by BL and RL, but both irradiations increased turgor pressure by approximately 0.05 megapascal (pressure-probe technique). Cell wall yielding was analyzed by in vivo stress relaxation (pressure-block technique). BL and RL reduced the initial rate of relaxation by 38 and 54%, while the final amount of relaxation was decreased by 48 and 10%, respectively. These results indicate that RL inhibits elongation mainly by lowering the wall yield coefficient, while most of the inhibitory effect of BL was due to an increase of the yield threshold. Mechanical extensibility of cell walls (Instron technique) was decreased by BL and RL, mainly due to a reduction in the plastic component of extensibility. Thus, photoinhibitions of elongation by both BL and RL are achieved through changes in cell wall properties, and are not due to effects on the hydraulic properties of the cell.

  14. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  15. Skin-pass rolling I – Studies on roughness transfer and elongation under pure normal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kijima, Hideo; Bay, Niels

    2008-01-01

    The influence of tool roughness in skin-pass or temper rolling of steel strip is investigated focusing on roughness transfer and strip elongation under pure normal loading, i.e. with no tangential shear between tool and workpiece. The process is simulated by an elasto-plastic FE simulation of pla...

  16. Improving the Determination of Eastern Elongations of Planetary Satellites in the Astronomical Almanac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rura, Christopher; Stollberg, Mark

    2018-01-01

    The Astronomical Almanac is an annual publication of the US Naval Observatory (USNO) and contains a wide variety of astronomical data used by astronomers worldwide as a general reference or for planning observations. Included in this almanac are the times of greatest eastern and northern elongations of the natural satellites of the planets, accurate to 0.1 hour UT. The production code currently used to determine elongation times generates X and Y coordinates for each satellite (16 total) in 5 second intervals. This consequentially caused very large data files, and resulted in the program devoted to determining the elongation times to be computationally intensive. To make this program more efficient, we wrote a Python program to fit a cubic spline to data generated with a 6-minute time step. This resulted in elongation times that were found to agree with those determined from the 5 second data currently used in a large number of cases and was tested for 16 satellites between 2017 and 2019. The accuracy of this program is being tested for the years past 2019 and, if no problems are found, the code will be considered for production of this section of The Astronomical Almanac.

  17. Isobutyrate biosynthesis via methanol chain elongation: converting organic wastes to platform chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Huang, Shengle; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND
    Isobutyrate is a platform chemical that is currently produced from a non-renewable fossil-based feedstock. This study aimed at developing a renewable isobutyrate production process by using methanol chain elongation, a novel bioprocess that uses organic waste as primary feedstocks and

  18. Strengthening and elongation mechanism of Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Ping; Hu, Bo-liang; Wang, Kuai-she; Song, Rui; Yang, Fan; Yu, Zhi-tao; Tan, Jiang-fei; Cao, Wei-cheng; Liu, Dong-xin; An, Geng; Guo, Lei; Yu, Hai-liang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural contributes to understand the strengthening and elongation mechanism in Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy. Lanthanum oxide particles not only act as heterogeneous nucleation core, but also act as the second phase to hinder the grain growth during sintering crystallization. The molybdenum substrate formed sub-grain under the effect of second phase when the alloy rolled to plate.

  19. Chain elongation in anaerobic reactor microbiomes to recover resources from waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spirito, C.M.; Richter, H.; Rabaey, K.; Stams, A.J.M.; Angenent, L.T.

    2014-01-01

    Different microbial pathways can elongate the carbon chains of molecules in open cultures of microbial populations (i.e. reactor microbiomes) under anaerobic conditions. Here, we discuss three such pathways: 1. homoacetogenesis to combine two carbon dioxide molecules into acetate; 2. succinate

  20. Chain elongation suppression of cyclic block copolymers in lamellar microphase-separated bulk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsushita, Y; Iwata, H; Asari, T; Uchida, T; ten Brinke, G; Takano, A

    2004-01-01

    Chain elongation suppression of cyclic block copolymers in microphase-separated bulk was determined quantitatively. Solvent-cast and annealed films are confirmed to show alternating lamellar structure and their microdomain spacing D increases with increasing total molecular weight M according to the

