WorldWideScience

Sample records for estimating luminosity function

  1. Maximum likelihood random galaxy catalogues and luminosity function estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shaun

    2011-09-01

    We present a new algorithm to generate a random (unclustered) version of an magnitude limited observational galaxy redshift catalogue. It takes into account both galaxy evolution and the perturbing effects of large-scale structure. The key to the algorithm is a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating both the luminosity function (LF) and the overdensity as a function of redshift. The random catalogue algorithm then works by cloning each galaxy in the original catalogue, with the number of clones determined by the ML solution. Each of these cloned galaxies is then assigned a random redshift uniformly distributed over the accessible survey volume, taking account of the survey magnitude limit(s) and, optionally, both luminosity and number density evolution. The resulting random catalogues, which can be employed in traditional estimates of galaxy clustering, make fuller use of the information available in the original catalogue and hence are superior to simply fitting a functional form to the observed redshift distribution. They are particularly well suited to studies of the dependence of galaxy clustering on galaxy properties as each galaxy in the random catalogue has the same list of attributes as measured for the galaxies in the genuine catalogue. The derivation of the joint overdensity and LF estimator reveals the limit in which the ML estimate reduces to the standard 1/Vmax LF estimate, namely when one makes the prior assumption that the are no fluctuations in the radial overdensity. The new ML estimator can be viewed as a generalization of the 1/Vmax estimate in which Vmax is replaced by a density corrected Vdc, max.

  2. properties and luminosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hektor Monteiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an investigation of a sample of 1072 stars extracted from the Villanova Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs (2005 on-line version, studying their distribution in the Galaxy, their physical properties and their luminosity functions. The distances and physical properties of the white dwarfs are determined through interpolation of their (B-V or (b-y colors in model grids. The solar position relative to the Galactic plane, luminosity function, as well as separate functions for each white dwarf spectral type are derived and discussed. We show that the binary fraction does not vary significantly as a function of distance from the Galactic disk out to 100 pc. We propose that the formation rates of DA and non-DAs have changed over time and/or that DAs evolve into non-DA types. The luminosity functions for DAs and DBs have peaks possibly related to a star burst event.

  3. A cross-correlation-based estimate of the galaxy luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Daalen, Marcel P.; White, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We extend existing methods for using cross-correlations to derive redshift distributions for photometric galaxies, without using photometric redshifts. The model presented in this paper simultaneously yields highly accurate and unbiased redshift distributions and, for the first time, redshift-dependent luminosity functions, using only clustering information and the apparent magnitudes of the galaxies as input. In contrast to many existing techniques for recovering unbiased redshift distributions, the output of our method is not degenerate with the galaxy bias b(z), which is achieved by modelling the shape of the luminosity bias. We successfully apply our method to a mock galaxy survey and discuss improvements to be made before applying our model to real data.

  4. The luminosity function of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new evolutionary model for the optical luminosity function of quasars. Our analytical model is derived from fits to the empirical luminosity function estimated by Hartwick and Schade and Warren, Hewett, and Osmer on the basis of more than 1200 quasars over the range of redshifts 0 approximately less than z approximately less than 4.5. We find that the evolution of quasars over this entire redshift range can be well fitted by a Gaussian distribution, while the shape of the luminosity function can be well fitted by either a double power law or an exponential L(exp 1/4) law. The predicted number counts of quasars, as a function of either apparent magnitude or redshift, are fully consistent with the observed ones. Our model indicates that the evolution of quasars reaches its maximum at z approximately = 2.8 and declines at higher redshifts. An extrapolation of the evolution to z approximately greater than 4.5 implies that quasars may have started their cosmic fireworks at z(sub f) approximately = 5.2-5.5. Forthcoming surveys of quasars at these redshifts will be critical to constrain the epoch of quasar formation. All the results we derived are based on observed quasars and are therefore subject to the bias of obscuration by dust in damped Ly alpha systems. Future surveys of these absorption systems at z approximately greater than 3 will also be important if the formation epoch of quasars is to be known unambiguously.

  5. The galaxy luminosity function around groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. E.; Padilla, N. D.; Galaz, G.; Infante, L.

    2005-11-01

    We present a study on the variations of the luminosity function of galaxies around clusters in a numerical simulation with semi-analytic galaxies, attempting to detect these variations in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. We subdivide the simulation box into equal-density regions around clusters, which we assume can be achieved by selecting objects at a given normalized distance (r/rrms, where rrms is an estimate of the halo radius) from the group centre. The semi-analytic model predicts important variations in the luminosity function out to r/rrms~= 5. In brief, variations in the mass function of haloes around clusters (large dark matter haloes with M > 1012h-1Msolar) lead to cluster central regions that present a high abundance of bright galaxies (high M* values) as well as low-luminosity galaxies (high α) at r/rrms~= 3 there is a lack of bright galaxies, which shows the depletion of galaxies in the regions surrounding clusters (minimum in M* and α), and a tendency to constant luminosity function parameters at larger cluster-centric distances. We take into account the observational biases present in the real data by reproducing the peculiar velocity effect on the redshifts of galaxies in the simulation box, and also by producing mock catalogues. We find that excluding from the analysis galaxies which in projection are close to the centres of the groups provides results that are qualitatively consistent with the full simulation box results. When we apply this method to mock catalogues of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the 2PIGG catalogue of groups, we find that the variations in the luminosity function are almost completely erased by the Finger of God effect; only a lack of bright galaxies at r/rrms~= 3 can be marginally detected in the mock catalogues. The results from the real 2dFGRS data show a clearer detection of a dip in M* and α for r/rrms= 3, consistent with the semi-analytic predictions.

  6. The luminosity function of field galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Mahtessian, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Schmidt's method for construction of luminosity function of galaxies is generalized by taking into account the dependence of density of galaxies from the distance in the near Universe. The logarithmical luminosity function (LLF) of field galaxies depending on morphological type is constructed. We show that the LLF for all galaxies, and also separately for elliptical and lenticular galaxies can be presented by Schechter function in narrow area of absolute magnitudes. The LLF of spiral galaxies...

  7. Theoretical stellar luminosity functions and globular cluster ages and compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, S. J.

    The ages and chemical compositions of the stars in globular clusters are of great interest, particularly because age estimates from the well known exercise of fitting observed color-magnitude diagrams to theoretical predictions tend to yield ages in excess of the Hubble time in standard cosmological models. Relatively little use was made of the stellar luminosity functions of the globular clusters to constrain the ages or compositions. The comparison of observed luminosity functions to theoretical ones allows the use of information not usually considered, and has the advantage of being relatively insensitive to lack of knowledge of the detailed structure of stellar envelopes and atmospheres. A computer program was developed to apply standard stellar evolutionary theory, using the most recently available input physics to the calculation of the evolution of low-mass Population II stars. A comparison of the computed theoretical luminosity functions to an observed, though still preliminary, luminosity function for the cluster M13 demonstrates the viability of this approach.

  8. THE LOCAL [C ii] 158 μ m EMISSION LINE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Yan, Lin; Capak, Peter; Faisst, Andreas; Masters, Daniel [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Diaz-Santos, Tanio [Nucleo de Astronomia de la Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Armus, Lee, E-mail: shemmati@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center, Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, the local [C ii] 158 μ m emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. [C ii] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-infrared (far-IR) luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S{sub 60μm} > 5.24 Jy. We calculate the completeness as a function of [C ii] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [C ii] luminosity function is constrained in the range ∼10{sup 7–9} L{sub ⊙} from both the 1/ V{sub max} and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [C ii] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [C ii] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [C ii]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [C ii] high-redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [C ii] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.

  9. Evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullis, C.R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Henry, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    We report measurements of the cluster X-ray luminosity function out to z = 0.8 based on the final sample of 201 galaxy systems from the 160 Square Degree ROSAT Cluster Survey. There is little evidence for any measurable change in cluster abundance out to z similar to 0.6 at luminosities of less...

  10. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J.; Allen, L. E.; Myers, P. C.; Muzerolle, J.

    2012-01-01

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 μm), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L ☉ and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L ☉ . The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L ☉ . Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity functions to those

  11. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Gutermuth, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Pipher, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Allen, L. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Myers, P. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  12. Reference Ultraviolet Luminosity Functions for the JWST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven

    We propose to construct the most accurate set of galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions yet assembled over the redshift range 4 early universe. This will be accomplished using archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and a variety of ground-based telescopes (NOAO CTIO and KPNO 4m, VISTA, Subaru, VLT, CFHT), selecting an expected sample of 47,000 galaxies (>4x larger than the previous largest sample of galaxies in this epoch selected with multiwavelength data). In an advance over previous studies, we will select samples of galaxies including Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) mid-infrared imaging data, which are crucial to both minimize contamination and to improve the precision of photometric redshifts. Additionally, we will be the first to apply a uniform set of selection criteria simultaneously to datasets spanning an order of magnitude in dynamic range of area covered, allowing the construction of high-redshift UV luminosity functions spanning nearly 10 astronomical magnitudes. We will use this dataset to accomplish the following science goals: 1) We will provide the most robust constraints on the abundance of bright star-forming galaxies in the epoch 4 early times. While initial results concluded that the SFR density decreased rapidly in this epoch, our pilot study using Spitzer/IRAC data implies that galaxies in this epoch are more numerous than previously observed. Our proposed project will perform a detailed analysis into the abundance of galaxies at z=9-10, providing a robust baseline for future studies with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3) Due to our large volume probed, we expect 1600 AGNs at z=4-6. These AGN come from the faint-end of the AGN luminosity function, which is presently poorly constrained. Our large dynamic range in UV luminosity probed will allow us to fit the galaxy and AGN luminosity functions simultaneously (supplementing with Sloan quasar data to constrain the bright-end of the AGN

  13. LUMINOUS SATELLITES. II. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION, AND COSMIC EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierenberg, A. M.; Treu, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Auger, M. W. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB30HA (United Kingdom); Marshall, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Fassnacht, C. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Busha, Michael T., E-mail: amn01@physics.ucsb.edu [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-06-20

    We infer the normalization and the radial and angular distributions of the number density of satellites of massive galaxies (log{sub 10}[M*{sub h}/M{sub Sun }] > 10.5) between redshifts 0.1 and 0.8 as a function of host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, and satellite luminosity. Exploiting the depth and resolution of the COSMOS Hubble Space Telescope images, we detect satellites up to 8 mag fainter than the host galaxies and as close as 0.3 (1.4) arcsec (kpc). Describing the number density profile of satellite galaxies to be a projected power law such that P(R){proportional_to}R{sup {gamma}{sub p}}, we find {gamma}{sub p} = -1.1 {+-} 0.3. We find no dependency of {gamma}{sub p} on host stellar mass, redshift, morphology, or satellite luminosity. Satellites of early-type hosts have angular distributions that are more flattened than the host light profile and are aligned with its major axis. No significant average alignment is detected for satellites of late-type hosts. The number of satellites within a fixed magnitude contrast from a host galaxy is dependent on its stellar mass, with more massive galaxies hosting significantly more satellites. Furthermore, high-mass late-type hosts have significantly fewer satellites than early-type galaxies of the same stellar mass, possibly indicating that they reside in more massive halos. No significant evolution in the number of satellites per host is detected. The cumulative luminosity function of satellites is qualitatively in good agreement with that predicted using SubHalo Abundance Matching techniques. However, there are significant residual discrepancies in the absolute normalization, suggesting that properties other than the host galaxy luminosity or stellar mass determine the number of satellites.

  14. The field luminosity function and nearby groups of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huchra, J.

    1978-01-01

    A catalog of radial velocities and magnitudes on a homogeneous system (the corrected Harvard, B(o) magnitudes of de Vaucouleurs) has been assembled for over 4000 galaxies. Using this catalog, a magnitude limited sample of approximately 1000 galaxies with nearly complete radial velocity data was compiled. The magnitude limit is 13.0 and the galaxies are primarily from the Shapley-Ames catalog plus a few low and high surface brightness objects properly included in a magnitude limited sample. A new determination of the field luminosity function and density plus initial experiments with the use of a redshift catalog to select groups of galaxies, are briefly described. (Auth.)

  15. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION USING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, B. H. F.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R. L. C.; De Simoni, F.; Benoist, C.; Makler, M.; Mesquita, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of using photometric redshifts for studying the evolution of both the global galaxy luminosity function (LF) and that for different galaxy types. To this end, we compare the LFs obtained using photometric redshifts from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) D1 field with those from the spectroscopic survey VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) comprising ∼4800 galaxies. We find that for z ≤ 2.0, in the interval of magnitudes considered by this survey, the LFs obtained using photometric and spectroscopic redshifts show a remarkable agreement. This good agreement led us to use all four Deep fields of the CFHTLS comprising ∼386,000 galaxies to compute the LF of the combined fields and directly estimate the error in the parameters based on the field-to-field variation. We find that the characteristic absolute magnitude M* of Schechter fits fades by ∼0.7 mag from z ∼ 1.8 to z ∼ 0.3, while the characteristic density φ* increases by a factor of ∼4 in the same redshift interval. We use the galaxy classification provided by the template fitting program used to compute photometric redshifts and split the sample into galaxy types. We find that these Schechter parameters evolve differently for each galaxy type, an indication that their evolution is a combination of several effects: galaxy merging, star formation quenching, and mass assembly. All these results are compatible with those obtained by different spectroscopic surveys such as VVDS, DEEP2, and zCosmos, which reinforces the fact that photometric redshifts can be used to study galaxy evolution, at least for the redshift bins adopted so far. This is of great interest since future very large imaging surveys containing hundreds of millions of galaxies will allow us to obtain important precise measurements to constrain the evolution of the LF and to explore the dependence of this evolution on morphology and/or color helping constrain the mechanisms of galaxy evolution.

  16. Physics as a function of energy and luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a new physics in the range of mass up to TeV region is discussed. Most of the discussion concern hadron-hadron (hh) colliders, and also electron-positron colliders are discussed. The cross-sections for new particle production in hh colliders have the general Drell-Yan form, in which the differential luminosity for the collision of partons is included. The formulas with the parton distribution scaled up from present energy using the Altarelli-Parisi equations may be approximately correct within a factor of 2 for the production of particles. Some typical parton-parton luminosity functions for proton-proton and proton-antiproton collisions are presented. From the consideration of luminosity, it can be said that the pp colliders are to be preferred. The case studies of some of the possible new physics discussed by Zakharov, mainly on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles, but also a few remarks about technicolor are presented. It seems possible to detect technicolor at a large hh collider. The physics reaches of different possible hh colliders are summarized in tables. In the tables, the observable production of Higgses up to 1 TeV in mass, the observable masses for gluinos (squarks) and the technicolor observability are shown. The cleanliness of electron-positron colliders compared to hadron-hadron colliders is pled, a guess is given as to the appropriate conversion factors between the energy in the electron-positron and hh collisions, the complementarity of electron-positron and hh colliders is urged, and it is argued that a rational mix of world accelerators would include both. (Kato, T.)

  17. Luminosity function for planetary nebulae and the number of planetary nebulae in local group galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    Identifications of 19 and 34 faint planetary nebulae have been made in the central regions of the SMC and LMC, respectively, using on-line/off-line filter photography at [O III] and Hα. The previously known brighter planetary nebulae in these fields, eight in both the SMC and the LMC, were also identified. On the basis of the ratio of the numbers of faint to bright planetary nebulae in these fields and the numbers of bright planetary nebulae in the surrounding fields, the total numbers of planetary nebulae in the SMC and LMC are estimated to be 285 +- 78 and 996 +- 253, respectively. Corrections have been applied to account for omissions due to crowding confusion in previous surveys, spatial and detectability incompleteness, and obscuration by dust.Equatorial coordinates and finding charts are presented for all the identified planetary nebulae. The coordinates have uncertainties smaller than 0.''6 relative to nearby bright stars, thereby allowing acquisition of the planetary nebulae by bling offsetting.Monochromatic fluxes are derived photographically and used to determine the luminosity function for Magellanic Cloud planetary nebulae as faint as 6 mag below the brightest. The luminosity function is used to estimate the total numbers of planetary nebulae in eight Local Group galaxies in which only bright planetary nebulae have been identified. The dervied luminosity specific number of planetary nebulae per unit luminosity is nearly constant for all eight galaxies, having a value of 6.1 x 10 -7 planetary nebulae L -1 /sub sun/. The mass specific number, based on the three galaxies with well-determined masses, is 2.1 x 10 -7 planetary nebulae M -1 /sub sun/. With estimates for the luminosity and mass of our Galaxy, its total number of planetary nebulae is calculated to be 10,000 +- 4000, in support of the Cudworth distance scale

  18. The luminosity function for different morphological types in the CfA Redshift Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzke, Ronald O.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We derive the luminosity function for different morphological types in the original CfA Redshift Survey (CfA1) and in the first two slices of the CfA Redshift Survey Extension (CfA2). CfA1 is a complete sample containing 2397 galaxies distributed over 2.7 steradians with m(sub z) less than or equal 14.5. The first two complete slices of CfA2 contain 1862 galaxies distributed over 0.42 steradians with m(sub z)=15.5. The shapes of the E-S0 and spiral luminosity functions (LF) are indistinguishable. We do not confirm the steeply decreasing faint end in the E-S0 luminosity function found by Loveday et al. for an independent sample in the southern hemisphere. We demonstrate that incomplete classification in deep redshift surveys can lead to underestimates of the faint end of the elliptical luminosity function and could be partially responsible for the difference between the CfA survey and other local field surveys. The faint end of the LF for the Magellanic spirals and irregulars is very steep. The Sm-Im luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function with M*=-18.79, alpha=-1.87, and phi*=0.6x10(exp -3) for M(sub z) less than or equal to -13. These galaxies are largely responsible for the excess at the faint end of the general CfA luminosity function. The abundance of intrinsically faint, blue galaxies nearby affects the interpretation of deep number counts. The dwarf population increases the expected counts at B=25 in a no-evolution, q(sub 0)=0.05 model by a factor of two over standard no-evolution estimates. These dwarfs change the expected median redshift in deep redshift surveys by less than 10 percent . Thus the steep Sm-Im LF may contribute to the reconciliation of deep number counts with deep redshift surveys.

  19. Extremely luminous far-infrared colliding galaxies - computation of colliding-galaxy luminosity function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwit, M.; Fuller, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computational model used to determine the luminosity function for gaseous galaxies in collision is described. It is based on the assumption of high-velocity encounters of two thin, gas-rich disks having identical radii and thickness, able to approach each other from arbitrary directions, with arbitrary orientations and with arbitrary degree of overlap. The distribution of expected luminosities generated in the dissipation of translational energy is then found to closely fit the observed distribution of luminosities of extremely luminous IRAS galaxies. Bursts of star formation resulting from such collisions would not have the correct luminosity function. 8 references

  20. The Evolution of the Type Ia Supernova Luminosity Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, K.J.; Toonen, S.; Graur, O.

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) exhibit a wide diversity of peak luminosities and light curve shapes: the faintest SNe Ia are 10 times less luminous and evolve more rapidly than the brightest SNe Ia. Their differing characteristics also extend to their stellar age distributions, with fainter SNe Ia

  1. Luminosity and Mass Function of the Galactic open cluster NGC 2422

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Favata, F.

    2003-06-01

    We present UBVRI photometry of the open cluster NGC 2422 (age ~ 108 yr) down to a limiting magnitude V =~ 19. These data are used to derive the Luminosity and Mass Functions and to study the cluster spatial distribution. By considering the color-magnitude diagram data and adopting a representative cluster main sequence, we obtained a list of candidate cluster members based on a photometric criterion. Using a reference field region and an iterative procedure, a correction for contaminating field stars has been derived in order to obtain the Luminosity and the Mass Functions in the M=0.4-3.5 Msun range. By fitting the spatial distribution, we infer that a non-negligible number of cluster stars lies outside our investigated region. We have estimated a correction to the Mass Function of the cluster in order to take into account the ``missing'' cluster stars. The Present Day Mass Function of NGC 2422 can be represented by a power-law of index alpha = 3.07 +/-0.08 (rms) - the Salpeter Mass Function in this notation has index alpha = 2.35 - in the mass range 0.9 <= M/Msun<= 2.5 . The index alpha and the total mass of the cluster are very similar to those of the Pleiades. Based on observations made at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile.

  2. The quasar luminosity function at redshift 4 with the Hyper Suprime-Cam Wide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; He, Wanqiu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Niida, Mana; Nagao, Tohru; Bosch, James; Coupon, Jean; Enoki, Motohiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Oguri, Masamune; Ono, Yoshiaki; Onoue, Masafusa; Ouchi, Masami; Schulze, Andreas; Silverman, John D.; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Terashima, Yuichi; Toba, Yoshiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of z ˜ 4 quasars based on the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Wide layer imaging data in the g, r, i, z, and y bands covering 339.8 deg2. From stellar objects, 1666 z ˜ 4 quasar candidates are selected via the g-dropout selection down to i = 24.0 mag. Their photometric redshifts cover the redshift range between 3.6 and 4.3, with an average of 3.9. In combination with the quasar sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range, a quasar luminosity function covering the wide luminosity range of M1450 = -22 to -29 mag is constructed. The quasar luminosity function is well described by a double power-law model with a knee at M1450 = -25.36 ± 0.13 mag and a flat faint-end slope with a power-law index of -1.30 ± 0.05. The knee and faint-end slope show no clear evidence of redshift evolution from those seen at z ˜ 2. The flat slope implies that the UV luminosity density of the quasar population is dominated by the quasars around the knee, and does not support the steeper faint-end slope at higher redshifts reported at z > 5. If we convert the M1450 luminosity function to the hard X-ray 2-10 keV luminosity function using the relation between the UV and X-ray luminosity of quasars and its scatter, the number density of UV-selected quasars matches well with that of the X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) above the knee of the luminosity function. Below the knee, the UV-selected quasars show a deficiency compared to the hard X-ray luminosity function. The deficiency can be explained by the lack of obscured AGNs among the UV-selected quasars.

  3. The luminosity function at z ∼ 8 from 97 Y-band dropouts: Inferences about reionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Treu, Tommaso; Kelly, Brandon C.; Trenti, Michele; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Oesch, Pascal A.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the largest search to date for Y-band dropout galaxies (z ∼ 8 Lyman break galaxies, LBGs) based on 350 arcmin 2 of Hubble Space Telescope observations in the V, Y, J, and H bands from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. In addition to previously published data, the BoRG13 data set presented here includes approximately 50 arcmin 2 of new data and deeper observations of two previous BoRG pointings, from which we present 9 new z ∼ 8 LBG candidates, bringing the total number of BoRG Y-band dropouts to 38 with 25.5 ≤ m J ≤ 27.6 (AB system). We introduce a new Bayesian formalism for estimating the galaxy luminosity function, which does not require binning (and thus smearing) of the data and includes a likelihood based on the formally correct binomial distribution as opposed to the often-used approximate Poisson distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the new method on a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts that combines the bright BoRG galaxies with the fainter sources published in Bouwens et al. from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Early Release Science programs. We show that the z ∼ 8 luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function over its full dynamic range with a characteristic magnitude M ⋆ =−20.15 −0.38 +0.29 , a faint-end slope of α=−1.87 −0.26 +0.26 , and a number density of log 10  ϕ ⋆ [Mpc −3 ]=−3.24 −0.24 +0.25 . Integrated down to M = –17.7, this luminosity function yields a luminosity density log 10  ϵ[erg s −1 Hz −1 Mpc −3 ]=25.52 −0.05 +0.05 . Our luminosity function analysis is consistent with previously published determinations within 1σ. The error analysis suggests that uncertainties on the faint-end slope are still too large to draw a firm conclusion about its evolution with redshift. We use our statistical framework to discuss the implication of our study for the physics of reionization. By assuming theoretically motivated priors on the clumping factor and the photon

  4. Modelling the luminosity function of long gamma-ray bursts using Swift and Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debdutta

    2018-01-01

    I have used a sample of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) common to both Swift and Fermi to re-derive the parameters of the Yonetoku correlation. This allowed me to self-consistently estimate pseudo-redshifts of all the bursts with unknown redshifts. This is the first time such a large sample of GRBs from these two instruments is used, both individually and in conjunction, to model the long GRB luminosity function. The GRB formation rate is modelled as the product of the cosmic star formation rate and a GRB formation efficiency for a given stellar mass. An exponential cut-off power-law luminosity function fits the data reasonably well, with ν = 0.6 and Lb = 5.4 × 1052 ergs- 1, and does not require a cosmological evolution. In the case of a broken power law, it is required to incorporate a sharp evolution of the break given by Lb ∼ 0.3 × 1052(1 + z)2.90 erg s- 1, and the GRB formation efficiency (degenerate up to a beaming factor of GRBs) decreases with redshift as ∝ (1 + z)-0.80. However, it is not possible to distinguish between the two models. The derived models are then used as templates to predict the distribution of GRBs detectable by CZT Imager onboard AstroSat as a function of redshift and luminosity. This demonstrates that via a quick localization and redshift measurement of even a few CZT Imager GRBs, AstroSat will help in improving the statistics of GRBs both typical and peculiar.

  5. The Truncated Lognormal Distribution as a Luminosity Function for SWIFT-BAT Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Zaninetti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the luminosity function (LF in Gamma ray bursts (GRBs depends on the adopted cosmology, each one characterized by its corresponding luminosity distance. Here, we analyze three cosmologies: the standard cosmology, the plasma cosmology and the pseudo-Euclidean universe. The LF of the GRBs is firstly modeled by the lognormal distribution and the four broken power law and, secondly, by a truncated lognormal distribution. The truncated lognormal distribution fits acceptably the range in luminosity of GRBs as a function of the redshift.

  6. Consistency between the luminosity function of resolved millisecond pulsars and the galactic center excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploeg, Harrison; Gordon, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutherford Building, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Crocker, Roland [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek (Australia); Macias, Oscar, E-mail: harrison.ploeg@pg.canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: chris.gordon@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: Roland.Crocker@anu.edu.au, E-mail: oscar.macias@vt.edu [Center for Neutrino Physics, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Fermi Large Area Telescope data reveal an excess of GeV gamma rays from the direction of the Galactic Center and bulge. Several explanations have been proposed for this excess including an unresolved population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and self-annihilating dark matter. It has been claimed that a key discriminant for or against the MSP explanation can be extracted from the properties of the luminosity function describing this source population. Specifically, is the luminosity function of the putative MSPs in the Galactic Center consistent with that characterizing the resolved MSPs in the Galactic disk? To investigate this we have used a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo to evaluate the posterior distribution of the parameters of the MSP luminosity function describing both resolved MSPs and the Galactic Center excess. At variance with some other claims, our analysis reveals that, within current uncertainties, both data sets can be well fit with the same luminosity function.

  7. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  8. Binary neutron star merger rate via the luminosity function of short gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debdutta

    2018-04-01

    The luminosity function of short Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) is modelled by using the available catalogue data of all short GRBs (sGRBs) detected till October, 2017. The luminosities are estimated via the `pseudo-redshifts' obtained from the `Yonetoku correlation', assuming a standard delay distribution between the cosmic star formation rate and the production rate of their progenitors. While the simple powerlaw is ruled out to high confidence, the data is fit well both by exponential cutoff powerlaw and broken powerlaw models. Using the derived parameters of these models along with conservative values in the jet opening angles seen from afterglow observations, the true rate of short GRBs are derived. Assuming a short GRB is produced from each binary neutron star merger (BNSM), the rate of gravitational wave (GW) detections from these mergers are derived for the past, present and future configurations of the GW detector networks. Stringent lower limits of 1.87yr-1 for the aLIGO-VIRGO, and 3.11yr-1 for the upcoming aLIGO-VIRGO-KAGRA-LIGO/India configurations are thus derived for the BNSM rate at 68% confidence. The BNSM rates calculated from this work and that independently inferred from the observation of the only confirmed BNSM observed till date, are shown to have a mild tension; however the scenario that all BNSMs produce sGRBs cannot be ruled out.

  9. The European Large Area ISO Survey - IV. The preliminary 90-mu m luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.; Efstathiou, A.; Oliver, S.

    2001-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of 90-mum-selected galaxies from the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS), extending to z = 0.3. Their luminosities are in the range 10(9)

  10. Luminosity and beta function measurement at the electron-positron collider ring LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, P

    1996-01-01

    The optimization of luminosity needs a fast signal which is provided with the measurement of the rate of small angle Bhabba scattered e+ and e-. It is shown that, despite the excess of background particles received at the detectors, luminosity measurements are possible by using appropriate techniques. The results presented include examples of luminosity optimization with the adjustment of the vertical beam separation at interaction points. The correlation between changes in measured beam sizes and changes in luminosity is shown. In the second part, a new method to obtain precise optics measurements is presented. The procedure to measure the phase advance using 1000-turn orbit measurements of a horizontally or vertically excited beam is described. Beta, alpha and phase advance functions can be obtained exclusively from the phase advances at beam position monitors. This method has been used to measure optics imperfections at LEP. Results of these experiments are compared with simulation results using MAD Measur...

  11. THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM DATA RELEASE NINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Bailey, Stephen; McGreer, Ian D.; Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Shen, Yue; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Aubourg, Éric; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Bovy, Jo; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the optical quasar luminosity function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine, a uniform sample of 22,301 i ∼ 2 , with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2 i (z = 2.2) ≈ –24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z = 3.5. A log-linear relation (in log Φ* – M*) for a luminosity evolution and density evolution model is found to adequately describe our data within the range 2.2 < z < 3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ∼2.6 while Φ* declines by a factor of ∼8. At z ∼< 2.2 our data are reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution model, and only a weak signature of ''AGN downsizing'' is seen, in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities

  12. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H. K. C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, H.

    2007-04-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the CNOC1 clusters. The extensive spectroscopic data set available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of cl=4.28+/-0.70 and cg=4.13+/-0.57, respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that they are similar to the cluster dark matter profile. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K* over the redshift range 0.2cluster galaxies form at high redshift (zf>1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is α=-0.84+/-0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z=0 and 0.3. Using principal component analysis of the spectra, we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star-forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z=0.3 and suggests that the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of ~3 from z=0 to 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high redshift. Passive evolution in both classes demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high redshift, and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral type have little effect on the total stellar mass.

  13. THE GALAXY OPTICAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Forman, William R.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Moustakas, John

    2012-01-01

    We present the galaxy optical luminosity function for the redshift range 0.05 2 in the Boötes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Our statistical sample is composed of 12,473 galaxies with known redshifts down to I = 20.4 (AB). Our results at low redshift are consistent with those from Sloan Digital Sky Survey; at higher redshift, we find strong evidence for evolution in the luminosity function, including differential evolution between blue and red galaxies. We find that the luminosity density evolves as (1 + z) (0.54±0.64) for red galaxies and (1 + z) (1.64±0.39) for blue galaxies.

  14. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Ellingson, E.; /Colorado U., CASA; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  15. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF LMXBs IN CENTAURUS A: GLOBULAR CLUSTERS VERSUS THE FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, Rasmus; Gilfanov, Marat; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Jordan, Andres; Brassington, Nicola J.; Evans, Daniel A.; Murray, Stephen S.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M.; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Harris, William E.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Juett, Adrienne M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) in the nearby early-type galaxy Centaurus A, concentrating primarily on two aspects of binary populations: the XLF behavior at the low-luminosity limit and the comparison between globular cluster and field sources. The 800 ksec exposure of the deep Chandra VLP program allows us to reach a limiting luminosity of ∼8 x 10 35 erg s -1 , about ∼2-3 times deeper than previous investigations. We confirm the presence of the low-luminosity break of the overall LMXB XLF at log(L X ) ∼ 37.2-37.6, below which the luminosity distribution follows a dN/d(ln L) ∼ const law. Separating globular cluster and field sources, we find a statistically significant difference between the two luminosity distributions with a relative underabundance of faint sources in the globular cluster population. This demonstrates that the samples are drawn from distinct parent populations and may disprove the hypothesis that the entire LMXB population in early-type galaxies is created dynamically in globular clusters. As a plausible explanation for this difference in the XLFs, we suggest an enhanced fraction of helium-accreting systems in globular clusters, which are created in collisions between red giants and neutron stars. Due to the four times higher ionization temperature of He, such systems are subject to accretion disk instabilities at ∼20 times higher mass accretion rate and, therefore, are not observed as persistent sources at low luminosities.

  16. The Optical Luminosity Function of Gamma-Ray Bursts Deduced from ROTSE-III Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X. H.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W. K.; Liang, E. W.; Akerlof, C. W.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Flewelling, H. A.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Kızıloǧlu, Ü.; McKay, T. A.; Pandey, S. B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rujopakarn, W.; Schaefer, B. E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Yost, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs) and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). We derive R-band fluxes for these two sub-samples 100 s after the onset of the burst. The optical LFs at 100 s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star formation rate. While fitting the optical LFs using Monte Carlo simulations, we take into account the detection function of ROTSE-III. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100 s is well described by an exponential rise and power-law decay, a broken power law,and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.

  17. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, William E.; O' Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert, E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: cockcroft@physics.mcmaster.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ≳ 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ≳ 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ∼ R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  18. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  19. A hot white dwarf luminosity function from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesinski, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Hügelmeyer, S.; Dreizler, S.; Liebert, J.; Harris, H.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We present a hot white dwarf (WD) luminosity function (LF) using data taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4. We present and discuss a combined LF, along with separate DA and non-DA as LFs. We explore the completeness of our LFs and interpret a sudden drop in the non-DA LF near 2 M_bol as a transition of the non-DA WD atmosphere into the DA one during WD evolution. Our LF extends roughly between -0.5 T_eff > ˜25 000 K. Our LF should now be useful for estimates of recent star formation and for studies of neutrino and other potential particle emission losses in hot WDs. Methods: To create a sample whose completeness can be characterized fully, we used stars whose spectra were obtained via the SDSS's “hot standard” target selection criteria. The hot standard stars were purposefully targeted to a high level of completeness by the SDSS for calibration purposes. We are fortunate that many of them are hot white dwarfs stars. We further limited the sample to stars with fitted temperatures exceeding 23 500 K and log{g} > 7.0. We determined stellar distances for our sample based on their absolute SDSS g filter magnitudes, derived from WD stellar atmosphere model fits to the SDSS stellar spectra. Results: We compared our LF with those of other researchers where overlap occurs; however, our LFs are unique in their extension to the most luminous/hottest WDs. The cool end of our LF connects with the hot end of previously determined SDSS WD LFs and agreement here is quite good. It is also good with previous non-SDSS WD LFs. We note distinct differences between the DA and non-DA LFs and discuss the reliability of the DA LF at its hot end. We have extended the range of luminosities covered in the most recent WD LFs. The SDSS sample is understood quite well and its exploration should contribute to a number of new insights into early white dwarf evolution.

  20. The NGC 7742 star cluster luminosity function: a population analysis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao

    2018-02-01

    We re-examine the properties of the star cluster population in the circumnuclear starburst ring in the face-on spiral galaxy NGC 7742, whose young cluster mass function has been reported to exhibit significant deviations from the canonical power law. We base our reassessment on the clusters’ luminosities (an observational quantity) rather than their masses (a derived quantity), and confirm conclusively that the galaxy’s starburst-ring clusters—and particularly the youngest subsample, {log}(t {{{yr}}}-1)≤ 7.2—show evidence of a turnover in the cluster luminosity function well above the 90% completeness limit adopted to ensure the reliability of our results. This confirmation emphasizes the unique conundrum posed by this unusual cluster population.

  1. The Seven Sisters DANCe. I. Empirical isochrones, luminosity, and mass functions of the Pleiades cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Sarro, L. M.; Barrado, D.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Berihuete, A.; Olivares, J.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The DANCe survey provides photometric and astrometric (position and proper motion) measurements for approximately 2 million unique sources in a region encompassing ~80 deg2 centered on the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at deriving a complete census of the Pleiades and measure the mass and luminosity functions of the cluster. Methods: Using the probabilistic selection method previously described, we identified high probability members in the DANCe (i ≥ 14 mag) and Tycho-2 (V ≲ 12 mag) catalogues and studied the properties of the cluster over the corresponding luminosity range. Results: We find a total of 2109 high-probability members, of which 812 are new, making it the most extensive and complete census of the cluster to date. The luminosity and mass functions of the cluster are computed from the most massive members down to ~0.025 M⊙. The size, sensitivity, and quality of the sample result in the most precise luminosity and mass functions observed to date for a cluster. Conclusions: Our census supersedes previous studies of the Pleiades cluster populations, in terms of both sensitivity and accuracy. Based on service observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Table 1 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgDANCe catalogs (Tables 6 and 7) and full Tables 2-5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A148

  2. A finer view of the conditional galaxy luminosity function and magnitude-gap statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    The gap between first- and second-ranked galaxy magnitudes in groups is often considered a tracer of their merger histories, which in turn may affect galaxy properties, and also serves to test galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We remeasure the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of the Main Galaxy Sample of the SDSS in an appropriately cleaned subsample of groups from the Yang catalogue. We find that, at low group masses, our best-fitting CLF has steeper satellite high ends, yet higher ratios of characteristic satellite to central luminosities in comparison with the CLF of Yang et al. The observed fractions of groups with large and small magnitude gaps as well as the Tremaine & Richstone statistics are not compatible with either a single Schechter LF or with a Schechter-like satellite plus lognormal central LF. These gap statistics, which naturally depend on the size of the subsamples, and also on the maximum projected radius, Rmax, for defining the second brightest galaxy, can only be reproduced with two-component CLFs if we allow small gap groups to preferentially have two central galaxies, as expected when groups merge. Finally, we find that the trend of higher gap for higher group velocity dispersion, σv, at a given richness, discovered by Hearin et al., is strongly reduced when we consider σv in bins of richness, and virtually disappears when we use group mass instead of σv. This limits the applicability of gaps in refining cosmographic studies based on cluster counts.

  3. The Faint End of the z = 5 Quasar Luminosity Function from the CFHTLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Cai, Zheng

    2018-03-01

    We present results from a spectroscopic survey of z ∼ 5 quasars in the CFHT Legacy Survey. Using both optical color selection and a likelihood method, we select 97 candidates over an area of 105 deg2 to a limit of i AB 4 quasars. This sample extends measurements of the quasar luminosity function ∼1.5 mag fainter than our previous work in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82. The resulting luminosity function is in good agreement with our previous results, and suggests that the faint end slope is not steep. We perform a detailed examination of our survey completeness, particularly the impact of the Lyα emission assumed in our quasar spectral models, and find hints that the observed Lyα emission from faint z ∼ 5 quasars is weaker than for z ∼ 3 quasars at a similar luminosity. Our results strongly disfavor a significant contribution of faint quasars to the hydrogen-ionizing background at z = 5.

  4. Collapsar γ-ray bursts: how the luminosity function dictates the duration distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2017-12-01

    Jets in long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) have to drill through the collapsing star in order to break out of it and produce the γ-ray signal while the central engine is still active. If the breakout time is shorter for more powerful engines, then the jet-collapsar interaction acts as a filter of less luminous jets. We show that the observed broken power-law GRB luminosity function is a natural outcome of this process. For a theoretically motivated breakout time that scales with jet luminosity as L-χ with χ ∼ 1/3-1/2, we show that the shape of the γ-ray duration distribution can be uniquely determined by the GRB luminosity function and matches the observed one. This analysis has also interesting implications about the supernova-central engine connection. We show that not only successful jets can deposit sufficient energy in the stellar envelope to power the GRB-associated supernovae, but also failed jets may operate in all Type Ib/c supernovae.

  5. The Bright SHARC Survey: The Selection Function and Its Impact on the Cluster X-Ray Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, C.; Ulmer, M. P.; Romer, A. K.; Nichol, R. C.; Holden, B. P.; Pildis, R. A.

    2000-12-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive set of simulations designed to quantify the selection function of the Bright SHARC survey for distant clusters. The statistical significance of the simulations relied on the creation of many thousands of artificial clusters with redshifts and luminosities in the range 0.250.8), elliptical clusters are significantly easier to detect than spherical ones in the Bright SHARC survey. We show also that all the tested parameters have only a small influence on the computed luminosity of the clusters (``recovered luminosity'' in the text) except the presence of a strong cooling flow. We conclude that the CXLF presented by Nichol et al. in 1999 is robust (under the assumption of standard parameters), but stress the importance of cluster follow-up, by Chandra and XMM, in order to better constrain the morphology of the distant clusters found in the Bright SHARC and other surveys.

  6. Binary black hole merger rates inferred from luminosity function of ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Isobe, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) has detected direct signals of gravitational waves (GWs) from GW150914. The event was a merger of binary black holes whose masses are 36^{+5}_{-4} M_{{⊙}} and 29^{+4}_{-4} M_{{⊙}}. Such binary systems are expected to be directly evolved from stellar binary systems or formed by dynamical interactions of black holes in dense stellar environments. Here we derive the binary black hole merger rate based on the nearby ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) luminosity function (LF) under the assumption that binary black holes evolve through X-ray emitting phases. We obtain the binary black hole merger rate as 5.8(tULX/0.1 Myr)- 1λ- 0.6exp ( - 0.30λ) Gpc- 3 yr- 1, where tULX is the typical duration of the ULX phase and λ is the Eddington ratio in luminosity. This is coincident with the event rate inferred from the detection of GW150914 as well as the predictions based on binary population synthesis models. Although we are currently unable to constrain the Eddington ratio of ULXs in luminosity due to the uncertainties of our models and measured binary black hole merger event rates, further X-ray and GW data will allow us to narrow down the range of the Eddington ratios of ULXs. We also find the cumulative merger rate for the mass range of 5 M⊙ ≤ MBH ≤ 100 M⊙ inferred from the ULX LF is consistent with that estimated by the aLIGO collaboration considering various astrophysical conditions such as the mass function of black holes.

  7. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS) in SDSS and the high-z bright-end Quasar Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early Universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. Unfortunately, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) nd the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) have so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z>3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of $z~3$ quasars at the brightest end.We have identified the purely optical color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore we have designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using WISE AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright (i footprint, to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 2.8<= z<=5.0. So far the ELQS has identified 75 bright new quasars in this redshift range and observations of the fall sky will continue until the end of the year. At the AAS winter meeting we will present the full spectroscopic results of the survey, including a re-estimation and extension of the high-z QLF toward higher luminosities.

  8. Quantitative Estimation of the Velocity of Urbanization in China Using Nighttime Luminosity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization with sizeable enhancements of urban population and built-up land in China creates challenging planning and management issues due to the complexity of both the urban development and the socioeconomic drivers of environmental change. Improved understanding of spatio-temporal characteristics of urbanization processes are increasingly important for investigating urban expansion and environmental responses to corresponding socioeconomic and landscape dynamics. In this study, we present an artificial luminosity-derived index of the velocity of urbanization, defined as the ratio of temporal trend and spatial gradient of mean annual stable nighttime brightness, to estimate the pace of urbanization and consequent changes in land cover in China for the period of 2000–2010. Using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program–derived time series of nighttime light data and corresponding satellite-based land cover maps, our results show that the geometric mean velocity of urban dispersal at the country level was 0.21 km·yr−1 across 88.58 × 103 km2 urbanizing areas, in which ~23% of areas originally made of natural and cultivated lands were converted to artificial surfaces between 2000 and 2010. The speed of urbanization varies among urban agglomerations and cities with different development stages and urban forms. Particularly, the Yangtze River Delta conurbation shows the fastest (0.39 km·yr−1 and most extensive (16.12 × 103 km2 urban growth in China over the 10-year period. Moreover, if the current velocity holds, our estimates suggest that an additional 13.29 × 103 km2 in land area will be converted to human-built features while high density socioeconomic activities across the current urbanizing regions and urbanized areas will greatly increase from 52.44 × 103 km2 in 2010 to 62.73 × 103 km2 in China’s mainland during the next several decades. Our findings may provide potential insights into the pace of urbanization in

  9. On Functional Calculus Estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenninger, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents various results within the field of operator theory that are formulated in estimates for functional calculi. Functional calculus is the general concept of defining operators of the form $f(A)$, where f is a function and $A$ is an operator, typically on a Banach space. Norm

  10. Dwarf Galaxies in Voids: Galaxy Luminosity and HI Mass Functions Using SDSS and ALFALFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Crystal M.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Alfalfa Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We examine the first statistically-significant sample of dwarf galaxies in voids with matched optical (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and radio (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey) observations, which allow us to probe the impact of voids on the luminosity function, the HI mass function, and star formation history of galaxies. Large-scale voids provide a unique environment for studying galaxy formation and evolution. Previous theoretical work predicts that galaxies residing in large-scale voids evolve as if they were in a universe with lower matter density, higher dark energy density, and larger Hubble constant. Environmental processes such as ram pressure stripping and galaxy-galaxy interactions should be less important for void galaxies than for galaxies in denser regions (wall galaxies). We measure the effects of environment on two fundamental tests of galaxy formation: the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the HI mass function (HIMF). In both cases, we find a significant shift towards lower-mass, fainter galaxies in voids. However, we do not detect a dependence on environment of the low-mass/faint end slope of the HIMF and LF. We further investigate how surface brightness selection effects impact the r-band LF. We also examine how HI selection of galaxies affects the optical LF. Utilizing both optical and HI information on nearby galaxies, we determine how star formation efficiency and star formation rates depend on environment.

  11. The Luminosity Functions of Old and Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 3610

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmore, B. C.; Schweizer, F.; Kundu, A.; Miller, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The WFPC2 Camera on board HST has been used to obtain high-resolution images of NGC 3610, a dynamically young elliptical galaxy. These observations supersede shorter, undithered HST observations where an intermediate-age population of globular clusters was first discovered. The new observations show the bimodal color distribution of globular clusters more clearly, with peaks at (V-I)o = 0.95 and 1.17. The luminosity function (LF) of the blue, metal-poor population of clusters in NGC 3610 turn...

  12. The UV Luminosity Function at 6 < z < 10 from the Hubble Frontier Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Rachael C.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields program has obtained deep optical and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging of six galaxy clusters and associated parallel fields. The depth of the imaging (m_AB ~ 29) means we can identify faint galaxies at z > 6, and those in the cluster fields also benefit from magnification due to strong gravitational lensing that allows us to reach intrinsic absolute magnitudes of M_UV ~ -12.5 at z ~ 6. Here, we present the UV luminosity functions at 6 Universe may have provided sufficient ionizing radiation to sustain reionization.

  13. Deep JHK Photometry and the Infrared Luminosity Function of the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Glenn P.; Frogel, Jay A.; Terndrup, D. M.

    1995-03-01

    We derive the deepest, most complete near-IR luminosity function for Galactic bulge stars yet obtained based on new JHK photometry for stars in two fields of Baade's Window. When combined with previously published data, we are able to construct a luminosity function over the range 5.5 Blanco, V.M., & Whitford, A.E. 1990, ApJ, 353, 494). Between b = -3 and -12 we find a gradient in [Fe/H] of -0.06 +/- 0.03 dex/degree, consistent with other, independent derivations. We derive a helium abundance for Baade's Window with the R and R(') methods and find that Y = 0.27 +/- 0.03. Finally, we find that the bolometric corrections for bulge K giants (V - K >= 2) are in excellent agreement with empirical derivations based on observations of globular cluster and local field stars. However, for the redder M giants we find, as did Frogel and Whitford 1987, that the bolometric corrections differ by several tenths of a magnitude from those derived for field giants and adopted in the Revised Yale Isochrones. This difference most likely arises from the excess molecular blanketing in the V and I bands of the bulge giants relative to that seen in field stars.

