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Sample records for erosion resistant materials

  1. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  2. Effect of mechanical properties on erosion resistance of ductile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Boris Feliksovih

    Solid particle erosion (SPE) resistance of ductile Fe, Ni, and Co-based alloys as well as commercially pure Ni and Cu was studied. A model for SPE behavior of ductile materials is presented. The model incorporates the mechanical properties of the materials at the deformation conditions associated with SPE process, as well as the evolution of these properties during the erosion induced deformation. An erosion parameter was formulated based on consideration of the energy loss during erosion, and incorporates the material's hardness and toughness at high strain rates. The erosion model predicts that materials combining high hardness and toughness can exhibit good erosion resistance. To measure mechanical properties of materials, high strain rate compression tests using Hopkinson bar technique were conducted at strain rates similar to those during erosion. From these tests, failure strength and strain during erosion were estimated and used to calculate toughness of the materials. The proposed erosion parameter shows good correlation with experimentally measured erosion rates for all tested materials. To analyze subsurface deformation during erosion, microhardness and nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-sections of the eroded materials and the size of the plastically deformed zone and the increase in materials hardness due to erosion were determined. A nanoindentation method was developed to estimate the restitution coefficient within plastically deformed regions of the eroded samples which provides a measure of the rebounding ability of a material during particle impact. An increase in hardness near the eroded surface led to an increase in restitution coefficient. Also, the stress rates imposed below the eroded surface were comparable to those measured during high strain-rate compression tests (10sp3-10sp4 ssp{-1}). A new parameter, "area under the microhardness curve" was developed that represents the ability of a material to absorb impact energy. By

  3. Correlating Inertial Acoustic Cavitation Emissions with Material Erosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, I.; Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Frota, M. N.

    The standard ASTM G32-10 concerns the hydrodynamic cavitation erosion resistance of materials by subjecting them to acoustic cavitation generated by a sonotrode. The work reported extends this technique by detecting and monitoring the ultrasonic cavitation, considered responsible for the erosion process, specifically for coupons of aluminium-bronze alloy. The study uses a 65 mm diameter variant of NPL's cavitation sensor, which detects broadband acoustic emissions, and logs acoustic signals generated in the MHz frequency range, using NPL's Cavimeter. Cavitation readings were made throughout the exposure duration, which was carried out at discrete intervals (900 to 3600 s), allowing periodic mass measurements to be made to assess erosion loss under a strict protocol. Cavitation measurements and erosion were compared for different separations of the sonotrode tip from the material under test. The maximum variation associated with measurement of cavitation level was between 2.2% and 3.3% when the separation (λ) between the transducer horn and the specimen increased from 0.5 to 1.0 mm, for a transducer (sonotrode) displacement amplitude of 43.5 μm. Experiments conducted at the same transducer displacement amplitude show that the mass loss of the specimen -a measure of erosion- was 67.0 mg (λ = 0.5 mm) and 66.0 mg (λ = 1.0 mm).

  4. Ice-Release and Erosion Resistant Materials for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Brinn, Cameron; Cook, Alex; Pascual-Marquez, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Icing conditions may cause wind turbine generators to partially lose productivity or to be completely shut down to avoid structural damage. At present, commercially available technologies to mitigate this problem consist of expensive, energy hungry heating elements, which costs roughly 70,000 euro per medium size turbine. Conventional passive ice protection coating systems heavily rely on delicate surface structures and expensive materials to create water repellent superhydrophobic / low surface energy surfaces, which have been proven to be ineffective against ice accumulation. The lack of performance among conventional ice protection materials stems from a flaw in the approach to the problem: failure to recognize that water in its liquid form (WATER) and water in its solid form (ICE) are two different things. Something that works for WATER does not automatically work for ICE. Another reason is that many superhydrophobic materials are often reliant upon often fragile micro-structured surfaces to achieve their intended effects. This paper discusses a fundamentally different approach to the creation of a robust, low cost, durable, and multifunctional materials for ice release and erosion resistance. This National Science Foundation sponsored ice-release coating technology holds promise for protecting wind turbine blades and towers, thus potentially increasing reliability for power generation under icing conditions. Because of the vulnerability of wind turbine blades to ice buildup and erosion damages, wind farm facilities stand to reap considerable benefits.

  5. Application of Computer Simulation to Identify Erosion Resistance of Materials of Wet-steam Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelyov, D. A.; Dergachyov, K. V.

    2017-10-01

    A problem of identifying the efficiency of using materials, coatings, linings and solderings of wet-steam turbine rotor blades by means of computer simulation is considered. Numerical experiments to define erosion resistance of materials of wet-steam turbine blades are described. Kinetic curves for erosion area and weight of the worn rotor blade material of turbines K-300-240 LMP and atomic icebreaker “Lenin” have been defined. The conclusion about the effectiveness of using different erosion-resistant materials and protection configuration of rotor blades is also made.

  6. Comparative evaluation of experimental and theoretical erosion resistance of materials upon electric pulse treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpman, M.G.; Fetisov, G.P.; Bologov, D.V.

    1999-01-01

    Using the Palatnik criterion a comparative analysis is performed of the theoretical and experimental data on comparative electric erosion and erosion resistance of the electrodes and parts made of different materials upon their treatment using electric pulse technique. A reasonable qualitative agreement of the theoretical and experimental data indicates the possibility of using the Palatnik criterion to predict the serviceability of different pairs of the materials in conditions of electroerosion wear [ru

  7. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  8. Erosion resistance in a stationary arc of powder materials on the base of heat resisting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minakova, R.V.; Kostenetskaya, L.I.; Krusanova, A.P.; Kukhtikov, V.A.; Smirnov, A.V.; Lugovskaya, E.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Materialovedeniya)

    1983-08-01

    Comparison investigations of some properties of the Mo-Cu, Mo-Ni(Co)-Cu materials and the W-Cu, W-Ni-Cu compositions used at the present time as well as contact pairs prepared from them is conducted. It is shown that electroerosion wear of the contacts is connected not only with the material properties but also with features of structural changes in the working layer under effect of arc discharge. It is shown also that directed alloying with respect to the origin of phase transition in the electrode material and the medium effect during current commutation promotes electroerosion resistance.

  9. Erosion resistance in a stationary arc of powder materials on the base of heat resisting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakova, R.V.; Kostenetskaya, L.I.; Krusanova, A.P.; Kukhtikov, V.A.; Smirnov, A.V.; Lugovskaya, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison investigations of some properties of the Mo-Cu, Mo-Ni(Co)-CU materials and the W-CU, W-Ni-CU compositions used at the present time as well as contact pairs prepared from them is conducted. It is shown that electroerosion wear of the contacts is connected not only with the material properties but also with features of structural changes in the working layer under effect of arc discharge. It in shown s also that directed alloying with respect to the origin of phase transition in the electrode material and the medium effect during current commutation promotes electroerosion resistance

  10. Standard Test Method for Dust Erosion Resistance of Optical and Infrared Transparent Materials and Coatings

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the resistance of transparent plastics and coatings used in aerospace windscreens, canopies, and viewports to surface erosion as a result of dust impingement. This test method simulates flight through a defined particle cloud environment by means of independent control of particle size, velocity, impact angle, mass loading, and test duration. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Erosion resistance comparison of alternative surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česánek, Z.; Schubert, J.; Houdková, Š.

    2017-05-01

    Erosion is a process characterized by the particle separation and the damage of component functional surfaces. Thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF (High Pressure / High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) is commonly used for protection of component surfaces against erosive wear. Alloy as well as cermet based coatings meet the requirements for high erosion resistance. Wear resistance is in many cases the determining property of required component functioning. The application suitability of coating materials is particularly influenced by different hardness. This paper therefore presents an erosion resistance comparison of alloy and cermet based coatings. The coatings were applied on steel substrates and were subjected to the erosive test using the device for evaluation of material erosion resistance working on the principle of centrifugal erodent flow. Abrasive sand Al2O3 with grain size 212-250 μm was selected as an erosive material. For this purpose, the specimens were prepared by thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF using commercially available powders Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-25%NiCr, Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY, Hastelloy C-276 and experimental coating TiMoCN-29% Ni. Erosion resistance of evaluated coatings was compared with erosive resistance of 1.4923 high alloyed steel without nitridation and in nitrided state and further with surface treatment using technology PVD. According to the evaluation, the resulting erosive resistance depends not only on the selected erodent and surface protection, but also on the erodent impact angle.

  12. Study on Co-free amorphous material cladding using a laser beam to improve the resistance of primary system parts in NPPs to wear/erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Woo, S. S.; Seo, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    A study on Co-free amorphous material, ARMACOR M, cladding using a laser beam has been performed to improve resistance of the primary system main parts on nuclear power plants to wear/erosion-corrosion. The wear/erosion-corrosion properties of ARMACRO M cladded speciemens were characterized in air at room temperature and 300 .deg. C and in air at room temperature, and compared to those of other hardfacing materials, such as Stellite 6, NOREM 02, Deloro 50, TIG-welde or laer cladded. According to the results, ARMACOR M laser-cladded specimen showed to have the highest resistance to wear/erosion-corrosion

  13. Erosion resistance of composite materials on titanium, zirconium and aluminium nitride base under the electron beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Kuzenkova, M.A.; Slutskin, M.G.; Kravchuk, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion resistance of composites based on nitrides of titanium, zirconium and aluminium to spark and electron beam processing has been studied. The erosion resistance in spark processing is shown to depend on specific electric resistance of the alloys. TiN-AlN and ZrN-AlN alloys containing more than 70% AlN (with specific electric resistance more than 10 6 -10 7 ohm/cm) caot be processed by spark method. It is shown that erosion of the composites by an electron beam depends primarily on the rate of evaporation of the components

  14. Analysis of the Effect of Surface Modification on Polyimide Composites Coated with Erosion Resistant Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndalama, Tchinga; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Sutter, James K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to enhance performance of composite coatings through modification of graphite-reinforced polyimide composite surfaces prior to metal bond coat/ hard topcoat application for use in the erosive and/or oxidative environments of advanced engines. Graphite reinforced polyimide composites, PMR-15 and PMR-II-50, formed by sheet molding and pre-pregging will be surface treated, overlaid with a bond coat and then coated with WC-Co. The surface treatment will include cleaning, RF plasma or ultraviolet light- ozone etching, and deposition of SiO(x) groups. These surface treatments will be studied in order to investigate and improve adhesion and oxidation resistance. The following panels were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center(NASA-GRC): Eight compression molded PMR-II-50; 6 x 6 x 0.125 in. Two vacuum-bagged PMR-II-50; 12 x 12 x 0.125 in. Eight compression molded PMR-15; 6 x 6 x 0.125 in. One vacuum-bagged PMR-15; 12 x 12 x 0.125 in. All panels were made using a 12 x 12 in. T650-35 8HS (3K-tow) graphite fabric. A diamond-wafering blade, with deionized water as a cutting fluid, was used to cut PMR-II-50 and PMR-15 panels into 1 x 1 in. pieces for surface tests. The panel edges exhibiting delamination were used for the preliminary surface preparation tests as these would be unsuitable for strength and erosion testing. PMR-15 neat resin samples were also provided by NASA GRC. Surface profiles of the as-received samples were determined using a Dektak III Surface profile measuring system. Two samples of compression molded PMR-II-50 and PMR-15, vacuum-bagged PMR-II-50 and PMR-15 were randomly chosen for surface profile measurement according to ANSI/ASME B46.1. Prior to each measurement, the samples were blasted with compressed air to remove any artifacts. Five 10 mm-long scans were made on each sample. The short and long wavelength cutoff filter values were set at 100 and 1000 m, diamond stylus radius was 12.5 microns. Table 1 is a summary of the

  15. Low cost sic coated erosion resistant graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, M.F.; Nicholls, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of materials with unique and improved properties using low cost processes is essential to increase performance and reduce cost of the solid rocket motors. Specifically advancements are needed for boost phase nozzle. As these motors operate at very high pressure and temperatures, the nozzle must survive high thermal stresses with minimal erosion to maintain performance. Currently three material choices are being exploited; which are refractory metals, graphite and carbon-carbon composites. Of these three materials graphite is the most attractive choice because of its low cost, light weight, and easy forming. However graphite is prone to erosion, both chemical and mechanical, which may affect the ballistic conditions and mechanical properties of the nozzle. To minimize this erosion high density graphite is usually preferred; which is again very expensive. Another technique used to minimize the erosion is Pyrolytic Graphite (PG) coating inside the nozzle. However PG coating is prone to cracking and spallation along with very cumbersome deposition process. Another possible methodology to avoid this erosion is to convert the inside surface of the rocket nozzle to Silicon Carbide (SiC), which is very erosion resistant and have much better thermal stability compared to graphite and even PG. Due to its functionally gradient nature such a layer will be very adherent and resistant to spallation. The current research is focused on synthesizing, characterizing and oxidation testing of such a converted SiC layer on commercial grade graphite. (author)

  16. Experimental Study of Laser Cladding Methods on Water Erosion Resistance to Low Pressure Blades Materials of Steam Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus was built to study the effects of liquid-solid impact on laser cladding processing specimens of 17-4PH stainless steel material in the present investigation. Then the result of specimens without laser surface process was compared. The impact effect on the specimens was observed using the three-dimensional digital microscope. The depth of laser cladding and substrate material caused by liquid droplet impact was studied in detail and measured. The accuracy and reliability of the experimental system and computing methods were also verified. The depth of the impact area of laser cladding specimens was distributed in the range of 0.5–1.5 μm while the 17-4PH group was distributed in the range of 2.5–3.5 μm. In contrast with specimens without laser surface processing, the material processed by laser cladding has significantly higher resistance to water erosion.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  18. Organo-Aluminate Polymeric Materials as Advanced Erosion/Corrosion Resistant Thin Film Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ...) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The coating system is based on the development of carboxylato- alumoxane precursors for fabrication of corrosion resistant oxide barrier layers and alumoxane-epoxy based primer coats...

  19. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    An elvow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveying comprising a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figures.

  20. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  1. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  2. Comparison of Inconel 625 and Inconel 600 in resistance to cavitation erosion and jet impingement erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, H.X. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zheng, Y.G., E-mail: ygzheng@imr.ac.c [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qin, C.P. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 62 Wencui Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Liquid droplet erosion (LDE), which often occurs in bellows made of nickel-based alloys, threatens the security operation of the nuclear power plant. As the candidate materials of the bellows, Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 were both tested for resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) and jet impingement erosion (JIE) through vibratory cavitation equipment and a jet apparatus for erosion-corrosion. Cumulative mass loss vs. exposure time was used to evaluate the erosion rate of the two alloys. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies before and after the erosion tests were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the inclusions were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the surface roughness was also measured by surface roughness tester to illustrate the evolution of erosion process. The results show that the cumulative mass loss of CE of Inconel 625 is about 1/6 that of Inconel 600 and the CE incubation period of the Inconel 625 is 4 times as long as that of the Inconel 600. The micro-morphology evolution of CE process illustrates that the twinning and hardness of the Inconel 625 plays a significant role in CE. In addition, the cumulative mass loss of JIE of Inconel 625 is about 2/3 that of Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 90{sup o}, and almost equal to that of the Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 30{sup o}. Overall, the resistance to CE and JIE of Inconel 625 is much superior to that of Inconel 600.

  3. Comparison of Inconel 625 and Inconel 600 in resistance to cavitation erosion and jet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, H.X.; Zheng, Y.G.; Qin, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid droplet erosion (LDE), which often occurs in bellows made of nickel-based alloys, threatens the security operation of the nuclear power plant. As the candidate materials of the bellows, Inconel 600 and Inconel 625 were both tested for resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) and jet impingement erosion (JIE) through vibratory cavitation equipment and a jet apparatus for erosion-corrosion. Cumulative mass loss vs. exposure time was used to evaluate the erosion rate of the two alloys. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies before and after the erosion tests were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the inclusions were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the surface roughness was also measured by surface roughness tester to illustrate the evolution of erosion process. The results show that the cumulative mass loss of CE of Inconel 625 is about 1/6 that of Inconel 600 and the CE incubation period of the Inconel 625 is 4 times as long as that of the Inconel 600. The micro-morphology evolution of CE process illustrates that the twinning and hardness of the Inconel 625 plays a significant role in CE. In addition, the cumulative mass loss of JIE of Inconel 625 is about 2/3 that of Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 90 o , and almost equal to that of the Inconel 600 at impacting angle of 30 o . Overall, the resistance to CE and JIE of Inconel 625 is much superior to that of Inconel 600.

  4. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  5. Combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of surface modified SS410 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarendra, H. J.; Pratap, M. S.; Karthik, S.; Punitha Kumara, M. S.; Rajath, H. C.; Ranjith, H.; Shubhatunga, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Slurry erosion and combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings are studied and compared with the as-received martensitic stainless steel material. 70Ni-Cr coatings are deposited on SS 410 material through plasma thermal spray process. The synergy effect of the combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of plasma thermal spray coatings were investigated in a slurry pot tester in the presence of bluff bodies known as Cavitation Inducers. Results showed the combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of martensitic stainless steel - 410 can be improved by plasma thermal spray coating. It is observed that the plasma spray coated specimens are better erosion resistant than the as- received material, subjected to erosion test under similar conditions. As-received and the surface modified steels are mechanically characterized for its hardness, bending. Morphological studies are conducted through scanning electron microscope.

  6. Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schechter, D.E.; Tsai, C.C.; Sluss, F.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

  7. A new concept for stainless steels ranking upon the resistance to cavitation erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Salcianu, L. C.; Ghera, C.; Micu, L. M.; Badarau, R.; Iosif, A.; Pirvulescu, L. D.; Podoleanu, C. E.

    2017-01-01

    In present, the ranking of materials as their resistance to cavitation erosion is obtained by using laboratory tests finalized with the characteristic curves mean depth erosion against time MDE(t) and mean depth erosion rate against time MDER(t). In some previous papers, Bordeasu and co-workers give procedures to establish exponential equation representing the curves, with minimum scatter of the experimental obtained results. For a given material, both exponential equations MDE(t) and MDER(t) have the same values for the parameters of scale and for the shape one. For the ranking of materials is sometimes important to establish single figure. Till now in Timisoara Polytechnic University Cavitation Laboratory were used three such numbers: the stable value of the curve MDER(t), the resistance to cavitation erosion (Rcav ≡ 1/MDERstable) and the normalized cavitation resistance Rns which is the rate between vs = MDERstable for the analyzed material and vse= MDERse the mean depth erosion rate for the steel OH12NDL (Rns = vs/vse ). OH12NDL is a material used for manufacturing the blades of numerous Kaplan turbines in Romania for which both cavitation erosion laboratory tests and field measurements of cavitation erosions are available. In the present paper we recommend a new method for ranking the materials upon cavitation erosion resistance. This method uses the scale and shape parameters of the exponential equations which represents the characteristic cavitation erosion curves. Till now the method was applied only for stainless steels. The experimental results show that the scale parameter represents an excellent method for ranking the stainless steels. In the future this kind of ranking will be tested also for other materials especially for bronzes used for manufacturing ship propellers.

  8. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, S. S

    2000-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials onto materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. (1) Development of a powder feeding system for the laser cladding. (2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. (3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. (4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phases of the clads. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clads. (6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR.

  9. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials onto materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. 1) Development of a powder feeding system for the laser cladding. 2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. 3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. 4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phases of the clads. 5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clads. 6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR

  10. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Hwang, S. S.; Lim, Y. S.

    1999-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials on materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. 1) Development of a power feeding system for the primary system. 2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. 3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. 4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phase of the clad. 5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clad. 6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR. (author)

  11. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  12. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  13. Effect of hard second-phase particles on the erosion resistance of model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosel, T.H.; Aptekar, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of erosion rate on second phase volume fraction (SPVF) has been studied for Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cu/WC(W/sub 2/C) model alloys produced by pressing and sintering. The intention was to investigate the reasons for the poor contribution to erosion resistance made by large hard second phase particles (SPP) in other studies. The results show that for Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ alloys, the erosion rate generally increased with SPVF, demonstrating a negative contribution to erosion resistance. This occurred despite the fact that the measured erosion rate of monolithic Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was lower by one to two orders of magnitude than that of the pure matrix. Changing from severe erosion with large erodent particles at high velocity to mild conditions with small erodent at low velocity caused a change from depression of the SPPs to protrusion from the surface, with some improvement of the relative erosion resistance compared to the pure matrix. For Cu/WC(W/sub 2/C) alloys, changing from severe to mild erosion conditions caused a change from an increase of erosion with SPVF to a decrease. The results are discussed in terms of the increased microfracture of the unsupported edges of the second phase particles compared to a flat single-phase surface. This edge is consistent with the results, and explains observations not predicted by existing theories for erosion of single-phase materials. A model is introduced which predicts a new averaging law for the erosion rate of a two-phase alloy in terms of erosion rates of its constituent phases

  14. Compressor Impeller Erosion Resistant Surface Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...). Coatings based on tungsten carbide tantalum carbide. titanium carbide all with a cobalt matrix were evaluated for high velocity particle erosion in conventional wear test studies as well as wind tunnel testing...

  15. Instrumentation and methods evaluations for shallow land burial of waste materials: water erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, D.D.; Murphy, E.M.; Childs, S.W.

    1981-08-01

    The erosion of geologic materials by water at shallow-land hazardous waste disposal sites can compromise waste containment. Erosion of protective soil from these sites may enhance waste transport to the biosphere through water, air, and biologic pathways. The purpose of this study was to review current methods of evaluating soil erosion and to recommend methods for use at shallow-land, hazardous waste burial sites. The basic principles of erosion control are: minimize raindrop impact on the soil surface; minimize runoff quantity; minimize runoff velocity; and maximize the soil's resistance to erosion. Generally soil erosion can be controlled when these principles are successfully applied at waste disposal sites. However, these erosion control practices may jeopardize waste containment. Typical erosion control practices may enhance waste transport by increasing subsurface moisture movement and biologic uptake of hazardous wastes. A two part monitoring program is recommended for US Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous waste disposal sites. The monitoring programs and associated measurement methods are designed to provide baseline data permitting analysis and prediction of long term erosion hazards at disposal sites. These two monitoring programs are: (1) site reconnaissance and tracking; and (2) site instrumentation. Some potential waste transport problems arising from erosion control practices are identified. This report summarizes current literature regarding water erosion prediction and control

  16. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  17. Laser processing of cast iron for enhanced erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.; Altstetter, C.J.; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The surfaces of nodular and gray cast iron have been modified by CO 2 laser processing for enhanced hardness and erosion resistance. Control of the near-surface microstructure was achieved primarily by controlling resolidification of the laser melted layer through variations in laser beam/target interaction time and beam power density. Typical interaction times and power densities used were 5 msec and 500 kW/cm 2 . Two basic kinds of microstructure can be produced-a feathery microstructure with high hardness (up to 1245 HV) and a dendritic microstructure with a metastable, fully austenitic matrix and lower hardness (600 to 800 HV). Erosion testing was done using slurries of SiO 2 or SiC in water. Weight loss and crater profile measurements were used to evaluate the erosion characteristics of the various microstructures. Both ductile and gray cast iron showed marked improvement in erosion resistance after laser processing

  18. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  19. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  20. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  1. The influence of material hardness on liquid droplet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Yamagata, Takayuki; Takano, Shotaro; Saito, Kengo; Morita, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied for various metal materials. • Average power dependency on droplet velocity is found as 7. • Power dependency on Vickers hardness is found as −4.5. • An empirical formula is constructed for erosion rates of metal materials. • Predicted erosion rate is well correlated with experiment within a factor of 1.5. - Abstract: This paper describes the experimental study on the liquid droplet impingement erosion of metal materials to understand the influence of material hardness on the erosion rate. The experiment is carried out using a water spray jet apparatus with a condition of relatively thin liquid film thickness. The metal materials tested are pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, brass, mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel. The liquid droplets considered are 30 ± 5 μm in volume average diameter of water, which is the same order of droplet diameter in the actual pipeline in nuclear/fossil power plants. In order to understand the influence of material hardness on the liquid droplet impingement erosion, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation on the eroded surface and the measurement of erosion rate are carried out in the terminal stage of erosion. The experimental results indicate that the erosion rates are expressed by the droplet velocity, volume flux, Vickers hardness and the liquid film thickness, which are fundamentals of the liquid droplet impingement erosion. The empirical formula shows that the power index for droplet velocity dependency is found to be 7 with a scattering from 5 to 9 depending on the materials, while the power index for Vickers hardness dependency is found as −4.5

  2. The influence of material hardness on liquid droplet impingement erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki, E-mail: fujisawa@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Yamagata, Takayuki, E-mail: yamagata@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Visualization Research Center, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Saito, Kengo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi 2-Nocho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Morita, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Inada, Fumio [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1, Iwatokita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied for various metal materials. • Average power dependency on droplet velocity is found as 7. • Power dependency on Vickers hardness is found as −4.5. • An empirical formula is constructed for erosion rates of metal materials. • Predicted erosion rate is well correlated with experiment within a factor of 1.5. - Abstract: This paper describes the experimental study on the liquid droplet impingement erosion of metal materials to understand the influence of material hardness on the erosion rate. The experiment is carried out using a water spray jet apparatus with a condition of relatively thin liquid film thickness. The metal materials tested are pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, brass, mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel. The liquid droplets considered are 30 ± 5 μm in volume average diameter of water, which is the same order of droplet diameter in the actual pipeline in nuclear/fossil power plants. In order to understand the influence of material hardness on the liquid droplet impingement erosion, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation on the eroded surface and the measurement of erosion rate are carried out in the terminal stage of erosion. The experimental results indicate that the erosion rates are expressed by the droplet velocity, volume flux, Vickers hardness and the liquid film thickness, which are fundamentals of the liquid droplet impingement erosion. The empirical formula shows that the power index for droplet velocity dependency is found to be 7 with a scattering from 5 to 9 depending on the materials, while the power index for Vickers hardness dependency is found as −4.5.

  3. Exceptionally high cavitation erosion and corrosion resistance of a high entropy alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, R B; Arora, H S; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Singh, S; Singh, H; Grewal, H S

    2018-03-01

    Cavitation erosion and corrosion of structural materials are serious concerns for marine and offshore industries. Durability and performance of marine components are severely impaired due to degradation from erosion and corrosion. Utilization of advanced structural materials can play a vital role in limiting such degradation. High entropy alloys (HEAs) are a relatively new class of advanced structural materials with exceptional properties. In the present work, we report on the cavitation erosion behavior of Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA in two different media: distilled water with and without 3.5wt% NaCl. For comparison, conventionally used stainless steel SS316L was also evaluated in identical test conditions. Despite lower hardness and yield strength, the HEA showed significantly longer incubation period and lower erosion-corrosion rate (nearly 1/4th) compared to SS316L steel. Enhanced erosion resistance of HEA was attributed to its high work-hardening behavior and stable passivation film on the surface. The Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA showed lower corrosion current density, high pitting resistance and protection potential compared to SS316L steel. Further, HEA showed no evidence of intergranular corrosion likely due to the absence of secondary precipitates. Although, the degradation mechanisms (formation of pits and fatigue cracks) were similar for both the materials, the damage severity was found to be much higher for SS316L steel compared to HEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The erosion and erosion products of tungsten and carbon based materials bombarded by high energy pulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Fu; Xu Zengyu; Liu Yong; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the erosion behaviors and erosion products of tungsten and some carbon based materials, such as graphite, C/C composite and B 4 C/Cu functionally graded material, were investigated by using a pulse electron beam to simulate the vertical displacement events (VDE) process. The authors will focus on the forms and differences of erosion products among these testing materials, and make clear to their erosion mechanisms

  5. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein; Emad Saadi AL-Hassani; Reem Alaa Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F) as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust) as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash) with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than n...

  6. Deformation-induced martensite and resistance to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to cavitating liquids can induce surface transformation in metastable alloys, notably the 18Cr-8Ni class of stainless steels. The question of whether such transformation contributes to erosion resistance has not been resolved. To address that issue, two metastable stainless steels (Types 301 and 304L) and a near-equiatomic NiTi alloy were subjected to cavitation. Magnetic measurements during and after cavitation erosion indicate that substantial reversion of deformation-induced martensite occurs in the highly deformed surface layers of the stainless steels. Thus, cyclic formation and reversion of martensite is deduced to be a non-trivial energy-adsorption mechanism in those steels. The extreme case of cyclic induction and essentially complete reversion of martensite is illustrated by superelastic NiTi, which is extraordinarily resistant to cavitation damage. (orig.)

  7. Wind erosion control of soils using polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Movahedan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion of soils is one of the most important problems in environment and agriculture which could affects several fields. Agricultural lands, water reservoires, irrigation canals, drains and etc. may be affected by wind erosion and suspended particles. As a result wind erosion control needs attention in arid and semi-arid regions. In recent years, some polymeric materials have been used for improvement of structural stability, increasing aggregate stability and soil stabilization, though kind of polymer, quantity of polymer, field efficiency and durability and environmental impacts are some important parameters which should be taken into consideration. In this study, a Polyvinil Acetate-based polymer was used to treat different soils. Then polymer-added soil samples were investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel to verify the effecte of polymer on wind erosion control of the soils and the results were compared with water treated soil samples. The results of wind tunnel experiments with a maximum 26 m/s wind velocity showed that there was a significat difference between the erosion of polymer treated and water treated soil samples. Application of 25g/m2 polymer to Aeolian sands reduced the erosion of Aeolian sands samples to zero related to water treated samples. For silty and calyey soils treated by polymer, the wind erosion reduced minimum 90% in relation to water treated samples.

  8. Heat-resistant materials

    CERN Document Server

    1997-01-01

    This handbook covers the complete spectrum of technology dealing with heat-resistant materials, including high-temperature characteristics, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, materials selection guidelines for industrial applications, and life-assessment methods. Also included is information on comparative properties that allows the ranking of alloy performance, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, high-temperature oxidation and corrosion-resistant coatings for superalloys, and design guidelines for applications involving creep and/or oxidation. Contents: General introduction (high-temperature materials characteristics, and mechanical and corrosion properties, and industrial applications); Properties of Ferrous Heat-Resistant Alloys (carbon, alloy, and stainless steels; alloy cast irons; and high alloy cast steels); Properties of superalloys (metallurgy and processing, mechanical and corrosion properties, degradation, and protective coa...

  9. Erosion resistance of FeAl-TiB2 and FeAl-WC at room and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alman, D.E.; Tylczak, J.H.; Hawk, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The resistance of FeAl-40%TiB 2 and FeAl-80%WC cermets to solid particle erosion at 25, 180, 500 and 700 C was evaluated and compared to the behavior of WC-6%Co (Co-90%WC) cemented carbides. Even though the WC-Co contained a higher volume fraction of the hard phase, the erosion rates of the FeAl-cermets were similar in magnitude to the erosion rates of the WC-Co. However, the erosion rates of the FeAl-cermets either were constant (FeAl-TiB 2 ) or decreased (FeAl-WC) with increasing test temperature; whereas, the erosion rates of the WC-Co cemented carbides increased with increasing test temperature. This indicated that once the microstructures of the FeAl-cermets are optimized for wear resistance, these materials might make promising candidates for high-temperature wear applications

  10. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  11. Radiation resistant lining material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Koki; Okagawa, Seigo; Tamaki, Hidehiro.

    1990-01-01

    Rigidity, viscoelasticity, flexibility, radiation resistance, leaching resistance, rust-proofness, endurance, etc. are required for the lining materials to wall surfaces and floor surfaces of facilities used under the effect of radiation rays and for the inner surface protection of vessels for radioactive wastes. The present invention provides radiation resistant lining material capable of satisfying such various requirements in a well-balanced manner. That is, the material contains (A) 100 parts by weight of rapidly curing cement, (B) 50 to 300 % by weight of aggregate, and (C) 80 to 120 parts by weight of polymer emulsion. As the specific example, the ingredient (A) is commercially available under the trade name of Jet Cement. The aggregate of the ingredient (B) has preferably from about 0.6 to 0.2 mm of size and is made of material, preferably, silicon or iron grains. As the ingredient (C), acrylic resin emulsion is preferred. As a result of example, these ingredient constitutions can satisfy each of the required performance described above. (I.S.)

  12. Erosion-corrosion resistance properties of 316L austenitic stainless steels after low-temperature liquid nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Pan, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The low-temperature liquid nitriding of stainless steels can result in the formation of a surface zone of so-called expanded austenite (S-phase) by the dissolution of large amounts of nitrogen in the solid solution and formation of a precipitate-free layer supersaturated with high hardness. Erosion-corrosion measurements were performed on low-temperature nitrided and non-nitrided 316L stainless steels. The total erosion-corrosion, erosion-only, and corrosion-only wastages were measured directly. As expected, it was shown that low-temperature nitriding dramatically reduces the degree of erosion-corrosion in stainless steels, caused by the impingement of particles in a corrosive medium. The nitrided 316L stainless steels exhibited an improvement of almost 84% in the erosion-corrosion resistance compared to their non-nitrided counterparts. The erosion-only rates and synergistic levels showed a general decline after low-temperature nitriding. Low-temperature liquid nitriding can not only reduce the weight loss due to erosion but also significantly reduce the weight loss rate of interactions, so that the total loss of material decreased evidently. Therefore, 316L stainless steels displayed excellent erosion-corrosion behaviors as a consequence of their highly favorable corrosion resistances and superior wear properties.

  13. Dust Erosion Performance of Candidate Motorcase Thermal Protection Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-10

    REFERENCE DESCRIPTION SOURCE NUMBER 4.01 NBR B. F. Goodrich Aerospace and Defense Products (Nitrile butadiene 500 South Main Street rubber ) Akron, Ohio...material degradation occurs. 5.3 BALLISTIC RANGES Ballistic ranges are widely used for reentry erosion testing for two reasons: 1) no other type of facility...DET REFERENCE OTHER COMMENTS NUMBER DESIGNATION 2002 KEVLAR-EPOXY STAGE 3 MOTORCASE MATERIAL MOTORCAS E 2402 NBR 68 2403 NBR 69 2404 NBR -19709-6A (60

  14. Plasma nitriding of a precipitation hardening stainless steel to improve erosion and corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo, Amado; Bruhl, Sonia P.; Vaca, Laura S.; Charadia, Raul Charadia

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation hardening stainless steels are used as structural materials in the aircraft and the chemical industry because of their good combination of mechanical and corrosion properties. The aim of this work is to analyze the structural changes produced by plasma nitriding in the near surface of Thyroplast PH X Supra®, a PH stainless steel from ThyssenKrupp, and to study the effect of nitriding parameters in wear and corrosion resistance. Samples were first aged and then nitriding was carried out in an industrial facility at two temperatures, with two different nitrogen partial pressures in the gas mixture. After nitriding, samples were cut, polished, mounted in resin and etched with Vilella reagent to reveal the nitrided case. Nitrided structure was also analyzed with XRD. Erosion/Corrosion was tested against sea water and sand flux, and corrosion in a salt spray fog (ASTM B117). All nitrided samples presented high hardness. Samples nitrided at 390 deg C with different nitrogen partial pressure showed similar erosion resistance against water and sand flux. The erosion resistance of the nitrided samples at 500 deg C was the highest and XRD revealed nitrides. Corrosion resistance, on the contrary, was diminished; the samples suffered of general corrosion during the salt spray fog test. (author)

  15. Oxygen plasma treatment and deposition of CNx on a fluorinated polymer matrix composite for improved erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratore, C.; Korenyi-Both, A.; Bultman, J. E.; Waite, A. R.; Jones, J. G.; Storage, T. M.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites in aerospace propulsion applications is currently limited by insufficient resistance to erosion by abrasive media. Erosion resistant coatings may provide necessary protection; however, adhesion to many high temperature polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials is poor. A low pressure oxygen plasma treatment process was developed to improve adhesion of CN x coatings to a carbon reinforced, fluorinated polymer matrix composite. Fullerene-like CN x was selected as an erosion resistant coating for its high hardness-to-elastic modulus ratio and elastic resilience which were expected to reduce erosion from media incident at different angles (normal or glancing) relative to the surface. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the effect of the plasma treatment on surface chemistry, and electron microscopy was used to identify changes in the surface morphology of the PMC substrate after plasma exposure. The fluorine concentration at the surface was significantly reduced and the carbon fibers were exposed after plasma treatment. CN x coatings were then deposited on oxygen treated PMC substrates. Qualitative tests demonstrated that plasma treatment improved coating adhesion resulting in an erosion resistance improvement of a factor of 2 compared to untreated coated composite substrates. The combination of PMC pretreatment and coating with CN x reduced the erosion rate by an order of magnitude for normally incident particles

  16. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  17. Study of alternative materials to minimize erosion in heat exchanger tubes used in thermoelectric generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnt, A.B.C.; Paula, M.M. da S. Paula; Rocha, M.R. da; Angioletto, E.; Zanini, L.C.; Miranda, R.; Zanelatto, C.C. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil)], e-mails: anb@unesc.net, mms@unesc.net, marcio2r@terra.com.br, an@unesc.net, elucaslcz@yahoo.com.br, frdgmiranda@hotmail.com, gcrisrincao20@yahoo.com.br; Felippe, L. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Capivari de Baixo, SC (Brazil)], e-mail: hlfelippe@tractebelenergia.com.br

    2007-07-01

    The machinery used in coal thermo electrical plants usually is submitted to erosive wear. The erosive wear occurs mainly in the metallic pipe set of heat exchangers due the flow of hot gases carrying erosive particles. Jaguar Ludicrous thermo electrical complex at Capivari de Baixo city holds seven power units, where two units use approximately 20 000 ASTM A178 heat pipes. The set is submitted to a semester maintenance schedule (preventive and corrective) where the damaged pipes are changed. So, in this work a set of erosive wear accelerated tests according ASTM G76 were performed in order to develop and specify materials and methods to diminish the erosive action caused by the combustion gases over the heat pipes. Specimens were coated with WC12Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr alloys using the HVOF technique and the coated specimens were tested at 450 deg C, the heat pipes working temperature. Silica was used as abrasive material at 30 deg and 45 deg impact angles, simulating a harder erosive condition than the real condition. The best performance coating at laboratory scale was later used in field condition. The results showed the coated specimen performance is better than the ASTM A178 alloy. The erosion resistance of the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr and WC12Co coatings is eight times higher than the uncoated alloy, and the coatings also presented a better corrosion resistance. This feature is important, because despite the erosive action the circulating gases also present a large amount of sulfur in their composition. Sulfur at lower temperatures forms H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, causing intense corrosion of the pipes located at the heat exchangers colder parts. Based on the results and considering the coating costs the Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25NiCr alloy was selected to coat a set of pipes mounted at the region of the heat exchanger with the most intense erosive wear. At the moment these coated tubes are in field operation and under observation regarding their performance in

  18. Conception de couches minces tribologiques pour augmenter la resistance a l'erosion par impacts de particules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Salim

    Solid particle erosion (SPE) is a serious problem in gas turbines, pumps, heat exchangers and piping systems in aircrafts and other applications. Sand and dust ingested by gas turbine engines may cause major damage to compressor gas path components, leading to severe performance degradation, excessive wear, increased maintenance and eventually premature failure of the engines. For the compressor section of aerospace gas turbine engines, in addition to the complex filtration systems used to screen the eroding particles, tribological coatings, such as TiN, Ti/TiN, CrN and TiAlN are used as protective layers of the base titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) or stainless steels (17-4PH and 410) materials (substrates) against erosive wear. Such coatings can extend the service life of the components, but their performance still remains insufficient due to the complexity of failure mechanisms occurring upon SPE. Therefore, aerospace industry seeks to develop high performance coatings for the protection against erosion by solid particles. However, with many new materials used and tested for different applications and operation under different conditions, conducting experiments for each one of them is becoming increasingly difficult. Presently, coating selection criteria to prevent damage caused by erosion are based on trial and error experiments instead of prior design of coating's architecture and properties to maximize erosion resistance. The present work focuses on the use of advanced finite element (FE) methods to design erosion resistant (ER) coatings. It contributes a new methodology based on the analysis of transient stresses generated by a single impact event. Identification of coating architectures in which such stresses are minimized and crack propagation suppressed, allows one to predict and possibly minimize the erosion rate. Erosion mechanisms and governing erosion parameters are investigated to predict the coating behavior in simulated erosion conditions. The

  19. Hybrid Composite Material and Solid Particle Erosion Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellaganesh, D.; Khan, M. Adam; Ashif, A. Mohamed; Ragul Selvan, T.; Nachiappan, S.; Winowlin Jappes, J. T.

    2018-04-01

    Composite is one of the predominant material for most challenging engineering components. Most of the components are in the place of automobile structure, aircraft structures, and wind turbine blade and so on. At the same all the components are indulged to mechanical loading. Recent research on composite material are machinability, wear, tear and corrosion studies. One of the major issue on recent research was solid particle air jet erosion. In this paper hybrid composite material with and without filler. The fibre are in the combination of hemp – kevlar (60:40 wt.%) as reinforcement using epoxy as a matrix. The natural material palm and coconut shell are used as filler materials in the form of crushed powder. The process parameter involved are air jet velocity, volume of erodent and angle of impingement. Experiment performed are in eight different combinations followed from 2k (k = 3) factorial design. From the investigation surface morphology was studied using electron microscope. Mass change with respect to time are used to calculate wear rate and the influence of the process parameters. While solid particle erosion the hard particle impregnates in soft matrix material. Influence of filler material has reduced the wear and compared to plain natural composite material.

  20. Effects of Rare Earth Metal addition on the cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sung-Ik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Soon-Tae; Song, Chi-Bok

    2002-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels such as AISI 316L have been used in equipment in which fluid flows at high speeds which can induce cavitation erosion on metallic surfaces due to the collapse of cavities, where the collapse is caused by the sudden change of local pressure within the liquid. Usually AISI 316L is susceptible to cavitation erosion. This research focuses on developing a better material to replace the AISI 316L used in equipment with high speed fluid flow, such as impellers. The effects of Rare Earth Metal (REM) additions on the cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels were studied using metallographic examination, the potentiodynamic anodic polarization test, the tensile test, the X-ray diffraction test and the ultrasonic cavitation erosion test. The experimental alloys were found to have superior mechanical properties due to interstitial solid solution strengthening, by adding high nitrogen (0.4%), as well as by the refinement of phases and grains induced by fine REM oxides and oxy-sulfides. Corrosion resistance decreases in a gentle gradient as the REM content increases. However, REM containing alloys show superior corrosion resistance compared with that of other commercial alloys (SAF 2507, AISI 316L). Owing to their excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, the alloys containing REM have high cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance.

  1. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Hutchings, I.M.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharply reducing the erosive wear at high erodent impact angles, whilst retaining the good erosion resistance of ceramics at low angles. It is shown that the proportion of metal and ceramic at the free surface can be specified so as to optimise the erosion resistance. Experiments have also been carried out on the resistance of the coatings to debonding during four-point bending of the coated substrate. Progress is being made towards the tailoring of composition profiles in graded coatings so as to optimise the combination of erosion resistance and adhesion. (orig.)

  2. Erosion products of ITER divertor materials under plasma disruption simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Korshunov, S.N.; Martynenko, Yu.V. E-mail: martyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Stolyarova, V.G.; Strunnikov, V.M.; Vasiliev, V.I

    2003-09-01

    Candidate ITER divertor armor materials: carbon-fiber-composite and four tungsten grades/alloys as well as mixed re-deposited W+Be and W+C layers were exposed in electrodynamic plasma accelerator MKT which provided a pulsed deuterium plasma flux simulating plasma disruptions with maximum ion energy of 1-2 keV, an energy density of 300 kJ/m{sup 2} per shot and a pulse duration of {approx}60 {mu}s. The number of pulses was from 2 to 10. The resultant erosion products were collected on a basalt filter and Si-collectors and studied in terms of morphology and size distribution using both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal erosion products usually occurred in the form of spherical droplets, sometimes flakes. Their size distribution depended on the positioning of the collector. Simultaneously irradiated W, CFC and mixed W+Be targets appeared to have undergone a greater erosion than the same targets irradiated individually. Particles sized from 0.01 to 30 {mu}m were found on collectors and on a molten W-surface. A model of droplet emission and behavior in shielding plasma is provided.