  1. Quantitative correlation between slip patterning and microstructure during tensile elongation in 6xxx series aluminum alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghodrat, S.; Pirgazi, H.; Kestens, L.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    To the purpose of evaluating the effect of deformation on the microstructure, aluminum structures were analyzed on tensile strained samples extended to 25% elongation. In the substructure of these deformed samples linear slip patterns were observed, generally confined to the bulk of the grain. In

  2. Mechanical modelling quantifies the functional importance of outer tissue layers during root elongation and bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rosemary J; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Band, Leah R; Fernandes, Anwesha N; French, Andrew P; Fozard, John A; Hodgman, T Charlie; Kenobi, Kim; Pridmore, Tony P; Stout, Michael; Wells, Darren M; Wilson, Michael H; Bennett, Malcolm J; Jensen, Oliver E

    2014-01-01

    Root elongation and bending require the coordinated expansion of multiple cells of different types. These processes are regulated by the action of hormones that can target distinct cell layers. We use a mathematical model to characterise the influence of the biomechanical properties of individual cell walls on the properties of the whole tissue. Taking a simple constitutive model at the cell scale which characterises cell walls via yield and extensibility parameters, we derive the analogous tissue-level model to describe elongation and bending. To accurately parameterise the model, we take detailed measurements of cell turgor, cell geometries and wall thicknesses. The model demonstrates how cell properties and shapes contribute to tissue-level extensibility and yield. Exploiting the highly organised structure of the elongation zone (EZ) of the Arabidopsis root, we quantify the contributions of different cell layers, using the measured parameters. We show how distributions of material and geometric properties across the root cross-section contribute to the generation of curvature, and relate the angle of a gravitropic bend to the magnitude and duration of asymmetric wall softening. We quantify the geometric factors which lead to the predominant contribution of the outer cell files in driving root elongation and bending. PMID:24641449

  3. In Vivo Cell Wall Loosening by Hydroxyl Radicals during Cress Seed Germination and Elongation Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, K.; Linkies, A.; Vreeburg, R.A.M.; Fry, S.C.; Krieger-Liszkay, A.; Leubner-Metzger, G.

    2009-01-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of the plant life cycle, including seed germination, elongation growth, and fruit ripening. Here, we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical (·OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and

  4. Comparative Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicology & Erionite’s Apparent  High Potency for Inducing Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent NHEERL research under EPA's Libby Action Plan has determined that elongated particle relative potency for rat pleural mesothelioma is best predicted on the basis of total external surface area (TSA) of slightly acid leached test samples which simulate particle bio-durabili...

  5. The Prediction of Yarn Elongation of Kenyan Ring-Spun Yarn using Extreme Learning Machines (ELM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josphat Igadwa Mwasiagi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of the manufacture of cotton yarns involves several processes, while the prediction of yarn quality parameters forms an important area of investigation. This research work concentrated on the prediction of cotton yarn elongation. Cotton lint and yarn samples were collected in textile factories in Kenya.The collected samples were tested under standard testing conditions. Cotton lint parameters, machine parameters and yarn elongation were used to design yarn elongation prediction models. The elongation prediction models used three network training algorithms, including backpropagation (BP, an extreme learning machine (ELM, and a hybrid of differential evolution (DE and an ELM referred to as DE-ELM. The prediction models recorded a mean squared error (mse value of 0.001 using 11, 43 and 2 neurons in the hidden layer for the BP, ELM and DE-ELM models respectively. The ELM models exhibited faster training speeds than the BP algorithms, but required more neurons in the hidden layer than other models. The DEELM hybrid algorithm was faster than the BP algorithm, but slower than the ELM algorithm.