  14. The infrared luminosity function of AKARI 90 μm galaxies in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilerci Eser, Ece; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2018-03-01

    Local infrared (IR) luminosity functions (LFs) are necessary benchmarks for high-redshift IR galaxy evolution studies. Any accurate IR LF evolution studies require accordingly accurate local IR LFs. We present IR galaxy LFs at redshifts of z ≤ 0.3 from AKARI space telescope, which performed an all-sky survey in six IR bands (9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm) with 10 times better sensitivity than its precursor Infrared Astronomical Satellite. Availability of 160 μm filter is critically important in accurately measuring total IR luminosity of galaxies, covering across the peak of the dust emission. By combining data from Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 13 (DR 13), six-degree Field Galaxy Survey and the 2MASS Redshift Survey, we created a sample of 15 638 local IR galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, factor of 7 larger compared to previously studied AKARI-SDSS sample. After carefully correcting for volume effects in both IR and optical, the obtained IR LFs agree well with previous studies, but comes with much smaller errors. Measured local IR luminosity density is ΩIR = 1.19 ± 0.05 × 108L⊙ Mpc-3. The contributions from luminous IR galaxies and ultraluminous IR galaxies to ΩIR are very small, 9.3 per cent and 0.9 per cent, respectively. There exists no future all-sky survey in far-IR wavelengths in the foreseeable future. The IR LFs obtained in this work will therefore remain an important benchmark for high-redshift studies for decades.

  15. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Naoki; Fukugita, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    The sample of 137 low-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with 0.05 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-II supernova survey for the southern equatorial stripe of 300 deg 2 is used to derive the luminosity functions (LFs) of SNe Ia and of their host galaxies in the g, r, i passbands. We show that the LF of SNe Ia host galaxies matches well with that of galaxies in the general field, suggesting that the occurrence of SNe Ia does not favor a particular type of galaxy but is predominantly proportional to the luminosity of galaxies. The evidence is weak that the SNe rate varies with the color of host galaxies. The only evidence that points to possible correlation between the SN rate and star formation activity is that the SN rate in late-type galaxies is higher than that in early-type galaxies by 31% ± 35%. In our low-redshift sample, the component of type Ia SN rate that is proportional to star formation activity is not evident in the integrated SN rate, while our observation is compatible with the current two-component models. The sample contains eight SNe Ia whose host galaxies were not identified, but it is shown that their occurrence is consistent with them occurring in low-luminous galaxies beyond the survey. The LF of SNe Ia is approximately Gaussian with the full width at half-maximum being a factor of σ = 0.24 mag or 1.67 in luminosity. The Gaussian distribution becomes tighter if the ratio of extinction to reddening, R V , is lower than the characteristic value for the Milky Way and if luminosity is corrected for the light-curve shape. The average color excess is ∼0.07 mag, which is significantly smaller than reddening expected for field galaxies. This color excess does not vary with the distance of the SNe from the center of the host galaxy to 15 kpc. This suggests that the major part of the color excess appears to be either intrinsic or reddening that arises in the immediate environment of SNe, rather than interstellar

  16. History of the Milky Way star formation rate from the white dwarf luminosity function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyerim; Scalo, J. (Texas Univ., Austin (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Consideration is given to the use of the white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) to study the history of the star formation rate in the Galaxy. It is shown that the WDLF is much more sensitive to the star formation rate than to variations in the initial mass function. A marginal feature in the WDLF at log(L/solar L) = -2 is found to represent the burst of star formation which occurred 300 million yrs ago, as proposed by Barry (1988) and Scalo (1987, 1988). Observations are used to limit the ratio of recent to past average star formation rates for smoothly decreasing and increasing star formation rates. The star formation rate histories derived from the results of Twarog (1980) and Barry (1988) are compared. 34 refs.

  17. History of the Milky Way star formation rate from the white dwarf luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Rim; Scalo, John

    1990-04-01

    Consideration is given to the use of the white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) to study the history of the star formation rate in the Galaxy. It is shown that the WDLF is much more sensitive to the star formation rate than to variations in the initial mass function. A marginal feature in the WDLF at log(L/solar L) = -2 is found to represent the burst of star formation which occurred 300 million yrs ago, as proposed by Barry (1988) and Scalo (1987, 1988). Observations are used to limit the ratio of recent to past average star formation rates for smoothly decreasing and increasing star formation rates. The star formation rate histories derived from the results of Twarog (1980) and Barry (1988) are compared.

  18. Joint Estimation Using Quadratic Estimating Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liang

    2011-01-01

    of the observed process becomes available, the quadratic estimating functions are more informative. In this paper, a general framework for joint estimation of conditional mean and variance parameters in time series models using quadratic estimating functions is developed. Superiority of the approach is demonstrated by comparing the information associated with the optimal quadratic estimating function with the information associated with other estimating functions. The method is used to study the optimal quadratic estimating functions of the parameters of autoregressive conditional duration (ACD models, random coefficient autoregressive (RCA models, doubly stochastic models and regression models with ARCH errors. Closed-form expressions for the information gain are also discussed in some detail.

  19. M dwarfs in the Local Milky Way: The Field Low-Mass Stellar Luminosity and Mass Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochanski, Jr, John J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Modern sky surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, have revolutionized how Astronomy is done. With millions of photometric and spectroscopic observations, global observational properties can be studied with unprecedented statistical significance. Low-mass stars dominate the local Milky Way, with tens of millions observed by SDSS within a few kpc. Thus, they make ideal tracers of the Galactic potential, and the thin and thick disks. In this thesis dissertation, I present my efforts to characterize the local low-mass stellar population, using a collection of observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). First, low-mass stellar template spectra were constructed from the co-addition of thousands of SDSS spectroscopic observations. These template spectra were used to quantify the observable changes introduced by chromospheric activity and metallicity. Furthermore, the average ugriz colors were measured as a function of spectral type. Next, the local kinematic structure of the Milky Way was quantified, using a special set of SDSS spectroscopic observations. Combining proper motions and radial velocities (measured using the spectral templates), along with distances, the full UVW space motions of over 7000 low-mass stars along one line of sight were computed. These stars were also separated kinematically to investigate other observational differences between the thin and thick disks. Finally, this dissertation details a project designed to measure the luminosity and mass functions of low-mass stars. Using a new technique optimized for large surveys, the field luminosity function (LF) and local stellar density profile are measured simultaneously. The sample size used to estimate the LF is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than any previous study, offering a definitive measurement of this quantity. The observed LF is transformed into a mass function (MF) and compared to previous studies.

  20. THE FAINT END OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale ' Amedeo Avogadro' , Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dell' Antonio, Ian P., E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dfabricant@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: adiaferio@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ian@het.brown.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, Box 1843, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a dense redshift survey covering a 4 deg{sup 2} region to a limiting R = 20.6. In the construction of the galaxy catalog and in the acquisition of spectroscopic targets, we paid careful attention to the survey completeness for lower surface brightness dwarf galaxies. Thus, although the survey covers a small area, it is a robust basis for computation of the slope of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function to a limiting M{sub R} = -13.3 + 5log h. We calculate the faint-end slope in the R band for the subset of SHELS galaxies with redshifts in the range 0.02 {<=}z < 0.1, SHELS{sub 0.1}. This sample contains 532 galaxies with R < 20.6 and with a median surface brightness within the half-light radius of SB{sub 50,R} = 21.82 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We used this sample to make one of the few direct measurements of the dependence of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function on surface brightness. For the sample as a whole the faint-end slope, {alpha} = -1.31 {+-} 0.04, is consistent with both the Blanton et al. analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Liu et al. analysis of the COSMOS field. This consistency is impressive given the very different approaches of these three surveys. A magnitude-limited sample of 135 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts with mean half-light surface brightness, SB{sub 50,R} {>=} 22.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} is unique to SHELS{sub 0.1}. The faint-end slope is {alpha}{sub 22.5} = -1.52 {+-} 0.16. SHELS{sub 0.1} shows that lower surface brightness objects dominate the faint-end slope of the luminosity function in the field, underscoring the importance of surface brightness limits in evaluating measurements of the faint-end slope and its evolution.

  1. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. V. Integrated JHKS magnitudes and luminosity functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we determine absolute integrated magnitudes in the J,H,KS passbands for Galactic star clusters from the Milky Way Star Clusters survey. In the wide solar neighbourhood, we derive the open cluster luminosity function (CLF) for different cluster ages. Methods: The integrated magnitudes are based on uniform cluster membership derived from the 2MAst catalogue (a merger of the PPMXL and 2MASS) and are computed by summing up the individual luminosities of the most reliable cluster members. We discuss two different techniques of constructing the CLF, a magnitude-limited and a distance-limited approach. Results: Absolute J,H,KS integrated magnitudes are obtained for 3061 open clusters, and 147 globular clusters. The integrated magnitudes and colours are accurate to about 0.8 and 0.2 mag, respectively. Based on the sample of open clusters we construct the general cluster luminosity function in the solar neighbourhood in the three passbands. In each passband the CLF shows a linear part covering a range of 6 to 7 mag at the bright end. The CLFs reach their maxima at an absolute magnitude of -2 mag, then drop by one order of magnitude. During cluster evolution, the CLF changes its slope within tight, but well-defined limits. The CLF of the youngest clusters has a steep slope of about 0.4 at bright magnitudes and a quasi-flat portion for faint clusters. For the oldest population, we find a flatter function with a slope of about 0.2. The CLFs at Galactocentric radii smaller than that of the solar circle differ from those in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. The CLF in the inner area is flatter and the cluster surface density higher than the local one. In contrast, the CLF is somewhat steeper than the local one in the outer disk, and the surface density is lower. The corresponding catalogue of integrated magnitudes is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. The Bright Sharc Survey Selection Function and its Impact on the Cluster X-ray Luminosity Function: Cosmological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Christophe; Ulmer, M.; Romer, K.; Nichol, R.; Holden, B.; Pildis, R.

    We present the results of a comprehensive set of simulations designed to quantify the selection function of the Bright SHARC survey (Romer et al. 2000a) for distant clusters. The statistical significance of the simulations relied on the creation of thousands of artificial clusters with redshifts and luminosities in the range 0.25luminosities in the range 0.25functions, each of which assumed a different set of cluster, cosmological and operational parameters. The parameters we varied included the values of Ω0, ΩΛ, β, core radius (rc) and ellipticity (e). We also investigated how non-standard surface brightness profiles (i.e the Navarro, Frenk & White 1997, NFW, model); and cooling flows, influence the selection function in the Bright SHARC survey. For our standard set we adopted the parameters used during the derivation of the Bright SHARC Cluster X-ray Luminosity Function (CXLF, Nichol et al. 1999, N99), i.e. Ω0=1, ΩΛ=0 and an isothermal β model with β=0.67, rc=250 kpc and e=0.15. We found that certain parameters have a dramatic effect on our ability to detect clusters, e.g. the presence of a NFW profile or a strong cooling flow profile, or the value of rc and β. Other parameters had very little effect, e.g. the cluster ellipticity. We show also that all the tested parameters have only a small influence on the computed luminosity of the clusters (recovered luminosity in the text) except the presence of a strong cooling flow. We stress the importance of cluster follow-up, by Chandra and XMM, in order to better constrain the morphology of the distant clusters found in the Bright SHARC and other surveys.

  3. The Faint End of the Cluster-galaxy Luminosity Function at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancone, Conor L.; Baker, Troy; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Snyder, Greg; Stern, Daniel; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-12-01

    We measure the faint-end slope of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) for cluster galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 using Spitzer IRAC data. We investigate whether this slope, α, differs from that of the field LF at these redshifts, and with the cluster LF at low redshifts. The latter is of particular interest as low-luminosity galaxies are expected to undergo significant evolution. We use seven high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey to measure the cluster-galaxy LF down to depths of M* + 3 (3.6 μm) and M* + 2.5 (4.5 μm). The summed LF at our median cluster redshift (z = 1.35) is well fit by a Schechter distribution with α3.6 μm = -0.97 ± 0.14 and α4.5 μm = -0.91 ± 0.28, consistent with a flat faint-end slope and is in agreement with measurements of the field LF in similar bands at these redshifts. A comparison to α in low-redshift clusters finds no statistically significant evidence of evolution. Combined with past studies which show that M* is passively evolving out to z ~ 1.3, this means that the shape of the cluster LF is largely in place by z ~ 1.3. This suggests that the processes that govern the buildup of the mass of low-mass cluster galaxies have no net effect on the faint-end slope of the cluster LF at z <~ 1.3.

  4. THE FAINT END OF THE CLUSTER-GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancone, Conor L.; Baker, Troy; Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Snyder, Greg [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stanford, Spencer A. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, Edward L., E-mail: cmancone@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We measure the faint-end slope of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) for cluster galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5 using Spitzer IRAC data. We investigate whether this slope, {alpha}, differs from that of the field LF at these redshifts, and with the cluster LF at low redshifts. The latter is of particular interest as low-luminosity galaxies are expected to undergo significant evolution. We use seven high-redshift spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey to measure the cluster-galaxy LF down to depths of M* + 3 (3.6 {mu}m) and M* + 2.5 (4.5 {mu}m). The summed LF at our median cluster redshift (z = 1.35) is well fit by a Schechter distribution with {alpha}{sub 3.6{mu}m} = -0.97 {+-} 0.14 and {alpha}{sub 4.5{mu}m} = -0.91 {+-} 0.28, consistent with a flat faint-end slope and is in agreement with measurements of the field LF in similar bands at these redshifts. A comparison to {alpha} in low-redshift clusters finds no statistically significant evidence of evolution. Combined with past studies which show that M* is passively evolving out to z {approx} 1.3, this means that the shape of the cluster LF is largely in place by z {approx} 1.3. This suggests that the processes that govern the buildup of the mass of low-mass cluster galaxies have no net effect on the faint-end slope of the cluster LF at z {approx}< 1.3.

  5. Characterizing the evolving K -band luminosity function using the UltraVISTA, CANDELS and HUDF surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Alice; McLure, Ross J.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; McLeod, Derek J.; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther; Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; Bruce, Victoria A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a new study of the K-band galaxy luminosity function (KLF) at redshifts z ≤ 3.75, based on a nested combination of the UltraVISTA, Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Legacy Extragalactic Survey and HUDF surveys. The large dynamic range in luminosity spanned by this new data set (3-4 dex over the full redshift range) is sufficient to clearly demonstrate for the first time that the faint-end slope of the KLF at z ≥ 0.25 is relatively steep (-1.3 ≤ α ≤ -1.5 for a single Schechter function), in good agreement with recent theoretical and phenomenological models. Moreover, based on our new data set, we find that a double Schechter function provides a significantly improved description of the KLF at z ≤ 2. At redshifts z ≥ 0.25, the evolution of the KLF is remarkably smooth, with little or no evolution evident at faint (MK ≥ -20.5) or bright magnitudes (MK ≤ -24.5). Instead, the KLF is seen to evolve rapidly at intermediate magnitudes, with the number density of galaxies at MK ≃-23 dropping by a factor of ≃5 over the redshift interval 0.25 ≤ z ≤ 3.75. Motivated by this, we explore a simple description of the evolving KLF based on a double Schechter function with fixed faint-end slopes (α1 = -0.5, α2 = -1.5) and a shared characteristic magnitude (MK^{star }). According to this parametrization, the normalization of the component which dominates the faint end of the KLF remains approximately constant, with φ ^{star }2 decreasing by only a factor of ≃2 between z ≃0 and 3.25. In contrast, the component which dominates the bright end of the KLF at low redshifts evolves dramatically, becoming essentially negligible by z ≃3. Finally, we note that within this parametrization, the observed evolution of MK^{star } between z ≃0 and 3.25 is entirely consistent with MK^{star } corresponding to a constant stellar mass of M⋆ ≃5 × 1010 M⊙ at all redshifts.

  6. Constraints on dark matter scenarios from measurements of the galaxy luminosity function at high redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corasaniti, P. S.; Agarwal, S.; Marsh, D. J. E.; Das, S.

    2017-04-01

    We use state-of-the-art measurements of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) at z =6 , 7, and 8 to derive constraints on warm dark matter (WDM), late-forming dark matter, and ultralight axion dark matter models alternative to the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm. To this purpose, we have run a suite of high-resolution N -body simulations to accurately characterize the low-mass end of the halo mass function and derive dark matter (DM) model predictions of the high-z luminosity function. In order to convert halo masses into UV magnitudes, we introduce an empirical approach based on halo abundance matching, which allows us to model the LF in terms of the amplitude and scatter of the ensemble average star formation rate halo mass relation, ⟨SFR (Mh ,z )⟩, of each DM model. We find that, independent of the DM scenario, the average SFR at fixed halo mass increases from z =6 to 8, while the scatter remains constant. At halo mass Mh≳1012 M⊙ h-1 , the average SFR as a function of halo mass follows a double power law trend that is common to all models, while differences occur at smaller masses. In particular, we find that models with a suppressed low-mass halo abundance exhibit higher SFR compared to the CDM results. Thus, different DM models predict a different faint-end slope of the LF which causes the goodness of fit to vary within each DM scenario for different model parameters. Using deviance statistics, we obtain a lower limit on the WDM thermal relic particle mass, mWDM≳1.5 keV at 2 σ . In the case of LFDM models, the phase transition redshift parameter is bounded to zt≳8 ×105 at 2 σ . We find ultralight axion dark matter best-fit models with axion mass ma≳1.6 ×10-22 eV to be well within 2 σ of the deviance statistics. We remark that measurements at z =6 slightly favor a flattening of the LF at faint UV magnitudes. This tends to prefer some of the non-CDM models in our simulation suite, although not at a statistically significant level to distinguish

  7. Cost function estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C K; Andersen, K; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    2000-01-01

    , marital status and presence of any co-morbidity other than dementia. Models with a log-transformed dependent variable, where predicted health care costs were re-transformed to the unlogged original scale by multiplying the exponential of the expected response on the log-scale with the average...... a regression model based on the quality of its predictions. In exploring the econometric issues, the objective of this study was to estimate a cost function in order to estimate the annual health care cost of dementia. Using different models, health care costs were regressed on the degree of dementia, sex, age...... of the exponentiated residuals, were part of the considered models. The root mean square error (RMSE), the mean absolute error (MAE) and the Theil U-statistic criteria were used to assess which model best predicted the health care cost. Large values on each criterion indicate that the model performs poorly. Based...

  8. The Galactic HII Region Luminosity Function at Infrared and Radio Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascoop, Joshua; Anderson, Loren; Sandor Makai, Zoltan; Armentrout, William Paul

    2018-01-01

    HII regions are the clearest indicators of ongoing high-mass star formation. The HII region luminosity function (LF) therefore probes present global star formation properties, and its shape has been related to HII region properties and galaxy Hubble types. Most HII region LF studies to date have been conducted in external galaxies; due to observational difficulties, there have been relatively few studies of the Milky Way HII region LF. Using ~600 HII regions from the WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions, we examine the Galactic LF in the first quadrant. Our high-resolution view of Galactic star formation regions allows us to separate nearby sources, and our sample is complete for all HII regions ionized by single O9.5 stars.We analyze the Galactic LF at six infrared wavelengths - where the emission is due to dust - and also at 20 cm, where the emission is from ionized gas. All LFs have a similar shape, showing that infrared LFs can be used in place of ionized gas tracers. All LFs can be described by a single power law with an index of approximately -2, in agreement with previous studes. We find no compelling evidence of a break or "knee" in the LF. Moreover, we see no significant variation in the form of the LF as a function of heliocentric distance, HII region size, or Galactocentric radius.

  9. The Power of SOFIA/FORCAST in Estimating Internal Luminosities of Low-mass Class 0/I Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Tracy L.; Terebey, Susan

    2017-12-01

    With the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) routinely operating science flights, we demonstrate that observations with the Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) can provide reliable estimates of the internal luminosities, L int, of protostars. We have developed a technique to estimate L int using a pair of FORCAST filters: one “short-wavelength” filter centered within 19.7–25.3 μm, and one “long-wavelength” filter within 31.5–37.1 μm. These L int estimates are reliable to within 30%–40% for 67% of protostars and to within a factor of 2.3–2.6 for 99% of protostars. The filter pair comprised of F 25.3 μm and F 37.1 μm achieves the best sensitivity and most constrained results. We evaluate several assumptions that could lead to systematic uncertainties. The OH5 dust opacity matches observational constraints for protostellar environments best, although not perfectly; we find that any improved dust model will have a small impact of 5%–10% on the L int estimates. For protostellar envelopes, the TSC84 model yields masses that are twice those of the Ulrich model, but we conclude that this mass difference does not significantly impact results at the mid-infrared wavelengths probed by FORCAST. Thus, FORCAST is a powerful instrument for luminosity studies targeting newly discovered protostars or suspected protostars lacking detections longward of 24 μm. Furthermore, with its dynamic range and greater angular resolution, FORCAST may be used to characterize protostars that were either saturated or merged with other sources in previous surveys using the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory.

  10. The Southern SHARC Survey: the Z = 0.3--0.7 Cluster X-Ray Luminosity Function 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D. J.; Collins, C. A.; Sharples, R. M.; Romer, A. K.; Holden, B. P.; Nichol, R. C.

    1997-10-01

    We present the z = 0.3-0.7 cluster X-ray luminosity function (XLF) determined from the Southern Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival ROSAT Cluster (SHARC) survey. Over the luminosity range L ~ (0.3-3) × 1044 ergs s-1 (0.5-2.0 keV), the XLF is in close agreement with that of the low-redshift X-ray cluster population. This result greatly strengthens our previous claim of no evolution of the cluster population, at these luminosities, at a median redshift of z=0.44. Based partly on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, and the Anglo-Australian Telescope, Siding Spring, Australia.

  11. Sub-mm emission line deep fields: CO and [C II] luminosity functions out to z = 6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, Gergö; van Kampen, Eelco; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Now that Atacama Large (Sub)Millimeter Array is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J =1-0 out to CO

  12. The Bright SHARC Survey: The X-Ray Cluster Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, R. C.; Romer, A. K.; Holden, B. P.; Ulmer, M. P.; Pildis, R. A.; Adami, C.; Merrelli, A. J.; Burke, D. J.; Collins, C. A.

    1999-08-01

    We present here initial results on the X-ray cluster luminosity function (XCLF) from the Bright Serendipitous High-Redshift Archival Cluster (SHARC) sample of distant X-ray clusters of galaxies. This sample is 97% complete in its optical identifications and contains 12 X-ray-luminous clusters in the redshift range 0.35×1044 ergs s-1, we find evidence for a deficit of clusters compared to that expected from a nonevolving XCLF. We detect only one such cluster in the redshift range 0.35×1044 ergs s-1 cluster, while we would expect 7.6 such clusters based on the local XCLF (De Grandi et al.). The statistical significance of the deficit in this joint survey increases to 99.5%. These results remain preliminary because of incompletenesses in the optical follow-up and uncertainties in the local XCLF. Based on data obtained at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, European Southern Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, and Apache Point Observatory.

  13. DEEP ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT THE INFALL REGION OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Jenkins, L.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M UV = –10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (α ≈ –1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parameterization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of α ≈ –1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than α = –1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star-forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star-forming galaxies show a turnover at M UV ≈ –14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M * = 10 8 M ☉ . A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star-forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star-forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  14. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  15. Luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    Luminosity monitors are needed in each experiment doing spin physics at RHIC. They concentrate on the luminosity aspects here because, for example, with a 10 -3 raw asymmetry in an experiment, an error of 10 -4 in the luminosity is as significant as a 10% polarization error. Because luminosity is a property of how two beams overlap, the luminosity at an interaction region must be measured at that interaction region in order to be relevant to the experiment at that interaction region. The authors will have to do the physics and the luminosity measurements by using labels on the event sums according to the polarization labels on the colliding bunches. Most likely they will not have independent polarization measurement on each bunch, but only on all the filled bunches in a ring, or perhaps all the bunches that are actually used in an experiment. Most analyses can then be handled by using the nine combinations gotten from three kinds of bunches in each ring, +, - and empty bunches. The empty bunches are needed to measure beam-gas background, (and some, like six in a row, are needed for the beam abort). Much of the difficulty comes from the fact that they must use a physics process to represent the luminosity. This process must have kinematic and geometric cuts both to reduce systematics such as beam-gas backgrounds, and to make it representative of the part of the interaction diamond from which the physics events come

  16. Spatial dependence of 2MASS luminosity and mass functions in the old open cluster NGC 188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, C.; Bica, E.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    Luminosity and mass functions in the old open cluster NGC 188 are analysed by means of J and H 2MASS photometry, which provides uniformity and spatial coverage for a proper background subtraction. With an age of about 6-8 Gyr, NGC 188 is expected to be suffering the effects of advanced dynamical evolution. Indeed, previous works in optical bands have suggested the presence of mass segregation. Within the uncertainties, the observed projected radial density profile of NGC 188 departs from the two-parameter King model in two inner regions, which reflects the non-virialized dynamical state and possibly, some degree of non-sphericity in the spatial shape of this old open cluster. Fits with two and three-parameter King models to the radial distribution of stars resulted in a core radius Rcore=1.3±0.1 pc and a tidal radius Rtidal=21±4 pc, about twice as large as the visual limiting radius. The concentration parameter c=1.2±0.1 of NGC 188 makes this open cluster structurally comparable to the loose globular clusters. The present 2MASS analysis resulted in significant slope variations with distance in the mass function φ(m)∝ m-(1+χ), being flat in the central parts (χ=0.6±0.7) and steep in the cluster outskirts (χ=7.2±0.6). The overall mass function has a slope χ=1.9±0.7, slightly steeper than a standard Salpeter mass function. In this context, NGC 188 is similar to the 3.2 Gyr, dynamically evolved open cluster M 67. Solar metallicity Padova isochrone fits to the near-infrared colour-magnitude diagram of NGC 188 resulted in an age of 7.0±1.0 Gyr. The best fit, obtained with the 7.1 Gyr isochrone, produced a distance modulus (m-M)0=11.1±0.1, E(B-V)=0.0, and a distance to the Sun d⊙=1.66±0.08 kpc. The observed stellar mass (in the range 0.98 M⊙- 1.08 M⊙) in NGC 188 is mobs=380±12 M⊙. A simple extrapolation of the observed overall mass function to stars with 0.08 M⊙ resulted in a total present mass of mtot˜(1.8±0.7)×104 M⊙. On the other hand

  17. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF RED SPIRAL GALAXIES ON THE SHAPE OF THE LOCAL K-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, Nicolas J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, Heath; Pimbblet, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    We have determined K-band luminosity functions for 13,325 local universe galaxies as a function of morphology and color (for K tot  ≤ 10.75). Our sample is drawn from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog, with all sample galaxies having measured morphologies and distances (including 4219 archival redshift-independent distances). The luminosity function for our total sample is in good agreement with previous works, but is relatively smooth at faint magnitudes (due to bulk flow distance corrections). We investigated the differences due to morphological and color selection using 5417 sample galaxies with NASA Sloan Atlas optical colors and find that red spirals comprise 20%-50% of all spirals with –25 ≤ M K  < –20. Fainter than M K = –24, red spirals are as common as early types, explaining the different faint end slopes (α = –0.87 and –1.00 for red and early-types, respectively). While we find red spirals comprise more than 50% of all M K  < –25 spiral galaxies, they do not dominate the bright end of the overall red galaxy luminosity function, which is dominated by early-type galaxies. The brightest red spirals have ongoing star formation and those without are frequently misclassified as early-types. The faintest ones have an appearance and Sérsic indices consistent with faded disks, rather than true bulge-dominated galaxies

  19. Stellar population samples at the galactic poles. IV. Luminosity function for the M-type dwarfs at the South Pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggen, O.J.

    1976-01-01

    The (UBVRI) photometry of all M dwarfs which are within 10degree of the South Galactic Pole and brighter than visual magnitude 15, and which have annual proper motions greater than 0/sup prime/./sub /096, are discussed. The observations themselves are listed and discussed in a recent Astrophysical Journal Supplement. The luminosity function is found to be very similar, in the overlapping sections, to that previously derived spectrophotometrically from the M stars near the Sun, and the extension to M/subV/ near +13 mag indicates that this luminosity is near the peak of that function. No support is found in these data for the recently suggested superabundance of low velocity M stars near the Sun

  20. Urban Landscape Spatial Pattern Estimation of Cities in Shandong Province Using Nighttime Luminosity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; He, H.; Hu, T.; Li, G.; Gao, H.; Zhao, X.

    2017-09-01

    China's cities have been undergoing rapid and intense urbanization processes in the past few decades. Shandong is a coastal province which is located in East China with big economy and population scales, and which also plays an important role in the rapid process of China's modernization. The DMSP/OLS dataset has been widely used for the urban development assessments in long time-series and large spatial scales situations. In this paper, we used a time series of nighttime light data to estimate the landscape spatial pattern changes of cities in Shandong province from 1994 to 2012. Nine landscape metrics were calculated and analyzed to figure out the spatial patterns of urban area developments of the cities in Shandong province. The landscape metrics include the number of patches (NP), the landscape total area (TA), the aggregation index (AI), the largest patch index (LPI), the mean patch area (AREA_MN), the landscape shape index (LSI), the total edge length (TE), the edge density (ED), and the mean radius of gyration (GYRATE_MN). The experimental results reveal that, in 1994-2012, the total urban area of cities in Shandong province expanded for 1.17 times, the average urban area increased by about 93.00%, the average annual growth rate of the TE metric is 2.67 %, while the ED metric decreased about 1.44 % annually. Bigger cities in this area show relative slower urbanization development processes, such as Jinan and Qingdao. Coastal cities represented much more rapid expansion velocities than inland cities. In the middle area of Shandong province, the connectivity between developed urban areas was constantly increased.

  1. URBAN LANDSCAPE SPATIAL PATTERN ESTIMATION OF CITIES IN SHANDONG PROVINCE USING NIGHTTIME LUMINOSITY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available China’s cities have been undergoing rapid and intense urbanization processes in the past few decades. Shandong is a coastal province which is located in East China with big economy and population scales, and which also plays an important role in the rapid process of China’s modernization. The DMSP/OLS dataset has been widely used for the urban development assessments in long time-series and large spatial scales situations. In this paper, we used a time series of nighttime light data to estimate the landscape spatial pattern changes of cities in Shandong province from 1994 to 2012. Nine landscape metrics were calculated and analyzed to figure out the spatial patterns of urban area developments of the cities in Shandong province. The landscape metrics include the number of patches (NP, the landscape total area (TA, the aggregation index (AI, the largest patch index (LPI, the mean patch area (AREA_MN, the landscape shape index (LSI, the total edge length (TE, the edge density (ED, and the mean radius of gyration (GYRATE_MN. The experimental results reveal that, in 1994–2012, the total urban area of cities in Shandong province expanded for 1.17 times, the average urban area increased by about 93.00%, the average annual growth rate of the TE metric is 2.67 %, while the ED metric decreased about 1.44 % annually. Bigger cities in this area show relative slower urbanization development processes, such as Jinan and Qingdao. Coastal cities represented much more rapid expansion velocities than inland cities. In the middle area of Shandong province, the connectivity between developed urban areas was constantly increased.

  2. The Paα Luminosity Function of H II Regions in Nearby Galaxies from HST/NICMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Schinnerer, Eva; Sofue, Yoshiaki; Komugi, Shinya; Egusa, Fumi; Scoville, Nicholas Z.

    2013-01-01

    The H II region luminosity function (LF) is an important tool for deriving the birthrates and mass distribution of OB associations and is an excellent tracer of the newly formed massive stars and associations. To date, extensive work (predominantly in Hα) has been done from the ground, which is hindered by dust extinction and the severe blending of adjacent (spatially or in projection) H II regions. Reliably measuring the properties of H II regions requires a linear resolution

  3. Evolution of Galaxy Luminosity and Stellar-Mass Functions since $z=1$ with the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozzi, D.; et al.

    2017-07-27

    We present the first study of the evolution of the galaxy luminosity and stellar-mass functions (GLF and GSMF) carried out by the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe the COMMODORE galaxy catalogue selected from Science Verification images. This catalogue is made of $\\sim 4\\times 10^{6}$ galaxies at $0functions against literature results obtained with spectroscopic redshifts; ii) we want to shed light on the way galaxies build up their masses over cosmic time. We find that both the ${\\it i}$-band galaxy luminosity and stellar mass functions are characterised by a double-Schechter shape at $z<0.2$. Both functions agree well with those based on spectroscopic redshifts. The DES GSMF agrees especially with those measured for the GAlaxy Mass Assembly and the PRism MUlti-object Survey out to $z\\sim1$. At $0.2luminosity and stellar-mass densities respectively to be constant ($\\rho_{\\rm L}\\propto (1+z)^{-0.12\\pm0.11}$) and decreasing ($\\rho_{\\rm Mstar}\\propto (1+z)^{-0.5\\pm0.1}$) with $z$. This indicates that, while at higher redshift galaxies have less stellar mass, their luminosities do not change substantially because of their younger and brighter stellar populations. Finally, we also find evidence for a top-down mass-dependent evolution of the GSMF.

  4. A Deep Proper Motion Catalog Within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Footprint. II. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; von Hippel, Ted; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGennaro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-01-01

    A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities {log} {\\text{}}g=8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5< {M}{bol}< 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5< {M}{bol}< 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5+/- 0.1× {10}-3 {{pc}}-3 and 3.5+/- 0.7× {10}-5 {{pc}}-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.

  5. MASS GROWTH AND MERGERS: DIRECT OBSERVATIONS OF THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF LRG SATELLITE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 0.7 FROM SDSS AND BOSS IMAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Van den Bosch, Frank C.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, Jon; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the luminosity functions of galaxies surrounding luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at average redshifts (z) = 0.34 and (z) = 0.65. The luminosity functions are derived by extracting source photometry around more than 40,000 LRGs and subtracting foreground and background contamination using randomly selected control fields. We show that at both studied redshifts the average luminosity functions of the LRGs and their satellite galaxies are poorly fitted by a Schechter function due to a luminosity gap between the centrals and their most luminous satellites. We utilize a two-component fit of a Schechter function plus a log-normal distribution to demonstrate that LRGs are typically brighter than their most luminous satellite by roughly 1.3 mag. This luminosity gap implies that interactions within LRG environments are typically restricted to minor mergers with mass ratios of 1:4 or lower. The luminosity functions further imply that roughly 35% of the mass in the environment is locked in the LRG itself, supporting the idea that mass growth through major mergers within the environment is unlikely. Lastly, we show that the luminosity gap may be at least partially explained by the selection of LRGs as the gap can be reproduced by sparsely sampling a Schechter function. In that case LRGs may represent only a small fraction of central galaxies in similar mass halos.

  6. Characterizing the Properties of Clusters of Galaxies as a Function of Luminosity and Redshift

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, K.; Peterson, J. R.; Madejski, G.; Goobar, A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the application of a new Monte Carlo method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI, described in a pair of companion papers), towards analysis and interpretation of X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our sample consists of publicly available, well-exposed observations of clusters at redshifts z > 0.069, totaling 101 objects. We determine the luminosity and temperature structure of the X-ray emitting gas, with the goal to quantify the scatter and the...

  7. Effects of Galaxy collisions on the structure and evolution of Galaxy clusters. I. Mass and luminosity functions and background light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.; Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin)

    1983-01-01

    The role of galaxy collisions in controlling the form of the galaxy mass and luminosity functions and in creating a diffuse background light is investigated by means of a direct computer simulation. Galaxy collisions are treated in a realistic manner, including both galaxy mergers and tidal encounters. A large number of theoretical studies of a galaxy collisions were consulted to formulate the basic input physics of collision cross sections. Despite this large number of studies, there remains considerable uncertainty in the effects of a collision on a galaxy due mainly to our lack of knowledge of the orbital distribution of matter in galaxies. To improve this situation, some methods of semiempirical calibration are suggested: for example, a survey of background light in clusters of different richness and morphological classes. If real galaxies are represented by galaxy models where the bulk of the matter is on radial, rather than circular, orbits, then tidal collisions are more damaging and there are a number of interesting effects: Repeated tidal encounters lead to galaxy mass and luminosity functions which are largely independent of model parameters and the initial galaxy mass function. It appears unlikely that the form of the average present-day luminosity function characteristic of both field and cluster galaxies is due to collisions, but certain observed deviations from the average found by Heiligman and Turner and by Dressler may be a signature of collisions, in particular a flat faint-end slope. The amount of luminous matter stripped from the galaxies in the simulations agrees with the amount of diffuse background light seen in the Coma Cluster

  8. The joint far-infrared-optical luminosity function for spiral galaxies and data for the Abell 400 and Cancer clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbelli, Edvige; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Dickey, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Visual and IRAS data for an optically selected sample of 183 late-type galaxies are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail to determine the joint FIR-optical luminosity function Psi from the FIR/blue luminosity ratio, r = L(FIR)/L(B). It is found that Psi can be approximated by a function of a single variable psi(r-prime), where r-prime is defined as r times L(B)/L(asterisk) exp -delta, with L(asterisk) a constant and delta = about 0.08. A lognormal curve peaking at r-prime = 0.35 and with dispersion of 0.28 is shown to give a good fit to psi(r-prime). From a lack of galaxies with very low r-prime in the present sample it is inferred that there are few spiral galaxies with low interstellar-dust abundances. Also included are data on the distribution function of r-prime for the more distant clusters Abell 400 and Cancer.

  9. FUNCIÓN DE LUMINOSIDAD DE CUÁSARES: UN ENFOQUE BASADO EN PROCESOS PUNTUALES // QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION: A POINT PROCESSES APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael José González De Gouveia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available La función de luminosidad de cuásares mide el número de cuásares que existen por megaparsec cúbico por unidad de magnitud absoluta. Es una de las herramientas más importantes para estudiar la población de galaxias de núcleo activo y su evolución a lo largo del tiempo. Nuestra investigación pretende estimar esta función bajo un enfoque probabilístico. Mediante un proceso de Poisson no homogéneo bidimensional modelamos la intensidad de cuásares observados en un espacio de magnitud absoluta por corrimiento al rojo. Se desarrollan una serie de modelos flexibles para la función de luminosidad que son estimados por el método de máxima verosimilitud y seleccionados mediante el criterio de información bayesiano (BIC. Un análisis de residuos es efectuado con el objetivo de estudiar la bondad del ajuste del mejor modelo, del cual a su vez se obtiene la función de luminosidad buscada.// ABSTRACT: The quasar luminosity function measures the number of quasars per cubic megaparsec and absolute magnitude. It is one of the most important tools for studying the active galactic nucleus population and how they have evolved in time. Our investigation estimates this function through a probabilistic approach. We model the observed density of quasars using a bidimensional non-homogeneous Poisson Process in the space of absolute magnitude times redshift. A series of adjustable parametrized models are tested and we use maximum likelihood and the Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC to select the best model, from wich the corresponding quasar luminosity function is obtained. Finally a residual analysis is made to study the goodness of fit.

  10. A New Determination Of The High-redshift Quasar Luminosity Function To I 25 In The COSMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Daniel; Capak, P.; Salvato, M.; Civano, F.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Trump, J.; Elvis, M.; Scoville, N.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the high-redshift quasar luminosity function down to I 25 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, using a selection that we demonstrate to be close to 100% complete for Type-1 quasars at the redshifts of interest. Careful analysis of the extensive COSMOS photometry and imaging data allows us to remove stellar and low-redshift contaminants from our candidate list. We find 133 likely quasars at z>3.1, 39 of which have prior spectroscopic confirmation. These confirmed and likely quasars are used to compute the rest-frame UV QLF in the redshift bins 3.1 3, and find that they evolve similarly between z 4 and z 3.2; however, the different normalizations imply that roughly 75% of X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) at z 3-4 are optically obscured. The implications of these results for the contribution of quasars to reionization are discussed.

  11. On the Mass and Luminosity Functions of Tidal Disruption Flares: Rate Suppression due to Black Hole Event Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, S.

    2018-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole is expected to yield a luminous flare of thermal emission. About two dozen of these stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) may have been detected in optical transient surveys. However, explaining the observed properties of these events within the tidal disruption paradigm is not yet possible. This theoretical ambiguity has led some authors to suggest that optical TDFs are due to a different process, such as a nuclear supernova or accretion disk instabilities. Here we present a test of a fundamental prediction of the tidal disruption event scenario: a suppression of the flare rate due to the direct capture of stars by the black hole. Using a recently compiled sample of candidate TDFs with black hole mass measurements, plus a careful treatment of selection effects in this flux-limited sample, we confirm that the dearth of observed TDFs from high-mass black holes is statistically significant. All the TDF impostor models we consider fail to explain the observed mass function; the only scenario that fits the data is a suppression of the rate due to direct captures. We find that this suppression can explain the low volumetric rate of the luminous TDF candidate ASASSN-15lh, thus supporting the hypothesis that this flare belongs to the TDF family. Our work is the first to present the optical TDF luminosity function. A steep power law is required to explain the observed rest-frame g-band luminosity, {dN}/{{dL}}g\\propto {L}g-2.5. The mean event rate of the flares in our sample is ≈ 1× {10}-4 galaxy‑1 yr‑1, consistent with the theoretically expected tidal disruption rate.

  12. The MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Field Survey. VI. The faint-end of the Lyα luminosity function at 2.91 < z < 6.64 and implications for reionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, A. B.; Garel, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Leclercq, F.; Hashimoto, T.; Richard, J.; Bacon, R.; Blaizot, J.; Caruana, J.; Conseil, S.; Contini, T.; Guiderdoni, B.; Herenz, E. C.; Inami, H.; Lewis, J.; Mahler, G.; Marino, R. A.; Pello, R.; Schaye, J.; Verhamme, A.; Ventou, E.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2017-11-01

    We present the deepest study to date of the Lyα luminosity function in a blank field using blind integral field spectroscopy from MUSE. We constructed a sample of 604 Lyα emitters (LAEs) across the redshift range 2.91 < z < 6.64 using automatic detection software in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deep data cubes allowed us to calculate accurate total Lyα fluxes capturing low surface-brightness extended Lyα emission now known to be a generic property of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We simulated realistic extended LAEs to fully characterise the selection function of our samples, and performed flux-recovery experiments to test and correct for bias in our determination of total Lyα fluxes. We find that an accurate completeness correction accounting for extended emission reveals a very steep faint-end slope of the luminosity function, α, down to luminosities of log10L erg s-1< 41.5, applying both the 1 /Vmax and maximum likelihood estimators. Splitting the sample into three broad redshift bins, we see the faint-end slope increasing from -2.03-0.07+ 1.42 at z ≈ 3.44 to -2.86-∞+0.76 at z ≈ 5.48, however no strong evolution is seen between the 68% confidence regions in L∗-α parameter space. Using the Lyα line flux as a proxy for star formation activity, and integrating the observed luminosity functions, we find that LAEs' contribution to the cosmic star formation rate density rises with redshift until it is comparable to that from continuum-selected samples by z ≈ 6. This implies that LAEs may contribute more to the star-formation activity of the early Universe than previously thought, as any additional intergalactic medium (IGM) correction would act to further boost the Lyα luminosities. Finally, assuming fiducial values for the escape of Lyα and LyC radiation, and the clumpiness of the IGM, we integrated the maximum likelihood luminosity function at 5.00

  13. Estimating Star Formation Rates from Infrared and Radio Luminosities: The Origin of the Radio-Infrared Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Eric F.

    2002-01-01

    I have assembled a diverse sample of galaxies from the literature with far-ultraviolet (FUV), optical, infrared (IR) and radio luminosities to explore the calibration of radio-derived and IR-derived star formation (SF) rates, and the origin of the radio-IR correlation. By comparing the 8-1000 micron IR, which samples dust-reprocessed starlight, with direct stellar FUV emission, I show that the IR traces most of the SF in luminous L* galaxies but traces only a small fraction of the SF in faint...

  14. OB ASSOCIATIONS AT THE UPPER END OF THE MILKY WAY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Matzner, Christopher D.; Moon, Dae-Sik, E-mail: mubdi@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    The Milky Way's most luminous, young, and massive (M {approx}> 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }) star clusters and OB associations have largely evaded detection despite knowledge of their surrounding H II regions. We search for these clusters and associations within the 40 star-forming complexes from Rahman and Murray in the 13 most luminous Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) free-free emission sources of the Galaxy. Selecting for objects with the dust-reddened colors of OB stars, we identify new candidate associations using the Two Micron All Sky Survey point-source catalog. In 40 star-forming complexes searched, 22 contain cluster/association candidates with sizes and masses in the range of 3'-26' and 10{sup 2.3}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Of the 22 candidates, at least seven have estimated masses {approx}> 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }, doubling the number of such massive clusters known in the Galaxy. Only one of the searched WMAP sources remains without a candidate. Applying our method to a statistically similar set of test locations, we estimate that 3.0 {+-} 0.6 of our 22 candidate associations are unrelated to the star-forming complexes. In addition, the apparent extinctions of our candidate associations correlate well with the predictions from a Galactic model. These facts, along with the clear detection of a known OB association and the previous spectral verification of one cluster found by this method, validate our method. In eight of the most luminous WMAP sources, the candidate associations can account for the observed free-free flux. With our new compilation, the Galactic census of young, massive stellar associations may now be about half complete.

  15. THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF BROAD-LINE QUASARS IN THE MASS-LUMINOSITY PLANE. II. BLACK HOLE MASS AND EDDINGTON RATIO FUNCTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Brandon C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93107 (United States); Shen, Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We employ a flexible Bayesian technique to estimate the black hole (BH) mass and Eddington ratio functions for Type 1 (i.e., broad line) quasars from a uniformly selected data set of {approx}58, 000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7. We find that the SDSS becomes significantly incomplete at M {sub BH} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} or L/L {sub Edd} {approx}< 0.07, and that the number densities of Type 1 quasars continue to increase down to these limits. Both the mass and Eddington ratio functions show evidence of downsizing, with the most massive and highest Eddington ratio BHs experiencing Type 1 quasar phases first, although the Eddington ratio number densities are flat at z < 2. We estimate the maximum Eddington ratio of Type 1 quasars in the observable universe to be L/L {sub Edd} {approx} 3. Consistent with our results in Shen and Kelly, we do not find statistical evidence for a so-called sub-Eddington boundary in the mass-luminosity plane of broad-line quasars, and demonstrate that such an apparent boundary in the observed distribution can be caused by selection effect and errors in virial BH mass estimates. Based on the typical Eddington ratio in a given mass bin, we estimate growth times for the BHs in Type 1 quasars and find that they are comparable to or longer than the age of the universe, implying an earlier phase of accelerated (i.e., with higher Eddington ratios) and possibly obscured growth. The large masses probed by our sample imply that most of our BHs reside in what are locally early-type galaxies, and we interpret our results within the context of models of self-regulated BH growth.