  3. Laser cladding of austenitic stainless steel using NiTi strips for resisting cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.Y.; Cheng, F.T.; Man, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Being part of a larger project on using different forms of nickel titanium (NiTi) in the surface modification of stainless steel for enhancing cavitation erosion resistance, the present study employs NiTi strips as the cladding material. Our previous study shows that laser surfacing using NiTi powder can significantly increase the cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316 L stainless steel [K.Y. Chiu, F.T. Cheng, H.C. Man, Mater. Sci. Eng. A 392 (2005) 348-358]. However, from an engineering point of view, NiTi strips are more attractive than powder because NiTi powder is very expensive due to high production cost. In the present study, NiTi strips were preplaced on AISI 316 L samples and remelted using a high-power CW Nd:YAG laser to form a clad layer. To lower the dilution due to the substrate material, samples doubly clad with NiTi were prepared. The volume dilution ratio in the singly clad sample was high, being in the range of 13-30% depending on the processing parameters, while that of the doubly clad sample was reduced to below 10%. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) reveals that the clad layer is composed of a NiTi B2 based matrix together with fine precipitates of a tetragonal structure. Vickers indentation shows a tough cladding/substrate interface. The microhardness of the clad layer is increased from 200 HV of the substrate to about 750 HV due to the dissolution of elements like Fe, Cr and N in the matrix. Nanoindentation tests record a recovery ratio near to that of bulk NiTi, a result attributable to a relatively low dilution. The cavitation erosion resistance of the doubly clad samples is higher than that of 316-NiTi-powder (samples laser-surfaced with NiTi powder) and approaches that of NiTi plate. The high erosion resistance is attributed to a high hardness, high indentation recovery ratio and the absence of cracks or pores

  4. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion.

  5. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics including: plasticity, : water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear strength. Many of these characteristics also : influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  6. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics : including: plasticity, water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear : strength. Many of these characteristics also influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  7. Fire Resistant Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Fire hazard is greater in atmospheres containing a high percentage of oxygen under pressure. NASA intensified its fire safety research after a 1967 Apollo fire. A chemically treated fabric called Durette developed by Monsanto Company, which will not burn or produce noxious fumes, was selected as a material for Apollo astronaut garments. Monsanto sold production rights for this material to Fire Safe Products (FSP). Durette is now used for a wide range of applications such as: sheets, attendants' uniforms in hyperbaric chambers; crew's clothing, furniture and interior walls of diving chambers operated by the U.S. Navy and other oceanographic companies and research organizations. Pyrotect Safety Equipment, Minneapolis, MN produces Durette suits for auto racers, refuelers and crew chiefs from material supplied by FSP. FSP also manufactures Durette bags for filtering gases and dust from boilers, electric generators and similar systems. Durette bags are an alternative to other felted fiber capable of operating at high temperature that cost twice as much.

  8. Flame-Resistant Composite Materials For Structural Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    Matrix-fiber composite materials developed for structural members occasionally exposed to hot, corrosive gases. Integral ceramic fabric surface layer essential for resistance to flames and chemicals. Endures high temperature, impedes flame from penetrating to interior, inhibits diffusion of oxygen to interior where it degrades matrix resin, resists attack by chemicals, helps resist erosion, and provides additional strength. In original intended application, composite members replace steel structural members of rocket-launching structures that deteriorate under combined influences of atmosphere, spilled propellants, and rocket exhaust. Composites also attractive for other applications in which corrosion- and fire-resistant structural members needed.

  9. Materials resistant to seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.

    1986-03-01

    The report is a summary of the topics discussed at a two-day seminar at Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller in August 1985. Experience with seawater corrosion in Nordic power reactor plants was discussed. There was also input from Danish experience with seawater corrosion in coal fired power plants. The following topics were dealt with: Experience in seawater cooling system materials, chlorination of seawater systems, and accelerated laboratory tests for stainless steels

  10. Loss of Plant Species Diversity Reduces Soil Erosion Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Ruijven, van J.; Jongejans, E.; Keesstra, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    In many estuarine areas around the world, the safety of human societies depends on the functioning of embankments (dikes) that provide protection against river floods and storm tides. Vegetation on land-side slopes protects these embankments from erosion by heavy rains or overtopping waves. We

  11. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  12. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  13. Statistical investigations into the erosion of material from the tool in micro-electrical discharge machining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the erosion of material from the tool electrode in a micro-electrical discharge machining process. The work involves analysis of variance and analysis of means approaches on the results of the tool electrode wear rate obtained based on design...... current (Id) and discharge frequency (fd) control the erosion of material from the tool electrode. The material erosion from the tool electrode (Me) increases linearly with the discharge frequency. As the current index increases from 20 to 35, the Me decreases linearly by 29%, and then increases by of 36......%. The current index of 35 gives the minimum material erosion from the tool. It is observed that none of the two-factor interactions are significant in controlling the erosion of the material from the tool....

  14. Influence of Ultrasound Treatment on Cavitation Erosion Resistance of AlSi7 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Pola

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound treatment of liquid aluminum alloys is known to improve mechanical properties of castings. Aluminum foundry alloys are frequently used for production of parts that undergo severe cavitation erosion phenomena during service. In this paper, the effect of the ultrasound treatment on cavitation erosion resistance of AlSi7 alloy was assessed and compared to that of conventionally cast samples. Cavitation erosion tests were performed according to ASTM G32 standard on as-cast and heat treated castings. The response of the alloy in each condition was investigated by measuring the mass loss as a function of cavitation time and by analyzing the damaged surfaces by means of optical and scanning electron microscope. It was pointed out that the ultrasound treatment increases the cavitation erosion resistance of the alloy, as a consequence of the higher chemical and microstructural homogeneity, the finer grains and primary particles and the refined structure of the eutectic induced by the treatment itself.

  15. Influence of Ultrasound Treatment on Cavitation Erosion Resistance of AlSi7 Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pola, Annalisa; Montesano, Lorenzo; Tocci, Marialaura; La Vecchia, Giovina Marina

    2017-03-03

    Ultrasound treatment of liquid aluminum alloys is known to improve mechanical properties of castings. Aluminum foundry alloys are frequently used for production of parts that undergo severe cavitation erosion phenomena during service. In this paper, the effect of the ultrasound treatment on cavitation erosion resistance of AlSi7 alloy was assessed and compared to that of conventionally cast samples. Cavitation erosion tests were performed according to ASTM G32 standard on as-cast and heat treated castings. The response of the alloy in each condition was investigated by measuring the mass loss as a function of cavitation time and by analyzing the damaged surfaces by means of optical and scanning electron microscope. It was pointed out that the ultrasound treatment increases the cavitation erosion resistance of the alloy, as a consequence of the higher chemical and microstructural homogeneity, the finer grains and primary particles and the refined structure of the eutectic induced by the treatment itself.

  16. Frost resistance of building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    materials, has been developed.The importance of the pore structure on the development of stresses in the material during freezing is emphasized. To verify the model, experimental investigations are made on various concretes without air-entrainment and brick tiles with different porosities.Calculations......In this thesis it is shown that the critical degree of saturation is suitable as parameter for the frost resistance of porous building materials. A numerical model for prediction of critical degrees of saturation based on fracture mechanics and phase geometry of two-phase materials, e.g. porous...

  17. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhe [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); Yu, Ting [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Kovacevic, Radovan, E-mail: kovacevi@smu.edu [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V{sub 8}C{sub 7}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content

  18. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  19. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I.; Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating

  20. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W. [Corporate R and D Institute Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating.

  1. An experimental estimation of the resistance against a high-temperature gas corrosion of C/C composite materials with protective plasma coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babin, S.V.; Khripakov, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    Materials with well-defined structure has been proposed as corrosion- and erosion-resistant coating from the carbon-carbon composite. Experiments on heat and erosion resistance of plasma coatings at carbon-carbon composite materials demonstrate availability of multilayer with upper erosion resistant layer on the basis of aluminium oxide, intermediate layer on the basis of boron-containing components with aluminium additions and damping layer of silicon carbide. Multilayer protective coats offer demand service characteristics of details [ru

  2. Piping and erosion in buffer and backfill materials. Current knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boergesson, Lennart; Sanden, Torbjoern

    2006-09-01

    The water inflow into the deposition holes and tunnels in a repository will mainly take place through fractures in the rock and will lead to that the buffer and backfill will be wetted and homogenised. But in general the buffer and backfill cannot absorb all water that runs through a fracture, which leads to that a water pressure will be generated in the fracture when the inflow is hindered. If the counter pressure and strength of the buffer or backfill is insufficiently high, piping and subsequent erosion may take place. The processes and consequences of piping and erosion have been studied in some projects and several laboratory test series in different scales have been carried through. This brief report describes these tests and the results and conclusions that have emerged. The knowledge of piping and erosion is insufficient today and additional studies are needed and running

  3. A durability test rig and methodology for erosion-resistant blade coatings in turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithead, Sean Gregory

    A durability test rig for erosion-resistant gas turbine engine compressor blade coatings was designed, completed and commissioned. Bare and coated 17-4PH steel V103-profile blades were rotated at up to 11500 rpm and impacted with Garnet sand for 5 hours at an average concentration of 2.51 gm3of air , at a blade leading edge Mach number of 0.50. The rig was determined to be an acceptable first stage axial compressor representation. Two types of 16 microm-thick coatings were tested: Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Chromium-Aluminum-Titanium Nitride (CrAlTiN), both applied using an Arc Physical Vapour Deposition technique at the National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada. A Leithead-Allan-Zhao (LAZ) score was created to compare the durability performance of uncoated and coated blades based on mass-loss and blade dimension changes. The bare blades' LAZ score was set as a benchmark of 1.00. The TiN-coated and CrAlTiN-coated blades obtained LAZ scores of 0.69 and 0.41, respectively. A lower score meant a more erosion-resistant coating. Major modes of blade wear included: trailing edge, leading edge and the rear suction surface. Trailing edge thickness was reduced, the leading edge became blunt, and the rear suction surface was scrubbed by overtip and recirculation zone vortices. It was found that the erosion effects of vortex flow were significant. Erosion damage due to reflected particles was not present due to the low blade solidity of 0.7. The rig is best suited for studying the performance of erosion-resistant coatings after they are proven effective in ASTM standardized testing. Keywords: erosion, compressor, coatings, turbomachinery, erosion rate, blade, experimental, gas turbine engine

  4. Erosion-corrosion of structural materials of wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomarov, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    A model of erosion-corrosion wear of elements of a wet steam zone and a condensate-feeding path of turbines is considered. It is shown that diffusion of impurities and corrosion products in pores of an oxide layer is the control mechanism under conditions of laminar flow of a media. Processes of mass transfer are controlling factors in turbulent flow

  5. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  6. Materials for coatings against erosion, fretting, and high-temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feller, H.G.; Wienstroth, U.; Balke, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of Co-Cr-W alloys (CoCr29W29, CoCr29W9Y1, CoCr29W9Fe3Y1, CoCr29W9Y1Al1) as coating materials for the substrates MA 6000 and MA 754. Their properties are compared with those of Amperit 410, which is the alloy NiCo23Cr17Al12.5Y0.5. Their isothermal oxidation behaviour at temperatures up to 1000deg C is found to be better for the most part than that of the commercially available Amperit 410. Furthermore, the oxide shows distinctly better adhesion, so that better results concerning resistance to hot-gas corrosion are expected. The fretting behaviour at room temperature is characterized by very low friction factors and a strong resistance to wear. A comparable behaviour is found for resistance to erosive wear. Specimens tested for 500 hours in the pressurised beam device exhibit only minimal changes of mass in the bond MA 600/coating. Single-particle impact tests reveal that exposure of specimens to high temperatures leads to an increase in mean hardness, which is caused by a solidification of the yttrium-containing phase. (orig./MM) [de

  7. Evaluation of erosion-corrosion resistance in Fe-Mn-Al austenitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Arnulfo Aperador

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of Mn and Al against corrosion/errosion resistance of three samples of the Fe-Mn-Al austenitic alloys are evaluated. The samples have composition Fe-(4,9 ~ 11,0 wt. (% Al-(17,49 ~ 34,3 wt. (% Mn-(0,43 ~ 1,25 wt. (%C, those were prepared in an induction furnace from high purity materials. The alloys were evaluated in a composed solution of NaCl 0,5 M and Silica in a special chamber and AISI 316 stainless steel as reference material. The electrochemical characterization was performed by Tafel curve polarizations technique. This microstructural characterization was by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. It was observed the significant decrease in the corrosion rate for steels Fermanal with a lower percentage of aluminum and manganese under conditions of dynamic corrosion and erosion-corrosion. SEM allows assessment of the dominant damage mechanisms and corroborated the results obtained by electrochemical measurements.

  8. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai, E-mail: wsk@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets can be well exfoliated with the help of nanofibrillated cellulose. • A carpet-like rough surface and distortion in crystal structure of h-BN are found in both h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film after AO exposure. • H-BN/epoxy film exhibits a higher mass loss and erosion yield, different element content changes and chemical oxidations compared with h-BN film. - Abstract: Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 2} were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  9. Erosive Wear Characterization of Materials for Lunar Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpagazehe, Jeremiah N.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Apollo missions revealed that exhaust from the retrorockets of landing spacecraft may act to significantly accelerate lunar dust on the surface of the Moon. A recent study by Immer et al. (C. Immer, P.T. Metzger, P.E. Hintze, A. Nick, and R. Horan, Apollo 12 Lunar Module exhaust plume impingement on Lunar Surveyor III, Icarus, Vol. 211, pp. 1089-1102, 2011) investigated coupons returned to Earth from the Surveyor III lunar probe which were subjected to lunar dust impingement by the Apollo 12 Lunar Module landing. Their study revealed that even with indirect impingement, the spacecraft sustained erosive damage from the fast-moving lunar dust particles. In this work, results are presented from a series of erosive wear experiments performed on 6061 Aluminum using the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. Optical profilometry was used to investigate the surface after the erosion process. It was found that even short durations of lunar dust simulant impacting at low velocities produced substantial changes in the surface.

  10. High-Z material erosion and its control in DIII-D carbon divertor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ding

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As High-Z materials will likely be used as plasma-facing components (PFCs in future fusion devices, the erosion of high-Z materials is a key issue for high-power, long pulse operation. High-Z material erosion and redeposition have been studied using tungsten and molybdenum coated samples exposed in well-diagnosed DIII-D divertor plasma discharges. By coupling dedicated experiments and modelling using the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO, the roles of sheath potential and background carbon impurities in determining high-Z material erosion are identified. Different methods suggested by modelling have been investigated to control high-Z material erosion in DIII-D experiments. The erosion of Mo and W is found to be strongly suppressed by local injection of methane and deuterium gases. The 13C deposition resulting from local 13CH4 injection also provides information on radial transport due to E ×B drifts and cross field diffusion. Finally, D2 gas puffing is found to cause local plasma perturbation, suppressing W erosion because of the lower effective sputtering yield of W at lower plasma temperature and for higher carbon concentration in the mixed surface layer.

  11. Influence of material and solution composition on the extrusion/erosion behaviour of compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, Timothy; Martikainen, Jari; Koskinen, Kari

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In principle, in a KBS-3 type repository, the volume of a deposition hole is fixed and the bentonite buffer mass accordingly balanced to lead to the development of a suitable swelling pressure upon saturation. However, fractures intersecting the deposition holes give rise to the possibility that volume constrained conditions do not universally exist. Such fractures may provide pathways for the continued, localised, free swelling of bentonite buffer material. Loss of mass from the deposition hole by extrusion into intersecting fractures may compromise the long-term safety and performance of the buffer component of the engineered barrier system. Furthermore, the continued hydration and expansion of extruded bentonite in these fracture environments could lead to the separation of colloid-sized (or larger) particles by diffusion or shear which may have to be accounted for in possible radionuclide migration scenarios. Geochemical conditions, with respect to both solution and material composition, are considered to play important roles regarding the fracture extrusion/erosion of bentonite buffer material. For example, calcium-montmorillonite exhibits limited free swelling relative to sodium-montmorillonite and the colloidal and rheological properties of montmorillonite dispersions are sensitive to the presence of electrolytes. Insofar as both the buffer material composition (due to ion exchange) and groundwater composition (dilution resulting from infiltration of glacial melt water) are expected to evolve with time, so too might the potential for fracture extrusion/erosion of buffer material vary over time. The hydraulic characteristics of the intersecting fracture are expected to influence the extrusion/erosion process as well. To evaluate the effect of material and solution composition on the potential for extrusion of buffer mass into intersecting fractures, a series of batch experiments were performed. In these

  12. Erosion resistance of pipe bends with bio-inspired internal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengchun; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    Guided by the structure of a shell surface, a bio-inspired surface is proposed to enhance the erosion resistance of pipe bends carrying crude-oil and sand in the turbulent flow regime. A comparison of the erosion rate between a smooth bend and the bio-inspired one is carried out using numerical simulations: large eddy simulations are used to simulate turbulence, and these are coupled to a discrete element method for the solid particles. The results indicate that the bio-inspired surface can control effectively the liquid-solid flow near the wall, and decrease the particle-wall force. This, then, leads to a reduction in the erosion rate brought about by the sand transported by the crude-oil in the pipe bend. The China Scholarship Council is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Elevated temperature erosion studies on some materials for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianren.

    1991-01-01

    The surface degradation of materials due to high temperature erosion or combined erosion corrosion is a serious problem in many industrial and aeronautical applications. As such, it has become an important design consideration in many situations. The materials investigated in the present studies are stainless steels, Ti-6Al-4V, alumina ceramics, with and without silicate glassy phase, and zirconia. These are some of the potential materials for use in the high temperature erosive-corrosive environments. The erosion or erosion-corrosion experiments were performed in a high temperature sand-blast type of test rig. The variables studied included the temperature, material composition, heat treatment condition, impingement velocity and angle, erodent concentration, etc. The morphological features of the eroded or eroded-corroded surfaces, substrate deformation, and oxide characteristics were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The scratch test, single ball impact, and indentation tests were used to understand the behavior of oxide film in particle impacts. Based on these studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical or combined mechanical and chemical actions in erosion was developed

  14. Investigation of erosion mechanisms and erosion products in divertor armour materials under conditions relevant to elms and mitigated disruptions in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.M.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Klimov, N.S.; Kovalenko, D.V.; Moskaleva, A.A.; Podkovyrov, V.L.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Landman, I.S.; Poznyak, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten were irradiated by intense plasma streams at plasma gun facilities MK-200UG and QSPA-T. The targets were tested by plasma loads relevant to Edge Localised Modes (ELM) and mitigated disruptions in ITER. Onset condition of material erosion and properties of erosion products have been studied

  15. Experiment study on sediment erosion of Pelton turbine flow passage component material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Lu, L.; Zhu, L.

    2012-11-01

    A rotating and jet experiment system with high flow velocity is designed to study the anti-erosion performance of materials. The resultant velocity of the experiment system is high to 120 m/s. The anti-erosion performance of materials used in needle and nozzle and bucket of Pelton turbine, which is widely used in power station with high head and little discharge, was studied in detail by this experiment system. The experimental studies were carried with different resultant velocities and sediment concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis method was applied to get the exponents of velocity and sediment concentration. The exponents for different materials are different. The exponents of velocity ranged from 3 to 3.5 for three kinds of material. And the exponents of sediment concentration ranged from 0.97 to 1.03 in this experiment. The SEM analysis on the erosion surface of different materials was also carried. On the erosion condition with high resultant impact velocity, the selective cutting loss of material is the mainly erosion mechanism for metal material.

  16. Experiment study on sediment erosion of Pelton turbine flow passage component material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Lu, L; Zhu, L

    2012-01-01

    A rotating and jet experiment system with high flow velocity is designed to study the anti-erosion performance of materials. The resultant velocity of the experiment system is high to 120 m/s. The anti-erosion performance of materials used in needle and nozzle and bucket of Pelton turbine, which is widely used in power station with high head and little discharge, was studied in detail by this experiment system. The experimental studies were carried with different resultant velocities and sediment concentrations. Multiple linear regression analysis method was applied to get the exponents of velocity and sediment concentration. The exponents for different materials are different. The exponents of velocity ranged from 3 to 3.5 for three kinds of material. And the exponents of sediment concentration ranged from 0.97 to 1.03 in this experiment. The SEM analysis on the erosion surface of different materials was also carried. On the erosion condition with high resultant impact velocity, the selective cutting loss of material is the mainly erosion mechanism for metal material.

  17. TEMPEST code modifications and testing for erosion-resisting sludge simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The TEMPEST computer code has been used to address many waste retrieval operational and safety questions regarding waste mobilization, mixing, and gas retention. Because the amount of sludge retrieved from the tank is directly related to the sludge yield strength and the shear stress acting upon it, it is important to incorporate the sludge yield strength into simulations of erosion-resisting tank waste retrieval operations. This report describes current efforts to modify the TEMPEST code to simulate pump jet mixing of erosion-resisting tank wastes and the models used to test for erosion of waste sludge with yield strength. Test results for solid deposition and diluent/slurry jet injection into sludge layers in simplified tank conditions show that the modified TEMPEST code has a basic ability to simulate both the mobility and immobility of the sludges with yield strength. Further testing, modification, calibration, and verification of the sludge mobilization/immobilization model are planned using erosion data as they apply to waste tank sludges

  18. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  19. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  20. Effects of laser shock processing on electrochemical corrosion resistance of ANSI 304 stainless steel weldments after cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.K.; Lu, J.Z.; Dai, F.Z.; Feng, A.X.; Luo, K.Y.; Zhong, J.S.; Wang, Q.W.; Luo, M.; Qi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Weldments were done with laser shock processing impacts after cavitation erosion. ► Laser shock processing enhanced the erosion and corrosion resistance of weldments. ► Tensile residual stress and surface roughness decreased by laser shock processing. ► Microstructure was observed to explain the improvement by laser shock processing. ► Obvious passivation areas occurred with laser shock processing impacts. - Abstract: Effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on electrochemical corrosion resistance of weldments after cavitation erosion were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology, scanning electron microscope (SEM), roughness tester and optical microscope (OM). Some main factors to influence erosion and corrosion of weldments, residual stresses, surface roughness, grain refinements and slip, were discussed in detail. Results show that LSP impacts can induce compressive residual stresses, decrease surface roughness, refine grains and generate the slip. Thus, the erosion and corrosion resistance with LSP impacts is improved.

  1. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  2. Extrusion and erosion of bentonite buffer material in a flow-through, horizontal, artificial fracture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, Timothy; Kanerva, Noora; Martikainen, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One scenario of interest for the long-term safety assessment of a spent nuclear fuel repository involves the loss of bentonite buffer material through contact with dilute groundwater at a transmissive fracture interface [SKB 2011, Posiva 2012]. In order to simulate the potential extrusion/erosion behaviour of bentonite buffer material in such an environment, a series of small-scale, flow-through, artificial fracture experiments were performed in which swelling clay material could extrude/erode into a well defined, system (see Figure 1). The fracture dimensions were 24 cm (length) x 24 cm (width) x 1 mm (aperture) and the compacted sample dimensions were 2 cm (height) x 2 cm (diameter). Extrusion/erosion effects were analysed against solution chemistry (salt concentration and composition), material composition (sodium montmorillonite and admixtures with calcium montmorillonite), and flow velocity. No erosion was observed for sodium montmorillonite against solution compositions from 10 to 0.5 g/L NaCl. Comparatively, most reports in the literature indicate that a concentration of 0.5 g/L NaCl (8.6 mM) is below, in some cases well below, the (experimentally observed) critical coagulation concentration (CCC) for the colloidal sodium montmorillonite/sodium chloride system [Garcia-Garcia et al. 2007]. It was also the case that no erosion was observed for 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite against 0.5 g/L NaCl. Overall, the results of the flow-through, artificial fracture tests, indicate stability to erosion down to a dilute concentration range between 8 to 4 mM NaCl for both sodium and 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite. These limits compare favorably to the erosion stability limits observed by Birgersson et al. [2009] in the case of the latter material but less so for the former. A number of tests were conducted for which measurable erosion was observed. The calculated mass loss rates for these tests, expressed in

  3. Durability of Compressed Earth Bricks: Assessing Erosion Resistance Using the Modified Spray Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarvizhi Baskaran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The discussion in this paper is part of research directed at establishing optimal stabilization strategy for compressed bricks. The deployment context for the use of the compressed bricks was Dar es Salaam (Tanzania where manually fabricated bricks are increasingly being used in low cost housing units. This discussion specifically focuses on strategies that can be used to counter deterioration due to wind-driven rain erosion. The impact of using cement, lime, fiber and a commercial stabilizing fluid was assessed. Factory-produced bricks were used for benchmarking. The durability of the bricks was assessed using the “modified” Bulletin 5 Spray Test. The different brick specimens were sprayed with water at 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa over one-hour time period while measuring the depth of erosion every 15 minutes. Factory-produced bricks hardly eroded at both 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa pressure levels. The maximum depth of erosion for Soil-Cement bricks ranged from a maximum of 0.5 mm at 2.07 MPa water pressure to 0.8 mm at 4.14 MPa. The maximum and minimum depths of erosion for Soil-Cement-Lime bricks were 25mm and 17 mm respectively. The inclusion of natural fiber in the bricks resulted in a sharp increase of the erosion depth to a maximum of 40 mm at 2.07 MPa and 55 mm at 4.14 Mpa. As the use of natural fibers and lime enhances some physio-mechanical properties, further research is necessary to determine ways of achieving this goal while maintaining acceptable levels of erosion resistance.

  4. Liquid impact erosion mechanism and theoretical impact stress analysis in TiN-coated steam turbine blade materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.K.; Kim, W.W.; Rhee, C.K.; Lee, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Coating of TiN film was done by reactive magnetron sputter ion plating to improve the liquid impact erosion resistance of steam turbine blade materials, 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B, for nuclear power plant application. TiN-coated blade materials were initially deformed with depressions due to plastic deformation of the ductile substrate. The increase in the curvature in the depressions induced stress concentration with increasing number of impacts, followed by circumferential fracture of the TiN coating due to the circular propagation of cracks. The liquid impact erosion resistance of the blade materials was greatly improved by TiN coating done with the optimum ion plating condition. Damage decreased with increasing TiN coating thickness. According to the theoretical analysis of stresses generated by liquid impact, TiN coating alleviated the impact stress of 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B due to stress attenuation and stress wave reactions such as reflection and transmission at the coating-substrate interface

  5. Crust behavior and erosion rate prediction of EPR sacrificial material impinged by core melt jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gen; Liu, Ming, E-mail: ming.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshi; Chong, Daotong; Yan, Junjie

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A numerical code was developed to analyze melt jet-concrete interaction in the frame of MPS method. • Crust and ablated concrete layer at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface periodically developed and collapsed. • Concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. • Concrete erosion by Fe-Zr melt jet was significantly faster than that by UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt jet. - Abstract: Sacrificial material is a special ferro-siliceous concrete, designed in the ex-vessel core melt stabilization system of European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR). Given a localized break of RPV lower head, the melt directly impinges onto the dry concrete in form of compact jet. The concrete erosion behavior influences the failure of melt plug, and further affects melt spreading. In this study, a numerical code was developed in the frame of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method, to analyze the crust behavior and erosion rate of sacrificial concrete, impinged by prototypic melt jet. In validation of numerical modeling, the time-dependent erosion depth and erosion configuration matched well with the experimental data. Sensitivity study of sacrificial concrete erosion indicates that the crust and ablated concrete layer presented at UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} melt and concrete interface, whereas no crust could be found in the interaction of Fe-Zr melt with concrete. The crust went through stabilization-fracture-reformation periodic process, accompanied with accumulating and collapsing of molten concrete layer. The concrete surface temperature fluctuated around a low temperature and ablation temperature. It increased as the concrete surface layer was heated to melting, and dropped down when the cold concrete was revealed. The erosion progression was fast in the conditions of small jet diameter and large concrete inclination angle, and it was significantly faster in the erosion by metallic melt jet than by oxidic melt jet.

  6. 3D flow simulation of liquid lead in the erosion test facility for ADS materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscher, Heinrich; Kieser, Martin; Weisenburger, Alfons; Mueller, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Future nuclear reactor concepts, such as GEN IV or ADS use liquid lead for neutron multiplication and coolant purposes. The design concepts assumes that the structural material is in contact with the liquid metal at temperatures up to 600 C and a flow rate of 20 m/s. Therefore a significant effect of liquid metal corrosion/erosion is expected. The paper describes the fluid dynamical simulation of the ADS erosion test facility. Earlier studies on the laminar flow modeling were completed by introduction of transient behavior and extended to 3D-models. The results for liquid lead should be transferable to LBE (lead bismuth eutectic). Further work has to include a mass transport model for modeling of the global isothermal erosion rate of the structural material dependent on time (for liquid lead and LBE).

  7. Erosion-corrosion synergistics in the low erosion regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, R.G.; Sethi, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many engineering alloys display good high temperature corrosion resistance. However, when they are used in corrosive environments where they are subjected to erosion also, the corrosion resistance has been adversely affected. The phenomenon known as erosion-corrosion is complex and requires detailed investigation of how the erosion and corrosion kinetics interact and compete. At the Kentucky Center for Energy Research Laboratory, an erosion-corrosion tester was used to perform erosion-oxidation tests on 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel at 500-600 0 C using alumina abrasive at low velocities. The erosion-oxidation rate data and morphology of exposed surfaces are consistent with oxide chipping and fracturing being the mode of material loss

  8. Simulation of simultaneous erosion-redeposition processes on material surfaces used in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Nestor O.; Gavarini, Hebe O.

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous erosion and redeposition of sputtered plasma-facing material has been studied using a 3-D computational model. The equations that govern the processes are reduced to a set of nonlinear particle-diffusion equations in which different particle interactions may be taken into account in the corresponding source terms. The effects of a magnetic field with arbitrary direction and of electrostatic potential are also included. The model is based on a combined diffusion limited aggregation and deaggregation code. Hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have been used to simulate erosion-redeposition of low-Z materials such as C, Be and B in the range of sample temperatures where chemical erosion is suppressed and the net erosion yield is due to physical sputtering only. The dependence of net erosion yield on surface temperature, plasma-particles densities and temperatures, and magnetic field intensity and direction is investigated. Computational results emphasize the importance of a magnetic field with appropriate direction and intensity in order to reduce the sputtering effects on surfaces exposed to plasma interactions. (author)

  9. Sampling by electro-erosion on irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, M.; Pizzanelli, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    Sampling on irradiated materials, in particular for mechanical property study of steels in the FAST NEUTRON program needed the set in a hot cell of a machining device by electroerosion. This device allows sampling of tenacity, traction, resilience test pieces [fr

  10. Thermal load resistance of erosion-monitoring beryllium maker tile for JET ITER like wall project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Sundelin, P.; Rubel, M.; Coad, J.P.; Matthews, G.F.; Lungu, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER reference materials, beryllium (Be), carbon fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten (W), have been tested separately in tokamaks. An integrated test demonstrating both compatibility of metal plasma facing components with high-power operation and acceptable tritium retention has not yet been carried out. At JET, the size, magnetic field strength and high plasma current allow to conducting tests with the combination of the materials. Thus, the ITER-like Wall (ILW) project has been launched. In the project, Be will be the plasmafacing material on the main chamber wall of JET. To assess the erosion of the Be tiles, a Be marker tile was proposed and designed. The test samples which simulate the JET Be marker tile have been produced in MEdC, Romania in order to study the thermal load resistance of the JET Be marker (20 x 20 mm 2 size with 30 mm height). The marker tile sample consists of bulk Be, high-Z interlayer (2-3 μm Ni coating) and 8-9 μm Be coating. Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) techniques based on the electron-induced evaporation have been selected for this purpose. In the present work, the global characterization of the maker tile samples and thermal load tests were performed. After the pre-characterization (microstructure observation by scanning electron microscope and elemental analysis by means of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy), the thermal loading tests were performed in the electron beam facility JUDITH. The coating consisted of tiny platelets of ∝0.1 um in diameter and localized larger platelets of 1 um in diameter. The surface and bulk temperature were observed during the tests. In the screening thermal load test, the samples were loaded to 6 MW/m 2 for 10 s. The layers did not show any macroscopic damages at up to 4.5 MW/m 2 for 10 s (45 MJ/m 2 ). However, the coating delaminated and the maker was damaged when the thermal loading reached at 5 MW/m 2 (∝50 MJ/m 2 ). Cyclic heat load tests were

  11. Resist materials for proton micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Sanchez, J.L.; Xu, B.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA, e.g. micromachining with 2 MeV protons results in microstructures with a height of 63 μm and lateral sub-micrometer resolution in PMMA resist. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. This involves the study of different types of resists. The dose distribution of high molecular weight PMMA is compared with three other types of resist: First the positive photo resist AZ P4620 will be discussed and then PMGI SF 23, which can be used as a deep UV, e-beam or X-ray resist. Finally SU-8, a new deep UV negative type of chemically amplified resist will be discussed. All these polymers are applied using the spin coating technique at thicknesses of between 1 and 36 μm

  12. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  13. Fire resistant aircraft seat materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabold, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The establishment of a technical data base for individual seat materials in order to facilitate materials selections is reviewed. The thermal response of multi-layer constructions representative of the basic functional layers of a typical future seat is examined. These functional layers include: (1) decorative fabric cover; (2) slip sheet (topper); (3) fire blocking layer; (4) cushion reinforcement; and (5) cushioning layer. The implications for material selection for full-scale seats are discussed.

  14. Materials surface modification by plasma bombardment under simultaneous erosion and redeposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-07-01

    The first in-depth investigation of surface modification of materials by continuous, high-flux argon plasma bombardment under simultaneous erosion and redeposition conditions have been carried out for copper and 304 stainless steel using the PISCES facility. The plasma bombardment conditions are: incident ion flux range from 10 17 to 10 19 ions sec -1 cm -2 , total ion fluence is controlled between 10 19 and 10 22 ions cm -2 , electron temperature range from 5 to 15 eV, and plasma density range from 10 11 to 10 13 cm -3 . The incident ion energy is 100 eV. The sample temperature is between 300 and 700K. Under redeposition dominated conditions, the material erosion rate due to the plasma bombardment is significantly smaller (by a factor up to 10) than that can be expected from the classical ion beam sputtering yield data. It is found that surface morphologies of redeposited materials strongly depend on the plasma bombardment condition. The effect of impurities on surface morphology is elucidated in detail. First-order modelings are implemented to interpret the reduced erosion rate and the surface evolution. Also, fusion related surface properties of redeposited materials such as hydrogen reemission and plasma driven permeation have been characterized

  15. Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion behavior of selected graphite materials have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. These materials include: Pyro-graphite; 2D-graphite weave; 4D-graphite weave; and POCO-graphite. Deuterium plasma bombardment conditions are: fluxes around 7 /times/ 10 17 ions s/sup /minus/1/cm/sup /minus/2/; exposure time in the range from 10 to 100 s; bombarding energy of 300 eV; and graphite temperatures between 20 and 120/degree/C. To reduce deuterium plasma recycling, several approaches have been investigated. Erosion due to high-fluence helium plasma conditioning significantly increases the surface porosity of POCO-graphite and 4D-graphite weave whereas little change for 2D-graphite weave and Pyro-graphite. The increased pore openings and refreshed in-pore surface sites are found to reduce the deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion rates at transient stages. The steady state recycling rates for these graphite materials can be also correlated to the surface porosity. Surface topographical modification by machined-grooves noticeably reduces the steady state deuterium recycling rate and the impurity emission from the surface. These surface topography effects are attributed to co-deposition of remitted deuterium, chemically sputtered hydrocarbon and physically sputtered carbon under deuterium plasma bombardment. The co-deposited film is found to have a characteristic surface morphology with dendritic microstructures. 18 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Insulating materials resistance in intense radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oproiu, Constantin; Martin, Diana; Scarlat, Florin; Timus, Dan; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the main changes of the mechanical and electrical properties of some organic insulating materials exposed to accelerated electron beams. These materials are liable to be used in nuclear plants and particle accelerators. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, fracture strength, tearing on fracture, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant and tangent angle of dielectric losses. (authors)

  17. Aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, S.; Mikami, K.; Yamada, K.

    1980-01-01

    An aluminum alloy for cladding excellent in sacrificial anode property and erosion-corrosion resistance, which consists essentially of, in weight percentage: zinc - 0.3 to 3.0%, magnesium - 0.2 to 4.0%, manganese - 0.3 to 2.0%, and, the balance aluminum and incidental impurities; said alloy including an aluminum alloy also containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of, in weight percentage: indium - 0.005 to 0.2%, tin - 0.01 to 0.3%, and, bismuth - 0.01 to 0.3%; provided that the total content of indium, tin and bismuth being up to 0.3%

  18. Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Energy Delivery: Pulse and Power Effects on Enamel Surface and Erosive Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renan Mota; de Souza, Vinicius Matsuzaki; Esteves, Camila Machado; de Oliveira Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco; Cassoni, Alessandra; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Brugnera Junior, Aldo

    2017-11-01

    High power lasers have been suggested as a useful tool for dental caries and erosion prevention due to the increase of enamel acid resistance. to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium,chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser irradiation pulse frequency and power on enamel surface and acid erosion resistance. By combining pulse frequency (5-75 Hz) and power settings (0.10-1.00 W), 20 irradiated groups and one nonirradiated control group were tested. A total of 63 bovine enamel blocks (n = 3/group) were prepared for surface hardness and roughness evaluation, performed in three phases: baseline, after irradiation, and after erosive challenge. Enamel blocks were irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser with MZ8 tip (iPlus; Waterlase, Biolase, CA) for 30 sec according to experimental group and submitted. Erosive challenge consisted of four cycles alternating immersion in 0.01 M HCl (5 mL/mm 2 ; 2 min; at 37°C) and immersion in artificial saliva for 3 h. Analysis of variance (three-way ANOVA), Tukey's test, and Pearson correlation were performed for the statistical analysis (p hardness. After erosive challenge, 5 and 75 W groups showed increase in surface hardness; 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 W groups showed minor alterations in surface roughness. the irradiation of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with different parameters of power and pulse frequency settings may alter enamel surface and erosive resistance differently. Pulse frequency of 30 Hz and power of 0.50 W was considered the best parameter to prevent enamel acid erosion.

  19. Method and device for the determination of material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugstad, A.; Videm, K.

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and an apparatus for gauging material loss due to corrosion and/or erosion during a certain period of time from a given piece of material which previously has been made radioactive. The material loss is determined by measuring the intensity of the radiactive radiation from the material by means of a radiation intensity meter disposed at a measuring site a fixed distance from said piece of material for the measurement of the radioactive radiation from the piece both at the beginning and at the end of said period of time. Each of the measurements is calibrated by means of an additional radiation source disposed for controllably adopting either a most radiation screened position or alternatively a least screened position with respect to a radiation screen, and thereby providing a known radiation intensity at the measuring site in both positions. The least radiation screened position provides full unscreened radiation intensity at the measuring site, whereas the most screened position provides negligible radiation intensity at said site. The measurement results in the two positions are subsequently compared in order to deduce the contribution of said piece of material to the combined radiation intensity in proporsion to the known contribution of the radiation source. The additional radiation source is preferable made from a calibration body composed of the same material as the piece of material exposed to corrosion and/or erosion, the calibration body body being activated at the same time and by the same activation process as said piece. The calibration body is preferably dimensioned to provide at all time the same radiation intensity at the measuring site as a predetermined material loss from the piece of material, e.g. a prefixed thickness reduction of the same. 4 figs

  20. Improving Erosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings by Elevating the Deposition Temperature Based on the Critical Bonding Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu-Wei; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Interlamellar bonding within plasma-sprayed coatings is one of the most important factors dominating the properties and performance of coatings. The interface bonding between lamellae significantly influences the erosion behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings. In this study, TiO2 and Al2O3 coatings with different microstructures were deposited at different deposition temperatures based on the critical bonding temperature concept. The erosion behavior of ceramic coatings was investigated. It was revealed that the coatings prepared at room temperature exhibit a typical lamellar structure with numerous unbonded interfaces, whereas the coatings deposited at the temperature above the critical bonding temperature present a dense structure with well-bonded interfaces. The erosion rate decreases sharply with the improvement of interlamellar bonding when the deposition temperature increases to the critical bonding temperature. In addition, the erosion mechanisms of ceramic coatings were examined. The unbonded interfaces in the conventional coatings act as pre-cracks accelerating the erosion of coatings. Thus, controlling interlamellar bonding formation based on the critical bonding temperature is an effective approach to improve the erosion resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings.

  1. Formation of accessory mineral bed layers during erosion of bentonite buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, Timothy; Kanerva, Noora

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. dilute groundwater at a transmissive fracture interface, accessory phases within bentonite, such as quartz, feldspar, etc., might remain behind and form a filter bed or cake. As more and more montmorillonite is lost, the thickness of the accessory mineral bed increases and the continued transport of montmorillonite slows and possibly stops if the porosity of the filter bed is sufficiently compressed. Alternatively or concurrently, as the accessory mineral filter bed retains montmorillonite colloids, a filter cake composed of montmorillonite itself may be formed. Ultimately, depending on their extent, properties, and durability, such processes may provide the bentonite buffer system with an inherent, self-filtration mechanism which serves to limit the effects of colloidal erosion. A conceptual view of bentonite buffer extrusion and erosion in an intersecting fracture with formation of an accessory mineral filter bed and montmorillonite filter cake is presented in Figure 1. Due to the swelling pressure of the bentonite buffer, the situation described in Figure 1 may be analogous to that of the case of pressure filtration where a filter cake is formed by pressing a suspension through a filter medium and, by a mechanism known as expression, the filter cake is compressed by direct contact with a solid surface resulting in a reduction of its porosity. In order to examine whether the erosion of bentonite material through contact with dilute groundwater at a transmissive fracture interface could intrinsically result in 1) the formation of an accessory mineral filter bed and cake and/or 2) filter caking of montmorillonite itself, a series of laboratory tests were performed in a flow-through, horizontal, 1 mm aperture, artificial fracture system. Bentonite buffer material was simulated by using mixtures (75/25 weight percent ratio) of purified sodium montmorillonite and various additives serving as accessory mineral proxies

  2. Theory and models of material erosion and lifetime during plasma instabilities in a tokamak environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1999-01-01

    Surface and structural damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) due to the frequent loss of plasma confinement remains a serious problem for the tokamak reactor concept. The deposited plasma energy causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure, and frequent plasma contamination. Surface damage consists of vaporization, spallation, and liquid splatter of metallic materials. Structural damage includes large temperature increases in structural materials and at the interfaces between surface coatings and structural members. To evaluate the lifetimes of plasma-facing materials and nearby components and to predict the various forms of damage that they experience, comprehensive models (contained in the HEIGHTS computer simulation package) are developed, integrated self-consistently, and enhanced. Splashing mechanisms such as bubble boiling and various liquid magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and brittle destruction mechanisms of nonmelting materials are being examined. The design requirements and implications of plasma-facing and nearby components are discussed, along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components

  3. In hydrofluoric acid corrosion-resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauffe, K.

    1985-01-01

    Copper, red brass (Cu-15 Zn), special treated carbon steel and chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel represent materials of high resistivity against concentrated hydrofluoric acid ( 2 O 3 ) are employed for windows in the presence of hydrogen fluoride and/or hydrofluoric acid because of their superior optical properties and their excellent corrosion resistance. Polyethylen, polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) belong to the cheapest corrosion resistant material for container and for coatings in the presence of hydrofluoric acid. Special polyester resins reinforced by glass or graphite fibers have been successfully employed as material for production units with hydrofluoric acid containing liquids up to 330 K. By carbon reinforced epoxy resin represents a corrosion resistant coating. Because of their excellent friction and corrosion resistance against concentrated hot hydrofluoric acid and HNO 3 -HF-solutions, PTFE and polyvinylidene fluoride are used as material for valves and axles in such environment. The expensive alloys, as for instance hastelloy and monel, are substituted more and more by fiber-reinfored polyolefins, PVC and fluorine containing polymers. (orig.) [de

  4. Cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel laser surface-modified with NiTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.Y.; Cheng, F.T.; Man, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study is part of a project on the surface modification of AISI 316 stainless steel using various forms of NiTi for enhancing cavitation erosion resistance. In this study, NiTi powder was preplaced on the AISI 316L substrate and melted with a high-power CW Nd:YAG laser. With appropriate laser processing parameters, an alloyed layer of a few hundred micrometers thick was formed and fusion bonded to the substrate without the formation of a brittle interface. EDS analysis showed that the layer contained Fe as the major constituent element while the XRD patterns of the surface showed an austenitic structure, similar to that of 316 stainless steel. The cavitation erosion resistance of the modified layer (316-NiTi-Laser) could reach about 29 times that of AISI 316L stainless steel. The improvement could be attributed to a much higher surface hardness and elasticity as revealed by instrumented nanoindentation tests. Among various types of samples, the cavitation erosion resistance was ranked in descending order as: NiTi plate > 316-NiTi-Laser > 316-NiTi-TIG > AISI 316L, where 316-NiTi-TIG stands for samples surfaced with the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using NiTi wire. Though the laser-surfaced samples and the TIG-surfaced samples had similar indentation properties, the former exhibited a higher erosion resistance mainly because of a more homogeneous alloyed layer with much less defects. In both the laser-surfaced and TIG-surfaced samples, the superelastic behavior typical of austenitic NiTi was only partially retained and the superior cavitation erosion resistance was thus still not fully attained

  5. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Rutherford, D.A.; Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Mangan, D.L.; Moya, R.W.; Moore, L.R.; Strait, R.S.