  6. ALFIN-LIKE 6 is involved in root hair elongation during phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Yu, Su-May; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Phosphate (Pi) starvation in plants induces dense and elongated root hairs, which increase the absorptive surface area of the roots and play a critical role in Pi uptake. The molecular mechanism underlying these changes remains unclear. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were employed to identify novel genes involved in root hair formation on Pi starvation. The mutant per2, with defects in root hair elongation specifically under low Pi conditions, was identified in a large-scale genetic screen of T-DNA insertion lines. The phenotype was caused by a mutation in the homeodomain protein ALFIN-LIKE 6 (AL6). From a screen of mutants defective in genes that showed lower transcript abundance in per2 relative to wild-type roots on low Pi medium, we identified four putative downstream targets of AL6, namely ETC1, NPC4, SQD2 and PS2, all of which were critical in root hair elongation of Pi-deficient plants. The results further indicate that AL6 is involved in the control of growth and several key responses to Pi starvation. Our findings demonstrate that AL6 controls the transcription of a suite of genes critical for root hair elongation under low Pi conditions, suggesting a novel physiological function for an Alfin gene in Arabidopsis. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

    2007-05-30

    Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

  8. Effect of Theophylline on Elongation and some Transport Processes in Embryos of Haplopappus gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M; Chiatante, D; Sparvoli, E

    1984-09-01

    In germinating embryos of Haplopappus gracilis, theophylline induced a FC-reversible inhibition of elongation and K(+) uptake. The possible action of theophylline on the proton pump and other transport processes is discussed and compared with the effects of its ethylenediamine salt, aminophylline. Copyright © 1984 Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  9. Promoting chain elongation in mixed culture acidification reactors by addition of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grootscholten, T.I.M.; Kinsky dal Borgo, F.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    In this research we investigate a microbial production process to produce medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) based on the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). In this microbial production process, called chain elongation, bacteria produce medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) from ethanol and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). MCFAs could be used as new biomass based building blocks for the chemical and fuel industry. The objective of this article is to investigate whether chain elongation can be promoted during acidification of OFMSW by addition of ethanol. The results show that chain elongation can be promoted during acidification of OFMSW by addition of ethanol. However, the hydrolysis rate and the carboxylic acid yield of the OFMSW in reactors with ethanol additions were lower than the hydrolysis rate and the carboxylic acid yield than in reactors without ethanol additions. Further research is required to determine whether a combined chain elongation and acidification reactor or a separated reactor system is more advantageous for MCFA production from OFMSW. -- Highlights: ► Production of medium chain fatty acids from municipal solid waste and ethanol. ► Insight in production of caproate and consumption of in-situ produced ethanol. ► Ethanol additions reduced propionate, butyrate and valerate concentrations. ► Ethanol additions hardly reduced acetate concentrations. ► Hydrolysis rate was lower in experiments with ethanol additions

  10. Mutational analysis of Glu272 in elongation factor 1A of E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous work (Mansilla et al. (1997) Protein Eng. 10, 927-934) we showed that Arg7 of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu (EF1A) plays an essential role in aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) binding. Substitution of Arg7 by Ala or Glu lost this activity. We proposed that Arg7 forms a salt bridge...

  11. Experimental verification of blade elongation and axial rotor shift in steam turbines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2016), s. 190-192 ISSN 2149-8024 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : blade elongation * axial rotor shift * steam turbines * magnetoresistive sensors Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.challengejournal.com/index.php/cjsmec/article/download/74/62

  12. The New Higher Level Classification of Eukaryotes with Emphasis on the Taxonomy of Protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINA M. ADL; ALASTAIR G. B. SIMPSON; MARK A. FARMER; ROBERT A. ANDERSEN; O. ROGER ANDERSON; JOHN R. BARTA; SAMUEL S. BOWSER; GUY BRUGEROLLE; ROBERT A. FENSOME; SUZANNE FREDERICQ; TIMOTHY Y. JAMES; SERGEI KARPOV; PAUL KUGRENS; JOHN KRUG; CHRISTOPHER E. LANE; LOUISE A. LEWIS; JEAN LODGE; DENIS H. LYNN; DAVID G. MANN; RICHARD M. MCCOURT; LEONEL MENDOZA; ØJVIND MOESTRUP; SHARON E. MOZLEY-STANDRIDGE; THOMAS A. NERAD; CAROL A. SHEARER; ALEXEY V. SMIRNOV; FREDERICK W. SPIEGEL; MAX F.J.R. TAYLOR

    2005-01-01

    This revision of the classification of unicellular eukaryotes updates that of Levine et al. (1980) for the protozoa and expands it to include other protists. Whereas the previous revision was primarily to incorporate the results of ultrastructural studies, this revision incorporates results from both ultrastructural research since 1980 and molecular phylogenetic...