  16. Ultra-faint ultraviolet galaxies at z ∼ 2 behind the lensing cluster A1689: The luminosity function, dust extinction, and star formation rate density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Richard, Johan [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles André, F-69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France); Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Rm N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Scarlata, Claudia [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: anahita.alavi@email.ucr.edu [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-01-10

    We have obtained deep ultraviolet imaging of the lensing cluster A1689 with the WFC3/UVIS camera onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the F275W (30 orbits) and F336W (4 orbits) filters. These images are used to identify z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies via their Lyman break, in the same manner that galaxies are typically selected at z ≥ 3. Because of the unprecedented depth of the images and the large magnification provided by the lensing cluster, we detect galaxies 100× fainter than previous surveys at this redshift. After removing all multiple images, we have 58 galaxies in our sample in the range –19.5 < M {sub 1500} < –13 AB mag. Because the mass distribution of A1689 is well constrained, we are able to calculate the intrinsic sensitivity of the observations as a function of source plane position, allowing for accurate determinations of effective volume as a function of luminosity. We fit the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be α = –1.74 ± 0.08, which is consistent with the values obtained for 2.5 < z < 6. Notably, there is no turnover in the luminosity function down to M {sub 1500} = –13 AB mag. We fit the UV spectral slopes with photometry from existing Hubble optical imaging. The observed trend of increasingly redder slopes with luminosity at higher redshifts is observed in our sample, but with redder slopes at all luminosities and average reddening of (E(B – V)) = 0.15 mag. We assume the stars in these galaxies are metal poor (0.2 Z {sub ☉}) compared to their brighter counterparts (Z {sub ☉}), resulting in bluer assumed intrinsic UV slopes and larger derived values for dust extinction. The total UV luminosity density at z ∼ 2 is 4.31{sub −0.60}{sup +0.68}×10{sup 26} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, more than 70% of which is emitted by galaxies in the luminosity range of our sample. Finally, we determine the global star formation rate density from UV-selected galaxies at z ∼ 2 (assuming a constant dust

  17. The zCOSMOS survey : the role of the environment in the evolution of the luminosity function of different galaxy types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; Pozzetti, L.; Mignoli, M.; Kovac, K.; Lilly, S.; Tresse, L.; Tasca, L.; Cassata, P.; Halliday, C.; Vergani, D.; Caputi, K.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Moresco, M.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Capak, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. An unbiased and detailed characterization of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) is a basic requirement in many astrophysical issues: it is of particular interest in assessing the role of the environment in the evolution of the LF of different galaxy types. Methods. We studied the evolution in

  18. The zCOSMOS survey: the role of the environment in the evolution of the luminosity function of different galaxy types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zucca, E.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; Pozzetti, L.; Mignoli, M.; Kovač, K.; Lilly, S.; Tresse, L.; Tasca, L.; Cassata, P.; Halliday, C.; Vergani, D.; Caputi, K.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Coppa, G.; Cucciati, O.; de La Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pellò, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Guzzo, L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Moresco, M.; Oesch, P.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Capak, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims. An unbiased and detailed characterization of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) is a basic requirement in many astrophysical issues: it is of particular interest in assessing the role of the environment in the evolution of the LF of different galaxy types. Methods: We studied the evolution in

  19. The faint end of the red sequence galaxy luminosity function: unveiling surface brightness selection effects with the CLASH clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Durret, Florence; Adami, Christophe; Rudnick, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing the evolution of the faint end of the cluster red sequence (RS) galaxy luminosity function (GLF) with redshift is a milestone in understanding galaxy evolution. However, the community is still divided in that respect, hesitating between an enrichment of the RS due to efficient quenching of blue galaxies from z 1 to present-day or a scenario in which the RS is built at a higher redshift and does not evolve afterwards. Recently, it has been proposed that surface brightness (SB) selection effects could possibly solve the literature disagreement, accounting for the diminishing RS faint population in ground-based observations. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the RS GLFs of 16 CLASH clusters computed independently from ground-based Subaru/Suprime-Cam V and Ip or Ic images and space-based HST/ACS F606W and F814W images in the redshift range 0.187 ≤ z ≤ 0.686. We stack individual cluster GLFs in two redshift bins (0.187 ≤ z ≤ 0.399 and 0.400 ≤ z ≤ 0.686) and two mass (6 × 1014M⊙ ≤ M200Japan.

  20. Deep CFHT Y-band Imaging of VVDS-F22 Field. II. Quasar Selection and Quasar Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Liu, Dezi; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Zuhui; Yuan, Shuo; Shan, Huanyuan

    2018-03-01

    We report the results of a faint quasar survey in a one-square-degree field. The aim is to test the Y-K/g-z and J-K/i-Y color selection criteria for quasars at faint magnitudes to obtain a complete sample of quasars based on deep optical and near-infrared color–color selection and to measure the faint end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) over a wide redshift range. We carried out a quasar survey based on the Y-K/g-z and J-K/i-Y quasar selection criteria, using the deep Y-band data obtained from our CFHT/WIRCam Y-band images in a two-degree field within the F22 field of the VIMOS VLT deep survey, optical co-added data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 and deep near-infrared data from the UKIDSS Deep Extragalactic Survey in the same field. We discovered 25 new quasars at 0.5color selections are highly complete in a wide redshift range (z 2.5.

  1. GALAXIES IN FILAMENTS HAVE MORE SATELLITES: THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC WEB ON THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION IN THE SDSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Quan; Libeskind, N. I.; Tempel, E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. < M prim. + 2.0) by a factor of ∼2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation

  2. The role of cluster mergers and travelling shocks in shaping the Hα luminosity function at z ˜ 0.2: `sausage' and `toothbrush' clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; van Weeren, Reinout J.

    2014-02-01

    The most extreme cluster mergers can lead to massive cluster-wide travelling shock waves. The CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`toothbrush') clusters (z ˜ 0.2) host enormous radio-emitting shocks with simple geometry. We investigate the role of mergers and shocks in shaping the Hα luminosity function, using custom-made narrow-band filters matching the cluster redshifts mounted on the Isaac Newton Telescope. We surveyed ˜0.28 deg2 for each cluster and found 181 line emitters in the `sausage' (volume of 3.371 × 103 Mpc3 for Hα at z = 0.1945) and 141 in the `toothbrush' (4.546 × 103 Mpc3 for Hα at z = 0.225), out of which 49 (`sausage') and 30 (`toothbrush') are expected to be Hα. We build luminosity functions for the field-of-view down to an average limiting star formation rate of 0.14 M⊙ yr-1, find good agreement with field luminosity functions at z = 0.2, but significant differences between the shapes of the luminosity functions for the two clusters. We discover extended, tens-of-kpc-wide Hα haloes in galaxies neighbouring relics, which were possibly disrupted by the passage of the shock wave. By comparing the `sausage' cluster with blank fields and other clusters, we also uncover an order of magnitude boost (at 9σ level) in the normalization φ* of the luminosity function in the relic areas. Our results suggest that cluster mergers may play an important role in the evolution of cluster galaxies through shock-induced star formation.

  3. Variance function estimation for immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, G.M.; Thompson, R.; McKenzie, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is described which implements a recently described, modified likelihood method of determining an appropriate weighting function to use when fitting immunoassay dose-response curves. The relationship between the variance of the response and its mean value is assumed to have an exponential form, and the best fit to this model is determined from the within-set variability of many small sets of repeated measurements. The program estimates the parameter of the exponential function with its estimated standard error, and tests the fit of the experimental data to the proposed model. Output options include a list of the actual and fitted standard deviation of the set of responses, a plot of actual and fitted standard deviation against the mean response, and an ordered list of the 10 sets of data with the largest ratios of actual to fitted standard deviation. The program has been designed for a laboratory user without computing or statistical expertise. The test-of-fit has proved valuable for identifying outlying responses, which may be excluded from further analysis by being set to negative values in the input file. (Auth.)

  4. Lyα EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Totani, Tomonori; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We present theoretical predictions of the UV continuum luminosity function (UV LF) and Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution of Lyα emitters (LAEs) in the framework of the hierarchical clustering model of galaxy formation. The model parameters for the LAEs were determined by fitting to the observed Lyα LF at z = 5.7 in our previous study, and the fit indicates that extinction of Lyα photons by dust is significantly less effective than that of UV continuum photons, implying a clumpy dust distribution in the interstellar medium. We then compare the predictions about UV LFs and EW distributions with a variety of observations at z∼ 3-6, allowing no more free parameters and paying careful attention to the selection conditions of LAEs in each survey. We find that the predicted UV LFs and EW distributions are in nice agreement with observed data, and especially, our model naturally reproduces the existence of large EW LAEs (∼> 240 A) without introducing Pop III stars or top-heavy initial mass function. We show that both the stellar population (young age and low metallicity) and extinction by clumpy dust are the keys to reproducing large EW LAEs. The evidence of EW enhancement by clumpy dust is further strengthened by the quantitative agreement between our model and recent observations about a positive correlation between EW and extinction. The observed trend that brighter LAEs in the UV continuum tend to have smaller mean EW is also reproduced, and the clumpy dust plays an important role again for this trend. We suggested in our previous study that the transmission of the intergalactic medium for Lyα emission rapidly decreases from z ∼ 6 to 7 by fitting to Lyα LFs, and this evidence is quantitatively strengthened by the comparison with the UV LF and EW distribution at z ∼ 6.6.

  5. A Renewed Look at the Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function: Circumstellar Extinction and Contamination From Compact Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian; Ciardullo, Robin; Feldmeier, John; Jacoby, George H.; McCarron, Adam; Herrmann, Kimberly

    2018-01-01

    The planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) has been used as an extragalactic distance indicator since 1988, but there are still unsolved problems associated with its use. The two most serious involve PNLF distances beyond ~ 10 Mpc, which tend to be slightly smaller than those of other methods, and the lack of a theoretical explanation for the technique. We investigate these questions using a combination of narrow-band imaging data from the KPNO 4-m telescope, and recent LRS2 spectroscopy from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope.For the first project, we consider the implications of spectroscopic investigations by Kreckel et al. (2017), who found that in M74, several of the brightest planetary nebula (PN) candidates found by Herrmann et al. (2008) are actually compact supernova remnants (SNRs). First, we measure the [O III] and H-alpha fluxes of all the known SNRs in M31 and M33, and test whether those objects could be misidentified as bright PNe at distances beyond ~ 8 Mpc. We also obtain spectroscopy of bright PN candidates in the Fireworks Galaxy, NGC 6946, to test for PN/SNR confusion via the strengths of the [N II] and [S II] emission lines. Both experiments suggest that compact supernova remnants are not an important source of contamination in photometric surveys for extragalactic PNe.For the second project, we, for the first time, determine the de-reddened PNLF of an old stellar population. By performing spectroscopy of the brightest PN in M31’s bulge and measuring the objects’ Balmer decrements, we remove the effects of circumstellar extinction and derive the true location of the PNLF’s bright-end cutoff. In future studies, these data can be used to directly test the latest PNLF models, which combine modern post-AGB stellar evolutionary tracks with the physics of expanding nebulae.

  6. Asymptotic Optimality of Estimating Function Estimator for CHARN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Amano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CHARN model is a famous and important model in the finance, which includes many financial time series models and can be assumed as the return processes of assets. One of the most fundamental estimators for financial time series models is the conditional least squares (CL estimator. However, recently, it was shown that the optimal estimating function estimator (G estimator is better than CL estimator for some time series models in the sense of efficiency. In this paper, we examine efficiencies of CL and G estimators for CHARN model and derive the condition that G estimator is asymptotically optimal.

  7. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-10-15

    van der Meer (VdM) scans. The proton beams are scanned against each other separately in the x and y directions. The effective width of the beams is measured and the visible cross section, the key quantity for the luminosity measurement, is determined. The imi pact of detector instability, beam-beam effects, correlations of the particle density distributions in the x and y planes, and satellite and ghost bunches are studied in detail and systematic uncertainties are derived. The systematic error on the visible cross section was estimated to be 3.1% in the 50 ns operation period. A comparison of the VdM scans of 2015 and 2016 completes the second part of the thesis, as well as a comparison of the results delivered by other luminometers. As a contribution to the upgrade of the beam instrumentation for the high luminosity LHC, a novel single crystal sapphire detector was designed, built and studied in a test-beam. The detector comprises a stack of sapphire plates. The response depends on the direction of the incident particles. The performance of the detector is described in the third part of the thesis. It is demonstrated that this sapphire detector can be used for the detection of single relativistic particles. The results point to the dominant contribution of the electrons to the signal generation in sapphire.

  8. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-10-01

    M) scans. The proton beams are scanned against each other separately in the x and y directions. The effective width of the beams is measured and the visible cross section, the key quantity for the luminosity measurement, is determined. The imi pact of detector instability, beam-beam effects, correlations of the particle density distributions in the x and y planes, and satellite and ghost bunches are studied in detail and systematic uncertainties are derived. The systematic error on the visible cross section was estimated to be 3.1% in the 50 ns operation period. A comparison of the VdM scans of 2015 and 2016 completes the second part of the thesis, as well as a comparison of the results delivered by other luminometers. As a contribution to the upgrade of the beam instrumentation for the high luminosity LHC, a novel single crystal sapphire detector was designed, built and studied in a test-beam. The detector comprises a stack of sapphire plates. The response depends on the direction of the incident particles. The performance of the detector is described in the third part of the thesis. It is demonstrated that this sapphire detector can be used for the detection of single relativistic particles. The results point to the dominant contribution of the electrons to the signal generation in sapphire.

  9. ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: CO Luminosity Functions and the Evolution of the Cosmic Density of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Ivison, R. J.; Popping, Gergö; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian R.; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Bell, Eric F.; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C.; Cox, Pierre; Dickinson, Mark; Elbaz, David; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Ibar, Edo; Infante, Leopoldo; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Le Fevre, Olivier; Magnelli, Benjamin; Neri, Roberto; Oesch, Pascal; Ota, Kazuaki; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; Sheth, Kartik; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeff

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to z ˜ 4.5. This study is based on galaxies that have been selected solely through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted “knee” of the CO luminosity function (around 5 × 109 K km s-1 pc2). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to z ˜ 0, with more CO-luminous galaxies present at z ˜ 2. The observed galaxies at z ˜ 2 also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a drop by a factor of 3-10 from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 0 (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at z > 3. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation (z ˜ 2).

  10. The evolution of the cluster optical galaxy luminosity function between z = 0.4 and 0.9 in the DAFT/FADA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Durret, Florence; Guennou, Loïc; Adami, Christophe; Biviano, Andrea; Ulmer, Melville P.; Clowe, Douglas; Halliday, Claire; Ilbert, Olivier; Márquez, Isabel; Schirmer, Mischa

    2015-03-01

    Context. There is some disagreement about the abundance of faint galaxies in high-redshift clusters, with contradictory results in the literature arising from studies of the optical galaxy luminosity function (GLF) for small cluster samples. Aims: We compute GLFs for one of the largest medium-to-high-redshift (0.4 ≤ z evolution of different cluster populations. Methods: We calculated the GLFs for 31 clusters taken from the DAFT/FADA survey in the B,V,R, and I rest-frame bands. We used photometric redshifts computed from BVRIZJ images to constrain galaxy cluster membership. We carried out a detailed estimate of the completeness of our data. We distinguished the red-sequence and blue galaxies using a V - I versus I colour-magnitude diagram. We studied the evolution of these two populations with redshift. We fitted Schechter functions to our stacked GLFs to determine average cluster characteristics. Results: We find that the shapes of our GLFs are similar for the B,V,R, and I bands with a drop at the red GLF faint ends that is more pronounced at high redshift: αred ~ -0.5 at 0.40 ≤ z 0.1 at 0.65 ≤ z evolution of the faint-end slope of the red sequence and the galaxy type evolution that we find. Finally, faint galaxies accreted from the field environment at all redshifts might have replaced the blue late-type galaxies that converted into early types, explaining the lack of evolution in the faint-end slopes of the blue GLFs. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. LUMINOUS BURIED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AS A FUNCTION OF GALAXY INFRARED LUMINOSITY REVEALED THROUGH SPITZER LOW-RESOLUTION INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 5-35 μm low-resolution spectroscopic energy diagnostics of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z> 0.15, classified optically as non-Seyferts. Based on the equivalent widths of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and the optical depths of silicate dust absorption features, we searched for signatures of intrinsically luminous, but optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in these optically non-Seyfert ULIRGs. We then combined the results with those of non-Seyfert ULIRGs at z IR 12 L sun . We found that the energetic importance of buried AGNs clearly increases with galaxy infrared luminosity, becoming suddenly discernible in ULIRGs with L IR > 10 12 L sun . For ULIRGs with buried AGN signatures, a significant fraction of infrared luminosities can be accounted for by the detected buried AGN and modestly obscured (A V < 20 mag) starburst activity. The implied masses of spheroidal stellar components in galaxies for which buried AGNs become important roughly correspond to the value separating red massive and blue less-massive galaxies in the local universe. Our results may support the widely proposed AGN-feedback scenario as the origin of galaxy downsizing phenomena, where galaxies with currently larger stellar masses previously had higher AGN energetic contributions and star formation originating infrared luminosities, and have finished their major star formation more quickly, due to stronger AGN feedback.

  12. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  13. The CALYMHA survey: Lyα luminosity function and global escape fraction of Lyα photons at z = 2.23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, David; Matthee, Jorryt; Best, Philip; Stroe, Andra; Röttgering, Huub; Oteo, Iván; Smail, Ian; Morabito, Leah; Paulino-Afonso, Ana

    2017-04-01

    We present the CAlibrating LYMan-α with Hα (CALYMHA) pilot survey and new results on Lyman α (Lyα) selected galaxies at z ˜ 2. We use a custom-built Lyα narrow-band filter at the Isaac Newton Telescope, designed to provide a matched volume coverage to the z = 2.23 Hα HiZELS survey. Here, we present the first results for the COSMOS and UDS fields. Our survey currently reaches a 3σ line flux limit of ˜4 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2, and a Lyα luminosity limit of ˜1042.3 erg s-1. We find 188 Lyα emitters over 7.3 × 105 Mpc3, but also find significant numbers of other line-emitting sources corresponding to He II, C III] and C IV emission lines. These sources are important contaminants, and we carefully remove them, unlike most previous studies. We find that the Lyα luminosity function at z = 2.23 is very well described by a Schechter function up to LLy α ≈ 1043 erg s-1 with L^{ast }=10^{42.59^{+0.16}_{-0.08}} erg s-1, φ ^{ast }=10^{-3.09^{+0.14}_{-0.34}} Mpc-3 and α = -1.75 ± 0.25. Above LLy α ≈ 1043 erg s-1, the Lyα luminosity function becomes power-law like, driven by X-ray AGN. We find that Lyα-selected emitters have a high escape fraction of 37 ± 7 per cent, anticorrelated with Lyα luminosity and correlated with Lyα equivalent width. Lyα emitters have ubiquitous large (≈40 kpc) Lyα haloes, ˜2 times larger than their Hα extents. By directly comparing our Lyα and Hα luminosity functions, we find that the global/overall escape fraction of Lyα photons (within a 13 kpc radius) from the full population of star-forming galaxies is 5.1 ± 0.2 per cent at the peak of the star formation history. An extra 3.3 ± 0.3 per cent of Lyα photons likely still escape, but at larger radii.

  14. The Luminosity Function of Star Clusters in 20 Star-forming Galaxies Based on Hubble Legacy Archive Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Bowers, Ariel S.; Larsen, Soeren; Lindsay, Kevin; Ansari, Asna; Evans, Jessica

    2014-04-01

    Luminosity functions (LFs) have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4-30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on Advanced Camera for Surveys source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA). These cluster catalogs provide one of the largest sets of uniform, automatically generated cluster candidates available in the literature at present. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster LF can be approximated by a power law, dN/dLvpropL α, with an average value for α of -2.37 and rms scatter = 0.18 when using the F814W ("I") band. A comparison of fitting results based on methods that use binned and unbinned data shows good agreement, although there may be a systematic tendency for the unbinned (maximum likelihood) method to give slightly more negative values of α for galaxies with steeper LFs. We find that galaxies with high rates of star formation (or equivalently, with the brightest or largest numbers of clusters) have a slight tendency to have shallower values of α. In particular, the Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39), a merging system with a relatively high star formation rate (SFR), has the second flattest LF in the sample. A tentative correlation may also be present between Hubble type and values of α, in the sense that later type galaxies (i.e., Sd and Sm) appear to have flatter LFs. Hence, while there do appear to be some weak correlations, the relative similarity in the values of α for a large number of star-forming galaxies suggests that, to first order, the LFs are fairly universal. We examine the bright end of the LFs and find evidence for a downturn, although it only pertains to about 1% of the clusters. Our uniform database results in a small scatter (≈0.4 to 0.5 mag) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster (M brightest) and log of the number of clusters

  15. Reliable Function Approximation and Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-16

    progress , quarterly, research, special, group study, etc. 3. DATES COVERED. Indicate the time during which the work was performed and the report...compressive sensing with norm estimation. K Knudson, R Saab, and R Ward. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 62 (5), 2016. 2748-2758. (O2) An arithmetic

  16. ALMA SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD: CO LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC DENSITY OF MOLECULAR GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Aravena, Manuel; Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Carilli, Chris [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Da Cunha, Elisabete [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Daddi, Emanuele [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Ivison, R. J.; Popping, Gergö [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Riechers, Dominik [Cornell University, 220 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Smail, Ian R. [6 Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Swinbank, Mark [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-053121 Bonn (Germany); Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo, E-mail: decarli@mpia.de [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Fernandez Concha 700, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2016-12-10

    In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to z  ∼ 4.5. This study is based on galaxies that have been selected solely through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted “knee” of the CO luminosity function (around 5 × 10{sup 9} K km s{sup −1} pc{sup 2}). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to z  ∼ 0, with more CO-luminous galaxies present at z  ∼ 2. The observed galaxies at z  ∼ 2 also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a drop by a factor of 3–10 from z  ∼ 2 to z  ∼ 0 (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at z  > 3. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ( z  ∼ 2).

  17. Luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073074; Milutinovic Dumbelovic, G; Pandurovic, M; Smiljanic,I

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a method of luminosity measurement at the future linear collider ILC that estimates and corrects for the impact of the dominant sources of systematic uncertainty originating from the beam-induced effects and the background from physics processes. Based on the relativistic kinematics of the collision frame of the Bhabha process, the beam-beam related uncertainty is reduced to a permille independently of the precision with which the beam parameters are known. With the specific event selection, different from the isolation cuts based on topology of the signal used at LEP, combined with the corrective methods we introduce, the overall systematic uncertainty in the peak region above 80% of the nominal center-of-mass energy meets the physics requirements to be at the few permille level at all ILC energies.

  18. The evolution of the rest-frame J- and H-band luminosity function of galaxies to z=3.5

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanon, Mauro; Marchesini, Danilo

    2011-01-01

    We present the rest-frame J- and H-band luminosity function (LF) of field galaxies, based on a deep multi-wavelength composite sample from the MUSYC, FIRES and FIREWORKS survey public catalogues, covering a total area of 450 arcmin^2. The availability of flux measurements in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 um channels allows us to compute absolute magnitudes in the rest-frame J and H bands up to z=3.5 minimizing the dependence on the stellar evolution models. We compute the LF in the fo...

  19. The role of cluster mergers and travelling shocks in shaping the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function at $\\bf z\\sim0.2$: `sausage' and `toothbrush' clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; van Weeren, Reinout J.

    2013-01-01

    The most extreme cluster mergers can lead to massive cluster-wide travelling shock waves. The CIZA J2242.8+5301 ('sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`toothbrush') clusters ($z\\sim0.2$) host enormous radio-emitting shocks with simple geometry. We investigate the role of mergers and shocks in shaping the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function, using custom-made narrow-band filters matching the cluster redshifts mounted on the INT. We surveyed $\\sim0.28$ deg$^2$ for each cluster and found $181$ line emitte...

  20. The Lyα luminosity function at z = 5.7 - 6.6 and the steep drop of the faint end: implications for reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio; Sobral, David; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-12-01

    We present new results from the widest narrow-band survey search for Lyα emitters at z = 5.7, just after reionization. We survey a total of 7 deg2 spread over the COSMOS, UDS and SA22 fields. We find over 11 000 line emitters, out of which 514 are robust Lyα candidates at z = 5.7 within a volume of 6.3 × 106 Mpc3. Our Lyα emitters span a wide range in Lyα luminosities, from faint to bright (LLyα ˜ 1042.5-44 erg s-1) and rest-frame equivalent widths (EW0 ˜ 25-1000 Å) in a single, homogeneous data set. By combining all our fields, we find that the faint end slope of the z = 5.7 Lyα luminosity function is very steep, with α =-2.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}. We also present an updated z = 6.6 Lyα luminosity function, based on comparable volumes and obtained with the same methods, which we directly compare with that at z = 5.7. We find a significant decline of the number density of faint Lyα emitters from z = 5.7 to 6.6 (by 0.5 ± 0.1 dex), but no evolution at the bright end/no evolution in L*. Faint Lyα emitters at z = 6.6 show much more extended haloes than those at z = 5.7, suggesting that neutral Hydrogen plays an important role, increasing the scattering and leading to observations missing faint Lyα emission within the epoch of reionization. Altogether, our results suggest that we are observing patchy reionization which happens first around the brightest Lyα emitters, allowing the number densities of those sources to remain unaffected by the increase of neutral Hydrogen fraction from z ˜ 5 to 7.

  1. Non-Parametric Estimation of Correlation Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Rytter, Anders; Krenk, Steen

    In this paper three methods of non-parametric correlation function estimation are reviewed and evaluated: the direct method, estimation by the Fast Fourier Transform and finally estimation by the Random Decrement technique. The basic ideas of the techniques are reviewed, sources of bias are point...... out, and methods to prevent bias are presented. The techniques are evaluated by comparing their speed and accuracy on the simple case of estimating auto-correlation functions for the response of a single degree-of-freedom system loaded with white noise....

  2. HST Imaging of the Brightest z ∼ 8–9 Galaxies from UltraVISTA: The Extreme Bright End of the UV Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanon, Mauro; Labbé, Ivo; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Oesch, Pascal; Franx, Marijn; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Muzzin, Adam; Illingworth, Garth D.; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Caputi, Karina I.; Holwerda, Benne W.; McCracken, Henry J.; Smit, Renske; Magee, Dan

    2017-12-01

    We report on the discovery of three especially bright candidate {z}{phot}≳ 8 galaxies. Five sources were targeted for follow-up with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), selected from a larger sample of 16 bright (24.8≲ H≲ 25.5 mag) candidate z≳ 8 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) identified over 1.6 degrees2 of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. These were selected as Y and J dropouts by leveraging the deep (Y-to-{K}{{S}}∼ 25.3{--}24.8 mag, 5σ ) NIR data from the UltraVISTA DR3 release, deep ground-based optical imaging from the CFHTLS and Suprime-Cam programs, and Spitzer/IRAC mosaics combining observations from the SMUVS and SPLASH programs. Through the refined spectral energy distributions, which now also include new HyperSuprimeCam g-, r-, i-, z-, and Y-band data, we confirm that 3/5 galaxies have robust {z}{phot}∼ 8.0{--}8.7, consistent with the initial selection. The remaining 2/5 galaxies have a nominal {z}{phot}∼ 2. However, with HST data alone, these objects have increased probability of being at z∼ 9. We measure mean UV continuum slopes β =-1.74+/- 0.35 for the three z∼ 8{--}9 galaxies, marginally bluer than similarly luminous z∼ 4{--}6 in CANDELS but consistent with previous measurements of similarly luminous galaxies at z∼ 7. The circularized effective radius for our brightest source is 0.9 ± 0.3 kpc, similar to previous measurements for a bright z∼ 11 galaxy and bright z∼ 7 galaxies. Finally, enlarging our sample to include the six brightest z∼ 8 LBGs identified over UltraVISTA (i.e., including three other sources from Labbé et al.) we estimate for the first time the volume density of galaxies at the extreme bright end ({M}{UV}∼ -22 mag) of the z∼ 8 UV luminosity function. Despite this exceptional result, the still large statistical uncertainties do not allow us to discriminate between a Schechter and a double-power-law form.

  3. The Herschel* PEP-HERMES Luminosity Function- I. Probing the Evolution of PACS Selected Galaxies to z approx. equal to 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppioni, Carlotta; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G.; Andreani, P.; Cimatti, A.; Ilbert, O.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We exploit the deep and extended far-IR data sets (at 70, 100 and 160 µm) of the Herschel Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) Survey, in combination with the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey data at 250, 350 and 500 µm, to derive the evolution of the rest-frame 35-, 60-, 90- and total infrared (IR) luminosity functions (LFs) up to z 4.We detect very strong luminosity evolution for the total IR LF (LIR ? (1 + z)(sup 3.55 +/- 0.10) up to z 2, and ? (1 + z)(sup 1.62 +/- 0.51) at 2 less than z less than approximately 4) combined with a density evolution (? (1 + z)(sup -0.57 +/- 0.22) up to z 1 and ? (1 + z)(sup -3.92 +/- 0.34) at 1 less than z less than approximately 4). In agreement with previous findings, the IR luminosity density (?IR) increases steeply to z 1, then flattens between z 1 and z 3 to decrease at z greater than approximately 3. Galaxies with different spectral energy distributions, masses and specific star formation rates (SFRs) evolve in very different ways and this large and deep statistical sample is the first one allowing us to separately study the different evolutionary behaviours of the individual IR populations contributing to ?IR. Galaxies occupying the well-established SFR-stellar mass main sequence (MS) are found to dominate both the total IR LF and ?IR at all redshifts, with the contribution from off-MS sources (=0.6 dex above MS) being nearly constant (20 per cent of the total ?IR) and showing no significant signs of increase with increasing z over the whole 0.8 < z <2.2 range. Sources with mass in the range 10 = log(M/solar mass) = 11 are found to dominate the total IR LF, with more massive galaxies prevailing at the bright end of the high-z (greater than approximately 2) LF. A two-fold evolutionary scheme for IR galaxies is envisaged: on the one hand, a starburst-dominated phase in which the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH) grows and is obscured by dust (possibly triggered by a major merging event

  4. Missing mass from low-luminosity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, M.R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Results from a deep photometric survey for low-luminosity stars show a turnup to the luminosity function at faint magnitudes, and reopen the possibility that the missing mass in the solar neighbourhood is made up of stars after all. (author)

  5. Estimating state-contingent production functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Svend; Karantininis, Kostas

    The paper reviews the empirical problem of estimating state-contingent production functions. The major problem is that states of nature may not be registered and/or that the number of observation per state is low. Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate an artificial, uncertain production...... environment based on Cobb Douglas production functions with state-contingent parameters. The pa-rameters are subsequently estimated based on different sizes of samples using Generalized Least Squares and Generalized Maximum Entropy and the results are compared. It is concluded that Maximum Entropy may...... be useful, but that further analysis is needed to evaluate the efficiency of this estimation method compared to traditional methods....

  6. Luminosity measurement at AMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A precise measurement of a luminosity is required by experiments with high statistics. The largest sources of a systematic error of a luminosity measurement are an alignment of the tube chambers which measure a polar angle of Bhabha events and a higher order correction for the Bhabha cross section calculation. We describe a resent study for these uncertainties and how to reduce the systematic errors from these sources. The total systematic error of the luminosity measurement of 1.8% can be reduced to 1.0% by this study. (author)

  7. Bivariate hard thresholding in wavelet function estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Fryzlewicz

    2007-01-01

    We propose a generic bivariate hard thresholding estimator of the discrete wavelet coefficients of a function contaminated with i.i.d. Gaussian noise. We demonstrate its good risk properties in a motivating example, and derive upper bounds for its mean-square error. Motivated by the clustering of large wavelet coefficients in real-life signals, we propose two wavelet denoising algorithms, both of which use specific instances of our bivariate estimator. The BABTE algorithm uses basis averaging...

  8. Estimating state-contingent production functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Svend; Karantininis, Kostas

    The paper reviews the empirical problem of estimating state-contingent production functions. The major problem is that states of nature may not be registered and/or that the number of observation per state is low. Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate an artificial, uncertain production...... environment based on Cobb Douglas production functions with state-contingent parameters. The pa-rameters are subsequently estimated based on different sizes of samples using Generalized Least Squares and Generalized Maximum Entropy and the results are compared. It is concluded that Maximum Entropy may...

  9. An estimating function approach to linkage heterogeneity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X chromosome. Science 230, 753–758. Fujii Y. 1994 On homogeneity test using estimating function. Bull. Informat. Cybern. 26, 101–107. Grice D. E., Halmi K. A., Fichter M. M., Strober M., Woodside. D. B., Treasure J. T. et al. 2002 Evidence for a susceptibility gene for anorexia nervosa on chromosome 1. Am. J. Hum. Genet.

  10. Nonlinear wavelet regression function estimator for censored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Let (Y;C;X) be a vector of random variables where Y; C and X are, respectively, the interest variable, a right censoring and a covariable (predictor). In this paper, we introduce a new nonlinear wavelet-based estimator of the regression function in the right censorship model. An asymptotic expression for the mean integrated ...

  11. Efficient Estimating Functions for Stochastic Differential Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Nina Munkholt

    The overall topic of this thesis is approximate martingale estimating function-based estimationfor solutions of stochastic differential equations, sampled at high frequency. Focuslies on the asymptotic properties of the estimators. The first part of the thesis deals with diffusions observed over...... a fixed time interval. Rate optimal and effcient estimators areobtained for a one-dimensional diffusion parameter. Stable convergence in distribution isused to achieve a practically applicable Gaussian limit distribution for suitably normalisedestimators. In a simulation example, the limit distributions...... multidimensional parameter. Conditions for rate optimality and effciency of estimatorsof drift-jump and diffusion parameters are given in some special cases. Theseconditions are found to extend the pre-existing conditions applicable to continuous diffusions,and impose much stronger requirements on the estimating...

  12. On the distinction between density and luminosity evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahcall, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the assumptions of pure density evolution and pure luminosity evolution lead to observable differences in the distribution of sources for all convergent luminosity functions. The proof given is valid for sources with an arbitrary number of intrinisic luminosities (e.g., optical, infrared, and radio) and also holds in the special cases of mixed evolution that are considered. (author)

  13. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point

  14. Effect of primordial non-Gaussianities on the far-UV luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies: implications for cosmic reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Silk, Joseph; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Habouzit, Melanie; Mamon, Gary A.; Peirani, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z ≳ 6 is one of the big challenges of current high-redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the cosmological model, and in particular in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations, affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run five different N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a phenomenological galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to MFUV = -14 at redshift 7 ≤ z ≤ 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on ≲ Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced (up to a factor of 3 at z = 14) in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such scale-dependent non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth τe. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of τe still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that τe could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties

  15. Luminosity measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Karacheban, Olena

    2017-01-01

    Luminosity is a key quantity of any collider, since it allows for the determinationof the absolute cross sections from the observed rates in a detector. Since theHiggs boson discovery in 2012, the highest priority at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) has been given to an accurate understanding of the electroweak scale anda search for new physics. Precise luminosity measurements in such conditions areof crucial importance, as they determine the precision of any physics cross sectionmeasurement.To increase the production of particles of interest, usually of low cross section,the LHC is running at the highest possible luminosity. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm−2 s−1was reached with 1011 protons per bunch and a bunch spacing of 25 ns. In suchconditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response time are required,especially for instrumentation near the beam.The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is equipped with three online luminomet...

  16. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  17. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...

  18. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey: First Direct Measurements of the Greater Than Or Similar To 10 Kev X-Ray Luminosity Function For Active Galactic Nuclei At z > 0.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aird, J.; Alexander, D. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the rest-frame 10-40 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on a sample of 94 sources at 0.1

  19. THE MEGASECOND CHANDRA X-RAY VISIONARY PROJECT OBSERVATION OF NGC 3115. III. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF LMXBS AND DEPENDENCE ON STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Wong, Ka-Wah [Eureka Scientific, Inc., 2452 Delmer Street Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Jennings, Zachary G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Homan, Jeroen; Remillard, Ronald A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, MI 48824 (United States); Sivakoff, Gregory R., E-mail: dacheng.lin@unh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2015-07-20

    We studied the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115, using the Megasecond Chandra X-ray Visionary Project Observation. With a total exposure time of ∼1.1 Ms, we constructed the XLF down to a limiting luminosity of ∼10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}, which is much deeper than that typically reached for other early-type galaxies. We found significant flattening of the overall LMXB XLF from dN/dL ∝ L{sup −2.2±0.4} above 5.5 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1} to dN/dL ∝ L{sup −1.0±0.1} below it, although we could not rule out a fit with a higher break at ∼1.6 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. We also found evidence that the XLF of LMXBs in globular clusters (GCs) is overall flatter than that of field LMXBs. Thus, our results for this galaxy do not support the idea that all LMXBs are formed in GCs. The XLF of field LMXBs seems to show spatial variation, with the XLF in the inner region of the galaxy being flatter than that in the outer region, probably due to contamination of LMXBs from undetected and/or disrupted GCs in the inner region. The XLF in the outer region is probably the XLF of primordial field LMXBs, exhibiting dN/dL ∝ L{sup −1.2±0.1} up to a break close to the Eddington limit of neutron star LMXBs (∼1.7 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}). The break of the GC LMXB XLF is lower, at ∼1.1 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1}. We also confirm previous findings that the metal-rich/red GCs are more likely to host LMXBs than the metal-poor/blue GCs, which is more significant for more luminous LMXBs, and that more massive GCs are more likely to host LMXBs.

  20. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  1. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Kaspi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM has been applied to about 100 AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 1046 erg/sec in the optical. Most of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we measured the BLR size in C iv of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603, and SBS 1425+606. We present the C iv BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

  2. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, Shai [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Brandt, William N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Maoz, Dan; Netzer, Hagai [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Shemmer, Ohad, E-mail: shai@wise.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2017-10-30

    Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM) has been applied to about 100 AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR) sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 10{sup 46} erg/sec in the optical. Most of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we measured the BLR size in C iv of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603, and SBS 1425+606). We present the C iv BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

  3. Estimating Stochastic Volatility Models using Prediction-based Estimating Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Asger; Brix, Anne Floor

    to the performance of the GMM estimator based on conditional moments of integrated volatility from Bollerslev and Zhou (2002). The case where the observed log-price process is contaminated by i.i.d. market microstructure (MMS) noise is also investigated. First, the impact of MMS noise on the parameter estimates from...... the two estimation methods without noise correction are studied. Second, a noise robust GMM estimator is constructed by approximating integrated volatility by a realized kernel instead of realized variance. The PBEFs are also recalculated in the noise setting, and the two estimation methods ability...

  4. Great Optically Luminous Dropout Research Using Subaru HSC (GOLDRUSH). I. UV luminosity functions at z ˜ 4-7 derived with the half-million dropouts on the 100 deg2 sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Harikane, Yuichi; Toshikawa, Jun; Rauch, Michael; Yuma, Suraphong; Sawicki, Marcin; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune; Willott, Chris; Akhlaghi, Mohammad; Akiyama, Masayuki; Coupon, Jean; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Komiyama, Yutaka; Konno, Akira; Lin, Lihwai; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Silverman, John; Tanaka, Masayuki; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    We study the UV luminosity functions (LFs) at z ˜ 4, 5, 6, and 7 based on the deep large-area optical images taken by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP). On the 100 deg2 sky of the HSC SSP data available to date, we take enormous samples consisting of a total of 579565 dropout candidates at z ˜ 4-7 by the standard color selection technique, 358 out of which are spectroscopically confirmed by our follow-up spectroscopy and other studies. We obtain UV LFs at z ˜ 4-7 that span a very wide UV luminosity range of ˜0.002-100 L_UV^\\ast (-26 2 σ significance, and require either double power-law functions or modified Schechter functions that consider a magnification bias due to gravitational lensing.

  5. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  6. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  7. Remarks on the maximum luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Ikeda, Taishi; Moore, Christopher J.; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2018-04-01

    The quest for fundamental limitations on physical processes is old and venerable. Here, we investigate the maximum possible power, or luminosity, that any event can produce. We show, via full nonlinear simulations of Einstein's equations, that there exist initial conditions which give rise to arbitrarily large luminosities. However, the requirement that there is no past horizon in the spacetime seems to limit the luminosity to below the Planck value, LP=c5/G . Numerical relativity simulations of critical collapse yield the largest luminosities observed to date, ≈ 0.2 LP . We also present an analytic solution to the Einstein equations which seems to give an unboundedly large luminosity; this will guide future numerical efforts to investigate super-Planckian luminosities.

  8. Estimating functions for inhomogeneous Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Estimation methods are reviewed for inhomogeneous Cox processes with tractable first and second order properties. We illustrate the various suggestions by means of data examples.......Estimation methods are reviewed for inhomogeneous Cox processes with tractable first and second order properties. We illustrate the various suggestions by means of data examples....

  9. An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

    2012-03-07

    At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

  10. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 35; Issue 3. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs ... We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for -ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical ...

  11. Prediction-based estimating functions: Review and new developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The general theory of prediction-based estimating functions for stochastic process models is reviewed and extended. Particular attention is given to optimal estimation, asymptotic theory and Gaussian processes. Several examples of applications are presented. In particular, partial observation...

  12. ESTIMATION OF IMPULSE RESPONSE FUNCTION BY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method proves stable in both numerical and statistical sense. There was no instability observed up to 80 input variables. KEY WORDS: Iterative multiple regression, impulse response function, error square contribution, time series analysis, transfer function model. Global Jnl of Mathematical Sciences Vol. 3(1) 2004: 47- ...

  13. How to use COSMIC Functional Size in Effort Estimation Models?

    OpenAIRE

    Gencel, Cigdem

    2008-01-01

    Although Functional Size Measurement (FSM) methods have become widely used by the software organizations, the functional size based effort estimation still needs further investigation. Most of the studies on effort estimation consider total functional size of the software as the primary input to estimation models and they mostly focus on identifying the project parameters which might have a significant effect on the size-effort relationship. This study brings suggestions on how to use COSMIC ...

  14. Luminosity class of neutron reflectometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleshanov, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    The formulas that relate neutron fluxes at reflectometers with differing q-resolutions are derived. The reference luminosity is defined as a maximum flux for measurements with a standard resolution. The methods of assessing the reference luminosity of neutron reflectometers are presented for monochromatic and white beams, which are collimated with either double diaphragm or small angle Soller systems. The values of the reference luminosity for unified parameters define luminosity class of reflectometers. The luminosity class characterizes (each operation mode of) the instrument by one number and can be used to classify operating reflectometers and optimize designed reflectometers. As an example the luminosity class of the neutron reflectometer NR-4M (reactor WWR-M, Gatchina) is found for four operation modes: 2.1 (monochromatic non-polarized beam), 1.9 (monochromatic polarized beam), 1.5 (white non-polarized beam), 1.1 (white polarized beam); it is shown that optimization of measurements may increase the flux at the sample up to two orders of magnitude with monochromatic beams and up to one order of magnitude with white beams. A fan beam reflectometry scheme with monochromatic neutrons is suggested, and the expected increase in luminosity is evaluated. A tuned-phase chopper with a variable TOF resolution is recommended for reflectometry with white beams.

  15. BOSS Great Wall: morphology, luminosity, and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Gramann, Mirt; Saar, Enn; Tempel, Elmo; Liivamägi, Lauri Juhan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Streblyanska, Alina; Maraston, Claudia; Rubiño-Martín, José Alberto

    2017-06-01

    Context. Galaxy superclusters are the largest systems in the Universe that can give us information about the formation and evolution of the cosmic web. Aims: We study the morphology of the superclusters from the BOSS Great Wall (BGW), a recently discovered very rich supercluster complex at the redshift z = 0.47. Methods: We have employed the Minkowski functionals to quantify supercluster morphology. We calculate supercluster luminosities and masses using two methods. Firstly, we used data about the luminosities and stellar masses of high stellar mass galaxies with log (M∗/h-1M⊙) ≥ 11.3. Secondly, we applied a scaling relation that combines morphological and physical parameters of superclusters to obtain supercluster luminosities, and obtained supercluster masses using the mass-to-light ratios found for local rich superclusters. Results: The BGW superclusters are very elongated systems, with shape parameter values of less than 0.2. This value is lower than that found for the most elongated local superclusters. The values of the fourth Minkowski functional V3 for the richer BGW superclusters (V3 = 7 and 10) show that they have a complicated and rich inner structure. We identify two Planck SZ clusters in the BGW superclusters, one in the richest BGW supercluster, and another in one of the poor BGW superclusters. The luminosities of the BGW superclusters are in the range of 1-8 × 1013h-2L⊙, and masses in the range of 0.4-2.1 × 1016h-1M⊙. Supercluster luminosities and masses obtained with two methods agree well. Conclusions: The BGW is a complex of massive, luminous and large superclusters with very elongated shape. The search and detailed study, including the morphology analysis of the richest superclusters and their complexes from observations and simulations can help us to understand formation and evolution of the cosmic web.

  16. Great Optically Luminous Dropout Research Using Subaru HSC (GOLDRUSH). I. UV Luminosity Functions at $z \\sim 4-7$ Derived with the Half-Million Dropouts on the 100 deg$^2$ Sky

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Harikane, Yuichi; Toshikawa, Jun; Rauch, Michael; Yuma, Suraphong; Sawicki, Marcin; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune; Willott, Chris; Akhlaghi, Mohammad; Akiyama, Masayuki; Coupon, Jean; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2017-01-01

    We study the UV luminosity functions (LFs) at $z\\sim 4$, $5$, $6,$ and $7$ based on the deep large-area optical images taken by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program (SSP). On the 100 deg$^2$ sky of the HSC SSP data available to date, we make enormous samples consisting of a total of 579,565 dropout candidates at $z\\sim 4-7$ by the standard color selection technique, 358 out of which are spectroscopically confirmed by our follow-up spectroscopy and other studies. We obtain UV L...

  17. The X-ray luminosity functions of field low-mass X-ray binaries in early-type galaxies: Evidence for a stellar age dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Tzanavaris, P.; Yukita, M. [The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Berkeley, M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Ptak, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zezas, A. [Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Alexander, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. E. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fragos, T. [IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Kalogera, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183 Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span ≈3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background active galactic nuclei/galaxies. We find that the 'young' early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (≈2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L {sub X} ≳ (5-10) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}) per unit K-band luminosity (L{sub K} ; a proxy for stellar mass) than the 'old' early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (≈8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of ≈2-3 excess of L {sub X}/L{sub K} for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  18. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  19. Usng subjective percentiles and test data for estimating fragility functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, L.L.; Mensing, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Fragility functions are cumulative distribution functions (cdfs) of strengths at failure. They are needed for reliability analyses of systems such as power generation and transmission systems. Subjective opinions supplement sparse test data for estimating fragility functions. Often the opinions are opinions on the percentiles of the fragility function. Subjective percentiles are likely to be less biased than opinions on parameters of cdfs. Solutions to several problems in the estimation of fragility functions are found for subjective percentiles and test data. How subjective percentiles should be used to estimate subjective fragility functions, how subjective percentiles should be combined with test data, how fragility functions for several failure modes should be combined into a composite fragility function, and how inherent randomness and uncertainty due to lack of knowledge should be represented are considered. Subjective percentiles are treated as independent estimates of percentiles. The following are derived: least-squares parameter estimators for normal and lognormal cdfs, based on subjective percentiles (the method is applicable to any invertible cdf); a composite fragility function for combining several failure modes; estimators of variation within and between groups of experts for nonidentically distributed subjective percentiles; weighted least-squares estimators when subjective percentiles have higher variation at higher percents; and weighted least-squares and Bayes parameter estimators based on combining subjective percentiles and test data. 4 figures, 2 tables

  20. Container Surface Evaluation by Function Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, James G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Container images are analyzed for specific surface features, such as, pits, cracks, and corrosion. The detection of these features is confounded with complicating features. These complication features include: shape/curvature, welds, edges, scratches, foreign objects among others. A method is provided to discriminate between the various features. The method consists of estimating the image background, determining a residual image and post processing to determine the features present. The methodology is not finalized but demonstrates the feasibility of a method to determine the kind and size of the features present.

  1. Bias-corrected estimation of stable tail dependence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beirlant, Jan; Escobar-Bach, Mikael; Goegebeur, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the stable tail dependence function. We propose a bias-corrected estimator and we establish its asymptotic behaviour under suitable assumptions. The finite sample performance of the proposed estimator is evaluated by means of an extensive simulation study where...