    1995-04-01

    The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study open-quotes Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutoniumclose quotes defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This report proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials

  6. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  7. Erosion and mass transfer of Mo, W and Nb under neutron irradiation of high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzhatyj, V.I.; Luk'yanov, A.N.; Zavalishin, A.A.; Tkach, V.N.; Fedorenko, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Studies have been made of the medium composition in thermionic fuel elements of two types during reactor tests; erosion and mass transfer of electrode materials have been investigated in the after-reactor analysis of the tested fuel elements. The studies of electrode material evaporation at the conditions approaching (in environment temperature and composition) those of reactor tests of thermionic fuel elements have shown that the process proceeds in the form of metal oxides. Evaporation rates are determined, the mechanism of evaporation is discussed, and the analytical dependences are obtained for calculating the evaporation rates of Mo and W at certain temperature and gaseous medium composition. It is found that the main contribution to the material transfer off the Mo and Nb surfaces under a high-temperature reactor irradiation comes through the thermal evaporation; in the case of tungsten at the same experimental conditions the rates of mass transfer due to thermal evaporation and neutron sputtering are nearly the same [ru

  8. Plasma treatment of heat-resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V A; Kosmachev, P V; Skripnikova, N K; Bezukhov, K A

    2015-01-01

    Refractory lining of thermal generating units is exposed to chemical, thermal, and mechanical attacks. The degree of fracture of heat-resistant materials depends on the chemical medium composition, the process temperature and the material porosity. As is known, a shortterm exposure of the surface to low-temperature plasma (LTP) makes possible to create specific coatings that can improve the properties of workpieces. The aim of this work is to produce the protective coating on heat-resistant chamotte products using the LTP technique. Experiments have shown that plasma treatment of chamotte products modifies the surface, and a glass-ceramic coating enriched in mullite is formed providing the improvement of heat resistance. For increasing heat resistance of chamotte refractories, pastes comprising mixtures of Bacor, alumina oxide, and chamot were applied to their surfaces in different ratios. It is proved that the appropriate coating cannot be created if only one of heat-resistant components is used. The required coatings that can be used and recommended for practical applications are obtained only with the introduction of powder chamot. The paste composition of 50% chamot, 25% Bacor, and 25% alumina oxide exposed to plasma treatment, has demonstrated the most uniform surface fusion. (paper)

  9. The use of arc-erosion as a patterning technique for transparent conductive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Trillo, J. [Dpt. Ingenieria de Circuitos y Sistemas, EUIT Telecomunicacion, U. P. M, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, A.L., E-mail: angelluis.alvarez@urjc.es [Dpt. Tecnologia Electronica, Univ. Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles, 28933 Madrid (Spain); Coya, C. [Dpt. Tecnologia Electronica, Univ. Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles, 28933 Madrid (Spain); Cespedes, E.; Espinosa, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Within the framework of cost-effective patterning processes a novel technique that saves photolithographic processing steps, easily scalable to wide area production, is proposed. It consists of a tip-probe, which is biased with respect to a conductive substrate and slides on it, keeping contact with the material. The sliding tip leaves an insulating path (which currently is as narrow as 30 {mu}m) across the material, which enables the drawing of tracks and pads electrically insulated from the surroundings. This ablation method, called arc-erosion, requires an experimental set up that had to be customized for this purpose and is described. Upon instrumental monitoring, a brief proposal of the physics below this process is also presented. As a result an optimal control of the patterning process has been acquired. The system has been used on different substrates, including indium tin oxide either on glass or on polyethylene terephtalate, as well as alloys like Au/Cr, and Al. The influence of conditions such as tip speed and applied voltage is discussed. - Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An experimental set up has been arranged to use arc erosion as a cost-effective patterning technique of conductive materials (ITO, and thin film metals). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monitoring of the process has revealed that patterning is performed by a sequence of electrical discharges, assisted by the bypass capacitor at the source output. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This process has been controlled optimizing the patterning conditions and quality over different materials.

  10. Investigating erosion of building materials used in an installation for pneumatic transport of coke breeze and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandrowski, J.; Kot-Borkowska, Z.; Misztal, M.; Raczek, J.; Kaczmarzyk, G.

    1980-09-01

    This article investigates the influence of the following factors on erosion of building material used in pneumatic transport of coal and coke breeze: intensity of coal or coke breeze flow within the range of 47 to 120 kg/h for coke and 99 to 165 kg/h for coal; speed of solid material particles within the range 3.71 to 7.97 m/s for coke, and 3.30 to 7.58 m/s for coal; duration of the experiments 0.5 to 1.5 h for coke and 2.0 to 5.0 for coal; angle of inclination of the sample of building material 30 to 60 degrees for both coal and coke breeze. Three types of construction material used in pneumatic transport were tested: steel, concrete and chamotte bricks. Investigations show that concrete is characterized by the highest erosion, chamotte bricks by medium erosion and steel by the lowest erosion. As a result of mathematical processing of experimental data, empirical models of erosion of the three materials are constructed. (7 refs.)

  11. Filamentary model in resistive switching materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Alladin C.

    2017-12-01

    The need for next generation computer devices is increasing as the demand for efficient data processing increases. The amount of data generated every second also increases which requires large data storage devices. Oxide-based memory devices are being studied to explore new research frontiers thanks to modern advances in nanofabrication. Various oxide materials are studied as active layers for non-volatile memory. This technology has potential application in resistive random-access-memory (ReRAM) and can be easily integrated in CMOS technologies. The long term perspective of this research field is to develop devices which mimic how the brain processes information. To realize such application, a thorough understanding of the charge transport and switching mechanism is important. A new perspective in the multistate resistive switching based on current-induced filament dynamics will be discussed. A simple equivalent circuit of the device gives quantitative information about the nature of the conducting filament at different resistance states.

  12. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  13. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  14. Accessibility evaluation of the IFMIF liquid lithium loop considering activated erosion/corrosion materials deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Takemura, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Fischer, U.; Ida, M.; Mori, S.; Nishitani, T.; Simakov, S.; Sugimoto, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of accessibility of the Li loop piping considering activated corrosion product. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a deuteron-lithium (Li) stripping reaction neutron source for fusion materials testing. Target assembly and back wall are designed as fully remote maintenance component. Accessibility around the Li loop piping will depend on activation level of the deposition materials due to the back wall erosion/corrosion process under liquid Li flow. Activation level of the corrosion products coming from the AISI 316LN back wall is calculated by the ACT-4 of the THIDA-2 code system. The total activities after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 1 year cooling are 3.1 x 10 14 , 2.8 x 10 14 , 2.3 x 10 14 and 7.5 x 10 13 Bq/kg, respectively. Radiation dose rate around the Li loop pipe is calculated by QAD-CGGP2R code. Activated area of the back wall is 100 cm 2 . Corrosion rate is assumed 1 μm/year. When 10% of the corrosion material is supposed to be deposited on the inner surface of the pipe, the dose rate is calculated to be less than a permissible level of 10 μSv/h for hands-on maintenance, therefore, the maintenance work is assessed to be possible

  15. Deep repository - Engineered barrier system. Erosion and sealing processes in tunnel backfill materials investigated in laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Boergesson, Lennart; Dueck, Ann; Goudarzi, Reza; Loennqvist, Margareta (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    SKB in Sweden and Posiva in Finland are developing and plan to implement similar disposal concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Co-operation and joint development work between Posiva and SKB with the overall objective to develop backfill concepts and techniques for sealing and closure of the repository have been going on for several years. The investigation described in this report is intended to acquire more knowledge regarding the behavior of some of the candidate backfilling materials. Blocks made of three different materials (Friedland clay, Asha 230 or a bentonite/ballast 30/70 mixture) as well as different bentonite pellets have been examined. The backfill materials will be exposed to an environment simulating that in a tunnel, with high relative humidity and water inflow from the rock. The processes and properties investigated are: 1. Erosion properties of blocks and pellets (Friedland blocks, MX-80 pellets, Cebogel QSE pellets, Minelco and Friedland granules). 2. Displacements of blocks after emplacement in a deposition drift (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 and Mixture 30/70). 3. The ability of these materials to seal a leaking in-situ cast plug cement/rock but also other fractures in the rock (MX-80 pellets). 4. The self healing ability after a piping scenario (Blocks of Friedland, Asha 230 Mixture 30/70 and also MX-80 pellets). 5. Swelling and cracking of the compacted backfill blocks caused by relative humidity. The erosion properties of Friedland blocks were also investigated in Phase 2 of the joint SKBPosiva project 'Backfilling and Closure of the Deep Repository, BACLO, which included laboratory scale experiments. In this phase of the project (3) some completing tests were performed with new blocks produced for different field tests. These blocks had a lower density than intended and this has an influence on the erosion properties measured. The erosion properties of MX-80 pellets were also investigated earlier in the project but

  16. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse ... lar carbides, precipitating at random boundaries, were more likely to ... 23-8-N nitronic steel is basically austenitic stainless steel.

  17. Erosion and redeposition of divertor and wall materials during abnormal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1990-09-01

    High energy deposition to in-vessel components of fusion reactors is expected to occur during abnormal operating conditions. This high energy dump in short times may result in very high surface temperatures and can cause severe erosion as a result of melting and vaporization of these components. One abnormal operating condition results from plasma disruptions where the plasma loses confinement and dumps its energy on reactor components. Another abnormal condition occurs when a neutral beam used in heating the plasma shines through the vacuum vessel to parts of the wall with no plasma present in the chamber. A third abnormal event that results in high energy deposition is caused by the runaway electrons to chamber components following a disruption. The failure of these components under the expected high heat loads can severely limit the operation of the fusion device. The redeposition of the eroded materials from these abnormal events over the first wall and other components may cause additional problems. Such problems are associated with tritium accumulation in the freshly deposited materials, charge exchange sputtering and additional impurity sources, and material compatibility issues

  18. Design of online testing system of material radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Junsheng; He Shengping; Gao Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The capability of radiation resistance is important for some material used in some specifically engineering fields. It is the same principal applied in all existing test system that compares the performance parameter after radiation to evaluate material radiation resistance. A kind of new technique on test system of material radiation resistance is put forward in this paper. Experimentation shows that the online test system for material radiation resistance works well and has an extending application outlook. (authors)

  19. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  20. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion behavior of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel were studied. A series of heat treatments were carried out in the temperature range of 1180–1240 °C to observe the effect on microstructure. Optimum heat treatment cycle was obtained at 1220 °C for holding time of 150 min, which leads to dissolution of carbides, formation of equiaxed grains and twins. Heat treatment has shown improvement in tensile strength, toughness, impact strength and work hardening capacity, however at the cost of marginal reduction in hardness and yield strength. This resulted in improvement of erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel. The microstructures, fractured surfaces and phases were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis respectively

  1. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cortés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP. The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER. The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case

  2. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; Madramany, Borja

    2017-01-01

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares

  3. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating-Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; O'Carroll, Anthony; Madramany, Borja; Hardiman, Mark; Young, Trevor M

    2017-09-28

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating-laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling-adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares two

  4. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  5. Shock resistance of composite material pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pays, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Composite materials have found a wide range of applications for EDF nuclear plants. Applications include fire pipework, demineralized water, service water, and emergency-supplied service water piping. Some of those pipework is classified nuclear safety, their integrity (resistance to water aging and earthquakes or accidental excess pressure (water hammer)) must be safeguarded. As composite materials generally suffer damage for low energy impacts (under 10 J), the pipes planned for the Civaux power plant have been studied for their resistance to a low speed shock (0 to 50 m/s) and of a 0 to 110 J energy level. For three representative diameters (20, 150, 600 mm), the minimum impact energy that leads to a leak has been determined to be respectively 18, 20 and 48 J. Then the leak rate versus impact energy was plotted; until roughly 90 J, the leak rate remains stable at less than 25 cm 3 /h and raises to higher values (300 cm 3 /h) afterwards. The level of leakage in the range of impact energy tested always stays within the limits set by the Safety Authorities for metallic pipes. These results have been linked to destructive examinations, to clarify the damage mechanisms. Other tests are still ongoing to follow the evolution of the damage and of the leak rate while the pipe is maintained under service pressure during one year

  6. [Effects of gravel mulch technology on soil erosion resistance and plant growth of river flinty slope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xie, San-Tao; Ruan, Ai-Dong; Bian, Xun-Wen

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the technical difficulties such as the stability and water balance in the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope, a gravel mulch technology was proposed, with the effects of different gravel mulch treatments on the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property, and plant growth investigated by anti-erosion and pot experiments. The results showed that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size could obviously enhance the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property and plant biomass, but no obvious differences were observed between the mulch thickness of 5 cm and 8 cm. It was indicated that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size and 5 cm in thickness was an effective and economical technology for the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope.

  7. Searching for plant root traits to improve soil cohesion and resist soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Smyth, Kevin; Denbigh, Tom; Weldon, Laura; Higgins, Ben; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Meersmans, Jeroen; Chenchiah, Isaac; Liverpool, Tannie; Quine, Tim; Grierson, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion poses a serious threat to future food and environmental security. Soil erosion protection measures are therefore of great importance for soil conservation and food security. Plant roots have proven to be very effective in stabilizing the soil and protecting the soil against erosion. However, no clear insights are yet obtained into the root traits that are responsible for root-soil cohesion. This is important in order to better select the best species for soil protection. Research using Arabidopsis mutants has made great progress towards explaining how root systems are generated by growth, branching, and responses to gravity, producing mutants that affect root traits. In this study, the performance of selected Arabidopsis mutants is analyzed in three root-soil cohesion assays. Measurements of detachment, uprooting force and soil detachment are here combined with the microscopic analysis of root properties, such as the presence, length and density of root hairs in this case. We found that Arabidopsis seedlings with root hairs (wild type, wer myb23, rsl4) were more difficult to detach from gel media than hairless (cpc try) or short haired (rsl4, rhd2) roots. Hairy roots (wild type, wer myb23) on mature, non-reproductive rosettes were more difficult to uproot from compost or clay soil than hairless roots (cpc try). At high root densities, erosion rates from soils with hairless roots (cpc try) were as much as 10 times those seen from soils occupied by roots with hairs (wer myb23, wild type). We find therefore root hairs play a significant role in root-soil cohesion and in minimizing erosion. This framework and associated suite of experimental assays demonstrates its ability to measure the effect of any root phenotype on the effectiveness of plant roots in binding substrates and reducing erosion.

  8. Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluoresence mapping of enamel and dental materials after chemical erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sídnei; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-10-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence was employed to test the hypothesis that beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization will change the chemical properties of dental materials and enamel mineral content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 45) each received two cavity preparations (n = 90), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin; GIC: glass-ionomer cement; RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: saliva; E: erosion/Pepsi Twist®; or EM: erosion+mouthwash/Colgate Plax®). It was found that mineral loss in enamel was greater in GICE samples than in RE > RMGICE > RMGICEM > REM > GICEM. An increased percentage of Zr was found in REM indicating organic matrix degradation. Dental materials tested (R, GIC, and RMGIC) were not able to protect adjacent enamel from acid erosion by the soft drink tested. The use of mouthwash promoted protection of enamel after erosion by the soft drink. To avoid chemical dissolution by mouthwashes, protection by resin composites with surface sealants is recommended.

  9. Study to develop improved fire resistant aircraft passenger seat materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duskin, F. E.; Schutter, K. J.; Sieth, H. H.; Trabold, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Phase 3 study of the NASA 'Improved Fire Resistant Aircraft Seat Materials' involved fire tests of improved materials in multilayered combinations representative of cushion configurations. Tests were conducted to determine their thermal, smoke, and fire resistance characteristics. Additionally, a 'Design Guideline' for Fire Resistant Passenger Seats was written outlining general seat design considerations. Finally, a three-abreast 'Tourist Class' passenger seat assembly fabricated from the most advanced fire-resistant materials was delivered.

  10. Cavitation erosion resistance of 13/4 and 21-4-N steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small change in the operating efficiency can be very expensive. ... The samples for cavitation erosion tests were cut by diamond cutter of 10 × 10 × .... in which it has been reported that the graphite inclusions provide the required crack initiation.

  11. A method for measuring effects of bioturbation and consolidation on erosion resistance of aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano, L.; Beijer, J.A.J.; Roozen, F.C.J.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment erosion by water movement affects turbidity and thus benthic communities in numerous aquatic systems. This aspect has been widely studied in coastal habitats and estuaries, but less studied in freshwater systems such as shallow lakes. Here we present a simple device to study the effects of

  12. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki (Ed.); Cordier, Stephane (Ed.); Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás de (Ed.); Centeri, Csaba (Ed.)

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  13. Corrosion resistance of copper canister weld material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban

    2007-03-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast iron insert fitted inside a copper canister. SKB has since several years developed manufacturing processes for the canister components using a network of manufacturers. For the encapsulation process SKB has built the Canister Laboratory to demonstrate and develop the encapsulation technique in full scale. The critical part of the encapsulation of spent fuel is the sealing of the canister which is done by welding the copper lid to the cylindrical part of the canister. Two welding techniques have been developed in parallel, Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Stir Welding (FSW). During the past two decades, SKB has developed the technology EBW at The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The development work at the Canister Laboratory began in 1999. In electron beam welding, a gun is used to generate the electron beam which is aimed at the joint. The beam heats up the material to the melting point allowing a fusion weld to be formed. The gun was developed by TWI and has a unique design for use at reduced pressure. The system has gone through a number of improvements under the last couple of years including implementation of a beam oscillation system. However, during fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow they will tend to concentrate impurities at the new grain boundaries that might pose adverse effects on the corrosion resistance of welds. As a new method for joining, SKB has been developing friction stir welding (FSW) for sealing copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel in cooperation with TWI since 1997. FSW was invented in 1991 at TWI and is a thermo

  14. Corrosion resistance of copper canister weld material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubner, Rolf; Andersson, Urban [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, Sto ckholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will be placed in granite bedrock and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast iron insert fitted inside a copper canister. SKB has since several years developed manufacturing processes for the canister components using a network of manufacturers. For the encapsulation process SKB has built the Canister Laboratory to demonstrate and develop the encapsulation technique in full scale. The critical part of the encapsulation of spent fuel is the sealing of the canister which is done by welding the copper lid to the cylindrical part of the canister. Two welding techniques have been developed in parallel, Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Stir Welding (FSW). During the past two decades, SKB has developed the technology EBW at The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The development work at the Canister Laboratory began in 1999. In electron beam welding, a gun is used to generate the electron beam which is aimed at the joint. The beam heats up the material to the melting point allowing a fusion weld to be formed. The gun was developed by TWI and has a unique design for use at reduced pressure. The system has gone through a number of improvements under the last couple of years including implementation of a beam oscillation system. However, during fabrication of the outer copper canisters there will be some unavoidable grain growth in the welded areas. As grains grow they will tend to concentrate impurities at the new grain boundaries that might pose adverse effects on the corrosion resistance of welds. As a new method for joining, SKB has been developing friction stir welding (FSW) for sealing copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel in cooperation with TWI since 1997. FSW was invented in 1991 at TWI and is a thermo

  15. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  16. Contribution of the different erosion processes to material release from the vessel walls of fusion devices during plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    2002-01-01

    In high temperature plasma experiments several processes contribute to erosion and loss of material from the vessel walls. This material may enter the plasma edge and the central plasma where it acts as impurities. It will finally be re-deposited at other wall areas. These erosion processes are: evaporation due to heating of wall areas. At very high power deposition evaporation may become very large, which has been named ''blooming''. Large evaporation and melting at some areas of the vessel wall surface may occur during heat pulses, as observed in plasma devices during plasma disruptions. At tips on the vessel walls and/or hot spots on the plasma exposed solid surfaces electrical arcs between the plasma and the vessel wall may ignite. They cause the release of ions, atoms and small metal droplets, or of carbon dust particles. Finally, atoms from the vessel walls are removed by physical and chemical sputtering caused by the bombardment of the vessel walls with ions as well as energetic neutral hydrogen atoms from the boundary plasma. All these processes have been, and are, observed in today's plasma experiments. Evaporation can in principle be controlled by very effective cooling of the wall tiles, arcing is reduced by very stable plasma operation, and sputtering by ions can be reduced by operating with a cold plasma in front of the vessel walls. However, sputtering by energetic neutrals, which impinge on all areas of the vessel walls, is likely to be the most critical process because ions lost from the plasma recycle as neutrals or have to be refuelled by neutrals leading to the charge exchange processes in the plasma. In order to quantify the wall erosion, ''materials factors'' (MF) have been introduced in the following for the different erosion processes. (orig.)

  17. Erosion of divertor materials in simulation experiments of ITEP thermonuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Korshunov, S.N.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Khripunov, B.I.; Vasil'ev, V.I.; Strunnikov, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    The tungsten sputtering by the deuterium ions with the energy of 5 eV at the temperature of 1470 K with the sputtering coefficient of 1.5 x 10 -4 at/ion is identified. Comparison of the erosion degree of various W types and W + C coatings on W is carried out in the experiments on simulating the plasma break-away; W drops distribution by the diameters, depending on the collector drops position, is studied. W(111) tungsten is characterized by the minimal erosion and W-10% Re tungsten - by the maximum one [ru

  18. Diagnostic mirrors for ITER: A material choice and the impact of erosion and deposition on their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wienhold, P.; Philipps, V.; Sergienko, G.; Schmitz, O.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Droste, S.; Samm, U.; Mertens, Ph.; Donne, A.H.; Rudakov, D.; Allen, S.; Boivin, R.; McLean, A.; Stangeby, P.; West, W.; Wong, C.; Lipa, M.; Schunke, B.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.; Costley, A.; Voitsenya, V.; Vukolov, K.; Oelhafen, P.; Rubel, M.; Romanyuk, A.

    2007-01-01

    Metal mirrors will be implemented in about half of the ITER diagnostics. Mirrors in ITER will have to withstand radiation loads, erosion by charge-exchange neutrals, deposition of impurities, particle implantation and neutron irradiation. It is believed that the optical properties of diagnostic mirrors will be primarily influenced by erosion and deposition. A solution is needed for optimal performance of mirrors in ITER throughout the entire lifetime of the machine. A multi-machine research on diagnostic mirrors is currently underway in fusion facilities at several institutions and laboratories worldwide. Among others, dedicated investigations of ITER-candidate mirror materials are ongoing in Tore-Supra, TEXTOR, DIII-D, TCV, T-10 and JET. Laboratory studies are underway at IPP Kharkov (Ukraine), Kurchatov Institute (Russia) and the University of Basel (Switzerland). An overview of current research on diagnostic mirrors along with an outlook on future investigations is the subject of this paper

  19. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Radiation resistance of polymer materials for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, Masahiko; Iwata, Minoru; Yokota, Rikio

    2011-01-01

    The thin film of thermoplastic polyimide with a new asymmetric structure is used in the solar sail 'IKAROS'. Here, the relation of its chemical structure to its thermodynamic properties and radiation resistance is introduced. (M.H.)

  1. Weather resistance of CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-based sand-fixation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Tie, Shengnian

    2017-07-01

    Searching for an economical and effective sand-fixing material and technology is of great importance in Northwest China. This paper described the use of a semihydrated gypsum-(CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-)based composite as a sand-fixing material. Its morphology and composition were characterized by SEM, and its water resistance, freezing-thawing resistance and wind erosion resistance were tested in the field. The results indicated that semihydrated gypsum-(CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-)based sand-fixing composite has good water resistance and water-holding capacity. Its strength is maintained at 1.42 MPa after 50 freezing and thawing cycles, and its wind erosion increases with increasing wind speed and slope. Its compressive strength starts to decrease after nine months of field tests with no change in appearance, but it still satisfies the requirements of fixation technology. This sand-fixing material should have wide application owing to its good weather resistance.

  2. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  3. Numerical insight into the micromechanics of jet erosion of a cohesive granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuéllar Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the physical mechanisms behind the surface erosion of a cohesive granular soil induced by an impinging jet by means of numerical simulations coupling fluid and grains at the microscale. The 2D numerical model combines the Discrete Element and Lattice Boltzmann methods (DEM-LBM and accounts for the granular cohesion with a contact model featuring a paraboloidal yield surface. Here we review first the hydrodynamical conditions imposed by the fluid jet on a solid granular packing, turning then the attention to the impact of cohesion on the erosion kinetics. Finally, the use of an additional subcritical debonding damage model based on the work of Silvani and co-workers provides a novel insight into the internal solicitation of the cohesive granular sample by the impinging jet.

  4. Numerical insight into the micromechanics of jet erosion of a cohesive granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar, Pablo; Benseghier, Zeyd; Luu, Li-Hua; Bonelli, Stéphane; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Radjaï, Farhang; Philippe, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Here we investigate the physical mechanisms behind the surface erosion of a cohesive granular soil induced by an impinging jet by means of numerical simulations coupling fluid and grains at the microscale. The 2D numerical model combines the Discrete Element and Lattice Boltzmann methods (DEM-LBM) and accounts for the granular cohesion with a contact model featuring a paraboloidal yield surface. Here we review first the hydrodynamical conditions imposed by the fluid jet on a solid granular packing, turning then the attention to the impact of cohesion on the erosion kinetics. Finally, the use of an additional subcritical debonding damage model based on the work of Silvani and co-workers provides a novel insight into the internal solicitation of the cohesive granular sample by the impinging jet.

  5. Data for Erosion and Tritium Retention in Beryllium Plasma-Facing Materials. Summary Report of the First Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2013-04-01

    Nine experts in the field of plasma-wall interaction on beryllium surfaces together with IAEA staff met at IAEA Headquarters 26-28 September 2012 for the First Research Coordination Meeting of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project on data for erosion and tritium retention in beryllium plasma-facing materials. They described their on-going research, reviewed the main data needs and made plans for coordinated research during the remaining years of the project. The proceedings of the meeting are summarized in this report. (author)

  6. Erosion on spark plug electrodes; Funkenerosion an Zuendkerzenelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rager, J.

    2006-07-01

    Durability of spark plugs is mainly determined by spark gap widening, caused by electrode wear. Knowledge about the erosion mechanisms of spark plug materials is of fundamental interest for the development of materials with a high resistance against electrode erosion. It is therefore crucial to identify those parameters which significantly influence the erosion behaviour of a material. In this work, a reliable and reproducible testing method is presented which produces and characterizes electrode wear under well-defined conditions and which is capable of altering parameters specifically. Endurance tests were carried out to study the dependence of the wear behaviour of pure nickel and platinum on the electrode temperature, gas, electrode gap, electrode diameter, atmospheric pressure, and partial pressure of oxygen. It was shown that erosion under nitrogen is negligible, irrespective of the material. This disproves all common mechanism discussed in the literature explaining material loss of spark plug electrodes. Based on this observation and the variation of the mentioned parameters a new erosion model was deduced. This relies on an oxidation of the electrode material and describes the erosion of nickel and platinum separately. For nickel, electrode wear is caused by the removal of an oxide layer by the spark. In the case of platinum, material loss occurs due to the plasma-assisted formation and subsequent evaporation of volatile oxides in the cathode spot. On the basis of this mechanism a new composite material was developed whose erosion resistance is superior to pure platinum. Oxidation resistant metal oxide particles were added to a platinum matrix, thus leading to a higher erosion resistance of the composite. However, this can be decreased by a side reaction, the separation of oxygen from the metal oxides, which effectively assists the oxidation of the matrix. This reaction can be suppressed by using highly stable oxides, characterized by a large negative Gibbs

  7. Solvent Resistant Elastomers and High TG Materials from the Same Carbosilane Backbone: Broadening the Materials Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagener, K

    2003-01-01

    .... We have directed our efforts towards solvent resistant materials that improve upon butyl rubber. Polycarobcsilanes combine the behavioral characteristics of hydrocarbon polymers and siloxane elastomers...

  8. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using electric...

  9. Improved Element Erosion Function for Concrete-Like Materials with the SPH Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper is a description of a simple test from the field of terminal ballistics and the handling of issues arising during its simulation using the numerical techniques of the finite element method. With regard to the possible excessive reshaping of the finite element mesh there is a danger that problems will arise such as the locking of elements or the appearance of negative volumes. It is often necessary to introduce numerical extensions so that the simulations can be carried out at all. When examining local damage to structures, such as the penetration of the outer shell or its perforation, it is almost essential to introduce the numerical erosion of elements into the simulations. However, when using numerical erosion, the dissipation of matter and energy from the computational model occurs in the mathematical background to the calculation. It is a phenomenon which can reveal itself in the final result when a discrepancy appears between the simulations and the experiments. This issue can be solved by transforming the eroded elements into smoothed particle hydrodynamics particles. These newly created particles can then assume the characteristics of the original elements and preserve the matter and energy of the numerical model.

  10. Data base of radiation-resistant dielectric and insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Yoshimasa; Sunazuka, Hideo; Nashiyama, Isamu; Kakuta, Tsunemi.

    1987-01-01

    In the data base of radiation-resistant dielectric and insulating materials, the data format contains such items as to give the summary; the data sheet contains the data in concrete form of respective properties from the references; the sheet of references contains the references in the former two. In the above three, there are attached code No., data sheet No., reference No. and key words. In the three areas as radiation-resistant dielectric and insulating materials, i.e., organic materials, inorganic materials and optical fibers, the following are explained: data format, data sheet and objectives. (Mori, K.)

  11. Resist materials for proton beam writing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.A. van, E-mail: phyjavk@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Physics Department, 2 Science Drive 3, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Malar, P. [Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai 603203 (India); Wang, Y.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Physics Department, 2 Science Drive 3, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PBW can now achieve 19 nm details in HSQ and 65 nm in PMMA. • A complete table of resist materials for PBW has been presented, including minimum feature size, achievable aspect ratio, suitability for electroplating and where available contrast of the resist. • PBW fabricated molds can now be used for single DNA molecule detection, single DNA manipulation and large scale Genome mapping. - Abstract: Proton beam writing (PBW) is a lithographic technique that has been developed since the mid 1990s, initially in Singapore followed by several groups around the world. MeV protons while penetrating materials will maintain a practically straight path. During the continued slowing down of a proton in material it will mainly interact with substrate electrons and transfer a small amount of energy to each electron, the induced secondary electrons will modify the molecular structure of resist within a few nanometers around the proton track. The recent demonstration of high aspect ratio sub 20 nm lithography in HSQ shows the potential of PBW. To explore the full capabilities of PBW, the understanding of the interaction of fast protons with different resist materials is important. Here we give an update of the growing number of resist materials that have been evaluated for PBW. In particular we evaluate the exposure and development strategies for the most promising resist materials like PMMA, HSQ, SU-8 and AR-P and compare their characteristics with respect to properties such as contrast and sensitivity. Besides an updated literature survey we also present new findings on AR-P and PMGI resists. Since PBW is a direct write technology it is important to look for fast ways to replicate micro and nanostructures. In this respect we will discuss the suitability and performance of several resists for Ni electroplating for mold fabrication in nano imprint technologies. We will summarize with an overview of proton resist characteristics like sensitivity, contrast

  12. Resist materials for proton beam writing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Malar, P.; Wang, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PBW can now achieve 19 nm details in HSQ and 65 nm in PMMA. • A complete table of resist materials for PBW has been presented, including minimum feature size, achievable aspect ratio, suitability for electroplating and where available contrast of the resist. • PBW fabricated molds can now be used for single DNA molecule detection, single DNA manipulation and large scale Genome mapping. - Abstract: Proton beam writing (PBW) is a lithographic technique that has been developed since the mid 1990s, initially in Singapore followed by several groups around the world. MeV protons while penetrating materials will maintain a practically straight path. During the continued slowing down of a proton in material it will mainly interact with substrate electrons and transfer a small amount of energy to each electron, the induced secondary electrons will modify the molecular structure of resist within a few nanometers around the proton track. The recent demonstration of high aspect ratio sub 20 nm lithography in HSQ shows the potential of PBW. To explore the full capabilities of PBW, the understanding of the interaction of fast protons with different resist materials is important. Here we give an update of the growing number of resist materials that have been evaluated for PBW. In particular we evaluate the exposure and development strategies for the most promising resist materials like PMMA, HSQ, SU-8 and AR-P and compare their characteristics with respect to properties such as contrast and sensitivity. Besides an updated literature survey we also present new findings on AR-P and PMGI resists. Since PBW is a direct write technology it is important to look for fast ways to replicate micro and nanostructures. In this respect we will discuss the suitability and performance of several resists for Ni electroplating for mold fabrication in nano imprint technologies. We will summarize with an overview of proton resist characteristics like sensitivity, contrast

  13. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO 2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO 2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310 -6 /K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on

  14. Erosion resistant anti-ice surfaces generated by ultra short laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Cerro, D.A.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in't Veld, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Wetting properties of a wide range of materials can be modified by accurate laser micromachining with ultra short laser pulses. Controlling the surface topography in a micro and sub-micrometer scale allows the generation of water-repellent surfaces, which remain dry and prevent ice accumulation

  15. Corrosion and chemical resistant masonry materials handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheppard, Walter Lee

    1986-01-01

    ... and other equipment. But few other than chemists and chemical engineers identify "corrosion" as chemical degradation or destruction of a material, and therefore, something that can happen to nonmetals (concrete, plastics, brick, timber, etc.) as well as to nletals. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers so defined "corrosion" over thirty years ago but this f...

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling: creep resistant materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, John; Korcakova, L.; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2008-01-01

    The use of thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of microstructure evolution in materials exposed to high temperatures in power plants is demonstrated with two examples. Precipitate stability in martensitic 9–12%Cr steels is modelled including equilibrium phase stability, growth of Laves phase part...

  17. Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li; Liu, Xuan; Pal, Shyam; Wang, Shulan; Ober, Christopher K.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous ongoing development of dense integrated circuits requires significant advancements in nanoscale patterning technology. As a key process in semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM), high resolution lithography is crucial in keeping with Moore's law. Currently, lithography technology for the sub-7 nm node and beyond has been actively investigated approaching atomic level patterning. EUV technology is now considered to be a potential alternative to HVM for replacing in some cases ArF immersion technology combined with multi-patterning. Development of innovative resist materials will be required to improve advanced fabrication strategies. In this article, advancements in novel resist materials are reviewed to identify design criteria for establishment of a next generation resist platform. Development strategies and the challenges in next generation resist materials are summarized and discussed.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liu, Xuan; Pal, Shyam; Wang, Shulan; Ober, Christopher K; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2017-08-14

    Continuous ongoing development of dense integrated circuits requires significant advancements in nanoscale patterning technology. As a key process in semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM), high resolution lithography is crucial in keeping with Moore's law. Currently, lithography technology for the sub-7 nm node and beyond has been actively investigated approaching atomic level patterning. EUV technology is now considered to be a potential alternative to HVM for replacing in some cases ArF immersion technology combined with multi-patterning. Development of innovative resist materials will be required to improve advanced fabrication strategies. In this article, advancements in novel resist materials are reviewed to identify design criteria for establishment of a next generation resist platform. Development strategies and the challenges in next generation resist materials are summarized and discussed.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2017-06-26

    Continuous ongoing development of dense integrated circuits requires significant advancements in nanoscale patterning technology. As a key process in semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM), high resolution lithography is crucial in keeping with Moore\\'s law. Currently, lithography technology for the sub-7 nm node and beyond has been actively investigated approaching atomic level patterning. EUV technology is now considered to be a potential alternative to HVM for replacing in some cases ArF immersion technology combined with multi-patterning. Development of innovative resist materials will be required to improve advanced fabrication strategies. In this article, advancements in novel resist materials are reviewed to identify design criteria for establishment of a next generation resist platform. Development strategies and the challenges in next generation resist materials are summarized and discussed.

  20. Heat-resistant materials 2. Conference proceedings of the 2. international conference on heat-resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Ganesan, P.; Lai, G.Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Heat-Resistant Materials was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, September 11--14, 1995 and focused on materials performance in cross-cutting technologies where heat resistant materials play a large and sometimes life-and performance-limiting roles in process schemes. The scope of materials for heat-resistant applications included structural iron- and nickel-base alloys, intermetallics, and ceramics. The conference focused on materials development, performance of materials in simulated laboratory and actual service environments on mechanical and structural integrity of components, and state-of-the-art techniques for processing and evaluating materials performance. The three keynote talks described the history of heat-resistant materials, relationship between microstructure and mechanical behavior, and applications of these materials in process schemes. The technical sessions included alloy metallurgy and properties, environmental effects and properties, deformation behavior and properties, relation between corrosion and mechanical properties, coatings, intermetallics, ceramics, and materials for waste incineration. Seventy one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  1. Evaluation on electrical resistivity of silicon materials after electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 5. Evaluation on ... This research deals with the study of electron beam melting (EBM) methodology utilized in melting silicon material and subsequently discusses on the effect of oxygen level on electrical resistivity change after EBM process. The oxygen ...

  2. Development of fire resistant, nontoxic aircraft interior materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, G.; Silverman, B.; Tajima, Y.

    1976-01-01

    All available newly developed nonmetallic polymers were examined for possible usage in developing fire resistant, nontoxic nonmetallic parts or assemblies for aircraft interiors. Specifically, feasibility for the development of clear films for new decorative laminates, compression moldings, injection molded parts, thermoformed plastic parts, and flexible foams were given primary considerations. Preliminary data on the flame resistant characteristics of the materials were obtained. Preliminary toxicity data were generated from samples of materials submitted from the contractor. Preliminary data on the physical characteristics of various thermoplastic materials to be considered for either compression molded, injection molded, or thermoformed parts were obtained.

  3. Calculation of the dynamic air flow resistivity of fibre materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    The acoustic attenuation of acoustic fiber materials is mainly determined by the dynamic resistivity to an oscillating air flow. The dynamic resistance is calculated for a model with geometry close to the geometry of real fibre material. The model constists of parallel cylinders placed randomly.......The second procedure is an extension to oscillating air flow of the Brinkman self-consistent procedure for dc flow. The procedures are valid for volume concentrations of cylinders less than 0.1. The calculations show that for the density of fibers of interest for acoustic fibre materials the simple self...

  4. Effects of polyacrylamide on soil erosion and nutrient losses from substrate material in steep rocky slope stabilization projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang; Chen, Wenlu; Li, Chengjun; Pu, Yanpin; Sun, Haifeng

    2016-06-01

    Erosion of denuded steep rocky slopes causes increasing losses of nitrogen and phosphorus, which is a severe problem in rocky slope protection. Thus, it is important to determine the appropriate materials that can reduce the erodibility and losses of nitrogen and phosphorus of the soil. In this paper, twenty-seven simulated rainfall events were carried out in a greenhouse, in which the substrate material was artificial soil; nine types of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) were studied, which consisted of three molecular weight (6, 12, and 18 Mg mol(-1)) and three charge density (10, 20, and 30%) formulations in a 3 by 3 factorial design. The results showed that: (1) Polyacrylamide application reduced total nitrogen losses by 35.3% to 50.0% and total phosphorus losses by 34.9% to 48.0% relative to the control group. (2) The losses of total nitrogen and total phosphorus had significant correlation with the molecular weight. Besides, the losses of total phosphorus, particulate-bound phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen (NH4-N) were significantly correlated with their molecular weight and charge density. However, the losses of dissolved organic nitrogen, inorganic nitrogen (NO3-N), dissolved organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus (PO4-P) were non-significantly correlated with molecular weight and charge density. (3) Particulate-bound nitrogen and phosphorus were responsible for the losses of nitrogen and phosphorus during runoff events, where particulate-bound nitrogen made up 71.7% to 73.2% of total nitrogen losses, and particulate-bound phosphorus made up 82.3% to 85.2% of total phosphorus losses. (4) Polyacrylamide treatments increased water-stable aggregates content by 32.3% to 59.1%, total porosity by 11.3% to 49.0%, final infiltrative rate by 41.3% to 72.5%, and reduced soil erosion by 18.9% to 39.8% compared with the control group. Overall, the results of this study indicated that polyacrylamide application in the steep rocky slope stabilization projects could

  5. Development of flame retardant, radiation resistant insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, M.

    1984-01-01

    On the cables used for nuclear power stations, in particular those ranked as IE class, flame retardation test, simulated LOCA environment test, radiation resistance test and so on are imposed. The results of the evaluation of performance by these tests largely depend on the insulating materials mainly made of polymers. Ethylene propylene copolymer rubber has been widely used as cable insulator because of its electrical characteristics, workability, economy and relatively good radiation resistance, but it is combustible, therefore, in the practical use, it is necessary to make it fire resistant. The author et al. have advanced the research on the molecular design of new fire retarding materials, and successfully developed acenaphthylene bromide condensate, which is not only fire resistant but also effective for improving radiation resistance. The condition of flame retardant, radiation resistant auxiliary agents is explained, and there are additive type and reaction type in fire retarding materials. The synthesis of acenaphthylene bromide condensate and its effect of giving flame retardant and radiation resistant properties are reported. The characteristics of the cables insulated with the flame retardant ethylene propylene rubber containing acenaphthylene bromide condensate were tested, and the results are shown. (Kako, I.).

  6. Active Anti-erosion Protection Strategy in Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-12-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind-sand erosion.

  7. Fire-resistant materials for aircraft passenger seat construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewell, L. L.; Tesoro, G. C.; Moussa, A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal response characteristics of fabric and fabric-foam assemblies are described. The various aspects of the ignition behavior of contemporary aircraft passenger seat upholstery fabric materials relative to fabric materials made from thermally stable polymers are evaluated. The role of the polymeric foam backing on the thermal response of the fabric-foam assembly is also ascertained. The optimum utilization of improved fire-resistant fabric and foam materials in the construction of aircraft passenger seats is suggested.

  8. Volume Resistivity and Mechanical Behavior of Epoxy Nanocomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Abdelkarim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and mechanical properties of polymer composite materials are investigated through the determination of resistivity and hardness for composites samples. Epoxy composite samples have been prepared with different concentrations of certain inorganic fillers such as; Titanium dioxide (TiO2 and Silica (SiO2, of various size (micro, nano and hybrid to study the electrical and mechanical behavior. The volume resistivity reaches 3.23×1014 ohm.cm for the micro silica composite. Surface of composite material has been mechanically examined by hardness test. The results show that the resistivity of microcomposites and nanocmposites are increased with the decrease of filler concentration. But the resistivity of hybrid composites is increased with the increase of filler concentration. Maximum hardness value was obtained from hybrid silica composite with 0.1% filler concentration.