  13. Production of yeastolates for uniform stable isotope labelling in eukaryotic cell culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Pistorius, A.M.A.; Grip, W.J. de

    2009-01-01

    Preparation of stable isotope-labelled yeastolates opens up ways to establish more cost-effective stable isotope labelling of biomolecules in insect and mammalian cell lines and hence to employ higher eukaryotic cell lines for stable isotope labelling of complex recombinant proteins. Therefore, we

  14. The Ancient Gamete Fusogen HAP2 Is a Eukaryotic Class II Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fédry, Juliette; Liu, Yanjie; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenhao; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Traincard, François; Meola, Annalisa; Bricogne, Gérard; Grishin, Nick V; Snell, William J; Rey, Félix A; Krey, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    Sexual reproduction is almost universal in eukaryotic life and involves the fusion of male and female haploid gametes into a diploid cell. The sperm-restricted single-pass transmembrane protein HAP2-GCS1 has been postulated to function in membrane merger. Its presence in the major eukaryotic taxa-animals, plants, and protists (including important human pathogens like Plasmodium)-suggests that many eukaryotic organisms share a common gamete fusion mechanism. Here, we report combined bioinformatic, biochemical, mutational, and X-ray crystallographic studies on the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii HAP2 that reveal homology to class II viral membrane fusion proteins. We further show that targeting the segment corresponding to the fusion loop by mutagenesis or by antibodies blocks gamete fusion. These results demonstrate that HAP2 is the gamete fusogen and suggest a mechanism of action akin to viral fusion, indicating a way to block Plasmodium transmission and highlighting the impact of virus-cell genetic exchanges on the evolution of eukaryotic life. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Eukaryotes in the gut microbiota in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra H. Mandarano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS often suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms and many are diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Previous studies, including from our laboratory, have demonstrated that the ME/CFS gut bacterial composition is altered and less diverse when compared to healthy individuals. Patients have increased biomarkers of inflammation and leaky gut syndrome. To further investigate dysbiosis in the ME/CFS gut microbiome, we sought to characterize the eukaryotes present in the gut of 49 individuals with ME/CFS and 39 healthy controls. Using 18S rRNA sequencing, we have identified eukaryotes in stool samples of 17 healthy individuals and 17 ME/CFS patients. Our analysis demonstrates a small, nonsignificant decrease in eukaryotic diversity in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy individuals. In addition, ME/CFS patients show a nonsignificant increase in the ratio of fungal phyla Basidiomycota to Ascomycota, which is consistent with ongoing inflammation in ME/CFS. We did not identify specific eukaryotic taxa that are associated with ME/CFS disease status.

  16. SUMO fusion technology for enhanced protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panavas, Tadas; Sanders, Carsten; Butt, Tauseef R

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the reversible attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein is a post-translational modification that has been demonstrated to play an important role in various cellular processes. Moreover, it has been found that SUMO as an N-terminal fusion partner enhances functional protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems, based upon significantly improved protein stability and solubility. Following the expression and purification of the fusion protein, the SUMO-tag can be cleaved by specific (SUMO) proteases via their endopeptidase activity in vitro to generate the desired N-terminus of the released protein partner. In addition to its physiological relevance in eukaryotes, SUMO can, thus, be used as a powerful biotechnological tool for protein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems.In this chapter, we will describe the construction of a fusion protein with the SUMO-tag, its expression in Escherichia coli, and its purification followed by the removal of the SUMO-tag by a SUMO-specific protease in vitro.