  2. LHC luminosity upgrade detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; de Roeck, Albert; Bortoletto, Daniela; Wigmans, Richard; Riegler, Werner; Smith, Wesley H

    2006-01-01

    LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm -2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: • Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) • Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector developments (lectures 2-4) • Electronics, trigger and data acquisition challenges (lecture 5) Note: the much more ambitious LHC energy upgrade will not be covered

  3. LUCID: The ATLAS Luminosity Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cabras, Grazia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LUCID detector is the main luminosity provider of the ATLAS experiment and the only one able to provide a reliable luminosity determination in all beam configurations, luminosity ranges and at bunch-crossing level. LUCID was entirely redesigned in preparation for Run II: both the detector and the electronics were upgraded in order to cope with the challenging conditions expected at the LHC center of mass energy of 13 TeV and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. An innovative calibration system based on radioactive 207Bi sources deposited on the quartz window of the readout photomultipliers was implemented, resulting in the ability to control the detectors long time stability at few percent level. A description of the detector and its readout electronics will be given as well as preliminary results on the ATLAS luminosity measurement and related systematic uncertainties.

  4. Luminosity lifetime in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.; Finley, D.; Johnson, R.P.; Kerns, Q.; McCarthy, J.; Siemann, R.; Zhang, P.

    1988-01-01

    Since the inauguration of colliding proton-antiproton operations in 1987, the Tevatron has exhibited luminosity lifetimes shorter than expected. During a typical colliding beam storage period, called a store, luminosity is calculated periodically by measuring the charge and emittances of each bunch. The growth of the transverse bunch emittances is the dominant cause of luminosity deterioration. Throughout, this period, the position spectrum of the bunches exhibited betatron signals larger than expected from Schottky noise. A model assuming externally driven betatron oscillations explains both the betatron signals and the emittance growth. A program is underway to improve the Tevatron luminosity lifetime. The abort kickers have been identified as sources of emittance growth, and some quadrupole power supplies are further candidates. Because the horizontal dispersion through the RF cavities is nonzero, RF phase noise has been investigated. Noise in the main dipole regulation circuit has also been studied. 13 refs., 4 figs

  5. A logistic regression estimating function for spatial Gibbs point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, Adrian; Coeurjolly, Jean-François; Rubak, Ege

    We propose a computationally efficient logistic regression estimating function for spatial Gibbs point processes. The sample points for the logistic regression consist of the observed point pattern together with a random pattern of dummy points. The estimating function is closely related...

  6. On a family of Bessel type functions: Estimations, series, overconvergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneva-Konovska, Jordanka

    2017-12-01

    A family of the Bessel-Maitland functions are considered in this paper and some useful estimations are obtained for them. Series defined by means of these functions are considered and their behaviour on the boundaries of the convergence domains is discussed. Using the obtained estimations, necessary and sufficient conditions for the series overconvergence, as well as Hadamard type theorem are proposed.

  7. Fast luminosity monitor at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, C.; De Pedis, D.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini-Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1994-01-01

    In 1990 the LEP-5 experiment measured luminosity at LEP by detecting the single bremsstrahlung photons emitted in the e + e - collisions. In 1991 the experiment was upgraded to exploit the intrinsic high speed of the method which allows luminosity measurement of the single bunches of LEP. In this paper the LEP-5 upgrade is described and the results of a test performed are discussed. ((orig.))

  8. Estimating Money Demand Function in Cambodia: ARDL Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Samreth, Sovannroeun

    2008-01-01

    This paper empirically estimates the money demand function in Cambodia. We adopt the money demand model that includes exchange rate. For the analysis, Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) approach to cointegration is employed. Our results indicate that there is cointegration among variables in money demand function. CUSUM and CUSUMSQ tests roughly support the stability of estimated model. However, in the long-run, even the sign of estimated coefficient of exchange rate support the currency s...

  9. High luminosity muon scattering at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazizi, K. (California Univ., Riverside, CA (USA)); Conrad, J.; Fang, G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Erdmann, M. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Guyot, C.; Virchaux, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Holmgren, H. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA)); Malensek, A.; Melanson, H.; Morfin

    1990-02-01

    The charge of this group was to evaluate the physics that can be done with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment at FNAL using the upgraded Tevatron muon beam, and consider the apparatus required. In this report, the physics that can be accomplished with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment is evaluated. The CERN and FNAL {mu} beams are compared in the context of such an experiment. The expected muon flux with the upgraded machine is estimated. Two possible detectors are compared: the air-core toroid experiment proposed by Guyot et al., and an upgraded version of the E665 double-diode apparatus now in place at FNAL. The relative costs of the detectors are considered. A list of detailed questions that need to be answered regarding the double-diode experiment has be compiled. 2 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A new class of methods for functional connectivity estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wutu

    Measuring functional connectivity from neural recordings is important in understanding processing in cortical networks. The covariance-based methods are the current golden standard for functional connectivity estimation. However, the link between the pair-wise correlations and the physiological connections inside the neural network is unclear. Therefore, the power of inferring physiological basis from functional connectivity estimation is limited. To build a stronger tie and better understand the relationship between functional connectivity and physiological neural network, we need (1) a realistic model to simulate different types of neural recordings with known ground truth for benchmarking; (2) a new functional connectivity method that produce estimations closely reflecting the physiological basis. In this thesis, (1) I tune a spiking neural network model to match with human sleep EEG data, (2) introduce a new class of methods for estimating connectivity from different kinds of neural signals and provide theory proof for its superiority, (3) apply it to simulated fMRI data as an application.

  11. Coefficient Estimate Problem for a New Subclass of Biunivalent Functions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Magesh; T. Rosy; S. Varma

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a unified subclass of the function class Σ of biunivalent functions defined in the open unit disc. Furthermore, we find estimates on the coefficients |a2| and |a3| for functions in this subclass. In addition, many relevant connections with known or new results are pointed out.

  12. On optimality of the empirical distribution function for the estimation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrateur

    Estimation of the Invariant Distribution function of a diffusion process. Ilia Negri, pp. 83-104 .... 1996), that is, there exists an invariant probability measure µ such that for every measurable function g such that E|g(ξ)| ..... distribution function because, in virtue of the strong law of large numbers, we have that for every x ∈ R the ...

  13. Unstable volatility functions: the break preserving local linear estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irene

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common in Finance. Markov switching models (Hamilton, 1989......) and threshold models (Lin and Terasvirta, 1994) are amongst the most popular models to describe the behaviour of data with structural breaks. The local linear (LL) estimator is not consistent at points where the volatility function has a break and it may even report negative values for finite samples...

  14. High Luminosity LHC Studies with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anna Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000fb$^{-1}$ from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV over the course of $\\sim$ 10 years, reaching instantaneous luminosities of up to L = 7.5 $\\times$ 1034cm$^{-2}s$^{-1}$, corresponding to an average of 200 inelastic p-p collisions per bunch crossing ($\\mu$ = 200). Fast simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate the prospects of various benchmark physics analyses to be performed using the upgraded ATLAS detector with the full HL-LHC dataset. The performance of the upgrade has been estimated in full simulation studies, assuming expected HL-LHC conditions. This talk will focus on the results of physics prospects studies for benchmark analyses involving in particular boosted hadronic objects (e.g. ttbar resonances, HH resonances), and on results of Jet/EtMiss studies of jet performance and pileup mitigation techniques that will be critical in HL-LHC analyses.

  15. Estimating Functions with Prior Knowledge, (EFPK) for diffusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, Kim; Kessler, Mathieu; Madsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a method is formulated in an estimating function setting for parameter estimation, which allows the use of prior information. The main idea is to use prior knowledge of the parameters, either specified as moments restrictions or as a distribution, and use it in the construction of a...... of an estimating function. It may be useful when the full Bayesian analysis is difficult to carry out for computational reasons. This is almost always the case for diffusions, which is the focus of this paper, though the method applies in other settings.......In this paper a method is formulated in an estimating function setting for parameter estimation, which allows the use of prior information. The main idea is to use prior knowledge of the parameters, either specified as moments restrictions or as a distribution, and use it in the construction...

  16. Estimation of flux distributions with Monte Carlo functional expansion tallies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Martin, W. R.; Holloway, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods provide a powerful technique for estimating the average radiation flux in a volume (or across a surface) in cases where analytical solutions may not be possible. Unfortunately, Monte Carlo simulations typically provide only integral results and do not offer any further details about the distribution of the flux with respect to space, angle, time or energy. In the functional expansion tally (FET) a Monte Carlo simulation is used to estimate the functional expansion coefficients for flux distributions with respect to an orthogonal set of basis functions. The expansion coefficients are then used in post-processing to reconstruct a series approximation to the true distribution. Discrete event FET estimators are derived and their application in estimating radiation flux or current distributions is demonstrated. Sources of uncertainty in the FET are quantified and estimators for the statistical and truncation errors are derived. Numerical results are presented to support the theoretical development. (authors)

  17. Lipschitz estimates for convex functions with respect to vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Magnani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present Lipschitz continuity estimates for a class of convex functions with respect to Hörmander vector fields. These results have been recently obtained in collaboration with M. Scienza, [22].

  18. METHODS FOR ESTIMATING THE PARAMETERS OF THE POWER FUNCTION DISTRIBUTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam zaka

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In this paper, we present some methods for estimating the parameters of the two parameter Power function distribution. We used the least squares method (LSM, relative least squares method (RELS and ridge regression method (RR. Sampling behavior of the estimates is indicated by a Monte Carlo simulation. The objective of identifying the best estimator amongst them we use the Total Deviation (T.D and Mean Square Error (M.S.E as performance index. We determined the best method for estimation using different values for the parameters and different sample sizes.

  19. ISR Superconducting High luminosity Insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The picture shows two of the eight superconducting quadrupoles of the low-beta insertion at intersection I8.The increase of luminosity produced by this insertion was above a factor 7. At right one can also see the Open- Axial- Field Magnet. The person is Stephan Pichler. See also 7702690X, 8102123, 8010397, 8008332.

  20. An improved method for estimating the frequency correlation function

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2012-04-01

    For time-invariant frequency-selective channels, the transfer function is a superposition of waves having different propagation delays and path gains. In order to estimate the frequency correlation function (FCF) of such channels, the frequency averaging technique can be utilized. The obtained FCF can be expressed as a sum of auto-terms (ATs) and cross-terms (CTs). The ATs are caused by the autocorrelation of individual path components. The CTs are due to the cross-correlation of different path components. These CTs have no physical meaning and leads to an estimation error. We propose a new estimation method aiming to improve the estimation accuracy of the FCF of a band-limited transfer function. The basic idea behind the proposed method is to introduce a kernel function aiming to reduce the CT effect, while preserving the ATs. In this way, we can improve the estimation of the FCF. The performance of the proposed method and the frequency averaging technique is analyzed using a synthetically generated transfer function. We show that the proposed method is more accurate than the frequency averaging technique. The accurate estimation of the FCF is crucial for the system design. In fact, we can determine the coherence bandwidth from the FCF. The exact knowledge of the coherence bandwidth is beneficial in both the design as well as optimization of frequency interleaving and pilot arrangement schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Bias effects on magnitude and ratio estimation power function exponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagot, R F; Pokorny, R

    1989-03-01

    A bias model of relative judgment was used to derive a ratio estimation (RE) power function, and its effectiveness in providing estimates of exponents free of the effects of standards was evaluated. The RE bias model was compared with the simple RE power function that ignores bias. Results showed that when bias was not taken into account, estimates of exponents exhibited the usual effects of standards observed in previous research. However, the introduction of bias parameters into the RE power function virtually eliminated these effects. Exponents calculated from "equal-range segments" (e.g., low stimulus range vs. high stimulus range) judged by magnitude estimation (ME) were examined: the effects of equal-range segments on exponents were much stronger for ME than standards were for RE, using the bias model.

  2. Bayesian error estimation in density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Frederiksen, Søren Lund

    2005-01-01

    We present a practical scheme for performing error estimates for density-functional theory calculations. The approach, which is based on ideas from Bayesian statistics, involves creating an ensemble of exchange-correlation functionals by comparing with an experimental database of binding energies...

  3. Estimating foreign trade functions: A comment and a correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.M.C. de; Harkema, R.; Heeswijk, B.J.

    In this note a more flexible restricted error covariance matrix is applied than Winters (1984) uses in order to estimate import demand functions. We show that the alternative specification performs better in the sense of yielding a considerably larger value of the log-likelihood function. Moreover,

  4. On optimality of the empirical distribution function for the estimation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work we present some results on the optimality of the empirical distribution function as estimator of the invariant distribution function of an ergodic diffusion process. The results presented were obtained in different previous works under conditions that are are rewritten in a unified form that make comparable those ...

  5. Estimation of Correlation Functions by the Random Decrement Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Krenk, Steen; Jensen, Jacob Laigaard

    1991-01-01

    The Random Decrement (RDD) Technique is a versatile technique for characterization of random signals in the time domain. In this paper a short review of the theoretical basis is given, and the technique is illustrated by estimating auto-correlation functions and cross-correlation functions on modal...... responses simulated by two SDOF ARMA models loaded by the same band-limited white noise. The speed and the accuracy of the RDD technique is compared to the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique. The RDD technique does not involve multiplications, but only additions. Therefore, the technique is very fast...... - in some cases up to 100 times faster than the FFT technique. Another important advantage is that if the RDD technique is implemented correctly, the correlation function estimates are unbiased. Comparison with exact solutions for the correlation functions shows that the RDD auto-correlation estimates...

  6. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-01-01

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  7. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutarno, D., E-mail: Sutarno@fi.itb.ac.id [Earth Physics and Complex System Division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  8. Green's function based density estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesarki, Peter; Brock, Ian C.; Nuncio Quiroz, Adriana Elizabeth [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A method was developed based on Green's function identities to estimate probability densities. This can be used for likelihood estimations and for binary classifications. It offers several advantages over neural networks, boosted decision trees and other, regression based classifiers. For example, it is less prone to overtraining, and it is much easier to combine several samples. Some capabilities are demonstrated using ATLAS data.

  9. A Luminosity Calorimeter for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Sadeh, I

    2009-01-01

    For the relative precision of the luminosity measurement at CLIC, a preliminary target value of 1% is being assumed. This may be accomplished by constructing a finely granulated calorimeter, which will measure Bhabha scattering at small angles. In order to achieve the design goal, the geometrical parameters of the calorimeter need to be defined. Several factors influence the design of the calorimeter; chief among these is the need to minimize the error on the luminosity measurement while avoiding the intense beam background at small angles. In this study the geometrical parameters are optimized for the best performance of the calorimeter. In addition, the suppression of physics background to Bhabha scattering is investigated and a set of selection cuts is introduced.

  10. A comparison of dependence function estimators in multivariate extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Vettori, Sabrina

    2017-05-11

    Various nonparametric and parametric estimators of extremal dependence have been proposed in the literature. Nonparametric methods commonly suffer from the curse of dimensionality and have been mostly implemented in extreme-value studies up to three dimensions, whereas parametric models can tackle higher-dimensional settings. In this paper, we assess, through a vast and systematic simulation study, the performance of classical and recently proposed estimators in multivariate settings. In particular, we first investigate the performance of nonparametric methods and then compare them with classical parametric approaches under symmetric and asymmetric dependence structures within the commonly used logistic family. We also explore two different ways to make nonparametric estimators satisfy the necessary dependence function shape constraints, finding a general improvement in estimator performance either (i) by substituting the estimator with its greatest convex minorant, developing a computational tool to implement this method for dimensions $$D\\\\ge 2$$D≥2 or (ii) by projecting the estimator onto a subspace of dependence functions satisfying such constraints and taking advantage of Bernstein–Bézier polynomials. Implementing the convex minorant method leads to better estimator performance as the dimensionality increases.

  11. Consistent Parameter and Transfer Function Estimation using Context Free Grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Daniel; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents a method for the inference of transfer functions for rainfall-runoff models. Here, transfer functions are defined as parametrized (functional) relationships between a set of spatial predictors (e.g. elevation, slope or soil texture) and model parameters. They are ultimately used for estimation of consistent, spatially distributed model parameters from a limited amount of lumped global parameters. Additionally, they provide a straightforward method for parameter extrapolation from one set of basins to another and can even be used to derive parameterizations for multi-scale models [see: Samaniego et al., 2010]. Yet, currently an actual knowledge of the transfer functions is often implicitly assumed. As a matter of fact, for most cases these hypothesized transfer functions can rarely be measured and often remain unknown. Therefore, this contribution presents a general method for the concurrent estimation of the structure of transfer functions and their respective (global) parameters. Note, that by consequence an estimation of the distributed parameters of the rainfall-runoff model is also undertaken. The method combines two steps to achieve this. The first generates different possible transfer functions. The second then estimates the respective global transfer function parameters. The structural estimation of the transfer functions is based on the context free grammar concept. Chomsky first introduced context free grammars in linguistics [Chomsky, 1956]. Since then, they have been widely applied in computer science. But, to the knowledge of the authors, they have so far not been used in hydrology. Therefore, the contribution gives an introduction to context free grammars and shows how they can be constructed and used for the structural inference of transfer functions. This is enabled by new methods from evolutionary computation, such as grammatical evolution [O'Neill, 2001], which make it possible to exploit the constructed grammar as a

  12. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 124, No. 2, May 2014, pp. 235–242. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed by generalized spherical mean operator. M EL HAMMA and R DAHER. Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University of Hassan II,.

  13. Estimating variability in functional images using a synthetic resampling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitra, R.; O'Sullivan, F.

    1996-01-01

    Functional imaging of biologic parameters like in vivo tissue metabolism is made possible by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Many techniques, such as mixture analysis, have been suggested for extracting such images from dynamic sequences of reconstructed PET scans. Methods for assessing the variability in these functional images are of scientific interest. The nonlinearity of the methods used in the mixture analysis approach makes analytic formulae for estimating variability intractable. The usual resampling approach is infeasible because of the prohibitive computational effort in simulating a number of sinogram. datasets, applying image reconstruction, and generating parametric images for each replication. Here we introduce an approach that approximates the distribution of the reconstructed PET images by a Gaussian random field and generates synthetic realizations in the imaging domain. This eliminates the reconstruction steps in generating each simulated functional image and is therefore practical. Results of experiments done to evaluate the approach on a model one-dimensional problem are very encouraging. Post-processing of the estimated variances is seen to improve the accuracy of the estimation method. Mixture analysis is used to estimate functional images; however, the suggested approach is general enough to extend to other parametric imaging methods

  14. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    20

    available scarce water resources in dry land agriculture, but direct measurement thereof for multiple locations in the field is not always feasible. Therefore, pedotransfer functions (PTFs) were developed to estimate soil water retention at FC and PWP for dryland soils of India. A soil database available for Arid Western India ...

  15. Estimating residual kidney function in dialysis patients without urine collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafi, Tariq; Michels, Wieneke M.; Levey, Andrew S.; Inker, Lesley A.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Hoekstra, Tiny; Schwartz, George J.; Eckfeldt, John H.; Coresh, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Residual kidney function contributes substantially to solute clearance in dialysis patients but cannot be assessed without urine collection. We used serum filtration markers to develop dialysis-specific equations to estimate urinary urea clearance without the need for urine collection. In our

  16. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyabrata Santra

    2018-03-27

    Mar 27, 2018 ... Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point in hot Arid Western India. Priyabrata Santra1,*, Mahesh Kumar1, R N Kumawat1, D K Painuli1,. K M Hati2, G B M Heuvelink3 and N H Batjes. 3. 1. ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute (CAZRI), Jodhpur ...

  17. Genetic Prediction Models and Heritability Estimates for Functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses these methodologies and their advantages and disadvantages. Heritability estimates obtained from these models are also reviewed. Linear methodologies can model binary and actual longevity, while RR and TM methodologies model binary survival. PH procedures model the hazard function of a cow ...

  18. Estimating Aggregate Import-Demand Function In Nigeria: A Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the behaviour of Nigeria's aggregate imports between the periods 1980-2005. In the empirical analysis of the aggregate import demand function for Nigeria, cointegration and Error Correction modeling approaches have been used. Our econometric estimates suggest that real GDP largely explains ...

  19. Impact of Base Functional Component Types on Software Functional Size based Effort Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Gencel, Cigdem; Buglione, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Software effort estimation is still a significant challenge for software management. Although Functional Size Measurement (FSM) methods have been standardized and have become widely used by the software organizations, the relationship between functional size and development effort still needs further investigation. Most of the studies focus on the project cost drivers and consider total software functional size as the primary input to estimation models. In this study, we investigate whether u...

  20. On Estimation of the CES Production Function - Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Arne; Henningsen, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of the non-linear Constant Elasticity of Scale (CES) function is generally considered problematic due to convergence problems and unstable and/or meaningless results. These problems often arise from a non-smooth objective function with large flat areas, the discontinuity of the CES fun...... function where the elasticity of substitution is one, and possibly significant rounding errors where the elasticity of substitution is close to one. We suggest three (combinable) solutions that alleviate these problems and improve the reliability and stability of the results....

  1. A note on reliability estimation of functionally diverse systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlewood, B.; Popov, P.; Strigini, L.

    1999-01-01

    It has been argued that functional diversity might be a plausible means of claiming independence of failures between two versions of a system. We present a model of functional diversity, in the spirit of earlier models of diversity such as those of Eckhardt and Lee, and Hughes. In terms of the model, we show that the claims for independence between functionally diverse systems seem rather unrealistic. Instead, it seems likely that functionally diverse systems will exhibit positively correlated failures, and thus will be less reliable than an assumption of independence would suggest. The result does not, of course, suggest that functional diversity is not worthwhile; instead, it places upon the evaluator of such a system the onus to estimate the degree of dependence so as to evaluate the reliability of the system

  2. Pinhole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J

    2004-05-17

    Previously, the generalized luminosity L was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e{sup +}e{sup -} design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam e{sup -}e{sup -} e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamsstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on L. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important--especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our ''pin-hole'' camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  3. Precision luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073074; Pandurovic, M; Smiljanic, I

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings a novel approach to deal with the beam-induced effects in luminosity measurement is presented. Based on the relativistic kinematics of the collision frame of the Bhabha process, the beam-beam related uncertainties can be reduced to the permille level independently of a precision with which the beam parameters are known. Specific event selection combined with the corrective methods we introduce, leads to the systematic uncertainty from the beam-induced effects to be at a few permille level in the peak region above the 80% of the nominal centre-of-mass energies at ILC.

  4. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value...

  5. To High Luminosity and beyond!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    This week marks a major milestone for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC - see here) project, as it moves from the design study to the machine construction phase. HL-LHC will extend the LHC’s discovery potential, increasing luminosity by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value and allowing the scientific community to study new phenomena.    Composer Domenico Vicinanza (left) directs the musical performance of sonified LHC data during a special Hi-Lumi event (see box). The green light was given during the 5th Joint HiLumi LHC-LARP annual meeting that took place at CERN from 26 to 30 October 2015. The meeting saw the participation of more than 230 experts from all over the world to discuss the results and achievements of the HiLumi LHC Design Study. During the week, these experts approved the first version of the HL-LHC Technical Design Report – the document that, following the Preliminary Design Report issued in 2014, describes in detail how the LHC upgrade progra...

  6. LHC Report: A new luminosity record

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    After about one month of operation, the LHC has already accumulated an integrated luminosity of 28 pb-1, which corresponds to over 50% of the total delivered to the experiments in 2010. This impressive start to the LHC run in 2011 bodes well for the rest of year.   Following careful collimator set-up and validation, the first phase of beam commissioning 2011 has come to an end. The first stable beams were declared on Sunday 13 March with a moderate 3 bunches per beam and an initial luminosity of 1.6 × 1030 cm-2s-1. Machine protection tests continued during the following week as the commissioning team made absolutely sure that all critical systems (beam dumps, beam interlock system, etc.) were functioning properly. When these tests had finished, the way was opened to increased intensity and the LHC quickly moved through the first part of its planned, staged intensity increase. Fills with increasing numbers of bunches were delivered to the experiments, culminating in a fill with 200...

  7. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 ≤ z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z ∼ 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with α = –1.27 ± 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z ∼ 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of ∼8 from z ∼ 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z ∼ 4 to z ∼ 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z ≈ 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of ∼4 from z = 4.0 to z ≈ 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of ∼1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Stefanon, Mauro [Observatori Astronomic Universitat de Valencia, C/Catedratico Agustin Escardino Benlloch, 7, 46980, Valencia (Spain); Brammer, Gabriel B. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Santiago (Chile); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 {<=} z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z {approx} 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with {alpha} = -1.27 {+-} 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of {approx}8 from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z {approx} 4 to z {approx} 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of {approx}4 from z = 4.0 to z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of {approx}1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  10. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ESTIMATION METHODS FOR CES PRODUCTION FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADIA ELENA STOICUŢA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the analysis of the stationary and dynamic case of the Kmenta method for estimating the CES production function. The data series which occur in the analysed models, are given by the real gross value added, regarded as output variable, and the tangible assets, respectively the average number of employees, regarded as input variables. The parameters of the models, are determined using the least squares method (LSM, using the software package Eviews.

  11. Modal depth function estimation using time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, J; Gervaise, C; Roux, P; Nicolas, B; Mars, J I

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic propagation in shallow water is characterized by a set of depth-dependent modes, the modal depth functions, which propagate in range according to their horizontal wavenumbers. For inversion purposes, modal depth function estimation in shallow water is an issue when the environment is not known. Classical methods that provide blind mode estimation rely on the singular value decomposition of the received field at different frequencies over a vertical array of transducers. These methods require that the vertical array spans the full water column. This is obviously a strong limitation for the application of such methods in an operational context. To overcome these shortcomings, this study proposes to replace the spatial diversity constraint by a frequency diversity condition, and thus considers the case of a field emanating from an impulsive source. Indeed, because of the discrete nature of the wavenumber spectrum and due to their dispersive behavior, the modes are separated in the time-frequency domain. This phenomenon enables the design of a modal filtering scheme for signals received on a single receiver. In the case of a vertical receiver array, the modal contributions can be isolated for each receiver even when using a partial water column spanning array. This method thus eliminates the receiving constraints of classical methods of modal depth function estimation, although it imposes the use of an impulsive source. The developed algorithm is benchmarked on numerical simulations and validated on laboratory experimental data recorded in an ultrasonic waveguide. Practical applications are also discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. Galaxy luminosity function: evolution at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, N.; Durret, F.; Guennou, L.; Adami, C.

    2014-12-01

    There are some disagreements about the abundance of faint galaxies in high redshift clusters. DAFT/FADA (Dark energy American French Team) is a medium redshift (0.4bands. We show that completeness is a key parameter to understand the different observed behaviors when fitting the GLFs. We also investigate the evolution of GLFs with redshift for red and blue galaxy populations separately. We find a drop of the faint end of red GLFs which is more important at higher redshift while the blue GLF faint end remains flat in our redshift range. These results can be interpreted in terms of galaxy quenching. Faint blue galaxies transform into red ones which enrich the red sequence from high to low redshifts in clusters while some blue galaxies are still accreted from the environment, compensating for this evolution so that the global GLF does not seem to evolve.

  13. Machine Learning Estimation of Atom Condensed Fukui Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyou; Zheng, Fangfang; Zhao, Tanfeng; Qu, Xiaohui; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2016-02-01

    To enable the fast estimation of atom condensed Fukui functions, machine learning algorithms were trained with databases of DFT pre-calculated values for ca. 23,000 atoms in organic molecules. The problem was approached as the ranking of atom types with the Bradley-Terry (BT) model, and as the regression of the Fukui function. Random Forests (RF) were trained to predict the condensed Fukui function, to rank atoms in a molecule, and to classify atoms as high/low Fukui function. Atomic descriptors were based on counts of atom types in spheres around the kernel atom. The BT coefficients assigned to atom types enabled the identification (93-94 % accuracy) of the atom with the highest Fukui function in pairs of atoms in the same molecule with differences ≥0.1. In whole molecules, the atom with the top Fukui function could be recognized in ca. 50 % of the cases and, on the average, about 3 of the top 4 atoms could be recognized in a shortlist of 4. Regression RF yielded predictions for test sets with R(2) =0.68-0.69, improving the ability of BT coefficients to rank atoms in a molecule. Atom classification (as high/low Fukui function) was obtained with RF with sensitivity of 55-61 % and specificity of 94-95 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Luminosity dependence in the Fundamental Plane projections of elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Quataert, Eliot; Ma, Chung-Pei; West, Andrew A.

    2007-05-01

    We analyse the Fundamental Plane projections of elliptical galaxies as a function of luminosity, using a sample of ~80000 galaxies drawn from Data Release 4 (DR4) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We separate brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from our main sample and reanalyse their photometry due to a problem with the default pipeline sky subtraction for BCGs. The observables we consider are effective radius (Re), velocity dispersion (σ), dynamical mass (Mdyn ~ Reσ2), effective density (σ2/R2e) and effective surface brightness (μe). With the exception of the L -Mdyn correlation, we find evidence of variations in the slope (i.e. the power-law index) of the Fundamental Plane projections with luminosity for our normal elliptical galaxy population. In particular, the radius-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations are steeper at high luminosity relative to low luminosity, and the more luminous ellipticals become progressively less dense and have lower surface brightnesses than lower luminosity ellipticals. These variations can be understood as arising from differing formation histories, with more luminous galaxies having less dissipation. Data from the literature and our reanalysis of BCGs show that BCGs have radius-luminosity and Faber-Jackson relations steeper than the brightest non-BCG ellipticals in our sample, consistent with significant growth of BCGs via dissipationless mergers. The variations in slope we find in the Faber-Jackson relation of non-BCGs are qualitatively similar to that reported in the black hole mass-velocity dispersion (MBH-σ) correlation. This similarity is consistent with a roughly constant value of MBH/M* over a wide range of early-type galaxies, where M* is the stellar mass.

  15. Electron-electron luminosity in the Next Linear Collider -- a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.; Thompson, K.A.; Helm, R.H.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss some operational aspects of electron-electron collisions at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and estimate the luminosity attainable in such a machine. They also consider the use of two future technologies which could simplify the operation and improve the luminosity in an e - e - collider: polarized rf guns and plasma lenses

  16. Bolometric Luminosity Correction of H2O Maser AGNs Q. Guo1,2, JS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. As a special subsample of AGN, H2O maser AGNs are always heavily obscured. (Zhang et al. 2006). So their AGN intrinsic bolometric luminosities Lb is difficult to be measured directly. It can generally be estimated with the bolometric correction, which is the ratio between the AGN intrinsic bolometric luminosity ...

  17. Functional Model to Estimate the Inelastic Displacement Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceangu Vlad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a functional model to estimate the inelastic displacement ratio as a function of the ductility factor is presented. The coefficients of the functional model are approximated using nonlinear regression. The used data is in the form of computed displacement for an inelastic single degree of freedom system with a fixed ductility factor. The inelastic seismic response spectra of constant ductility factors are used for generating data. A method for selecting ground-motions that have similar frequency content to that of the ones picked for the comparison is presented. The variability of the seismic response of nonlinear single degree of freedom systems with different hysteretic behavior is presented.

  18. On the non-evolution of the dependence of black hole masses on bolometric luminosities for QSOs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Corredoira, Martín; Gutiérrez, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    There are extremely luminous quasi stellar objects (QSOs) at high redshift which are absent at low redshift. The lower luminosities at low redshifts can be understood as the external manifestation of either a lower Eddington ratio or a lower mass. To distinguish between both effects, we determine the possible dependence of masses and Eddington ratios of QSOs with a fixed luminosity as a function of redshifts; this avoids the Malmquist bias or any other selection effect. For the masses and Eddington ratios derived for a sample of QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we model their evolution by a double linear fit separating the dependence on redshifts and luminosities. The validity of the fits and possible systematic effects were tested by the use of different estimators of masses or bolometric luminosities, and possible intergalactic extinction effects. The results do not show any significant evolution of black hole masses or Eddington ratios for equal luminosity QSOs. The black hole mass only depends on the bolometric luminosity without significant dependence on the redshift as ((M BH )/10 9 M ☉ ) approx. 3.4 ((L bol )/10 47 erg s -1 ) 0.65 on average for z ≤ 5. This must not be confused with the possible evolution in the formation of black holes in QSOs. The variations of the environment might influence the formation of the black holes but not their subsequent accretion. It also leaves a question to be solved: Why are there not QSOs with very high mass at low redshift? A brief discussion of the possible reasons for this is tentatively pointed out.

  19. Conical square function estimates in UMD Banach spaces and applications to H?-functional calculi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hytönen, T.; Van Neerven, J.; Portal, P.

    2008-01-01

    We study conical square function estimates for Banach-valued functions and introduce a vector-valued analogue of the Coifman-Meyer-Stein tent spaces. Following recent work of Auscher-M(c)Intosh-Russ, the tent spaces in turn are used to construct a scale of vector-valued Hardy spaces associated with

  20. Kidney Function in Obesity-Challenges in Indexing and Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alex R; Zafar, Waleed; Grams, Morgan E

    2018-01-01

    As the prevalence of obesity continues to increase worldwide, an increasing number of people are at risk for kidney disease. Thus, there is a critical need to understand how best to assess kidney function in this population, and several challenges exist. The convention of indexing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to body surface area (BSA) attempts to normalize exposure to metabolic wastes across populations of differing body size. In obese individuals, this convention results in a significantly lower indexed GFR than unindexed GFR, which has practical implications for drug dosing. Recent data suggest that "unindexing" estimated GFR (multiplying by BSA/1.73 m 2 ) for drug dosing may be acceptable, but pharmocokinetic data to support this practice are lacking. Beyond indexing, biomarkers commonly used for estimating GFR may induce bias. Creatinine is influenced by muscle mass, whereas cystatin C correlates with fat mass, both independent of kidney function. Further research is needed to evaluate the performance of estimating equations and other filtration markers in obesity, and determine whether unindexed GFR might better predict optimal drug dosing and clinical outcomes in patients whose BSA is very different than the conventional normalized value of 1.73 m 2 . Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Update on Predictions for Yearly Integrated Luminosity for HL-LHC based on Expected Machine Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Apollonio, Andrea; Jonker, Michael; Schmidt, Ruediger; Todd, Benjamin; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Machine availability is one of the key performance indicators to reach the ambitious goals for integrated luminosity in the post Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) era. Machine availability is even more important for the future High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1]. In this paper a Monte Carlo approach has been used to predict integrated luminosity as a function of LHC machine availability. The baseline model assumptions such as fault-time distributions and machine failure rate (number of fills with stable bea...

  2. Luminosity Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Maettig, Stefan; Pauly, T

    For almost all measurements performed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) one crucial ingredient is the precise knowledge about the integrated luminosity. The determination and precision on the integrated luminosity has direct implications on any cross-section measurement, and its instantaneous measurement gives important feedback on the conditions at the experimental insertions and on the accelerator performance. ATLAS is one of the main experiments at the LHC. In order to provide an accurate and reliable luminosity determination, ATLAS uses a variety of different sub-detectors and algorithms that measure the luminosity simultaneously. One of these sub-detectors are the Beam Condition Monitors (BCM) that were designed to protect the ATLAS detector from potentially dangerous beam losses. Due to its fast readout and very clean signals this diamond detector is providing in addition since May 2011 the official ATLAS luminosity. This thesis describes the calibration and performance of the BCM as a luminosity detec...

  3. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  4. Differential Luminosity Measurement using Bhabha Events

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV CLIC. The model is used in a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  5. Power estimation on functional level for programmable processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In diesem Beitrag werden verschiedene Ansätze zur Verlustleistungsschätzung von programmierbaren Prozessoren vorgestellt und bezüglich ihrer Übertragbarkeit auf moderne Prozessor-Architekturen wie beispielsweise Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW-Architekturen bewertet. Besonderes Augenmerk liegt hierbei auf dem Konzept der sogenannten Functional-Level Power Analysis (FLPA. Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Einteilung der Prozessor-Architektur in funktionale Blöcke wie beispielsweise Processing-Unit, Clock-Netzwerk, interner Speicher und andere. Die Verlustleistungsaufnahme dieser Bl¨ocke wird parameterabhängig durch arithmetische Modellfunktionen beschrieben. Durch automatisierte Analyse von Assemblercodes des zu schätzenden Systems mittels eines Parsers können die Eingangsparameter wie beispielsweise der erzielte Parallelitätsgrad oder die Art des Speicherzugriffs gewonnen werden. Dieser Ansatz wird am Beispiel zweier moderner digitaler Signalprozessoren durch eine Vielzahl von Basis-Algorithmen der digitalen Signalverarbeitung evaluiert. Die ermittelten Schätzwerte für die einzelnen Algorithmen werden dabei mit physikalisch gemessenen Werten verglichen. Es ergibt sich ein sehr kleiner maximaler Schätzfehler von 3%. In this contribution different approaches for power estimation for programmable processors are presented and evaluated concerning their capability to be applied to modern digital signal processor architectures like e.g. Very Long InstructionWord (VLIW -architectures. Special emphasis will be laid on the concept of so-called Functional-Level Power Analysis (FLPA. This approach is based on the separation of the processor architecture into functional blocks like e.g. processing unit, clock network, internal memory and others. The power consumption of these blocks is described by parameter dependent arithmetic model functions. By application of a parser based automized analysis of assembler codes of the systems to be estimated

  6. LHCb: LHCb Muon System Performance at High Luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinci, D

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector was conceived to operate with an average Luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. During the last year of LHC run, the whole apparatus has shown to be able to perfectly acquire and manage data produced at a Luminosity as high as $4 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. In these conditions, all sub-detectors operated at average particle rates higher than the design ones and in particular the Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers equipping the Muon System had to sustain a particle rate as high as 250 kHz/cm$^{2}$. In order to study the possibility of increasing the Luminosity of operation of the whole experiment several tests were performed. The effective beam Luminosity at the interaction point of LHCb was increased in several steps up to $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and in each step the behavior of all the detectors in the Muon System was recorded. The data analysis has allowed to study the performance of the Muon System as a function of the LHC Luminosity and the results are r...

  7. Effect of weight reductions on estimated kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Davies, Melanie J; Persson, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Weight loss-induced serum creatinine reduction may increase creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) producing incorrect estimates of kidney function. We investigated whether weight changes in the SCALE program with liraglutide 3.0mg were associated with changes in serum...... in serum creatinine was observed (P≥0.05, both trials, all tests). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate gradual body weight reductions observed in the SCALE program were not associated with changes in serum creatinine....... creatinine. METHODS: Post hoc analysis of two 56-week, randomized, double-blind trials: SCALE Obesity and Prediabetes (n=3731, without type 2 diabetes [T2D], randomized [2:1] to liraglutide 3.0mg [n=2487] or placebo [n=1244]); SCALE Diabetes (n=846 with T2D, randomized [2:1:1] to liraglutide 3.0mg [n=423], 1...

  8. Estimating Vehicle Stability Region Based on Energy Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-guang Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the deficiency of vehicle stability region, according to vehicle nonlinear dynamic model, method of estimating vehicle spatial stability region was proposed. With Pacejka magic formula tire model, nonlinear 3DOF vehicle model was deduced and verified though vehicle test. Detailed detecting system and data processing were introduced. In addition, stability of the vehicle system was discussed using Hurwitz criterion. By establishing energy function for vehicle system, the vehicle’s stability region in 20 m/s was estimated based on Lyapunov theorem and vehicle system characteristics. Vehicle test in the same condition shows that the calculated stability region defined by Lyapunov and system stability theorem has good effect on characterized vehicle stability and it could be a valuable reference for vehicle stability evaluation.

  9. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high...

  10. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  11. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”, or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh.

  12. Luminosity monitoring and measurement at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Beretvas, A.; Derwent, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Using two telescopes of beam-beam counters, CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) has measured the luminosity to an accuracy of 4.1% (3.6%) in run Ib (Ia). For run Ib (Ia) the average luminosity was 9.1(3.3)x10 30 cm -2 s -1 . For a typical data set the integrated luminosity was 86.47 (19.65) pb -1 in run Ib (Ia) resulting in a total integrated luminosity of 106.1±4.1 pb -1 . This paper shows how we have determined the accuracy of our results

  13. Quantitative criteria for estimation of natural and artificial ecosystems functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    Using biotic turnover of substances in trophic chains, natural and artificial ecosystems are similar in functioning, but different in structure. It is necessary to have quantitative criteria to evaluate the efficiency of artificial ecosystems (AES). These criteria are dependent on the specific objectives for which the AES are designed. For example, if AES is considered for use in space, important criteria are efficiency in use of mass, power, volume (size) and human labor and reliability. Another task involves the determination of quantitative criteria for the functioning of natural ecosystems. To solve the problem, it is fruitful to use a hierarchical approach suitable for both individual links and the ecosystem as a whole. Energy flux criteria (principles) were developed to estimate the functional activities of biosystems at the population, community and ecosystem levels. A major feature of ecosystems as a whole is their biotic turnover of matter the rate of which is restricted by the lack of limiting substances. Obviously, the most generalized criterion is to take into account the energy flux used by the biosystem and the quantity of limiting substance included in its turnover. The use of energy flux by ecosystem, EUSED - is determined from the photoassimilation of CO 2 by plants (per time unit). It can be approximately estimated as the net primary production of photosynthesis (NPP). So, the ratio of CO 2 photoassimilation rate (sometimes, measured as NPP) to the total mass of limiting substrate can serve as a main universal criterion (MUC). This MUC characterizes the specific cycling rate of limiting chemical elements in the system and effectiveness of every ecosystem including the global Biosphere. Comparative analysis and elaboration of quantitative criteria for estimation of natural and artificial ecosystems activities is of high importance both for theoretical considerations and for real applications.

  14. Machine constraints for experiments in an intermediate luminosity interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, D.

    1989-05-01

    We summarize existing information about the luminosity as a function of clear space between the interaction point and the front of the final-focus triplet, and about the minimum beam pipe dimensions (stay-clear dimensions) in the region. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Bayesian Parameter Estimation via Filtering and Functional Approximations

    KAUST Repository

    Matthies, Hermann G.

    2016-11-25

    The inverse problem of determining parameters in a model by comparing some output of the model with observations is addressed. This is a description for what hat to be done to use the Gauss-Markov-Kalman filter for the Bayesian estimation and updating of parameters in a computational model. This is a filter acting on random variables, and while its Monte Carlo variant --- the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) --- is fairly straightforward, we subsequently only sketch its implementation with the help of functional representations.

  16. Fused Adaptive Lasso for Spatial and Temporal Quantile Function Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Quantile functions are important in characterizing the entire probability distribution of a random variable, especially when the tail of a skewed distribution is of interest. This article introduces new quantile function estimators for spatial and temporal data with a fused adaptive Lasso penalty to accommodate the dependence in space and time. This method penalizes the difference among neighboring quantiles, hence it is desirable for applications with features ordered in time or space without replicated observations. The theoretical properties are investigated and the performances of the proposed methods are evaluated by simulations. The proposed method is applied to particulate matter (PM) data from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to characterize the upper quantiles, which are crucial for studying spatial association between PM concentrations and adverse human health effects. © 2016 American Statistical Association and the American Society for Quality.

  17. Estimation of renal function in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbian, Fabio; Pala, Marco; Scanelli, Giovanni; Manzato, Emilia; Longhini, Carlo; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2011-04-01

    Renal function could be evaluated with different equations such as Cockcroft-Gault formula (C-G), Mayo Clinic Quadratic (MAYO) and four MDRD variables. Clinical application of different formulae in conditions with severe energy restriction or in obese subjects is still a matter of investigation. Renal function of 55 anorexia nervosa (AN) and 44 bulimia nervosa (BN) patients was evaluated with C-G formula for creatinine clearance calculation, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated with MAYO and MDRD equations. BN group was older and had higher weight, body mass index (BMI), body surface area than AN subjects; however, their mean BMI was in the normal range. AN group had better renal function than BN one when it was evaluated with MAYO and MDRD; on the contrary, it was worse when it was calculated with C-G. The results obtained from the three formulae were poorly correlated and Bland-Altman analysis confirmed that the results of the three formulae were not in agreement. C-G is inaccurate when it is applied to obese or cachectic subjects. MDRD underestimates renal function in normal-high GFR. MAYO seems to be a good alternative to the other equations leading to correct classification of patients; therefore, it should be used to diagnose eating disorder subjects as renal insufficient. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Estimation of cost function in the natural gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Duk [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1999-02-01

    The natural gas industry in Korea has characteristics of a dual industrial structure with wholesale and retail and a regional monopoly of city gas company. Recently there have been discussions on the restructuring of gas industry and the problems arising from such industrial organization. At this point, the labor and capital cost of KOGAS were analyzed to find out efficiency of KOGAS, the wholesaler and the cost function focusing on distribution was estimated to find out effect of scale of city gas company, the retailer. As a result, in the case of KOGAS, it is prove that enhancing competitive power is needed by improving labor productivity through stabilization of labor structure and by maximizing value-added through stability of capital combination. From the estimation of cost function of city gas companies, the existing regional monopoly of city gas company have effects on its scale only when the area of operation and end users used the same amount per end user are increased. (author). 31 refs., 10 figs., 43 tabs.

  19. Nonparametric Bayes Estimation of Distribution Functions and the Study of Probability Density Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-30

    AO AObS 250 SOUTH CARO.INA UNIV COLUNSIA DEPT OF MATHENATICS CON--ETC V/6 12/I1 NONPARANETRIC BAYES ESTIMATION OF DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AND TH-rTCM...WeiF4964 79-C -4YF 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 0NT. SK ~ University of South Carolina, Department of IL . - Mathematics, Computer ...powerful than the sign test. The power of the test was compared with that of the sign test by computer simulations using the Marshall-Olkin bivariate

  20. Development of fragility functions to estimate homelessness after an earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Susan A.; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Immediately after an earthquake, many stakeholders need to make decisions about their response. These decisions often need to be made in a data poor environment as accurate information on the impact can take months or even years to be collected and publicized. Social fragility functions have been developed and applied to provide an estimate of the impact in terms of building damage, deaths and injuries in near real time. These rough estimates can help governments and response agencies determine what aid may be required which can improve their emergency response and facilitate planning for longer term response. Due to building damage, lifeline outages, fear of aftershocks, or other causes, people may become displaced or homeless after an earthquake. Especially in cold and dangerous locations, the rapid provision of safe emergency shelter can be a lifesaving necessity. However, immediately after an event there is little information available about the number of homeless, their locations and whether they require public shelter to aid the response agencies in decision making. In this research, we analyze homelessness after historic earthquakes using the CATDAT Damaging Earthquakes Database. CATDAT includes information on the hazard as well as the physical and social impact of over 7200 damaging earthquakes from 1900-2013 (Daniell et al. 2011). We explore the relationship of both earthquake characteristics and area characteristics with homelessness after the earthquake. We consider modelled variables such as population density, HDI, year, measures of ground motion intensity developed in Daniell (2014) over the time period from 1900-2013 as well as temperature. Using a base methodology based on that used for PAGER fatality fragility curves developed by Jaiswal and Wald (2010), but using regression through time using the socioeconomic parameters developed in Daniell et al. (2012) for "socioeconomic fragility functions", we develop a set of fragility curves that can be

  1. Luminosity Tuning at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, W

    2006-01-01

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the interaction point (IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) due to the asymmetric lattice. In addition in the LHC both beams share a common beam pipe through the inner triplet magnets (in these region changes of the magnetic field act on both beams). To control and adjust the beta-functions without perturbation of other optics functions, quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the so-called "tuning knobs" for the IP beta-functions. For a specific correction one of these knobs is scaled by a common multiplier. The different methods which were used to compute such knobs are discussed: (1) matching in MAD, (2)i...