  9. Scratch, wear and corrosion resistant organic inorganic hybrid materials for metals protection and barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, M.; Gisario, A.; Puopolo, M.; Vesco, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Polysiloxane coatings as protective barriers to delay erosion/corrosion of Fe 430 B metal substrates. • Methyl groups feature a very small steric hindrance and confer ductility to the Si–O–Si backbone. • Phenyl groups feature a larger steric hindrance, but they ensure stability and high chemical inertness. • Remarkable adhesion to the substrate, good scratch resistance and high wear endurance. • Innovative ways to design of long lasting protective barriers against corrosion and aggressive chemicals. - Abstract: Polysiloxanes are widely used as protective barriers to delay erosion/corrosion and increase chemical inertness of metal substrates. In the present work, a high molecular weight methyl phenyl polysiloxane resin was designed to manufacture a protective coating for Fe 430 B structural steel. Methyl groups feature very small steric hindrance and confer ductility to the Si–O–Si backbone of the organic inorganic hybrid resin, thus allowing the achievement of high thickness. Phenyl groups feature larger steric hindrance, but they ensure stability and high chemical inertness. Visual appearance and morphology of the coatings were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy and contact gauge surface profilometry. Micro-mechanical response of the coatings was analyzed by instrumented progressive load scratch, while wear resistance by dry sliding linear reciprocating tribological tests. Lastly, chemical inertness and corrosion endurance of the coatings were evaluated by linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry in aggressive acid environment. The resulting resins yielded protective materials, which feature remarkable adhesion to the substrate, good scratch resistance and high wear endurance, thus laying the foundations to manufacture long lasting protective barriers against corrosion and, more in general, against aggressive chemicals

  10. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M.; Ito, H.; Shibasaki, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A.; Sugimoto, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M; Ito, H; Shibasaki, K [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A; Sugimoto, H [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Cavitation Erosion in Hydraulic Turbine Components and Mitigation by Coatings: Current Status and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, Suman K.

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation erosion is a frequently observed phenomenon in underwater engineering materials and is the primary reason for component failure. The damage due to cavitation erosion is not yet fully understood, as it is influenced by several parameters, such as hydrodynamics, component design, environment, and material chemistry. This article gives an overview of the current state of understanding of cavitation erosion of materials used in hydroturbines, coatings and coating methodologies for combating cavitation erosion, and methods to characterize cavitation erosion. No single material property fully characterizes the resistance to cavitation erosion. The combination of ultimate resilience, hardness, and toughness rather may be useful to estimate the cavitation erosion resistance of material. Improved hydrodynamic design and appropriate surface engineering practices reduce damage due to cavitation erosion. The coatings suggested for combating the cavitation erosion encompasses carbides (WC Cr2C3, Cr3C2, 20CrC-80WC), cermets of different compositions (e.g., 56W2C/Ni/Cr, 41WC/Ni/Cr/Co), intermetallic composites, intermetallic matrix composites with TiC reinforcement, composite nitrides such as TiAlN and elastomers. A few of them have also been used commercially. Thermal spraying, arc plasma spraying, and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) processes have been used commercially to apply the coatings. Boronizing, laser surface hardening and cladding, chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and plasma nitriding have been tried for surface treatments at laboratory levels and have shown promise to be used on actual components.

  13. Borides - a new generation of highly resistant materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, R.

    1988-01-01

    High-duty ceramics are on advance in all sectors where materials with extremely good resistance to high temperatures and wear are required. The group of oxides, nitrides and carbides in use for quite a time now recently has been increased by the metal borides which offer among others economic advantages in certain applications. The drawbacks of these materials still to be reduced are their brittleness and susceptibility to oxidation and corrosion. Current research work on the thermodynamics of such systems, on the interaction between structure and properties, and on means to improve strength and resistance to wear are expected to soon open up new applications. (orig.) [de

  14. 耐漏电起痕硅橡胶的制备及应用研究进展%Progress in the Preparation and Application of Tracking and Erosion Resistant Silicone Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭燕霞; 赖学军; 曾幸荣; 李红强; 张亚军; 方伟镇

    2017-01-01

    硅橡胶以其优异的电气绝缘性、憎水防污和耐污闪等性能而广泛应用于高压超高压电力电气设备及外绝缘领域.然而硅橡胶绝缘材料在长期使用过程中,在外界强电场放电作用下会发生漏电起痕破坏,致使材料失效甚至燃烧.这对电力系统与电气设备的安全运行,以及人们的生产和生活造成巨大的危害.因此,硅橡胶的耐漏电起痕研究吸引了越来越多研究者的关注.文中综述了近年来国内外关于耐漏电起痕硅橡胶的最新研究进展,分析了硅橡胶耐漏电起痕剂亟待解决的问题,并指出高效率、相容好、多功能的有机耐漏电起痕剂是耐电痕化硅橡胶的重要发展方向.%Silicone rubber is widely used in high-voltage and super-high voltage electrical equipments and outdoor insulation,due to its excellent electrical insulation,water-repellence and flashover resistance.However,when served for a long time,silicone rubber insulation materials may suffer from tracking and erosion,resulting in insulation failure and even fire,because of strong external discharges.This caused great harm to the safety of the operation of power transmission systems and electrical equipment,as well as the industrial production and daily life of human.Therefore,research on the tracking and erosion resistance of silicone rubber attracted more and more attention.This paper reviewed the latest progress in the research of tracking and erosion resistant silicone rubber and analyzes the problems needed to be solved.Finally,it is pointed out that versatile organic agent for tracking and erosion resistance of silicone rubber with high efficiency and good compatibility is one of the most important developmental trends.

  15. Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Close, D.A.; Tolk, K.M.; Mangan, D.L.; Moore, L.

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 National Acdaemy of Sciences study ''Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium'' defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This paper proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options as well defining the ''Standards'' from the report. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials

  16. Standard test method for galling resistance of material couples

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory test that ranks the galling resistance of material couples using a quantitative measure. Bare metals, alloys, nonmetallic materials, coatings, and surface modified materials may be evaluated by this test method. 1.2 This test method is not designed for evaluating the galling resistance of material couples sliding under lubricated conditions, because galling usually will not occur under lubricated sliding conditions using this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Stagnation, circulation, and erosion of granular materials through belt conveyor sluice gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Moralda, Michael; Dunne, Ryan

    2013-11-01

    Control of flow rates in conversion reactors for discrete materials like biomass can be achieved in belt conveyors through a combination of belt speed, hopper size, and aperture opening. As material is extracted from the bottom of the storage hopper, other material cannot achieve plug flow and therefore is restricted from exiting through a sluice-gate type opening. The excess material moves vertically from the opening causing a pile up and recirculation back along the free surface of the hopper. Experimental results obtained through high speed imaging show the position of the stagnation point as well as the rate of circulation is dependent on the mass flow rate achieved and instantaneous fill level. The movement of material into the plug flow along the belt allows verification of deposition models on erodible beds rather than rigid surfaces with artificial roughness of glued particles. Similarly, the pile-up at the exit influences the efficiency of the transport affecting the narrow energy return on investment of biomass resources. The laboratory-scale behavior can therefore be translated into industrial performance metrics for increased operational efficiency. This work is supported by the NSF REU Site Operation E-Tank under award number 1156789.

  18. Materials for fire resistant passenger seats in aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoro, G.; Moussa, A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the selection of cushioning foam and upholstery fabric materials for aircraft passenger seats. Polyurethane, polychloroprene, polyimide, and polyphosphazene are the foam materials considered; and a variety of commercial and developmental fabrics (including wool, cotton, synthetics, and blends) are examined. Viable approaches to the design of fire-resistant seat assemblies are indicated. Results of an experimental laboratory study of fabrics and fabric/foam assemblies exposed to external point-source radiative heat flux are discussed.

  19. Development of radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsutomu

    1976-01-01

    The excellent radiation-resisting polyvinyl chloride developed at the opportunity of the research on the relationships between the protection of living body and the polymer-technological protection from radiation is reviewed. The report is divided into four main parts, namely 1) the change in the molecular arrangement of market-available, high molecular-weight materials by gamma-ray irradiation, 2) the protection of high molecular-weight materials from radiation, 3) the relationships between the biological radiation-protective substances and the change to radiation-resisting property of synthesized high molecular-weight substances, and 4) the development of the radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials as metal-collecting agents. Attention is paid to the polyvinyl chloride having N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical (PMD), synthesized by the author et. al., that has excellent radiation-resisting property. PMD has some possibility to form thiol- and amino-radicals necessary to protect living things from radiation. It is believed that the protection effects of N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical are caused by the relatively stable S radical produced by the energy transfer. PMD film is suitable for the irradiation of foods, because it hardly changes the permeability of oxygen and carbon dioxide. PMD produces mercaptide or chelate. A new metal-collecting agent (PSDC) having reactivity with the metallic ions with radiation-resisting property was developed, which is derived from polyvinyl chloride and sodium N-methyl-N-carboxy-methyl-dithio-carbamate. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Hard metal - a wear resistant material. Hartmetall - ein verschleissbestaendiger Werkstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolaska, J.; Dreyer, K. (Krupp Widia GmbH, Essen (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-01-01

    The article provides a survey of the various types of alloys of presently used carbides, their production processes and properties. Cermets (alloys with a high content of titanium carbide) are in the foreground here. With an eye on the future, advancements of further improved carbide materials are described, which feature at the same time a high resistance to wear and tenacity. (orig.).

  1. [Research progress on wind erosion control with polyacrylamide (PAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhan Li

    2016-03-01

    Soil wind erosion is one of the main reasons for soil degradation in the northwest region of China. Polyacrylamide (PAM), as an efficient soil amendment, has gained extensive attention in recent years since it is effective in improving the structure of surface soil due to its special physical and chemical properties. This paper introduced the physical and chemical properties of PAM, reviewed the effects of PAM on soil wind erosion amount and threshold wind velocity, as well as the effect differences of PAM in soil wind erosion control under conditions of various methods and doses. Its effect was proved by comparing with other materials in detail. Furthermore, we analyzed the mecha-nism of wind erosion control with PAM according to its influence on soil physical characteristics. Comprehensive analysis showed that, although some problems existed in wind erosion control with (PAM), PAM as a sand fixation agent, can not only enhance the capacity of the soil resis-tance to wind erosion, but also improve soil physical properties to form better soil conditions. Besides, we proposed that combination of PAM and plant growth would increase the survival rate of plants greatly, control soil wind erosion in wind-erosive areas, and improve the quality of the ecological environment construction. Thus, PAM has practically important significance and wide application prospect in controlling soil wind erosion.

  2. The effects of acid erosion and remineralization on enamel and three different dental materials: FT-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Soares, Ana Lúcia Silva; De Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sidnei

    2016-07-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to test the hypothesis that the beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization would change the chemistry of dental materials and enamel inorganic content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 36) each received two cavity preparations (n = 72), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin, GIC: glass-ionomer cement, RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: artificial saliva, E: erosion/Pepsi Twist or EM: erosion + mouthwash/Colgate Plax). Reduction of carbonate content of enamel was greater in RE than RS (P erosion. Material degradation was greater after E and EM than S. GIC and RMGIC materials had a positive effect against acid erosion in the adjacent enamel after remineralization with mouthwash. The beverage and mouthwash utilization would change R and GIC chemical properties. A professional should periodically monitor the glass-ionomer and resin restorations, as they degrade over time under erosive challenges and mouthwash utilization. Microsc. Res. Tech., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:646-656, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Radiation resistance of InP-related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Takamoto, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Eiji; Kurita, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Masamichi; Ando, Koshi; Vargas-Aburto, C.

    1995-01-01

    Irradiation effects of 1-MeV electrons on InP-related materials such as InP, InGaP and InGaAsP have been examined in comparison with those of GaAs. Superior radiation-resistance of InP-related materials and their devices compared to GaAs has been found in terms of minority-carrier diffusion length and properties of devices such as solar cells and light-emitting devices. Moreover, minority-carrier injection-enhanced annealing of radiation-induced defects in InP-related materials has also been observed. (author)

  4. Erosion corrision in water steam circuits - reasons and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    An increased material erosion on tubes in steam generators, preheaters and condensers but also on turbine casings and connecting pipes of unalloyed and low-alloy steels occurs, to an essential extent, due to erosion-corrosion processes in the fluid-swept plant sections. On the one hand, they cause thinning of the material and sometimes leaks, on the other hand the erosion material leads to contamination of the water-steam cycle with its harmful consequences. The cause of erosion-corrosion is a dissolving corrosion due to the convective effect of pure fluid turbulences. The occurrence of erosion-corrosion is limited to such metallic materials, which are in need of oxide protection layers for their constancy. The cover layers are destroyed by erosive influence and the formation of new protection layers is prevented. At KWU, experimental studies of plates were carried out in the Benson test section to obtain information about the most important parameters of influence. These are in particular the flow velocity, the medium temperature and the water quality (pH value and oxygen content). Moreover, the resistivity of different materials has been compared and the resistance of magnetite protection layers to erosion-corrosion was examined. The results of these studies deliver fundamentals to avoid erosion-corrosion also in power plant engineering to the greatest possible extent. The following variants reveal to be important: 1. Use of chrome alloy materials. 2. Decrease of the flow velocity. 3. Increase of the pH value or the oxygen content. The importance of the test results for power plant engineering is briefly described. (orig.) [de

  5. Soil erosion model predictions using parent material/soil texture-based parameters compared to using site-specific parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Foltz; W. J. Elliot; N. S. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    Forested areas disturbed by access roads produce large amounts of sediment. One method to predict erosion and, hence, manage forest roads is the use of physically based soil erosion models. A perceived advantage of a physically based model is that it can be parameterized at one location and applied at another location with similar soil texture or geological parent...

  6. Corrosion resistant materials for fluorine and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauffe, K.

    1984-12-01

    Aluminum and Duralumin are resistant against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride up to 600 and 700 K, respectively. The resistance of nickel and its alloys, particularly monel, against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride is fairly good up to 900 and 800 K. During the attack of nickel-chromium alloys by fluorine between 1000 and 1300 K, it appears an inner fluorination similarly to the inner oxidation. The resistance of titanium in water-free liquid fluorine at lower temperatures with <0,3 mm.a/sup -1/ is comparable to that of nickel and monel. However, the corrosion of titanium in gaseous fluorine amounts at 377 K only 0,0082 mm.a/sup -1/. In spite of their limited resistance against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride, very pure molybdenum and tungsten are employed as construction materials in the rocket technology because of their large strength at high temperatures if fluorine-hydrogen and fluorine-hydrazine flames are used. Lanthanum and calcium borides are only little attacked by fluorine hydrazine flames between 1400 and 1800 K; they are superior to all special grade alloys. The same is true in a lower temperature region (290-400 K) with fluorcarbon resins. Organic materials substitute in increasing extent metal alloys and non-metal inorganic materials.

  7. Corrosion resistant materials for fluorine and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauffe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum and Duralumin are resistant against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride up to 600 and 700 K, respectively. The resistance of nickel and its alloys, particularly monel, against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride is fairly good up to 900 and 800 K. During the attack of nickel-chromium alloys by fluorine between 1000 and 1300 K, it appears an inner fluorination similarly to the inner oxidation. The resistance of titanium in water-free liquid fluorine at lower temperatures with -1 is comparable to that of nickel and monel. However, the corrosion of titanium in gaseous fluorine amounts at 377 K only 0,0082 mm.a -1 . In spite of their limited resistance against fluorine and hydrogen fluoride, very pure molybdenum and tungsten are employed as construction materials in the rocket technology because of their large strength at high temperatures if fluorine-hydrogen and fluorine-hydrazine flames are used. Lanthanum and calcium borides are only little attacked by fluorine hydrazine flames between 1400 and 1800 K; they are superior to all special grade alloys. The same is true in a lower temperature region (290-400 K) with fluorcarbon resins. Organic materials substitute in increasing extent metal alloys and non-metal inorganic materials. (orig.) [de

  8. To Analyse the Erosive Potential of Commercially Available Drinks on Dental Enamel and Various Tooth Coloured Restorative Materials - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karda, Babita; Jindal, Ritu; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sandhu, Sanam; Sharma, Sunila; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2016-05-01

    With the enormous change in life style pattern of a common man through the past few decades, there has been proportional variation in the amount and frequency of consumption of drinks. An increased consumption of these drinks will concurrently increase enamel surface roughness by demineralization, resulting in hypersensitivity and elevated caries risk. The present study was designed to evaluate the erosive potential of commercially available drinks on tooth enamel and various tooth coloured restorative materials. Extracted human teeth were taken and divided into four groups i.e. tooth enamel, glass ionomer cement, composite and compomer. Four commercially available drinks were chosen these were Coca -Cola, Nimbooz, Frooti and Yakult. The pH of each drink was measured. Each group was immersed in various experimental drinks for a period of 14 days. The erosive potential of each drink was measured by calculating the change in average surface roughness of these groups after the immersion protocol in various drinks. The data analysis was done by One Way Anova, Post-Hoc Bonferroni, and paired t -test. Group II-GIC showed highest values for mean of change in average surface roughness and the values were statistically significant (pCoca-cola showed the highest erosive potential and Yakult showed the lowest, there was no statistical significant difference between the results shown by Yakult and Frooti. Characteristics which may promote erosion of enamel and tooth coloured restorative materials were surface texture of the material and pH of the drinks.

  9. Usage of abrasion-resistant materials in agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Votava

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural soil-processing machines are subject to an extensive abrasive wear. This paper analyses technical materials and their fitness to exchangeable parts of plough bottoms, such as edge-tools and whole plough cutting edges. There were tested abrasion-resistant steels with different microstructures: austenite, martensite-bainite, and carbide. Steel with the pearlite-ferrite structure was used as an etalon. Abrasion resistance tests were processed in compliance with the norm CSN 01 5084, which is a test of abrasion wear on abrasive cloth.

  10. Effect of radiation resistance additives for insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Yagyu, Hideki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1988-01-01

    For the electric wires and cables used in radiation environment such as nuclear power stations and fuel reprocessing facilities, the properties of excellent radiation resistance are required. For these insulators and sheath materials, ethylene propylene rubber, polyethylene and other polymers have been used, but it cannot be said that they always have good radiation resistance. However, it has been well known that radiation resistance can be improved with small amount of additives, and heat resistance and burning retarding property as well as radiation resistance are given to the insulators of wires and cables for nuclear facilities by mixing various additives. In this research, the measuring method for quantitatively determining the effect of Anti-rad (radiation resistant additive) was examined. Through the measurement of gel fraction, radical formation and decomposed gas generation, the effect of Anti-rad protecting polymers from radiation deterioration was examined from the viewpoint of chemical reaction. The experimental method and the results are reported. The radiation energy for cutting C-H coupling is polymers is dispersed by Anti-rad, and the probability of cutting is lowered. Anti-rad catches and extinguishes radicals that start oxidation reaction. (K.I.)

  11. Numerical studies of cavitation erosion on an elastic-plastic material caused by shock-induced bubble collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turangan, C. K.; Ball, G. J.; Jamaluddin, A. R.; Leighton, T. G.

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of shock-induced collapse of single bubbles near/attached to an elastic-plastic solid using the free-Lagrange method, which forms the latest part of our shock-induced collapse studies. We simulated the collapse of 40 μm radius single bubbles near/attached to rigid and aluminium walls by a 60 MPa lithotripter shock for various scenarios based on bubble-wall separations, and the collapse of a 255 μm radius bubble attached to aluminium foil with a 65 MPa lithotripter shock. The coupling of the multi-phases, compressibility, axisymmetric geometry and elastic-plastic material model within a single solver has enabled us to examine the impingement of high-speed liquid jets from the shock-induced collapsing bubbles, which imposes an extreme compression in the aluminium that leads to pitting and plastic deformation. For certain scenarios, instead of the high-speed jet, a radially inwards flow along the aluminium surface contracts the bubble to produce a `mushroom shape'. This work provides methods for quantifying which parameters (e.g. bubble sizes and separations from the solid) might promote or inhibit erosion on solid surfaces.

  12. Non-uniform Erosion and Surface Evolution of Plasma-Facing Materials for Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Christopher Stanley Rutter

    A study regarding the surface evolution of plasma-facing materials is presented. Experimental efforts were performed in the UCLA Pi Facility, designed to explore the physics of plasma-surface interactions. The influence of micro-architectured surfaces on the effects of plasma sputtering is compared with the response of planar samples. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. This result is quantified using a QCM to demonstrate the evolution of surface features and the corresponding influence on the instantaneous sputtering yield. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is found to be roughly 1 of the 2 corresponding value of flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22+/-8%, converging to 0.4+/-8% at high fluence. Although the yield is dependent on the initial surface structure, it is shown to be transient, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A continuum model of surface evolution resulting from sputtering, deposition and surface diffusion is also derived to resemble the damped Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation of non-linear dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the evolution equation provides an estimate of the selected wavelength, and its dependence on the ion energy and angle of incidence. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of the equation with a Fast Fourier Transform method. It is shown that for an initially flat surface, small perturbations lead to the evolution of a selected surface pattern that has nano- scale wavelength. When the surface is initially patterned by other means, the final resulting pattern is a competition between the "templated" pattern and the "self-organized" structure. Potential future routes of research are also

  13. CERTIFICATION OF THE RADIATION RESISTANCE OF COIL INSULATION MATERIAL

    CERN Document Server

    Polinski, J; Bogdan, P

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the WP 7.2.1 sub-task of the EuCARD program has been to determine the Nb$_{3}$Sn based accelerator magnet coil electrical insulation resistance against irradiation, which will occur in future accelerators. The scope of the certification covers determination of mechanical, electrical and thermal properties changes due to irradiation. The report presents a selection of the insulation material candidates for future accelerator magnets as well as the definition of the radiation certification methodology with respect of radiation type, energy, doses and irradiation conditions. The test methods and results of the electrical and mechanical insulation materials properties degradation due to irradiation are presented. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance at temperature range from 1.5 K to 2.0 K (superfluid helium conditions) are given.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  15. Corrosion resistance of metal materials for HLW canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takashi; Muraoka, Susumu; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-02-01

    In order to verify the materials as an important artificial barrier for canister of vitrified high-level waste from spent fuel reprocessing, data and reports were researched on corrosion resistance of the materials under conditions from glass form production to final disposal. Then, in this report, investigated subjects, improvement methods and future subjects are reviewed. It has become clear that there would be no problem on the inside and outside corrosion of the canister during glass production, but long term corrosion and radiation effect tests and the vitrification methods would be subjects in future on interim storage and final disposal conditions. (author)

  16. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  17. Mesh erosion after abdominal sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, N; Walsh, P M; Roat, T W; Karram, M M

    1998-12-01

    To report our experience with erosion of permanent suture or mesh material after abdominal sacrocolpopexy. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients who underwent sacrocolpopexy by the same surgeon over 8 years. Demographic data, operative notes, hospital records, and office charts were reviewed after sacrocolpopexy. Patients with erosion of either suture or mesh were treated initially with conservative therapy followed by surgical intervention as required. Fifty-seven patients underwent sacrocolpopexy using synthetic mesh during the study period. The mean (range) postoperative follow-up was 19.9 (1.3-50) months. Seven patients (12%) had erosions after abdominal sacrocolpopexy with two suture erosions and five mesh erosions. Patients with suture erosion were asymptomatic compared with patients with mesh erosion, who presented with vaginal bleeding or discharge. The mean (+/-standard deviation) time to erosion was 14.0+/-7.7 (range 4-24) months. Both patients with suture erosion were treated conservatively with estrogen cream. All five patients with mesh erosion required transvaginal removal of the mesh. Mesh erosion can follow abdominal sacrocolpopexy over a long time, and usually presents as vaginal bleeding or discharge. Although patients with suture erosion can be managed successfully with conservative treatment, patients with mesh erosion require surgical intervention. Transvaginal removal of the mesh with vaginal advancement appears to be an effective treatment in patients failing conservative management.

  18. Gamma radiation shielding materials improved with burning resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Michio; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Yukawa, Katsunori.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain gamma irradiation shielding materials excellent in workability and resistant to burning by using a two component type room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber composition as the base material. Method: Silicon rubber comprising a diorganopolysiloxane polymer, an alkyl silicate as a crosslinker and a suitable sulfurdizing catalyst, for example, a carboxylate is mixed with iron powder and silicon oxide powder as reinforcing and flame retardant material and applied with molding. The iron powder and the silica rocks powder have grain size of 50 - 150 μm and 1 - 70 μm and charged by the amount of from 55 to 60 % by weight and from 20 to 25 % by weight respectively. The fluidizing property is impaired if the particle size of the silica rocks powder is less than 1 μm and, while on the other hand, no desired specific gravity of a predetermined value can be obtained for the molding product if the filled amount of the iron powder is less than 55 %. The oxygen index of the molding product is 45 to improve the burning resistance. The materials are excellent in the air-tightness, gamma radiation shielding performance, elasticity and workability required for the cable penetrations in a nuclear power plant and they generate noxious gases neither. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Radiation resistance of insulating materials for electric wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemitsuya, Kazuhiko; Okuda, Tomoaki; Tachibana, Tadao; Yagi, Toshiaki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    In no halogen incombustible materials, smoke and poisonous gas generation at the time of burning is small, and corrosive gas rarely arises. Since no halogen electric wires and cables which use these material maintain safety for people and equipment in the case of fires, those are used for ships, tunnels, subways and so on. Also in nuclear power stations, the demand for no halogen cables becomes high although the condition of adoption is difficult. In this study, for the purpose of developing the no halogen cables for nuclear power stations, the basic data on the radiation resistance of no halogen incombustible materials were collected, and by using chemical analysis method, the radiation deterioration behavior was examined. The samples were those with base polymers of VLDPE, ULDPE, EEA, EMA and EVA. Gamma ray irradiation, tensile test, chemi-luminescence measurement, and the determination of gel fraction and swelling rate were carried out. The results are reported, In no halogen materials, when ethylene system copolymer is used as the base polymer instead of PE, the composition with good radiation resistance can be obtained, and by combining amine oxidation inhibitor, it is further improved. (K.I.)

  20. Cavitation Erosion of Cermet-Coated Aluminium Bronzes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Mitelea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cavitation erosion resistance of CuAl10Ni5Fe2.5Mn1 following plasma spraying with Al2O3·30(Ni20Al powder and laser re-melting was analyzed in view of possible improvements of the lifetime of components used in hydraulic environments. The cavitation erosion resistance was substantially improved compared with the one of the base material. The thickness of the re-melted layer was in the range of several hundred micrometers, with a surface microhardness increasing from 250 to 420 HV 0.2. Compositional, structural, and microstructural explorations showed that the microstructure of the re-melted and homogenized layer, consisting of a cubic Al2O3 matrix with dispersed Ni-based solid solution is associated with the hardness increase and consequently with the improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance.

  1. Cavitation Erosion of Cermet-Coated Aluminium Bronzes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelea, Ion; Oancă, Octavian; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu M

    2016-03-17

    The cavitation erosion resistance of CuAl10Ni5Fe2.5Mn1 following plasma spraying with Al₂O₃·30(Ni 20 Al) powder and laser re-melting was analyzed in view of possible improvements of the lifetime of components used in hydraulic environments. The cavitation erosion resistance was substantially improved compared with the one of the base material. The thickness of the re-melted layer was in the range of several hundred micrometers, with a surface microhardness increasing from 250 to 420 HV 0.2. Compositional, structural, and microstructural explorations showed that the microstructure of the re-melted and homogenized layer, consisting of a cubic Al₂O₃ matrix with dispersed Ni-based solid solution is associated with the hardness increase and consequently with the improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance.

  2. Excellent mechanical properties and resistance to cavitation erosion for an ultra-low carbon CrMnN stainless steel through quenching and partitioning treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ze-an; Fu, Wan-tang; Zhu, Zhe; Li, Bin; Shi, Zhong-ping; Sun, Shu-hua

    2018-05-01

    The retained austenite content (RAC), the mechanical properties, and the resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) of the 00Cr13Mn8MoN steel after quenching and partitioning (Q&P) processing were investigated. The results show that the Q&P process affected the RAC, which reached the maximum value after partitioning at 400°C for 10 min. The tensile strength of the steel slightly decreased with increasing partitioning temperature and time. However, the elongation and product of strength and elongation first increased and then decreased. The sample partitioned at 400°C for 10 min exhibited the optimal property: a strength-ductility of 23.8 GPa·%. The resistance to CE for the 00Cr13Mn8MoN steel treated by the Q&P process was improved due to work hardening, spalling, and cavitation-induced martensitic transformation of the retained austenite.

  3. Lead-Bismuth technology ; corrosion resistance of structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Park, Won Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Lead-Bismuth (Pb-Bi) eutectic alloy was determined as a coolant material for the HYPER system being studied by KAERI. The Pb-Bi alloy as a coolant, has a number of the favorable thermo-physical and technological properties, while it is comparatively corrosive to the structural materials. It is necessary to solve this problem for providing a long failure-proof operation of the facilities with Pb-Bi coolant. It seems to be possible to maintain corrosion resistance on structural material up to 600 deg C by using of various technologies, but it needs more studies for application to large-scale NPPs. 22 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  4. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  5. Microstructure and elevated-temperature erosion-oxidation behaviour of aluminized 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, E.; Honkanen, M.; Tsipas, Sophia Alexandra; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials by a combination of erosive wear and atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures constitutes a problem in some power generation processes, such as fluidized-bed combustion. In this work, 9Cr-1Mo steel, a common tube material in combustion chambers, is coated by a pack cementation method from an Al-containing pack in order to improve the resistance to erosion-oxidation at elevated temperatures. The resulting coating is studied in terms of microstructure and microhar...

  6. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  7. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, CEDENNA, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Duin, Adri C. T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  8. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel; Duin, Adri C. T. van; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  9. Proton beam micromachined buried microchannels in negative tone resist materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Chatzichristidi, M.; Baradacs, E.; Cserhati, C.; Raptis, I.; Manoli, K.; Valamontes, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work the Atomki, Debrecen microprobe facility has been used to write long tilted structures by 2 MeV protons. For the formation of the structures, two exposures have been carried out at +20 o and -20 o using a goniometer stage sample holder. The tilted structures were resolved in the negative tone resist materials SU-8 and ADEPR (an aqueous base developable chemically amplified resist). The length of the microchannels was varied between 100 μm and 1000 μm, the wall thickness was less than 10 μm. By applying the developed methodology it was possible to resolve the desired layout through the whole length of the channel

  10. Erosion of buffer caused by groundwater leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, J.; Hanana, K.; Punkkinen, O.; Koskinen, K.; Olin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Finnish HLW disposal concept the most important properties of the bentonite clay being considered for these isolation purposes are its thermal behaviour, low hydraulic conductivity, diffusion limited transport, rheology, plasticity, sufficient swelling potential, and exchange capacity. All of these properties depend critically on bentonite density; therefore, any potential mass loss or redistribution events must be well characterized. One such event or process is the erosion of bentonite by flowing groundwater and the groundwater flowing in newly formed channels, in special. Mechanical erosion during the operational phase, due to high groundwater pressure gradients in open excavations, has been identified as a critical issue in TKS-2006 and SR-Can. This work addresses the mechanical erosion of bentonite by fluid shear. In order for buffer erosion to occur three processes must take place: detachment, entrainment, and transport. These processes are followed by the settling of the material and redistribution of buffer mass. Erosion begins with the detachment of a particle from surrounding material, which requires the application of shear forces greater than the attractive force between the particle and parent structure. Entrainment is the process by which the eroding medium lifts the detached particle into the flow. The most important aspect in entrainment is transfer of fluid's inertial forces via surface friction to particles' inertial forces, which, in turn, must overcome the frictional resistance between the particle and its surroundings. Factors influencing frictional resistance include gravity, particle mass, saturation degree of parent structure, composition of water present in parent structure, particle size, and surface roughness. Recent erosion tests, whereby water flow was directed over compacted bentonite blocks or through a system of bentonite pellets, have indicated that bentonite erodes

  11. Corrosion-Resistant Container for Molten-Material Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; McNaul, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In a carbothermal process, gaseous methane is passed over molten regolith, which is heated past its melting point to a temperature in excess of 1,625 C. At this temperature, materials in contact with the molten regolith (or regolith simulant) corrode and lose their structural properties. As a result, fabricating a crucible to hold the molten material and providing a method of contact heating have been problematic. Alternative containment approaches use a large crucible and limit the heat zone of the material being processed, which is inefficient because of volume and mass constraints. Alternative heating approaches use non-contact heating, such as by laser or concentrated solar energy, which can be inefficient in transferring heat and thus require higher power heat sources to accomplish processing. The innovation is a combination of materials, with a substrate material having high structural strength and stiffness and high-temperature capability, and a coating material with a high corrosion resistance and high-temperature capability. The material developed is a molybdenum substrate with an iridium coating. Creating the containment crucible or heater jacket using this material combination requires only that the molybdenum, which is easily processed by conventional methods such as milling, electric discharge machining, or forming and brazing, be fabricated into an appropriate shape, and that the iridium coating be applied to any surfaces that may come in contact with the corrosive molten material. In one engineering application, the molybdenum was fashioned into a container for a heat pipe. Since only the end of the heat pipe is used to heat the regolith, the container has a narrowing end with a nipple in which the heat pipe is snugly fit, and the external area of this nipple, which contacts the regolith to transfer heat into it, is coated with iridium. At the time of this reporting, no single material has been found that can perform the functions of this combination

  12. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-01-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  13. Erosive gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-08-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported.

  14. Erosion-corrosion interactions and their affect on marine and offshore components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert JK [Surface Engineering and Tribology Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The operation of modern fluid handling systems demands for low costs, reliability, longevity and no loss of fluid containment. All these can be achieved by minimising the material damage caused by the combined attack of solid particle or cavitation impingement and corrosion. This paper will cover the rationale behind the selection of erosion resistance surfaces for fluid handling equipment and highlight the complexities encountered when these surfaces are exposed to environments which contain sand particles or cavitation in a corrosive medium. The erosion and erosion-corrosion performance of a variety of coatings and bulk surfaces will be discussed using volume loss rate versus sand impact energy maps. Recent research into the erosion-corrosion of polymer coatings, PEO and HVOF aluminium and nickel aluminium bronze coatings will be reviewed. Electrochemical techniques designed to monitor the erosion-corrosion mechanisms and coating integrity will be presented and used to quantify the synergistic terms present when both erosion and corrosion act concurrently. (author)

  15. Optimized adhesives for strong, lightweight, damage-resistant, nanocomposite materials: new insights from natural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansma, P K; Turner, P J; Ruoff, R S

    2007-01-01

    From our investigations of natural composite materials such as abalone shell and bone we have learned the following. (1) Nature is frugal with resources: it uses just a few per cent glue, by weight, to glue together composite materials. (2) Nature does not avoid voids. (3) Nature makes optimized glues with sacrificial bonds and hidden length. We discuss how optimized adhesives combined with high specific stiffness/strength structures such as carbon nanotubes or graphene sheets could yield remarkably strong, lightweight, and damage-resistant materials

  16. Optimized adhesives for strong, lightweight, damage-resistant, nanocomposite materials: new insights from natural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansma, P K [Physics Department, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Turner, P J [Physics Department, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Ruoff, R S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    From our investigations of natural composite materials such as abalone shell and bone we have learned the following. (1) Nature is frugal with resources: it uses just a few per cent glue, by weight, to glue together composite materials. (2) Nature does not avoid voids. (3) Nature makes optimized glues with sacrificial bonds and hidden length. We discuss how optimized adhesives combined with high specific stiffness/strength structures such as carbon nanotubes or graphene sheets could yield remarkably strong, lightweight, and damage-resistant materials.

  17. Slurry Erosion Performance of Ni-Al2O3 Based Thermal-Sprayed Coatings: Effect of Angle of Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, H. S.; Agrawal, Anupam; Singh, H.; Shollock, B. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, slurry erosion performance of high velocity flame-sprayed Ni-Al2O3 based coatings was evaluated. The coatings were deposited on a hydroturbine steel (CA6NM) by varying the content of Al2O3 in Ni. Using jet-type test rig, erosion behavior of coatings and bare steel was evaluated at different impingement angles. Detailed investigation of the surface morphology of the eroded specimens was undertaken using SEM/EDS to identify potential erosion mechanism. A parameter named "erosion mechanism identifier" (ξ) was used to predict the mode of erosion. It was observed that the coating prepared using 40 wt.% of Al2O3 showed a highest resistance to erosion. This coating enhanced the erosion resistance of the steel by 2 to 4 times. Spalling in the form of splats and chunks of material (formed by interlinking of cracks) along with fracture of Al2O3 splats were identified as primary mechanisms responsible for the loss of coating material. The erosion mechanism of coatings and bare steel predicted by ξ was in good agreement with that observed experimentally. Among different parameters,, a function of fracture toughness ( K IC) and hardness ( H) showed excellent correlation with erosion resistance of coatings at both the impingement angles.

  18. Development of superior radiation resistant materials and cables. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehara, Junichiro; Kanemitsuya, Kazuhiko; Ohara, Hideo; Araki, Syogo; Hamachi, Katsuhiko [Mitsubishi Cable Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants have been constructed in Japan and electric power generation is now highly dependent on this technology. Therefore, the needs for facilities that will enrich and reprocess nuclear fuel from nuclear power stations will be high. As there are areas with high levels of radiation, the cables which can be used in these environments are needed. We have developed a superior radiation-resistant cable which uses halogen flame-retardant materials. This radiation-resistant cable consists of Ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM) insulation and Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSM) sheath can be safely used in areas with high levels of radiation. We developed this product to aid in disaster prevention. Non-halogen, flame-retardant EPDM is used for the insulation, and low-halogen, flame-retardant CSM and new non-halogen, flame-retardant materials are used for the sheath. These cables have superior flame-retardant properties and generate little smoke on corrosive gas. This products can hence reduce the danger of a secondary disaster in a fire. We expect that these cables will find application in areas with high levels of radiation. (author).

  19. Development of superior radiation resistant materials and cables. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehara, Junichiro; Kanemitsuya, Kazuhiko; Ohara, Hideo; Araki, Syogo; Hamachi, Katsuhiko

    1996-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants have been constructed in Japan and electric power generation is now highly dependent on this technology. Therefore, the needs for facilities that will enrich and reprocess nuclear fuel from nuclear power stations will be high. As there are areas with high levels of radiation, the cables which can be used in these environments are needed. We have developed a superior radiation-resistant cable which uses halogen flame-retardant materials. This radiation-resistant cable consists of Ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM) insulation and Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSM) sheath can be safely used in areas with high levels of radiation. We developed this product to aid in disaster prevention. Non-halogen, flame-retardant EPDM is used for the insulation, and low-halogen, flame-retardant CSM and new non-halogen, flame-retardant materials are used for the sheath. These cables have superior flame-retardant properties and generate little smoke on corrosive gas. This products can hence reduce the danger of a secondary disaster in a fire. We expect that these cables will find application in areas with high levels of radiation. (author)

  20. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  1. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  2. Materials growth and characterization of thermoelectric and resistive switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kate J.

    In the 74 years since diode rectifier based radar technology helped the allied forces win WWII, semiconductors have transformed the world we live in. From our smart phones to semiconductor-based energy conversion, semiconductors touch every aspect of our lives. With this thesis I hope to expand human knowledge of semiconductor thermoelectric devices and resistive switching devices through experimentation with materials growth and subsequent materials characterization. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was the primary method of materials growth utilized in these studies. Additionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), atomic layer deposition (ALD),ion beam sputter deposition, reactive sputter deposition and electron-beam (e-beam) evaporation were also used in this research for device fabrication. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were the primary characterization methods utilized for this research. Additional device and materials characterization techniques employed include: current-voltage measurements, thermoelectric measurements, x-ray diffraction (XRD), reflection absorption infra-red spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL), and raman spectroscopy. As society has become more aware of its impact on the planet and its limited resources, there has been a push toward developing technologies to sustainably produce the energy we need. Thermoelectric devices convert heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectric devices have the potential to save huge amounts of energy that we currently waste as heat, if we can make them cost-effective. Semiconducting thin films and nanowires appear to be promising avenues of research to attain this goal. Specifically, in this work we will explore the use of ErSb thin films as well as Si and InP nanowire networks for thermoelectric applications. First we will discuss the growth of

  3. Erosion of common structural materials and the degradation of suspended particles in flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, D.A.; Hawes, R.I.; Rose, P.W.

    1968-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to examine the erosion of common materials of construction by a flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas and the degradation of the graphite powder in the suspension. The suspension was circulated through a stainless steel loop at a pressure of 200 p.s.i.g. and bulk fluid temperature of 100-150 deg. C. No change in the weight of pins of mild steel, stainless steel and zircaloy, which were placed across the flow stream in a region where the velocity approached 100 ft./sec, could be detected after 350 hours of circulation. Examination of micro-photographs of the cross sections of the specimens showed no change in the structure of the metals. Considerable erosion of graphite pins producing a 6% decrease in the weight was observed under similar conditions. Detailed spectrographic analysis of the suspended powder taken at various times during the experiment showed no noticeable increase in the impurity content which could be attributed to erosion of the test specimens. A considerable increase in the tungsten, tin and cobalt concentration was observed and this is attributed to wear of the pump seal surfaces. The mean particle size of the suspended graphite powder was observed to decrease rapidly from 5 microns to 3 microns after only a few hours of circulation in the loop. After this initial period there was little further change in the particle size, the mean diameter being 2.85 microns after 167 hours of circulation. (author)

  4. Application of newly developed heat resistant materials for USC boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Tamura, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Matsuda, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the research on the development and improvement of new high strength heat resistant steels such as SUPER304H (18Cr-9Ni-3Cu-Nb-N), NF709 (20Cr-25Ni-1.5Mo-Nb-Ti-N) and HR3C (25Cr-20Ni-Nb-N) as boiler tube, and NF616 (9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W-Nb-V) and HCM12A (11Cr-0.4Mo-2W-Nb-V-Cu) as thick section pipe. The latest manufacturing techniques applied for these steels are introduced. In addition the high temperature strength of Alloy617 (52Ni-22Cr-13Co-9Mo-Ti-Al) that is one of the candidate materials for the next generation 700 □ USC boilers is described. (orig.)

  5. Strength of heat-resistant materials. Vynoslivost' zharoprochnykh materialov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, L M

    1977-01-01

    A presentation is made of the research results of the effect that metallurgical, technological, construction, and exploitation factors have on the durability of heat-resistant alloys, tested for mechanical, heat, and corrosion effects on metal in standard cylindrical and specially contoured samples under conventional conditions and conditional approaching operational ones. The causes of changes in fatigue strength of alloys are explained by the use of fractographic and metallographic analyses of fractures and structure. The book is intended for engineering--technical personnel at research institutes, and plant mechanical and metal studies laboratories in machine-building factories. The book may also be used by undergraduate and graduate students at institutions of higher learning specializing in the field of material studies and mechanical testing of steels and alloys. 176 references, 79 figures, 12 tables.

  6. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-01-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO 2 , TiO 2 , Ta 2 O 5 , and Al 2 O 3 , to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta 2 O 5 RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy

  7. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John [Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  8. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-01-01

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking

  9. Investigations of the surface resistance of superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    In particle accelerators superconducting RF cavities are widely used to achieve high accelerating gradients and low losses. Power consumption is proportional to the surface resistance R S which depends on a number of external parameters, including frequency, temperature, magnetic and electric field. Presently, there is no widely accepted model describing the increase of R S with applied field. In the frame of this project the 400 MHz Quadrupole Resonator has been extended to 800 and 1200 MHz to study surface resistance and intrinsic critical RF magnetic field of superconducting samples over a wide parameter range, establishing it as a world-wide unique test facility for superconducting materials. Different samples were studied and it was shown that R S is mainly caused by the RF electric field in the case of strongly oxidized surfaces. This can be explained by interface tunnel exchange of electrons between the superconductor and localized states in adjacent oxides. For well prepared surfaces, however, the majority of the dissipation is caused by the magnetic field and R S factorizes into field and temperature dependent parts. These different loss mechanisms were correlated to surface topography of the samples and distribution of oxides by using ultrasonic force microscopy and X-ray photon spectroscopy.