  17. Large-scale patterns in biodiversity of microbial eukaryotes from the abyssal sea floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckenbach, Frank; Hausmann, Klaus; Wylezich, Claudia; Weitere, Markus; Arndt, Hartmut

    2010-01-05

    Eukaryotic microbial life at abyssal depths remains "uncharted territory" in eukaryotic microbiology. No phylogenetic surveys have focused on the largest benthic environment on this planet, the abyssal plains. Moreover, knowledge of the spatial patterns of deep-sea community structure is scanty, and what little is known originates primarily from morphology-based studies of foraminiferans. Here we report on the great phylogenetic diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities of all 3 abyssal plains of the southeastern Atlantic Ocean--the Angola, Cape, and Guinea Abyssal Plains--from depths of 5,000 m. A high percentage of retrieved clones had no close representatives in genetic databases. Many clones were affiliated with parasitic species. Furthermore, differences between the communities of the Cape Abyssal Plain and the other 2 abyssal plains point to environmental gradients apparently shaping community structure at the landscape level. On a regional scale, local species diversity showed much less variation. Our study provides insight into the community composition of microbial eukaryotes on larger scales from the wide abyssal sea floor realm and marks a direction for more detailed future studies aimed at improving our understanding of deep-sea microbes at the community and ecosystem levels, as well as the ecological principles at play.

  18. Eukaryotic Ribonucleases P/MRP: the Crystal Structure of the P3 Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perederina, A.; Esakova, O; Quan, C; Khanova, E; Krasilnikov, A

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 {angstrom}. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  19. Revealing genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hannen, E.J.; Van Agterveld, M.P.; Gons, H.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new Eucarya-specific 18S rDNA primer set was constructed and tested using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to analyze the genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments. All eukaryal lines of descent exhibited four or fewer nucleotide mismatches in the forward primer

  20. Studying NK cell lectin receptors and their interactions using HEK293T eukaryotic expression system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, O.; Celadová, P.; Kolenko, Petr; Dohnálek, Jan; Bezouška, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 170 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress "Life´s Molecular Interactions /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : NK cell lectin receptors * HEK293T * eukaryotic expression system Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  1. A complex cell division machinery was present in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Eme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The midbody is a transient complex structure containing proteins involved in cytokinesis. Up to now, it has been described only in Metazoa. Other eukaryotes present a variety of structures implied in the last steps of cell division, such as the septum in fungi or the phragmoplast in plants. However, it is unclear whether these structures are homologous (derive from a common ancestral structure or analogous (have distinct evolutionary origins. Recently, the proteome of the hamster midbody has been characterized and 160 proteins identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using phylogenomic approaches, we show here that nearly all of these 160 proteins (95% are conserved across metazoan lineages. More surprisingly, we show that a large part of the mammalian midbody components (91 proteins were already present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes (LECA and were most likely involved in the construction of a complex multi-protein assemblage acting in cell division. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the midbodies of non-mammalian metazoa are likely very similar to the mammalian one and that the ancestor of Metazoa possessed a nearly modern midbody. Moreover, our analyses support the hypothesis that the midbody and the structures involved in cytokinesis in other eukaryotes derive from a large and complex structure present in LECA, likely involved in cytokinesis. This is an additional argument in favour of the idea of a complex ancestor for all contemporary eukaryotes.

  2. Are maternal mitochondria the selfish entities that are masters of the cells of eukaryotic multicellular organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Peter W; Baldelli, E; Baluška, Frantisek

    2009-01-01

    The Energide concept, as well as the endosymbiotic theory of eukaryotic cell organization and evolution, proposes that present-day cells of eukaryotic organisms are mosaics of specialized and cooperating units, or organelles. Some of these units were originally free-living prokaryotes, which were engulfed during evolutionary time. Mitochondria represent one of these types of previously independent organisms, the Energide, is another type. This new perspective on the organization of the cell has been further expanded to reveal the concept of a public milieu, the cytosol, in which Energides and mitochondria live, each with their own private internal milieu. The present paper discusses how the endosymbiotic theory implicates a new hypothesis about the hierarchical and communicational organization of the integrated prokaryotic components of the eukaryotic cell and provides a new angle from which to consider the theory of evolution and its bearing upon cellular complexity. Thus, it is proposed that the “selfish gene” hypothesis of Dawkins1 is not the only possible perspective for comprehending genomic and cellular evolution. Our proposal is that maternal mitochondria are the selfish “master” entities of the eukaryotic cell with respect not only to their propagation from cell-to-cell and from generation-to-generation but also to their regulation of all other cellular functions. However, it should be recognized that the concept of “master” and “servant” cell components is a metaphor; in present-day living organisms their organellar components are considered to be interdependent and inseparable. PMID:19513277