  2. Cepheids : the period-luminosity relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu, JP

    1997-01-01

    The Cepheids are relatively young, bright, periodic supergiant variable stars showing a correlation between their periods and luminosities. Since the beginning of the century, the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation has been the corner stone of distance determination, and of the measure of the

  3. Luminosity Monitoring in ATLAS with MPX Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086061

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on the Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of multiple types of radiation. Sixteen such detectors were successfully operated in the ATLAS detector at the LHC and collected data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain from 2008 to 2013. Each ATLAS-MPX detector provides separate measurements of the bunch-integrated LHC luminosity. An internal consistency for luminosity monitoring of about 2% was demonstrated. In addition, the MPX devices close to the beam are sensitive enough to provide relative-luminosity measurements during van der Meer calibration scans, in a low-luminosity regime that lies below the sensitivity of the ATLAS calorimeter-based bunch-integrating luminometers. Preliminary results from these luminosity studies are presented for 2012 data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV proton-proton collisions.

  4. The luminosity dependence of clustering and higher order correlations in the PSCz survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szapudi, [No Value; Branchini, E; Frenk, CS; Maddox, S; Saunders, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies in the PSCz galaxy redshift survey, as revealed by the two-point correlation function, the luminosity mark correlations and the moments of counts-in-cells. We construct volume-limited subsamples at different depths and search for a luminosity

  5. Pixel-Cluster Counting Luminosity Measurement In ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)782710; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of the delivered luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A fundamental ingredient of the strategy to control the systematic uncertainties affecting the absolute luminosity has been to compare the measure- ments of several luminometers, most of which use more than one counting technique. The level of consistency across the various methods provides valuable cross-checks as well as an estimate of the detector-related systematic uncertainties. This poster describes the development of a luminosity algorithm based on pixel-cluster counting in the recently installed ATLAS inner b-layer (IBL), using data recorded during the 2015 pp run at the LHC. The noise and background contamination of the luminosity-associated cluster count is minimized by a multi-component fit to the measured cluster-size distribution in the forward pixel modules of the IBL. The linearity, long-term stability and statistical precision of the cluster- counting method a...

  6. Pedotransfer functions estimating soil hydraulic properties using different soil parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions (PTF) are useful in many studies such as hydrochemical modelling and soil mapping. The objective of this study was to calibrate and test parametric PTFs that predict soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity...... parameters. The PTFs are based on neural networks and the Bootstrap method using different sets of predictors and predict the van Genuchten/Mualem parameters. A Danish soil data set (152 horizons) dominated by sandy and sandy loamy soils was used in the development of PTFs to predict the Mualem hydraulic...... of the hydraulic properties of the studied soils. We found that introducing measured water content as a predictor generally gave lower errors for water retention predictions and higher errors for conductivity predictions. The best of the developed PTFs for predicting hydraulic conductivity was tested against PTFs...

  7. Venous refocusing for volume estimation: VERVE functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Bojana; Pike, G Bruce

    2005-02-01

    A novel, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging-based method for measuring changes in venous cerebral blood volume (CBV(v)) is presented. Venous refocusing for volume estimation (VERVE) exploits the dependency of the spin-spin relaxation rate of deoxygenated blood on the refocusing interval. Interleaved CPMG EPI acquisitions following a train of either tightly or sparsely spaced hard refocusing pulses (every 3.7 or 30 msec, respectively) at matched echo time were used to isolate the blood signal while minimizing the intravascular blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal contribution. The technique was employed to determine the steady-state increase in the CBV(v) in the visual cortex (VC) in seven healthy adult volunteers during flickering checkerboard photic stimulation. A functional activation model and a set of previously collected in vitro human whole blood relaxometry data were used to evaluate the intravascular BOLD effect on the VERVE signal. The average VC venous blood volume change was estimated to be 16 +/- 2%. This method has the potential to provide efficient and continuous monitoring of venous cerebral blood volume, thereby enabling further exploration of the mechanism underlying BOLD signal changes upon physiologic, pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic perturbations.

  8. LHC Luminosity calibration using the Longitudinal Density Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Mazzoni, S; Palm, M

    2013-01-01

    The present note describes how data measured with the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) can contribute to the 2012-2013 LHC luminosity calibration experiments. More specifically, LDM data can provide an estimation of the ghost fraction fghost and satellite fraction fsat needed for the normalisation of bunch populations. After a concise description of the LDM data treatment, the key quantities of interest are derived and commented. Finally, a description of the LDM analysis products is given.

  9. A power function method for estimating base flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Darline A; Stewart, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    Analytical base flow separation techniques are often used to determine the base flow contribution to total stream flow. Most analytical methods derive base flow from discharge records alone without using basin-specific variables other than basin area. This paper derives a power function for estimating base flow, the form being aQ(b) + cQ, an analytical method calibrated against an integrated basin variable, specific conductance, relating base flow to total discharge, and is consistent with observed mathematical behavior of dissolved solids in stream flow with varying discharge. Advantages of the method are being uncomplicated, reproducible, and applicable to hydrograph separation in basins with limited specific conductance data. The power function relationship between base flow and discharge holds over a wide range of basin areas. It better replicates base flow determined by mass balance methods than analytical methods such as filters or smoothing routines that are not calibrated to natural tracers or empirical basin and gauge-specific variables. Also, it can be used with discharge during periods without specific conductance values, including separating base flow from quick flow for single events. However, it may overestimate base flow during very high flow events. Application of geochemical mass balance and power function base flow separation methods to stream flow and specific conductance records from multiple gauges in the same basin suggests that analytical base flow separation methods must be calibrated at each gauge. Using average values of coefficients introduces a potentially significant and unknown error in base flow as compared with mass balance methods. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - a statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, K.M.; Strom, S.E.; Kenyon, S.J.; Hartmann, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties. 38 references

  11. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  12. Luminosity determination at HERA-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    A detailed description of an original method used to measure the luminosity accumulated by the HERA-B experiment for a data sample taken during the 2002-2003 HERA running period is reported. We show that, with this method, a total luminosity measurement can be achieved with a typical precision, including overall systematic uncertainties, at a level of 5% or better. We also report evidence for the detection of {delta}-rays generated in the target and comment on the possible use of such delta rays to measure luminosity. (orig.)

  13. Possible Scenarios for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2107593

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider possible scenarios to upgrade the LHC luminosity beyond 1034 cm−2s−1. By pushing the accelerator parameters to the ultimate performance we can increase to 1.7 1011 the bunch population and eventually reach a peak luminosity of 2.3×1034 cm−2s−1. To go beyond, a considerable improvement of the LHC parameters, such as ß*, beam intensity, bunch length, number of circulating bunches is required. Finally, the upgrade of the injector complex and of the injection energy is another important ingredient to upgrade both peak and integrated luminosity up to an order of magnitude above the nominal value.

  14. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing β function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Online luminosity measurement at BES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wenbo; Fu Chengdong; Mo Xiaohu; He Kanglin; Zhu Kejun; Li Fei; Zhao Shujun

    2010-01-01

    As a crucial parameter of both accelerator and detector, the realization of online luminosity measurement is of great importance. Several methods of luminosity measurement are recapitulated and the emphasis is laid on the algorithm of using e + e - and γγ final states. Taking into account the status at the beginning of the joint commissioning of detector and accelerator, the information from end cap electromagnetic calorimeter is used to select the good event. With the help of online Event filter, the luminosity is calculated and the monitoring of online cross section of hadron is realized. The preliminary results indicate that the online luminosity measurement is stable and its role for machine tuning and monitoring of the overall running status is indispensable. (authors)

  16. Estimating fast neural input using anatomical and functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eriksson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years there has been an increased interest in estimating signals that are sent between neurons and brain areas. During this time many new methods have appeared for measuring those signals. Here we review a wide range of methods for which connected neurons can be identified anatomically, by tracing axons that runs between the cells, or functionally, by detecting if the activity of two neurons are correlated with a short lag. The signals that are sent between the neurons are represented by the activity in the neurons that are connected to the target population or by the activity at the corresponding synapses. The different methods not only differ in the accuracy of the signal measurement but they also differ in the type of signal being measured. For example, unselective recording of all neurons in the source population encompasses more indirect pathways to the target population than if one selectively record from the neurons that project to the target population. Infact, this degree of selectivity is similar to that of optogenetic perturbations; one can perturb selectively or unselectively. Thus it becomes possible to match a given signal measurement method with a signal perturbation method, something that allows for an exact input control to any neuronal population.

  17. Spectral velocity estimation using autocorrelation functions for sparse data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    -mode image for orientation, and data for this has to acquired interleaved with the flow data. The power spectrum can be calculated from the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function Ry (k), where its span of lags k is given by the number of emission N in the data segment for velocity estimation......The distribution of velocities of blood or tissue is displayed using ultrasound scanners by finding the power spectrum of the received signal. This is currently done by making a Fourier transform of the received signal and then showing spectra in an M-mode display. It is desired to show a B....... The lag corresponds to the difference in pulse number, so that for lag k data from emission i is correlated with i + k. The autocorrelation for lag k can be averaged over N-k pairs of emissions. It is possible to calculate Ry (k) for a sparse set of emissions, as long as all combinations of emissions...

  18. Estimation of Baroreflex Function Using Independent Component Analysis of Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Makoto; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Tanaka, Akira; Homma, Noriyasu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-Ichi

    The maximum cross-correlation coefficient ρmax between blood pressure variability and heart rate variability, whose frequency components are limited to the Mayer wave-related band, is a useful index to evaluate the state of the autonomic nervous function related to baroreflex. However, measurement of continuous blood pressure with an expensive and bulky measuring device is required to calculate ρmax. The present study has proposed an easier method for obtaining ρmax with measurement of finger photoplethysmography (PPG) only. In the proposed method, independent components are extracted from feature variables specifying the PPG signal by using the independent component analysis (ICA), and then the most appropriate component is chosen out of them so that the ρmax calculated from the component can approximate its true value. The results from the experiment with a postural change performed in 18 healthy subjects have suggested that the proposed method is available for estimating ρmax by using the ICA to extract blood pressure information from the PPG signal.

  19. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run2

    CERN Document Server

    Lujan, Paul Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into telescopes, each consisting of three sensor planes. It was installed in CMS at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2 of the LHC. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the fast-or capability of the pixel readout chip to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope, corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. This paper presents results from the 2016 running of the PLT, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Van der Meer scans, and...

  20. Performance of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Luminosity Measurement at CMS during Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors arranged into "telescopes", each consisting of three planes. It was installed during LS1 at the beginning of 2015 and has been providing online and offline luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to identify events where a hit is registered in all three sensors in a telescope corresponding primarily to tracks originating from the interaction point. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for the calculation of corrections to the online luminosity from effects such as the miscounting of tracks not originating from the interaction point and detector efficiency. In this talk, we will present results from 2016 running and preliminary 2017 results, including commissioning and operational history, luminosity calibration using Va...

  1. MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN STELLAR SYSTEMS: 'QUIESCENT' ACCRETION AND LUMINOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volonteri, M.; Campbell, D.; Mateo, M.; Dotti, M.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small fraction of local galaxies harbor an accreting black hole, classified as an active galactic nucleus. However, many stellar systems are plausibly expected to host black holes, from globular clusters to nuclear star clusters, to massive galaxies. The mere presence of stars in the vicinity of a black hole provides a source of fuel via mass loss of evolved stars. In this paper, we assess the expected luminosities of black holes embedded in stellar systems of different sizes and properties, spanning a large range of masses. We model the distribution of stars and derive the amount of gas available to a central black hole through a geometrical model. We estimate the luminosity of the black holes under simple, but physically grounded, assumptions on the accretion flow. Finally, we discuss the detectability of 'quiescent' black holes in the local universe.

  2. Optimal estimation of the intensity function of a spatial point process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Yongtao; Jalilian, Abdollah; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    easily computable estimating functions. We derive the optimal estimating function in a class of first-order estimating functions. The optimal estimating function depends on the solution of a certain Fredholm integral equation and reduces to the likelihood score in case of a Poisson process. We discuss...... the numerical solution of the Fredholm integral equation and note that a special case of the approximated solution is equivalent to a quasi-likelihood for binary spatial data. The practical performance of the optimal estimating function is evaluated in a simulation study and a data example....

  3. Improved parameter estimation for hydrological models using weighted object functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.; Zaadnoordijk, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the sensitivity of calibration of hydrological model parameters to different objective functions. Several functions are defined with weights depending upon the hydrological background. These are compared with an objective function based upon kriging. Calibration is applied to

  4. Cost and Benefit of Control Strategies - Estimation of Benefit functions, enforcement-probability function and enforcement-cost function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Jensen, Frank

    of undersized lobsters and illegal bycactch of cod. The enforcement to avoid the illegal activities consists of physical control, such as dock side inspections and boarding, and administrative control with integration of different databases. This paper presents the first steps in the application of the theory...... on fishery enforcement from the COBECOS project to a specific case. It is done by estimations of functional relationships' for describing 1) the fisheries benefit function 2) the shadow value of biomass 3) the connection between the probability of being detected and apprehended for different enforcement...... levels and 4) the connection between different enforcement levels and costs. The purpose of estimating the functional relationships are for future application in the COBECOS computer modeling in order to carry out an cost-benefit analysis of control strategies and thereby find the optimal mix and level...

  5. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  6. Topological estimation of aerodynamic controlled airplane system functionality of quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С.В. Павлова

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available  It is suggested to use topological methods for stage estimation of aerodynamic airplane control in widespread range of its conditions The estimation is based on normalized stage virtual non-isotropy of configurational airplane systems calculation.

  7. Phase Function Determination in Support of Orbital Debris Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, M. D.; Cowardin, H. M.; Stansbery, Eugene G.

    2012-01-01

    To recover the size of a space debris object from photometric measurements, it is necessary to determine its albedo and basic shape: if the albedo is known, the reflective area can be calculated; and if the shape is known, the shape and area taken together can be used to estimate a characteristic dimension. Albedo is typically determined by inferring the object s material type from filter photometry or spectroscopy and is not the subject of the present study. Object shape, on the other hand, can be revealed from a time-history of the object s brightness response. The most data-rich presentation is a continuous light-curve that records the object s brightness for an entire sensor pass, which could last for tens of minutes to several hours: from this one can see both short-term periodic behavior as well as brightness variations with phase angle. Light-curve interpretation, however, is more art than science and does not lend itself easily to automation; and the collection method, which requires single-object telescope dedication for long periods of time, is not well suited to debris survey conditions. So one is led to investigate how easily an object s brightness phase function, which can be constructed from the more survey-friendly point photometry, can be used to recover object shape. Such a recovery is usually attempted by comparing a phase-function curve constructed from an object s empirical brightness measurements to analytically-derived curves for basic shapes or shape combinations. There are two ways to accomplish this: a simple averaged brightness-versus phase curve assembled from the empirical data, or a more elaborate approach in which one is essentially calculating a brightness PDF for each phase angle bin (a technique explored in unpublished AFRL/RV research and in Ojakangas 2011); in each case the empirical curve is compared to analytical results for shapes of interest. The latter technique promises more discrimination power but requires more data; the

  8. MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Bergmann, Benedikt; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Ashba, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Bekhouche, Khaled [Biskra University (Algeria); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Lipniacka, Anna [Bergen University (Norway)

    2016-07-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s) =8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX luminosity measurements are below 0.3% for one minute intervals.

  9. Characterization of exoplanets from their formation. III. The statistics of planetary luminosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C.; Marleau, G.-D.; Mollière, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. This paper continues a series in which we predict the main observable characteristics of exoplanets based on their formation. In Paper I we described our global planet formation and evolution model that is based on the core accretion paradigm. In Paper II we studied the planetary mass-radius relationship with population syntheses. Aims: In this paper we present an extensive study of the statistics of planetary luminosities during both formation and evolution. Our results can be compared with individual directly imaged extrasolar (proto)planets and with statistical results from surveys. Methods: We calculated three populations of synthetic planets assuming different efficiencies of the accretional heating by gas and planetesimals during formation. We describe the temporal evolution of the planetary mass-luminosity relation. We investigate the relative importance of the shock and internal luminosity during formation, and predict a statistical version of the post-formation mass vs. entropy "tuning fork" diagram. Because the calculations now include deuterium burning we also update the planetary mass-radius relationship in time. Results: We find significant overlap between the high post-formation luminosities of planets forming with hot and cold gas accretion because of the core-mass effect. Variations in the individual formation histories of planets can still lead to a factor 5 to 20 spread in the post-formation luminosity at a given mass. However, if the gas accretional heating and planetesimal accretion rate during the runaway phase is unknown, the post-formation luminosity may exhibit a spread of as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude at a fixed mass. As a key result we predict a flat log-luminosity distribution for giant planets, and a steep increase towards lower luminosities due to the higher occurrence rate of low-mass (M ≲ 10-40 M⊕) planets. Future surveys may detect this upturn. Conclusions: Our results indicate that during formation an estimation of

  10. Quality Factor for the Hadronic Calorimeter in High Luminosity Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Seixas, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Sotto-Maior-Peralva, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS experiment and has about 10,000 eletronic channels. An Optimal Filter (OF) has been used to estimate the energy sampled by the calorimeter and applies a Quality Factor (QF) for signal acceptance. An approach using Matched Filter (MF) has also been pursued. In order to cope with the luminosity rising foreseen for LHC operation upgrade, different algorithms have been developed. Currently, the OF measure for signal acceptance is implemented through a chi-square test. At a low luminosity scenario, such QF measure has been used as a way to describe how the acquired signal is compatible to the pulse shape pattern. However, at high-luminosity conditions, due to pile up, this QF acceptance is no longer possible when OF is employed, and the QF becomes a measure to indicate whether the reconstructed signal suffers or not from pile up. Methods are being developed in order to recover the superposed information, and the QF may be us...

  11. Estimating Import-Demand Function in ARDL Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Rashid; Tayyaba Razzaq

    2010-01-01

    We develop a structural econometric model of import demand for Pakistan, with binding foreign exchange constraint. ARDL and DOLS techniques are used to estimate the log-run coefficients of price and income elasticities. The empirical results from ARDL bound testing approach and Johansen’s method for cointegration show strong evidence of the existence of a long-run stable relationship among the variables included in the import demand model. The price and income elasticity estimates have correc...

  12. ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    With the LHC having successfully collected data at center-of-mass energies of sqrt{s} = 7/8 TeV, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about five times the LHC design luminosity some 10-years from now in the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project. Coping with the high luminosity and the corresponding very high particle density will require significant changes to the ATLAS detector. Designs are developing rapidly for a replacement for the inner tracker, great changes in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers. This article summarizes the environment expected at the HL-LHC and the status of various improvements to the ATLAS detector.

  13. The period-luminosity relation for Cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the empirical determination of the period-luminosity-colour relation for classical Cepheids are presented. In this study the quantitative effects of random errors, reddening, sample size and the presence of both colour and period cut-offs (imposed by the finite extent of the instability strip) on the observational redetermination of the original relation are evaluated. Both random errors in the photometry and correlated errors in the reddening corrections are shown to have systematic effects. Especially sensitive to these errors is the colour coefficient in the period-luminosity-colour relation, where the ratio of the error to the width of the instability strip is the determining factor. With present observations only broad confidence limits can be placed on present knowledge of the intrinsic period-luminosity-colour relation and/or its variations from galaxy to galaxy. (author)

  14. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, H.S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bravin, E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Miyamoto, R. [European Spallation Source, ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2017-03-11

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  15. Beam-beam effects and generalized luminosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The assumption is made that before an NLC is approved, a prototype will be necessary that demonstrates the feasibility of a general purpose linear collider capable of {rvec e}{sup {+-}}{rvec e}{sup {+-}}, {rvec {gamma}}{rvec e} and {rvec {gamma}}{rvec {gamma}} incident channels. At an upgraded SLC, such channels could provide new physics over a range of energies upwards of a few GeV. Effects that limit the luminosity of a GLC are discussed together with their possible mitigations. The expected luminosities in the different channels are then predicted in a consistent way for {radical}s{sub ee} = 0.5 TeV.

  16. Software Functional Size: For Cost Estimation and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Baris; Turetken, Oktay; Demirors, Onur

    Determining software characteristics that will effectively support project planning, execution, monitoring and closure remains to be one of the prevalent challenges software project managers face. Functional size measures were introduced to quantify one of the primary characteristics of software. Although functional size measurement methods have not been without criticisms, they have significant promises for software project management. In this paper, we explore the contributions of functional size measurement to project management. We identified diverse uses of functional size by performing a literature survey and investigating how functional size measurement can be incorporated into project management practices by mapping the uses of functional size to the knowledge areas defined in project management body of knowledge (PMBOK).

  17. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and -functionals. The main result of the paper is the proof of the equivalence theorem for a -functional and a modulus of smoothness for the Dunkl transform on R d . Author Affiliations. M El Hamma1 R Daher1. Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University of Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco ...

  18. Comprehensive discard reconstruction and abundance estimation using flexible selectivity functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, G.M.; Poos, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    The additional mortality caused by discarding may hamper the sustainable use of marine resources, especially if it is not accounted for in stock assessment and fisheries management. Generally, long and precise time-series on age-structured landings exist, but historical discard estimates are often

  19. Estimating Functions of Distributions Defined over Spaces of Unknown Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wolpert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider Bayesian estimation of information-theoretic quantities from data, using a Dirichlet prior. Acknowledging the uncertainty of the event space size m and the Dirichlet prior’s concentration parameter c, we treat both as random variables set by a hyperprior. We show that the associated hyperprior, P(c, m, obeys a simple “Irrelevance of Unseen Variables” (IUV desideratum iff P(c, m = P(cP(m. Thus, requiring IUV greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom of the hyperprior. Some information-theoretic quantities can be expressed multiple ways, in terms of different event spaces, e.g., mutual information. With all hyperpriors (implicitly used in earlier work, different choices of this event space lead to different posterior expected values of these information-theoretic quantities. We show that there is no such dependence on the choice of event space for a hyperprior that obeys IUV. We also derive a result that allows us to exploit IUV to greatly simplify calculations, like the posterior expected mutual information or posterior expected multi-information. We also use computer experiments to favorably compare an IUV-based estimator of entropy to three alternative methods in common use. We end by discussing how seemingly innocuous changes to the formalization of an estimation problem can substantially affect the resultant estimates of posterior expectations.

  20. Micro-Economic Estimation On The Demand Function For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article focused on the estimation of the prostitution demand behaviour in Adamawa State. An econometric model was specified based on economic theory and confronted with both primary and secondary data. Ordinary least square multiple regression techniques were adopted and the linear model was chosen as a ...

  1. Estimation Of Impulse Response Function Using The Left And Right ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The right and left parameters of the models are estimated by applying the iterative multiple regression approach on the input and output processes respectively. Results obtained are comparable to those obtained from direct application of the iterative multiple regression on the input process. Global Journal of Mathematical ...

  2. Multivariable Frequency Response Functions Estimation for Industrial Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, T.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.

    2005-01-01

    The accuracy of industrial robots limits its applicability for high demanding processes, like robotised laser welding. We are working on a nonlinear exible model of the robot manipulator to predict these inaccuracies. This poster presents the experimental results on estimating the Multivariable

  3. The relative spatial distributions of high- and low-luminosity galaxies toward Coma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzer, J.J.; Hanson, M.M.; Gavazzi, G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative spatial distributions of low- and high-mass galaxies which lie in a field in the direction of the Coma Supercluster are investigated. Three tests are used to compare the distributions of high-luminosity and low-luminosity galaxies in the field: correlation functions, nearest neighbor distributions, and local density environments. All three tests indicate that the low-luminosity galaxies are significantly less confined to the structure defined by the luminous galaxies than are the luminous galaxies themselves. Several galaxies in the low-luminosity subsample are within voids. These findings lend support to various models for the formation of large-scale structure that include biased galaxy formation. In particular, the ratio of the amplitudes of the correlation functions for dwarfs and giants agrees closely with the predictions of the cold dark matter models of White et al. (1987). 54 refs

  4. Semi-empirical model for optimising future heavy-ion luminosity of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, M

    2014-01-01

    The wide spectrum of intensities and emittances imprinted on the LHC Pb bunches during the accumulation of bunch trains in the injector chain result in a significant spread in the single bunch luminosities and lifetimes in collision. Based on the data collected in the 2011 Pb-Pb run, an empirical model is derived to predict the single-bunch peak luminosity depending on the bunch’s position within the beam. In combination with this model, simulations of representative bunches are used to estimate the luminosity evolution for the complete ensemble of bunches. Several options are being considered to improve the injector performance and to increase the number of bunches in the LHC, leading to several potential injection scenarios, resulting in different peak and integrated luminosities. The most important options for after the long shutdown (LS) 1 and 2 are evaluated and compared.

  5. Funnel stability and VLBI-jet luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turolla, R.; Zaninetti, L.

    1986-01-01

    The stability of the jet-funnel interface in thick disc models is investigated. In particular an analysis is made of the circumstances in which the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities can destroy the jet-funnel configuration, and the expected luminosity emitted at the top of the funnel from conversion of bulk kinetic energy into radiation via turbulent cascade processes. (author)

  6. Recent improvements in luminosity at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.; Allen, M.; Chao, A.

    1983-03-01

    We will describe improvements which have led to new records for peak and average luminosity at PEP. Comparison of recent results with several earlier lattice and optical modifications shows rather good correlation with the predictions of a beam-beam simulation program

  7. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  8. MPX Detectors as LHC Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; Asbah, Nedaa; Bergmann, Benedikt; Bekhouche, Khaled; Caforio, Davide; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik; Leroy, Claude; Lipniacka, Anna; Nessi, Marzio; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Soueid, Paul; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX lum...

  9. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and redness/greenness for comparison of leaf spectral profiles in multi-temporally acquired remote sensing images. Ryoichi Doi. Articles Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 723-730 ...

  10. Source Estimation for the Damped Wave Equation Using Modulating Functions Method: Application to the Estimation of the Cerebral Blood Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-10-19

    In this paper, a method based on modulating functions is proposed to estimate the Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF). The problem is written in an input estimation problem for a damped wave equation which is used to model the spatiotemporal variations of blood mass density. The method is described and its performance is assessed through some numerical simulations. The robustness of the method in presence of noise is also studied.

  11. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    functional and a modulus of smoothness for the Dunkl transform on Rd. Author Affiliations. M El Hamma1 R Daher1. Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences Aïn Chock, University of Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco. Dates.

  12. Absolute Monotonicity of Functions Related To Estimates of First Eigenvalue of Laplace Operator on Riemannian Manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors find the absolute monotonicity and complete monotonicity of some functions involving trigonometric functions and related to estimates the lower bounds of the first eigenvalue of Laplace operator on Riemannian manifolds.

  13. HEDONIC PRICE FUNCTION ESTIMATION FOR MOBILE PHONE IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mahdi Mostafavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the survey of mobile price determinants by hedonic model. We have applied the hedonic price model for mobile phone market in Iran in the year of 2008. The brands conclude NOKIA, QTEK, HTC, MOTOROLA, SONY ERICSSON and SAMSUNG that comprise 193 types of handset mobile phone. The results show that in the hedonic function, the maximum amount of parameters of hedonic price function related to the following variables respectively: touch screen, hands free and connectivity tools, and the minimum amount of them are belonged to clarification of monitor images, phone volume and phone memory. Moreover, except Motorola brand the type of brand has not a significant parameter in the hedonic price function.

  14. Bayesian Nonparametric Mixture Estimation for Time-Indexed Functional Data in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrance D. Savitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present growfunctions for R that offers Bayesian nonparametric estimation models for analysis of dependent, noisy time series data indexed by a collection of domains. This data structure arises from combining periodically published government survey statistics, such as are reported in the Current Population Study (CPS. The CPS publishes monthly, by-state estimates of employment levels, where each state expresses a noisy time series. Published state-level estimates from the CPS are composed from household survey responses in a model-free manner and express high levels of volatility due to insufficient sample sizes. Existing software solutions borrow information over a modeled time-based dependence to extract a de-noised time series for each domain. These solutions, however, ignore the dependence among the domains that may be additionally leveraged to improve estimation efficiency. The growfunctions package offers two fully nonparametric mixture models that simultaneously estimate both a time and domain-indexed dependence structure for a collection of time series: (1 A Gaussian process (GP construction, which is parameterized through the covariance matrix, estimates a latent function for each domain. The covariance parameters of the latent functions are indexed by domain under a Dirichlet process prior that permits estimation of the dependence among functions across the domains: (2 An intrinsic Gaussian Markov random field prior construction provides an alternative to the GP that expresses different computation and estimation properties. In addition to performing denoised estimation of latent functions from published domain estimates, growfunctions allows estimation of collections of functions for observation units (e.g., households, rather than aggregated domains, by accounting for an informative sampling design under which the probabilities for inclusion of observation units are related to the response variable. growfunctions includes plot

  15. Estimation of acoustic resonances for room transfer function equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Strong acoustic resonances create long room impulse responses (RIRs) which may harm the speech transmission in an acoustic space and hence reduce speech intelligibility. Equalization is performed by cancelling the main acoustic resonances common to multiple room transfer functions (RTFs), i...

  16. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Casablanca, Morocco. E-mail: m_elhamma@yahoo.fr. MS received 17 January 2013. Abstract. Using a generalized spherical mean operator, we define generalized modu- lus of smoothness in the space L2 k. (Rd). Based on the Dunkl operator we define. Sobolev-type space and K-functionals. The main result of the paper ...

  17. estimating an aggregate import demand function for ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Oteng-Abayie and Appiah-Nkrumah. Import demand function for Ghana ... remarkable. It is thus suggested that to increase total imports, it would be essential to imple- ment a set of macroeconomic and sector- specific policies that considerably relax the binding constraint on foreign exchange avail- ability. Also, the near ...

  18. Estimation of reference values for liver function test analytes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine age and sex based reference ranges for liver function test biochemical parameters for adult population. Methodology: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, Okolobiri, Bayelsastate, Southern Nigeria. A total of 200 ...

  19. Sanotyping in estimation of functional abilities of the athlete's organism

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    With the use of express polyfunctional methods of organism research - cardiorythmography, spirometery, laser cross-correlation spectroscopy and computing of motions - the sanotyping model of sportsmen organism functioning is got. The features of sanotypes sportsmen are marked specialized in playing kinds, heavy athletics, at run, boxing, kikboxing, swimming.

  20. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    20

    Soil water retention, Dry lands, Western India, Pedotransfer functions, Soil moisture calculator. 1. 2. 3. 4 ..... samples although it is known that structure and macro-porosity of the sample affect water retention (Unger ..... and OC content has positive influence on water retention whereas interaction of clay and OC has negative ...

  1. $L^{p}$-square function estimates on spaces of homogeneous type and on uniformly rectifiable sets

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Steve; Mitrea, Marius; Morris, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    The authors establish square function estimates for integral operators on uniformly rectifiable sets by proving a local T(b) theorem and applying it to show that such estimates are stable under the so-called big pieces functor. More generally, they consider integral operators associated with Ahlfors-David regular sets of arbitrary codimension in ambient quasi-metric spaces. The local T(b) theorem is then used to establish an inductive scheme in which square function estimates on so-called big pieces of an Ahlfors-David regular set are proved to be sufficient for square function estimates to hold on the entire set. Extrapolation results for L^p and Hardy space versions of these estimates are also established. Moreover, the authors prove square function estimates for integral operators associated with variable coefficient kernels, including the Schwartz kernels of pseudodifferential operators acting between vector bundles on subdomains with uniformly rectifiable boundaries on manifolds.

  2. Luminosity measurement method for the LHC: Event selection and absolute luminosity determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, M. W.; Chwastowski, J.; Cyz, A.; Słowikowski, K.

    2013-11-01

    In our earlier papers Krasny et al. [1,2] have proposed a new luminosity measurement method which uses lepton pairs produced in peripheral collisions of the LHC beam particles, and identified the requirements for a new, specialized luminosity detector which is indispensable for their efficient on-line selection. In this paper we use the base-line detector model, with no precise timing capabilities, to evaluate the statistical and systematic accuracy of the method. We propose the complete event selection procedure and demonstrate that it allows to collect a sufficiently large sample of e+e- pairs to achieve a better than 1% statistical accuracy of the luminosity measurement over less than one-month-long running time intervals. We argue that the absolute luminosity measurement systematic errors can be kept below 1%. The proposed method can be directly applied to the LHC running periods for which the machine instantaneous luminosity does not exceed the L=1033 s-1 cm-2 value. Two ways extending the method to the large pile-up periods corresponding to higher instantaneous luminosities are proposed.

  3. INCREASING OF PRECISE ESTIMATION OF OPTIMAL CRITERIA BOILER FUNCTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Skakovsk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of laboratory and industrial research allowed offering a way to improve the accuracy of estimation the optimal criterion of boilers' operation depending on fuel quality. Criterion is calculated continuously during boiler operation as heat ratio transmitted in production with superheated steam to the thermal energy obtained by combustion in boiler’s furnace fuel (natural gas .The non-linearity dependence of steam enthalpy from its temperature and pressure are considered when calculating, as well as changes in calorific value of natural gas, depending on variety in nitrogen content therein. The control algorithm and program for Ukrainian PLC MIC-52 are offered. The user selection program implements two searching modes for criterion maximum: automated and automatic. The results are going to be used for upgrading the existing control system on sugar factory.

  4. Smoothed Conditional Scale Function Estimation in AR(1-ARCH(1 Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lema Logamou Seknewna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the Smoothed Conditional Scale Function for time series was taken out under the conditional heteroscedastic innovations by imitating the kernel smoothing in nonparametric QAR-QARCH scheme. The estimation was taken out based on the quantile regression methodology proposed by Koenker and Bassett. And the proof of the asymptotic properties of the Conditional Scale Function estimator for this type of process was given and its consistency was shown.

  5. Green's function based unparameterised multi-dimensional kernel density and likelihood ratio estimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kövesárki, P; Brock, I C; Quiroz, A E Nuncio

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a probability density estimator based on Green's function identities. A density model is constructed under the sole assumption that the probability density is differentiable. The method is implemented as a binary likelihood estimator for classification purposes, so issues such as mis-modeling and overtraining are also discussed. The identity behind the density estimator can be interpreted as a real-valued, non-scalar kernel method which is able to reconstruct differentiable density functions.

  6. Clustering of quasars in a wide luminosity range at redshift 4 with Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam Wide-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wanqiu; Akiyama, Masayuki; Bosch, James; Enoki, Motohiro; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Nagashima, Masahiro; Niida, Mana; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Oguri, Masamune; Onoue, Masafusa; Oogi, Taira; Ouchi, Masami; Schulze, Andreas; Shirasaki, Yuji; Silverman, John D.; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Toba, Yoshiki; Uchiyama, Hisakazu; Yamashita, Takuji

    2018-01-01

    We examine the clustering of quasars over a wide luminosity range, by utilizing 901 quasars at \\overline{z}_phot˜ 3.8 with -24.73 Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) S16A Wide2 date release and 342 more luminous quasars at 3.4 Digital Sky Survey that fall in the HSC survey fields. We measure the bias factors of two quasar samples by evaluating the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) between the quasar samples and 25790 bright z ˜ 4 Lyman break galaxies in M1450 < -21.25 photometrically selected from the HSC dataset. Over an angular scale of 10.0" to 1000.0", the bias factors are 5.93+1.34-1.43 and 2.73+2.44-2.55 for the low- and high-luminosity quasars, respectively, indicating no significant luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at z ˜ 4. It is noted that the bias factor of the luminous quasars estimated by the CCF is smaller than that estimated by the auto-correlation function over a similar redshift range, especially on scales below 40.0". Moreover, the bias factor of the less-luminous quasars implies the minimal mass of their host dark matter halos is 0.3-2 × 1012 h-1 M⊙, corresponding to a quasar duty cycle of 0.001-0.06.

  7. LHC operation at higher energy and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) was commissioned and operated in the years 2009-2013 up to a beam energy of 4 TeV. A peak luminosity of 0.77 · 1034 cm−2s−1 was reached and an integrated luminosity of around 29 fb−1 was delivered to both ATLAS and CMS. This performance allowed the discovery of a scalar boson. The LHC is presently in a shutdown phase dedicated to consolidation and maintenance that will allow the restart of beam operation in early 2015 at an increased beam energy of 6.5 to 7TeV. Maximum acceptable pileup, effectiveness of electron-cloud scrubbing, and fast loss events are some of the issues that will shape the choice of operational parameters, cycle setup, and the commissioning strategy. The baseline choices and options for the restart after the shutdown are presented. In addition the roadmap for future performance upgrades is sketched.

  8. Robust Tracking at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Natasha Lee; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) aims to increase the LHC data-set by an order of magnitude in order to increase its potential for discoveries. Starting from the middle of 2026, the HL-LHC is expected to reach the peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5×10^34cm^-2s^-1 which corresponds to about 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. To cope with the large radiation doses and high pileup, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new all-silicon Inner Tracker. In this talk the expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the HL-LHC tracker is presented. Comparison is made to the performance with the Run2 detector. Ongoing developments of the track reconstruction for the HL-LHC are also discussed.

  9. Modified Moment, Maximum Likelihood and Percentile Estimators for the Parameters of the Power Function Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Zaka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the modifications of maximum likelihood, moments and percentile estimators of the two parameter Power function distribution. Sampling behavior of the estimators is indicated by Monte Carlo simulation. For some combinations of parameter values, some of the modified estimators appear better than the traditional maximum likelihood, moments and percentile estimators with respect to bias, mean square error and total deviation.

  10. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. (orig.)

  11. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-09-15

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. (orig.).

  12. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  13. Cochlear function tests in estimation of speech dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Ju; Park, So Young; Park, Shi Nae; Na, Mi Sun; Lee, Philip; Han, Jae Sang

    2016-10-01

    The loss of active cochlear mechanics causes elevated thresholds, loudness recruitment, and reduced frequency selectivity. The problems faced by hearing-impaired listeners are largely related with reduced dynamic range (DR). The aim of this study was to determine which index of the cochlear function tests correlates best with the DR to speech stimuli. Audiological data on 516 ears with pure tone average (PTA) of ≤55 dB and word recognition score of ≥70% were analyzed. PTA, speech recognition threshold (SRT), uncomfortable loudness (UCL), and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were explored as the indices of cochlear function. Audiometric configurations were classified. Correlation between each index and the DR was assessed and multiple regression analysis was done. PTA and SRT demonstrated strong negative correlations with the DR (r = -0.788 and -0.860, respectively), while DPOAE sum was moderately correlated (r = 0.587). UCLs remained quite constant for the total range of the DR. The regression equation was Y (DR) = 75.238 - 0.719 × SRT (R(2 )=( )0.721, p equation.

  14. K0 finding efficiencies in increasing luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassard, J.F.; Margetides S.

    1993-01-01

    In early LHC running it is anticipated that experiments will obtain luminosities of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 , during which typically only one interaction per event will be obtained. But at higher luminosities, necessary for any Higgs and myriad other searches, experiments will have to deal with up to 50 distinct primary processes. Most will be minimum bias, and easily distinguished in terms of trigger. They can still, of course, confuse analysis of high P T events. When it comes to B events, the confusion even from minimum bias events becomes more acute, since B events are not open-quotes high P T close quotes in this environment. The need for vertex discrimination, particularly in z, is well understood; however, a collateral effect - the increasing difficulty in finding tracks at all - has received little attention. The authors show the distribution of the K 0 in the Pythia process B → J/ψK 0 in the space γ vs. η. Confusion in reconstructing the K 0 is acute for many reasons, not the least of which is the way their pions are boosted forward, and even out of acceptance. Extra luminosity merely increases the problems in finding K 0 's, so it must not be assumed that 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 is ten times better than 10 32 cm -2 sec -1

  15. BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF THE SHAPE PARAMETER OF THE GENERALISED EXPONENTIAL DISTRIBUTION UNDER DIFFERENT LOSS FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANKU DEY

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The generalized exponential (GE distribution proposed by Gupta and Kundu (1999 is an important lifetime distribution in survival analysis. In this article, we propose to obtain Bayes estimators and its associated risk based on a class of  non-informative prior under the assumption of three loss functions, namely, quadratic loss function (QLF, squared log-error loss function (SLELF and general entropy loss function (GELF. The motivation is to explore the most appropriate loss function among these three loss functions. The performances of the estimators are, therefore, compared on the basis of their risks obtained under QLF, SLELF and GELF separately. The relative efficiency of the estimators is also obtained. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are performed to compare the performances of the Bayes estimates under different situations.

  16. Variations of the core luminosity and solar neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    that errors add up linearly. This conservative error estimation gives δ u/u = 1.7 %, δ ρ/ρ = 7 % at r=0.06× Rsolar, and so the δ T/T = 9 %, since δ T/T ~ δ ρ/ρ + δ P/P. At r=0.04× Rsolar, δ u/u=2.2 %, δ ρ/ρ=10 %, δ T/T=13 %. At r=0, δ u/u=3.5 %, therefore δ ρ/ρ=16 % and so δ T/T=20 %. So even with the usual, not conservative error estimation, roughly dividing these conservative errors by 4, with δ u/u=0.4 %, we still get an allowed range cca. 2 % temperature change at r=0.06× Rsolar and higher in the more central regions. In solar core varying cyclically on a decade timescale, the longer timescale nuclear reactions cannot build up equilibrium. In such a short timescale the variations of the local temperature regulates the proton-proton chain instead of the global luminosity constraint that is applicable only on evolutionary timescales. Therefore, the temperature dependences of the pp cycle neutrinos will be different from the ones determined by solar model calculations with the luminosity constraint: instead of the usual pp ~ T-1/2, Be ~ T8, B~ T18. we determined by the nuclear reaction rates formulas pp ~ T4.2, Be ~ T-1/2, B~ T13.5, for τ guns'' of neutrino oscillations are not found yet.

  17. Selection of the wavelet function for the frequencies estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, A.

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the signals are used to diagnose the state of the systems, by means of the extraction of their more important characteristics such as the frequencies, tendencies, changes and temporary evolutions. This characteristics are detected by means of diverse analysis techniques, as Autoregressive methods, Fourier Transformation, Fourier transformation in short time, Wavelet transformation, among others. The present work uses the one Wavelet transformation because it allows to analyze stationary, quasi-stationary and transitory signals in the time-frequency plane. It also describes a methodology to select the scales and the Wavelet function to be applied the one Wavelet transformation with the objective of detecting to the dominant system frequencies. (Author)

  18. [Hygienic estimation of functional reserves and adaptive capabilities of students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setko, N P; Bulycheva, E V; Beilina, E B

    In the article there are presented data on characteristics ofpeculiarities of the functional state of medical 1-6 years students of higher educational institutions. The results were obtained with the aid of variation pulsometry. Students were shown to have typical elevated tone of the sympathetic nervous system, especially for students of the 1, 3, 5 and 6 courses, that is confirmed by the amplitude mode (AMo), characterizing the sympathetic activity of autonomous nervous system (ANS), which is an average of the students 1 year accounted for 38.6 ± 1.89%, for students of the 3 course - 38.5 ± 1.72%, for students of the 5 year (40.9 ± 3.25 %) and the students of 6 course (46.7 ± 2.59%). There was determined the trend to the centralization of the heart rate control, as evidenced by a reduced proportion of high-frequency waves (HF) by 29.2% to 35.2%, exceeding by 3.6 to 14.4 times in waves of the very low frequency (VLF) relative to the average standard values; the high proportion of students from 41% to 52%, with a mismatch of the sympathetic and parasympathetic compartments of the autonomic nervous system in the regulation of biological processes of adaptation. For medical students of higher education institutions there are typical functional reserves reduced from 20.5 % to 97.6% and a decrease in the proportion of students with a satisfactory adaptation by 40.4% from the 1 to the 6th year.

  19. Off-Grid DOA Estimation Based on Analysis of the Convexity of Maximum Likelihood Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Liang; WEI, Ping; LIAO, Hong Shu

    Spatial compressive sensing (SCS) has recently been applied to direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation owing to advantages over conventional ones. However the performance of compressive sensing (CS)-based estimation methods decreases when true DOAs are not exactly on the discretized sampling grid. We solve the off-grid DOA estimation problem using the deterministic maximum likelihood (DML) estimation method. In this work, we analyze the convexity of the DML function in the vicinity of the global solution. Especially under the condition of large array, we search for an approximately convex range around the ture DOAs to guarantee the DML function convex. Based on the convexity of the DML function, we propose a computationally efficient algorithm framework for off-grid DOA estimation. Numerical experiments show that the rough convex range accords well with the exact convex range of the DML function with large array and demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and speed.

  20. Estimation of magnesium in patients with functional hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It is evident that about 30-50% of patients with Vitamin D deficiency (VDD do not manifest develop secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT. A number of theories have been proposed to explain this lack of SHPT, including hypomagnesemia. Settings and Design: Retrospective review of laboratory database. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the differences in serum magnesium (Mg levels among those with VDD with or without SHPT. A retrospective review of 6255 laboratory data of bone mineral profiles performed in the period of 2007-2013. After excluding patients with hypercalcemia, renal dysfunction/unknown kidney function and primary hypothyroidism, the remaining 1323 patient data were analyzed. SHPT was defined as serum parathyroid hormone >65 in those with VDD. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests as appropriate to compare means. Multivariate logistic regression to analyze relation between variables and outcome of SHPT. Results: We noted that 55% patients (n = 727 had VDD, and among those who had VDD, 23% (n = 170 were hypocalcemic (corrected serum calcium <8.5. Patients with VDD who did not exhibit SHPT were 56% (n = 407. The mean (±standard deviation serum Mg levels in the entire cohort (n = 1323 was 1.94 ± 0.26 mg/dl and 1.95 ± 0.26 mg/dl in VDD cohort and 2 ± 0.31 mg/dl in the VDD-hypocalcemic cohort. There was no statistical difference in the Mg levels among those with SHPT compared to those without SHPT (P = 0.14. Serum calcium and phosphorus were lower in those with SHPT (P = 0.06 and P < 0.001, respectively. In multivariate logistic regression, serum calcium (P = 0.043, phosphorus (P < 0.001 and severe VDD (P < 0.001 independently correlated with occurrence of SHPT in VDD. Conclusions: Serum Mg levels did not explain the functional hypoparathyroidism seen in about half of the patients with VDD. A low normal serum calcium and phosphorus levels are more likely to be associated with VDD patients who develop SHPT.

  1. Estimation of a monotone percentile residual life function under random censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pereira, Alba M; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new estimator of a percentile residual life function with censored data under a monotonicity constraint. Specifically, it is assumed that the percentile residual life is a decreasing function. This assumption is useful when estimating the percentile residual life of units, which degenerate with age. We establish a law of the iterated logarithm for the proposed estimator, and its n-equivalence to the unrestricted estimator. The asymptotic normal distribution of the estimator and its strong approximation to a Gaussian process are also established. We investigate the finite sample performance of the monotone estimator in an extensive simulation study. Finally, data from a clinical trial in primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver are analyzed with the proposed methods. One of the conclusions of our work is that the restricted estimator may be much more efficient than the unrestricted one. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Estimation and model selection of semiparametric multivariate survival functions under general censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Fan, Yanqin; Pouzo, Demian; Ying, Zhiliang

    2010-07-01

    We study estimation and model selection of semiparametric models of multivariate survival functions for censored data, which are characterized by possibly misspecified parametric copulas and nonparametric marginal survivals. We obtain the consistency and root- n asymptotic normality of a two-step copula estimator to the pseudo-true copula parameter value according to KLIC, and provide a simple consistent estimator of its asymptotic variance, allowing for a first-step nonparametric estimation of the marginal survivals. We establish the asymptotic distribution of the penalized pseudo-likelihood ratio statistic for comparing multiple semiparametric multivariate survival functions subject to copula misspecification and general censorship. An empirical application is provided.