  10. Tamper and radiation resistant instrumentation for safeguarding special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, B.B.; Wells, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    A tamper-resistant liquid level/accountability instrumentation system for safeguards use has been developed and tested. The tests demonstrate the accuracy of liquid level measurement using TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) techniques and the accuracy of differential pressure and temperature measurements utilizing a custom designed liquid level sensor probe. The calibrated liquid level, differential pressure, and temperature data provide sufficient information to accurately determine volume, density, and specific gravity. Test solutions used include ordinary tap water, diluted nitric acid in varying concentrations, and diluted uranium trioxide also in varying concentrations. System operations and preliminary test results conducted at the General Electric Midwest Fuel Recovery Plant and the National Bureau of Standards, respectively, suggest that the system will provide the safeguards inspector with an additional tool for real-time independent verification of normal operations and special nuclear materials accountancy data for chemical reprocessing plants. This paper discusses the system design concepts, including a brief description of the tamper and radiation resistant features, the preliminary test results, and the significance of the work

  11. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  12. Fatigue Characterization of Fire Resistant Syntactic Foam Core Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Mynul

    Eco-Core is a fire resistant material for sandwich structural application; it was developed at NC A&T State University. The Eco-Core is made of very small amount of phenolic resin and large volume of flyash by a syntactic process. The process development, static mechanical and fracture, fire and toxicity safety and water absorption properties and the design of sandwich structural panels with Eco-Core material was established and published in the literature. One of the important properties that is needed for application in transportation vehicles is the fatigue performance under different stress states. Fatigue data are not available even for general syntactic foams. The objective of this research is to investigate the fatigue performance of Eco-Core under three types of stress states, namely, cyclic compression, shear and flexure, then document failure modes, and develop empherical equations for predicting fatigue life of Eco-Core under three stress states. Compression-Compression fatigue was performed directly on Eco-Core cylindrical specimen, whereas shear and flexure fatigue tests were performed using sandwich beam made of E glass-Vinyl Ester face sheet and Eco-Core material. Compression-compression fatigue test study was conducted at two values of stress ratios (R=10 and 5), for the maximum compression stress (sigmamin) range of 60% to 90% of compression strength (sigmac = 19.6 +/- 0.25 MPa) for R=10 and 95% to 80% of compression strength for R=5. The failure modes were characterized by the material compliance change: On-set (2% compliance change), propagation (5%) and ultimate failure (7%). The number of load cycles correspond to each of these three damages were characterized as on-set, propagation and total lives. A similar approach was used in shear and flexure fatigue tests with stress ratio of R=0.1. The fatigue stress-number of load cycles data followed the standard power law equation for all three stress states. The constant of the equation were

  13. Erosion and foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.R.; Jaslier, Y.; Rickerby, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating technology is used in the hot sections of gas turbines to extend component life. To maximise these benefits, the thermal barrier coating has to remain intact throughout the life of the turbine. High velocity ballistic damage can lead to total thermal barrier removal, while erosion may lead to progressive loss of thickness during operation. This paper particularly addresses the erosion resistance and resistance to foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings. It was found that EB-PVD thermal barriers are significantly more erosion resistant when impacted with alumina or silica, than the equivalent plasma spray coating, both at room temperature and 910 C. Examination of tested hardware, reveals that cracking occurs within the near surface region of the columns for EB-PVD ceramic and that erosion occurs by removal of these small blocks of material. In stark contrast, removal of material for plasma sprayed ceramic occurs through poorly bonded splat boundaries. Large particle impact results in severe damage to the EB-PVD thermal barrier, with cracks penetrating through the ceramic coating to the ceramic/bond coat interface. Material removal, per particle impact, increases with increased particle size. (orig.)

  14. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  15. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material

  16. Multilayer Steel Materials Deformation Resistance and Roll Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kolesnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To create new types of cars, raise their reliability, gain operational life, and decrease in metal consumption of products it is necessary to improve mechanical, physical, and also special properties of the constructional materials applied in mechanical engineering. Presently, there are intensive researches and developments under way to create materials with ultrafine-grained structure (the sizes of grains in their crystal lattice make less than 1 micron in one of the measurements.BMSTU developed a manufacturing technology of multilayer steel sheets with steady ultrafine-grained structure based on the multiple hot rolling of billet as a composition consisting of the alternating metal sheets. A principled condition for implementation of such technology is existence of different crystallographic modifications in the adjoining sheets of the composition at specified temperature of rolling.Power parameters of rolling are important technical characteristics of the process. Usually, to determine a deformation resistance value when rolling the diverse multilayer materials, is used the actual resistance value averaging in relation to the components of the composition. The aim of this work is a comparative analysis of known calculated dependences with experimental data when rolling the 100-layer samples. Objects of research were the 100-layer compositions based on the alternating layers of steel 08H18N10 and U8.Experimental samples represented the vacuumized capsules with height, width, and length of 53 mm x 53 mm x 200 mm, respectively, in which there were the 100-layer packs from sheets, each of 0.5 mm, based on the composition of steels (U8+08H18N10. Rolling was made on the double-high mill with rolls of 160 mm in diameter during 19 passes to the thickness of 7 mm with the speed of 0,1 m/s. Relative sinking in each pass was accepted to be equal 10±2,5%. Rolling forces were measured by the strain-gauging method using the measuring cells, located under

  17. Radiation resistance of cable insulation and jacket materials for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Minoru; Kon, Shuji; Nishikawa, Ichiro

    1978-01-01

    The cables for use in nuclear power plants are required to satisfy the specific environmental resistance and excellent flame resistance as stipulated in IEEE Std. 383. The materials to be used to cables intended for this specific purpose of use must therefore be strictly tested so as to evaluate their flame resistance in addition to compliance with various environmental requirements, such as heat resistance, water-vapor resistance, and radiation resistance. This paper describes general information on radiation resistance and deterioration of various high-molecular materials, suggests the direction of efforts to be made to improve their properties including flame resistance of various rubber and plastic materials for cables to be used in nuclear power plants, and indicates the performance characteristics of such materials. (author)

  18. Interfacial reaction effects on erosion of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, J.P.; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima; Matsumura, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alumina borate (A 18 B 4 O 33 ) whisker reinforced aluminum composites have attracted interest because of their high specific strength, high modulus and low cost. An obvious feature of the microstructure in A 18 B 4 O 33 /Al composite is that an interfacial reaction exists between the whisker and the aluminum alloy. In order to discuss the influence of interface interaction between the whisker and matrix on the erosion resistance of composites, two reaction treatments are conducted. From the results of the treated composites, it can be obtained about the erosion characteristics of the composite materials under steady-state conditions

  19. Standard test method for liquid impingement erosion using rotating apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers tests in which solid specimens are eroded or otherwise damaged by repeated discrete impacts of liquid drops or jets. Among the collateral forms of damage considered are degradation of optical properties of window materials, and penetration, separation, or destruction of coatings. The objective of the tests may be to determine the resistance to erosion or other damage of the materials or coatings under test, or to investigate the damage mechanisms and the effect of test variables. Because of the specialized nature of these tests and the desire in many cases to simulate to some degree the expected service environment, the specification of a standard apparatus is not deemed practicable. This test method gives guidance in setting up a test, and specifies test and analysis procedures and reporting requirements that can be followed even with quite widely differing materials, test facilities, and test conditions. It also provides a standardized scale of erosion resistance numbers applicab...

  20. Experimental comparison of cavitation erosion rates of different steels used in hydraulic turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, L

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of cavitation erosion rates has an important role in order to evaluate the exact life of components in fluid machineries. Hydro-Quebec has studied this phenomenon for several years, in particular in hydraulic turbine runners, to try to understand the different degradation mechanisms related to this phenomenon. This paper presents part of this work. In this study, we carried out experimental erosion tests to compare different steels used in actual hydraulic turbine runners (carbon steels, austenitic and martensitic stainless steels) to high strength steels in terms of cavitation erosion resistance. The results for these different classes of steels are presented. The tests have been performed in a cavitating liquid jet apparatus according to the ASTM G134-95 standard to simulate the flow conditions. The mass loss has been followed during the exposure time. The maximum depth of erosion, the mean depth of erosion, and the mean depth erosion rate are determined. As a result we found that ASTM-A514 high strength steels present excellent cavitation erosion resistance properties. The cavitation eroded surface is followed by optical profilometry technique. Determination of mechanical properties and examinations of the eroded surfaces of the samples have also been carried out in order to identify the erosion mechanisms involved in the degradation of these kinds of materials.

  1. Efficacy of Vonoprazan for Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Patients with Proton Pump Inhibitor-resistant Non-erosive Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Yoku; Takahashi, Akihiro; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2018-03-30

    Objective Clinically, patients with proton pomp inhibitor (PPI)-resistant gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very challenging to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of symptom relief and adverse events among PPI-resistant GERD patients that changed their therapy from a PPI to vonoprazan. Methods Patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (total GERD-Q score ≥8) without endoscopic findings of mucosal breaks who changed their medication from a PPI to vonoprazan during a 12-week period from 2015 to 2016 at 2 hospitals were selected. The primary outcome was the self-reported relief of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The odds ratio (OR) for the improvement of symptoms was calculated based on an exact binomial distribution using a matched-pair analysis. The secondary outcome was the GERD-Q score and adverse events. Results Twenty-six patients (6 men) with a mean age of 67.5 years were analyzed. After the therapy was changed from a PPI to vonoprazan, 18 patients (69.2%) reported an improvement, 6 (23.1%) reported no change, and 2 (7.7%) reported an exacerbation of symptoms. A change in therapy was significantly associated with improved self-reported symptoms (OR 9.0, pgastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Vonoprazan is one of the most promising treatment options for patients with PPI-resistant GERD.

  2. Creep resistance and material degradation of a candidate Ni–Mo–Cr corrosion resistant alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Sachin L., E-mail: sachin@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yuan, Guangzhou; Li, Zhijun J. [Center of Thorium Molten Salts Reactor System, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Budzakoska-Testone, Elizabeth; De Los Reyes, Massey; Drew, Michael; Edwards, Lyndon [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2016-09-30

    This study investigated the creep deformation properties of GH3535, a Ni–Mo–Cr corrosion resistant structural alloy being considered for use in future Gen IV molten salt nuclear reactors (MSR) operating at around 700 °C. Creep testing of the alloy was conducted at 650–750 °C under applied stresses between 85–380 MPa. From the creep rupture results the long term creep strain and rupture life of the alloy were estimated by applying the Dorn Shepard and Larson Miller time-temperature parameters and the alloy's allowable ASME design stresses at the MSR's operating temperature were evaluated. The material's microstructural degradation at creep rupture was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural study revealed that the material failure was due to wedge cracking at triple grain boundary points and cavitation at coarse secondary grain boundary precipitates, nucleated and grown during high temperature exposure, leading to intergranular crack propagation. EBSD local misorientation maps clearly show that the root cause of cavitation and crack propagation was due to large strain localisation at the grain boundaries and triple points instigated by grain boundary sliding during creep deformation. This caused the grain boundary decohesion and subsequent material failure.

  3. The erosion/corrosion of small superalloy turbine rotors operating in the effluent of a PFB coal combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellars, G. R.; Benford, S. M.; Rowe, A. P.; Lowell, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a turbine in the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal combustor presents serious materials problems. Synergistic erosion/corrosion and deposition/corrosion interactions may favor the growth of erosion-resistant oxides on blade surfaces, but brittle cracking of these oxides may be an important source of damage along heavy particle paths. Integrally cast alloy 713LC and IN792 + Hf superalloy turbine rotors in a single-stage turbine with 6% partial admittance have been operated in the effluent of a PFB coal combustor for up to 164 hr. The rotor erosion pattern exhibits heavy particle separation with severe erosion at the leading edge, pressure side center, and suction side trailing edge at the tip. The erosion distribution pattern gives a spectrum of erosion/oxidation/deposition as a function of blade position. The data suggest that preferential degradation paths may exist even under the targeted lower loadings (less than 20 ppm).

  4. Effects of surface treatment on the cavitation erosion of high-chrome steel, zirconium, titanium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinin, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The erosion resistance of some structural materials used for equipment components of the first and second circuits of NPPs is studied under cavitation created by an ultrasonic vibrator. It appears that after various thermomechanical treatments (programmed loading, low-temperature rolling) and coating deposition (titanium, zirconium and titanium nitride), the erosion resistance of the materials under consideration increases and the plasticity value is not notably modified. The titanium coatings deposited onto the steel increase the corrosion-fatigue resistance in a sodium chloride environment, in several cases

  5. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  6. Small ring testing of a creep resistant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, C.J.; Hyde, T.H.; Sun, W.; Nardone, S.; De Bruycker, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many components in conventional and nuclear power plant, aero-engines, chemical plant etc., operate at temperatures which are high enough for creep to occur. These include steam pipes, pipe branches, gas and steam turbine blades, etc. The manufacture of such components may also require welds to be part of them. In most cases, only nominal operating conditions (i.e. pressure, temperatures, system load, etc.) are known and hence precise life predictions for these components are not possible. Also, the proportion of life consumed will vary from position to position within a component. Hence, non-destructive techniques are adopted to assist in making decisions on whether to repair, continue operating or replace certain components. One such approach is to test a small sample removed from the component to make small creep test specimens which can be tested to give information on the remaining creep life of the component. When such a small sample cannot be removed from the operating component, e.g. in the case of small components, the component can be taken out of operation in order to make small creep test specimens, the results from which can then be used to assist with making decisions regarding similar or future components. This paper presents a small creep test specimen which can be used for the testing of particularly strong and creep resistant materials, such as nickel-based superalloys

  7. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: johannes.bertsch@psi.ch; Hoffelner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness K {sub IC} or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness J {sub IC} are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J {sub 0.2} (J at 0.2 mm crack length), J {sub m} (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  8. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  9. Erosion scenarios for Wellenberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemenz, W.

    1993-09-01

    The proposed Wellenberg site for a radioactive waste repository is located between Altzellen in the Engelberger valley and the Oberrickenbach valley, in a thick Valanginian marl series. The marl is generally overlaid with unconsolidated rocks but reaches to the surface in some places. In contrast to the situation in the Oberbauenstock region this marl complex is not protected by an overlying erosion resistant series and exhibits a marked relief. The question therefore arises with respect to the Wellenberg site, to what extent will the marl (i.e. the repository host rock formation) be removed by erosion processes during the 100,000 years interval under consideration and what overburden will remain at the end of this period. This report presents the results of an investigation of the longterm behaviour of the proposed site in respect of those processes of erosion and deposition which can lead to changes in the terrain surface and its location relative to the repository. A wide range of possible scenarios encompassing different developments of climatic conditions during the 100,000 year period of interest, was investigated. In addition to the continuation of the present climate and the occurrence of a new ice age on the scale of the Wuerm glaciation the consequences of altered climatic conditions on erosion removal of the repository overburden were considered. Within the 100,000 year period of interest none of the scenarios considered leads to the exposure of the repository. (author) figs., tabs, refs

  10. Microstructure and erosion characteristic of nodular cast iron surface modified by tungsten inert gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Jaafar Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Local surface melting. ► Significant improvement in erosion resistance. ► The ductile behaviour was found. -- Abstract: The surface of nodular cast iron has been melted and rapidly solidified by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) process to produce a chilled structure of high hardness and better erosion resistance. Welding currents of magnitude 100, 150, and 200 A at a constant voltage of 72 have been used to melt the surface of nodular cast iron. Microstructural characterization, hardness measurements, and erosion wear tests have been performed on these modified surfaces as well as on the untreated material. Microstructural characterization has shown that surface melting resulted in complete or partial dissolution of the graphite nodules and resolidification of primary austenite dendrites, which undergo further decomposition into ferrite and cementite, and interdendritic of acicular eutectic; their microhardness measured across the melted depth ranged between 600 and 800 Hv. The scale of the dendrites and the interdendritic eutectic became coarser when a higher current is used. The results also indicated that remelting process by TIG improved erosion resistance by three to four times. Eroded surface observations of the as-received and TIG melted samples showed a ductile behavior with a maximum erosion rate at 30°. The fine microstructures obtained by the rapid cooling and the formation of a large amount of eutectic cementite instead of the graphite have contributed greatly to the plastic flow and consequently to the better erosion resistance of the TIG surface melted samples.

  11. Ion implantation to improve mechanical and electrical properties of resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeli, A.V.; Shykh, S.K.; Beresina, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of ion implantation, using different chemical species, on the surface micromorphology, wear resistance, coefficient of friction and electrical resistivity, and its variation during friction for resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide. It is demonstrated that nitrogen and hydrogen ions are the most effective for modifying surface properties. (Author)

  12. Airflow resistivity of models of fibrous acoustic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A new way of calculating the airflow resistivity of randomly placed parallel cylinders is presented. The calculation is based on Voronoi polygons, and the resistivity is given by the mean spacing between the fibers, their diameters, and the physical properties of air. New explicit formulas...

  13. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....... patient, der arbejder som pladesmed, blev henvist til Landsdels- og Videnscenter, Århus Sygehus, med henblik på udredning af patientens kraftige slid. Patienten udviste ikke-alderssvarende tandslid af emalje og dentin svarende til erosion forårsaget af syredampe i arbejdsmiljøet, muligvis forstærket af...

  14. Simultaneous acid exposure and erosive particle wear of thermoset coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria

    2018-01-01

    , similar to the erosion/corrosion-type phenomena found in metals. A vinyl ester-based coating was the most resistant to the simultaneous erosive/acidic exposure, with a maximum polishing rate of 3.24±0.61 μm/week, while novolac epoxy and polyurethane coatings showed high polishing rates of 11.7±1.50 and 13.4±0......Handling acidic chemicals is a challenge in the chemical industry, requiring a careful choice of contact material. Certain thermoset organic coatings are applicable in low pH environments, but when particulate erosion is also present the performance demand is increased. This is the case in, e...

  15. Buffer erosion in dilute groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, T.; Kanerva, N.; Martikainen, J.; Sane, P.; Olin, M.; Seppaelae, A.; Koskinen, K.

    2013-08-01

    One scenario of interest for repository safety assessment involves the loss of bentonite buffer material in contact with dilute groundwater flowing through a transmissive fracture interface. In order to examine the extrusion/erosion behavior of bentonite buffer material under such circumstances, a series of experiments were performed in a flow-through, 1 mm aperture, artificial fracture system. These experiments covered a range of solution chemistry (salt concentration and composition), material composition (sodium montmorillonite and admixtures with calcium montmorillonite), and flow velocity conditions. No erosion was observed for sodium montmorillonite against solution compositions from 0.5 g/L to 10 g/L NaCl. No erosion was observed for 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite against 0.5 g/L NaCl. Erosion was observed for both sodium montmorillonite and 50/50 calcium/sodium montmorillonite against solution compositions ≤ 0.25 g/L NaCl. The calculated erosion rates for the tests with the highest levels of measured erosion, i.e., the tests run under the most dilute conditions (ionic strength (IS) < ∼1 mM), were well-correlated to flow velocity, whereas the calculated erosion rates for the tests with lower levels of measured erosion, i.e., the tests run under somewhat less dilute conditions (∼1 mM < IS < ∼4 mM), were not similarly correlated indicating that material and solution composition can significantly affect erosion rates. In every experiment, both erosive and non-erosive, emplaced buffer material extruded into the fracture and was observed to be impermeable to water flowing in the fracture effectively forming an extended diffusive barrier around the intersecting fracture/buffer interface. Additionally, a model which was developed previously to predict the rate of erosion of bentonite buffer material in low ionic strength water in rock fracture environments was applied to three different cases: sodium montmorillonite expansion in a vertical tube, a

  16. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  17. Dynamic control of low-Z material deposition and tungsten erosion by strike point sweeping on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guterl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon deposition on tungsten between ELMs was investigated in DIII-D in semi-attached/detached H-mode plasma conditions using fixed outer strike point (OSP positions. Carbon deposition during plasma exposure of tungsten was monitored in-situ by measuring the reflectivity of the tungsten sample surface. No significant carbon deposition, i.e., without strong variations of the reflectivity, was observed during these experiments including discharges at high densities. In contrast, ERO modeling predicts a significant carbon deposition on the tungsten surface for those high density plasma conditions. The surface reflectivity decreases with methane injection, consistent with increased carbon coverage, as expected. The sweeping of OSP leads to a pronounced increase of the surface reflectivity, suggesting that the strike point sweeping may provide an effective means to remove carbon coating from tungsten surface. The ERO modeling however predicts again a regime of carbon deposition for these experiments. The discrepancies between carbon deposition regime predicted by the ERO model and the experimental observations suggest that carbon erosion during ELMs may significantly affect carbon deposition on tungsten.

  18. Contact Resistance of Ceramic Interfaces Between Materials Used for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may....... The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constric-tion at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resis-tance calculated on basis of the contact...... areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential...

  19. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of various concrete reinforcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Vermont Agency of Transportation undertook a simple experiment to determine the corrosion : resistance ability of various reinforcing steels (rebar) that may be used in bridges and other concrete : structures. Eight types of rebar were used in th...

  20. Comparison of CFD simulations with experimental Jet Erosion Tests results

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, F.; Bonelli, S.; Pinettes, P.; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F.; Philippe, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Erosion Test (JET) is an experimental device increasingly used to quantify the resistance of soils to erosion. This resistance is characterised by two geotechnical parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion coefficient. The JET interpretation model of Hanson and Cook (2004) provides an estimation of these erosion parameters. But Hanson's model is simplified, semi-empirical and several assumed hypotheses can be discussed. Our aim is to determine the relevance of the JET inte...

  1. Resistance Welding of Advanced Materials and Micro Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard

    With the use of the Finite Element Method it has become possible to analyse and better understand complex physical processes such as the resistance welding by numerical simulation. However, simulation of resistance welding is a very complex matter due to the strong interaction between mechanical......, thermal, electrical and metallurgical effects all signifcantly in uencing the process. Modelling is further complicated when down-scaling the process for welding micro components or when welding new advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry. The current project deals with three main themes...... aimed at improving the understanding of resistance welding for increasing the accuracy of numerical simulation of the process. Firstly methods for measuring and modelling mechanical and electrical properties at a wide range of temperatures is investigated, and especially the electrical contact...

  2. Preventing erosion at pipeline crossings of watercourses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatsky, L.; Arnold, G.

    1997-01-01

    Watercourses are naturally vulnerable to erosion but the risk is particularly acute after sub-soil and armour materials have been disturbed by trenching and backfilling during construction. Various types of erosion (river scour, river bed, river channel bed and river bank ) and the progressive removal of pipeline cover resulting from erosion were discussed. Methods of estimating the risk of progressive erosion, river avulsions and beaver dam scour, and methods of mitigating erosion at pipeline crossings such as deep burial, proper siting, conventional armouring, and a combination of bank toe protection, and upper bank vegetation cover, were described

  3. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A.; Arkhipov, I.; Werle, H.; Wuerz, H.

    1998-01-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heat loads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  4. Some regularities of structure and surface layer properties changing of metal materials after electro-erosion machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostyntsev, K.I.; Kuz'mina, T.S.; Kruglov, V.V.; Lukovkin, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of electoerosion machining on the surface state of pearlitic class steel of the 12KhN4MFA type, bronzes BrAMts 9-2 and BrAZhNMts 9-4-4-1, of the alloy PT-3V has been studied. As a result of electroerosion machining (EEM) a transformed layer, presenting overheated and partially melted metal, the structure and hardness of which depend on chemical composition of the materials treated, their tendency to phase transformatins and saturation with introduction elements, is formed on the surface of metal materials

  5. Some regularities of structure and surface layer properties changing of metal materials after electro-erosion machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostyntsev, K.I.; Kuz' mina, T.S.; Kruglov, V.V.; Lukovkin, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of electoerosion machining on the surface state of pearlitic class steel of the 12KhN4MFA type, bronzes BrAMts 9-2 and BrAZhNMts 9-4-4-1, of the alloy PT-3V has been studied. As a result of electroerosion machining (EEM) a transformed layer, presenting overheated and partially melted metal, the structure and hardness of which depend on chemical composition of the materials treated, their tendency to phase transformatins and saturation with introduction elements, is formed on the surface of metal materials.

  6. Developing an Instructional Material Using a Concept Cartoon Adapted to the 5E Model: A Sample of Teaching Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birisci, Salih; Metin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Using different instructional materials adapted within the constructivist learning theory will enhance students' conceptual understanding. From this point of view, an instructional instrument using a concept cartoon adapted with 5E model has developed and introduced in this study. The study has some deficiencies in investigating students'…

  7. Contact resistance of ceramic interfaces between materials used for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, S.

    2002-01-01

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may be smaller or larger than the constriction resistance. The contact resistance between pairs of three different materials were analysed (strontium doped lanthanum manganite, yttria stabilised zirconia and strontium and nickel doped lanthanum cobaltite), and the effects of temperature, atmosphere, polarisation and mechanical load on the contact resistance were investigated. The investigations revealed that the mechanical load of a ceramic contact has a high influence on the contact resistance, and generally power law dependence between the contact resistance and the mechanical load was found. The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constriction at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resistance calculated on basis of the contact areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential barriers to model the observed behaviour. The current-voltage behaviour of the YSZ contact interfaces was only weakly non-linear, and could be described by 22{+-}1 barriers in series. Contact interfaces with sinterable contact layers were also investigated, and the measured contact resistance for these interfaces were more than 10 times less than for the other interfaces. (au)

  8. Slurry Erosion Studies on Surface Modified 13Cr-4Ni Steels: Effect of Angle of Impingement and Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisekaran, T.; Kamaraj, M.; Sharrif, S. M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroturbine steels, such as 13Cr-4Ni martensitic steels, are generally subjected to heavy-erosive wear and loss of efficiency due to solid particulate entrainment in the water. Surface-modified steels have proven to give better performance in terms of erosive wear resistance. In the present study, an attempt is made to investigate the effect of angle of impingement and particle size on slurry-jet erosion behavior of pulsed plasma nitrided and laser hardened 13Cr-4Ni steels. Laser hardening process has shown good performance at all angles of impingement due to martensitic transformation of retained austenite. Plastic deformation mode of material removal was also an evident feature of all laser-hardened surface damage locations. However, pulsed-plasma nitrided steels have exhibited chip formation and micro-cutting mode of erosive wear. Erosion with 150-300 μm size was twice compared to 150 μm size slurry particulates.

  9. Microwave surface resistance of bulk YBa2Cu3O6+x material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, A.; Kalokitis, D.; Belohoubek, E.; Sundar, H. G. K.; Safari, A.

    1988-10-01

    Superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O samples were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction. The microwave surface resistance of 1:2:3 compound superconductor material was measured in a special disk resonator structure at 10 GHz. At liquid-nitrogen temperatures the microwave surface resistance is comparable to that of Au. At lower temperature (~10 K) the surface resistance is an order of magnitude lower than that of Au at the same temperature.

  10. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  11. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  12. Highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy for reactor structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoichi.

    1996-01-01

    The alloy of the present invention is a zirconium based alloy comprising tin (Sn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) in zirconium (Zr). The amount of silicon (Si) as an impurity is not more than 60ppm. It is preferred that Sn is from 0.9 to 1.5wt%, that of Cr is from 0.05 to 0.15wt%, and (Fe + Ni) is from 0.17 to 0.5wt%. If not less than 0.12wt% of Fe is added, resistance against nodular corrosion is improved. The upper limit of Fe is preferably 0.40wt% from a view point of uniform suppression for the corrosion. The nodular corrosion can be suppressed by reducing the amount of Si-rich deposition product in the zirconium based alloy. Accordingly, a highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy improved for the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 and usable for a fuel cladding tube of a BWR type reactor can be obtained. (I.N.)

  13. Grids on TCO's for higly transparent materials with a resistivity below 1 Ohm/sq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Rendering, H.; Mannetje, H.H 't; Hovestad, A.

    2011-01-01

    Various transparent conducting materials are compared based on their transparency versus sheet resistance characteristics. At present, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are still superior in performance compared to various recent alternatives and can only be surpassed by the combination of TCOs

  14. Speci﬿c contact resistance of phase change materials to metal electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha A.A.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    For phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells, it is important to know the contact resistance of phase change materials (PCMs) to metal electrodes at the contacts. In this letter, we report the systematic determination of the speci﬿c contact resistance (Ͽc ) of doped Sb2Te and Ge2Sb2Te5 to TiW

  15. Bias dependent specic contact resistance of phase change material to metal contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of contact resistance of phase change materials (PCM) to metal electrodes is important for scaling, device modeling and optimization of phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells. In this article, we report the systematic determination of the speci_c contact resistance (_c) with

  16. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.))

  17. Effects of pressure and temperature on thermal contact resistance between different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore whether pressure and temperature can affect thermal contact resistance, we have proposed a new experimental approach for measurement of the thermal contact resistance. Taking the thermal contact resistance between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites, cuprum, and aluminum as the examples, the influence of the thermal contact resistance between specimens under pressure is tested by experiment. Two groups of experiments are performed and then an analysis on influencing factors of the thermal contact resistance is presented in this paper. The experimental results reveal that the thermal contact resistance depends not only on the thermal conductivity coefficient of materials, but on the interfacial temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the thermal contact resistance between cuprum and aluminum is more sensitive to pressure and temperature than that between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites.

  18. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  19. Effect of Environmental Variables on the Flammability of Fire Resistant Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Andres Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the effects of external radiation, ambient pressure and microgravity on the flammability limits of fire-resistant (FR) materials. Future space missions may require spacecraft cabin environments different than those used in the International Space Station, 21%O2, 101.3kPa. Environmental variables include flow velocity, oxygen concentration, ambient pressure, micro or partial-gravity, orientation, presence of an external radiant flux, etc. Fire-resistant materials are use...

  20. Plasma-material interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-interactive components must be resistant to erosion processes, efficient in heat removal, and effective in minimizing tritium inventory and permeation. As long as plasma edge temperatures are 50 eV, no one material can satisfy the diverse requirements imposed by these plasma materials interactions. The only solution is the design of duplex, or even more complicated, structures. The material that faces the plasma should be low atomic number, with acceptable erosion and evaporation characteristics. The substrate material must have high thermal conductivity for heat removal. Finally, materials must be selected judiciously for tritium compatibility. In conclusion, materials play a critical role in the achievement of safe and economical magnetic fusion energy. Improvements in materials have already led to many advances in present day device operation, but additional innovative materials solutions are required for the critical plasma materials interaction issues in future power reactors

  1. Resistance of gloves and protective clothing materials to permeation of cytostatic solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Sylwia Krzemińska; Małgorzata Pośniak; Małgorzata Szewczyńska

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the work was to determine the resistance of selected protective clothing and glove materials to permeation of cytostatics such as docetaxel, fluorouracil, and doxorubicin. Material and Methods The following glove materials were used: natural rubber latex (code A), acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (code B) and chloroprene rubber (code C). In addition, we tested a layered material composed of a non-woven polyester (PES), a polypropylene (PP) film, ...

  2. INVESTIGATION ON NEW CREEP- AND OXIDATION-RESISTANT MATERIALS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khalaj, O.; Mašek, B.; Jirková, H.; Ronešová, A.; Svoboda, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2015), s. 645-651 ISSN 1580-2949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-24252S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : ODS steel * alloys * composite * creep * Fe-Al Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2015

  3. Thermal contact resistance in carbon nanotube enhanced heat storage materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Nedea, S.V.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Smeulders, D.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-liquid phase change is one of the most favorable means of compact and economical heat storage in the built environment. In such storage systems, the vast available solar heat is stored as latent heat in the storage materials. Recent studies suggest using sugar alcohols as seasonal heat storage

  4. Measuring the resistance of different substructure materials by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... 2016 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Abstract ... materials by sticking them to dentine with two different resin cements in vitro. Niger J Clin .... In an evaluation after the statistical results were obtained, the .... Panavia, and glass ionomer cement in their study.

  5. Materials and coatings to resist high temperature oxidation and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Object of the given papers are the oxidation and corrosion behaviour of several materials (such as stainless steels, iron-, or nickel-, or cobalt-base alloys, Si-based ceramics) used at high temperatures and various investigations on high-temperature protective coatings. (IHoe) [de

  6. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  7. Cavitation erosion - scale effect and model investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, F.; Rutschmann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The experimental works presented in here contribute to the clarification of erosive effects of hydrodynamic cavitation. Comprehensive cavitation erosion test series were conducted for transient cloud cavitation in the shear layer of prismatic bodies. The erosion pattern and erosion rates were determined with a mineral based volume loss technique and with a metal based pit count system competitively. The results clarified the underlying scale effects and revealed a strong non-linear material dependency, which indicated significantly different damage processes for both material types. Furthermore, the size and dynamics of the cavitation clouds have been assessed by optical detection. The fluctuations of the cloud sizes showed a maximum value for those cavitation numbers related to maximum erosive aggressiveness. The finding suggests the suitability of a model approach which relates the erosion process to cavitation cloud dynamics. An enhanced experimental setup is projected to further clarify these issues.

  8. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  9. Numerical modeling and experimental simulation of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhin, V.P.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V.M.; Sherbakov, A.R.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and experimentally investigated at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. In the optical wavelength range C II, C III, C IV emission lines for graphite, Cu I, Cu II lines for copper and continuum radiation for tungsten samples are observed in the target plasma. The plasma expands along the magnetic field lines with velocities of (4±1)x10 6 cm/s for graphite and 10 5 cm/s for copper. Modeling was done with a radiation hydrodynamics code in one-dimensional planar geometry. The multifrequency radiation transport is treated in flux limited diffusion and in forward reverse transport approximation. In these first modeling studies the overall shielding efficiency for carbon and tungsten defined as ratio of the incident energy and the vaporization energy for power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 exceeds a factor of 30. The vapor shield is established within 2 μs, the power fraction to the target after 10 μs is below 3% and reaches in the stationary state after about 20 μs a value of around 1.5%. ((orig.))

  10. Measurement of tritium permeation through resistant materials near room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.; DuVal, V.; McMurphy, F.; Uribe, F.; Musket, R.; Brown, D.

    1985-01-01

    To measure tritium permeation through low-permeability materials at 50 to 170 0 C, we use highly-sensitive liquid scintillation counting to detect the permeating tritium. To validate our method, we conducted extensive experiments with copper, for which much data exists for comparison. We report permeability of tritium through copper at 50, 100, and 170 0 C, and discuss details of the experimental technique. Further plans are outlined. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Wear-resistant powder materials with intermetallic hardening. I. Nonporous materials for antifriction purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, G.K.; Akopov, N.L.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Manukyan, N.N.

    1987-09-01

    This article investigates the wear resistance, microhardness, microstructure, and crystal-phase behavior of a molybdenum alloy solid lubricant under cyclic wear and sliding friction tests against steel 45. Calculated and experimental results are given.

  12. RESISTENCIA AL DESGASTE EROSIVO-CORROSIVO DE ACEROS AUSTENÍTICOS FERMANAL RESISTÊNCIA AO DESGASTE EROSIVO-CORROSIVO DE AÇOS AUSTENÍTICOS FERMANAL EROSIVE-CORROSIVE WEAR RESISTANCE OF FERMANAL AUSTENITIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Aperador

    2012-12-01

    the range (4.9~11.0 wt% Al - (17.49~34.3 wt% Mn - (0, 43~1.25 wt% C, which were melted in an induction furnace from high purity materials. The alloys were evaluated with respect to corrosion, wet erosion and corrosion-erosion at an impact angle of 90°. For the evaluation of corrosion a solution composed of 0.5 M NaCl and silica particles with size between 210 to 300 microns was used in order to analyze the effect of aluminum and manganese content in the resistance to erosion and corrosion-erosion of these alloys. To characterize the corrosion, response technique was used by potentiodynamic polarization curves and using the same technique as Tafel extrapolation, the microstructural characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the composition of corrosion products were analyzed using diffraction of X-rays (XRD.

  13. On interrelation of crack resistance characteristics of metal materials under static and dynamic loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyan, K.G.; Goloveshkin, Yu.V.; Tuzlukova, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    Home and foreign data on crack resistance characteristics of metal structural materials are generalized and analyzed. Dependence between various parameters of material strength and toughness on the one hand and racck resistance on the other hand is established on the basis of the energy concept of the failure mechanics. Effect of the strain rate on σsub(0.2) and Ksub(Ic) values is evaluated. Quanlitative and quantitative relations obtained permit conducting a complex estimation of materials behaviour during static and dynamic loading operations

  14. Moessbauer Study of Materials Displaying Colossal Magnetic Resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klencsar, Z.; Vertes, A.; Nemeth, Z.; Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Kotsis, I.; Nagy, M.; Simopoulos, A.; Devlin, E.; Kallias, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade the discovery of colossal magnetoresistance in Mn based perovskites brought various perovskite and spinel materials, displaying the effect of magnetoresistance, into the center of scientific interest. The physical and chemical effects, underlying the phenomenon of negative magnetoresistance in these compounds, are not yet fully understood. In this article we investigate the local electronic and magnetic state of iron in three different type of perovskite and spinel compounds: the double perovskite Sr 2 Fe 1+x Mo 1-x O 6 with an excess of iron (x≅0.12), the perovskite La 0.8 Sr 0.2 Fe 0.3 Co 0.7 O 3-z , and the chalcogenide spinel FeCr 2 S 4 .

  15. EB and EUV lithography using inedible cellulose-based biomass resist material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto; Oshima, Akihiro; Kashiwakura, Miki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2016-03-01

    The validity of our approach of inedible cellulose-based resist material derived from woody biomass has been confirmed experimentally for the use of pure water in organic solvent-free water spin-coating and tetramethylammonium hydroxide(TMAH)-free water-developable techniques of eco-conscious electron beam (EB) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The water developable, non-chemically amplified, high sensitive, and negative tone resist material in EB and EUV lithography was developed for environmental affair, safety, easiness of handling, and health of the working people. The inedible cellulose-based biomass resist material was developed by replacing the hydroxyl groups in the beta-linked disaccharides with EB and EUV sensitive groups. The 50-100 nm line and space width, and little footing profiles of cellulose-based biomass resist material on hardmask and layer were resolved at the doses of 10-30 μC/cm2. The eco-conscious lithography techniques was referred to as green EB and EUV lithography using inedible cellulose-based biomass resist material.

  16. Erosion--corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.

    1978-01-01

    The deterioration of materials by corrosion or erosion by itself presents a formidable problem and for this reason investigators have studied these two phenomena independently. In fact, there are very few systematic studies on E-C and the majority of references mention it only in passing. In most real systems, however, the two destructive processes take place simultaneously, hence the purpose of this review is to present the various interactions between the chemical and mechanical agents leading to accelerated degradation of the material. The papers cited in the review are those that lead to a better understanding of the process involved in the accelerated rate of material loss under E-C conditions

  17. Numerical study of impact erosion of multiple solid particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Chen, Cheng; Qin, Jie; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

    2017-11-01

    Material erosion caused by continuous particle impingement during hydraulic fracturing results in significant economic loss and increased production risks. The erosion process is complex and has not been clearly explained through physical experiments. To address this problem, a multiple particle model in a 3D configuration was proposed to investigate the dynamic erosion process. This approach can significantly reduce experiment costs. The numerical model considered material damping and elastic-plastic material behavior of target material. The effects of impact parameters on erosion characteristics, such as plastic deformation, contact time, and energy loss rate, were investigated. Based on comprehensive studies, the dynamic erosion mechanism and geometry evolution of eroded crater was obtained. These findings can provide a detailed erosion process of target material and insights into the material erosion caused by multiple particle impingement.

  18. Auto consolidated cohesive sediments erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternat, F.

    2007-02-01

    Pollutants and suspended matters of a river can accumulate into the sedimentary column. Once deposited, they are submitted to self-weight consolidation processes, ageing and burying, leading to an increase of their erosion resistance. Pollutant fluxes can be related to sedimentary fluxes, determined by threshold laws. In this work, an erosion threshold model is suggested by introducing a cohesion force into the usual force balance. A model of cohesion is developed on the basis of interactions between argillaceous cohesive particles (clays), particularly the Van der Waals force, whose parameterization is ensured by means of granulometry and porosity. Artificial erosion experiments were performed in a recirculating erosion flume with natural cored sediments where critical shear stress measurements were performed. Other analyses provided granulometry and porosity. The results obtained constitute a good database for the literature. The model is then applied to the experimental conditions and gives good agreement with measurements. An example of the accounting for self-weight consolidation processes is finally suggested, before finishing on a Mohr like diagram dedicated to soft cohesive sediment erosion. (author)

  19. Strategies to prevent the occurrence of resistance against antibiotics by using advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassegoda, Arnau; Ivanova, Kristina; Ramon, Eva; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2018-03-01

    Drug resistance occurrence is a global healthcare concern responsible for the increased morbidity and mortality in hospitals, time of hospitalisation and huge financial loss. The failure of the most antibiotics to kill "superbugs" poses the urgent need to develop innovative strategies aimed at not only controlling bacterial infection but also the spread of resistance. The prevention of pathogen host invasion by inhibiting bacterial virulence and biofilm formation, and the utilisation of bactericidal agents with different mode of action than classic antibiotics are the two most promising new alternative strategies to overcome antibiotic resistance. Based on these novel approaches, researchers are developing different advanced materials (nanoparticles, hydrogels and surface coatings) with novel antimicrobial properties. In this review, we summarise the recent advances in terms of engineered materials to prevent bacteria-resistant infections according to the antimicrobial strategies underlying their design.

  20. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  1. Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

    2006-04-24

    Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

  2. Heat resistance study of basalt fiber material via mechanical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Jia, C.; Meng, L.; Li, X. H.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the relationship between the fracture strength of basalt rovings and temperature. Strong stretching performance of the rovings has been tested after the treatment at fixed temperatures but different heating time and then the fracture strength of the rovings exposed to the heating at different temperatures and cooled in different modes investigated. Finally, the fracture strength of the basalt material after the heat treatment was studied. The results showed that the room-temperature strength tends to decrease with an increase of the heat treatment time at 250 °C, but it has the local maximum after 2h heating. And the basalt rovings strength increased after the heat treatment up to 200 °C. It was 16.7 percent higher than the original strength. The strength depends not only on the temperature and duration of the heating, but also on the cooling mode. The value of the strength measured after cold water cooling was less by 6.3% compared with an ambient air cooling mode. The room-temperature breaking strength of the rovings heated at 200 °C and 100 °C for 2 hours each increased by about 14.6% with respect to unpretreated basalt rovings.