  3. Optimizing eukaryotic cell hosts for protein production through systems biotechnology and genome-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jahir M; Lewis, Nathan E

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cell lines, including Chinese hamster ovary cells, yeast, and insect cells, are invaluable hosts for the production of many recombinant proteins. With the advent of genomic resources, one can now leverage genome-scale computational modeling of cellular pathways to rationally engineer eukaryotic host cells. Genome-scale models of metabolism include all known biochemical reactions occurring in a specific cell. By describing these mathematically and using tools such as flux balance analysis, the models can simulate cell physiology and provide targets for cell engineering that could lead to enhanced cell viability, titer, and productivity. Here we review examples in which metabolic models in eukaryotic cell cultures have been used to rationally select targets for genetic modification, improve cellular metabolic capabilities, design media supplementation, and interpret high-throughput omics data. As more comprehensive models of metabolism and other cellular processes are developed for eukaryotic cell culture, these will enable further exciting developments in cell line engineering, thus accelerating recombinant protein production and biotechnology in the years to come. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  5. Eukaryotic ribonucleases P/MRP: the crystal structure of the P3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-02-17

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 A. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  6. Sex is a ubiquitous, ancient, and inherent attribute of eukaryotic life

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Speijer, D.; Lukeš, Julius; Eliáš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 29 (2015), s. 8827-8834 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR GA15-21974S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reactive oxygen species * evolution * protists * eukaryotes * sex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  7. High Genetic Diversity and Novelty in Eukaryotic Plankton Assemblages Inhabiting Saline Lakes in the Qaidam Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  8. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair migration and aortic elongation differentiated using dual reference point analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Takayama, Toshio; Panthofer, Annalise; Cambria, Richard P; Farber, Mark A; Jordan, William D; Matsumura, Jon S

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated images of patients undergoing a thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedure using two reference points as a means for differentiating stent graft migration from aortic elongation. Conventional standards define migration of a stent graft as an absolute change in the distance from the distal graft ring to a distal landmark ≥10 mm compared with a baseline measurement. Aortic elongation occurs over time in both healthy individuals and patients with aortic disease. Aortic elongation in patients with stent grafts may result in increased distal thoracic aortic lengths over time. False-positive stent graft migration would be defined when these patients meet the standard definition for migration, even if the stent has not moved in relation to the elongating aorta. This retrospective study evaluated the aortic length of 23 patients treated with the conformable GORE TAG thoracic endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) in three clinical trials (dissection, traumatic injury, and aneurysm). Patients who met the standard definition for migration were selected. A standardized protocol was used to measure aortic centerline lengths, including the innominate artery (IA) to the most distal device ring, the IA to the celiac artery (CA), and the distal ring to the CA. Baseline lengths obtained from the first postoperative image were compared with length measurements obtained from the first interval at which they met the standard definition for migration. The conventional standards for migration using a single reference point were compared with the use of dual reference points. Of the 23 patients with endograft changes, 20 were deemed to have aortic elongation rather than true migration. The remaining three patients were deemed to have migration on the basis of the IA to distal ring position compared with the IA to CA length change. The IA to CA interval length change was markedly greater in those with elongation compared with migration (23.8 ± 8.4

  9. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection. IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected

  10. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  11. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin.

  12. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Association of specific pectin methylesterases with Al-induced root elongation inhibition in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Ying; Zeng, Zhang Hui; Yan, Jing Ying; Fan, Wei; Bian, Hong Wu; Zhu, Mu Yuan; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-08-01