  3. BULK FLOWS FROM GALAXY LUMINOSITIES: APPLICATION TO 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY AND FORECAST FOR NEXT-GENERATION DATA SETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusser, Adi; Branchini, Enzo; Davis, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple method for measuring cosmological bulk flows from large redshift surveys, based on the apparent dimming or brightening of galaxies due to their peculiar motion. It is aimed at estimating bulk flows of cosmological volumes containing large numbers of galaxies. Constraints on the bulk flow are obtained by minimizing systematic variations in galaxy luminosities with respect to a reference luminosity function measured from the whole survey. This method offers two advantages over more popular bulk flow estimators: it is independent of error-prone distance indicators and of the poorly known galaxy bias. We apply the method to the Two Micron All Sky Survey redshift survey to measure the local bulk flows of spherical shells centered on the Milky Way (MW). The result is consistent with that obtained by Nusser and Davis using the SFI++ catalogue of Tully-Fisher distance indicators. We also make an assessment of the ability of the method to constrain bulk flows at larger redshifts (z = 0.1-0.5) from next-generation data sets. As a case study we consider the planned EUCLID survey. Using this method we will be able to measure a bulk motion of ∼200 km s -1 of 10 6 galaxies with photometric redshifts, at the 3σ level for both z ∼ 0.15 and z ∼ 0.5. Thus, the method will allow us to put strong constraints on dark energy models as well as alternative theories for structure formation.

  4. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  5. A DENSITY DEPENDENCE FOR PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY IN CLASS I SOURCES: COLLABORATIVE ACCRETION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Hts., NY 10598 (United States); Hurst, Rachel [Scarsdale High School, 1057 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale, NY 10583 (United States); Koenig, Xavier, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Class I protostars in three high-mass star-forming regions are found to have correlations among the local projected density of other Class I protostars, the summed flux from these other protostars, and the protostellar luminosity in the WISE 22 μm band. Brighter Class I sources form in higher-density and higher-flux regions, while low luminosity sources form anywhere. These correlations depend slightly on the number of neighbors considered (from 2 to 20) and could include a size-of-sample effect from the initial mass function (i.e., larger numbers include rarer and more massive stars). Luminosities seem to vary by neighborhood with nearby protostars having values proportional to each other and higher density regions having higher values. If Class I luminosity is partially related to the accretion rate, then this luminosity correlation is consistent with the competitive accretion model, although it is more collaborative than competitive. The correlation is also consistent with primordial mass segregation and could explain why the stellar initial mass function resembles the dense core mass function even when cores form multiple stars.

  6. On the a priori estimation of collocation error covariance functions: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabelos, D.N.; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Error covariance estimates are necessary information for the combination of solutions resulting from different kinds of data or methods, or for the assimilation of new results in already existing solutions. Such a combination or assimilation process demands proper weighting of the data, in order ...... error covariance estimates and given features of the input data we investigate the possibility of a straightforward estimation of error covariance functions exploiting known characteristics of the observations. The experiments using gravity anomalies for the computation of geoid heights...

  7. Estimating Import-Demand Function in ARDL Framework: The Case of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Abdul; Razzaq, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the import demand function for Pakistan using the structural model recently developed by Emran and Shilpi (2010). ARDL and DOLS techniques are used to estimate the log-run coefficients of price and income elasticities. The empirical results from ARDL bound testing approach and Johansen’s method for cointegration show strong evidence of the existence of a long-run stable relationship among the variables included in the import demand model. The price and income elasticity estimates ...

  8. FUNCTIONS OF THE HEAD OF SPECIAL (CORRECTIONAL) EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION ON PERFECTION OF ESTIMATION OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Voynelenko Natalya Vaselyevna

    2012-01-01

    In article the maintenance of activity of the head of special (correctional) educational institution on the organization of estimation of quality of educational system is discussed. The model of joint activity of participants of educational process on estimation of educational objects, as component of system of quality management in Educational institution is presented. Functions of estimation of educational system in activity of the head of educational institution are formulated.

  9. An estimating function approach to inference for inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    “This paper is concerned with inference for a certain class of inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott point processes depending on spatial covariates. Regression parameter estimates obtained from a simple estimating function are shown to be asymptotically normal when the “mother” intensity for the Neyman-Scott...

  10. An estimating function approach to inference for inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    This article is concerned with inference for a certain class of inhomogeneous Neyman-Scott point processes depending on spatial covariates. Regression parameter estimates obtained from a simple estimating function are shown to be asymptotically normal when the "mother" intensity for the Neyman-Scott...

  11. Precision of estimating equations for GFR in children with a solitary functioning kidney: the KIMONO study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westland, R.; Abraham, Y.; Bokenkamp, A.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Schreuder, M.F.; Wijk, J.A. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Children with a solitary functioning kidney may develop CKD. Although widely used, equations to estimate GFR are not validated in these patients. This study sought to determine the precision of common estimating equations in the KIMONO (KIdney of MONofunctional Origin)

  12. Luminosity Determination in $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV using the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Ackers, Mario; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmed, Hossain; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Akesson, Torsten Paul; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Jose; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amoros, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arms, Kregg; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Asman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Guimaraes da Costa, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Belhorma, Bouchra; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jurg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bischof, Reinhard; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Boaretto, Christian; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Rudolf; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; B{oser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Booth, Peter; Booth, Richard; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Braccini, Saverio; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, Andre; Brambilla, Elena; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Brett, Nicolas; Bright-Thomas, Paul; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brubaker, Erik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Buis, Ernst-Jan; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, Francois; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urban, Susana; Caccia, Massimo; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camard, Arnaud; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Cammin, Jochen; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Garrido, Maria Del Mar Capeans; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Caprio, Mario; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carpentieri, Carmen; Montoya, German D.Carrillo; Carron Montero, Sebastian; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, Joao; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavallari, Alvise; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Cazzato, Antonio; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerna, Cedric; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervetto, Mario; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Clark, Allan G.; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H.; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Coluccia, Rita; Comune, Gianluca; Conde Muino, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Correard, Sebastien; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, Maria Jose; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Cote, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; Donszelmann, Tulay Cuhadar; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; De Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard De; de la Taille, Christophe; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; de Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedes, George; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; del Papa, Carlo; del Peso, Jose; del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Dennis, Chris; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diaz Gomez, Manuel Maria; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Yagci, Kamile Dindar; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, Andre; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Dogan, Ozgen Berkol; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jurgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Drohan, Janice; Dubbert, Jorg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duhrssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Duren, Michael; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferguson, Douglas; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Ferro, Fabrizio; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipcic, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fohlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Garcia, Carmen; Garcia Navarro, Jose Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Helene; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gildemeister, Otto; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Borge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Gopfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gossling, Claus; Gottfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gollub, Nils Peter; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Goncalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gong, Chenwei; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Gorski, Boguslaw Tomasz; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanere, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafstrom, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hartel, Roland; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jrgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harper, Robert; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hart, John; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Hendriks, Patrick John; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frederic; Hensel, Carsten; Hens, Tobias; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higon-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hindson, Daniel; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Hollins, Ivan; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homer, Jim; Homma, Yasuhiro; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Goran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jez, Pavel; Jezequel, Stephane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Mark; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joo, Kwang; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Jorgensen, Sigrid; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Koneke, Karsten; Konig, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Konig, Stefan; Kopke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamaki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Krobath, Gernot; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramon; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambacher, Marion; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Celine; Lechowski, Matthieu; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lehto, Mark; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepidis, Johannes; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Lim, Heuijin; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Sterzo, Francesco Lo; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dorthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Bjorn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lynn, James; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maasen, Michael; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macek, Bostjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mattig, Peter; Mattig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amelia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandi{c, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, Jose; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Mangin-Brinet, Mariane; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Mann, Anthony; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mas, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGarvie, Scott; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McMahon, Tania; McMahon, Tom; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Merkl, Doris; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W.Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Migliaccio, Agostino; Mijovi{c, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuz, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Miscetti, Stefano; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitra, Ankush; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjornmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Monig, Klaus; Moser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Mock, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moye, Tamsin; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Muller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nasteva, Irina; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Nauyock, Farah; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neukermans, Lionel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nicholson, Caitriana; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozicka, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Odino, Gian Andrea; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver, Concepcion; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, Antonio; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ottewell, Brian; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Oye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Palmer, Matt; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Su-Jung; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pasztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peeters, Simon Jan Marie; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Cavalcanti, Tiago Perez; Perez Codina, Estel; Perez Garcia-Estan, Maria Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petereit, Emil; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, Joao Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommes, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Bueso, Xavier Portell; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Rohne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottlander, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Ruhr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, Jose; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Bjorn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, Joao; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schafer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schoning, Andre; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schreiner, Alexander; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schweiger, Dietmar; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, Jose; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, Jose; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sj{olin, J{orgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spano, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Stefanidis, Efstathios; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stodulski, Marek; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Strohmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sanchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Gary; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothee; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Viegas, Florbela De Jes Tique Aires; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jurgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokar, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torro Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocme, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Ferrer, Juan Antonio Valls; Van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; Van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Ventura, Silvia; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vertogardov, Leonid; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sebastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Anh, Tuan Vu; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C.; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Stephanie; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zdrazil, Marian; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Zenis, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zivkovi{c, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of luminosity obtained using the ATLAS detector during early running of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are presented. The luminosity is independently determined using several detectors and multiple algorithms, each having different acceptances, systematic uncertainties and sensitivity to background. The ratios of the luminosities obtained from these methods are monitored as a function of time and of mu, the average number of inelastic interactions per bunch crossing. Residual time- and mu-dependence between the methods is less than 2% for 0luminosity calibrations, performed using beam separation scans, have a common systematic uncertainty of +/-11, dominated by the measurement of the LHC beam currents. After calibration, the luminosities obtained from the different methods differ by at most +/-2%. The visible cross sections measured using the beam scans are compared to predictions obtained with the PYTHIA and PHOJET event generators and the ATLAS detect...

  13. Statistics of the Hubble diagram. I. Determination of q2 and luminosity evolution with application to quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A rank statistic version of the magnitude-redshift q 0 test is developed. It may be applied to the Hubble diagram of objects with an arbitrary and unknown luminosity function; in particular, the objects need not be ''standard candles.'' Only the single restriction that the objects' luminosity function does not vary in functional form is placed on the sources' intrinsic properties. Density and/or luminosity evolution are taken into account. Corrections for sample selection biases are incorporated into the analysis. Tests for the presence of luminosity evolution are given. Methods for determining either q 0 or the luminosity evolution when the other is a priori known are described.Application of these techniques to a sample of 119 3CR and 4C quasars leads to the following results: The radio Hubble diagram is consistent with all values of q 0 , suggesting that the quasar radio luminosity function is a featureless power law. The optical Hubble diagram indicates one of these possibilities: (1) the value of q 0 is in the range 2--32, probably near 5; (2) the value of q 0 is more reasonable and there is strong optical luminosity evolution [e.g., if q/sub o/ approx. = 0.05, then the characteristic optical luminosity scales like approx. (1 + Z)/sup 7/3/]; or (3) the data are a low-probability (< or =0.05) statistical fluctuation. The second interpretation is probably the most sensible one.Generalizations of the rank statistic magnitude-redshift test are suggested for application to a variety of extragalactic and stellar problems. Specific examples of applications to unorthodox cosmologies are given. Even for the unfavorable (very broad luminosity function) case of the optical quasar data, the rank statistic analysis is sensitive to relative variations in the distance-modulus-redshift relation as small as approx.0.4 mag for 1/2 < or = Z < or = 2

  14. Selected issues for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laface, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider started its operations on September 10. 2008. In a realistic forecast it is supposed to demonstrate (or confute) the existence of the Higgs boson for the year 2014. After this date the physics of rare events will be explored more in details and an upgrade of the luminosity can make an important difference in the program of experiments at CERN. This thesis proposes several ideas to increase the luminosity of ATLAS and CMS experiments and the acceptance of TOTEM experiment. The main object of study is the Interaction Region, that consists in the set of magnets in charge to provide the final beam focalization for the collisions. The Interaction Region is studied with the methods of beam optics and beam dynamics to design new layouts for the upgrade. These layouts are also explored from the point of view of integrability in the existing experiments developing the analysis of energy deposition and misalignment tolerances. This study was performed with the use of analytical methods for the general considerations and numerical methods for the parameters optimization. (author)

  15. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Benrong [Physics Teaching and Research section, College of Medical Technology, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 1166 Liutai Avenue, Chengdu (China); Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang, E-mail: mubenrong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pengw@scu.edu.cn, E-mail: hyanga@scu.edu.cn [Center for Theoretical Physics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, No. 24 South Section 1 Yihuan Road, Chengdu (China)

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ''Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ''Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E{sup 2} = m{sup 2}+p{sup 2}[1−η(E/m{sub p}){sup n}] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n ≥ 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  16. High luminosity polarized proton collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides the unique opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at a center-of-mass energy of up to 500 GeV and luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Such high luminosity and high energy polarized proton collisions will open up the possibility of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. After successful operation of RHIC with gold beams polarized protons from the AGS have been successfully injected into RHIC and accelerated using a full Siberian snakes built from four superconducting helical dipoles. A new high energy proton polarimeter was also successfully commissioned. Operation with two snakes per RHIC ring is planned for next year

  17. LHC Report: a break from luminosity production

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC has been in great shape over the last few months, delivering over 20 fb-1 of integrated luminosity before the ICHEP conference in Chicago at the beginning of August. This is not much below the 25 fb-1 target for the whole of 2016. With this success in mind, a break in luminosity production was taken for six days, starting on 26 July 2016, for a machine development period.   This year, 20 days of the LHC schedule are devoted to machine development with the aim of carrying out detailed studies of the accelerator. The 20 days are divided over five different periods, called MD blocks. They can be seen as an investment in the future, so the machine can produce collisions more efficiently in the months and years to come. A detailed programme is worked out for each MD block, whereby different specialist teams are assigned periods of four to twelve hours, depending on the topic, to perform their previously approved tests. The MD program continues 24 hours per day, as in normal physics operation. One...

  18. High Luminosity LHC: Challenges and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11–12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb 3 Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. As a result, the dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  19. Tracking Triggers for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The planned High Luminosity Phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will increase the collision rate in the ATLAS and CMS detectors by nearly an order of magnitude beyond the maximum luminosity for which the detectors have been designed. In that scenario, the number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing is expected to be about 140, on average. This very high pileup environment represents a major challenge for the L1 trigger of the experiments. The inclusion of the high granularity information coming from the Silicon Tracking detectors increases the performance of traditional triggers, based on Muon and Calorimeter information only. This poses new challenges in the design and integration of the novel inner tracking detectors in both ATLAS and CMS. On one hand, this is accomplished by modules capable of transverse momentum (p T ) discrimination, to only readout hits from relatively high p T particles. A second stage performs pattern recognition and tracking at the first level trigger in a few m s, then combined wi...

  20. The low-luminosity end of the radius-luminosity relationship for active galactic nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, M.C.; Denney, K.D.; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new...

  1. An estimator of the survival function based on the semi-Markov model under dependent censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yeoun; Tsai, Wei-Yann

    2005-06-01

    Lee and Wolfe (Biometrics vol. 54 pp. 1176-1178, 1998) proposed the two-stage sampling design for testing the assumption of independent censoring, which involves further follow-up of a subset of lost-to-follow-up censored subjects. They also proposed an adjusted estimator for the survivor function for a proportional hazards model under the dependent censoring model. In this paper, a new estimator for the survivor function is proposed for the semi-Markov model under the dependent censorship on the basis of the two-stage sampling data. The consistency and the asymptotic distribution of the proposed estimator are derived. The estimation procedure is illustrated with an example of lung cancer clinical trial and simulation results are reported of the mean squared errors of estimators under a proportional hazards and two different nonproportional hazards models.

  2. Current Status of Luminosity Measurement with the CMD-3 Detector at the VEPP-2000 e + e − Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhenenkov, A E; Amirkhanov, A N; Anisenkov, A V; Aulchenko, V M; Banzarov, V Sh; Bashtovoy, N S; Bondar, A E; Bragin, A V; Eidelman, S I; Epifanov, D A; Epshteyn, L B; Erofeev, A L; Fedotovich, G V; Gayazov, S E; Grebenuk, A A; Gribanov, S S; Grigoriev, D N; Ignatov, F V; Ivanov, V L; Karpov, S V; Kazanin, V F; Korobov, A A; Kovalenko, O A; Kozyrev, A N; Kozyrev, E A; Krokovny, P P; Kuzmenko, A E; Kuzmin, A S; Logashenko, I B; Lukin, P A; Mikhailov, K Yu; Okhapkin, V S; Pestov, Yu N; Popov, A S; Razuvaev, G P; Ruban, A A; Ryskulov, N M; Shebalin, V E; Shemyakin, D N; Shwartz, B A; Sibidanov, A L; Solodov, E P; Talyshev, A A; Titov, V M; Vorobiov, A I; Yudin, Yu V

    2017-01-01

    The CMD-3 detector has taken data at the electron-positron collider VEPP-2000 since december 2010. The collected data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb-6 in the c.m. energy range from 0.32 up to 2 GeV. Preliminary results of the luminosity measurement are presented for various energy ranges and its accuracy is estimated to be 1%.

  3. Using step and path selection functions for estimating resistance to movement: Pumas as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. Zeller; Kevin McGarigal; Samuel A. Cushman; Paul Beier; T. Winston Vickers; Walter M. Boyce

    2015-01-01

    GPS telemetry collars and their ability to acquire accurate and consistently frequent locations have increased the use of step selection functions (SSFs) and path selection functions (PathSFs) for studying animal movement and estimating resistance. However, previously published SSFs and PathSFs often do not accommodate multiple scales or multiscale modeling....

  4. Estimates of the integral modulus of continuity of functions with rarely changing Fourier coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telyakovskii, S A

    2002-01-01

    The functions under consideration are those satisfying the condition Δa i =Δb i =0 for all i≠n j , where {n j } is a lacunary sequence. An asymptotic estimate of the rate of decrease of the modulus of continuity in the L-metric of such functions in terms of their Fourier coefficients is obtained

  5. Nonparametric estimation of the stationary M/G/1 workload distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted

    2005-01-01

    In this paper it is demonstrated how a nonparametric estimator of the stationary workload distribution function of the M/G/1-queue can be obtained by systematic sampling the workload process. Weak convergence results and bootstrap methods for empirical distribution functions for stationary associ...

  6. LARF: Instrumental Variable Estimation of Causal Effects through Local Average Response Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua An

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available LARF is an R package that provides instrumental variable estimation of treatment effects when both the endogenous treatment and its instrument (i.e., the treatment inducement are binary. The method (Abadie 2003 involves two steps. First, pseudo-weights are constructed from the probability of receiving the treatment inducement. By default LARF estimates the probability by a probit regression. It also provides semiparametric power series estimation of the probability and allows users to employ other external methods to estimate the probability. Second, the pseudo-weights are used to estimate the local average response function conditional on treatment and covariates. LARF provides both least squares and maximum likelihood estimates of the conditional treatment effects.

  7. Nonparametric estimation of the stationary M/G/1 workload distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted

    In this paper it is demonstrated how a nonparametric estimator of the stationary workload distribution function of the M/G/1-queue can be obtained by systematic sampling the workload process. Weak convergence results and bootstrap methods for empirical distribution functions for stationary...... associated sequences are used to derive asymptotic results and bootstrap methods for inference about the workload distribution function. The potential of the method is illustrated by a simulation study of the M/D/1 model....

  8. LIGHT and LUMINOSITY, from Einstein to LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. ROSSI, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    After an introduction on the concept of light in physics, this talk will focus on CERN’s High Luminosity LHC project, aiming at extending the discovery potential of CERN’s flagship accelerator by increasing its “luminosity” (ie the number of particles that can be squeezed inside the accelerator to maximize the number of collisions). To achieve this objective, many new technologies are being developed at CERN and many collaborating institutes worldwide, especially in the field of superconductivity. Lucio Rossi, the main speaker, is the head of the HL-LHC project, based at CERN. Giorgio Apollinari, Director for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) will speak through a videoconference from Fermilab (USA). The event is webcast live and will be followed by Fermilab and other institutes in the USA.

  9. History of the sun's luminosity, 0 to 460,000 BP, based on the geologic record in light of recent climate theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viecelli, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A solar luminosity index extending 460,000 years into the past is computed from ocean surface temperatures derived from the geologic record. It is estimated that the sun's luminosity fluctuated between 2% above to 5% below the current value over this period. The index shows pulses occurring at intervals of 75,000 to 120,000 years

  10. Cost function tuning improves muscle force estimation computed by static optimization during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, V; Coscia, M; Micera, S

    2011-01-01

    Muscle force estimation while a dynamic motor task is carried out still presents open questions. In particular, concerning locomotion, although the inverse dynamic based static optimization has been widely accepted as a suitable method to obtain reliable results, appropriate modifications of the object function may improve results. This paper was aimed at analyzing the sensitivity of estimated muscle forces when modifications of the objective function are adopted to better fit EMG signals of healthy subjects. A 7 links and 9 degrees of freedom biomechanical model accounting for 14 lower limb muscles, grouped in 9 equivalent actuators, was developed. Muscle forces were estimated by using the inverse dynamic based static optimization in which the performance criteria was the sum of muscle stresses raised to a certain n power. This exponent was gradually changed (from 2 to 100) and the agreement between force patterns and EMG signals was estimated by both the correlation coefficient and the Coactivation Index. Results suggested that force estimation can be improved by slightly modifying the cost function. In particular, with respect to adopted data, when the exponent belong to the interval between 2.75 and 4, estimated forces better captured general features of EMG signals. Concluding, a more reliable solution can be obtained by suitably tuning the cost function in order to fit EMG signals.

  11. Diversity-interaction modeling: estimating contributions of species identities and interactions to ecosystem function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, L; Connolly, J; Finn, J A

    2009-01-01

    We develop a modeling framework that estimates the effects of species identity and diversity on ecosystem function and permits prediction of the diversity-function relationship across different types of community composition. Rather than just measure an overall effect of diversity, we separately...... estimate the contributions of different species interactions. This is especially important when both positive and negative interactions occur or where there are patterns in the interactions. Based on different biological assumptions, we can test for different patterns of interaction that correspond...... to the roles of evenness, functional groups, and functional redundancy. These more parsimonious descriptions can be especially useful in identifying general diversity-function relationships in communities with large numbers of species. We provide an example of the application of the modeling framework...

  12. Non-parametric Estimation of a Survival Function with Two-stage Design Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Tseng, Chi-Hong

    2008-06-01

    The two-stage design is popular in epidemiology studies and clinical trials due to its cost effectiveness. Typically, the first stage sample contains cheaper and possibly biased information, while the second stage validation sample consists of a subset of subjects with accurate and complete information. In this paper, we study estimation of a survival function with right-censored survival data from a two-stage design. A non-parametric estimator is derived by combining data from both stages. We also study its large sample properties and derive pointwise and simultaneous confidence intervals for the survival function. The proposed estimator effectively reduces the variance and finite-sample bias of the Kaplan-Meier estimator solely based on the second stage validation sample. Finally, we apply our method to a real data set from a medical device post-marketing surveillance study.

  13. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  14. Protogalaxy interactions in newly formed clusters: Galaxy luminosities, colors, and intergalactic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1978-01-01

    The role of protogalaxy interactions in galactic evolution is studied during the formation of galaxy clusters. In the early stages of the collapse, coalescent encounters of protogalaxies lead to the development of a galactic luminosity function. Once galaxies acquire appreciable random motions, mutual collisions between galaxies in rich clusters will trigger the collapse of interstellar clouds to form stars. This provides both a source for enriched intracluster gas and an interpretation of the correlation between luminosity and color for cluster elliptical galaxies. Other observational consequences that are considered include optical, X-ray, and diffuse nonthermal radio emission from newly formed clusters of galaxies

  15. Optimal replacement time estimation for machines and equipment based on cost function

    OpenAIRE

    J. Šebo; J. Buša; P. Demeč; J. Svetlík

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with a multidisciplinary issue of estimating the optimal replacement time for the machines. Considered categories of machines, for which the optimization method is usable, are of the metallurgical and engineering production. Different models of cost function are considered (both with one and two variables). Parameters of the models were calculated through the least squares method. Models testing show that all are good enough, so for estimation of optimal replacement time is ...

  16. The Abundance of Low-Luminosity Lyα Emitters at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Michael R.; Ellis, Richard S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Kuijken, Konrad

    2004-05-01

    We derive the luminosity function of high-redshift Lyα-emitting sources from a deep, blind, spectroscopic survey that utilized strong-lensing magnification by intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. We observed carefully selected regions near nine clusters, consistent with magnification factors generally greater than 10 for the redshift range 4.5account our varying intrinsic Lyα line sensitivity as a function of wavelength and sky position. By virtue of the strong magnification factor, we provide constraints on the Lyα luminosity function to unprecedented limits of 1040 ergs s -1, corresponding to a star formation rate of 0.01 Msolar yr-1. Our cumulative z~=5 Lyα luminosity function is consistent with a power-law form n(>L)~L-1 over 1041-1042.5 ergs s-1. When combined with the results of other surveys, limited at higher luminosities, our results suggest evidence for the suppression of star formation in low-mass halos, as predicted in popular models of galaxy formation. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Estimation of Nonlinear Functions of State Vector for Linear Systems with Time-Delays and Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Young Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on estimation of a nonlinear function of state vector (NFS in discrete-time linear systems with time-delays and model uncertainties. The NFS represents a multivariate nonlinear function of state variables, which can indicate useful information of a target system for control. The optimal nonlinear estimator of an NFS (in mean square sense represents a function of the receding horizon estimate and its error covariance. The proposed receding horizon filter represents the standard Kalman filter with time-delays and special initial horizon conditions described by the Lyapunov-like equations. In general case to calculate an optimal estimator of an NFS we propose using the unscented transformation. Important class of polynomial NFS is considered in detail. In the case of polynomial NFS an optimal estimator has a closed-form computational procedure. The subsequent application of the proposed receding horizon filter and nonlinear estimator to a linear stochastic system with time-delays and uncertainties demonstrates their effectiveness.

  18. A method of moments to estimate bivariate survival functions: the copula approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Angela Osmetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the problem on parametric and non parametric estimation of the distributions generated by the Marshall-Olkin copula. This copula comes from the Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribution used in reliability analysis. We generalize this model by the copula and different marginal distributions to construct several bivariate survival functions. The cumulative distribution functions are not absolutely continuous and they unknown parameters are often not be obtained in explicit form. In order to estimate the parameters we propose an easy procedure based on the moments. This method consist in two steps: in the first step we estimate only the parameters of marginal distributions and in the second step we estimate only the copula parameter. This procedure can be used to estimate the parameters of complex survival functions in which it is difficult to find an explicit expression of the mixed moments. Moreover it is preferred to the maximum likelihood one for its simplex mathematic form; in particular for distributions whose maximum likelihood parameters estimators can not be obtained in explicit form.

  19. Assessment of various parameters in the estimation of differential renal function using technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lythgoe, M.F.; Gordon, I.; Khader, Z.; Smith, T.; Anderson, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Differential renal function (DRF) is an important parameter that should be assessed from virtually every dynamic renogram. With the introduction of technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ( 99m Tc-MAG3), a tracer with a high renal extraction, the estimation of DRF might hopefully become accurate and reproducible both between observers in the same institution and also between institutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different parameters on the estimation of DRF. To this end we investigated two groups of children: group A, comprising 35 children with a single kidney (27 of whom had poor renal function), and group B, comprising 20 children with two kidneys and normal global function who also had an associated 99m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scan ( 99m Tc-DMSA). The variables assessed for their effect on the estimation of DRF were: different operators, the choice of renal regions of interest (ROIs), the applied background subtraction, and six different techniques for analysis of the renogram. The six techniques were based on: linear regression of the slopes in the Rutland-Patlak plot, matrix deconvolution, differential method, integral method, linear regression of the slope of the renograms, and the area under the curve of the renogram. The estimation of DRF was less dependent upon both observer and method in patients with two normally functioning kidneys than in patients with a single kidney. The inter-observer comparison among children in either group was not dependent on either ROI or background subtraction. However, in patients with poor renal function the method of choice for the estimation of DRF was dependent on background subtraction, though not ROI. In children with two kidneys and normal renal function, the estimation of DRF from the 24 techniques gave similar results. Methods that produced DRF values closest to expected results, from either group of children, were the Rutland-Patlak plot and matrix deconvolution methods. (orig.)

  20. The impact of temporal regularization on estimates of the BOLD hemodynamic response function: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Ramon; Ryali, Srikanth; Serences, John; Yang, Lucie; Kraft, Robert; Laurienti, Paul J; Maldjian, Joseph A

    2008-05-01

    In fMRI data analysis it has been shown that for a wide range of situations the hemodynamic response function (HRF) can be reasonably characterized as the impulse response function of a linear and time invariant system. An accurate and robust extraction of the HRF is essential to infer quantitative information about the relative timing of the neuronal events in different brain regions. When no assumptions are made about the HRF shape, it is most commonly estimated using time windowed averaging or a least squares estimated general linear model based on either Fourier or delta basis functions. Recently, regularization methods have been employed to increase the estimation efficiency of the HRF; typically these methods produce more accurate HRF estimates than the least squares approach [Goutte, C., Nielsen, F.A., Hansen, L.K., 2000. Modeling the Haemodynamic Response in fMRI Using Smooth FIR Filters. IEEE Trans. Med. Imag. 19(12), 1188-1201.]. Here, we use simulations to clarify the relative merit of temporal regularization based methods compared to the least squares methods with respect to the accuracy of estimating certain characteristics of the HRF such as time to peak (TTP), height (HR) and width (W) of the response. We implemented a Bayesian approach proposed by Marrelec et al. [Marrelec, G., Benali, H., Ciuciu, P., Pelegrini-Issac, M., Poline, J.-B., 2003. Robust Estimation of the Hemodynamic Response Function in Event-Related BOLD fMRI Using Basic Physiological Information. Hum. Brain Mapp. 19, 1-17., Marrelec, G., Benali, H., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B. Bayesian estimation of the hemodynamic of the hemodynamic response function in functional MRI. In: R. F, editor; 2001; Melville. p 229-247.] and its deterministic counterpart based on a combination of Tikhonov regularization [Tikhonov, A.N., Arsenin, V.Y., 1977. Solution of ill-posed problems. Washington DC: W.H. Winston.] and generalized cross-validation (GCV) [Wahba, G., 1990. Spline Models for Observational Data

  1. mBEEF-vdW: Robust fitting of error estimation density functionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgård, Keld Troen; Wellendorff, Jess; Voss, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general-purpose semilocal/nonlocal exchange-correlation functional approximation, named mBEEF-vdW. The exchange is a meta generalized gradient approximation, and the correlation is a semilocal and nonlocal mixture, with the Rutgers-Chalmers approximation for van der Waals (vdW) forces......, reducing the sensitivity to outliers in the datasets. To more reliably determine the optimal model complexity, we furthermore introduce a generalization of the bootstrap 0.632 estimator with hierarchical bootstrap sampling and geometric mean estimator over the training datasets. Using this estimator, we...

  2. A Functional Analysis Framework for Modeling, Estimation and Control in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, HT

    2012-01-01

    A Modern Framework Based on Time-Tested Material A Functional Analysis Framework for Modeling, Estimation and Control in Science and Engineering presents functional analysis as a tool for understanding and treating distributed parameter systems. Drawing on his extensive research and teaching from the past 20 years, the author explains how functional analysis can be the basis of modern partial differential equation (PDE) and delay differential equation (DDE) techniques. Recent Examples of Functional Analysis in Biology, Electromagnetics, Materials, and Mechanics Through numerous application exa

  3. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetized white dwarfs: suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Mukul; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Mukerjee, Subroto

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetized white dwarfs with electron-degenerate cores and non-degenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature increases whereas the interface radius decreases. For a given age of the white dwarf and for fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the luminosity decreases significantly from about 10-6 L⊙ to 10-9 L⊙ as the magnetic field strength increases from about 109 G to 1012 G at the interface and hence the envelope. This is remarkable because it argues that magnetized white dwarfs are fainter and can be practically hidden in an observed H-R diagram. We also find the cooling rates corresponding to these luminosities. Interestingly, the decrease in temperature with time, for the fields under consideration, is not found to be appreciable.

  4. Estimation and Application of Ecological Memory Functions in Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itter, M.; Finley, A. O.; Dawson, A.

    2017-12-01

    A common goal in quantitative ecology is the estimation or prediction of ecological processes as a function of explanatory variables (or covariates). Frequently, the ecological process of interest and associated covariates vary in time, space, or both. Theory indicates many ecological processes exhibit memory to local, past conditions. Despite such theoretical understanding, few methods exist to integrate observations from the recent past or within a local neighborhood as drivers of these processes. We build upon recent methodological advances in ecology and spatial statistics to develop a Bayesian hierarchical framework to estimate so-called ecological memory functions; that is, weight-generating functions that specify the relative importance of local, past covariate observations to ecological processes. Memory functions are estimated using a set of basis functions in time and/or space, allowing for flexible ecological memory based on a reduced set of parameters. Ecological memory functions are entirely data driven under the Bayesian hierarchical framework—no a priori assumptions are made regarding functional forms. Memory function uncertainty follows directly from posterior distributions for model parameters allowing for tractable propagation of error to predictions of ecological processes. We apply the model framework to simulated spatio-temporal datasets generated using memory functions of varying complexity. The framework is also applied to estimate the ecological memory of annual boreal forest growth to local, past water availability. Consistent with ecological understanding of boreal forest growth dynamics, memory to past water availability peaks in the year previous to growth and slowly decays to zero in five to eight years. The Bayesian hierarchical framework has applicability to a broad range of ecosystems and processes allowing for increased understanding of ecosystem responses to local and past conditions and improved prediction of ecological

  5. On the similarity of functional connectivity between neurons estimated across timescales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian H Stevenson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A central objective in neuroscience is to understand how neurons interact. Such functional interactions have been estimated using signals recorded with different techniques and, consequently, different temporal resolutions. For example, spike data often have sub-millisecond resolution while some imaging techniques may have a resolution of many seconds. Here we use multi-electrode spike recordings to ask how similar functional connectivity inferred from slower timescale signals is to the one inferred from fast timescale signals. We find that functional connectivity is relatively robust to low-pass filtering--dropping by about 10% when low pass filtering at 10 hz and about 50% when low pass filtering down to about 1 Hz--and that estimates are robust to high levels of additive noise. Moreover, there is a weak correlation for physiological filters such as hemodynamic or Ca2+ impulse responses and filters based on local field potentials. We address the origin of these correlations using simulation techniques and find evidence that the similarity between functional connectivity estimated across timescales is due to processes that do not depend on fast pair-wise interactions alone. Rather, it appears that connectivity on multiple timescales or common-input related to stimuli or movement drives the observed correlations. Despite this qualification, our results suggest that techniques with intermediate temporal resolution may yield good estimates of the functional connections between individual neurons.

  6. Estimation of parameters of constant elasticity of substitution production functional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaboob, B.; Venkateswarlu, B.; Sankar, J. Ravi

    2017-11-01

    Nonlinear model building has become an increasing important powerful tool in mathematical economics. In recent years the popularity of applications of nonlinear models has dramatically been rising up. Several researchers in econometrics are very often interested in the inferential aspects of nonlinear regression models [6]. The present research study gives a distinct method of estimation of more complicated and highly nonlinear model viz Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) production functional model. Henningen et.al [5] proposed three solutions to avoid serious problems when estimating CES functions in 2012 and they are i) removing discontinuities by using the limits of the CES function and its derivative. ii) Circumventing large rounding errors by local linear approximations iii) Handling ill-behaved objective functions by a multi-dimensional grid search. Joel Chongeh et.al [7] discussed the estimation of the impact of capital and labour inputs to the gris output agri-food products using constant elasticity of substitution production function in Tanzanian context. Pol Antras [8] presented new estimates of the elasticity of substitution between capital and labour using data from the private sector of the U.S. economy for the period 1948-1998.

  7. Time variation of the electromagnetic transfer function of the earth estimated by using wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Noriko; Harada, Makoto; Izutsu, Jun; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2006-07-01

    In order to accurately estimate the geomagnetic transfer functions in the area of the volcano Mt. Iwate (IWT), we applied the interstation transfer function (ISTF) method to the three-component geomagnetic field data observed at Mt. Iwate station (IWT), using the Kakioka Magnetic Observatory, JMA (KAK) as remote reference station. Instead of the conventional Fourier transform, in which temporary transient noises badly degrade the accuracy of long term properties, continuous wavelet transform has been used. The accuracy of the results was as high as that of robust estimations of transfer functions obtained by the Fourier transform method. This would provide us with possibilities for routinely monitoring the transfer functions, without sophisticated statistical procedures, to detect changes in the underground electrical conductivity structure.

  8. Detector Performance and Upgrade Plans of the Pixel Luminosity Telescope for Online per-Bunch Luminosity Measurement at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a dedicated system for luminosity measurement at the CMS experiment using silicon pixel sensors. It was installed during LS1 and has been providing luminosity measurements throughout Run 2. The online bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement employs the "fast-or" capability of the pixel readout chip (PSI46) to quickly identify likely tracks at the full 40MHz interaction rate. In addition, the full pixel information is read out at a lower rate, allowing for more detailed offline analysis. In this talk, we will present details of the commissioning, performance and operational history of the currently installed hardware and upgrade plans for LS2.

  9. Estimates for the mixed derivatives of the Green functions on homogeneous manifolds of negative curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Urban

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Green functions for second-order left-invariant differential operators on homogeneous manifolds of negative curvature, being a semi-direct product of a nilpotent Lie group $N$ and $A=mathbb{R}^+$. We obtain estimates for mixed derivatives of the Green functions both in the coercive and non-coercive case. The current paper completes the previous results obtained by the author in a series of papers [14,15,16,19].

  10. Intrinsic luminosities of the Jovian planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    We review available data and theories on the size and nature of interior power sources in the Jovian planets. Broad band infrared measurements indicate that Jupiter and Saturn have interior heat fluxes about 150 and 50 times larger, respectively, than the terrestrial value. While Neptune has a modest heat flux (approx.5 times terrestrial), it is clearly detected by earth-based measurements. Only Uranus seems to lack a detectable interior heat flow. Various models, ranging from simple cooling to gravitational layering to radioactivity, are discussed. Current evidence seems to favor a cooling model in which the escape of heat is regulated by the atmosphere. This model seems capable of explaining phenomena such as the uniformity of effective temperature over Jupiter's surface and the different emission rates of Uranus and Neptune. In such a model the heat radiated from the atmosphere may derived from depletion of a thermal reservoir in the interior, or it may derive from separation of chemical elements during formation of a core. Calculations indicate that in the earlier stages of cooling, Jupiter and Saturn may have more homogeneous abundances of hydrogen and helium and radiate energy derived from simple cooling. At a subsequent phase (which may be later than the present time), hydrogen and helium will separate and supply grativational energy. Either model is consistent with a hot, high-luminosity origin for the Jovian Planets

  11. ATLAS gets its own luminosity detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    During the winter shutdown, the ATLAS collaboration has completed the installation of ALFA, the detector system that aims at the LHC absolute luminosity at Point 1 analysing the elastic scattering of protons at small angles.   Upper and lower ALFA Roman Pots as installed in sector 8-1 of the LHC tunnel, 240 metres from the ATLAS Interaction Point. The detectors of the ALFA system are installed at ± 240 meters from the interaction point 1, on either side of the ATLAS detector. The whole system consists of four stations, two on each side of the interaction point. Each station is equipped with two Roman Pots; each pot – that is separated from the vacuum of the accelerator by a thin window but is connected with bellows to the beam-pipe – can be moved very close to the beam. “The Roman Pot technique has been used successfully in the past for the measurement of elastic scattering very close to the circulating beam,” says Patrick Fassn...

  12. Higher luminosities via alternative incident channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1985-04-01

    We show that PEP provides some unique opportunities for one and two photon physics with real photons as well as for QCD studies with internal targets. Photon beams would avoid the major limitation on the luminosity of present machines and could provide PEP an ideal b-physics factory producing the full range of J/sub c//sup PC/ and J/sub b//sup PC/ states that may not be observable otherwise as well as allow a whole new class of ''missing-mass'' experiments. These latter particles are the pseudo-Goldstone bosons and their supersymmetric counterparts. These and related possibilities like a single-pass, ''free electron laser'' facility or even synchrotron radiation beam lines all favor a mini-maxi configuration for the low-beta insertions in PEP. This allows more diverse experiments without excluding any ongoing experimental programs. Such possibilities have interesting implications for a number of proposed facilities including the SSC. Some systematic machine physics studies over a range of energies are suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs

  13. Entropy Estimation of Disaggregate Production Functions: An Application to Northern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Howitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a robust maximum entropy approach to estimating flexible-form farm-level multi-input/multi-output production functions using minimally specified disaggregated data. Since our goal is to address policy questions, we emphasize the model’s ability to reproduce characteristics of the existing production system and predict outcomes of policy changes at a disaggregate level. Measurement of distributional impacts of policy changes requires use of farm-level models estimated across a wide spectrum of sizes and types, which is often difficult with traditional econometric methods due to data limitations. We use a two-stage approach to generate observation-specific shadow values for incompletely priced inputs. We then use the shadow values and nominal input prices to estimate crop-specific production functions using generalized maximum entropy (GME to capture individual heterogeneity of the production environment while replicating observed inputs and outputs to production. The two-stage GME approach can be implemented with small data sets. We demonstrate this methodology in an empirical application to a small cross-section data set for Northern Rio Bravo, Mexico and estimate production functions for small family farms and moderate commercial farms. The estimates show considerable distributional differences resulting from policies that change water subsidies in the region or shift price supports to direct payments.

  14. Modulating Function-Based Method for Parameter and Source Estimation of Partial Differential Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-10-08

    Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are commonly used to model complex systems that arise for example in biology, engineering, chemistry, and elsewhere. The parameters (or coefficients) and the source of PDE models are often unknown and are estimated from available measurements. Despite its importance, solving the estimation problem is mathematically and numerically challenging and especially when the measurements are corrupted by noise, which is often the case. Various methods have been proposed to solve estimation problems in PDEs which can be classified into optimization methods and recursive methods. The optimization methods are usually heavy computationally, especially when the number of unknowns is large. In addition, they are sensitive to the initial guess and stop condition, and they suffer from the lack of robustness to noise. Recursive methods, such as observer-based approaches, are limited by their dependence on some structural properties such as observability and identifiability which might be lost when approximating the PDE numerically. Moreover, most of these methods provide asymptotic estimates which might not be useful for control applications for example. An alternative non-asymptotic approach with less computational burden has been proposed in engineering fields based on the so-called modulating functions. In this dissertation, we propose to mathematically and numerically analyze the modulating functions based approaches. We also propose to extend these approaches to different situations. The contributions of this thesis are as follows. (i) Provide a mathematical analysis of the modulating function-based method (MFBM) which includes: its well-posedness, statistical properties, and estimation errors. (ii) Provide a numerical analysis of the MFBM through some estimation problems, and study the sensitivity of the method to the modulating functions\\' parameters. (iii) Propose an effective algorithm for selecting the method\\'s design parameters

  15. A canonical process for estimation of convex functions : The "invelope" of integrated Brownian motion +t4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboom, P.; Jongbloed, G.; Wellner, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    A process associated with integrated Brownian motion is introduced that characterizes the limit behavior of nonparametric least squares and maximum likelihood estimators of convex functions and convex densities, respectively. We call this process “the invelope” and show that it is an almost surely

  16. Econometric estimation of the “Constant Elasticity of Substitution" function in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Arne; Henningsen, Geraldine

    The Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) function is popular in several areas of economics, but it is rarely used in econometric analysis because it cannot be estimated by standard linear regression techniques. We discuss several existing approaches and propose a new grid-search approach...

  17. Clinical use of estimated glomerular filtration rate for evaluation of kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Bo; Lindhardt, Morten; Rossing, Peter

    2013-01-01

    is a significant predictor for cardiovascular disease and may along with classical cardiovascular risk factors add useful information to risk estimation. Several cautions need to be taken into account, e.g. rapid changes in kidney function, dialysis, high age, obesity, underweight and diverging and unanticipated...

  18. Estimation of Climate Change Damage Functions for 140 Regions in the GTAP9 Database

    OpenAIRE

    Roson, Roberto; Sartori, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Climate change damage (or, more correctly, impact) functions relate variations in temperature (or other climate variables) to economic impacts in various dimensions, and are at the basis of quantitative modeling exercises for the assessment of climate change policies. This document provides a summary of results from a series of meta-analyses aimed at estimating parameters for six specific ...

  19. Nonparametric Estimation of Cumulative Incidence Functions for Competing Risks Data with Missing Cause of Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Effraimidis, Georgios; Dahl, Christian Møller

    In this paper, we develop a fully nonparametric approach for the estimation of the cumulative incidence function with Missing At Random right-censored competing risks data. We obtain results on the pointwise asymptotic normality as well as the uniform convergence rate of the proposed nonparametri...

  20. Status report on cross-organizational functional size measurement and cost estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia; Abran, A.; Bundschuh, M.; Dumke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement is a fundamental part of any managed activity and functional size of software is the core to successful management of any software work of any magnitude [10,12,15,16]. It is crucial for estimating project team efforts and normalizing quality attributes such as defect rates, defect

  1. Survival estimation through the cumulative hazard function with monotone natural cubic splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Leonidas E; Tsimikas, John V; Georgiou, Stelios D

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we explore the estimation of survival probabilities via a smoothed version of the survival function, in the presence of censoring. We investigate the fit of a natural cubic spline on the cumulative hazard function under appropriate constraints. Under the proposed technique the problem reduces to a restricted least squares one, leading to convex optimization. The approach taken in this paper is evaluated and compared via simulations to other known methods such as the Kaplan Meier and the logspline estimator. Our approach is easily extended to address estimation of survival probabilities in the presence of covariates when the proportional hazards model assumption holds. In this case the method is compared to a restricted cubic spline approach that involves maximum likelihood. The proposed approach can be also adjusted to accommodate left censoring.

  2. Drug Dosing and Estimated Renal Function-Any Step Forward from Effersoe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    . Despite serious limitations, there has also been a tendency to use estimated GFR (eGFR) as a "hard" clinical endpoint in clinical studies. This has increased the risk of misinterpretation and has led to conclusions that are not necessarily supported by data. Finally, new methods of testing drug toxicity......Drug dosing in accordance with the renal function is a long-standing challenge to clinicians. For many years it has been evident that in many clinical situations there is no easy way to correctly dose any drug that is mainly cleared by the kidneys. Despite the development of many formulas...... for estimating the glomerular filtration rate, they all have serious shortcomings. Much effort has been put in to develop estimation formulas to evaluate the renal function as an alternative to direct methods with the aim of safely dosing drugs that are mainly cleared by the kidneys. Both creatinine- A nd...

  3. High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) general infographics

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to be operational after 2025, will increase the LHC’s luminosity by a factor of 10. To achieve this major upgrade, several technologies, some of which are completely innovative, are being developed.