  3. Radiation resistance of polymer materials. Degradation evaluation by accelerated testing for application condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Sorimachi, Masami

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents re-evaluated radiation resistance property data of polymer materials, which had been tested in past times in TAKASAKI Quantum Beam Science Directorate, for the future study of ageing evaluation of low voltage electric cable insulation materials used in light-water nuclear reactors. The radiation resistance of 25 types of plastics and rubbers materials applied in practical environments was evaluated by the accelerated testing of gamma-ray irradiation under oxygen pressure, and was compared with the radiation resistance determined from the traditional testing by irradiation with a high dose rate in air. The polymer materials were formulated to be similar or equivalent to practical materials, and the most of formulation (chemical compounds and quantities) were described. For all materials, the tensile properties (elongation at break, ultimate strength, 100% or 200% modulus), electric resistivity, gel-fraction, and density were measured after irradiation in oxidation conditions and irradiation in air with a high dose rate (non-oxidation conditions). The data of relations between each properties and total dose at various conditions were compiled, and the relations among the changes of mechanical properties, electrical properties, and radiation induced chemical reactions were discussed. (author)

  4. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy

  5. Backward erosion piping : Initiation and progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beek, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Backward erosion piping is an internal erosion mechanism during which shallow pipes are formed in the direction opposite to the flow underneath water-retaining structures as a result of the gradual removal of sandy material by the action of water. It is an important failure mechanism in both dikes

  6. Flexible screen printed thick film thermoelectric generator with reduced material resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Z; Koukharenko, E; Torah, R N; Tudor, J; Beeby, S P

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a flexible thick-film Bismuth Tellurium/Antimony Tellurium (BiTe/SbTe) thermoelectric generator (TEG) with reduced material resistivity fabricated by screen printing technology. Cold isostatic pressing (CIP) was introduced to lower the resistivity of the printed thermoelectric materials. The Seebeck coefficient (α) and the resistivity (ρ) of printed materials were measured as a function of applied pressure. A prototype TEG with 8 thermocouples was fabricated on flexible polyimide substrate. The dimension of a single printed element was 20 mm × 2 mm × 78.4 pm. The coiled-up prototype produced a voltage of 36.4 mV and a maximum power of 40.3 nW from a temperature gradient of 20 °C

  7. Process Simulation of Resistance Weld Bonding and Automotive Light-weight Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Chergui, Azeddine; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    of mechanical, electrical, thermal and metallurgical processes, which are essential for simulation of resistance welding process to predict the welding results and evaluate the weldability of materials. These functions have been further extended with new functions for optimization of welding process parameters...... and predicting welding process window, for weld planning with optimal welding parameter settings, and for modeling microstructures and hardness distribution after welding. Latest developments have been made on simulation of resistance welding with nonconductive materials for applications in weld bonding......This paper presents the latest developments in numerical simulation of resistance welding especially with the new functions for simulation of microstructures, weld bonding and spot welding of new light-weight materials. The fundamental functions in SORPAS® are built on coupled modeling...

  8. FIRE-RESISTANCE PROPERTIES RESEARCH OF “WATER GLASS - GRAPHITE MICROPARTICLES” COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Pitukhin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Research results of the fire-resistance for “water glass - graphite microparticles” composite material (CM are given. The method for fire-resistance test of the micro composition is suggested in order to determine the limit state of the experimental samples under hightemperature action. Method. Test-benchequipment being used for research includes metering devices of temperature and time, as well as laboratory electric furnace PL20 with a maximum temperature in the chamber up to 1250ºC. Fire-resistance limit for the test samples of composite material is determined by the loss of insulating ability (I. For that purpose, the time is obtained from the test beginning with the standard temperature mode up to a limiting condition. Main Results. In accordance with the requirements of regulatory documents fire-resistance limit I15 has been obtained equal to 15 minutes. The qualitative and quantitative phase analysis of the CM structure has been done. By the study of samples by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy we have determined that the material retains the same chemical structure with a monotonic heating above 700° C. Practical Relevance. The composite material with obtained characteristics can be used as a protective coating for building constructions with the aim of fire-resistance enhancement and fuel hazard reduction.

  9. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 7, part B. Particle induced erosion of Be, C and W in fusion plasmas. Part B: Physical sputtering and radiation-enhanced sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, W.; Stephens, J.A.; Clark, R.E.H.; Davis, J.W.; Haasz, A.A.; Vietzke, E.; Hirooka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The present volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to a critical review of the physical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation (RES) behaviour of fusion plasma-facing materials, in particular carbon, beryllium and tungsten. The present volume is intended to provide fusion reactor designers a detailed survey and parameterization of existing, critically assessed data for the chemical erosion of plasma-facing materials by particle impact. The survey and data compilation is presented for a variety of materials containing the elements C, Be and W (including dopants in carbon materials) and impacting plasma species. The dependencies of physical sputtering and RES yields on the material temperature, incident projectile energy, and incident flux are considered. The main data compilation is presented as separate data sheets indicating the material, impacting plasma species, experimental conditions, and parameterizations in terms of analytic functions

  10. Mixture for producing fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic material by microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1985-04-03

    A fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is produced by a method which involves preparing a ceramic precursor mixture comprising glass material, a coupling agent, and resilient fibers, and then exposing the mixture to microwave energy. The microwave field orients the fibers in the resulting ceramic material in a desired pattern wherein heat later generated in or on the substrate can be dissipated in a desired geometric pattern parallel to the fiber pattern. Additionally, the shunt capacitance of the fracture-resistant, fiber-reinforced ceramic substrate is lower which provides for a quicker transit time for electronic pulses in any conducting pathway etched into the ceramic substrate.

  11. Influence of Water Absorption on Volume Resistivity and the Dielectric Properties of Neat Epoxy Material

    KAUST Repository

    Sulaimani, Anwar Ali

    2014-07-15

    Influence of Water Absorption on the Dielectric Properties and Volume Resistivity of Neat Epoxy Material Anwar Ali Sulaimani Epoxy resins are widely used materials in the industry as electrical insulators, adhesives and in aircrafts structural components because of their high mechanical sti ness, strength and high temperature and chemical resistance properties. But still, the in uence of water uptake due to moisture adsorption is not fully understood as it detrimentally modi es the electrical and chemical properties of the material. Here, we investigate the in uence of water moisture uptake on the neat epoxy material by monitoring the change in the volume resistivity and dielectric properties of epoxy material at three di erent thickness con gurations: 0.250 mm, 0.50 mm and 1 mm thicknesses. Gravimetric analysis was done to monitor the mass uptake behaviour, Volume Resistivity was measured to monitor the change in conductivity of the material, and the dielectric properties were mapped to characterise the type of water mechanism available within the material during two ageing processes of sorption and desorption. Two-stage behaviours of di usion and reaction have been identi ed by the mass uptake analysis. Moreover, the plot of volume resistivity versus mass uptake has indi- cated a non-uniform relationship between the two quantities. However, the analysis of the dielectric spectrum at medium range of frequency and time has showed a change 5 in the dipolar activities and also showed the extent to which the water molecules can be segregated between bounding to the resin or existing as free water.

  12. Cavitation Erosion of Electro Spark Deposited Nitinol vs. Stellite Alloy on Stainless Steel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    lower proportion of carbon. The lower carbon content of SS-316L allows lower carbide precipitation for welding . Online Metals SS-2205 Duplex ...erosion, per ASTM G32. As a comparison, a known erosion-resistant, weld -friendly alloy called Stellite 6® was ESD’d and its cavitation erosion resistance...Microscopy was conducted to examine the metallurgical bond established by the ESD process. As a comparison, a known erosion resistant, weld

  13. Chemical resistance of valve packing and sealing materials to molten nitrate salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between a number of compression packings and sealing materials and molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate was evaluated at temperatures of 288 0 C (550 0 F), 400 0 C (750 0 F), and 565 0 C (1050 0 F). The types of packing materials tested included graphite, asbestos, PTFE, aramid, glass and ceramic fibers; perfluoroelastomers, and boron nitride. Several materials were chemically resistant to the molten salt at 288 0 C, but the compatibility of packings at 400 0 C and 565 0 C was not adequate. The chemical and physical phenomena affecting compatibility are discussed and recommendations concerning materials selection are made

  14. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the Rfactor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national...... and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based...

  15. Study on erosion behaviour of hybrid aluminium composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwas, D. K.; Chandrappa, C. N.; Venkatesh, Shreyas

    2018-04-01

    The origin of the light metals, as compared to other metals in this century, is noticeable and an exciting area of expansion for innovation. Light metals, are need of the day in engineering, among them application of aluminium and its alloys is enormous. we observe that these metals tend to have a progressive loss of metal from having contact surface with other metals. Erosion is one such wear process, where damage occurs by the repeated application of high localised stresses. Erosion due to impact of solid particle, is a significant problem. In the present work, the erosion behaviour of hybrid aluminium composite is studied. AL 6061 is used as the base alloy. AL 6061 alloy has excellent corrosion resistance but poor wear resistance. So, in order to have improved properties, it is reinforced with Tungsten Chromium Nickel powder in varied proportions by the method of stir casting. The results are compared with the as-cast Al-alloy to determine the improvement in mechanical properties. The tests were conducted in ASTM G76 setup, to determine solid particle erosion behaviour and the results of the hybrid composite were compared with that of as-cast AL 6061 alloy. It was evident that mass loss was maximum at 300 inclinations, which is a characteristic of ductile materials. It was observed that upon increasing the percentages of reinforcement (wt.%), the wear resistance of the hybrid composite increased significantly. It was also observed that the inclusion of tungsten-chromium-nickel powder increased the hardness of the hybrid composite significantly.

  16. A new approach for assessing the wear resistance of soft ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.; Banna, M.A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are the most versatile and attractive metallic materials which have been used for many decades in many engineering applications specially in the automobile and airspace industries due to their high strength-to- weight ratio, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, corrosion and wear resistances. Wear is the loss of material from a surface caused by interaction with another material. The main mechanisms of interaction are applied loads and relative motion, which can cause adhesion or/and abrasion, all of which leads to material loss. Therefore, most of the suggested methods, theoretical and empirical, for estimating the wear resistance of material is based on the mass loss, irrespective of the material or type of existing wear. Experimental observations reveal that in some situations, especially for soft and ductile materials, the tested specimen showed little or no mass loss while its dimensions and shape have suffered from plastic deformation which causes more damage than mass loss. Similar phenomenon was observed during electric spot welding of aluminum and zinc coated steels at the area beneath the electrode where plastic deformation takes place, causing increase in area which reduces the current density, will be also discussed in the paper. The amount of the plastic deformation, even when mentioned in some publications, was neglected in assessing wear resistance. In this paper, a model based on the plastic deformation at the worn end together with the mass loss is forwarded and discussed. The model was tested qualitatively using commercially pure aluminum of 99.97% purity in the as supplied condition and in grain refined conditions by some rare earth materials e.g. titanium and titanium plus boron, which are normally used in industry for improving its hardness and mechanical behavior. The wear tests were carried out under different loads and speeds (the main parameters in assessing wear resistance) and the data was used for

  17. Rutting and Fatigue Cracking Resistance of Waste Cooking Oil Modified Trinidad Asphaltic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rean Maharaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of waste cooking oil (WCO on the performance characteristics of asphaltic materials indigenous to Trinidad, namely, Trinidad Lake Asphalt (TLA, Trinidad Petroleum Bitumen (TPB, and TLA : TPB (50 : 50 blend, was investigated to deduce the applicability of the WCO as a performance enhancer for the base asphalt. The rheological properties of complex modulus (G∗ and phase angle (δ were measured for modified base asphalt blends containing up to 10% WCO. The results of rheology studies demonstrated that the incremental addition of WCO to the three parent binders resulted in incremental decreases in the rutting resistance (decrease in G∗/sinδ values and increases in the fatigue cracking resistance (decrease in G∗sinδ value. The fatigue cracking resistance and rutting resistance for the TLA : TPB (50 : 50 blends were between those of the blends containing pure TLA and TPB. As operating temperature increased, an increase in the resistance to fatigue cracking and a decrease in the rutting resistance were observed for all of the WCO modified asphaltic blends. This study demonstrated the capability to create customized asphalt-WCO blends to suit special applications and highlights the potential for WCO to be used as an environmentally attractive option for improving the use of Trinidad asphaltic materials.

  18. Effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking resistance of organic insulating materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Boxue; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Shigeo [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the influence of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure of organic insulating materials by use of the IEC Publ.112 method. Tracking resistance of organic insulating materials under wet polluted condition has been studied by many investigators with a test method of the IEC Publ.112. The investigations on irradiation effects on tracking resistance should be enhanced due to the increasing usage of organic insulating materials in the radiation environments. The tracking resistance seems to be affected by gamma-irradiation, but the knowledge on the influence of gamma-irradiation is quite a few and systematic studies are needed. In this paper, modified polyphenylene oxide, polybutylene naphthalate, modified polycarbonate and polybutylene terephthalate which were irradiated in air until 1x10{sup 7}R and 1x10{sup 8}R with dose rate of 10{sup 6}R/hr using {sup 60}Co gamma-source have been employed. The total dose effects on the number of drops to tracking failure, contact angle and charges of scintillation have been studied. As the total doses are increased, the number of drops to tracking failure decreases with polybutylene terephthalate. On the other hand, the number of drops to tracking failure increases with polybutylene naphthalate and modified polycarbonate when the total doses are increased. The effects of gamma-rays irradiation on tracking failure are due to radiation-induced degradation or cross-linking of organic insulating materials. When the organic insulating materials are degraded by gamma-irradiation, the tracking resistance decreases, but for cross-linking type materials, the tracking resistance increases. (author)

  19. Cavitation erosion - corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 runner steel in natural river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tôn-Thât, L

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation erosion is still one of the most important degradation modes in hydraulic turbine runners. Part of researches in this field focuses on finding new materials, coatings and surface treatments to improve the resistance properties of runners to this phenomenon. However, only few studies are focused on the deleterious effect of the environment. Actually, in some cases a synergistic effect between cavitation erosion mechanisms and corrosion kinetics can establish and increase erosion rate. In the present study, the cavitation erosion-corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 steel in natural river water is investigated. This paper state the approach which has been used to enlighten the synergy between both phenomena. For this, a 20 kHz vibratory test according ASTM G32 standard is coupled to an electrochemical cell to be able to follow the different corrosion parameters during the tests to get evidence of the damaging mechanism. Moreover, mass losses have been followed during the exposure time. The classical degradation parameters (cumulative weight loss and erosion rate) are determined. Furthermore, a particular effort has been implemented to determine the evolution of surface damages in terms of pitting, surface cracking, material removal and surface corrosion. For this, scanning electron microscopy has been used to link the microstructure to the material removal mechanisms

  20. Resistance of gloves and protective clothing materials to permeation of cytostatic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Pośniak, Małgorzata; Szewczyńska, Małgorzata

    2018-01-15

    The objective of the work was to determine the resistance of selected protective clothing and glove materials to permeation of cytostatics such as docetaxel, fluorouracil, and doxorubicin. The following glove materials were used: natural rubber latex (code A), acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (code B) and chloroprene rubber (code C). In addition, we tested a layered material composed of a non-woven polyester (PES), a polypropylene (PP) film, and a non-woven PP used for protective coats (code D). The cytostatics were analyzed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The tested samples were placed in a purpose-built permeation cell modified to be different from that specified in the standard EN 6529:2001. The tested materials were characterized by good resistance to solutions containing 2 out of the 3 selected cytostatics: doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil, as indicated by a breakthrough time of over 480 min. Equally high resistance to permeation of the third cytostatic (docetaxel) was exhibited by natural rubber latex, acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber, and chloroprene rubber. However, docetaxel permeated much more readily through the clothing layered material, compromising its barrier properties. It was found that the presence of additional components in cytostatic preparations accelerated permeation through material samples, thus deteriorating their barrier properties. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(3):341-350. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Evaluation of air jet erosion profiles in metal mesh supported SCR plate catalyst based on glass fiber concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajath, S.; Nandakishora, Y.; Siddaraju, C.; Roy, Sukumar

    2018-04-01

    This paper explains the evaluation of erosion profiles in metal mesh supported SCR plate catalyst structures in which the glass fibers concentration in the catalyst material is considered as prime factor for erosion resistance and mechanical strength. The samples are prepared and tested at the specified and constant conditions like velocity as 30m/s, sand flow rate as 2g/min, average particle diameter 300 µm and all these samples were tested at different angles at impact preferably 15°,30°,45°,60°,75°,and 90° as per ASTM G76 standards. Say, if 5% glass fibers are present in catalyst material, then erosion resistance increases, but the density of glass fibers is very less because each glass fiber is approximately 20 microns in diameter and weight of individual is negligible. The composition in which 2% fiber is present has slightly higher erosion comparatively, but 3% glass fibers or more foreign inclusion like excessive binders can be eliminated that contributes much for the conversion of NOx. So 2% -3% glass fibers are preferred and optimized based on NOx conversion and erosion resistance property.

  2. The water erosion processes in the retreat erosive of cliff on soft rocks in the province of Cadiz (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon Aragon, J. J.; Gracia Prieto, F. J.; Rio Rodriguez, L. del

    2009-01-01

    The littoral cliffs on soft materials of the Atlantic Cadiz coast show an important activity of the fresh water erosion processes, sometimes even more significant than the marine erosion processes. The connection of the lower cliffs with sandy beaches favours aeolian sand invasion, which fills previous rills and reduces the water erosion intensity by increasing infiltration. Cliff retreat and rill erosion measurement by using erosion sticks has shown very variables values, most of them higher than the estimated error of the employed methods. This indicates the existence of other factors influencing the distribution of water erosion processes along these cliffs, which have to be studied through different techniques. (Author) 5 refs.

  3. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  4. Investigation of Resistance to Mechanical Effect of Braille Formed on Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrida VENYTĖ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative analysis of stresses emerged in paperboard during Braille embossing, using specialized polarimetric equipment, was carried out. Resistance to mechanical effect of Braille dot surfaces, formed with different printing types on different materials (paper, paperboard, polymer, textile, Al foil was investigated. It was determined that Braille dot height change after period mechanical effect is different.

  5. HBCUs as Sites of Resistance: The Malignity of Materialism, Western Masculinity, and Spiritual Malefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Ty-Ron M. O.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the author challenges stakeholders (i.e., administrators, educators, students) of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to examine how HBCUs can continue to serve as sites of resistance against the prevailing cultural norms of materialism, Western masculinity, and spiritual malefaction. The author traces his…

  6. A comparison of fatigue resistance of three materials for cusp-replacing adhesive restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijs, R.H.; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the fatigue resistance and failure behaviour of cusp-replacing restorations in premolars using different types of adhesive restorative materials. METHODS: A class 2 cavity was prepared and the buccal cusp was removed in an extracted sound human upper premolar. By using a

  7. The effect of air permeability of chemical protective clothing material on clothing vapour resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, G.; Vuister, R.; Wammes, L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with Chemical Warfare Protective Clothing (CW) is the additional heat load created by the garments. For CW-overgarments, research in the direction of reducing material thickness and thus heat and vapour resistance have not resulted in major improvements. The

  8. Corrosion resistance of metallic materials for use in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legry, J.P.; Pelras, M.; Turluer, G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the corrosion resistance properties required from metallic materials to be used in the various developments of the PUREX process for nuclear fuel reprocessing. Stainless steels, zirconium or titanium base alloys are considered for the various plant components, where nitric acid is the main electrolyte with differing acid and nitrate concentrations, temperature and oxidizing species. (author)

  9. PRODUCTION OF POROUS POWDER MATERIALS OF SPHERICAL POWDERS OF CORROSION-RESISTANT STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevskij

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of porous powder materials from spherical powders of corrosion-resistant steel 12Х18н10Т with formation at low pressures 120–140 mpa in the mold with the subsequent activated sintering became possible due to increase of duration of process of spattering and formation of condensate particles (Si–C or (Mo–Si on surface.

  10. Fracture resistance of direct inlay-retained adhesive bridges : Effect of pontic material and occlusal morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuklander, Marijn; Salihoglu-Yener, Esra; Ozcan, Mutlu

    This study evaluated the effect of a) pontic materials and b) occlusal morphologies on the fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Inlay-retained FRC FPDs (N=45, n=9) were constructed using a) resin composite (deep anatomy), b) natural

  11. Effect of corrosion protective coatings on compressor blades affected by different erosive exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happle, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    It was the task of this dissertation to examine and to classify the inorganically bonded aluminum coatings with regard to their suitability as a coating for compressor blades for stationary gas turbines and aerojet engines. Industrial aluminum coatings bonded inorganically were used for the tests. Comparative examinations were done with diffusion-deposited aluminum layers as well as with aluminum layers precipitated electrolytically, and with modified inorganically bonded aluminum coatings (with additional TiN protective coating). The examination program was subdivided into two main tasks: Suitability tests and examination of corrosion fatigue. The suitability tests covered corrosion examinations (with salt spray and intermittent immersion tests), electrochemically controlled corrosion assessments (pitting corrosion behavior) and erosion assessments (erosive and abrasive wear tests). Experimental material was mainly the commercial compressor blade steel X20Cr13, and sample tests were carried out with the higher-strength steel X10CrNiMoV12 2 2. For the practical examination of the erosion resistance of the aluminum coatings, it was required to develop an erosion testing method. It was designed as an erosive and abrasive wear testing method with solid-face fluidized bed. The testing method makes it possible to pre-set all relevant quantities which influence the erosive and abrasive wear. (orig./MM) [de

  12. Experiment of cavitation erosion at the exit of a long orifice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Yoshinori; Murase, Michio [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We performed experiments to clarify mechanism of cavitation erosion and to predict cavitation erosion rate at the exit of a long orifice equipped at the chemical and volume control system in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to find this mechanism, we used a high speed video camera. As the result, we observed bubble collapses near the exit of the orifice when flow condition was oscillating. So the bubble collapses due to the oscillation might cause the first stage erosion at the exit of the orifice. Using the orifice which had the cone-shaped exit, we observed that bubbles collapsed near the exit and then they collapsed at the upstream like a chain reaction. So this bubble collapse mechanism could be explained as follows: shock wave was generated by the bubble collapse near the exit, then it propagated upwards, consequently it caused the bubble collapse at the upstream. And we predicted erosion rate by evaluating the effect of the velocity and comparing the erosion resistance between the test speciment (aluminum) and the plant material (stainless steel) by means of vibratory tests. We compared the predicted erosion rate with that of the average value estimated from plant investigation, then we examined the applicability of these method to the plant evaluations. (author)

  13. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  14. [Applications of self-renewing coatings to improved vacuum materials, hydrogen permeation barriers and sputter-resistant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of Gibbsian segregation, radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation modify the surface composition and properties of alloys and compounds. In some cases, the change in properties is both substantial and useful, the most notable example being that of stainless steel. When surface-modifying phenomena are investigated as a class, a number of additional materials emerge as candidates for study, having potential applications in a number of technologically important areas. These materials are predicted to produce self-sustaining coatings which provide hydrogen permeation barriers, low-sticking and stimulated desorption coefficients for vacuum applications, and low-Z, sputtering-resistant surfaces for fusion applications. Several examples of each type of material are presented, along with a discussion of the experimental verification of their properties and the status of the corresponding applications development program

  15. Evaluating the attractiveness of nuclear material for proliferation-resistance and nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Ikegame, Kou; Kuno, Yusuke

    2011-01-01

    The attractiveness of nuclear material, defined as a function of the isotopic composition of the nuclear material in formulas expressing the material's intrinsic properties, is of considerably debate in recent developments of proliferation-resistance measures of a nuclear energy system. A reason for such debate arises from the fact that the concept of nuclear material attractiveness can be confusing because the desirability of a material for nuclear explosive use depends on many tangible and intangible factors including the intent and capability of the adversary. In addition, a material that is unattractive to an advanced nation (in the case of proliferation) may be very attractive to a terrorist (in the case of physical protection and nuclear security). Hence, the concept of 'Nuclear Material Attractiveness' for different nuclear materials must be considered in the context of safeguards and security. The development of a ranking scheme on the attractiveness of nuclear materials could be a useful concept to start-off the strategies for safeguards and security on a new footing (i.e., why and how nuclear material is attractive, and what are the quantifiable basis). Japan may benefit from such concept regarding the attractiveness of nuclear materials when recovering nuclear materials from the damaged cores in Fukushima because safety, security, and safeguards (3S) would be a prominent consideration for the recovery operation, and it would be the first time such operation is performed in a non-nuclear weapons state. (author)

  16. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  17. Mapping erosion from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is the most important land degradation problem worldwide. Spatial information on erosion is required for defining effective soil and water conservation strategies. Satellite remote sensing can provide relevant input to regional erosion assessment. This thesis comprises a review

  18. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  19. Assessing storm erosion hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.; Ciavola, Paolo; Coco, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can

  20. Evaluation of fatigue crack growth and fracture resistance of SA350 LF2 material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.K.; Dubey, J.S.; Chakrabarty, J.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the SA350 LF2 carbon steel material used as the Header material in the primary heat transport (PHT) system piping of the Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). Tensile, fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been carried out on specimens machined from the Header of the actual PHT pipes. The effect of temperature on tensile properties has been discussed. The effect of temperature and notch orientation on fracture resistance behavior of the material and fatigue crack growth rate dependence on the notch orientation and stress ratio has also been discussed. (author)

  1. Kinetics of non-equilibrium carries in high-resistance materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, V.I.; Rudenko, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of equilibrium carriers of high-resistance material samples is analytically studied to investigate and control the parameters and properties of these materials. Nonequilibrium carriers were generated by electron beam in these samples near by one of the contacts. The carrier drift causes the transient current. The study of it permits to make a conclusion about carrier mobility, their capture and release times and also about zone structure of material. Both the model taking into account energy-level transitions and the model taking into account the conduction zone interaction with local energy- level are shown to have features of anomalous behaviour

  2. Characterization of fatigue resistance in photochromic composite materials for 3D rewritable optical memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoylova, Elena; Dallari, William; Allione, Marco; Pignatelli, Francesca; Marini, Lara; Cingolani, Roberto; Diaspro, Alberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Fatigue resistance of diarylethene–polymer composites was tested with optical absorption and fluorescence methods upon repetitive UV–VIS irradiation. • Significant differences in fatigue were found in different polymeric matrices and in one-photon and two-photon excitation experiments. • Several explanations for fatigue resistance of the composites are proposed based on the physico-chemical properties of the diarylethenes and polymeric matrices. -- Abstract: Fatigue resistance of the photochromic diarylethene molecules 1,2-bis[2-methylbenzo[b]thyophen-3-yl] -3,3,4,4,5,5-hexafluoro-1-cyclopentene embedded in three different acrylic polymers is studied upon multiple coloration–decoloration cycles. The resistance to photofatigue is found to be different in the three polymeric materials when one-photon excitation was used for the reversible photoconversion experiment. In particular, the photochromic molecules lose their photoisomerization ability faster if they are embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with respect to poly(ethyl methacrylate-co-methyl acrylate) (PEMMA) and poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA). We propose several explanations based on the physico-chemical properties of the matrix and of the photochromic molecules. In the case of two-photon excitation, which is necessary for 3D optical writing, the fatigue resistance is found to be poorer than in the one-photon case. The accelerated photodegradation can be assigned to the non-linear nature of interaction between the polymeric composite material and light

  3. Characterization of fatigue resistance in photochromic composite materials for 3D rewritable optical memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoylova, Elena, E-mail: Elena.Samoylova@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Dallari, William; Allione, Marco; Pignatelli, Francesca; Marini, Lara; Cingolani, Roberto; Diaspro, Alberto [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Athanassiou, Athanassia, E-mail: athanassia.athanassiou@iit.it [Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies-Unile, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Barsanti, 73010 Arnesano, Lecce (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: • Fatigue resistance of diarylethene–polymer composites was tested with optical absorption and fluorescence methods upon repetitive UV–VIS irradiation. • Significant differences in fatigue were found in different polymeric matrices and in one-photon and two-photon excitation experiments. • Several explanations for fatigue resistance of the composites are proposed based on the physico-chemical properties of the diarylethenes and polymeric matrices. -- Abstract: Fatigue resistance of the photochromic diarylethene molecules 1,2-bis[2-methylbenzo[b]thyophen-3-yl] -3,3,4,4,5,5-hexafluoro-1-cyclopentene embedded in three different acrylic polymers is studied upon multiple coloration–decoloration cycles. The resistance to photofatigue is found to be different in the three polymeric materials when one-photon excitation was used for the reversible photoconversion experiment. In particular, the photochromic molecules lose their photoisomerization ability faster if they are embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with respect to poly(ethyl methacrylate-co-methyl acrylate) (PEMMA) and poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA). We propose several explanations based on the physico-chemical properties of the matrix and of the photochromic molecules. In the case of two-photon excitation, which is necessary for 3D optical writing, the fatigue resistance is found to be poorer than in the one-photon case. The accelerated photodegradation can be assigned to the non-linear nature of interaction between the polymeric composite material and light.

  4. Electric Resistance Tests on Compacted Clay Material under Dynamic Load Coupled with Dry-Wet Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of compacted clay material under dynamic load coupled with dry-wet cycling is one of the most important areas in the field of transportation. In this paper, experiments in terms of compacted clay under dynamic load coupled with dry-wet cycling are performed, and synchronous resistivity tests are also conducted. According to the test results, the influences of cumulative plastic strain, dry-wet cycles, and amplitudes on the soil resistivity are analyzed. Then a new damage factor based on resistivity is proposed to evaluate the long-term performance of compacted clay material. The result of research shows that the evolution of the soil resistivity can be divided into two stages, which has a contrary tendency with that of cumulative plastic strain. The dry-wet cycles and amplitudes have a significant effect on the damage of the compacted soil, which indicates that the dry-wet cycling of compacted soil materials should not be ignored in road engineering, especially in rainy and humid areas.

  5. Non-ferrous metals, anorganic and organic materials resistent to fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauffe, K.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminium and its alloys are resistant in fluoride solutions up to 400 K. Aluminium is also a suitable reactor material for the thermal decomposition of acidic fluorides between 750 and 825 K. Brass corrodes at room temperature in a 0,1 m KF solution with and without inhibitors very slowly ( -1 ). Nickel and the nickel alloys Inconel 600, Hastelloy N and Monel 500 are the most resistant materials against fluoride solutions and melts. A similar behavior exhibit zirconium-titanium-iron and zirconium-titanium-molybdenum alloys, respectively. From the inorganic compounds, compressed graphite, Al 2 O 3 and hexaborides of earth and rare earth metals, particularly LaB 6 , are extraordinarily resistant against fluorine ions at high temperatures. If the reaction temperature remains below 370 K, then polymers and resins, e.g. polyolefines, PVC, acrylic and epoxy resins and fluorcarbon resins can be employed as coating or compound material (resin + carbon fibers) resistant against fluorine ions up to 370 K. (orig.) [de

  6. Effect that radiation exerts to insulation breakdown of heat resistant polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Baba, Makoto; Noto, Fumitoshi; Ruike, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial satellites are always exposed to cosmic rays which contain the radiations which do not reach the ground, therefore, the radiation resistance of the polymer insulators for cables and others used in such environment becomes a problem. Also the polymer insulator materials used for nuclear facilities require excellent radiation resistance. It is important to examine the effect that radiation exerts to electric insulation characteristics from the viewpoint of material development. In this paper, the insulation breakdown characteristics of heat resistant polymer films and the mini-cables made for trial of heat resistant polymer materials in the case without irradiation and in the case of gamma ray irradiation, and the results of the structural analysis are reported. The specimens tested, the experimental method and the results are described. The insulation breakdown strength of PFA and FEP films lowered from 0.15-0.2 MGy, but that of PEEK film did not change up to 5 MGy. It was found that fluorine group resins were apt to deteriorate by oxidation as dose increased. (K.I.)

  7. Impact resistance of sustainable construction material using light weight oil palm shells reinforced geogrid concrete slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muda, Z C; Usman, F; Beddu, S; Alam, M A; Mustapha, K N; Birima, A H; Sidek, L M; Rashid, M A; Malik, G; Zarroq, O S

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigate the performance of lightweight oil palm shells (OPS) concrete slab with geogrid reinforcement of 300mm × 300mm size with 20mm, 30mm and 40 mm thick casted with different geogrid orientation and boundary conditions subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.2 kg drop at 1 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance the slab thickness, boundary conditions and geogrid reinforcement orientation. Test results indicate that the used of the geogrid reinforcement increased the impact resistance under service (first) limit crack up to 5.9 times and at ultimate limit crack up to 20.1 times against the control sample (without geogrid). A good linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against the slab thickness. The orientation of the geogrid has minor significant to the crack resistance of the OPS concrete slab. OPS geogrid reinforced slab has a good crack resistance properties that can be utilized as a sustainable impact resistance construction materials.

  8. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  9. Development of bushing material with higher corrosion and wear resistance; Taishoku taimamosei dogokin bush zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kira, T; Yokota, H; Kamiya, S [Taiho Kogyo Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Recent diesel engines require a higher performance and a longer life. Due to higher cylinder pressure, the operating load and temperature of piston pin bushings become higher. Therefore, higher load capacity, higher wear resistance and higher corrosion resistance are required for piston pin bushings. For this reason, we have studied the effect of components added to copper alloy upon the corrosion resistance and the effect of hard particles dispersed in copper matrix upon the wear resistance and the influence of hard particles on the machinablity of materials. Based on the experimental results, we have developed a new bushing material improving wear and corrosion resistance. 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Resistance to ionizing radiations of materials installed at the CERN accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbacher, H.

    1982-01-01

    All materials installed in high energy accelerators along the lines of primary and secondary beams are exposed to ionizing radiation. This can in certain cases cause a degradation of the properties of these materials and consequently affect the good function of the installation. The author has taken at CERN large number of samples of materials in order to determine their radioresistance. Generally the organic materials and the electronic components are more sensitive to ionizing radiation. The author presents the results of these studies which concern the isolations of the cables (polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, caoutchouc ethylene propylene, etc.), the isolations for the magnets on the base of epoxy resins, as well as other thermoresistant and thermoplastic products. The author equally presents a choice of materials and components which are used at CERN and which are resistant to radiations above an integral dose of 10 7 -10 8 Gy. (orig.)

  11. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  12. A simple approach to measure the surface resistivity of insulating materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    A simple approach for measuring high surface resistivity of insulating materials using standard laboratory equipments is proposed. The developed system consists of a DC power transformer, a concentric ring probe assembly and a digital multi-meter. The DC power transformer can provide either 500V ...... for different materials, source voltages, and serially connected resistors. The testing results showed that the developed system and methods can provide a reasonably accurate measurement of surface resistivity of insulating materials in a robust and economic manner.......A simple approach for measuring high surface resistivity of insulating materials using standard laboratory equipments is proposed. The developed system consists of a DC power transformer, a concentric ring probe assembly and a digital multi-meter. The DC power transformer can provide either 500V...... or 250V DC signal. The probe assembly is constructed according to Danish Standard (DS/EN 1149-1:2006). The multi-meter (Agilent 3440 1A 6½) is used to measure the micro voltage over a known resistor which is serially connected with electrodes in the probe assembly. In order to obtain reliable...

  13. Water-Resistant Material from Recovered Fibers and Acrylic Emulsion Terpolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Styrene (SM, methyl methacrylate (MMA, and butyl acrylate (BA were used to synthesize a polyacrylic emulsion by core-shell emulsion polymerization. The solid content of the emulsion reached 40% using reasonable reactive emulsifier contents and feeding modes. Then, the emulsion and a fiber were dispersed, coated, and dried together. Finally, fiber-based water-resistant material was successfully fabricated. The experimental results showed that under the conditions of a monomer mass ratio of 1:1:1 and a mass ratio of polyacrylic emulsion to fiber of 2:1, the Cobb value of the material reached 5.0 g/m2. The tensile strength, elongation, and breaking length were 7.4225 kN/m, 1.0%, and 11.706 km, respectively. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM to analyze the surface morphology and internal structure of products, the reasons for the high water resistance of fiber-based material was due to the bonding and filling effects of the polyacrylic emulsion on the fibers. For tightly bound fibers, the porous structures formed in fiber-based boards were reduced. On the other hand, the polyacrylic emulsion filled the gaps between fibers. This filling effect led to a continuous structure, and the water resistance of the material was further enhanced.

  14. Transient and steady-state erosion of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasek, K.R. [Allied Signal Research and Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Whalen, P.J. [Allied Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); Rateick, R.G. Jr. [Allied Signal Aerospace, South Bend, IN (United States); Hamilton, A.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Routbort, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Relative to most other materials silicon nitride is very erosion resistant. However, the resulting surface flaws degrade strength - a serious concern for component designers. AlliedSignal Ceramic Components GS-44 in-situ reinforced silicon nitride was eroded in a slinger apparatus. Both transient (extremely low level) and steady-state erosion regimes were investigated. Alumina particles with effective average diameters of 140 Jim and 63 {mu}m were used at velocities of 50 m/s, 100 m/s, and 138 m/s. Biaxial tensile strength was measured. Strength decreased by about 15% after a very small erodent dosage and then remained virtually constant with further erosion. In-situ reinforcement produces R-curve behavior in which the fracture toughness increases with crack size. The effect of this is quite dramatic with strength loss being significantly less than expected for a normal silicon nitride with constant fracture toughness.

  15. A study on erosive wear behavior of HVOF sprayed nanostructured WC-CoCr coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-01-01

    WC-CoCr cermet coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrate using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The coatings were developed with two different thermal spray powders: one has WC grains of conventional micron size and the other is composed of nanosized (near-nanostructured) grains. HVOF spraying was assisted with in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system to control the process parameters that have resulted in quality coatings. Cavitation erosion testing was performed using a vibratory test apparatus based on ASTM standard G32-98. Surface morphology of powders and coatings was examined using the FESEM images, and phase identification was performed by XRD analysis. The erosion behavior of coatings and mechanism of material removal was discussed by examining the microstructure images of worn-out surfaces. WC-CoCr cermet coating deposited with nanosized WC grains exhibited higher cavitation erosion resistance as compared to conventional coating.

  16. A study on erosive wear behavior of HVOF sprayed nanostructured WC-CoCr coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee (India)

    2013-05-15

    WC-CoCr cermet coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrate using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The coatings were developed with two different thermal spray powders: one has WC grains of conventional micron size and the other is composed of nanosized (near-nanostructured) grains. HVOF spraying was assisted with in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system to control the process parameters that have resulted in quality coatings. Cavitation erosion testing was performed using a vibratory test apparatus based on ASTM standard G32-98. Surface morphology of powders and coatings was examined using the FESEM images, and phase identification was performed by XRD analysis. The erosion behavior of coatings and mechanism of material removal was discussed by examining the microstructure images of worn-out surfaces. WC-CoCr cermet coating deposited with nanosized WC grains exhibited higher cavitation erosion resistance as compared to conventional coating.

  17. Resistance of HEPA filter separator materials to humid air--hydrogen fluoride--fluorine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, C.W.; Petit, G.S.; Woodfin, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    The U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) is interested in the development of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter that is resistant to such corrosive reagents as hydrogen fluoride (HF) and fluorine (F 2 ) in air environments of normal relative humidity (about 50% RH). Several types of separator materials are used in the fabrication of commercial filters. The basic types of separator materials are asbestos, Kraft paper, plastic, and aluminum. At the request of the ERDA Division of Operational Safety, the different types of separator materials have been evaluated for their resistance to corrosive attack by HF and F 2 . The separator materials were dynamically tested in the 4-stage multiunit tester located in the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant laboratories. This is the system previously used in the evaluation of the Herty Foundation filter paper samples. Concurrent with the testing of filter media for its resistance to HF and F 2 , another component of the completed filter, the separator, was tested. All samples were exposed to a constant air flow (50% RH) of 32 liters/min, at 100 0 F, containing 900 ppM HF and 300 ppM F 2 . Exposure periods varied from 2 to 1000 h; however, the longer exposures were made only on the stronger candidates. Test results show the plastic and aluminum separator materials to be superior to the other types in resistance to HF and F 2 . The asbestos separators disintegrated after a relatively short exposure time; the Kraft paper types were the next weakest. The Clear Plastic S was the best performer of the plastics tested

  18. Electronic structure, excitation properties, and chemical transformations of extreme ultra-violet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Narasimhan, Amrit; Brainard, Robert L.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of extreme ultra violet resist materials and of their individual components, two polymers and two photoacid generators (PAGs), is studied using a combination of x-ray and UV photoemission spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab-initio techniques. It is shown that simple molecular models can be used to understand the electronic structure of each sample and describe the experimental data. Additionally, effects directly relevant to the photochemical processes are observed: low energy loss processes are observed for the phenolic polymer containing samples that should favor thermalization of electrons; PAG segregation is measured at the surface of the resist films that could lead to surface inhomogeneities; both PAGs are found to be stable upon irradiation in the absence of the polymer, contrasting with a high reactivity that can be followed upon x-ray irradiation of the full resist.

  19. Nanoscale inhomogeneity and photoacid generation dynamics in extreme ultraviolet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping-Jui; Wang, Yu-Fu; Chen, Wei-Chi; Wang, Chien-Wei; Cheng, Joy; Chang, Vencent; Chang, Ching-Yu; Lin, John; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2018-03-01

    The development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography towards the 22 nm node and beyond depends critically on the availability of resist materials that meet stringent control requirements in resolution, line edge roughness, and sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern the structure-function relationships in current EUV resist systems are not well understood. In particular, the nanoscale structures of the polymer base and the distributions of photoacid generators (PAGs) should play a critical roles in the performance of a resist system, yet currently available models for photochemical reactions in EUV resist systems are exclusively based on homogeneous bulk models that ignore molecular-level details of solid resist films. In this work, we investigate how microscopic molecular organizations in EUV resist affect photoacid generations in a bottom-up approach that describes structure-dependent electron-transfer dynamics in a solid film model. To this end, molecular dynamics simulations and stimulated annealing are used to obtain structures of a large simulation box containing poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) base polymers and triphenylsulfonium based PAGs. Our calculations reveal that ion-pair interactions govern the microscopic distributions of the polymer base and PAG molecules, resulting in a highly inhomogeneous system with nonuniform nanoscale chemical domains. Furthermore, the theoretical structures were used in combination of quantum chemical calculations and the Marcus theory to evaluate electron transfer rates between molecular sites, and then kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to model electron transfer dynamics with molecular structure details taken into consideration. As a result, the portion of thermalized electrons that are absorbed by the PAGs and the nanoscale spatial distribution of generated acids can be estimated. Our data reveal that the nanoscale inhomogeneous distributions of base polymers and PAGs strongly affect the

  20. Eco-friendly electron beam lithography using water-developable resist material derived from biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Oshima, Akihiro; Wakabayashi, Takanori; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the eco-friendly electron beam (EB) lithography using a high-sensitive negative type of water-developable resist material derived from biomass on hardmask layer for tri-layer processes. A water developable, non-chemically amplified, high sensitive, and negative tone resist material in EB lithography was developed for environmental affair, safety, easiness of handling, and health of the working people, instead of the common developable process of trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide. The images of 200 nm line and 800 nm space pattern with exposure dose of 7.0 μC/cm2 and CF4 etching selectivity of 2.2 with hardmask layer were provided by specific process conditions.

  1. Proliferation Resistance and Material Type considerations within the Collaborative Project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, Guido; Alim, Fatih; Cojazzi, Giacomo GM.

    2015-01-01

    The collaborative project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP‑ESFR) is an international project where 25 European partners developed Research & Development solutions and concepts for a European sodium fast reactor. The project was funded by the 7. European Union Framework Programme and covered topics such as the reactor architectures and components, the fuel, the fuel element and the fuel cycle, and the safety concepts. Within sub‑project 3, dedicated to safety, a task addressed proliferation resistance considerations. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP) Evaluation Methodology has been selected as the general framework for this work, complemented by punctual aspects of the IAEA‑INPRO Proliferation Resistance methodology and other literature studies - in particular for material type characterization. The activity has been carried out taking the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology and its Addendum as the general guideline for identifying potential nuclear material diversion targets. The targets proliferation attractiveness has been analyzed in terms of the suitability of the targets’ nuclear material as the basis for its use in nuclear explosives. To this aim the PR and PP Fissile Material Type measure was supplemented by other literature studies, whose related metrics have been applied to the nuclear material items present in the considered core alternatives. This paper will firstly summarize the main ESFR design aspects relevant for PR following the structure of the GIF PR and PP White Paper template. An analysis on proliferation targets is then discussed, with emphasis on their characterization from a nuclear material point of view. Finally, a high‑level ESFR PR analysis according to the four main proliferation strategies identified by the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology (concealed diversion, concealed misuse, breakout, clandestine production in clandestine facilities) is

  2. On inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölla, Gunnar; Jonski, Grazyna; Saxegaard, Erik

    2013-11-01

    To examine the erosion-inhibiting effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. Thirty-six human molars were individually treated with 10 ml of 0.1 M citric acid for 30 min (Etch 1), acid was collected and stored until analysis. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups and then individually treated with 10 ml of one of six dilutions (from 0.1-1%) of hydrofluoric acid. The teeth were then again treated with citric acid (Etch 2). The individual acid samples from Etch 1 and 2 were analyzed for calcium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and difference in calcium loss was calculated. The highest erosion inhibiting effect was obtained in groups with the highest concentrations of hydrofluoric acid, where the pH was lowest, below pKa of 3.17, thus the hydrofluoric acids being mainly in an undissociated state. Diluted hydrofluoric acid is present in aqueous solution of SnF2 and TiF4 (which are known to inhibit dental erosion): SnF2 + 3H2O = Sn(OH)2 + 2HF + H2O and TiF4 + 5H2O = Ti(OH)4 + 4HF + H2O. It is also known that pure, diluted hydrofluoric acid can inhibit dental erosion. Teeth treated with hydrofluoric acid are covered by a layer of CaF2-like mineral. This mineral is acid resistant at pH acid resistant mineral, initiated by tooth enamel treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is different in having fluoride as a conjugated base, which provides this acid with unique properties.