    The negative charges of cell wall pectin molecules attributed by pectin methylesterase (PME, EC 3.1.1.11) contribute to Al binding capacity. We examined the expression profiles of 35 members of the PME gene family in the root apex of an Al-sensitive rice 'Zhefu802' under Al stress. While root elongation was inhibited by 40% after 3-h exposure to 25 µM Al, cell wall PME activity and the abundance of eight PME genes transcripts were increased. The same Al treatment which had almost no effect on root elongation of an Al-resistant rice ssp. japonica 'Nipponbare' did not change the expression patterns of these eight PME genes. However, when Al concentration was increased to 50 µM, by which the root elongation of 'Nipponbare' was inhibited by 40% too, the expression of these PME genes were also upregulated except two genes with no signal. These suggest a possible correlation between the upregulated genes and Al-induced inhibition of root elongation in rice. Furthermore, these eight PME genes behaved differently when subjected to CdCl2 and LaCl3 treatments, implying the specificity of different PME genes in response to different metal toxicities. The transgenic rice overexpressing one of these eight PME genes OsPME14 showed higher PME activity and Al content in root tip cell wall, and became more sensitive to Al stress, verifying the involvement of the specific PME gene in Al toxicity. Therefore, our results provided the molecular evidence to connect the expression of specific PME genes with the Al-induced inhibition of root elongation in rice. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  14. Evolutionary Origins of the Eukaryotic Shikimate Pathway: Gene Fusions, Horizontal Gene Transfer, and Endosymbiotic Replacements†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A.; Dacks, Joel B.; Campbell, Samantha A.; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.; Foster, Peter G.; McLeod, Rima; Roberts, Craig W.

    2006-01-01

    Currently the shikimate pathway is reported as a metabolic feature of prokaryotes, ascomycete fungi, apicomplexans, and plants. The plant shikimate pathway enzymes have similarities to prokaryote homologues and are largely active in chloroplasts, suggesting ancestry from the plastid progenitor genome. Toxoplasma gondii, which also possesses an alga-derived plastid organelle, encodes a shikimate pathway with similarities to ascomycete genes, including a five-enzyme pentafunctional arom. These data suggests that the shikimate pathway and the pentafunctional arom either had an ancient origin in the eukaryotes or was conveyed by eukaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer (HGT). We expand sampling and analyses of the shikimate pathway genes to include the oomycetes, ciliates, diatoms, basidiomycetes, zygomycetes, and the green and red algae. Sequencing of cDNA from Tetrahymena thermophila confirmed the presence of a pentafused arom, as in fungi and T. gondii. Phylogenies and taxon distribution suggest that the arom gene fusion event may be an ancient eukaryotic innovation. Conversely, the Plantae lineage (represented here by both Viridaeplantae and the red algae) acquired different prokaryotic genes for all seven steps of the shikimate pathway. Two of the phylogenies suggest a derivation of the Plantae genes from the cyanobacterial plastid progenitor genome, but if the full Plantae pathway was originally of cyanobacterial origin, then the five other shikimate pathway genes were obtained from a minimum of two other eubacterial genomes. Thus, the phylogenies demonstrate both separate HGTs and shared derived HGTs within the Plantae clade either by primary HGT transfer or secondarily via the plastid progenitor genome. The shared derived characters support the holophyly of the Plantae lineage and a single ancestral primary plastid endosymbiosis. Our analyses also pinpoints a minimum of 50 gene/domain loss events, demonstrating that loss and replacement events have been

  15. Ion Channels Activated by Mechanical Forces in Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokabe, Masahiro; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Since the first discovery of mechanosensitive ion channel (MSC) in non-sensory cells in 1984, a variety of MSCs has been identified both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. One of the central issues concerning MSCs is to understand the molecular and biophysical mechanisms of how mechanical forces activate/open MSCs. It has been well established that prokaryotic (mostly bacterial) MSCs are activated exclusively by membrane tension. Thus the problem to be solved with prokaryotic MSCs is the mechanisms how the MSC proteins receive tensile forces from the lipid bilayer and utilize them for channel opening. On the other hand, the activation of many eukaryotic MSCs crucially depends on tension in the actin cytoskeleton. By using the actin cytoskeleton as a force sensing antenna, eukaryotic MSCs have obtained sophisticated functions such as remote force sensing and force-direction sensing, which bacterial MSCs do not have. Actin cytoskeletons also give eukaryotic MSCs an interesting and important function called "active touch sensing", by which cells can sense rigidity of their substrates. The contractile actin cytoskeleton stress fiber (SF) anchors its each end to a focal adhesion (FA) and pulls the substrate to generate substrate-rigidity-dependent stresses in the FA. It has been found that those stresses are sensed by some Ca2+-permeable MSCs existing in the vicinity of FAs, thus the MSCs work as a substrate rigidity sensor that can transduce the rigidity into intracellular Ca2+ levels. This short review, roughly constituting of two parts, deals with molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the MSC activation process mostly based on our recent studies; (1) structure-function in bacterial MSCs activation at the atomic level, and (2) roles of actin cytoskeletons in the activation of eukaryotic MSCs.