  4. A modified weighted function method for parameter estimation of Pearson type three distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongmin; Hu, Yiming; Li, Binquan; Yu, Zhongbo

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, an unconventional method called Modified Weighted Function (MWF) is presented for the conventional moment estimation of a probability distribution function. The aim of MWF is to estimate the coefficient of variation (CV) and coefficient of skewness (CS) from the original higher moment computations to the first-order moment calculations. The estimators for CV and CS of Pearson type three distribution function (PE3) were derived by weighting the moments of the distribution with two weight functions, which were constructed by combining two negative exponential-type functions. The selection of these weight functions was based on two considerations: (1) to relate weight functions to sample size in order to reflect the relationship between the quantity of sample information and the role of weight function and (2) to allocate more weights to data close to medium-tail positions in a sample series ranked in an ascending order. A Monte-Carlo experiment was conducted to simulate a large number of samples upon which statistical properties of MWF were investigated. For the PE3 parent distribution, results of MWF were compared to those of the original Weighted Function (WF) and Linear Moments (L-M). The results indicate that MWF was superior to WF and slightly better than L-M, in terms of statistical unbiasness and effectiveness. In addition, the robustness of MWF, WF, and L-M were compared by designing the Monte-Carlo experiment that samples are obtained from Log-Pearson type three distribution (LPE3), three parameter Log-Normal distribution (LN3), and Generalized Extreme Value distribution (GEV), respectively, but all used as samples from the PE3 distribution. The results show that in terms of statistical unbiasness, no one method possesses the absolutely overwhelming advantage among MWF, WF, and L-M, while in terms of statistical effectiveness, the MWF is superior to WF and L-M.

  5. A bias-corrected covariance estimate for improved inference with quadratic inference functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M

    2012-12-20

    The method of quadratic inference functions (QIF) is an increasingly popular method for the analysis of correlated data because of its multiple advantages over generalized estimating equations (GEE). One advantage is that it is more efficient for parameter estimation when the working covariance structure for the data is misspecified. In the QIF literature, the asymptotic covariance formula is used to obtain standard errors. We show that in small to moderately sized samples, these standard error estimates can be severely biased downward, therefore inflating test size and decreasing coverage probability. We propose adjustments to the asymptotic covariance formula that eliminate finite-sample biases and, as shown via simulation, lead to substantial improvements in standard error estimates, inference, and coverage. The proposed method is illustrated in application to a cluster randomized trial and a longitudinal study. Furthermore, QIF and GEE are contrasted via simulation and these applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Point and interval estimates of percentile ranks for scores on the Texas Functional Living Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John R; Cullum, C Munro; Garthwaite, Paul H; Lycett, Emma; Allsopp, Kate J

    2012-01-01

    Point and interval estimates of percentile ranks are useful tools in assisting with the interpretation of neurocognitive test results. We provide percentile ranks for raw subscale scores on the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS; Cullum, Weiner, & Saine, 2009) using the TFLS standardization sample data (N = 800). Percentile ranks with interval estimates are also provided for the overall TFLS T score. Conversion tables are provided along with the option of obtaining the point and interval estimates using a computer program written to accompany this paper (TFLS_PRs.exe). The percentile ranks for the subscales offer an alternative to using the cumulative percentage tables in the test manual and provide a useful and quick way for neuropsychologists to assimilate information on the case's profile of scores on the TFLS subscales. The provision of interval estimates for the percentile ranks is in keeping with the contemporary emphasis on the use of confidence intervals in psychological statistics.

  7. Modulating functions method for parameters estimation in the fifth order KdV equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-07-25

    In this work, the modulating functions method is proposed for estimating coefficients in higher-order nonlinear partial differential equation which is the fifth order Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The proposed method transforms the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations of the unknowns. The statistical properties of the modulating functions solution are described in this paper. In addition, guidelines for choosing the number of modulating functions, which is an important design parameter, are provided. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are shown through numerical simulations in both noise-free and noisy cases.

  8. Symbolic Regression for the Estimation of Transfer Functions of Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, D.; Herrnegger, M.; Schulz, K.

    2017-11-01

    Current concepts for parameter regionalization of spatially distributed rainfall-runoff models rely on the a priori definition of transfer functions that globally map land surface characteristics (such as soil texture, land use, and digital elevation) into the model parameter space. However, these transfer functions are often chosen ad hoc or derived from small-scale experiments. This study proposes and tests an approach for inferring the structure and parametrization of possible transfer functions from runoff data to potentially circumvent these difficulties. The concept uses context-free grammars to generate possible proposition for transfer functions. The resulting structure can then be parametrized with classical optimization techniques. Several virtual experiments are performed to examine the potential for an appropriate estimation of transfer function, all of them using a very simple conceptual rainfall-runoff model with data from the Austrian Mur catchment. The results suggest that a priori defined transfer functions are in general well identifiable by the method. However, the deduction process might be inhibited, e.g., by noise in the runoff observation data, often leading to transfer function estimates of lower structural complexity.

  9. Impacts of Luminosity in the Cab at Night on the Dynamic Distance of Visual Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Suddenly encountering light sources at night will reduce drivers' dynamic distance of visual cognition. In order to investigate the law of quantitative changes of the visual recognition distance under the conditions of different speeds and different environmental luminosity around drivers, calibration experiments were conducted on an actual road. And on the basis of the data set from the experiments, using the method of curved surface regression analysis, the function models describing the rule of the visual recognition distance changing with the environmental luminosity around drivers and running speeds were established. The models were effective via statistical tests. Furthermore, combined with the automobile braking distance, the reaction time allowed for drivers and the critical speeds were analyzed then. Verification tests were also designed to test the established function model. Results showed that as the environmental luminosity around drivers increases, vision recognition distance decreases; as vehicle speed increases, vision recognition distance decreases. Therefore, the sudden showing-up light sources will affect the environmental luminosity in the cab and lead to the reduction in the visual recognition distance as well as the reaction time for drivers. In this circumstance, drivers must control the speed lower than the critical speed to avoid collision.

  10. The evolution of low-luminosity AGN and X-ray binaries in star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Civano, Francesca M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Elvis, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Numerous studies on the connection between X-ray AGN and their host galaxies are building up a detailed picture of the physical mechanisms regulating AGN activity and star formation as a function of redshift. Most of these works have focused on moderate and high-luminosity AGN with LX > 10^42 erg/s, and only recently the lower-luminosity AGN population in dwarf and early-type galaxies was investigated using stacking techniques. In this talk, we present the redshift evolution of low-luminosity AGN (LX seeds models, and are important for informing future mission studies. We compare our results to other studies of the redshift evolution of XRBs and the observed evolution of higher luminosity AGN.

  11. Estimation of the Low-End Mass Function of the Arches Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that the nonstandard star formation environment near the Galactic Center (GC) may lead to an initial mass function (IMF) skewed toward relatively massive stars and having an elevated mass cutoff. Two GC star clusters, the Arches and the Quintuplet, may give an answer to this hypothesis, but the most recent high-resolution IR, observations for these clusters can only resolve stars with masses down to ∼5M o-dot . Here, we present a new method for estimating the low-end mass function (MF) from a background-limited observation of a star cluster. We empirically find the mass function that gives the best match between the pixel intensity histograms of the observed image and the model image that is constructed for an assumed mass function. This method also employs Fokker-Planck (FP) models to reproduce the spatial distribution of stars as a function of mass

  12. Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubowski, Ruben N.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Stavins, Robert N.

    2001-01-01

    Increased attention by policy makers to the threat of global climate change has brought with it considerable interest in the possibility of encouraging the expansion of forest area as a means of sequestering carbon dioxide. The marginal costs of carbon sequestration or, equivalently, the carbon sequestration supply function will determine the ultimate effects and desirability of policies aimed at enhancing carbon uptake. In particular, marginal sequestration conts are the critical statistic for identifying a cost-effective policy mix to mitigate net carbon dioxide emissions. We develop a framework for conducting an econometric analysis of land use for the forty-eight contiguous United States and employing it to estimate the carbon sequestration supply function. By estimating the opportunity costs of land on the basis of econometric evidence of landowners' actual behavior, we aim to circumvent many of the shortcomings of previous sequestration cost assessments. By conducting the first nationwide econometric estimation of sequestration costs, endogenizing prices for land-based commodities, and estimating land-use transition probabilities in a framework that explicitly considers the range of land-use alternatives, we hope to provide better estimates eventually of the true costs of large-scale carbon sequestration efforts. In this way, we seek to add to understanding of the costs and potential of this strategy for addressing the threat of global climate change

  13. Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubowski, Ruben N.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Stavins, Robert N.

    2001-01-01

    Increased attention by policy makers to the threat of global climate change has brought with it considerable interest in the possibility of encouraging the expansion of forest area as a means of sequestering carbon dioxide. The marginal costs of carbon sequestration or, equivalently, the carbon sequestration supply function will determine the ultimate effects and desirability of policies aimed at enhancing carbon uptake. In particular, marginal sequestration costs are the critical statistic for identifying a cost-effective policy mix to mitigate net carbon dioxide emissions. We develop a framework for conducting an econometric analysis of land use for the forty-eight contiguous United States and employing it to estimate the carbon sequestration supply function. By estimating the opportunity costs of land on the basis of econometric evidence of landowners' actual behavior, we aim to circumvent many of the shortcomings of previous sequestration cost assessments. By conducting the first nationwide econometric estimation of sequestration costs, endogenizing prices for land-based commodities, and estimating land-use transition probabilities in a framework that explicitly considers the range of land-use alternatives, we hope to provide better estimates eventually of the true costs of large-scale carbon sequestration efforts. In this way, we seek to add to understanding of the costs and potential of this strategy for addressing the threat of global climate change.

  14. Comparison of Two New Robust Parameter Estimation Methods for the Power Function Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Haq, Muhammad Ahsan Ul; Hussain, Ijaz; Abdulhamid, Alaa Mohamd; Faisal, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of any probability distribution parameters is vital because imprecise and biased estimates can be misleading. In this study, we investigate a flexible power function distribution and introduced new two methods such as, probability weighted moments, and generalized probability weighted methods for its parameters. We compare their results with L-moments, trimmed L-moments by a simulation study and a real data example based on performance measures such as, mean square error and total deviation. We concluded that all the methods perform well in the case of large sample size (n>30), however, the generalized probability weighted moment method performs better for small sample size.

  15. Comparison of Two New Robust Parameter Estimation Methods for the Power Function Distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shakeel

    Full Text Available Estimation of any probability distribution parameters is vital because imprecise and biased estimates can be misleading. In this study, we investigate a flexible power function distribution and introduced new two methods such as, probability weighted moments, and generalized probability weighted methods for its parameters. We compare their results with L-moments, trimmed L-moments by a simulation study and a real data example based on performance measures such as, mean square error and total deviation. We concluded that all the methods perform well in the case of large sample size (n>30, however, the generalized probability weighted moment method performs better for small sample size.

  16. Parameterizing Dose-Response Models to Estimate Relative Potency Functions Directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinse, Gregg E.

    2012-01-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals’ dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology. PMID:22700543

  17. Two-point correlation functions to characterize microgeometry and estimate permeabilities of synthetic and natural sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed an image-processing method for characterizing the microstructure of rock and other porous materials, and for providing a quantitative means for understanding the dependence of physical properties on the pore structure. This method is based upon the statistical properties of the microgeometry as observed in scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images of cross sections of porous materials. The method utilizes a simple statistical function, called the spatial correlation function, which can be used to predict bounds on permeability and other physical properties. We obtain estimates of the porosity and specific surface area of the material from the two-point correlation function. The specific surface area can be related to the permeability of porous materials using a Kozeny-Carman relation, and we show that the specific surface area measured on images of sandstones is consistent with the specific surface area used in a simple flow model for computation of permeability. In this paper, we discuss the two-point spatial correlation function and its use in characterizing microstructure features such as pore and grain sizes. We present estimates of permeabilities found using SEM images of several different synthetic and natural sandstones. Comparison of the estimates to laboratory measurements shows good agreement. Finally, we briefly discuss extension of this technique to two-phase flow.

  18. The effect of cluster size imbalance and covariates on the estimation performance of quadratic inference functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M; Braun, Thomas M

    2012-09-10

    Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are commonly used for the analysis of correlated data. However, use of quadratic inference functions (QIFs) is becoming popular because it increases efficiency relative to GEE when the working covariance structure is misspecified. Although shown to be advantageous in the literature, the impacts of covariates and imbalanced cluster sizes on the estimation performance of the QIF method in finite samples have not been studied. This cluster size variation causes QIF's estimating equations and GEE to be in separate classes when an exchangeable correlation structure is implemented, causing QIF and GEE to be incomparable in terms of efficiency. When utilizing this structure and the number of clusters is not large, we discuss how covariates and cluster size imbalance can cause QIF, rather than GEE, to produce estimates with the larger variability. This occurrence is mainly due to the empirical nature of weighting QIF employs, rather than differences in estimating equations classes. We demonstrate QIF's lost estimation precision through simulation studies covering a variety of general cluster randomized trial scenarios and compare QIF and GEE in the analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A functional framework for flow-duration-curve and daily streamflow estimation at ungauged sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Ana I.; Chebana, Fateh; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2018-03-01

    Flow duration curves (FDC) are used to obtain daily streamflow series at ungauged sites. In this study, functional multiple regression (FMR) is proposed for FDC estimation. Its natural framework for dealing with curves allows obtaining the FDC as a whole instead of a limited number of single points. FMR assessment is performed through a case study in Quebec, Canada. FMR provides a better mean FDC estimation when obtained over sites by considering simultaneously all FDC quantiles in the assessment of each given site. However, traditional regression provides a better mean FDC estimation when obtained over given FDC quantiles by considering all sites in the assessment of each quantile separately. Mean daily streamflow estimation is similar; yet FMR provides an improved estimation for most sites. Furthermore, FMR represents a more suitable framework and provides a number of practical advantages, such as insight into descriptor influence on FDC quantiles. Hence, traditional regression may be preferred if only few FDC quantiles are of interest; whereas FMR would be more suitable if a large number of FDC quantiles is of interest, and therefore to estimate daily streamflows.

  20. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  1. Estimating the residential demand function for natural gas in Seoul with correction for sample selection bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Hea-Jin; Kwak, Seung-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, the consumption of natural gas in Korea has increased dramatically. This increase has mainly resulted from the rise of consumption in the residential sector. The main objective of the study is to estimate households' demand function for natural gas by applying a sample selection model using data from a survey of households in Seoul. The results show that there exists a selection bias in the sample and that failure to correct for sample selection bias distorts the mean estimate, of the demand for natural gas, downward by 48.1%. In addition, according to the estimation results, the size of the house, the dummy variable for dwelling in an apartment, the dummy variable for having a bed in an inner room, and the household's income all have positive relationships with the demand for natural gas. On the other hand, the size of the family and the price of gas negatively contribute to the demand for natural gas. (author)

  2. Bayesian Estimation Of Shift Point In Poisson Model Under Asymmetric Loss Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    uma srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with estimating  shift point which occurs in any sequence of independent observations  of Poisson model in statistical process control. This shift point occurs in the sequence when  i.e. m  life data are observed. The Bayes estimator on shift point 'm' and before and after shift process means are derived for symmetric and asymmetric loss functions under informative and non informative priors. The sensitivity analysis of Bayes estimators are carried out by simulation and numerical comparisons with  R-programming. The results shows the effectiveness of shift in sequence of Poisson disribution .

  3. Bayesian estimation of dynamic matching function for U-V analysis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyo, Koki; Noda, Hideo; Kitagawa, Genshiro

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we propose a Bayesian method for analyzing unemployment dynamics. We derive a Beveridge curve for unemployment and vacancy (U-V) analysis from a Bayesian model based on a labor market matching function. In our framework, the efficiency of matching and the elasticities of new hiring with respect to unemployment and vacancy are regarded as time varying parameters. To construct a flexible model and obtain reasonable estimates in an underdetermined estimation problem, we treat the time varying parameters as random variables and introduce smoothness priors. The model is then described in a state space representation, enabling the parameter estimation to be carried out using Kalman filter and fixed interval smoothing. In such a representation, dynamic features of the cyclic unemployment rate and the structural-frictional unemployment rate can be accurately captured.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF MAMMARY GLAND TISSUE USING JOINT ESTIMATORS OF MINKOWSKI FUNCTIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Mattfeldt

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical approach to estimate the Minkowski functionals, i.e., area fraction, specifc boundary length and specifc Euler number in 2D, and their asymptotic covariance matrix proposed by Spodarev and Schmidt (2005 and Pantle et al. (2006a;b is applied to real image data. These two-dimensional images show mammary gland tissue and should be classifed automatically as tumor-free or mammary cancer, respectively. The estimation procedure is illustrated step-by-step and the calculations are described in detail. To reduce dependencies from chosen parameters, a least-squares approach is considered as recommended by Klenk et al. (2006. Emphasis is placed on the detailed description of the estimation procedure and the application of the theory to real image data.

  5. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  6. Estimation of Multiple Point Sources for Linear Fractional Order Systems Using Modulating Functions

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor

    2017-06-28

    This paper proposes an estimation algorithm for the characterization of multiple point inputs for linear fractional order systems. First, using polynomial modulating functions method and a suitable change of variables the problem of estimating the locations and the amplitudes of a multi-pointwise input is decoupled into two algebraic systems of equations. The first system is nonlinear and solves for the time locations iteratively, whereas the second system is linear and solves for the input’s amplitudes. Second, closed form formulas for both the time location and the amplitude are provided in the particular case of single point input. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the proposed technique in both noise-free and noisy cases. The joint estimation of pointwise input and fractional differentiation orders is also presented. Furthermore, a discussion on the performance of the proposed algorithm is provided.

  7. Constrained robust estimation of magnetotelluric impedance functions based on a bounded-influence regression M-estimator and the Hilbert transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sutarno

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Robust impedance estimation procedures are now in standard use in magnetotelluric (MT measurements and research. These always yield impedance estimates which are better than the conventional least square (LS estimation because the 'real' MT data almost never satisfy the statistical assumptions of Gaussian distribution upon which normal spectral analysis is based. The robust estimation procedures are commonly based on M-estimators that have the ability to reduce the influence of unusual data (outliers in the response (electric field variables, but are often not sensitive to exceptional predictors (magnetic field data, which are termed leverage points.

    This paper proposes an alternative procedure for making reliably robust estimates of MT impedance functions, which simultaneously provide protection from the influence of outliers in both response and input variables. The means for accomplishing this is based on the bounded-influence regression M-estimation and the Hilbert Transform operating on the causal MT impedance functions. In the resulting regression estimates, outlier contamination is removed and the self consistency between the real and imaginary parts of the impedance estimates is guaranteed. Using synthetic and real MT data, it is shown that the method can produce improved MT impedance functions even under conditions of severe noise contamination.

  8. An Energy-Based Limit State Function for Estimation of Structural Reliability in Shock Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Guthrie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available limit state function is developed for the estimation of structural reliability in shock environments. This limit state function uses peak modal strain energies to characterize environmental severity and modal strain energies at failure to characterize the structural capacity. The Hasofer-Lind reliability index is briefly reviewed and its computation for the energy-based limit state function is discussed. Applications to two degree of freedom mass-spring systems and to a simple finite element model are considered. For these examples, computation of the reliability index requires little effort beyond a modal analysis, but still accounts for relevant uncertainties in both the structure and environment. For both examples, the reliability index is observed to agree well with the results of Monte Carlo analysis. In situations where fast, qualitative comparison of several candidate designs is required, the reliability index based on the proposed limit state function provides an attractive metric which can be used to compare and control reliability.

  9. High precision measurements of the luminosity at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, B.

    1994-01-01

    The art of the luminosity measurements at LEP is presented. First generation LEP detectors have measured the absolute luminosity with the precision of 0.3-0.5%. The most precise present detectors have reached the 0.07% precision and the 0.05% is not excluded in future. Center-of-mass energy dependent relative precision of the luminosity detectors and the use of the theoretical cross-section in the LEP experiments are also discussed. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Signal processing for fast luminosity monitor of BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Wang Yonggang; Li Kai; Yan Tianxin

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of the fast luminosity monitor system of Beijing electron-positron collider (BEPC II), a high-speed bunch-by-bunch luminosity signal processing and displaying system was designed. The techniques such as fast signal amplification, discrimination, long-distance signal transmission, anti-coincidence event judgment, counting for each bunch and ping-pang storage were involved effectively. The preliminary test result shows that the system can process and display the luminosity signals for bunches with 4 ns separation. (authors)

  11. Physics potential of ATLAS detector with high luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bing

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to exploit the full physics potential in the TeV energy region opened up by the Large Hadron Collider at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with very high luminosities. The physics performance of the ATLAS detector on Higgs, extra-dimension and strong symmetry breaking scenario is summarized in this note. ATLAS experiment has great discovery potential for these new phenomena with high luminosity. Triple gauge couplings are very sensitive for probing new physics at TeV scale. We show that ATLAS can measure these couplings very precisely with high luminosity. (orig.)

  12. Estimation of functional failure probability of passive systems based on adaptive importance sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baosheng; Wang Dongqing; Zhang Jianmin; Jiang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In order to estimate the functional failure probability of passive systems, an innovative adaptive importance sampling methodology is presented. In the proposed methodology, information of variables is extracted with some pre-sampling of points in the failure region. An important sampling density is then constructed from the sample distribution in the failure region. Taking the AP1000 passive residual heat removal system as an example, the uncertainties related to the model of a passive system and the numerical values of its input parameters are considered in this paper. And then the probability of functional failure is estimated with the combination of the response surface method and adaptive importance sampling method. The numerical results demonstrate the high computed efficiency and excellent computed accuracy of the methodology compared with traditional probability analysis methods. (authors)

  13. Estimation of functional failure probability of passive systems based on subset simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongqing; Wang Baosheng; Zhang Jianmin; Jiang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of multi-dimensional epistemic uncertainties and small functional failure probability of passive systems, an innovative reliability analysis algorithm called subset simulation based on Markov chain Monte Carlo was presented. The method is found on the idea that a small failure probability can be expressed as a product of larger conditional failure probabilities by introducing a proper choice of intermediate failure events. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation was implemented to efficiently generate conditional samples for estimating the conditional failure probabilities. Taking the AP1000 passive residual heat removal system, for example, the uncertainties related to the model of a passive system and the numerical values of its input parameters were considered in this paper. And then the probability of functional failure was estimated with subset simulation method. The numerical results demonstrate that subset simulation method has the high computing efficiency and excellent computing accuracy compared with traditional probability analysis methods. (authors)

  14. Correlation Function Approach for Estimating Thermal Conductivity in Highly Porous Fibrous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Jorge; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Lawson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transport in highly porous fiber networks is analyzed via two-point correlation functions. Fibers are assumed to be long and thin to allow a large number of crossing points per fiber. The network is characterized by three parameters: the fiber aspect ratio, the porosity and the anisotropy of the structure. We show that the effective thermal conductivity of the system can be estimated from knowledge of the porosity and the correlation lengths of the correlation functions obtained from a fiber structure image. As an application, the effects of the fiber aspect ratio and the network anisotropy on the thermal conductivity is studied.

  15. Estimation Methods of the Point Spread Function Axial Position: A Comparative Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Eduardo Diaz Zamboni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise knowledge of the point spread function is central for any imaging system characterization. In fluorescence microscopy, point spread function (PSF determination has become a common and obligatory task for each new experimental device, mainly due to its strong dependence on acquisition conditions. During the last decade, algorithms have been developed for the precise calculation of the PSF, which fit model parameters that describe image formation on the microscope to experimental data. In order to contribute to this subject, a comparative study of three parameter estimation methods is reported, namely: I-divergence minimization (MIDIV, maximum likelihood (ML and non-linear least square (LSQR. They were applied to the estimation of the point source position on the optical axis, using a physical model. Methods’ performance was evaluated under different conditions and noise levels using synthetic images and considering success percentage, iteration number, computation time, accuracy and precision. The main results showed that the axial position estimation requires a high SNR to achieve an acceptable success level and higher still to be close to the estimation error lower bound. ML achieved a higher success percentage at lower SNR compared to MIDIV and LSQR with an intrinsic noise source. Only the ML and MIDIV methods achieved the error lower bound, but only with data belonging to the optical axis and high SNR. Extrinsic noise sources worsened the success percentage, but no difference was found between noise sources for the same method for all methods studied.

  16. On Estimation Of The Orientation Of Mobile Robots Using Turning Functions And SONAR Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel AIORDACHIOAIE

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available SONAR systems are widely used by some artificial objects, e.g. robots, and by animals, e.g. bats, for navigation and pattern recognition. The objective of this paper is to present a solution on the estimation of the orientation in the environment of mobile robots, in the context of navigation, using the turning function approach. The results are shown to be accurate and can be used further in the design of navigation strategies of mobile robots.

  17. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  18. Long term dynamics of the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider with crab cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco García, J.; De Maria, R.; Grudiev, A.; Tomás García, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Brett, D. R.

    2016-10-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) aims to achieve an integrated luminosity of 200 - 300 fb-1 per year, including the contribution from the upgrade of the injector chain. For the HL-LHC the larger crossing angle together with a smaller beta function at the collision point would result in more than 70% luminosity loss due to the incomplete geometric overlap of colliding bunches. To recover head-on collisions at the high-luminosity particle-physics detectors ATLAS and CMS and benefit from the very low β* provided by the Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) optics, a local crab cavity scheme provides transverse kicks to the proton bunches. The tight space constraints at the location of these cavities leads to designs which are axially non-symmetric, giving rise to high order multipoles components of the main deflecting mode and, since these kicks are harmonic in time, we expand them in a series of multipoles in a similar fashion as is done for static field magnets. In this work we calculate, for the first time, the higher order multipoles and their impact on beam dynamics for three different crab cavity prototypes. Different approaches to calculate the multipoles are presented. Furthermore, we perform the first calculation of their impact on the long term stability of the machine using the concept of dynamic aperture.

  19. Long term dynamics of the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider with crab cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Barranco García

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC aims to achieve an integrated luminosity of 200–300  fb^{-1} per year, including the contribution from the upgrade of the injector chain. For the HL-LHC the larger crossing angle together with a smaller beta function at the collision point would result in more than 70% luminosity loss due to the incomplete geometric overlap of colliding bunches. To recover head-on collisions at the high-luminosity particle-physics detectors ATLAS and CMS and benefit from the very low β^{*} provided by the Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS optics, a local crab cavity scheme provides transverse kicks to the proton bunches. The tight space constraints at the location of these cavities leads to designs which are axially non-symmetric, giving rise to high order multipoles components of the main deflecting mode and, since these kicks are harmonic in time, we expand them in a series of multipoles in a similar fashion as is done for static field magnets. In this work we calculate, for the first time, the higher order multipoles and their impact on beam dynamics for three different crab cavity prototypes. Different approaches to calculate the multipoles are presented. Furthermore, we perform the first calculation of their impact on the long term stability of the machine using the concept of dynamic aperture.

  20. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, S

    2015-01-01

    Three methods for handling beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC are tested and evaluated in this work. The first method represents an optimization of the LEPtype asymmetric selection cuts that reduce the counting biases. The second method uses the experimentally reconstructed shape of the √ s ′ spectrum to determine the Beamstrahlung component of the bias. The last, recently proposed, collision-frame method relies on the reconstruction of the collision-frame velocity to define the selection function in the collision frame both in experiment and in theory. Thus the luminosity expression is insensitive to the difference between the CM frame of the collision and the lab frame. The collision-frame method is independent of the knowledge of the beam parameters, and it allows an accurate reconstruction of the luminosity spectrum above 80% of the nominal CM energy. However, it gives no precise infromation about luminosity below 80% of the nominal CM energy. The compatibility of diverse selection cut...

  1. A NEW LUMINOSITY RELATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND ITS IMPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Shi; Lu Tan

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous astrophysical events observed so far. They are conventionally classified into long and short ones depending on their time duration, T 90 . Because of the advantage that their high redshifts offer, many efforts have been made to apply GRBs to cosmology. The key to this is to find correlations between some measurable properties of GRBs and the energy or the luminosity of GRBs. These correlations are usually referred to as luminosity relations and are helpful in understanding the GRBs themselves. In this paper, we explored such correlations in the X-ray emission of GRBs. The X-ray emission of GRBs observed by Swift has the exponential functional form in the prompt phase and relaxes to a power-law decay at time T p . We have assumed a linear relation between log L X,p (with L X,p being the X-ray luminosity at T p ) and log [T p /(1 + z)], but there is some evidence for curvature in the data and the true relationship between L X,p and T p /(1 + z) may be a broken power law. The limited GRB sample used in our analysis is still not sufficient for us to conclude whether the break is real or just an illusion caused by outliers. We considered both cases in our analysis and discussed the implications of the luminosity relation, especially on the time duration of GRBs and their classification.

  2. The fraction of AGNs in major merger galaxies and its luminosity dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Anna K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Sanders, David B.

    2018-05-01

    We use a phenomenological model which connects the galaxy and active galactic nucleus (AGN) populations to investigate the process of AGNs triggering through major galaxy mergers at z ˜ 0. The model uses stellar mass functions as input and allows the prediction of AGN luminosity functions based on assumed Eddington ratio distribution functions (ERDFs). We show that the number of AGNs hosted by merger galaxies relative to the total number of AGNs increases as a function of AGN luminosity. This is due to more massive galaxies being more likely to undergo a merger and does not require the assumption that mergers lead to higher Eddington ratios than secular processes. Our qualitative analysis also shows that to match the observations, the probability of a merger galaxy hosting an AGN and accreting at a given Eddington value has to be increased by a factor ˜10 relative to the general AGN population. An additional significant increase of the fraction of high Eddington ratio AGNs among merger host galaxies leads to inconsistency with the observed X-ray luminosity function. Physically our results imply that, compared to the general galaxy population, the AGN fraction among merger galaxies is ˜10 times higher. On average, merger triggering does however not lead to significantly higher Eddington ratios.

  3. Modulation transfer function estimation of optical lens system by adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Pavlović, Nenad T.; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

    2014-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a graphical description of the sharpness and contrast of an imaging system or of its individual components. The MTF is also known and spatial frequency response. The MTF curve has different meanings according to the corresponding frequency. The MTF of an optical system specifies the contrast transmitted by the system as a function of image size, and is determined by the inherent optical properties of the system. In this study, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) estimator is designed and adapted to estimate MTF value of the actual optical system. Neural network in ANFIS adjusts parameters of membership function in the fuzzy logic of the fuzzy inference system. The back propagation learning algorithm is used for training this network. This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  4. A recursive Monte Carlo method for estimating importance functions in deep penetration problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.

    1980-04-01

    A pratical recursive Monte Carlo method for estimating the importance function distribution, aimed at importance sampling for the solution of deep penetration problems in three-dimensional systems, was developed. The efficiency of the recursive method was investigated for sample problems including one- and two-dimensional, monoenergetic and and multigroup problems, as well as for a practical deep-penetration problem with streaming. The results of the recursive Monte Carlo calculations agree fairly well with Ssub(n) results. It is concluded that the recursive Monte Carlo method promises to become a universal method for estimating the importance function distribution for the solution of deep-penetration problems, in all kinds of systems: for many systems the recursive method is likely to be more efficient than previously existing methods; for three-dimensional systems it is the first method that can estimate the importance function with the accuracy required for an efficient solution based on importance sampling of neutron deep-penetration problems in those systems

  5. Calculation of Coupled Vibroacoustics Response Estimates from a Library of Available Uncoupled Transfer Function Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Fulcher, Clay; Towner, Robert; McDonald, Emmett

    2012-01-01

    The design and theoretical basis of a new database tool that quickly generates vibroacoustic response estimates using a library of transfer functions (TFs) is discussed. During the early stages of a launch vehicle development program, these response estimates can be used to provide vibration environment specification to hardware vendors. The tool accesses TFs from a database, combines the TFs, and multiplies these by input excitations to estimate vibration responses. The database is populated with two sets of uncoupled TFs; the first set representing vibration response of a bare panel, designated as H(sup s), and the second set representing the response of the free-free component equipment by itself, designated as H(sup c). For a particular configuration undergoing analysis, the appropriate H(sup s) and H(sup c) are selected and coupled to generate an integrated TF, designated as H(sup s +c). This integrated TF is then used with the appropriate input excitations to estimate vibration responses. This simple yet powerful tool enables a user to estimate vibration responses without directly using finite element models, so long as suitable H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets are defined in the database libraries. The paper discusses the preparation of the database tool and provides the assumptions and methodologies necessary to combine H(sup s) and H(sup c) sets into an integrated H(sup s + c). An experimental validation of the approach is also presented.

  6. Joint entropy for space and spatial frequency domains estimated from psychometric functions of achromatic discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Vladímir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4π or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint

  7. Improvement to the D0 luminosity monitor constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantley, J.

    1996-03-01

    The D0 experiment has previously calculated its luminosity using the visible cross section (luminosity monitor constant) for its Level 0 trigger, σ L0 = 48.2 mb, based on the world average pp inelastic cross sections at √s = 1.8 TeV. The error on luminosity had been set at 12%. Recent studies using the MBR and DTUJET Monte Carlo event generators and unbiased D0 data samples have resulted in a more precise determination of the D0 luminosity monitor constant. The result, σ L0 = 46.7 ± 2.5 mb, lowers the central value by 3.1% and reduces the error to 5.4%. 12 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  8. The CMS Outer Tracker Upgrade for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Luetic, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    The era of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will pose unprecedented challenges for detector design and operation. The planned luminosity of the upgraded machine is $5$x$10^{34} $ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, reaching an integrated luminosity of more than 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. The CMS Tracker detector will have to be replaced in order to fully exploit the delivered luminosity and cope with the demanding operating conditions. The new detector will provide robust tracking as well as input for the first level trigger. This report is focusing on the replacement of the CMS Outer Tracker system, describing the new layout and technological choices together with some highlights of research and development activities.

  9. Physics potential of precision measurements of the LHC luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty in the determination of the LHC luminosity is rapidly becoming a limiting factor for the analysis and interpretation of many important LHC processes. In this talk first of all we discuss the theoretical accuracy of total cross sections and examine in which cases the luminosity error is or will be dominant. We then review the impact of LHC data in PDF determinations, with enphasis on the effects of the luminosity uncertainty. We explore the requirements for the accuracy of the 2011 luminosity determination from the point of view of standard candle cross section and other important processes. Finally we discuss what we can learn from the accurate measurement of cross section ratios at different center of mass energies for processes like W, ttbar and dijet production.

  10. LOW CO LUMINOSITIES IN DWARF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Leroy, Adam K.; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl; Usero, Antonio; Weiss, Axel; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    We present maps of 12 COJ = 2-1 emission covering the entire star-forming disks of 16 nearby dwarf galaxies observed by the IRAM HERACLES survey. The data have 13'' angular resolution, ∼250 pc at our average distance of D = 4 Mpc, and sample the galaxies by 10-1000 resolution elements. We apply stacking techniques to perform the first sensitive search for CO emission in dwarf galaxies outside the Local Group ranging from individual lines of sight, stacking over IR-bright regions of embedded star formation, and stacking over the entire galaxy. We detect five galaxies in CO with total CO luminosities of L CO2-1 = (3-28) × 10 6 K km s –1 pc 2 . The other 11 galaxies remain undetected in CO even in the stacked images and have L CO2-1 ∼ 6 K km s –1 pc 2 . We combine our sample of dwarf galaxies with a large sample of spiral galaxies from the literature to study scaling relations of L CO with M B and metallicity. We find that dwarf galaxies with metallicities of Z ≈ 1/2-1/10 Z ☉ have L CO of 2-4 orders of magnitude smaller than massive spiral galaxies and that their L CO per unit L B is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller. A comparison with tracers of star formation (FUV and 24 μm) shows that L CO per unit star formation rate (SFR) is 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller in dwarf galaxies. One possible interpretation is that dwarf galaxies form stars much more efficiently: we argue that the low L CO /SFR ratio is due to the fact that the CO-to-H 2 conversion factor, α CO , changes significantly in low-metallicity environments. Assuming that a constant H 2 depletion time of τ dep = 1.8 Gyr holds in dwarf galaxies (as found for a large sample of nearby spirals) implies α CO values for dwarf galaxies with Z ≈ 1/2-1/10 Z ☉ that are more than one order of magnitude higher than those found in solar metallicity spiral galaxies. Such a significant increase of α CO at low metallicity is consistent with previous studies, in particular those of Local Group dwarf

  11. Density functionals for surface science: Exchange-correlation model development with Bayesian error estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess; Lundgård, Keld Troen; Møgelhøj, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding the overfit......A methodology for semiempirical density functional optimization, using regularization and cross-validation methods from machine learning, is developed. We demonstrate that such methods enable well-behaved exchange-correlation approximations in very flexible model spaces, thus avoiding...... the energetics of intramolecular and intermolecular, bulk solid, and surface chemical bonding, and the developed optimization method explicitly handles making the compromise based on the directions in model space favored by different materials properties. The approach is applied to designing the Bayesian error...... estimation functional with van der Waals correlation (BEEF-vdW), a semilocal approximation with an additional nonlocal correlation term. Furthermore, an ensemble of functionals around BEEF-vdW comes out naturally, offering an estimate of the computational error. An extensive assessment on a range of data...

  12. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Dementia: National Estimates of Functional Disability Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil Vroomen, Janet L; Han, Ling; Monin, Joan K; Lipska, Kasia J; Allore, Heather G

    2018-03-09

    To estimate the associations between diabetes, heart disease, and dementia, which may increase the difficulty of self-care; model functional disability trajectories jointly with attrition (death or dropout) over 5 years. Population-based complex survey design. National Health and Aging Trends Study. Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older (N=7,609). National estimates were generated using sampling weights. Sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported physician-diagnosed chronic conditions, six activities of daily living (ADL), and cognitive status were ascertained in annual in-person interviews. A joint model using group-based trajectory modeling was used to estimate the number of ADL disabilities and attrition probability. Multinomial logistic regression with survey weights was used to estimate the association between diabetes, heart disease, and dementia and resultant trajectories of disability, with the least disabled trajectory used as a reference. Three functional disability trajectories were identified: 26.9 million (76.3%) individuals with no disability and a constant study attrition of 14.3%, 4.9 million (13.9%) with mild and increasing disability and 12% attrition in 2012 and 27.2% in 2015, and 3.4 million (9.7%) with severe and increasing disability and 25.4% attrition in 2012 and 35% in 2015. Persons with possible dementia, possible dementia and diabetes, or possible dementia with diabetes and heart disease had significantly greater odds of being on the mild disability trajectory than those with no disability. Persons with probable dementia, representing more than 1.5 million persons, regardless of concurrent conditions, had significantly greater odds of being on the severe disability trajectory than on the no disability trajectory. Methods that generate national estimates and account for attrition and for multiple chronic conditions and cognitive status may be useful for health policy-makers to make decisions on care provisions

  13. Performance of the new high precision luminosity monitor of DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Giordano, V.; Guerzoni, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Perrotta, A.; Camporesi, T.; Obraztsov, V.; Paganoni, M.; Vallazza, E.; Bozzo, M.; Cereseto, R.; Barreira, G.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Maio, A.; Onofre, A.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Tome, B.; Carling, H.; Falk, E.; Hedberg, V.; Jarlskog, G.; Kronkvist, I.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Ferrari, P.; Gumenyuk, S.; Leoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Negri, P.; Petrovykh, L.; Terranova, F.; Dharmasiri, D.R.; Nossum, B.; Read, A.L.; Skaali, B.; Rohne, O.; Castellani, L.; Pegoraro, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Ivanyushenkov, I.; Karyukhin, A.; Konopliannikov, A.; Shalanda, N.; Sen'ko, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaitsev, A.; Bigi, M.; Cassio, V.; Gamba, D.; Gouz, I.; Migliore, E.; Romero, A.; Simonetti, L.; Trapani, P.P.; Bari, M.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.

    1997-01-01

    The STIC calorimeter was installed in the DELPHI detector in 1994. The main goal is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The calorimeter was built using the ''Shashlik'' technique. The light is collected by wavelength shifting fibers and readout by phototetrodes that can operate inside the magnetic field. The detector performance during the 1994-1995 data taking is presented. The different contributions to the systematic error on the luminosity measurement are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Triggering at high luminosity: fake triggers from pile-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Triggers based on a cut in transverse momentum (p/sub t/) have proved to be useful in high energy physics both because they indicte that a hard constituent scattering has occurred and because they can be made quickly enough to gate electronics. These triggers will continue to be useful at high luminosities if overlapping events do not cause an excessive number of fake triggers. In this paper, I determine if this is indeed a problem at high luminosity machines

  15. On the Luminosity Distance and the Hubble Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Heymann

    2013-01-01

    By differentiating luminosity distance with respect to time using its standard formula we find that the peculiar velocity is a time varying velocity of light. Therefore, a new definition of the luminosity distance is provided such that the peculiar velocity is equal to c. Using this definition a Hubble constant H0 = 67.3 km s−1 Mpc−1 is obtained from supernovae data.

  16. Estimates on potential functions and boundary behavior of positive solutions for sublinear Dirichlet problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Alsaedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We give global estimates on some potential of functions in a bounded domain of the Euclidean space ${\\mathbb{R}}^n\\; (n\\geq 2$. These functions may be singular near the boundary and are globally comparable to a product of a power of the distance to the boundary by some particularly well behaved slowly varying function near zero. Next, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a positive solution for the integral equation $u=V(a u^{\\sigma}$ with $0\\leq \\sigma <1$, where V belongs to a class of kernels that contains in particular the potential kernel of the classical Laplacian $V=(-\\Delta^{-1}$ or the fractional laplacian $V=(-\\Delta^{\\alpha/2}$, $0<\\alpha<2$.

  17. Estimation of Time-Varying Coherence and Its Application in Understanding Brain Functional Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-varying coherence is a powerful tool for revealing functional dynamics between different regions in the brain. In this paper, we address ways of estimating evolutionary spectrum and coherence using the general Cohen's class distributions. We show that the intimate connection between the Cohen's class-based spectra and the evolutionary spectra defined on the locally stationary time series can be linked by the kernel functions of the Cohen's class distributions. The time-varying spectra and coherence are further generalized with the Stockwell transform, a multiscale time-frequency representation. The Stockwell measures can be studied in the framework of the Cohen's class distributions with a generalized frequency-dependent kernel function. A magnetoencephalography study using the Stockwell coherence reveals an interesting temporal interaction between contralateral and ipsilateral motor cortices under the multisource interference task.

  18. Precision of MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Kladiva, Edward [IEP SAS Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    A network consisting of MPX detectors based on Medipix2 silicon pixel devices were originally adapted for measuring the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. We demonstrate that the MPX network, which consists of 16 MPX detectors, is a self-contained luminosity monitor system. As the MPX detectors are collecting data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with good precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The variations of the MPX luminosity measurements around the fitted curve lead to a relative uncertainty on the luminosity measurement below 0.3% for one minute time intervals.

  19. Quantitative pre-surgical lung function estimation with SPECT/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D. L.; Willowson, K. P.; Timmins, S.; Harris, B. E.; Bailey, E. A.; Roach, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To develop methodology to predict lobar lung function based on SPECT/CT ventilation and perfusion (V/Q) scanning in candidates for lobectomy for lung cancer. Methods: This combines two development areas from our group: quantitative SPECT based on CT-derived corrections for scattering and attenuation of photons, and SPECT V/Q scanning with lobar segmentation from CT. Eight patients underwent baseline pulmonary function testing (PFT) including spirometry, measure of DLCO and cario-pulmonary exercise testing. A SPECT/CT V/Q scan was acquired at baseline. Using in-house software each lobe was anatomically defined using CT to provide lobar ROIs which could be applied to the SPECT data. From these, individual lobar contribution to overall function was calculated from counts within the lobe and post-operative FEV1, DLCO and VO2 peak were predicted. This was compared with the quantitative planar scan method using 3 rectangular ROIs over each lung. Results: Post-operative FEV1 most closely matched that predicted by the planar quantification method, with SPECT V/Q over-estimating the loss of function by 8% (range - 7 - +23%). However, post-operative DLCO and VO2 peak were both accurately predicted by SPECT V/Q (average error of 0 and 2% respectively) compared with planar. Conclusions: More accurate anatomical definition of lobar anatomy provides better estimates of post-operative loss of function for DLCO and VO2 peak than traditional planar methods. SPECT/CT provides the tools for accurate anatomical defintions of the surgical target as well as being useful in producing quantitative 3D functional images for ventilation and perfusion.

  20. Estimation of the input function in dynamic positron emission tomography applied to fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouvie, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method of functional imaging, used in particular for drug development and tumor imaging. In PET, the estimation of the arterial plasmatic activity concentration of the non-metabolized compound (the 'input function') is necessary for the extraction of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These parameters enable the quantification of the compound dynamics in the tissues. This PhD thesis contributes to the study of the input function by the development of a minimally invasive method to estimate the input function. This method uses the PET image and a few blood samples. In this work, the example of the FDG tracer is chosen. The proposed method relies on compartmental modeling: it deconvoluates the three-compartment-model. The originality of the method consists in using a large number of regions of interest (ROIs), a large number of sets of three ROIs, and an iterative process. To validate the method, simulations of PET images of increasing complexity have been performed, from a simple image simulated with an analytic simulator to a complex image simulated with a Monte-Carlo simulator. After simulation of the acquisition, reconstruction and corrections, the images were segmented (through segmentation of an IRM image and registration between PET and IRM images) and corrected for partial volume effect by a variant of Rousset's method, to obtain the kinetics in the ROIs, which are the input data of the estimation method. The evaluation of the method on simulated and real data is presented, as well as a study of the method robustness to different error sources, for example in the segmentation, in the registration or in the activity of the used blood samples. (author) [fr

  1. Different shades of default mode disturbance in schizophrenia: Subnodal covariance estimation in structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort-Besnard, Jérémy; Bassett, Danielle S; Smallwood, Jonathan; Margulies, Daniel S; Derntl, Birgit; Gruber, Oliver; Aleman, Andre; Jardri, Renaud; Varoquaux, Gaël; Thirion, Bertrand; Eickhoff, Simon B; Bzdok, Danilo

    2018-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating mental disease with an apparent disruption in the highly associative default mode network (DMN). Interplay between this canonical network and others probably contributes to goal-directed behavior so its disturbance is a candidate neural fingerprint underlying schizophrenia psychopathology. Previous research has reported both hyperconnectivity and hypoconnectivity within the DMN, and both increased and decreased DMN coupling with the multimodal saliency network (SN) and dorsal attention network (DAN). This study systematically revisited network disruption in patients with schizophrenia using data-derived network atlases and multivariate pattern-learning algorithms in a multisite dataset (n = 325). Resting-state fluctuations in unconstrained brain states were used to estimate functional connectivity, and local volume differences between individuals were used to estimate structural co-occurrence within and between the DMN, SN, and DAN. In brain structure and function, sparse inverse covariance estimates of network coupling were used to characterize healthy participants and patients with schizophrenia, and to identify statistically significant group differences. Evidence did not confirm that the backbone of the DMN was the primary driver of brain dysfunction in schizophrenia. Instead, functional and structural aberrations were frequently located outside of the DMN core, such as in the anterior temporoparietal junction and precuneus. Additionally, functional covariation analyses highlighted dysfunctional DMN-DAN coupling, while structural covariation results highlighted aberrant DMN-SN coupling. Our findings reframe the role of the DMN core and its relation to canonical networks in schizophrenia. We thus underline the importance of large-scale neural interactions as effective biomarkers and indicators of how to tailor psychiatric care to single patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Accounting for animal movement in estimation of resource selection functions: sampling and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester, James D; Im, Hae Kyung; Rathouz, Paul J

    2009-12-01

    Patterns of resource selection by animal populations emerge as a result of the behavior of many individuals. Statistical models that describe these population-level patterns of habitat use can miss important interactions between individual animals and characteristics of their local environment; however, identifying these interactions is difficult. One approach to this problem is to incorporate models of individual movement into resource selection models. To do this, we propose a model for step selection functions (SSF) that is composed of a resource-independent movement kernel and a resource selection function (RSF). We show that standard case-control logistic regression may be used to fit the SSF; however, the sampling scheme used to generate control points (i.e., the definition of availability) must be accommodated. We used three sampling schemes to analyze simulated movement data and found that ignoring sampling and the resource-independent movement kernel yielded biased estimates of selection. The level of bias depended on the method used to generate control locations, the strength of selection, and the spatial scale of the resource map. Using empirical or parametric methods to sample control locations produced biased estimates under stronger selection; however, we show that the addition of a distance function to the analysis substantially reduced that bias. Assuming a uniform availability within a fixed buffer yielded strongly biased selection estimates that could be corrected by including the distance function but remained inefficient relative to the empirical and parametric sampling methods. As a case study, we used location data collected from elk in Yellowstone National Park, USA, to show that selection and bias may be temporally variable. Because under constant selection the amount of bias depends on the scale at which a resource is distributed in the landscape, we suggest that distance always be included as a covariate in SSF analyses. This approach to

  3. Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Ryne Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubble form...