  3. Development of low-pH cementitious materials for HLRW repositories. Resistance against ground waters aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Calvo, Jose Luis; Hidalgo, A.; Fernandez Luco, L.; Alonso Alonso, Maria Cruz

    2010-01-01

    One of the most accepted engineering construction concepts of underground repositories for high radioactive waste considers the use of low-pH cementitious materials. This paper deals with the design of those based on Ordinary Portland Cements with high contents of silica fume and/or fly ashes that modify most of the concrete “standard” properties, the pore fluid composition and the microstructure of the hydrated products. Their resistance to long-term groundwater aggression is also evaluated....

  4. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  5. Thermal shock resistances of a bonding material of C/C composite and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Akira; Oku, Tatsuo; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Motojima, Osamu; Noda, Nobuaki; McEnaney, B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the development and the safety design of plasma facing components for fusion reactor devices. We evaluated the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of a bonding material which was jointed a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) to oxygen-free copper. We also examined the microstructures of the bonding layers using a scanning electron microscope before and after thermal shock tests. The bonding material did not fracture during thermal shock tests. However, thermal cracks and delamination cracks were observed in the bonding layers. (author)

  6. Enhancing wear resistance of working bodies of grinder through lining crushed material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovich, A. A.; Annenko, D. M.; Romanovich, M. A.; Apukhtina, I. V.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents the analysis of directions of increasing wear resistance of working surfaces of rolls. A technical solution developed at the level of the invention is proposed, which is simple to implement in production conditions and which makes it possible to protect the roll surface from heavy wear due to surfacing of wear-resistant mesh material, cells of which are filling with grinding material in the process of work. Retaining them enables one to protect the roll surface from wear. The paper dwells on conditions of pressing materials in cells of eccentric rolls on the working surface with a grid of rectangular shape. The paper presents an equation for calculation of the cell dimension that provides the lining of the working surface by a mill material with respect to its properties. The article presents results of comparative studies on the grinding process of a press roller grinder (PRG) between rolls with and without a fusion-bonded mesh. It is clarified that the lining of rolls working surface slightly reduces the quality of the grinding, since the material thickness in the cell is small and has a finely divided and compacted structure with high strength.

  7. Development of heat resistant geopolymer-based materials from red mud and rice husk ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Nguyen Hoc; Nhung, Le Thuy; Quyen, Pham Vo Thi Ha; Phong, Dang Thanh; Khe, Dao Thanh; Van Phuc, Nguyen

    2018-04-01

    Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite developed by Joseph Davidovits in 1970s. Such material has potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC)-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in this study, red mud and rice husk ash were used as raw materials for geopolymeric production, which are aluminum industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their negative impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash were mixed with sodium silicate (water glass) solution to form geopolymer paste. The geopolymer paste was filled into 5-cm cube molds according to ASTM C109/C109M 99, and then cured at room temperature for 28 days. These products were then tested for compressive strength and volumetric weight. Results indicated that the material can be considered lightweight with a compressive strength at 28 days that are in the range of 6.8 to 15.5 MPa. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000oC for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength from 262% to 417% after exposed at high temperature.

  8. A setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiong, Yucheng; Zhang, Wenhua; Xu, Dongyan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a setup for measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials. The sample holder was designed to have a compact structure and can be directly mounted in a standard cryostat system for temperature-dependent measurements. For the Seebeck coefficient measurement, a thin bar-shaped sample is mounted bridging two copper bases; and two ceramic heaters are used to generate a temperature gradient along the sample. Two type T thermocouples are used to determine both temperature and voltage differences between two widely separated points on the sample. The thermocouple junction is flattened into a disk and pressed onto the sample surface by using a spring load. The flexible fixation method we adopted not only simplifies the sample mounting process but also prevents thermal contact deterioration due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the sample and other parts. With certain modifications, the sample holder can also be used for four-probe electrical resistivity measurements. High temperature measurements are essential for thermoelectric power generation. The experimental system we developed is capable of measuring the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical resistivity of bulk thermoelectric materials in a wide temperature range from 80 to 500 K, which can be further extended to even higher temperatures. Measurements on two standard materials, constantan and nickel, confirmed the accuracy and the reliability of the system.

  9. New approaches to the estimation of erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, Murat; Ereemin, Alexandr; Levchuck, Vasiliy; Chubarov, Sergey

    2006-09-01

    erosion-corrosion in a double-phase flow is that of moving deaerated liquid in directly contact with metal as a barrier between the metal and main steam-drop flow. Local processes of mass transfer, corrosion properties and water-chemical parameters of this film define intensity of erosion-corrosion and features of its behavior. Erosion-corrosion of metal in a double-phase flow is determined by the gas-dynamics of double-phase flaws, water chemistry, thermodynamic, materials science, etc. The goal of the work: development of theoretical and methodological basis of physical, chemical and mathematical models, as well as the finding of technical solutions and method of diagnostics, forecast and control of the erosion-corrosion processes. It will allow the increase of reliability and safety operation of the power equipment of the secondary circuit in NPP with WWER by use of monitoring of erosion-corrosion wear of pipelines. One concludes by stressing that the described design-experimental approach for solving of FAC problem will enable to carry out the following works: - elaboration and certification of the procedure of design-experimental substantiation of zones, aims and periodicity of the NPP elements operational inspection; - development and certification of a new Regulatory Document of stress calculation for definition of the minimum acceptable wall thickness levels considering real wear shape, FAC rates and inaccuracy of devices for wall thickness measurements; - improving the current Regulatory Documents and correcting of the Typical programs of operational inspection - optimization of zones, aims and periodicity of the inspection; - elaboration of recommendations for operational lifetime prolongation of the WWER secondary circuits elements by means of increasing of erosion-corrosion resistance of the new equipment and of the equipment, exceeding the design lifetime; - improving of safe and uninterrupted work of the power unit due to prediction of the most damaged

  10. Soil physical properties affecting soil erosion in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo Lujan, D.

    2004-01-01

    The total vegetated land area of the earth is about 11,500 hectare. Of this, about 12% is in South America. Of this, about 14% is degraded area. Water erosion, chemical degradation, wind erosion, and physical degradation have been reported as main types of degradation. In South America water erosion is a major process for soil degradation. Nevertheless, water erosion can be a consequence of degradation of the soil structure, especially the functional attributes of soil pores to transmit and retain water, and to facilitate root growth. Climate, soil and topographic characteristics determine runoff and erosion potential from agricultural lands. The main factors causing soil erosion can be divided into three groups: Energy factors: rainfall erosivity, runoff volume, wind strength, relief, slope angle, slope length; Protection factors: population density, plant cover, amenity value (pressure for use) and land management; and resistance factors: soil erodibility, infiltration capacity and soil management. The degree of soil erosion in a particular climatic zone, with particular soils, land use and socioeconomic conditions, will always result from a combination of the above mentioned factors. It is not easy to isolate a single factor. However, the soil physical properties that determine the soil erosion process, because the deterioration of soil physical properties is manifested through interrelated problems of surface sealing, crusting, soil compaction, poor drainage, impeded root growth, excessive runoff and accelerated erosion. When an unprotected soil surface is exposed to the direct impact of raindrops it can produce different responses: Production of smaller aggregates, dispersed particles, particles in suspension and translocation and deposition of particles. When this has occurred, the material is reorganized at the location into a surface seal. Aggregate breakdown under rainfall depends on soil strength and a certain threshold kinetic energy is needed to start

  11. Wear Resistance of 3D Printing Resin Material Opposing Zirconia and Metal Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Man Park

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing offers many advantages in dental prosthesis manufacturing. This study evaluated the wear resistance of 3D printing resin material compared with milling and conventional resin materials. Sixty substrate specimens were prepared with three types of resin materials: 3D printed resin, milled resin, and self-cured resin. The 3D printed specimens were printed at a build angle of 0° and 100 μm layer thickness by digital light processing 3D printing. Two kinds of abraders were made of zirconia and CoCr alloy. The specimens were loaded at 5 kg for 30,000 chewing cycles with vertical and horizontal movements under thermocycling condition. The 3D printed resin did not show significant difference in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear compared to the milled and the self-cured resins. No significant difference was revealed depending on the abraders in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear. In SEM views, the 3D printed resin showed cracks and separation of inter-layer bonds when opposing the metal abrader. The results suggest that the 3D printing using resin materials provides adequate wear resistance for dental use.

  12. Wear Resistance of 3D Printing Resin Material Opposing Zirconia and Metal Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Man; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Cha, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Joo-Hee

    2018-06-20

    3D printing offers many advantages in dental prosthesis manufacturing. This study evaluated the wear resistance of 3D printing resin material compared with milling and conventional resin materials. Sixty substrate specimens were prepared with three types of resin materials: 3D printed resin, milled resin, and self-cured resin. The 3D printed specimens were printed at a build angle of 0° and 100 μm layer thickness by digital light processing 3D printing. Two kinds of abraders were made of zirconia and CoCr alloy. The specimens were loaded at 5 kg for 30,000 chewing cycles with vertical and horizontal movements under thermocycling condition. The 3D printed resin did not show significant difference in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear compared to the milled and the self-cured resins. No significant difference was revealed depending on the abraders in the maximal depth loss or the volume loss of wear. In SEM views, the 3D printed resin showed cracks and separation of inter-layer bonds when opposing the metal abrader. The results suggest that the 3D printing using resin materials provides adequate wear resistance for dental use.

  13. Solid-state resistance upset welding: A process with unique advantages for advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state resistance upset welding is suitable for joining many alloys that are difficult to weld using fusion processes. Since no melting takes place, the weld metal retains many of the characteristics of the base metal. Resulting welds have a hot worked structure, and thereby have higher strength than fusion welds in the same mate. Since the material being joined is not melted, compositional gradients are not introduced, second phase materials are minimally disrupted, and minor alloying elements, do not affect weldability. Solid-state upset welding has been adapted for fabrication of structures considered very large compared to typical resistance welding applications. The process has been used for closure of capsules, small vessels, and large containers. Welding emphasis has been on 304L stainless steel, the material for current applications. Other materials have, however, received enough attention to have demonstrated capability for joining alloys that are not readily weldable using fusion welding methods. A variety of other stainless steels (including A-286), superalloys (including TD nickel), refractory metals (including tungsten), and aluminum alloys (including 2024) have been successfully upset welded

  14. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift.

  15. Edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of polymer infiltrated ceramic network and resin nanoceramic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrou, Renos; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W

    2016-09-01

    Two novel restorative materials, a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and a resin nanoceramic (RNC), for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) applications have recently become commercially available. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists to facilitate material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of the PICN and RNC materials and compare them with 2 commonly used feldspathic ceramic (FC) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LRGC) CAD-CAM materials that share the same clinical indications. PICN, RNC, FC, and LRGC material specimens were obtained by sectioning commercially available CAD-CAM blocks. Edge chipping test specimens (n=20/material) were adhesively attached to a resin substrate before testing. Edge chips were produced using a 120-degree, sharp, conical diamond indenter mounted on a universal testing machine and positioned 0.1 to 0.7 mm horizontally from the specimen's edge. The chipping force was plotted against distance to the edge, and the data were fitted to linear and quadratic equations. One-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) in edge chipping toughness. Beam specimens (n=22/material) were tested for determining flexural strength using a 3-point bend test. Weibull statistics determined intergroup differences (α=.05). Flexural modulus and work of fracture were also calculated, and 1-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) RESULTS: Significant (Pmaterials for the 4 mechanical properties. Specifically, the material rankings were edge chipping toughness: RNC>LRGC=FC>PICN; flexural strength: RNC=LRGC>PICN>FC; flexural modulus: RNCLRGC=PICN>FC. The RNC material demonstrated superior performance for the mechanical properties tested compared with the other 3 materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Control of Eolian soil erosion from waste site surface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1994-11-01

    Physical models were tested in a wind tunnel to determine optimum surface-ravel admixtures for protecting silt-loam soil from erosion by, wind and saltating, sand stresses. The tests were performed to support the development of a natural-material surface barrier for and waste sites. Plans call for a 2-m deep silt-loam soil reservoir to retain infiltrating water from rainfall and snowmelt. The objective of the study was to develop a gravel admixture that would produce an erosion-resistant surface layer during, periods of extended dry climatic stress. Thus, tests were performed using simulated surfaces representing dry, unvegetated conditions present just after construction, after a wildfire, or during an extended drought. Surfaces were prepared using silt-loam soil mixed with various grades of sand and Travel. Wind-induced surface shear stresses were controlled over the test surfaces, as were saltating, sand mass flow rates and intensities. Tests were performed at wind speeds that approximated and exceeded local 100-year peak gust intensities. Surface armors produced by pea gravel admixtures were shown to provide the best protection from wind and saltating sand stresses. Compared with unprotected silt-loam surfaces, armored surfaces reduced erosion rates by more than 96%. Based in part on wind tunnel results, a pea gravel admixture of 15% will be added to the top 1 in of soil in a prototype barrier under construction in 1994. Field tests are planned at the prototype site to provide data for comparison with wind tunnel results

  17. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  18. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  19. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb 3 Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy

  20. Methods for Increasing the Material Resistance of the Mulching Tool Body Against its Deformation in Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ľuptáčiková, Veronika; Ťavodová, Miroslava

    2017-12-01

    Instruments working in the cultivation of forest areas, for example under the guidance of high stress, are exposed to factors of heterogeneous environment which are soil, wood, various types of rocks, sometimes waste - metal, plastics or glass as well. The mulching tool body, the forging, deforms and worsens rapidly after loss of the WC toe-caps. Currently used tools have a non-heat-treated body material with a ferritic-pearlitic structure that has low abrasion resistance. One of the possibilities is to heat the tool body. Another possibility is to apply suitable welds to exposed areas. By correctly selecting the thermal mode of the tool material or by applying the welded material to the exposed body part of the tool, we can ensure that the tool's operating time is increased.

  1. Erodibility of cemented materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gass, BG

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of stabilised layers is cost effective in road construction in South Africa. Some stabilised materials have however been found to be susceptible to erosion. To identify erodible materials the Erosion Test was developed in 1989...

  2. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Pcomposite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  3. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  4. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  5. Erosion onset of a cohesionless granular medium by an immersed impinging round jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier-Coulin, Florian; Cuéllar, Pablo; Philippe, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    Among different devices developed quite recently to quantify the resistance to erosion of natural soil within the broader context of dyke safety, the most commonly used is probably the jet erosion test in which a scouring crater is induced by impingement of an immersed water jet. A comprehensive experimental investigation on the jet erosion in the specific situation of a cohesionless granular material is presented here. The tests were performed by combining special optical techniques allowing for an accurate measurement of the scouring onset and evolution inside an artificially translucent granular sample. The impinging jet hydrodynamics are also analyzed, empirically validating the use of a self-similar theoretical framework for the laminar round jet. The critical conditions at the onset of erosion appear to be best described by a dimensionless Shields number based on the inertial drag force created by the fluid flow on the eroded particles rather than on the pressure gradients around them. To conclude, a tentative empirical model for the maximal flow velocity initiating erosion at the bottom of the scoured crater is put forward and discussed in the light of some preliminary results.

  6. Corrosion resistant structural materials for use in lithium fluoride molten salts and thermonuclear device using it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazutaka; Takagi, Ryuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To provide blanket materials for thermo nuclear devices and structural materials for containers with less MHD effect and good heat exchanging efficiency. Constitution: LiF-PbF 2 is used as the liquid blanket material for moderating the MHD effect. That is, the lithium compound, in the form of a fluoride, can be made easily liquefiable being and PbF 2 is added for lowering the melting point. The reason of using the fluoride is that fluorine material is less activated by the adsorption of neutrons. Copper, phosphor bronze, nickel or nickel-based alloy, e.g., Monel metal is used as corrosion resistant structural material to LiF-PbF 2 molten salts. Use of copper as the low activating structural material can provide an excellent effect also in view of the maintenance and, further, a series of processes for purifying, separating injecting and recoverying tritium can be conducted safely and stationarily without contaminating the circumferences. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Scales and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need to develop scale explicit understanding of erosion to overcome existing conceptual and methodological flaws in our modelling methods currently applied to understand the process of erosion, transport and deposition at the catchment scale. These models need to be based on a sound under...

  8. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  9. Experiment of radiation-resistant materials for nuclear powers generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, J.H.; Lee, C.K.; Kong, Y.K.; Chang, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of polyethylene materials exhibit good insulation and radiation resistance, but exhibit poor flame resistance. Flame retardant properties of the polyethylene were improved by the radiation induced grafting, coating or cross-linking. When the various flame retardants were fixed onto polyethylene, the amount of fixation in grafting or coating was increased with the increase of radiation dosages. In the case of grafting, it is necessary for high grafting yield that the polyethylene films were swelled before irradiation with γ-rays or electron beams. It is the suitable method for the fixation of flame retardant that polyethylene samples were blended with various flame retardants at 125 0 C and then blended polymers were crosslinked by the electron beams at room temperature

  10. Influence of deep cryogenic treatment on structure and wear resistance of materials of hydraulic breaker chisels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolobov, V. I.; BinhLe, Thanh

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that shallow cryogenic treatment at -75°C (SCT) of the materials of hydraulic breaker chisels - P20, 1080 and D2 steels leads to a decrease (44 ÷ 82%) in the amount of retained austenite and an increase (26 ÷ 99%) in the amount of carbides in the structure of hardened steel, which is accompanied by an increase in its hardness (1.4 ÷ 2.1%) and abrasive wear resistance (10 ÷ 31%) with a simultaneous decrease in impact toughness (19 ÷ 24%). Deep cryogenic treatment at -196°C (DCT) and subsequent low-temperature tempering of D2 steel leads to a significant increase in its wear resistance (98%) and impact toughness (32%).

  11. The physical chemistry and materials science behind sinter-resistant catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunqian; Lu, Ping; Cao, Zhenming; Campbell, Charles T; Xia, Younan

    2018-06-18

    Catalyst sintering, a main cause of the loss of catalytic activity and/or selectivity at high reaction temperatures, is a major concern and grand challenge in the general area of heterogeneous catalysis. Although all heterogeneous catalysts are inevitably subjected to sintering during their operation, the immediate and drastic consequences can be mitigated by carefully engineering the catalytic particles and their interactions with the supports. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent progress in understanding the physical chemistry and materials science involved in sintering, including the discussion of advanced techniques, such as in situ microscopy and spectroscopy, for investigating the sintering process and its rate. We also discuss strategies for the design and rational fabrication of sinter-resistant catalysts. Finally, we showcase recent success in improving the thermal stability and thus sinter resistance of supported catalytic systems.

  12. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  13. Compatibility tests of materials for a prototype ceramic melter for defense glass-waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    Objective is to evaluate the corrosion/erosion resistance of melter materials. Materials tested were Monofrox K3 and E, Serv, Inconel 690, Pt, and SnO. Results show that Inconel 690 is the leading electrode material and Monofrox K3 the leading refractory candidate. Melter lifetime is estimated to be 2 to 5 years for defense waste

  14. Pathogenesis of Double-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Erosive Reflux Disease, and Mechanism of Reflux Symptoms and Gastric Acid Secretion-Suppressive Effect in the Presence or Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawami, Noriyuki; Takenouchi, Nana; Umezawa, Mariko; Hoshino, Shintaro; Hanada, Yuriko; Hoshikawa, Yoshimasa; Sano, Hirohito; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been suggested to be responsible for contributing to the occurrence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-resistant non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aims of this study were to clarify the pathogenesis of PPI-resistant NERD. Fifty-three patients with NERD, who had persistent reflux symptoms despite taking double-dose PPI, were included in this study. After excluding eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and primary esophageal motility disorder, esophageal impedance-pH monitoring was carried out. In symptom index (SI)-positive patients, the mechanism of SI positivity and the percent time with intragastric pH >4 were investigated according to the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori infection. One of the 53 patients had EoE, and 4 had primary esophageal motility disorder. Twenty-three and 2 patients were SI-positive for liquid and gas-only reflux respectively. Of 17 SI-positive, H. pylori-negative patients, 5 were SI-positive for acid reflux, whereas all of the H. pylori-positive patients were SI-positive for non-acid reflux. The percent time with intragastric pH >4 was significantly lower in the H. pylori-negative patients than in the H. pylori-positive patients. The pathogenesis of double-dose PPI-resistant NERD was identified in 57%. In some of H. pylori-negative patients, acid-related symptoms were observed. However, in H. pylori-positive patients, these symptoms were excluded by taking double-dose PPI. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors in Japan (Role of research reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Nozawa, T.; Muroga, T.; Aoyama, T.; Kawamura, H.; Ishihara, M.; Ito, C.; Kaneda, S.; Mimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    Structural materials for next-generation nuclear power systems should have a good radiation resistance, where the expected accumulation dose will largely exceed 10 dpa. Among several candidate materials, materials of five categories, 1. Austenitic steels, including high nickel alloys, 2. Low activation ferritic martensitic steels, 3. ODS steels (austenitic and ferritic), 4. Vanadium based alloys, 5. Silicon carbide composites (SiC/SiCf). All have been most extensively studied in Japan, in collaboration among industries, national institutes such as Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) and National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and universities. The high nickel base alloys were studied for their low swelling behaviors mainly by the NIMS and the austenitic steels are studied for their reliable engineering data base and their reliable performance in irradiation environments mainly by the JAEA, mainly for their application in the near-term projects such as the ITER and the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. The most extensive studies are now concentrated on the Low Activation Ferritic Marsensitic steels and ODS steels, for their application in a demonstration fusion reactor and prototype sodium cooled fast reactors. Fundamental studies on radiation effects are carried out, mainly utilizing Japan Materials Testing Rector (JMTR) with its flexible irradiation ability, up to a few dpa. For higher dpa irradiation, a fast test reactor, JOYO is utilized up to several 10s dpa. Some international collaborations such as Japan/USA and Japan/France are effective to utilize reactors abroad, such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and sodium cooled high flux fast reactors in France. Silicon carbide based composites are extensively studied by university groups led by Kyoto University and the JAEA. For their performance in heavy irradiation environments, the Japan/USA collaboration plays an important role

  16. Transparent Heat-Resistant PMMA Copolymers for Packing Light-Emitting Diode Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ling Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transparent and heat-resistant poly(methyl methacrylate copolymers were synthesized by bulk polymerizing methyl methacrylate (MMA, isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA, and methacrylamide (MAA monomers. Copolymerization was performed using a chain transfer agent to investigate the molecular weight changes of these copolymers, which exhibited advantages including a low molecular weight distribution, excellent optical properties, high transparency, high glass transition temperature, low moisture absorption, and pellets that can be readily mass produced by using extrusion or jet injection for packing light-emitting diode materials.

  17. On 'lower bound crack resistance curves' as material law for the safety assessment of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Silcher, H.; Eisele, U.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental fracture-mechanics investigations were carried out on large scale specimens. The specimen geometries and the crack depth ratio, a/W, in a parameter field were varied. Three materials of different toughness were chosen for the specimens. Their load-deformation behaviour, crack resistance curves, stretched zones Δa i and crack initiation values J i were determined and compared with the results from CT25 specimens. Numerical finite-element calculations were made to determine the state of stres in the specimens and the size of the plastic zones. (orig.)

  18. INVESTIGATION OF MATERIAL RESISTANCE TO PLASTIC DEFORMATION AT PROCESSING METALS BY PRESSURE WITH IMPOSING ULTRASONIC OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains substantiation for application of experimental technique in order to investigate material resistance to plastic deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations while proceeding from laws of similarity. It is shown that at modeling any metal processing by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations it is possible to consider that actual elastic and plastic metal properties remain constant during processing under ultrasound action. The second aspect that requires a special attention at modeling is pulse or vibration-shock deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations.

  19. NVENTIONS IN THE NANOTECHNOLOGICAL AREA PROVIDE INCREASED RESISTANCE OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS TO OPERATIONAL LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLASOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The invention «Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes (RU 2494961» can be used in production of modifying additives for construction materials. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes contains, mass %: carbon nanotubes 1–20; surface active agent – sodium chloride of sulfonated derived naphthalene 1–20; fumed silica 5–15; water – the rest. Dispersion can additionally contain ethylene glycol as antifreeze. Dispersion is steady in storage, it is soluble in water, provides increased strength of construction materials. Invention «Building Structures Reinforcement Composition (RU 2493337» can beused in construction to reinforce concrete, brick and masonry structures. Composition contains glass or basalt roving taken in quantity 90÷100 parts by weight, soaked in polymer binder based on epoxy taken in quantity 0,001÷1,5 parts by weight. This invention provides high resistance to operational load.

  20. Gamma-Ray Dosimetry System Using Radiation-Resistant Optical Fibers and a Luminescent Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toh, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yamagishi, H.; Sakasai, K.; Soyama, K.; Shikama, T.; Nagata, S.

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-ray dosimetry system using radiation-resistant optical fibers and a luminescent material was developed for use in a damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The system was designed to be compact and unnecessary of an external supply of electricity to a radiation sensor head with a contaminated working environment and restricted through-holes to a measurement point in the damaged reactor. The system can detect a gamma-ray dose rate at a measurement point using a couple of optical fibers and a luminescent material with a coincidence method. This system demonstrated a linear response with respect to the gamma-ray dose rate from 0.5 mGy/h to 0.1 Gy/h and the system had a capability to measure the dose rate of more than 10 2 Gy/h. (authors)

  1. Weld nugget formation in resistance spot welding of new lightweight sandwich material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagüés Tanco, J.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    Weldability of a new lightweight sandwich material, LITECOR®, by resistance spot welding is analyzed by experiments and numerical simulations. The spot welding process is accommodated by a first pulse squeezing out the non-conductive polymer core of the sandwich material locally to allow metal......–metal contact. This is facilitated by the use of a shunt tool and is followed by a second pulse for the actual spot welding and nugget formation. A weldability lobe in the time-current space of the second pulse reveals a process window of acceptable size for automotive assembly lines. Weld growth curves...... with experimental results in the range of welding parameters leading to acceptable weld nugget sizes. The validated accuracy of the commercially available software proves the tool useful for assisting the choice of welding parameters....

  2. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  3. Damage mechanisms and metallic materials development in multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yugui; Liu, Wei; Yao, Zhiming; Ke, Wei

    2002-01-01

    The investigation on the synergistic effects among corrosion, slurry erosion and cavitation erosion has special significance for hydraulic turbines operated in Yangtze River and Yellow River where the high concentration solid particles exist in water. Two typical metallic materials i.e. Cr-Mn-N stainless steel and Ni-Ti shapememory-alloy, and two typical materials used for hydraulic turbines 20SiMn and 0Cr13Ni5Mo as compared materials were selected in order to investigate the roles of work-hardening ability and martensitic transformation as well as pseudoelastics in damage mechanism in multiphase flow. Both modified rotating disk rig and ultrasonic vibration facility were used to simulate the possible damage mechanism of materials in multiphase flow. The effects of corrosion on cavitation erosion were investigated through adding 3wt% NaCl. The degradation mechanism was analyzed by electrochemical test, SEM observation, hardness and roughness measurement. The results showed that there was a strong synergistic interaction among electrochemical corrosion, slurry erosion and cavitation erosion for 20SiMn in liquid-solid two-phase medium. In contrast, corrosion played little role for 0Cr13Ni5Mo. Cr-Mn-N stainless steel with high Mn content showed better resistance to cavitation erosion and slurry erosion than 0Cr13Ni5Mo, which was mainly due to its good work-hardening ability as well as strain-induced martensite transformation. The cavitation micro-cracks for Cr-Mn-N stainless steel were parallel to the specimen surface in contrast with 0Cr13Ni5Mo whose micro-cracks were perpendicular to the surface. Ni-Ti alloy with pseudoelasticity showed excellent resistance to combined interaction of cavitation erosion and slurry erosion

  4. EFFECTS OF MINERAL ADMIXTURE ON THE CARBONIC ACID LEACHING RESISTANCE OF CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Dong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the degradation process and deterioration mechanism of cement-based materials, this paper analyzes the effects of carbonic acid leaching on the mechanical strength of mortars, as well as relative mass loss, microstructure, and composition of various cement pastes. The results indicate that cement pastes containing less than 20 % fly ash have higher carbonic acid leaching resistance than cement pastes without fly ash. However, after carbonic acid leaching, the compressive strength of the samples with fly ash is lower than that of the cement pastes without fly ash. The leaching resistance is good for samples cured at an early age before leaching. Carbonic acid leaching proceeds from the paste surface to the interior. The incorporation of an appropriate amount of slag powder helps to increase the density of the paste. Due to the pozzolanic activity of fly ash at late-stage leaching, a mixture of fly ash (≤ 20 % and slag powder (≤ 20 % effectively improves carbonic acid leaching resistance. The products of early-stage leaching were mainly CaCO₃ and small amounts of SiO₂ and Fe₂O₃. The C-S-H phase at the paste surface suffered serious damage after long periods of leaching, and the main products of leaching were SiO₂ and Fe₂O₃.

  5. Improvement on corrosion resistance of NiTi orthopedic materials by carbon plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Ray W.Y.; Ho, Joan P.Y.; Luk, Camille M.Y.; Liu Xuanyong; Chung, Jonathan C.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) have potential applications as orthopedic implants because of their unique super-elastic properties and shape memory effects. However, the problem of out-diffusion of harmful Ni ions from the alloys during prolonged use inside a human body must be overcome before they can be widely used in orthopedic implants. In this work, we enhance the corrosion resistance of NiTi using carbon plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Our corrosion and simulated body fluid tests indicate that either an ion-mixed amorphous carbon coating fabricated by PIII and D or direct carbon PIII can drastically improve the corrosion resistance and block the out-diffusion of Ni from the materials. Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that both C 2 H 2 -PIII and D and C 2 H 2 -PIII do not roughen the original flat surface to an extent that can lead to degradation in corrosion resistance

  6. Evaluation of the local temperature of conductive filaments in resistive switching materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalon, E; Cohen, S; Gavrilov, A; Ritter, D

    2012-01-01

    The resistive switching effect in metal oxides and other dielectric materials is among the leading future non-volatile memory technologies. Resistive switching is widely ascribed to the formation and rupture of conductive filaments in the oxide, which are generated by temperature-enhanced nano-scale ion migration or other thermal effects. In spite of the central role of the local filament temperature on the switching effect, as well as on the conduction and reliability physics, no measurement methods of the filament temperature are yet available. In this work, we report on a method for evaluating the conducting filament temperature, using a metal–insulator–semiconductor bipolar transistor structure. The filament temperature is obtained by analyzing the thermal excitation rate of electrons from the filament Fermi level into the conduction band of a p-type semiconductor electrode. Measurements were carried out to obtain the conductive filament temperature in hafnia at varying ambient temperatures in the range of 3–300 K. Significant Joule heating of the filament was observed across the entire measured ambient temperature range. The extracted temperatures provide physical insight into the resistive switching effect. (paper)

  7. Mechanical and thermal resistance of multi-material components for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlet, H.

    2013-01-01

    The First Wall panels for ITER are complex parts composed of stainless steel, copper and beryllium [1]. These materials are joined using diffusion bonding technique. The stainless steel is a commonly used in nuclear reactors 316LN material and acts as a structural material. The copper alloy is a CuCrZr material which acts as a heat sink. The beryllium consisting in tiles and layer is used as the protective plasma facing material. The fabrication of these panels is performed through 2 main steps. The first step consists in welding all together a bi-metallic support structure made from a thick CuCrZr plate embedded with 316LN tubes and bonded to a thick 316LN backing plate with cooling channels. The bonding is performed in a HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressure) facility. The second step is performed at a lower temperature and aims at simultaneously welding by HIP Be onto CuCrZr and ageing the CuCrZr heat sink to obtain the correct mechanical resistance of this alloy reinforced by precipitates. The various joints 316LN/316LN, 316LN/CuCrZr, and CuCrZr/Be are then characterized [2] from a microstructural point of view and by mechanical tests. It is quite hard to characterize the strength of a diffusion bonded joints. Standard tests may be used for homogeneous joints whereas specific tests have been developed to characterize the heterogeneous bonds. To optimize the bond, we performed mainly impact and tensile bi-material tests (Fig 1). Once the manufacture parameters have been optimized, advanced mechanical tests are performed based on Bimetallic CT specimens, axisymmetric notched specimens, 4P bending specimens. Numerical simulations are required to analyse the mechanical response. In order to characterize the fatigue resistance of the joints, specific mock-ups have been designed by the European Fusion Development Agreement EFDA team (Fig 2). Results of heat flux testing will be reviewed for the various joints. The assembly of heterogeneous materials by Hipping is very complex

  8. Resistive Random Access Memory from Materials Development fnd Engineering to Novel Encryption and Neuromorphic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Karsten

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM or RRAM) is a novel form of non-volatile memory that is expected to play a major role in future computing and memory solutions. It has been shown that the resistance state of ReRAM devices can be precisely tuned by modulating switching voltages, by limiting peak current, and by adjusting the switching pulse properties. This enables the realization of novel applications such as memristive neuromorphic computing and neural network computing. I have developed two processes based on 100 and 300mm wafer platforms to demonstrate functional HfO2 based ReRAM devices. The first process is designed for a rapid materials engineering and device characterization, while the second is an advanced hybrid ReRAM/CMOS combination based on the IBM 65nm 10LPe process technology. The 100mm wafer efforts were used to show impacts of etch processes on ReRAM switching performance and the need for a rigorous structural evaluation of ReRAM devices before starting materials development. After an etch development, a bottom electrode comparison between the inert materials Pt, Ru and W was performed where Ru showed superior results with respect to yield and resilience against environmental impacts such as humidity over a 2-month period. A comparison of amorphous and crystalline devices showed no statistical difference in the performance with respect to random telegraph noise. This demonstrates, that the forming process fundamentally alters the crystallographic structure within and around the filament. The 300mm wafer development efforts were aimed towards implementing ReRAM in the FEOL, combined with CMOS, to yield a seamless process flow of 1 transistor 1 ReRAM structures (1T1R). This technology was customized with custom-developed tungsten metal 1 (M1) and dual tungsten/copper via 1 (V1) structures, within which the ReRAM stack is embedded. The ReRAM itself consists of an inert W bottom electrode, HfO2 based active switching layer, a Ti oxygen scavenger

  9. Long-term behaviour of heat-resistant steels and high-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 lectures with the following subjects: On the effect of thermal pretreatment on the structure and creep behaviour of the alloy 800 H (V. Guttmann, J. Timm); Material properties of heat resistant ferritic and austenitic steels after cold forming (W. Bendick, H. Weber); Investigations for judging the working behaviour of components made of alloy 800 and alloy 617 under creep stress (H.J. Penkalla, F. Schubert); Creep behaviour of gas turbine materials in hot gas (K.H. Kloos et al.); Effect of small cold forming on the creep beahviour of gas turbine blades made of Nimonic 90 (K.H. Keienburg et al.); Investigations on creep fatigue alternating load strength of nickel alloys (G. Raule); Change of structure, creep fatigue behaviour and life of X20 Cr Mo V 12 1 (by G. Eggeler et al.); Investigations on thermal fatigue behaviour (K.H. Mayer et al.); Creep behaviour of similar welds of the steels 13 Cr Mo 4 4, 14 MoV 6 3, 10 Cr Mo 910 and GS-17 Cr Mo V 5 11 (K. Niel et al.); Determining the creep crack behaviour of heat resistant steels with samples of different geometry (K. Maile, R. Tscheuschner). (orig.,/MM) [de

  10. Evaluation of the measurement uncertainty when measuring the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stare, E.; Beges, G.; Drnovsek, J.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of research into the measurement of the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking. Two types of tracking were investigated: the proof tracking index (PTI) and the comparative tracking index (CTI). Evaluation of the measurement uncertainty in a case study was performed using a test method in accordance with the IEC 60112 standard. In the scope of the tests performed here, this particular test method was used to ensure the safety of electrical appliances. According to the EN ISO/IEC 17025 standard (EN ISO/IEC 17025), in the process of conformity assessment, the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty of the test method should be carried out. In the present article, possible influential parameters that are in accordance with the third and fourth editions of the standard IEC 60112 are discussed. The differences, ambiguities or lack of guidance referring to both editions of the standard are described in the article 'Ambiguities in technical standards—case study IEC 60112—measuring the resistance of solid isolating materials to tracking' (submitted for publication). Several hundred measurements were taken in the present experiments in order to form the basis for the results and conclusions presented. A specific problem of the test (according to the IEC 60112 standard) is the great variety of influential physical parameters (mechanical, electrical, chemical, etc) that can affect the results. At the end of the present article therefore, there is a histogram containing information on the contributions to the measurement uncertainty.

  11. The water erosion processes in the retreat erosive of cliff on soft rocks in the province of Cadiz (Spain); Los procesos de erosion hidrica en el retroceso erosivo de acantilados sobre rocas blandas en la provincia de Cadiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendon Aragon, J. J.; Gracia Prieto, F. J.; Rio Rodriguez, L. del

    2009-07-01

    The littoral cliffs on soft materials of the Atlantic Cadiz coast show an important activity of the fresh water erosion processes, sometimes even more significant than the marine erosion processes. The connection of the lower cliffs with sandy beaches favours aeolian sand invasion, which fills previous rills and reduces the water erosion intensity by increasing infiltration. Cliff retreat and rill erosion measurement by using erosion sticks has shown very variables values, most of them higher than the estimated error of the employed methods. This indicates the existence of other factors influencing the distribution of water erosion processes along these cliffs, which have to be studied through different techniques. (Author) 5 refs.

  12. Using synchrotron light to accelerate EUV resist and mask materials learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Gideon; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Mochi, Iacopo; Montgomery, Warren; Rekawa, Seno; Wallow, Tom

    2011-03-01

    As commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) progresses, direct industry activities are being focused on near term concerns. The question of long term extendibility of EUVL, however, remains crucial given the magnitude of the investments yet required to make EUVL a reality. Extendibility questions are best addressed using advanced research tools such as the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool (MET) and actinic inspection tool (AIT). Utilizing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source facility as the light source, these tools benefit from the unique properties of synchrotron light enabling research at nodes generations ahead of what is possible with commercial tools. The MET for example uses extremely bright undulator radiation to enable a lossless fully programmable coherence illuminator. Using such a system, resolution enhancing illuminations achieving k1 factors of 0.25 can readily be attained. Given the MET numerical aperture of 0.3, this translates to an ultimate resolution capability of 12 nm. Using such methods, the SEMATECH Berkeley MET has demonstrated resolution in resist to 16-nm half pitch and below in an imageable spin-on hard mask. At a half pitch of 16 nm, this material achieves a line-edge roughness of 2 nm with a correlation length of 6 nm. These new results demonstrate that the observed stall in ultimate resolution progress in chemically amplified resists is a materials issue rather than a tool limitation. With a resolution limit of 20-22 nm, the CAR champion from 2008 remains as the highest performing CAR tested to date. To enable continued advanced learning in EUV resists, SEMATECH has initiated a plan to implement a 0.5 NA microfield tool at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. This tool will be capable of printing down to 8-nm half pitch.

  13. Production of a nuclear radiation resistant and mechanically tough electrically insulating material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechna, H.

    1975-01-01

    According to the invention, an electrically insulating material of high mechanical strength and resistance to nuclear radiation may be made of a hardenable plastic material coated on an inorganic supporting tissue. The synthetic resin serving as binder - duroplasts, e.g. epoxide resins, polyester resins or silicon resins - is heated, mixed with a catalyst, a wetting agent and a filler (and, if required, with 0.5-1.5 weight % thixotropic material) and coated, under reduced pressure (o.4 to 0.6 mm Hg), on the supporting tissue whose surface is cleaned before this by heating. It is then hardened. Hardening may also take place directly on the electric conductor to be insulated. One obtains a bubble-free wire coating. The inorganic supporting material is glas fibre tissue, also in combination with mica, while Al 2 O 3 , zirconium, zirconia, magnesium oxide, mica and silica (grain size 10-20 μ). The invention is illustrated by a number of examples. (UWI) [de

  14. Metallographical investigations on cavitation erosion of the steel X 2 CrNiMoN 22 5 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, M.; Goecke, A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of erosion-resistant material, however, presupposes a precise knowledge of the mechanism and progress of the destruction. For this reason, cavitation erosion was studied in this investigation using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultra-microhardness tests (UMHT) - as well as gravimetry. A Cr-Ni-Mo steel with a ferritic-austenitic structure was investigated. This material was selected to provide information about the possible interaction between the phases within such a structure and about the damage mechanism of the individual phases. The experimental material was modified by a heat treatment to precipitate the σ-phase so that a three-phase model material could be obtained as well as the two-phase alloy. (orig./MM) [de

  15. Corrosion resistance of structural material AlMg-2 in water following heat treatment and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maman Kartaman A; Djoko Kisworo; Dedi Hariyadi; Sigit

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion tests of structural material AlMg-2 in water were carried out using autoclave in order to study the effects of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of the material. Prior to the tests, the samples were heat-treated at temperatures of 90, 200, 300 and 500 °C and cooled in air, sand and water. The corrosion tests were conducted in water at temperature of 150 °C for 250 hours. The results showed that AlMg-2 samples were corroded although the increase of mass gain was relatively small. Heat treatment from 90 to 500 °C in sand cooling media resulted in an increase of mass gain despite that at 300 °C the increase was less than those at 200 °C and 500 °C. For water cooling media in the temperature range of 90 to 200 °C, the mass gain increased from 0.1854 g/cm 2 to 2.1204 g/cm 2 although after 200 °C it decreased to 1.8207 g/cm 2 and 1.6779 g/cm 2 respectively. For air cooling media, the mass gain was relatively constant. Based on the experiment results, it can be concluded that heat treatment and cooling did not significantly influence the corrosion resistance of material AlMg-2. The passive film Al 2 O 3 on the surface was able to protect the inner surface from further corrosion. Water media with pH range from 4 – 9 did not cause damage to passive layer formed. (author)

  16. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  17. Numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion during Hole Erosion Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, F.; Bonelli, S.; Golay, F.; Anselmet, F.; Philippe, P.; Borghi, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the numerical modelling of concentrated leak erosion of a cohesive soil by a turbulent flow in axisymmetrical geometry, with application to the Hole Erosion Test (HET). The numerical model is based on adaptive remeshing of the water/soil interface to ensure accurate description of the mechanical phenomena occurring near the soil/water interface. The erosion law governing the interface motion is based on two erosion parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion co...