  16. Did group II intron proliferation in an endosymbiont-bearing archaeon create eukaryotes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poole Anthony M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Martin & Koonin recently proposed that the eukaryote nucleus evolved as a quality control mechanism to prevent ribosome readthrough into introns. In their scenario, the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria was resident in an archaeal cell, and group II introns (carried by the fledgling mitochondrion inserted into coding regions in the archaeal host genome. They suggest that if transcription and translation were coupled, and because splicing is expected to have been slower than translation, the effect of insertion would have been ribosome readthrough into introns, resulting in production of aberrant proteins. The emergence of the nuclear compartment would thus have served to separate transcription and splicing from translation, thereby alleviating this problem. In this article, I argue that Martin & Koonin's model is not compatible with current knowledge. The model requires that group II introns would spread aggressively through an archaeal genome. It is well known that selfish elements can spread through an outbreeding sexual population despite a substantial fitness cost to the host. The same is not true for asexual lineages however, where both theory and observation argue that such elements will be under pressure to reduce proliferation, and may be lost completely. The recent introduction of group II introns into archaea by horizontal transfer provides a natural test case with which to evaluate Martin & Koonin's model. The distribution and behaviour of these introns fits prior theoretical expectations, not the scenario of aggressive proliferation advocated by Martin & Koonin. I therefore conclude that the mitochondrial seed hypothesis for the origin of eukaryote introns, on which their model is based, better explains the early expansion of introns in eukaryotes. The mitochondrial seed hypothesis has the capacity to separate the origin of eukaryotes from the origin of introns, leaving open the possibility that the cell that engulfed the

  17. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene. Anders Bach, Kristoffer Almdal, Henrik Koblitz Rasmussen and Ole Hassager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...

  18. Mutation of the conserved Gly83 and Gly94 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu. Indication of structural pivots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Wiborg, O

    1995-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli cycles between an active conformation where GTP is bound, and an inactive conformation where GDP is bound. Between the two conformations, elongation factor Tu undergoes major structural changes. The aim of this work has been to reveal the role of two very...

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c-Myc...

  20. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit α (eIF2α) inhibitor salubrinal attenuates paraquat-induced human lung epithelial-like A549 cell apoptosis by regulating the PERK-eIF2α signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Da-Zhuang; Song, Chun-Qing; Xu, Yong-Min; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhi; Dong, Xue-Song

    2018-02-01

    Paraquat (PQ), as one of the most widely used herbicides in the world, can cause severe lung damage in humans and animals. This study investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of PQ-induced lung cell damage and the protective role of salubrinal. Human lung epithelial-like A549 cells were treated with PQ for 24h and were pre-incubated with salubrinal for 2h, followed by 500μM of PQ treatment. Silencing eIF2α gene of the A549 cells with siRNA interference method was conducted. Cell morphology, cell viability, apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were assessed by different assays accordingly thereafter. The expression of PERK, p-PERK, ATF6, c-ATF6, IRE1α, p-IRE1α, CHOP, GRP78, p-eIF2α and β-actin was assayed by western blot. The data showed that PQ significantly reduced A549 cell viability, changed cell morphology, induced cell apoptosis and significantly upregulated the levels of GRP78, CHOP, p-PERK, c-ATF6 and p-IRE1α. However, 30μM salubrinal could attenuate the effects of PQ on damages to A549 cells through upregulating p-eIF2α. In contrast, knocking down eIF2α gene inhabited the effects of salubrinal. These results suggest that PQ-induced A549 cell apoptosis involved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, specially the PERK-eIF2α pathway. Salubrinal attenuated A549 cells from PQ-induced damages through regulation of the PERK-eIF2α signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.