  4. Bayesian Estimation of Inequality and Poverty Indices in Case of Pareto Distribution Using Different Priors under LINEX Loss Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaljit Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bayesian estimators of Gini index and a Poverty measure are obtained in case of Pareto distribution under censored and complete setup. The said estimators are obtained using two noninformative priors, namely, uniform prior and Jeffreys’ prior, and one conjugate prior under the assumption of Linear Exponential (LINEX loss function. Using simulation techniques, the relative efficiency of proposed estimators using different priors and loss functions is obtained. The performances of the proposed estimators have been compared on the basis of their simulated risks obtained under LINEX loss function.

  5. Conceptual design of a high luminosity 510 MeV collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the magnetic lattice design of a high luminosity 510 MeV electron-positron collider, based on high field superconduction bending dipoles. The design criteria are flexibility in the choice of the tune and beta functions at the interaction point, horizontal emittance larger than 1 mm mrad to produce a luminosity larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , large synchrotron radiation damping rate, and large momentum compaction. The RF system parameter are chosen to provide a short bunch length also when the beam energy spread is determined by the microwave instability. A satisfactory ring dynamic aperature, and a simultaneous small value of the horizontal and vertical beta function at the interaction point, the authors expect will be achieved by using Cornacchia-Halbach modified sextupoles

  6. Luminosity evaluation and fragmentation studies for the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina

    The first subject addressed in this thesis is the contribution of the VSAT luminosity to the lineshape analysis, i.e. to the extraction of the mass and width of the Z0 boson from LEP1 DELPHI data. The VSAT detector has contributed to the lineshape parameter determination by providing a relative luminosity measurement of high accuracy. The second subject of the thesis is the extraction of the helicity components of the fragmentation function. The analysis is performed on data collected by the DELPHI detector from 1992 to 1995. The study concentrates on the correction required for the hadronization process. Hadronization mainly affects the longitudinal component of the fragmentation function. The corrected measurement is used for the extraction of the strong coupling constant.

  7. Sensitivity of Calibrated Parameters and Water Resource Estimates on Different Objective Functions and Optimization Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delaram Houshmand Kouchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The successful application of hydrological models relies on careful calibration and uncertainty analysis. However, there are many different calibration/uncertainty analysis algorithms, and each could be run with different objective functions. In this paper, we highlight the fact that each combination of optimization algorithm-objective functions may lead to a different set of optimum parameters, while having the same performance; this makes the interpretation of dominant hydrological processes in a watershed highly uncertain. We used three different optimization algorithms (SUFI-2, GLUE, and PSO, and eight different objective functions (R2, bR2, NSE, MNS, RSR, SSQR, KGE, and PBIAS in a SWAT model to calibrate the monthly discharges in two watersheds in Iran. The results show that all three algorithms, using the same objective function, produced acceptable calibration results; however, with significantly different parameter ranges. Similarly, an algorithm using different objective functions also produced acceptable calibration results, but with different parameter ranges. The different calibrated parameter ranges consequently resulted in significantly different water resource estimates. Hence, the parameters and the outputs that they produce in a calibrated model are “conditioned” on the choices of the optimization algorithm and objective function. This adds another level of non-negligible uncertainty to watershed models, calling for more attention and investigation in this area.

  8. Accurate estimation of the myocardium global function from reduced magnetic resonance image acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rewaidy, Hossam; Khalifa, Ayman; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the heart global function from magnetic resonance images is based on estimating a number of functional parameters such as the left ventricular (LV) volume, LV mass, ejection fraction, and stroke volume. Estimating these parameters requires accurate calculation of the volumes enclosed by the inner and outer surfaces of the LV chamber at the max contraction and relaxation states of the heart. Currently, this is achieved through acquisition and segmentation of a large number of short-axis (SAX) views of the LV, which is time-consuming and expensive. Reducing the number of acquisitions results in undersampling the LV surfaces and hence increases the calculation errors. In this work, we describe and evaluate a method for estimating the cardiac parameters from a small number of image acquisitions that includes one long-axis (LAX) view of the LV. In this method, the LAX contour is used to swipe the SAX contours to fill in the missed LV surface between the SAX slices. Results on 25 patients and CT phantoms shows that, given the same number of slices, the proposed method is superior to other methods.

  9. Stacking the invisibles: A guided search for low-luminosity Milky Way satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Banholzer, Sophianna R.; Cohen, Judith G.; Levitan, David; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ofek, Eran O., E-mail: bsesar@mpia.de [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-10-01

    Almost every known low-luminosity Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxy contains at least one RR Lyrae star. Assuming that a fraction of distant (60 < d {sub helio} < 100 kpc) Galactic halo RR Lyrae stars are members of yet to be discovered low-luminosity dSph galaxies, we perform a guided search for these low-luminosity dSph galaxies. In order to detect the presence of dSph galaxies, we combine stars selected from more than 123 sightlines centered on RR Lyrae stars identified by the Palomar Transient Factory. We find that this method is sensitive enough to detect the presence of Segue 1-like galaxies (M{sub V}=−1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +0.6}, r{sub h} = 30 pc) even if only ∼20 sightlines were occupied by such dSph galaxies. Yet, when our method is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 imaging catalog, no signal is detected. An application of our method to sightlines occupied by pairs of close (<200 pc) horizontal branch stars, also did not yield a detection. Thus, we place upper limits on the number of low-luminosity dSph galaxies with half-light radii from 30 pc to 120 pc, and in the probed volume of the halo. Stronger constraints on the luminosity function may be obtained by applying our method to sightlines centered on RR Lyrae stars selected from the Pan-STARRS1 survey, and eventually, from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. In Appendix A, we present spectroscopic observations of an RRab star in the Boötes 3 dSph and a light curve of an RRab star near the Boötes 2 dSph.

  10. The feasibility of experiments at high luminosity at the large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvey, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The studies reported in this volume extend some of those made during Workshop on Physics at Future Accelerators held at La Thuile and CERN in January 1987 (CERN 87-07, Vol. 1 and 2). They consider the feasibility of performing experiments with a 16 TeV proton-proton collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at luminosities as high as 5.10 34 cm -2 s -1 . To illustrate the difficulties and the extent to which the potential for discovery at the LHC might be improved by such a step, three specific topics were chosen: searches for a) a massive Higgs boson, b) SUSY gluinos and squarks, and c) a new Z'. Following the Summary Report of the High Luminosity Study Group are papers discussing a possible detector system, radiation levels, and the analyses leading to estimated mass-limits for the searches. (orig.)

  11. An improved quadratic inference function for parameter estimation in the analysis of correlated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Philip M; Braun, Thomas M

    2013-08-30

    Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are commonly employed for the analysis of correlated data. However, the quadratic inference function (QIF) method is increasing in popularity because of its multiple theoretical advantages over GEE. We base our focus on the fact that the QIF method is more efficient than GEE when the working covariance structure for the data is misspecified. It has been shown that because of the use of an empirical weighting covariance matrix inside its estimating equations, the QIF method's realized estimation performance can potentially be inferior to GEE's when the number of independent clusters is not large. We therefore propose an alternative weighting matrix for the QIF, which asymptotically is an optimally weighted combination of the empirical covariance matrix and its model-based version, which is derived by minimizing its expected quadratic loss. Use of the proposed weighting matrix maintains the large-sample advantages the QIF approach has over GEE and, as shown via simulation, improves small-sample parameter estimation. We also illustrated the proposed method in the analysis of a longitudinal study. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. HIGH LUMINOSITY RHIC INSERTIONS, 0.5M BETA AT IP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEPIKIAN, S.; FISCHER, W.; MACKAY, W.; PILAT, F.; HUANG, H.; PTITSYN, V.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    An increase in RHIC collision luminosity is possible by reducing the beam size at the interaction point (IP). They present a method for reducing the IP beta function, β*, from the design minimum of 1m to 0.5m. They demonstrate that this β* = 0.5m configuration is achievable with existing RHIC power supplies for 100 GeV protons. They discuss the correction of the higher order IR multi-poles and the second order chromaticity

  13. Estimating the Persistence and the Autocorrelation Function of a Time Series that is Measured with Error

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2014-01-01

    An economic time series can often be viewed as a noisy proxy for an underlying economic variable. Measurement errors will influence the dynamic properties of the observed process and may conceal the persistence of the underlying time series. In this paper we develop instrumental variable (IV......) methods for extracting information about the latent process. Our framework can be used to estimate the autocorrelation function of the latent volatility process and a key persistence parameter. Our analysis is motivated by the recent literature on realized volatility measures that are imperfect estimates...... of actual volatility. In an empirical analysis using realized measures for the Dow Jones industrial average stocks, we find the underlying volatility to be near unit root in all cases. Although standard unit root tests are asymptotically justified, we find them to be misleading in our application despite...

  14. Estimating the Persistence and the Autocorrelation Function of a Time Series that is Measured with Error

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    An economic time series can often be viewed as a noisy proxy for an underlying economic variable. Measurement errors will influence the dynamic properties of the observed process and may conceal the persistence of the underlying time series. In this paper we develop instrumental variable (IV......) methods for extracting information about the latent process. Our framework can be used to estimate the autocorrelation function of the latent volatility process and a key persistence parameter. Our analysis is motivated by the recent literature on realized (volatility) measures, such as the realized...... variance, that are imperfect estimates of actual volatility. In an empirical analysis using realized measures for the DJIA stocks we find the underlying volatility to be near unit root in all cases. Although standard unit root tests are asymptotically justified, we find them to be misleading in our...

  15. Lithium-ion battery state of function estimation based on fuzzy logic algorithm with associated variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, L.; Yang, F.; Shi, Y. F.; He, H. L.

    2017-11-01

    Many occasions related to batteries demand to know how much continuous and instantaneous power can batteries provide such as the rapidly developing electric vehicles. As the large-scale applications of lithium-ion batteries, lithium-ion batteries are used to be our research object. Many experiments are designed to get the lithium-ion battery parameters to ensure the relevance and reliability of the estimation. To evaluate the continuous and instantaneous load capability of a battery called state-of-function (SOF), this paper proposes a fuzzy logic algorithm based on battery state-of-charge(SOC), state-of-health(SOH) and C-rate parameters. Simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed approach is suitable for battery SOF estimation.

  16. Optimal replacement time estimation for machines and equipment based on cost function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Šebo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a multidisciplinary issue of estimating the optimal replacement time for the machines. Considered categories of machines, for which the optimization method is usable, are of the metallurgical and engineering production. Different models of cost function are considered (both with one and two variables. Parameters of the models were calculated through the least squares method. Models testing show that all are good enough, so for estimation of optimal replacement time is sufficient to use simpler models. In addition to the testing of models we developed the method (tested on selected simple model which enable us in actual real time (with limited data set to indicate the optimal replacement time. The indicated time moment is close enough to the optimal replacement time t*.

  17. An improved parameter estimation and comparison for soft tissue constitutive models containing an exponential function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankush

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by the well-known result that stiffness of soft tissue is proportional to the stress, many of the constitutive laws for soft tissues contain an exponential function. In this work, we analyze properties of the exponential function and how it affects the estimation and comparison of elastic parameters for soft tissues. In particular, we find that as a consequence of the exponential function there are lines of high covariance in the elastic parameter space. As a result, one can have widely varying mechanical parameters defining the tissue stiffness but similar effective stress-strain responses. Drawing from elementary algebra, we propose simple changes in the norm and the parameter space, which significantly improve the convergence of parameter estimation and robustness in the presence of noise. More importantly, we demonstrate that these changes improve the conditioning of the problem and provide a more robust solution in the case of heterogeneous material by reducing the chances of getting trapped in a local minima. Based upon the new insight, we also propose a transformed parameter space which will allow for rational parameter comparison and avoid misleading conclusions regarding soft tissue mechanics.

  18. Association of renal function, estimated by four equations, with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganer, Yusuf C; Rohrer, James E; Aydogan, Umit; Barcin, Cem; Cayci, Tuncer; Saglam, Kenan

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with impaired renal function are at increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is also associated with an increased likelihood of having chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we sought to determine the association between impaired renal function with CAD presence and CAD severity based on four different estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equations. We estimated GFR values using four equations: modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), Cockcroft-Gault (C-G), chronic kidney disease epidemiology (CKD-Epi), and Mayo Quadratic. Three hundred and fifty-six CAD patients were classified by the number of stenotic coronary arteries occluded >50%, while the CAD severity was categorized based on the number of involved coronary arteries determined to be healthy, single- and multi-vessel disease. The mean values of eGFR calculated by CKD-Epi, MDRD, Mayo, and C-G equations were 77.44, 71.34, 96.33, and 89.49 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively. Based on these equations, the prevalence of eGFR equations were independently related to significant CAD: CKD-Epi (p = 0.004, β = 0.969), MDRD (p = 0.003, β = 0.965), and C-G (p = 0.021, β = 0.978). The present study established that accurate eGFR equations commonly used still accurate to determine the association of the impaired renal function with CAD presence and extent.

  19. Estimating functional liver reserve following hepatic irradiation: Adaptive normal tissue response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and methods: From 2005 to 2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1 − (ICG-R15 pre-RT /ICG-R15 post-RT )] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results: Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ⩾78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p < 0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion: The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation

  20. Estimating the cost of improving quality in electricity distribution: A parametric distance function approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelli, Tim J.; Gautier, Axel; Perelman, Sergio; Saplacan-Pop, Roxana

    2013-01-01

    The quality of electricity distribution is being more and more scrutinized by regulatory authorities, with explicit reward and penalty schemes based on quality targets having been introduced in many countries. It is then of prime importance to know the cost of improving the quality for a distribution system operator. In this paper, we focus on one dimension of quality, the continuity of supply, and we estimated the cost of preventing power outages. For that, we make use of the parametric distance function approach, assuming that outages enter in the firm production set as an input, an imperfect substitute for maintenance activities and capital investment. This allows us to identify the sources of technical inefficiency and the underlying trade-off faced by operators between quality and other inputs and costs. For this purpose, we use panel data on 92 electricity distribution units operated by ERDF (Electricité de France - Réseau Distribution) in the 2003–2005 financial years. Assuming a multi-output multi-input translog technology, we estimate that the cost of preventing one interruption is equal to 10.7€ for an average DSO. Furthermore, as one would expect, marginal quality improvements tend to be more expensive as quality itself improves. - Highlights: ► We estimate the implicit cost of outages for the main distribution company in France. ► For this purpose, we make use of a parametric distance function approach. ► Marginal quality improvements tend to be more expensive as quality itself improves. ► The cost of preventing one interruption varies from 1.8 € to 69.2 € (2005 prices). ► We estimate that, in average, it lays 33% above the regulated price of quality.

  1. Grid occupancy estimation for environment perception based on belief functions and PCR6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moras, Julien; Dezert, Jean; Pannetier, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution, we propose to improve the grid map occupancy estimation method developed so far based on belief function modeling and the classical Dempster's rule of combination. Grid map offers a useful representation of the perceived world for mobile robotics navigation. It will play a major role for the security (obstacle avoidance) of next generations of terrestrial vehicles, as well as for future autonomous navigation systems. In a grid map, the occupancy of each cell representing a small piece of the surrounding area of the robot must be estimated at first from sensors measurements (typically LIDAR, or camera), and then it must also be classified into different classes in order to get a complete and precise perception of the dynamic environment where the robot moves. So far, the estimation and the grid map updating have been done using fusion techniques based on the probabilistic framework, or on the classical belief function framework thanks to an inverse model of the sensors. Mainly because the latter offers an interesting management of uncertainties when the quality of available information is low, and when the sources of information appear as conflicting. To improve the performances of the grid map estimation, we propose in this paper to replace Dempster's rule of combination by the PCR6 rule (Proportional Conflict Redistribution rule #6) proposed in DSmT (Dezert-Smarandache) Theory. As an illustrating scenario, we consider a platform moving in dynamic area and we compare our new realistic simulation results (based on a LIDAR sensor) with those obtained by the probabilistic and the classical belief-based approaches.

  2. Prospects of a search for $t\\bar{t}$ resonances at the High Luminosity LHC with an upgraded ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anna Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A study of the expected mass reach of a search for new high-mass resonances decaying to a top quark pair using a simulation of the upgraded ATLAS experiment and using an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ from the High Luminosity LHC has been made. The simulation of the upgraded ATLAS experiment under HL-LHC conditions, including pileup, was done using parameterised estimates of the performance. Expected upper limits are set on the cross section of a $t\\bar{t}$ resonance in a benchmark model for several signal masses and show that particles with masses up to 4 TeV can be seen.

  3. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-01-01

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.)

  4. Simple luminosity normalization of greenness, yellowness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-11

    Aug 11, 2012 ... For rooftop spectral profiling and analysis, in the Google Earth window, a virtual altitude of 900 m above ground was chosen when copying the remote sensing images from the Google Earth window using the 'copy image' function. The original multi- spectral image included data on RGB colour intensity and.

  5. Robust velocity estimates, stream functions, and simulated Lagrangian drifters from sequential spacecraft data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.J.; Gobat, J.I. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States). Digital Image Analysis Lab.)

    1994-05-01

    The maximum cross-correlation (MCC) method has been used to compute both oceanic and cloud velocity vectors from sequences of satellite data [e.g., advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), coastal zone color scanner (CZCS), geostationary observing earth satellite (GOES)]. Unfortunately, the two-dimensional cross-correlation functions used in the computation often contain saddlepoints, which can give rise to large magnitude and direction uncertainties in the derived velocity estimates. This paper develops a numerical iterative procedure that combines image analysis methods and dynamical constraints to minimize these difficulties. The resultant velocities are both physically realistic and numerically stable. Thus, it is also possible to compute stream functions and simulated Lagrangian drifters. The validity of these results are confirmed with independent oceanic observations. Finally, the advective-diffusive equation is solved for a few oceanic applications (e.g., prediction of sea-surface temperature, dispersal of anchovy eggs and larvae) using the derived velocities.

  6. A characteristic function to estimate the longitudinal dispersion coefficient in surface water flows over porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofuentes, M.; Polo, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    One-dimensional modelling of solute transport in shallow water flows relies on an accurate approximation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, E, especially under transient conditions of the water flow during the solute residence time. Previous approaches have used expressions (e.g., the Rutherford equation) that allow the inclusion of spatiotemporal variability of E during the transport process, but their accuracy is reduced in marked transient regimes since the data were obtained from experimental work in rivers. This work proposes a different approach from experimental work with slow, shallow flows over porous media in fertigation essays, and provides us with a simple, parametric sigmoid function to estimate a priori effective values of E from simple measurements of flow characteristics and variables. The results have been successfully validated and compared to the Rutherford equation approach. Furthermore, the methodology to develop this characteristic function can be easily adapted for application in other practical cases.

  7. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  8. Estimating the basilar-membrane input-output function in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    is transformed more linearly, the ratio between the slopes of growth of masking (GOM) functions provides an estimate of BM compression at the signal frequency. In this study, this paradigm is extended to also estimate the knee-point of the I/O-function between linear rocessing at low levels and compressive......To partly characterize the function of cochlear processing in humans, the basilar membrane (BM) input-output function can be estimated. In recent studies, forward masking has been used to estimate BM compression. If an on-frequency masker is processed compressively, while an off-frequency masker....... Data were collected from eight normal-hearing (NH) and five hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Both groups showed large inter-subject but low intrasubject variability. When the knee-point could be estimated for the HI listeners it was shifted towards...

  9. Estimation of leaf area index in the sunflower as a function of thermal time1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dioneia Daiane Pitol Lucas

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain a mathematical model for estimating the leaf area index (LAI of a sunflower crop as a function of accumulated thermal time. Generating the models and testing their coefficients was carried out using data obtained from experiments carried out for different sowing dates in the crop years of 2007/08, 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11 with two sunflower hybrids, Aguará 03 and Hélio 358. Linear leaf dimensions were used for the non-destructive measurement of the leaf area, and thermal time was used to quantify the biological time. With the data for accumulated thermal time (TTa and LAI known for any one day after emergence, mathematical models were generated for estimating the LAI. The following models were obtained, as they presented the best fit (lowest rootmean- square error, RMSE: gaussian peak, cubic polynomial, sigmoidal and an adjusted compound model, the modified sigmoidal. The modified sigmoidal model had the best fit to the generation data and the highest value for the coefficient of determination (R2. In testing the models, the lowest values for root-mean-square error, and the highest R2 between the observed and estimated values were obtained with the modified sigmoidal model.

  10. Assessment of pedotransfer functions for estimating soil water retention curves for the amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Medeiros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the soil water retention curve (SWRC is essential for understanding and modeling hydraulic processes in the soil. However, direct determination of the SWRC is time consuming and costly. In addition, it requires a large number of samples, due to the high spatial and temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties. An alternative is the use of models, called pedotransfer functions (PTFs, which estimate the SWRC from easy-to-measure properties. The aim of this paper was to test the accuracy of 16 point or parametric PTFs reported in the literature on different soils from the south and southeast of the State of Pará, Brazil. The PTFs tested were proposed by Pidgeon (1972, Lal (1979, Aina & Periaswamy (1985, Arruda et al. (1987, Dijkerman (1988, Vereecken et al. (1989, Batjes (1996, van den Berg et al. (1997, Tomasella et al. (2000, Hodnett & Tomasella (2002, Oliveira et al. (2002, and Barros (2010. We used a database that includes soil texture (sand, silt, and clay, bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil pH, cation exchange capacity, and the SWRC. Most of the PTFs tested did not show good performance in estimating the SWRC. The parametric PTFs, however, performed better than the point PTFs in assessing the SWRC in the tested region. Among the parametric PTFs, those proposed by Tomasella et al. (2000 achieved the best accuracy in estimating the empirical parameters of the van Genuchten (1980 model, especially when tested in the top soil layer.

  11. Luminosity Measurement at The CMS Detector (BCM1F)

    CERN Document Server

    Shaglel, Salwa

    2017-01-01

    The most important performance parameters for a particle collider are the beam energy and the luminosity. An event is the rate of useful interactions, and it’s a very important term in particle collider world. The quantity that defines the ability of a collider to produce events is called the luminosity (L). Precise luminosity measurements are of crucial importance, as it determines the precision of any physics cross section measurement. After the first Long Shutdown (LS1) the original performance goal for the luminosity of 1 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 was reached with 10 11 protons per bunch and bunch spacing of 25 ns. In such conditions radiation hard detectors with extremely fast response are required, especially for instrumentation near the beam. BCM1F measures separately both luminosity and machine induced background particles with an excellent time resolution. Particles originating from collisions and machine induced back- ground arrive with 12 ns time difference. The performance of the BCM1F detector is...

  12. Very high-luminosity infrared galaxies - are they very young?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbidge, G.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that most of the very high-luminosity IRAS galaxies, those which emit greater than or equal to 10 to the 12th solar luminosities nearly all in the far infrared out to 100 microns, are very young systems with ages less than or equal to 10 to the 9th years. The luminosity comes largely from stars with masses near 100 solar masses which evolve rapidly, ejecting much of their mass as elements heavier than hydrogen. The gas ejected condenses into dust in circumstellar shells. The prototype star in the Galaxy which shows all of these attributes is Eta Car. It is shown that total masses of order 10 to the 7th-10 to the 8th solar masses condensed into such stars can produce the observed luminosities, and that 10-100 generations of such stars will produce enough dust (about 10 to the 8th solar masses) to explain the observed infrared luminosities. If this hypothesis is correct the composition of gas and dust may well be highly anomalous, and there should be no old stars with ages about 10 to the 10th years present. Initial star formation is probably triggered by interactions with close companion galaxies. 40 references

  13. An early separation scheme for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sterbini, G

    2010-01-01

    The present document is organized in five chapters. In the first chapter the framework of the study is described, developing the motivations, the goals and the requirements for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade. We analyze the need for the crossing angle and its impact on the peak luminosity of the collider. After having introduced the Early Separation Scheme, we explain how it may overcome some limitations of the present machine. We compare the nominal LHC crossing scheme with the proposed one underlining its potential in terms of performance and its issues with respect to the integration in the detectors. An analysis of the integrated magnetic field required is given. In the second chapter we introduce one of the most powerful aspect of the scheme: the luminosity leveling. After the description of the physical model adopted, we compare the results of its analytical and numerical solutions. All the potential improvement due to the Early Separation Scheme are shown on the luminosity plane (peak luminosity versus int...

  14. Estimation of automobile-driver describing function from highway tests using the double steering wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, P.; Crossman, E. R. F. W.; Szostak, H.

    1972-01-01

    The automobile-driver describing function for lateral position control was estimated for three subjects from frequency response analysis of straight road test results. The measurement procedure employed an instrumented full size sedan with known steering response characteristics, and equipped with a lateral lane position measuring device based on video detection of white stripe lane markings. Forcing functions were inserted through a servo driven double steering wheel coupling the driver to the steering system proper. Random appearing, Gaussian, and transient time functions were used. The quasi-linear models fitted to the random appearing input frequency response characterized the driver as compensating for lateral position error in a proportional, derivative, and integral manner. Similar parameters were fitted to the Gabor transformed frequency response of the driver to transient functions. A fourth term corresponding to response to lateral acceleration was determined by matching the time response histories of the model to the experimental results. The time histories show evidence of pulse-like nonlinear behavior during extended response to step transients which appear as high frequency remnant power.

  15. An improved peak frequency shift method for Q estimation based on generalized seismic wavelet function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Gao, Jinghuai

    2018-02-01

    As a powerful tool for hydrocarbon detection and reservoir characterization, the quality factor, Q, provides useful information in seismic data processing and interpretation. In this paper, we propose a novel method for Q estimation. The generalized seismic wavelet (GSW) function was introduced to fit the amplitude spectrum of seismic waveforms with two parameters: fractional value and reference frequency. Then we derive an analytical relation between the GSW function and the Q factor of the medium. When a seismic wave propagates through a viscoelastic medium, the GSW function can be employed to fit the amplitude spectrum of the source and attenuated wavelets, then the fractional values and reference frequencies can be evaluated numerically from the discrete Fourier spectrum. After calculating the peak frequency based on the obtained fractional value and reference frequency, the relationship between the GSW function and the Q factor can be built by the conventional peak frequency shift method. Synthetic tests indicate that our method can achieve higher accuracy and be more robust to random noise compared with existing methods. Furthermore, the proposed method is applicable to different types of source wavelet. Field data application also demonstrates the effectiveness of our method in seismic attenuation and the potential in the reservoir characteristic.

  16. Estimating Water Footprints of Vegetable Crops: Influence of Growing Season, Solar Radiation Data and Functional Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsie le Roux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water footprint (WF accounting as proposed by the Water Footprint Network (WFN can potentially provide important information for water resource management, especially in water scarce countries relying on irrigation to help meet their food requirements. However, calculating accurate WFs of short-season vegetable crops such as carrots, cabbage, beetroot, broccoli and lettuce presented some challenges. Planting dates and inter-annual weather conditions impact WF results. Joining weather datasets of just rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature with ones that include solar radiation and wind-speed affected crop model estimates and WF results. The functional unit selected can also have a major impact on results. For example, WFs according to the WFN approach do not account for crop residues used for other purposes, like composting and animal feed. Using yields in dry matter rather than fresh mass also impacts WF metrics, making comparisons difficult. To overcome this, using the nutritional value of crops as a functional unit can connect water use more directly to potential benefits derived from different crops and allow more straightforward comparisons. Grey WFs based on nitrogen only disregards water pollution caused by phosphates, pesticides and salinization. Poor understanding of the fate of nitrogen complicates estimation of nitrogen loads into the aquifer.

  17. The Impact of Clinical and Cognitive Variables on Social Functioning in Parkinson's Disease: Patient versus Examiner Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McNamara

    2010-01-01

    Results. Patients' estimates of their own social functioning were not significantly different from examiners' estimates. The impact of clinical variables on social functioning in PD revealed depression to be the strongest association of social functioning in PD on both the patient and the examiner version of the Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale. Conclusions. PD patients appear to be well aware of their social strengths and weaknesses. Depression and motor symptom severity are significant predictors of both self- and examiner reported social functioning in patients with PD. Assessment and treatment of depression in patients with PD may improve social functioning and overall quality of life.

  18. Efficient Estimation of Dynamic Density Functions with Applications in Streaming Data

    KAUST Repository

    Qahtan, Abdulhakim

    2016-05-11

    Recent advances in computing technology allow for collecting vast amount of data that arrive continuously in the form of streams. Mining data streams is challenged by the speed and volume of the arriving data. Furthermore, the underlying distribution of the data changes over the time in unpredicted scenarios. To reduce the computational cost, data streams are often studied in forms of condensed representation, e.g., Probability Density Function (PDF). This thesis aims at developing an online density estimator that builds a model called KDE-Track for characterizing the dynamic density of the data streams. KDE-Track estimates the PDF of the stream at a set of resampling points and uses interpolation to estimate the density at any given point. To reduce the interpolation error and computational complexity, we introduce adaptive resampling where more/less resampling points are used in high/low curved regions of the PDF. The PDF values at the resampling points are updated online to provide up-to-date model of the data stream. Comparing with other existing online density estimators, KDE-Track is often more accurate (as reflected by smaller error values) and more computationally efficient (as reflected by shorter running time). The anytime available PDF estimated by KDE-Track can be applied for visualizing the dynamic density of data streams, outlier detection and change detection in data streams. In this thesis work, the first application is to visualize the taxi traffic volume in New York city. Utilizing KDE-Track allows for visualizing and monitoring the traffic flow on real time without extra overhead and provides insight analysis of the pick up demand that can be utilized by service providers to improve service availability. The second application is to detect outliers in data streams from sensor networks based on the estimated PDF. The method detects outliers accurately and outperforms baseline methods designed for detecting and cleaning outliers in sensor data. The

  19. Association of estimated glomerular filtration rate with muscle function in older persons who have fallen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tap, Lisanne; Boyé, Nicole D A; Hartholt, Klaas A; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S

    2018-03-01

    studies suggest that estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is less reliable in older persons and that a low serum-creatinine might reflect reduced muscle mass rather than high kidney function. This study investigates the possible relationship between eGFR and multiple elements of physical performance in older fallers. baseline data of the IMPROveFALL-study were examined in participants ≥65 years. Serum-creatinine based eGFR was classified as normal (≥90 ml/min), mildly reduced (60-89 ml/min) or moderately-severely reduced (<60 ml/min). Timed-Up-and-Go-test and Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand-test were used to assess mobility; calf circumference and handgrip strength to assess muscle status. Ancova models adjusted for age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index and body mass index were performed. a total of 578 participants were included. Participants with a normal eGFR had lower handgrip strength than those with a mildly reduced eGFR (-9.5%, P < 0.001) and those with a moderately-severely reduced eGFR (-6.3%, P = 0.033) with mean strengths of 23.4, 25.8 and 24.9 kg, respectively. Participants with a normal eGFR had a smaller calf circumference than those with a mildly reduced eGFR (35.5 versus 36.5 cm, P = 0.006). Mean time to complete the mobility tests did not differ. in this study we found that older fallers with an eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min had smaller calf circumference and up to 10% lower handgrip strength than those with a reduced eGFR. This lower muscle mass is likely to lead to an overestimation of kidney function. This outcome therefore supports the search for biomarkers independent of muscle mass to estimate kidney function in older persons.

  20. Mapping functional traits: comparing abundance and presence-absence estimates at large spatial scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Newbold

    Full Text Available Efforts to quantify the composition of biological communities increasingly focus on functional traits. The composition of communities in terms of traits can be summarized in several ways. Ecologists are beginning to map the geographic distribution of trait-based metrics from various sources of data, but the maps have not been tested against independent data. Using data for birds of the Western Hemisphere, we test for the first time the most commonly used method for mapping community trait composition - overlaying range maps, which assumes that the local abundance of a given species is unrelated to the traits in question - and three new methods that as well as the range maps include varying degrees of information about interspecific and geographic variation in abundance. For each method, and for four traits (body mass, generation length, migratory behaviour, diet we calculated community-weighted mean of trait values, functional richness and functional divergence. The maps based on species ranges and limited abundance data were compared with independent data on community species composition from the American Christmas Bird Count (CBC scheme coupled with data on traits. The correspondence with observed community composition at the CBC sites was mostly positive (62/73 correlations but varied widely depending on the metric of community composition and method used (R(2: 5.6 × 10(-7 to 0.82, with a median of 0.12. Importantly, the commonly-used range-overlap method resulted in the best fit (21/22 correlations positive; R(2: 0.004 to 0.8, with a median of 0.33. Given the paucity of data on the local abundance of species, overlaying range maps appears to be the best available method for estimating patterns of community composition, but the poor fit for some metrics suggests that local abundance data are urgently needed to allow more accurate estimates of the composition of communities.

  1. Report of the Working Group on High Luminosities at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blucher, E.; Jowett, J.; Merritt, F.; Mikenberg, G.; Panman, J.; Renard, F.M.; Treille, D.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of an order-of-magnitude increase in the luminosity of LEP (CERN's Large Electron-Positron Collider) can dramatically increase its physics output. With the help of a pretzel scheme, it should be possible to increase the peak luminosity beyond 10 32 cm -2 s -1 at the Z energy and to significantly increase the luminosity around the W-pari threshold. This report spells out the physics possibilities opened up by the availability of several 10 7 Z events. The three domains of physics that benefit mostly from this abundance are very accurate measurements of Standard Model parameters, rare decays of the Z, and the physics of fermion-antifermion states such as B physics. The possibilities and implications for the machine and the experiments are presented. The physics possibilities are explored and compared with those at other accelerators. (orig.)

  2. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction of β* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the β*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze

  3. The luminosity of particle beams from thick accretion discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, R.; Nityananda, R.; Wiita, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of the radiation produced in the funnels of thick, highly luminous accretion discs with the walls of these funnels is investigated. Some processes not considered in an earlier discussion have been included. The turbulent mixing of the surface layer with deeper regions acts to reduce the luminosity associated with outflowing matter. The modification of the radiation field by the moving walls is also important. It is found, for the specific funnel geometry studied, corresponding to a radiation luminosity of 8.5 times the Eddington limit Lsub(E), that up to 1.5 Lsub(E) can be carried away as a particle beam, even for an optically thin funnel. This particle luminosity is sensitive to the sound velocity and the mixing efficiency in the walls. (author)

  4. High luminosity μ+ μ- collider: Report of a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R ampersand D plan to determine whether such machines are practical

  5. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00444244; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor, LUCID, and its read-out electronics have been completely rebuilt for the LHC Run II in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV) and the 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive $^{207}$Bi sources that produce internal-conversion electrons with energy above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count signals with amplitude above a predefined threshold (hits) as well as the integrated pulseheight of the signals, which makes it possible to measure luminosity with complementary methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be described, together with the results of the 2015 luminosity measurement.

  6. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II.

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID and its read-out electronics has been completely rebuilt for the 2015 LHC run in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive Bi$^{207}$ sources that produces internal conversion electrons above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count particle hits above a threshold but also the integrated pulseheight of the signals from the particles which makes it possible to measure luminosity with new methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be covered by the contribution as well as the results of the luminosity measurements with the detector in 2015.

  7. ATLAS Future Plans: Upgrade and the Physics with High Luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS experiment is planning a series of detector upgrades to cope with the planned increases in instantaneous luminosity and multiple interactions per crossing to maintain its physics capabilities. During the coming decade, the Large Hadron Collider will collide protons on protons at a center of mass energy up to 14 TeV with luminosities steadily increasing in a phased approach to over 5 × 1034 cm−2s−1. The resulting large data sets will significantly enhance the physics reach of the ATLAS detector building on the recent discovery of the Higgs-like boson. The planned detector upgrades being designed to cope with the increasing luminosity and its impact on the ATLAS physics program will be discussed.

  8. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY AND HIGHER POLARIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SATOGATA,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent rings, has completed its fourth year of operation since commissioning in 1999. RHIC is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and asymmetric beam collisions. RHIC has produced physics data at four experiments in runs that include gold-on-gold collisions at various beam energies (9.8, 31, 65, and 100 GeV/u), high-energy polarized proton-proton collisions (100 GeV), and deuteron-gold collisions (100 GeV/u). We review recent machine performance for high-luminosity gold-gold operations and polarized proton operations, including causes and solutions for known operational limits. Plans and progress for luminosity and polarization improvements, electron cooling, and the electron-ion collider eRHIC are discussed.

  9. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    beta line to be 0.518 +/- 0.039, shallower than previously reported and consistent with the slope of 0.5 expected from the naive theoretical assumption that all AGN have, on average, the same ionizing spectrum and the same ionization parameter and gas density in the H beta line-emitting region.......We have obtained high resolution images of the central regions of 14 reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Camera to account for host-galaxy starlight contamination of measured AGN luminosities. We measure...... the host-galaxy starlight contribution to the continuum luminosity at 5100 A through the typical ground-based slit position and geometry used in the reverberation-mapping campaigns. We find that removing the starlight contribution results in a significant correction to the luminosity of each AGN, both...

  10. Reduction of beta* and increase of luminosity at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat,F.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The reduction of {beta}* beyond the 1m design value at RHIC has been consistently achieved over the last 6 years of RHIC operations, resulting in an increase of luminosity for different running modes and species. During the recent 2007-08 deuteron-gold run the reduction to 0.70 from the design 1m achieved a 30% increase in delivered luminosity. The key ingredients allowing the reduction have been the capability of efficiently developing ramps with tune and coupling feedback, orbit corrections on the ramp, and collimation, to minimize beam losses in the final focus triplets, the main aperture limitations for the collision optics. We will describe the operational strategy used to reduce the {beta}*, at first squeezing the beam at store, to test feasibility, followed by the operationally preferred option of squeezing the beam during acceleration, and the resulting luminosity increase. We will conclude with future plans for the beta squeeze.

  11. Luminosity optimization schemes in Compton experiments based on Fabry-Perot optical resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Variola

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The luminosity of Compton x-ray and γ sources depends on the average current in electron bunches, the energy of the laser pulses, and the geometry of the particle bunch to laser pulse collisions. To obtain high power photon pulses, these can be stacked in a passive optical resonator (Fabry-Perot cavity especially when a high average flux is required. But, in this case, owing to the presence of the optical cavity mirrors, the electron bunches have to collide at an angle with the laser pulses with a consequent luminosity decrease. In this article a crab-crossing scheme is proposed for Compton sources, based on a laser amplified in a Fabry-Perot resonator, to eliminate the luminosity losses given by the crossing angle, taking into account that in laser-electron collisions only the electron bunches can be tilted at the collision point. We report the analytical study on the crab-crossing scheme for Compton gamma sources. The analytical expression for the total yield of photons generated in Compton sources with the crab-crossing scheme of collision is derived. The optimal collision angle of the bunch was found to be equal to half of the collision angle. At this crabbing angle, the maximal yield of scattered off laser photons is attained thanks to the maximization, in the collision process, of the time spent by the laser pulse in the electron bunch. Estimations for some Compton source projects are presented. Furthermore, some schemes of the optical cavities configuration are analyzed and the luminosity calculated. As illustrated, the four-mirror two- or three-dimensional scheme is the most appropriate for Compton sources.

  12. Studies on the Zeroes of Bessel Functions and Methods for Their Computation: IV. Inequalities, Estimates, Expansions, etc., for Zeros of Bessel Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimov, M. K.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series of survey articles concerning zeros of Bessel functions and methods for their computation. Various inequalities, estimates, expansions, etc. for positive zeros are analyzed, and some results are described in detail with proofs.

  13. Modified use of Van de Meer method for luminosity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications are suggested which should improve the accuracy of the Van de Meer method of determining beam luminosity at the CERN ISR. Four bending magnets would be inserted between the quadrupoles of a given experimental straight section, connected in series, and shimmed so that the machine parameters are not affected. The magnets would be driven with a zigzag current power supply with a uniform rate of current change. Experiments requiring accurate luminosity determination would be run while the deflection magnets are being driven with the oscillatory current pattern. (U.S.)

  14. Online calculation of the Tevatron collider luminosity using accelerator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    The luminosity of a collision region may be calculated if one understands the lattice parameters and measures the beam intensities, the transverse and longitudinal emittances, and the individual proton and antiproton beam trajectories (space and time) through the collision region. This paper explores an attempt to make this calculation using beam instrumentation during Run 1b of the Tevatron. The instrumentation used is briefly described. The calculations and their uncertainties are compared to luminosities calculated independently by the Collider Experiments (CDF and D0)

  15. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Netzer, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    measurements at 5100A. After correcting the luminosities of the AGNs for the contribution from starlight, we re-examine the Hbeta R-L relationship. Our best fit for the relationship gives a powerlaw slope of 0.52 with a range of 0.45 - 0.59 allowed by the uncertainties. This is consistent with our previous...... findings, and thus still consistent with the naive assumption that all AGNs are simply luminosity-scaled versions of each other. We discuss various consistency checks relating to the galaxy modeling and starlight contributions, as well as possible systematic errors in the current set of reverberation...

  16. Flexible parametric modelling of cause-specific hazards to estimate cumulative incidence functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Competing risks are a common occurrence in survival analysis. They arise when a patient is at risk of more than one mutually exclusive event, such as death from different causes, and the occurrence of one of these may prevent any other event from ever happening. Methods There are two main approaches to modelling competing risks: the first is to model the cause-specific hazards and transform these to the cumulative incidence function; the second is to model directly on a transformation of the cumulative incidence function. We focus on the first approach in this paper. This paper advocates the use of the flexible parametric survival model in this competing risk framework. Results An illustrative example on the survival of breast cancer patients has shown that the flexible parametric proportional hazards model has almost perfect agreement with the Cox proportional hazards model. However, the large epidemiological data set used here shows clear evidence of non-proportional hazards. The flexible parametric model is able to adequately account for these through the incorporation of time-dependent effects. Conclusion A key advantage of using this approach is that smooth estimates of both the cause-specific hazard rates and the cumulative incidence functions can be obtained. It is also relatively easy to incorporate time-dependent effects which are commonly seen in epidemiological studies. PMID:23384310

  17. Hypnosis and pain perception: An Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; De Rossi, Pietro; Angeletti, Gloria; Sani, Gabriele; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Several studies reported that hypnosis can modulate pain perception and tolerance by affecting cortical and subcortical activity in brain regions involved in these processes. We conducted an Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on functional neuroimaging studies of pain perception under hypnosis to identify brain activation-deactivation patterns occurring during hypnotic suggestions aiming at pain reduction, including hypnotic analgesic, pleasant, or depersonalization suggestions (HASs). We searched the PubMed, Embase and PsycInfo databases; we included papers published in peer-reviewed journals dealing with functional neuroimaging and hypnosis-modulated pain perception. The ALE meta-analysis encompassed data from 75 healthy volunteers reported in 8 functional neuroimaging studies. HASs during experimentally-induced pain compared to control conditions correlated with significant activations of the right anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's Area [BA] 32), left superior frontal gyrus (BA 6), and right insula, and deactivation of right midline nuclei of the thalamus. HASs during experimental pain impact both cortical and subcortical brain activity. The anterior cingulate, left superior frontal, and right insular cortices activation increases could induce a thalamic deactivation (top-down inhibition), which may correlate with reductions in pain intensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Soil hydraulic functions determined from measurements of air permeability, capillary modeling, and high-dimensional parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, J.H.; Vrugt, J.A.; Unsal, E.

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of flow and transport through unsaturated porous media requires knowledge of the water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions. In the past few decades many different laboratory procedures have been developed to estimate these hydraulic properties. Most of these

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY LUMINOSITY AND MAJOR FLARE LAUNCHING IN GRS 1915+105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    We perform the most detailed analysis to date of the X-ray state of the Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1915+105 just prior to (0-4 hr) and during the brief (1-7 hr) ejection of major (superluminal) radio flares. A very strong model independent correlation is found between the 1.2 keV-12 keV X-ray flux 0-4 hr before flare ejections with the peak optically thin 2.3 GHz emission of the flares. This suggests a direct physical connection between the energy in the ejection and the luminosity of the accretion flow preceding the ejection. In order to quantify this concept, we develop techniques to estimate the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosity, L intrinsic , from RXTE All Sky Monitor data and to implement known methods to estimate the time-averaged power required to launch the radio emitting plasmoids, Q (sometimes called jet power). We find that the distribution of intrinsic luminosity from 1.2 keV-50 keV, L intrinsic (1.2-50), is systematically elevated just before ejections compared to arbitrary times when there are no major ejections. The estimated Q is strongly correlated with L intrinsic (1.2-50) 0-4 hr before the ejection, the increase in L intrinsic (1.2-50) in the hours preceding the ejection and the time-averaged L intrinsic (1.2-50) during the flare rise. Furthermore, the total time-averaged power during the ejection (Q + the time average of L intrinsic (1.2-50) during ejection) is strongly correlated with L intrinsic (1.2-50) just before launch with near equality if the distance to the source is ≈10.5 kpc.

  20. Galaxies in the Illustris simulation as seen by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Size-luminosity relations and the deficit of bulge-dominated galaxies in Illustris at low mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrell, Connor; Torrey, Paul; Simard, Luc; Ellison, Sara L.

    2017-05-01

    The interpretive power of the newest generation of large-volume hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation rests upon their ability to reproduce the observed properties of galaxies. In this second paper in a series, we employ bulge+disc decompositions of realistic dust-free galaxy images from the Illustris simulation in a consistent comparison with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Examining the size-luminosity relations of each sample, we find that galaxies in Illustris are roughly twice as large and 0.7 mag brighter on average than galaxies in the SDSS. The trend of increasing slope and decreasing normalization of size-luminosity as a function of bulge fraction is qualitatively similar to observations. However, the size-luminosity relations of Illustris galaxies are quantitatively distinguished by higher normalizations and smaller slopes than for real galaxies. We show that this result is linked to a significant deficit of bulge-dominated galaxies in Illustris relative to the SDSS at stellar masses log M_{\\star }/M_{⊙}≲ 11. We investigate this deficit by comparing bulge fraction estimates derived from photometry and internal kinematics. We show that photometric bulge fractions are systematically lower than the kinematic fractions at low masses, but with increasingly good agreement as the stellar mass increases.