  18. Data on post irradiation experiments of heat resistant ceramic composite materials. PIE for 97M-13A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Souzawa, Shizuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Sekino, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The research on the radiation damage mechanism of heat resistant ceramic composite materials is one of the research subjects of the innovative basic research in the field of high temperature engineering, using the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Three series of irradiation tests on the heat resistant ceramic composite materials, first to third irradiation test program, were carried out using the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR). This is a summary report on the first irradiation test program; irradiation induced dimensional change, thermal expansion coefficient, X-ray diffraction and {gamma}-ray spectrum are reported. (author)

  19. Investigation of Erosion of Cement-Bentonite via Piping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement-bentonite is one of the main materials used in the seepage barriers to protect earth dams and levees from water erosion. However, the current understanding of the erodibility of the cementitious materials and the interactions between cracked seepage barriers and the water flow is inadequate. Based on the laboratory pinhole erosion test, we first investigated the impacts of cement-bentonite treatments by using the ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS as replacement on the erosion characteristics, compared with the original mixtures; the inclusion of GGBS highlighted a potential advantage against water erosion. In addition, we proposed to calculate the erosion percentage and establish the mathematical relationships between the erosion percentage and different regimes, that is, different curing period, erosion time, and sizes of initial holes. Results showed that enough curing period was critical to avoid the increases of hydraulic conductivity in the macrofabric of the barrier; meanwhile, the materials were eroded quickly at the beginning and slowed down with the erosion time, where the enlargement of the initial creaks would be stabilised at some point in time. Moreover, the sizes of initial holes may affect the erosion situation varying from the sample curing periods.

  20. Rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Klik, Andreas; Rousseva, Svetla; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Michaelides, Silas; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Beguería, Santiago; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1), with the highest values (>1000 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also the highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods

  1. Comparaison de simulations CFD avec des résultats expérimentaux de Jet Erosion Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier , F.; Bonelli , S.; Pinettes , P.; Golay , F.; Anselmet , F.; Philippe , P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The Jet Erosion Test (JET) is an experimental device increasingly used to quantify the resistance of soils to erosion. This resistance is characterised by two geotechnical parameters: the critical shear stress and the erosion coefficient. The JET interpretation model of Hanson and Cook (2004) provides an estimation of these erosion parameters. But Hanson's model is simplified, semi-empirical and several assumed hypotheses can be discussed. Our aim is to determine the r...

  2. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  3. Improvement of the electrical contact resistance at rough interfaces using two dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianchen; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario, E-mail: mlanza@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nanoscience and Technology, Soochow University, 199 Ren-Ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Heng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Panpan; Sun, Hui; Duan, Huiling [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, CAPT, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-07

    Reducing the electronic contact resistance at the interfaces of nanostructured materials is a major goal for many kinds of planar and three dimensional devices. In this work, we develop a method to enhance the electronic transport at rough interfaces by inserting a two dimensional flexible and conductive graphene sheet. We observe that an ultra-thin graphene layer with a thickness of 0.35 nm can remarkably reduce the roughness of a sample in a factor of 40%, avoiding the use of thick coatings, leading to a more homogeneous current flow, and extraordinarily increasing the total current compared to the graphene-free counterpart. Due to its simplicity and performance enhancement, this methodology can be of interest to many interface and device designers.

  4. Wrought stainless steel butt-welding fittings: including reference to other corrosion resistant materials - approved 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    ANSI B16.9 is the American Standard for steel butt-welding fittings and although not so stated, it is implied that its scope deals primarily with the schedules of wall thicknesses which are common to carbon steel and the grades of alloy steel piping that are selected for pressure and temperature considerations. The purpose of this standard is to provide industry with a set of dimensional standards for butt-welding fittings that can be used with these light wall pipes of corrosion resisting materials. The center-to-end dimensions of all fittings are identical with those in ANSI B16.9 which give to industry the advantage of uniform design room practice and a maximum utilization of existing die equipment. The only departure from this is in the lap-joint stub end where for purposes of economy the face-to-end of the product has been reduced for use with thin wall piping

  5. The corrosion resistance of materials used for the manufacture of ear piercing studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, O. V.; Saiki, M.; Rogero, S. O.; Costa, I.

    2003-01-01

    Nickel containing alloy shave been widely used as substrates for the manufacture of studs used for ear piercing. Unfortunately, nickel has also been related to the development of allergic contact dermatitis caused by skin sensitization due to Ni''2+ ions. Nickel ions can be leached out into the body fluids due to corrosion reactions. Defect free coatings are very difficult to produce, and therefore nickel free materials should be used as substrates of ear piercing studs, although the commercial alloys used usually contain this element. In this study, the corrosion resistance of two kinds of commercial studs prepared with nickel containing substrates and a titanium laboratory made stud was determined in a culture medium. The corrosion resistance of the studs was investigated by means of potentiodynamic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as a function of immersion time in the culture medium. The elements that leached out into the medium due to corrosion reactions were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The surfaces of the commercial gold-coated studs were examined by scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, both before and after exposure to the culture medium. The cytotoxicity of the tested studs was also determined in the culture medium. (Author) 10 refs

  6. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  7. Changes in electrical transport and density of states of phase change materials upon resistance drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Daniel; Bachmann, Tobias; Jonnalagadda, Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Raoux, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change memory technology has become more mature in recent years. But some fundamental problems linked to the electrical transport properties in the amorphous phase of phase-change materials still need to be solved. The increase of resistance over time, called resistance drift, for example, poses a major challenge for the implementation of multilevel storage, which will eventually be necessary to remain competitive in terms of high storage densities. To link structural properties with electrical transport, a broader knowledge of (i) changes in the density of states (DoS) upon structural relaxation and (ii) the influence of defects on electrical transport is required. In this paper, we present temperature-dependent conductivity and photo-conductivity measurements on the archetype phase change material GeTe. It is shown that trap-limited band transport at high temperatures (above 165 K) and variable range hopping at low temperatures are the predominating transport mechanism. Based on measurements of the temperature dependence of the optical band gap, modulated photo-conductivity and photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy, a DoS model for GeTe was proposed. Using this DoS, the temperature dependence of conductivity and photo-conductivity has been simulated. Our work shows how changes in the DoS (band gap and defect distributions) will affect the electrical transport before and after temperature-accelerated drift. The decrease in conductivity upon annealing can be explained entirely by an increase of the band gap by about 12%. However, low-temperature photo-conductivity measurements revealed that a change in the defect density may also play a role

  8. Polymers Erosion and Contamination Experiment Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Barney-Barton, Elyse A.; Sechkar, Edward; Hunt, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    The Polymers Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) is currently being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center by the Electro-Physics Branch in conjunction with students and faculty from Hathaway Brown School in Cleveland. The experiment is a Get Away Special Canister shuttle flight experiment sponsored by the American Chemical Society. The two goals of this experiment are (1) to measure ram atomic oxygen erosion rates of approximately 40 polymers that have potential use in space applications and (2) to validate a method for identifying sources of silicone contamination that occur in the shuttle bay. Equipment to be used in this flight experiment is shown in the schematic diagram. Spacecraft materials subjected to attack by atomic oxygen in the space environment experience significant degradation over the span of a typical mission. Therefore, learning the rates of atomic oxygen erosion of a wide variety of polymers would be of great benefit to future missions. PEACE will use two independent techniques to determine the atomic oxygen erosion rates of polymers. Large (1-in.-diameter) samples will be used for obtaining mass loss. Preflight and postflight dehydrated masses will be obtained, and the mass lost during flight will be determined. Small (0.5-in.-diameter) samples will be protected with isolated particles (such as NaCl crystals) and then exposed to the space environment. After flight, the protective particles will be removed (washed off) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be used to measure the erosion depth from protected mesas. Erosion depth measurements are more sensitive than traditional mass measurements and are very useful for materials with low erosion yields or with very low fluence missions.

  9. Cavitation erosion of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy deposited coatings and Fe base shape memory alloy solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shuji; Fujisawa, Seiji; Owa, Tomonobu

    2007-01-01

    In this study, cavitation erosion tests were carried out by using thermal spraying and deposition of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy for the surface coating. The results show the test speciment of Ti-Ni thermal spraying has many initial defects, so that the erosion resistance is very low. The erosion resistance of Ti-Ni deposit is about 5-10 times higher than that of SUS 304, thus erosion resistance of Ti-Ni deposit is better than that of Ti-Ni thermal spraying. The cavitation erosion tests were carried out by using Fe-Mn-Si with shape memory and gunmetal with low elastic modulus. The erosion resistance of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy solid is about 9 times higher than that of SUS 304. The erosion resistance of gunmetal is almost the same as SUS 304, because the test specimen of gunmetal has many small defects on the original surface. (author)

  10. Distribution of erosion and deposition on the JET belt limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Behrisch, R.; Roth, J.; Coad, J.P.; Harbour, P.; Kock, L. de; Pick, M.A.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of erosion and deposition of limiter material is of importance both for extrapolating to the next generation of fusion machines and for understanding impurity transport in the boundary layers of present day tokamaks. Erosion patterns have previously been reported for the JET discrete graphite limiters used up to 1986. We have now made measurements on the belt limiters used in 1987-88. These measurements show that although the pattern of net erosion is qualitatively similar to the earlier results the new maximum erosion (∼40μm) is reduced by about a factor 5, consistent with the larger limiter surface area. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. Coastal Erosion Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal erosion is bad because the ecosystem there will be washed away and the animals could drown or be displaced and have to adapt to a new ecosystem that they are not prepared for. I'm interested in this problem because if there aren't beaches when I grow up I won't be able to do the things I would really like to do. I would like to be a marine biologist. Secondly, I don't want to see beach houses washed away. I would like to see people live in harmony with their environment. So, to study ways in which to preserve beaches I will make and use models that test different erosion controls. Two different ideas for erosion control I tested are using seaweed or a rock berm. I think the rock berm will work better than the model of seaweed because the seaweed is under water and the waves can carry the sand over the seaweed, and the rock berm will work better because the rocks will help break the waves up before they reach the shore and the waves can not carry the sand over the rocks that are above the water. To investigate this I got a container to use to model the Gulf of Mexico coastline. I performed several test runs using sand and water in the container to mimic the beach and waves from the Gulf of Mexico hitting the shoreline. I did three trials for the control (no erosion control), seaweed and a rock berm. Rock berms are a border of a raised area of rock. The model for seaweed that I used was plastic shopping bags cut into strips and glued to the bottom of my container to mimic seaweed. My results were that the control had the most erosion which ranged from 2.75 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The seaweed was a little better than the control but was very variable and ranged from 1.5 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The rock berm worked the best out of all at controlling erosion with erosion ranging from 1.5 - 2 inches. My hypothesis was correct because the rock berm did best to control erosion compared to the control which had no erosion control and the model with seaweed.

  12. MISSE PEACE Polymers Atomic Oxygen Erosion Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim, K.; Banks, Bruce A.; McCarthy, Catherine E.; Rucker, Rochelle N.; Roberts, Lily M.; Berger, Lauren A.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-one different polymer samples, collectively called the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers, have been exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly 4 years as part of Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The objective of the PEACE Polymers experiment was to determine the atomic oxygen erosion yield of a wide variety of polymeric materials after long term exposure to the space environment. The polymers range from those commonly used for spacecraft applications, such as Teflon (DuPont) FEP, to more recently developed polymers, such as high temperature polyimide PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants). Additional polymers were included to explore erosion yield dependence upon chemical composition. The MISSE PEACE Polymers experiment was flown in MISSE Passive Experiment Carrier 2 (PEC 2), tray 1, on the exterior of the ISS Quest Airlock and was exposed to atomic oxygen along with solar and charged particle radiation. MISSE 2 was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005, during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. Details on the specific polymers flown, flight sample fabrication, pre-flight and post-flight characterization techniques, and atomic oxygen fluence calculations are discussed along with a summary of the atomic oxygen erosion yield results. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment is unique because it has the widest variety of polymers flown in LEO for a long duration and provides extremely valuable erosion yield data for spacecraft design purposes.

  13. Modeling erosion of unsaturated compacted bentonite by groundwater flow; pinhole erosion test case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, T.; Sane, P.; Olin, M.; Koskinen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Erosion of compacted clay material by water flow is a critical factor affecting the performance of radioactive waste confinement. Our emphasis in this work is the buffer of KBS-3V concept, proposed to be compacted MX-80 bentonite. Unsaturated erosion occurs during the saturation phase of the EBS, and the main quantity of interest is the total buffer mass carried away by a groundwater flow that induces erosion by forming piping channels near the buffer/rock interface. The purpose of this work is to provide modeling tools to support erosion experiments. Role of modeling is first to interpret experimental observations in terms of processes, and to estimate robustness of experimental results. Secondly, we seek to scale up results from the laboratory scale, particularly to time scales longer than those experimentally accessible. We have performed modeling and data analysis pertaining to tests of unsaturated clay erosion. Pinhole experiments were used to study this erosion case. The main differences to well-understood pinhole erosion tests are that the material is strongly swelling and that the water flow is not determined by the pressure head but by the total flux. Groundwater flow in the buffer is determined by the flux because pressure losses occur overwhelmingly in the surrounding rock, not in the piping channel. We formulate a simple model that links an effective solid diffusivity -based swelling model to erosion by flow on the solid/liquid interface. The swelling model is similar in concept to that developed at KTH, but simpler. Erosion in the model is caused by laminar flow in the pinhole, and happens in a narrow region at the solid/liquid interface where velocity and solid volume fraction overlap. The erosion model can be mapped to erosion by wall shear, and can thus be considered as extension of that classic erosion model. The main quantity defining the behavior of clay erosion in the model is the ratio of

  14. Soil erosion and management activities on forested slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1986-01-01

    Some of the most productive forests in the Western United States grow on marginally stable mountainous slopes, where disturbance increases the likelihood of erosion. Much of the public's concern about, and, consequently, most of the research on, erosion from these forested areas is related more to the degradation of stream resources by eroded material than to the...

  15. Modelling soil erosion potential in the transboundary (Kenya & Tanzania) catchment of river Umba using remotely sensed data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedam, N.; Mutisya, B.; Kairo, J.; Resink-Ndungu, Jane Njeri; Kervyn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is one of the leading forms of soil degradation. Estimating soil erosion from field measurements is expensive hence the extent of soil erosion in many tropical watersheds is unknown. Erosion is a complex process; some of the eroded materials are deposited within the watershed while the

  16. Erosion rates and landscape evolution of the lowlands of the Upper Paraguay river basin (Brazil) from cosmogenic 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupim, Fabiano do Nascimento; Bierman, Paul R.; Assine, Mario Luis; Rood, Dylan H.; Silva, Aguinaldo; Merino, Eder Renato

    2015-04-01

    slowly than associated residual hills, regional relief is decreasing over time and the landscape is not in steady state. The extremely slow erosion rates of the clastic-laterite are similar to the slowest outcrop erosion rates reported worldwide. These slow rates are due to the material's properties and resistance, being comprised of quartzite fragments cemented by an iron-rich crust, and reflecting long-term weathering with iron chemical precipitation and ferricrete formation, at least since the Middle Pleistocene. The lateritic caprock appears to be a key factor maintaining hilltop summits of the planation surface over long timescales.

  17. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity standard reference materials: tungsten SRM's 730 and 799, from 4 to 30000K. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hust, J.G.; Giarratano, P.J.

    1975-09-01

    A historical review of the development of thermophysical Standard Reference Materials, SRM's, is given and selection criteria of SRM's are listed. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity data for arc cast and sintered tungsten are compiled, analyzed, and correlated. Recommended values of thermal conductivity (SRM 730) and electrical resistivity (SRM 799) for these lots of tungsten are presented for the range 4 to 3000 0 K

  18. Millimeter wave surface resistance of grain-aligned Y1Ba2Cu3O(x) bulk material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosik, J.; Kranenburg, R.A.; Wolfe, J.C.; Selvamanickam, V.; Salama, K.

    1990-04-01

    Measurements are reported of the millimeter-wave surface resistance of grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O(x) bulk material grown by a liquid-phase process. The measurements were performed by replacing the endplate of a TE(011) cylindrical copper cavity with the superconducting sample. Surface resistance was measured for samples with surfaces oriented perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the grains. For the parallel configuration, the surface resistance at 77 K and 80 GHz is given. For a very well-aligned sample with a very low density of Y2BaCuO(y) precipitates, measured in the perpendicular configuration, the transition width (10-90 percent) is about 2 K and the surface resistance is derived at 88 K. The effect of microstructure on surface resistance is discussed. 19 refs

  19. Millimeter wave surface resistance of grain-aligned Y1Ba2Cu3O(x) bulk material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosik, J.; Kranenburg, R. A.; Wolfe, J. C.; Selvamanickam, V.; Salama, K.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the millimeter wave surface resistance of grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O(x) bulk material grown by a liquid phase process are reported. The measurements were performed by replacing the endplate of a TE011 cylindrical copper cavity with the superconducting sample. Surface resistance was measured for samples with surfaces oriented perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the grains. It is shown that, for the parallel configuration, the surface resistance at 77 K and 80 GHz is typically near 100 milliohms. For a very well-aligned sample with a very low density of Y2BaCuO(y) precipitates, measured in the perpendicular configuration, the transition width (10-90 percent) is about 2 K, and the surface resistance is less than 50 milliohms at 88 K. The effect of microstructure on surface resistance is discussed.

  20. Millimeter wave surface resistance of grain-aligned Y1Ba2Cu3Ox bulk material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosik, J.; Kranenburg, R.A.; Wolfe, J.C.; Selvamanickam, V.; Salama, K.

    1991-01-01

    We report measurements of the millimeter wave surface resistance of grain-aligned YBa 2 Cu 3 O x bulk material grown by a liquid phase process. The measurements were performed by replacing the endplate of a TE 011 cylindrical copper cavity with the superconducting sample. Surface resistance was measured for samples with surfaces oriented perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis of the grains. We show that, for the parallel configuration, the surface resistance at 77 K and 80 GHz is typically near 100 mΩ. For a very well-aligned sample with a very low density of Y 2 BaCuO y precipitates, measured in the perpendicular configuration, the transition width (10%--90%) is about 2 K and the surface resistance is less than 50 mΩ at 88 K. The effect of microstructure on surface resistance is discussed

  1. Tensile strength and impact resistance properties of materials used in prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerschutz, Maria J; Haynes, Michael L; Nixon, Derek M; Colvin, James M

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic sockets serve as the interface between people with amputations and their prostheses. Although most materials used to make prosthetic sockets have been used for many years, knowledge of these materials' properties is limited, especially after they are subjected to fabrication processes. This study evaluated tensile and impact properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used to fabricate prosthetic check sockets, copolymer sockets, and definitive laminated sockets. Thermolyn Rigid and Orfitrans Stiff check socket materials produced significantly lower tensile strength and impact resistance than polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG). Copolymer socket materials exhibited greater resistance to impact forces than the check socket materials but lower tensile strengths than PETG. The heated molding processes, for the check socket and copolymer materials, reduced both tensile strength and elongation at break. Definitive laminated sockets were sorted according to fabrication techniques. Nyglass material had significantly higher elongation, indicating a more ductile material than carbon-based laminations. Carbon sockets with pigmented resin had higher tensile strength and modulus at break than nonpigmented carbon sockets. Elongation at yield and elongation at break were similar for both types of carbon-based laminations. The material properties determined in this study provide a foundation for understanding and improving the quality of prosthetic sockets using current fabrication materials and a basis for evaluating future technologies.

  2. A MODIFIED VAN DER PAUW SETUP FOR MEASURING THE RESISTIVITY AND THERMOPOWER OF THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS OF VARYING THICKNESSES

    KAUST Repository

    HITCHCOCK, DALE

    2013-10-01

    In the investigation of thermoelectric (TE) materials as a practical, and efficient, means of power generation/ refrigeration nearly ninety percent of the possible high-efficient binary compounds have been evaluated. But only a few proved to be useful such as Bi2Te3 alloys, PbTe and SiGe to name the most important materials. Therefore, in order to expand the research of high-efficiency TE materials new compounds and methods of efficiency optimization must be explored. There currently exist a vast number of uninvestigated ternary and quaternary materials that could be potential high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. The device and methodology discussed herein deal with rapidly measuring both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric materials, at a set temperature of T ≈ 300 K. Using nontraditional resistivity measurements and rapid, room-temperature thermopower measurements, a reliable and time-efficient means of gauging the power factor (defined below) values of newly synthesized thermoelectric materials is achievable. Furthermore, the efficacy of the van der Pauw technique for measuring the resistivity of thermoelectric materials has been verified. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  3. A MODIFIED VAN DER PAUW SETUP FOR MEASURING THE RESISTIVITY AND THERMOPOWER OF THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS OF VARYING THICKNESSES

    KAUST Repository

    HITCHCOCK, DALE; WALDROP, SPENCER; WILLIAMS, JARED; TRITT, TERRY M.

    2013-01-01

    In the investigation of thermoelectric (TE) materials as a practical, and efficient, means of power generation/ refrigeration nearly ninety percent of the possible high-efficient binary compounds have been evaluated. But only a few proved to be useful such as Bi2Te3 alloys, PbTe and SiGe to name the most important materials. Therefore, in order to expand the research of high-efficiency TE materials new compounds and methods of efficiency optimization must be explored. There currently exist a vast number of uninvestigated ternary and quaternary materials that could be potential high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. The device and methodology discussed herein deal with rapidly measuring both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric materials, at a set temperature of T ≈ 300 K. Using nontraditional resistivity measurements and rapid, room-temperature thermopower measurements, a reliable and time-efficient means of gauging the power factor (defined below) values of newly synthesized thermoelectric materials is achievable. Furthermore, the efficacy of the van der Pauw technique for measuring the resistivity of thermoelectric materials has been verified. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  4. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  5. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, an external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  6. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Evaluation of Resistance to Los Angeles Abrasion and Physical Factors with Grindability Properties of Some Aggregate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sensogut

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the usage of aggregate materials has increased both in Turkey and the entire world. It can be said that the main reason of this rise is the population growth together with the demand towards the more qualitative life. Therefore, the usability of some aggregate materials was investigated in the present paper. The properties of Los Angeles abrasion resistance, freezing-thaw resistance, slake durability strength and frost resistance of basalt and andesite samples obtained from Karaman and Ankara regions were studied at the first stage. In the second order, the grindability performance of these materials was also determined from the discontinuous grinding tests and the obtained results were correlated. Whereas the Los Angeles resistance of the basalt sample was higher than the andesite sample, the mass losses after the freezing-thaw and the frost tests for the andesite sample were superior. Both of the basalt and andesite samples were classified as ‘very high’ for their slake durability strength (Id-2 values. The material percentage of the andesite sample, which is passing through the sub-size ( %90 was greater than the value obtained for the basalt sample during the same grinding time. The resistance to the crushing process was obtained to be maximum at -850+600 µm of feed size for the basalt and the andesite samples.

  8. Erosive Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between material fracture resistance and the kinetics of fracture in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the onset of fast brittle fracture are reasonably well understood. However with increasing material ductility at normal engineering stress levels the effects of structure size and type of loading become more important and make the understanding of the behaviour of large structures and laboratory test pieces and their inter-relation, more difficult.By using Berry's concept of a fracture locus, it is shown that the crack size - stress level - material fracture resistance relationship, as typified for instance by the Griffith-Irwin formulae, is necessary and sufficient for defining the point at which fast brittle fracture occurs, but that in the case of fast ductile fracture it is not sufficient by itself and must be supplemented by a description of the unloading path of the structural system. Although the demarcation line between these two types of behaviour is seen to be dependent on stress level it can nevertheless provide a definition of brittle and ductile fracture in engineering structures. Berry's use of the Griffith equation to describe the separation of the crack tip material limits any practical use of his locus equation to stress levels that are low by present day engineering standards. Consideration is given to the use of relationships describing crack tip failure which are more appropriate for the ductilities and stress levels of current engineering interest. These equations explicitly involve the size of the crack tip perturbation and therefore allow a direct check to be made on validity. Examples are given of the application of these methods to describe fractures which have occurred in structural components. (author)

  10. Effect of ultraviolet curing wavelength on low-k dielectric material properties and plasma damage resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsik, Premysl, E-mail: marsik@physics.muni.c [UFKL, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Urbanowicz, Adam M. [UFKL, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic); Verdonck, Patrick [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); De Roest, David; Sprey, Hessel [ASM Belgium, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baklanov, Mikhail R. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2011-03-31

    A set of SiCOH low dielectric constant films (low-k) has been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using variable flow rates of the porogen (sacrificial phase) and matrix precursors. During the deposition, two different substrate temperatures and radio frequency power settings were applied. Next, the deposited films were cured by the UV assisted annealing (UV-cure) using two industrial UV light sources: a monochromatic UV source with intensity maximum at {lambda} = 172 nm (lamp A) and a broadband UV source with intensity spectrum distributed below 200 nm (lamp B). This set of various low-k films has been additionally exposed to NH{sub 3} plasma (used for the CuO{sub x} reduction during Cu/low-k integration) in order to evaluate the effect of the film preparation conditions on the plasma damage resistance of low-k material. Results show that the choice of the UV-curing light source has significant impact on the chemical composition of the low-k material and modifies the porogen removal efficiency and subsequently the material porosity. The 172 nm photons from lamp A induce greater changes to most of the evaluated properties, particularly causing undesired removal of Si-CH{sub 3} groups and their replacement with Si-H. The softer broadband radiation from lamp B improves the porogen removal efficiency, leaving less porogen residues detected by spectroscopic ellipsometry in UV range. Furthermore, it was found that the degree of bulk hydrophilization (plasma damage) after NH{sub 3} plasma exposure is driven mainly by the film porosity.

  11. Corrosion Resistance of a Cast-Iron Material Coated With a Ceramic Layer Using Thermal Spray Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, C. D.; Bejinariu, C.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Toma, S. L.; Alexandru, A.; Cimpoesu, R.

    2018-06-01

    Cast-iron 250 used for breake systems present many corrosion signs after a mean usage time based on the environment conditions they work. In order to improve them corrosion resistance we propose to cover the active part of the material using a ceramic material. The deposition process is an industrial deposition system based on thermal spraying that can cover high surfaces in low time. In this articol we analyze the influence of a ceramic layer (40-50 µm) on the corrosion resistance of FC250 cast iron. The results were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive (EDS) and linear and cyclic potentiometry.

  12. A material based approach to creating wear resistant surfaces for hot forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Sailesh

    Tools and dies used in metal forming are characterized by extremely high temperatures at the interface, high local pressures and large metal to metal sliding. These harsh conditions result in accelerated wear of tooling. Lubrication of tools, done to improve metal flow drastically quenches the surface layers of the tools and compounds the tool failure problem. This phenomenon becomes a serious issue when parts forged at complex and are expected to meet tight tolerances. Unpredictable and hence uncontrolled wear and degradation of tooling result in poor part quality and premature tool failure that result in high scrap, shop downtime, poor efficiency and high cost. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a computer-based methodology for analyzing the requirements hot forging tooling to resist wear and plastic deformation and wear and predicting life cycle of forge tooling. Development of such is a system is complicated by the fact that wear and degradation of tooling is influenced by not only the die material used but also numerous process controls like lubricant, dilution ratio, forging temperature, equipment used, tool geometries among others. Phenomenological models available u1 the literature give us a good thumb rule to selecting materials but do not provide a way to evaluate pits performance in field. Once a material is chosen, there are no proven approaches to create surfaces out of these materials. Coating approaches like PVD and CVD cannot generate thick coatings necessary to withstand the conditions under hot forging. Welding cannot generate complex surfaces without several secondary operations like heat treating and machining. If careful procedures are not followed, welds crack and seldom survive forging loads. There is a strong need for an approach to selectively, reliably and precisely deposit material of choice reliably on an existing surface which exhibit not only good tribological properties but also good adhesion to the substrate

  13. Immunohistochemical Study of p53 Expression in Patients with Erosive and Non-Erosive Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, Atena; Zamanian, Ali; Arab, Shahin; Boloki, Mahsa

    2018-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Oral lichen planus is a common mucocutaneous lesion with a chronic inflammatory process mediated by immune factors while a few cases of the disease become malignant. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the frequency of p53 marker as a tumor suppressor in patients with erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) by using immunohistochemical methods. Materials and Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the p53 expression in 16 erosive OLP, 16 non-erosive OLP samples, and 8 samples of normal oral mucosa through immunohistochemistry. The percentage of stained cells in basal and suprabasal layers, and inflammatory infiltrate were graded according to the degree of staining; if 0%, 50% of the cells were stained, they were considered as (-), (+), (++), (+++) and (++++), respectively. The obtained data was statistically analyzed and compared by using Chi square and Fisher’s exact test. Results: The mean percentage of p53 positive cells in erosive OLP (34.5±14.2) was considerably higher than that in non-erosive OLP (23.8±10.4) and normal mucosa (17.5±17). There was a significant difference among the three groups of erosive, non-erosive and control in terms of staining intensity. No significant difference existed between the patients’ age and sex in the two OLP groups. Conclusion: The increased incidence of p53 from normal mucosa to erosive OLP indicated the difference between biological behavior of erosive and non-erosive OLP. It can be claimed that the erosive OLP has great premalignant potential compared with the non-erosive one.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE EROSION WEAR OF CERMET PARTICLES REINFORCED SELF-FLUXING ALLOY MATRIX HVOF SPRAYED COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Surzhenkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the resistance of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF sprayed TiC-NiMo and Cr3C2-Ni cermet particles reinforced NiCrSiB self-fluxing alloy matrix coatings to high temperature erosion wear is studied. Microstructure of the coatings was examined by SEM, phase composition was determined by XRD. A four-channel centrifugal particle accelerator was applied to study the high temperature erosion wear of the coatings. The impact angles were 30 and 90 degrees, initial particle velocity was 50 m/s, temperature of the test - 650 degrees. Volume wear of the coatings was calculated and compared to the respective values of the reference materials. Wear mechanisms were studied by SEM.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7617

  15. IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF BEDROCK EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rieke-Zapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are – if at all available – based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest

  16. In Situ Measurement of Bedrock Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke-Zapp, D. H.; Beer, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Campana, L.

    2012-07-01

    While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are - if at all available - based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ) and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest generation of compact

  17. Observation and measurement of erosion-corrosion in nuclear plants influence of chemical conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, M.; Svoboda, R.; Ziffermayer, G.

    1984-01-01

    The erosion-corrosion caused by wet steam leads to considerable damage of certain components of the thermal cycle and, the metallic oxides which are formed are carried by the circulating fluid and form deposits particularly on heat exchangers. This paper describes the measurements and the observations techniques that were used. The experimental data permits to quantify the material resistance as well as the transportation of oxydes during the successive periodes during which a modification of both the conception and the material were introduced. The analysis of trace quantities of Fe, Cr, Ni, CO... permit to determine the attack of various materials as well as the transportation of the respective oxides. The analysis of the circulating fluid and the measurements of the respective quantities of deposits allows to evaluate the calculations of transport, deposit and oxides removal. The erosion-corrosion phenomenon is dependent upon the environment. A modification of the conditioning (higher pH in PWR, use of oxidizing agents in BWR) permits only a limited reduction of erosion-corrosion and may even present some disadvantages [fr

  18. Creation of initial breeding material of potato with complex resistance to Fusarium dry rot and tuber late blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Гордієнко

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To select the initial breeding material with complex resistance to Fusarium dry rot and tuber late blight among the created potato of secondary interspecific hyb­rids. Methods. Interspecific hybridization, laboratory test, analytical approach. Results. Based on the interspecific hybridization, the initial breeding material was created and the degree of its resistance to the above pathogens was determined by way of artificial infection of tubers with the inoculum of such fungi as Fusarium sambucinum Fuck and Phytophthora infestans (Mont. De Bary. During interspecific hybridization based on schemes of saturating and enriching crosses, using forms of various species with a high phenotypic expression of resistance to Fusarium dry rot, the result of the cumulative effect of genes that control resistance to the pathogen was observed. Crossing combinations differed significantly for the degree of population average manifestation of resistance to the diseases. Conclusions. Combinations В54, В53, В61 with a mean resistance (above 7 grades to Fusarium dry rot have been selected. Such combinations as B52, B50 and B54 had increased resistance to tuber late blight. It was found that the combination В54 is characterized by complex resistance to both diseases. For further work, the following samples with complex resistance to Fusarium dry rot and tuber late blight (7 grades or more were selected: В59с42, В59с43, В50с16, В50с19, В50с44, В51с1, В51с26, В51с28, В52с11, В52с23, В52с24, В52с29, В53с1, В53с11, В53с17 , В53с23, В54с13, В54с14.

  19. 22. lecture meeting of the association for heat-resistant steels and the association for high temperature materials 'long-term performance of heat-resistant steels and high-temperature materials'. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings volume contains 14 full papers discussing the long-term performance of high-temperature resistant materials (creep, creep fatigue, crack growth). 13 papers have been analysed and processed for separate retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Advanced experimental and numerical techniques for cavitation erosion prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Chahine, Georges; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Karimi, Ayat

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the cavitation erosion phenomenon and state-of-the-art research in the field. It is divided into two parts. Part 1 consists of seven chapters, offering a wide range of computational and experimental approaches to cavitation erosion. It includes a general introduction to cavitation and cavitation erosion, a detailed description of facilities and measurement techniques commonly used in cavitation erosion studies, an extensive presentation of various stages of cavitation damage (including incubation and mass loss), and insights into the contribution of computational methods to the analysis of both fluid and material behavior. The proposed approach is based on a detailed description of impact loads generated by collapsing cavitation bubbles and a physical analysis of the material response to these loads. Part 2 is devoted to a selection of nine papers presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Experimental and Numerical Techniques for Cavitation Erosion (Gr...

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide hybrid and nanohydroxyapatite composite: A novel coating to prevent dentin erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahorny, Sídnei; Zanin, Hudson; Christino, Vinie Abreu; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2017-10-01

    To date is emergent the development of novel coatings to protect erosion, especially to preventive dentistry and restorative dentistry. Here, for the first time we report the effectiveness of multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide hybrid carbon-base material (MWCNTO-GO) combined with nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) as a protective coating for dentin erosion. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), scanning electron (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy were used to investigated the coatings and the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF) treatment on bovine teeth root dentin before and after erosion. The electrochemical corrosion performance of the coating was evaluated. Raman spectra identified that: (i) the phosphate (ν 1 PO 4 3- ) content of dentin was not significantly affected by the treatments and (ii) the carbonate (ν 1 CO 3 2- ) content in dentin increased when nHAp was used. However, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite exposited lower levels of organic matrix (CH bonds) after erosion compared to other treatments. Interesting, SEM micrographs identified that the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO formed layers after erosive cycling when associate with APF treatment, indicating a possible chemical bond among them. Treatments of root dentin with nHAp, MWCNTO-GO, APF_MWCNTO-GO, and APF_nHAp/MWCNTO-GO increased the carbonate content, carbonate/phosphate ratio, and organic matrix band area after erosion. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plot showed that nHAp, MWCNT-GO and nHAp/MWCNT-GO composites acted as protective agents against corrosion process. Clearly, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite was stable after erosive cycling and a thin and acid-resistant film was formed when associated to APF treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of electric resistivity in estimation of the properties of carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slobodskoy, S.A. [Kharkov Polytechnical University, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    1999-07-01

    The electrical resistivity of thermoanthracite and coal and pitch cokes were measured. Results showed that the Russian standard (GOST 4668-75) for measuring electrical resistivity needs amending. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple

  4. Hydrology and soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard J. Lane; Mary R. Kidwell

    2003-01-01

    We review research on surface water hydrology and soil erosion at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER). Almost all of the research was associated with eight small experimental watersheds established from 1974 to 1975 and operated until the present. Analysis of climatic features of the SRER supports extending research findings from the SRER to broad areas of the...

  5. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  6. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  7. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf

    2009-12-01

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  8. The cathode material for a plasma-arc heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelyutin, A. V.; Berlin, I. K.; Averyanov, V. V.; Kadyshevskii, V. S.; Savchenko, A. A.; Putintseva, R. G.

    1983-11-01

    The cathode of a plasma arc heater experiences a large thermal load. The temperature of its working surface, which is in contact with the plasma, reaches high values, as a result of which the electrode material is subject to erosion. Refractory metals are usually employed for the cathode material, but because of the severe erosion do not usually have a long working life. The most important electrophysical characteristic of the electrode is the electron work function. The use of materials with a low electron work function allows a decrease in the heat flow to the cathode, and this leads to an increase in its erosion resistance and working life. The electroerosion of certain materials employed for the cathode in an electric arc plasma generator in the process of reduction smelting of refractory metals was studied.

  9. Strengthening of oxidation resistant materials for gas turbine applications. [treatment of silicon ceramics for increased flexural strength and impact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics were treated to form compressive surface layers. On the silicon carbide, quenching and thermal exposure treatments were used, and on the silicon nitride, quenching, carburizing, and a combination of quenching and carburizing were used. In some cases substantial improvements in impact resistance and/or flexural strength were observed. The presence of compressive surface stresses was demonstrated by slotted rod tests.

  10. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    OpenAIRE

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  11. Categorization of erosion control matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Erosion control is a critical aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) : construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural : waterways having been well documented. A variety of erosion control ...

  12. How does slope form affect erosion in CATFLOW-SED?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelmann, Petra; Wienhöfer, Jan; Zehe, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Erosion is a severe environmental problem in agro-ecosystems with highly erodible loess soils. It is controlled by various factors, e.g. rainfall intensity, initial wetness conditions, soil type, land use and tillage practice. Furthermore slope form and gradient have been shown to influence erosion amounts to a large extent. Within the last fifty years, various erosion models have been developed to describe the erosion process, estimate erosion amounts and identify erosion-prone areas. These models differ in terms of complexity, the processes which are considered, and the data required for model calibration and they can be categorised into empirical or statistical, conceptual, and physically-based models. CATFLOW-SED is a process-based hydrology and erosion model that can operate on catchment and hillslope scales. Soil water dynamics are described by the Richards equation including effective approaches for preferential flow. Evapotranspiration is simulated using an approach based on the Penman-Monteith equation. The model simulates overland flow using the diffusion wave equation. Soil detachment is related to the attacking forces of rainfall and overland flow, and the erosion resistance of soil. Sediment transport capacity and sediment deposition are related to overland flow velocity using the equation of Engelund and Hansen and the sinking velocity of grain sizes respectively. We performed a study to analyse the erosion process on different virtual hillslopes, with varying slope gradient and slope form, using the CATFLOW-SED model. We explored the role of landform on erosion and sedimentation, particularly we look for forms that either maximise or minimise erosion. Results indicate the importance to performing the process implementation within physically meaningful limits and choose appropriate model parameters respectively.

  13. Cavitation Erosion of Nodular Cast Iron − Microstructural Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orłowicz A.W.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with susceptibility of nodular cast iron with ferritic-pearlitic matrix on cavitation erosion. Cavitation tests were carried out with the use of a cavitation erosion vibratory apparatus employing a vibration exciter operated at frequency of 20 kHz. The study allowed to determine the sequence of subsequent stages in which microstructure of cast iron in superficial regions is subject to degradation. The first features to be damaged are graphite precipitates. The ferritic matrix of the alloy turned out to be definitely less resistant to cavitation erosion compared to the pearlitic matrix component.

  14. Erosion of heat-treated AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C. (Materials and Components Tech. Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Thompson, A.C. (Materials and Components Tech. Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Routbort, J.L. (Materials Science Div., Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-03-15

    Solid-particle erosion was studied on AISI 4140 steel heat treated to have a Vickers hardness (Hv) of 288-650 kg mm[sup -2]. The experiments were conducted in vacuum with 143 [mu]m Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] abrasive impacting at 50-100 m s[sup -1] at an angle of 30 or 90 . Erosion rates were nearly independent of hardness for Hv[<=]365 kg mm[sup -2], but increased with hardness for Hv>365 kg mm[sup -2]. The improved erosion resistances of the softer alloys were attributed to increased ductilities. (orig.). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. A 30000 yr record of erosion rates from cosmogenic 10Be in middle European river terraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, M.; Blanckenburg, von F.; Veldkamp, A.; Tebbens, L.A.; Hovius, N.; Kubik, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be in river-borne quartz sand records a time-integrated erosion rate representative of an entire drainage basin. When sequestered in a terrace of known age, paleo-erosion rates may be recovered from the nuclide content of the terrace material. Paleo-erosion rates between 30 and 80

  16. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-12-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source.

  17. Macroscopic erosion of divertor and first wall armour in future tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Bazylev, B.; Landman, I.; Pestchanyi, S.; Safronov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Sputtering, evaporation and macroscopic erosion determine the lifetime of the 'in vessel' armour materials CFC, tungsten and beryllium presently under discussion for future tokamaks. For CFC armour macroscopic erosion means brittle destruction and dust formation whereas for metallic armour melt layer erosion by melt motion and droplet splashing. Available results on macroscopic erosion from hot plasma and e-beam simulation experiments and from tokamaks are critically evaluated and a comprehensive discussion of experimental and numerical macroscopic erosion and its extrapolation to future tokamaks is given. Shielding of divertor armour materials by their own vapor exists during plasma disruptions. The evolving plasma shield protects the armour from high heat loads, absorbs the incoming energy and reradiates it volumetrically thus reducing drastically the deposited energy. As a result, vertical target erosion by vaporization turns out to be of the order of a few microns per disruption event and macroscopic erosion becomes the dominant erosion source

  18. Testing the frost resistance of backfilling materials for geothermal heat probes; Pruefung der Frostbestaendigkeit von Verfuellmassen fuer Erdwaermesonden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Tobias; Schnell, Kurt [HDG Umwelttechnik GmbH, Kisslegg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Groundwater protection, general operational safety and the reliable operation over many years are the key factors in the use of geothermal probes. Backfilling materials with which probes are pressed in the hole meet these requirements. For several years, manufacturers and researchers devote a great attention to the issue of an adequate freeze-thaw resistance of these components.

  19. Metal-Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegin, Cengiz; Nagabandi, Nirup; Feng, Xuhui; King, Charles; Catalano, Massimo; Oh, Jun Kyun; Talib, Ansam J; Scholar, Ethan A; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Cagin, Tahir; Sokolov, Alexei V; Kim, Moon J; Matin, Kaiser; Narumanchi, Sreekant; Akbulut, Mustafa

    2017-03-22

    As electronic devices get smaller and more powerful, energy density of energy storage devices increases continuously, and moving components of machinery operate at higher speeds, the need for better thermal management strategies is becoming increasingly important. The removal of heat dissipated during the operation of electronic, electrochemical, and mechanical devices is facilitated by high-performance thermal interface materials (TIMs) which are utilized to couple devices to heat sinks. Herein, we report a new class of TIMs involving the chemical integration of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS), soft organic linkers, and a copper matrix-which are prepared by the chemisorption-coupled electrodeposition approach. These hybrid nanocomposites demonstrate bulk thermal conductivities ranging from 211 to 277 W/(m K), which are very high considering their relatively low elastic modulus values on the order of 21.2-28.5 GPa. The synergistic combination of these properties led to the ultralow total thermal resistivity values in the range of 0.38-0.56 mm 2 K/W for a typical bond-line thickness of 30-50 μm, advancing the current state-of-art transformatively. Moreover, its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is 11 ppm/K, forming a mediation zone with a low thermally induced axial stress due to its close proximity to the CTE of most coupling surfaces needing thermal management.

  20. Initial experimental evaluation of crud-resistant materials for light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumnernchanvanit, I.; Zhang, N. Q.; Robertson, S.; Delmore, A.; Carlson, M. B.; Hussey, D.; Short, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    The buildup of fouling deposits on nuclear fuel rods, known as crud, continues to challenge the worldwide fleet of light water reactors (LWRs). Crud causes serious operational problems for LWRs, including axial power shifts, accelerated fuel clad corrosion, increased primary circuit radiation dose rates, and in some instances has led directly to fuel failure. Numerous studies continue to attempt to model and predict the effects of crud, but each assumes that it will always be present. In this study, we report on the development of crud-resistant materials as fuel cladding coatings, to reduce or eliminate these problems altogether. Integrated loop testing experiments at flowing LWR conditions show significantly reduced crud adhesion and surface crud coverage, respectively, for TiC and ZrN coatings compared to ZrO2. The loop testing results roughly agree with the London dispersion component of van der Waals force predictions, suggesting that they contribute most significantly to the adhesion of crud to fuel cladding in out-of-pile conditions. These results motivate a new look at ways of reducing crud, thus avoiding many expensive LWR operational issues.